Sample records for pancreatic duct stent

  1. Treatment of Common Bile Duct Obstruction by Pancreatic Cancer Using Various Stents: Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Toshifumi; Hirai, Ritsuko; Kitagawa, Mutsuo; Takehira, Yasunori; Yamada, Masami [Department of Gastroenterology, Hamamatsu Medical Center, 328 Tomitsuka-cho, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka (Japan); Tamakoshi, Katsutoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Nakamura, Hirotoshi [SecondDepartment of Internal Medicine, Hamamatsu University School ofMedicine, Shizuoka (Japan); Kanamori, Masao [Department of Public Health, HamamatsuUniversity School of Medicine, Shizuoka (Japan)

    2002-10-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of various means of stenting in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer in a retrospective analysis. Methods: Sixty-two patients with biliary obstruction due to unresectable pancreatic cancer underwent biliary stenting. On the basis of the findings obtained by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography(10 patients) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (52 patients),the site of obstruction was distal to the hilar confluence,predominantly especially in the middle to lower third of the common bile duct. Polyurethane-covered Wallstents (9 mm in diameter) we reinserted in 13 patients, while uncovered Wallstents (10 mm in diameter)were used in 10 patients and plastic stents (10 Fr and 12 Fr) were used in 39 patients. Results: Stenting was successful in 34 patients (87.2%) treated with plastic stents and in 22 patients(95.7%) treated with Wallstents. Effective biliary drainage was achieved in 32 out of 34 patients (94.1%) treated with plastic stents and in 21 out of 22 patients (95.5%) treated with Wallstents. The cumulative patency rate was significantly higher for the uncovered and covered Wallstents compared to plastic stents, but was not significantly higher for covered than for uncovered Wallstents. Stentocclusion occurred in 23 patients (70%; all by clogging) from the plastic stent group, in two patients (22%; by tumor ingrowth) from the uncovered Wallstent group, and in one patient (9%; by clogging) from the covered Wallstent group. The survival rate showed no significant difference among the three stent groups. Conclusion: The Wallstent is effective for long-term palliation in patients with obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer invading the middle to lower part of the common bile duct. The covered Wallstent can prevent tumor ingrowth, a problem with the uncovered Wallstent. However, it may be necessary to take measures to prevent the migration or clogging of covered Wallstents.

  2. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis Causing a Highway to the Colon with Subsequent Road Closure: Pancreatic Colonic Fistula Presenting as a Large Bowel Obstruction Treated with Pancreatic Duct Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Justin; Schlepp, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Context. Colonic complications associated with acute pancreatitis have a low incidence but carry an increased risk of mortality with delayed diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic colonic fistula is most commonly associated with walled off pancreatic necrosis or abscess formation and rarely forms spontaneously. Classic clinical manifestations for pancreatic colonic fistula include diarrhea, hematochezia, and fever. Uncommonly pancreatic colonic fistula presents as large bowel obstruction. Case. We report a case of a woman with a history of recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis who presented with large bowel obstruction secondary to pancreatic colonic fistula. Resolution of large bowel obstruction and pancreatic colonic fistula was achieved with pancreatic duct stenting. Conclusion. Pancreatic colonic fistula can present as large bowel obstruction. Patients with resolved acute pancreatitis who have radiographic evidence of splenic flexure obstruction, but without evidence of mechanical obstruction on colonoscopy, should be considered for ERCP to evaluate for PCF. PCF not associated with walled off pancreatic necrosis or peritoneal abscess can be treated conservatively with pancreatic duct stenting.

  3. Alterations in pancreatic ductal morphology following polyethylene pancreatic stent therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Milton T. Smith; Stuart Sherman; Steven O. Ikenberry; Robert H. Hawes; Glen A. Lehman

    1996-01-01

    Background: Polyethylene stents placed in the main pancreatic duct induce morphologic alterations that may resemble chronic pancreatitis.Methods: We reviewed the sequential pancreatograms of stented patients who had long-term follow-up after stent removal.Results: Forty patients (66%) had a normal baseline pancreatogram, whereas 21 (34%) showed changes of chronic pancreatitis. In 49 of 61 patients (80.3%), one or more had new morphologic

  4. Traumatic transection of the pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Magrill, Dan; Paterson, Iain

    2009-01-01

    A young man presented after a mountain biking accident having received a sharp blow from his handlebars to just below his right costal margin. Although initially he was clinically well and his primary investigations were normal, he was admitted for observation. After becoming peritonitic, his amylase increased to 502 U/ml, and an axial CT scan showed transection of the pancreas. An endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) was arranged in the operating department, confirming ductal damage. A stent was placed to bridge the pancreatic duct preoperatively, and a laparotomy lavage was carried out and an external drain placed. The patient recovered well and 12 weeks later, after the stent was removed, there was no evidence of pancreatic stricture. Pancreatic injuries must be suspected in blunt abdominal trauma, and preoperative endoscopic stenting may provide the definitive procedure for ductal injuries. PMID:21686960

  5. Proximal migration of a 5 French pancreatic stent during bile stone extraction: a successful retrieval using mini-snare.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Sheng; Zhao, Qiu; Fan, Yan; Wu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic stents are used for a variety of conditions during therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography (ERCP). Pancreatic duct stenting reduces the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis and facilitate bilitary cannulation in difficult cases. Proximal migration of a pancreatic stent during bile duct stone extraction is an infrequent event, but its management can be technically challenging. We present a case that a double flanged pancreatic stent (5 French (Fr), 5 cm) was placed to facilitate the bilitary cannulation during the bile duct stone extraction. The pancreatic duct stent migrated into the proximal pancreas duct at the end of the bile duct stone clearance. After two unsuccessful attempts to remove the impacted stent with a balloon catheter and forceps, wire-guided endoscopic snare retrieval was conducted. Firstly, a guide wire was placed in the pancreatic duct and a soft mini-snare was passed over the guide wire. Then, the mini-snare was advanced into the proximal pancreatic duct over the guide wire and the proximally migrated stent was removed successfully with the mini-snare. Wire-guided endoscopic snare retrieval of proximally migrated pancreatic stents is safe and effective. The successful case of the retrieval with mini-snare provides another option for proximal migration retrieval of pancreatic stent retrieval. Further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness and elucidate its associated complications. PMID:24714023

  6. Need for pancreatic stenting after sphincterotomy in patients with difficult cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Kazunari; Okuse, Chiaki; Suetani, Keigo; Michikawa, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Otsubo, Takehito; Itoh, Fumio

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the need for pancreatic stenting after endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) in patients with difficult biliary cannulation. METHODS: Between April 2008 and August 2013, 2136 patients underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-related procedures. Among them, 55 patients with difficult biliary cannulation who underwent EST after bile duct cannulation using the pancreatic duct guidewire placement method (P-GW) were divided into two groups: a stent group (n = 24; pancreatic stent placed) and a no-stent group (n = 31; no pancreatic stenting). We retrospectively compared the two groups to examine the need for pancreatic stenting to prevent post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) in patients undergoing EST after biliary cannulation by P-GW. RESULTS: No differences in patient characteristics or endoscopic procedures were observed between the two groups. The incidence of PEP was 4.2% (1/24) and 29.0% (9/31) in the Stent and no-stent groups, respectively, with the no-stent group having a significantly higher incidence (P = 0.031). The PEP severity was mild for all the patients in the stent group. In contrast, 8 had mild PEP and 1 had moderate PEP in the no-stent group. The mean serum amylase levels (means ± SD) 3 h after ERCP (183.1 ± 136.7 vs 463.6 ± 510.4 IU/L, P = 0.006) and on the day after ERCP (209.5 ± 208.7 vs 684.4 ± 759.3 IU/L, P = 0.002) were significantly higher in the no-stent group. A multivariate analysis identified the absence of pancreatic stenting (P = 0.045; odds ratio, 9.7; 95%CI: 1.1-90) as a significant risk factor for PEP. CONCLUSION: In patients with difficult cannulation in whom the bile duct is cannulated using P-GW, a pancreatic stent should be placed even if EST has been performed. PMID:25024617

  7. Acute Suppuration of the Pancreatic Duct in a Patient with Tropical Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Deeb, Liliane S.; Bajaj, Jasmeet; Bhargava, Sandeep; Alcid, David; Pitchumoni, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aim Pancreatic sepsis secondary to infected necrosis, pseudocyst, or pancreatic abscess is a well-known clinical entity. Acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct (ASPD) in the setting of chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal obstruction with septicemia is a rare complication that is seldom reported. It is our aim to report a case of ASPD with Klebsiella ornithinolytica, in the absence of pancreatic abscess or infected necrosis. Case Report A 46-year-old Asian-Indian man with chronic tropical pancreatitis who was admitted with recurrent epigastric pain that rapidly evolved into septic shock. A CT scan of abdomen revealed a dilated pancreatic duct with a large calculus. Broad-spectrum antibiotics, vasopressors and activated recombinant protein C were initiated. Emergency ERCP showed the papilla of Vater spontaneously expelling pus. Probing and stenting was instantly performed until pus drainage ceased. Repeat CT scan confirmed the absence of pancreatic necrosis or fluid collection, and decreasing ductal dilatation. Dramatic clinical improvement was observed within 36 hours after intervention. Blood cultures grew Klebsiella ornithinolytica. The patient completed his antibiotic course and was discharged. Conclusion ASPD without pancreatic abscess or infected necrosis is an exceptional clinical entity that should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic sepsis. A chronically diseased pancreas and diabetes may have predisposed to the uncommon pathogen. The presence of intraductal pancreatic stones obstructing outflow played a major role in promoting bacterial growth, suppuration and septicemia. Immediate drainage of the pancreatic duct with endoscopic intervention is critical and mandatory. PMID:21490834

  8. Acute Cholecystitis Caused by Malignant Cystic Duct Obstruction: Treatment with Metallic Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro, E-mail: s-miyayama@fukui.saiseikai.or.jp; Yamashiro, Masashi; Takeda, Taro; Aburano, Hiroyuki [Fukuiken Saiseikai Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Komatsu, Tetsuya [Fukuiken Saiseikai Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology (Japan); Sanada, Taku; Kosaka, Shotaro; Toya, Daisyu [Fukuiken Saiseikai Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine (Japan); Matsui, Osamu [Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2008-07-15

    We report the successful management of acute cholecystitis using cystic duct stent placement in 3 patients with inoperable malignant cystic duct obstruction (2 cholangiocarcinoma and 1 pancreatic carcinoma). All patients underwent stent placement in the bile duct, using an uncovered stent in 2 and a covered stent in 1, to relieve jaundice occurring 8-184 days (mean 120 days) before the development of acute cholecystitis. The occluded cystic duct was traversed by a microcatheter and a stent was implanted 4-17 days (mean 12 days) after cholecystostomy. Acute cholecystitis was improved after the procedure in all patients. Two patients died 3 and 10 months later, while 1 has survived without cholecystitis for 22 months after the procedure to date.

  9. Clinical significance of main pancreatic duct dilation on computed tomography: Single and double duct dilation

    PubMed Central

    Edge, Mark D; Hoteit, Maarouf; Patel, Amil P; Wang, Xiaoping; Baumgarten, Deborah A; Cai, Qiang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the patients with main pancreatic duct dilation on computed tomography (CT) and thereby to provide the predictive criteria to identify patients at high risk of significant diseases, such as pancreatic cancer, and to avoid unnecessary work up for patients at low risk of such diseases. METHODS: Patients with dilation of the main pancreatic duct on CT at Emory University Hospital in 2002 were identified by computer search. Clinical course and ultimate diagnosis were obtained in all the identified patients by abstraction of their computer database records. RESULTS: Seventy-seven patients were identified in this study. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer were the most common causes of the main pancreatic duct dilation on CT. Although the majority of patients with isolated dilation of the main pancreatic duct (single duct dilation) had chronic pancreatitis, one-third of patients with single duct dilation but without chronic pancreatitis had pancreatic malignancies, whereas most of patients with concomitant biliary duct dilation (double duct dilation) had pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSION: Patients with pancreatic double duct dilation need extensive work up and careful follow-up since a majority of these patients are ultimately diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Patients with single duct dilation, especially such patients without any evidence of chronic pancreatitis, also need careful follow-up since the possibility of pancreatic malignancy, including adenocarcinoma and intraductal papillary mucinous tumors, is still high. PMID:17461473

  10. The leaking pancreatic duct in childhood chronic pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dhruva Nath Ghosh; Sudipta Sen; Jacob Chacko; Gordon Thomas; Sampath Karl; John Mathai

    2007-01-01

    The leaking pancreatic duct in childhood chronic pancreatitis presents with ascites and pleural effusion and is a potentially\\u000a lethal condition. Seven children with this condition were seen in the period 2003–2006. The correct diagnosis was not entertained\\u000a till a raised serum amylase was discovered. The diagnosis was confirmed by very high levels of amylase in the aspirated abdominal\\u000a or pleural

  11. Genetics of Pancreatitis with a focus on the Pancreatic Ducts

    PubMed Central

    LaRusch, Jessica; Whitcomb, David C

    2013-01-01

    Genetic risk for acute pancreatitis (AP), recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) are increasingly recognized. The exocrine pancreas is composed of both acinar cells and duct cells, with genetic factors associated with AP, RAP and CP linked to one cell type or the other. Increased susceptibility to pancreatitis occurs when the normal physiological mechanisms that allow the pancreas to respond to common stresses or injury are altered. Currently, most our knowledge about genetics focuses on three genes that play critical roles in pancreatic function (PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1) such that isolated defects lead to disease. However, recent data suggest that more complex combination of genetic and environmental factors are also as important, or more important than Mendelian genetic risk. Understanding of complex interactions requires modeling of these factors so that the response to stresses or injury can be simulated and critical interactions understood. A simple duct cell model is given to illustration the relationship between CFTR, CASR, aquaporins, claudins, and SPINK1, and how they interact. The role of CFTR variants in pancreatic diseases is then discussed. PMID:23207607

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLE A Mathematical Model of the Pancreatic Duct Cell

    E-print Network

    Ermentrout, G. Bard

    a proximal pancreatic duct and included a sodium-2- bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC) and sodium-potassium pump dysfunction in humans. Key Words: bicarbonate, chloride, pancreatitis, pancreas, secretin, sodium bicarbonateORIGINAL ARTICLE A Mathematical Model of the Pancreatic Duct Cell Generating High Bicarbonate

  13. Pancreatic stenting prevents pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul R. Tarnasky; Yuko Y. Palesch; John T. Cunningham; Patrick D. Mauldin; Peter B. Cotton; Robert H. Hawes

    1998-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction are at high risk of developing pancreatitis after endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Impaired pancreatic drainage caused by pancreatic sphincter hypertension is the likely explanation for this increased risk. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine if ductal drainage with pancreatic stenting protects against pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with

  14. Percutaneous Transcholecystic Placement of an ePTFE/FEP-Covered Stent in the Common Bile Duct

    SciTech Connect

    Krokidis, Miltiadis E., E-mail: mkrokidis@hotmail.co [University Hospital of Heraklion, Department of Radiology (Greece); Hatzidakis, Adam A. [Medical School of Crete (Greece)

    2010-06-15

    We report the case of a 78-year-old male patient with obstructive jaundice due to a pancreatic head neoplasm. The patient's general condition did not permit an endoscopic approach and the presence of diffuse liver metastases prohibited hepatic puncture for percutaneous biliary drainage, therefore the transcolecystic transperitoneal approach was decided to be the safest decompression route. Through a gallbladder access, a Viabil-covered stent with a mesh extension was placed in the distal common bile duct, without complications. The patient died 8 months later without signs of stent dysfunction or necessity of reintervention. Transcholecystic transperitoneal access is a safe option when diffuse liver metastases prohibit the transhepatic approach, even in cases where placement of a covered stent is considered necessary.

  15. Acute Suppuration of the Pancreatic Duct in a Patient with Tropical Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liliane S. Deeb; Jasmeet Bajaj; Sandeep Bhargava; David Alcid; C. S. Pitchumoni

    2008-01-01

    Background\\/Aim: Pancreatic sepsis secondary to infected necrosis, pseudocyst, or pancreatic abscess is a well-known clinical entity. Acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct (ASPD) in the setting of chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal obstruction with septicemia is a rare complication that is seldom reported. It is our aim to report a case of ASPD with Klebsiella ornithinolytica, in the absence

  16. Human Pancreatic Duct Epithelial Cell Model for KRAS Transformation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nikolina Radulovich

    2008-01-01

    Mutations on the KRAS gene occur early during pancreatic duct cell carcinogenesis and have been identified in up to 90% of ductal adenocarcinoma. However, the functional role of KRAS mutations in the malignant transformation of normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells into cancer cells remains unknown. We have developed an in vitro model for KRAS transformation using near?normal HPV?16E6E7?immortalized human pancreatic

  17. Pain in chronic pancreatitis: Managing beyond the pancreatic duct

    PubMed Central

    Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) continues to be a clinical challenge. Persistent or recurrent abdominal pain is the most compelling symptom that drives patients to seek medical care. Unfortunately, in spite of using several treatment approaches in the clinical setting, there is no single specific treatment modality that can be earmarked as a cure for this disease. Traditionally, ductal hypertension has been associated with causation of pain in CP; and patients are often subjected to endotherapy and surgery with a goal to decompress the pancreatic duct. Recent studies on humans (clinical and laboratory based) and experimental models have put forward several mechanisms, including neuroimmune alterations, which could be responsible for pain. This might explain the partial or no response to single modality treatment in a significant proportion of patients. The current review discusses the recent concepts of pain generation in CP and evidence based therapeutic approaches (other than ductal decompression) to handle persistent or recurrent pain. We focus primarily on parenchymal and neural components; and discuss the role of antioxidants and the existing controversies, drugs that interfere with neural transmission, pancreatic enzyme supplementation, celiac neurolysis, and pancreatic resection procedures. The review concludes with the treatment approach that we follow at our institute. PMID:24151350

  18. Evaluation of Polyurethane Nasolacrimal Duct Stents: In Vivo Studies in New Zealand Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, K.E., E-mail: wilhelm@uni-bonn.de; Grabolle, B.; Urbach, H. [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Tolba, R. [Clinics of the University of Bonn, Haus fuer Experimentelle Therapie (Germany); Schild, H. [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Paulsen, F. [Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic and biological effects of different polyurethane nasolacrimal duct stents in an animal model. Fifteen polyurethane nasolacrimal duct stents (n = 5 mushroom-type stents, n = 5 newly designed S-shaped TearLeader stents without hydrophilic coating, and n = 5 S-shaped TearLeader stents with hydrophilic coating) were implanted in the nasolacrimal ducts of eight unaffected New Zealand rabbits. One nasolacrimal system served as control. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed at 1-, 2-, and 4-week intervals, then after a 3-month interval, after which the animals were euthanized. All stents were implanted without major periprocedural complications. The stents proved to be patent by the end of the procedure. During follow-up, all mushroom-type stents were occluded at 4 weeks. None of these stents opened to forced irrigation. Clinically, all rabbits demonstrated severe dacryocystitis. Three out of five TearLeader stents without hydrophilic coating were blocked at 4 weeks; one out of five was open to irrigation. Best results were observed in the stent group with hydrophilic coating. Follow-up dacryocystography demonstrated patent stents in nasolacrimal ducts of all animals after 4 weeks. In only one of five cases, the coated stent became partially occluded after 2 months. These animals were free of clinical symptoms. After 3 months, at least three out of five stents still opened to forced irrigation and only one stent was completely blocked. Dislocation of the stents was not observed. Refinement of the stent surface and stent design improves the results of nasolacrimal duct stenting in this animal model. Implantation of hydrophilic-coated S-shaped stents is highly superior to conventional mushroom-type stents and noncoated stent types. Hydrophilic coating seems to prevent foreign-body reactions, resulting in maximized stent patency.

  19. A rare ring-shaped anomaly of the main pancreatic duct accompanying a branch duct IPMN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryushi Shudo; Shuichi Maeda; Haruyasu Yoshizaki; Akihiro Imada; Takafumi Yamashita; Shigeru Kitamori; Yoko Sato; Mizuho Oniwa; Yukihiko Sato

    2009-01-01

    The patient was a 74-year-old female. Screening computed tomography for examination of the abdomen showed a cystic mass in\\u000a the pancreatic body. Close investigation using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography\\u000a revealed a very rare finding: the main pancreatic duct bifurcated at the pancreatic body, and these two ducts converged at\\u000a the caudal side. A multilocular cystic mass in

  20. Failure of sequential biliary stenting for unsuccessful common bile duct stone removal

    PubMed Central

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the factors associated with the failure of stone removal by a biliary stenting strategy. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 645 patients with common bile duct (CBD) stones who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for stone removal in Siriraj GI Endoscopy center, Siriraj Hospital from June 2009 to June 2012. A total of 42 patients with unsuccessful initial removal of large CBD stones that underwent sequential biliary stenting were enrolled in the present study. The demographic data, laboratory results, stone characteristics, procedure details, and clinical outcomes were recorded and analyzed. In addition, the patients were classified into two groups based on outcome, successful or failed sequential biliary stenting, and the above factors were compared. RESULTS: Among the initial 42 patients with unsuccessful initial removal of large CBD stones, there were 37 successful biliary stenting cases and five failed cases. Complete CBD clearance was achieved in 88.0% of cases. The average number of sessions needed before complete stone removal was achieved was 2.43 at an average of 25 wk after the first procedure. Complications during the follow-up period occurred in 19.1% of cases, comprising ascending cholangitis (14.3%) and pancreatitis (4.8%). The factors associated with failure of complete CBD stone clearance in the biliary stenting group were unchanged CBD stone size after the first biliary stenting attempt (10.2 wk) and a greater number of endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography sessions performed (4.2 sessions). CONCLUSION: The sequential biliary stenting is an effective management strategy for the failure of initial large CBD stone removal. PMID:23772266

  1. Ultrasound imaging of the mouse pancreatic duct using lipid microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, B.; McKeown, K. R.; Skovan, B.; Ogram, E.; Ingram, P.; Ignatenko, N.; Paine-Murrieta, G.; Witte, R.; Matsunaga, T. O.

    2012-03-01

    Research requiring the murine pancreatic duct to be imaged is often challenging due to the difficulty in selectively cannulating the pancreatic duct. We have successfully catheterized the pancreatic duct through the common bile duct in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice and imaged the pancreatic duct with gas filled lipid microbubbles that increase ultrasound imaging sensitivity due to exquisite scattering at the gas/liquid interface. A SCID mouse was euthanized by CO2, a midline abdominal incision made, the common bile duct cut at its midpoint, a 2 cm, 32 gauge tip catheter was inserted about 1 mm into the duct and tied with suture. The duodenum and pancreas were excised, removed in toto, embedded in agar and an infusion pump was used to instill normal saline or lipid-coated microbubbles (10 million / ml) into the duct. B-mode images before and after infusion of the duct with microbubbles imaged the entire pancreatic duct (~ 1 cm) with high contrast. The microbubbles were cavitated by high mechanical index (HMI) ultrasound for imaging to be repeated. Our technique of catheterization and using lipid microbubbles as a contrast agent may provide an effective, affordable technique of imaging the murine pancreatic duct; cavitation with HMI ultrasound would enable repeated imaging to be performed and clustering of targeted microbubbles to receptors on ductal cells would allow pathology to be localized accurately. This research was supported by the Experimental Mouse Shared Service of the AZ Cancer Center (Grant Number P30CA023074, NIH/NCI and the GI SPORE (NIH/NCI P50 CA95060).

  2. Tight junctions in human pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Ito, Tatsuya; Kyuno, Daisuke; Kono, Tsuyoshi; Konno, Takumi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2013-01-01

    Tight junctions of the pancreatic duct are essential regulators of physiologic secretion of the pancreas and disruption of the pancreatic ductal barrier is known to contribute to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and progression of pancreatic cancer. Various inflammatory mediators and carcinogens can trigger tight junction disassembly and disruption of the pancreatic barrier, however signaling events that mediates such barrier dysfunctions remain poorly understood. This review focuses on structure and regulation of tight junctions in normal pancreatic epithelial cells and mechanisms of junctional disruption during pancreatic inflammation and cancer. We will pay special attention to a novel model of human telomerase reverse transcriptase-transfected human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells and will describe the roles of major signaling molecules such as protein kinase C and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in formation and disassembly of the pancreatic ductal barrier. PMID:24665406

  3. [Endoscopic treatment of a pediatric patient with acute pancreatitis caused by anomalous union of pancreaticobiliary duct combined with incomplete pancreatic divisum].

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Beom; Seo, Joo Hee; Park, Jung Yeup; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Chung, Jae Bock; Bang, Seungmin

    2009-11-01

    The most common causes of acute pancreatitis are microlithiasis and alcohol. In pediatrics, anomalies in pancreaticobiliary system should be considered as possible causes. Among many anomalies, pancreas divisum associated with anomalous pancreaticobiliary ductal union (APBDU) is very rare. APBDU is associated with acute pancreatitis, choledochal cyst, and gallbladder cancer. Pancreas divisum is also a well known cause of acute recurrent pancreatitis. In adult cases with such conditions, the role of endoscopic management including sphincterotomy or stenting through the Santorini duct is well documented. However, it is still controversial to perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in pediatrics. Herein, we experienced a case of 4 year 7 month old female patient suffered from recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis, which were caused by APBDU and incomplete pancreas divisum. She was treated by endoscopic sphincterectomy of both openings to the Santorinis and Wirsungs ducts. Thus, we report this interesting case with literature review. PMID:19934615

  4. Ionic flux and mucosal ultrastructure in the rat bile-pancreatic duct

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. P. ARIVISTRONG; T. V. Taylor; H. B. Torrence

    1987-01-01

    The property of the pancreatic ductal system that restricts free ionic diffusion has been termed the “pancreatic duct mucosal barrier,” damage to which may be important in the pathogenesis of acute gallstone pancreatitis. The bile-pancreatic duct of the rat (BPD) was perfusedin situ with a standard ionic solution. The normal duct was permeable to both chloride and bicarbonate ions, and

  5. Human pancreatic duct epithelial cell model for KRAS transformation.

    PubMed

    Radulovich, Nikolina; Qian, Jia-ying; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2008-01-01

    Mutations on the KRAS gene occur early during pancreatic duct cell carcinogenesis and have been identified in up to 90% of ductal adenocarcinoma. However, the functional role of KRAS mutations in the malignant transformation of normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells into cancer cells remains unknown. We have developed an in vitro model for KRAS transformation using near-normal HPV-16E6E7-immortalized human pancreatic ductal epithelial (HPDE-E6E7) cells. The expression of mutant KRAS(G12V) in HPDE cells by retroviral transduction resulted in weak tumorigenic transformation, with tumors formed in 50% of immune-deficient scid mice implanted by these KRAS-transformed cells. The model provides an opportunity to dissect further the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with human pancreatic duct cell carcinogenesis. PMID:18374152

  6. Stent displacement in endoscopic pancreatic pseudocyst drainage and endoscopic management

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Xin; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Sheng; Ge, Nan; Guo, Jin-Tao; Liu, Wen; Sun, Si-Yu

    2015-01-01

    A pancreatic pseudocyst (PPC) is a collection of pancreatic fluid enclosed by a non-epithelialized, ?brous or granulomatous wall. Endoscopic pancreatic pseudocyst drainage (PPD) has been widely used clinically to treat PPCs. The success and complications of endoscopic PPD are comparable with surgical interventions. Stent displacement is a rare complication after endoscopic PPD. Almost all the complications of endoscopic PPD have been managed surgically, and there is rare report involving the endoscopic treatment of intraperitoneal stent displacement. We report here a case of stent displacement after endoscopic ultrasound- and fluoroscopy-guided PPD in a 41-year-old female patient with a PPC in the tail of the pancreas. The endoscopic treatment was successfully performed to remove the displaced stent. The clinical course of the patient was unremarkable. The cyst had significantly reduced and disappeared by 12 wk. We found that both endoscopic ultrasound and fluoroscopy should be used during endoscopic PPD to avoid stent displacement. The displaced stent can be successfully treated by endoscopic removal. PMID:25717266

  7. Molecular basis of potassium channels in pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Mikio; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels regulate excitability, epithelial ion transport, proliferation, and apoptosis. In pancreatic ducts, K+ channels hyperpolarize the membrane potential and provide the driving force for anion secretion. This review focuses on the molecular candidates of functional K+ channels in pancreatic duct cells, including KCNN4 (KCa3.1), KCNMA1 (KCa1.1), KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), KCNH2 (Kv11.1), KCNH5 (Kv10.2), KCNT1 (KCa4.1), KCNT2 (KCa4.2), and KCNK5 (K2P5.1). We will give an overview of K+ channels with respect to their electrophysiological and pharmacological characteristics and regulation, which we know from other cell types, preferably in epithelia, and, where known, their identification and functions in pancreatic ducts and in adenocarcinoma cells. We conclude by pointing out some outstanding questions and future directions in pancreatic K+ channel research with respect to the physiology of secretion and pancreatic pathologies, including pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer, in which the dysregulation or altered expression of K+ channels may be of importance. PMID:23962792

  8. Experimental Study of Poly-l-Lactic Acid Biodegradable Stents in Normal Canine Bile Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kiyosei, E-mail: yamakiyo@zg7.so-net.ne.jp; Yoshioka, Tetsuya; Furuichi, Kinya; Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Anai, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Morimoto, Kengo [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Uchida, Hideo [Daiyukai General Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Kichikawa, Kimihiko [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to clarify the advantages of biodegradable stents in terms of mucosal reaction and biodegradation after placement. We designed a biodegradable stent and assessed stent degradation and changes in the normal bile ducts of dogs. Methods: The biodegradable stent is a balloon-expandable Z stent consisting of poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) with a diameter of 6 mm and a length of 15 mm. We assessed four groups of three beagle dogs each at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of follow-up. After evaluating stent migration by radiography and stent and bile duct patency by cholangiography, the dogs were sacrificed to remove the bile duct together with the stent. The bile duct lumen was examined macroscopically and histologically, and the stent degradation was examined macroscopically and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Bile duct obstruction was absent and none of the stents migrated. Macroscopic evaluation showed moderate endothelial proliferation in the bile ducts at the implant sites at 3 and 6 months and a slight change at 9 months. Slight mononuclear cell infiltration was histologically identified at all time points and epithelial hyperplasia that was moderate at 3 months was reduced to slight at 6 and 9 months. Stent degradation was macroscopically evident in all animals at 9 months and was proven by SEM in two dogs at 6 months and in all of them at 9 months. Conclusions: Our results suggest that PLLA bioabsorbable stents seems to be useful for implantation in the biliary system with further investigation.

  9. Successful pancreatic duct-to-jejunum anastomosis in a patient with a double pancreatic duct: usefulness of intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS) and IOUS-guided pancreatography.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Takao; Imamura, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Takayama, Tadatoshi; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2002-01-01

    We treated a patient with cancer of the papilla of Vater associated with an infrequent pancreatic duct course. With a preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, the presence of a double pancreatic duct was found. These ducts were bifurcated at the pancreatic body. Intraoperative ultrasonography and intraoperative ultrasonography-guided pancreatography were performed during the surgery. These procedures clarified the tumor extension and exact location of the duct bifurcation. The confirmation of the location of the duct bifurcation enabled to prevent the inadvertent suture of the second pancreatic duct or leaving the second duct without an anastomosis, which would have resulted in the leakage of the pancreatic juice and serious complications, to be avoided. PMID:12397777

  10. A Novel Model of Severe Gallstone Pancreatitis: Murine Pancreatic Duct Ligation Results in Systemic Inflammation and Substantial Mortality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isaac Samuel; Zuobiao Yuan; David K. Meyerholz; Erik Twait; Deborah E. Williard; Duraisamy Kempuraj

    2010-01-01

    Background: Suitable experimental models of gallstone pancreatitis with systemic inflammation and mortality are limited. We developed a novel murine model of duct-ligation-induced acute pancreatitis associated with multiorgan dysfunction and severe mortality. Methods: Laparotomy was done on C57\\/BL6 mice followed by pancreatic duct (PD) ligation, bile duct (BD) ligation without PD ligation, or sham operation. Results: Only mice with PD ligation

  11. Accessory Pancreatic Duct-Portal Vein Fistula: A Rare Complication of Chronic Pancreatitis during Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Lin, Jung-Chun; Kawashima, Yohei; Maruno, Atsuko; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Masami; Mine, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis, hemorrhage and perforation are the most frequent complications associated with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). We report a rare case of accessory pancreatic duct-portal vein fistula, which occurred during ERCP in a patient with chronic pancreatitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of accessory pancreatic duct-portal vein fistula created during ERCP by the use of a guide wire. PMID:25473386

  12. Selective agenesis of pancreatic isthmus parenchyma with preservation of main pancreatic duct continuity, a very rare entity: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Paiella, Salvatore; De Pastena, Matteo; Esposito, Alessandro; Salvia, Roberto; Morigi, Consuelo; Bassi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Context Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas is a rare anomaly, mostly associated with other medical conditions. It may be complicated with pancreatic neoplasms. Case report We report the case of a 51-year-old male with selective agenesis of pancreatic isthmus with preservation of main pancreatic duct and branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN) with suspicious features of the pancreas. Conclusion This is probably the first report of isolated agenesis of pancreatic isthmus with conservation of main pancreatic duct. PMID:25544484

  13. Effect of bicarbonate on potassium conductance of isolated perfused rat pancreatic ducts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Novak; R. Greger

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the K+ conductance in unstimulated and stimulated pancreatic ducts and to see how it is affected by provision of exogenous HCO3-\\/CO2. For this purpose we have applied electrophysiological techniques to perfused pancreatic ducts, which were dissected from rat pancreas. The basolateral membrane potential PDbl of unstimulated duct cells was

  14. Spontaneous air in the main pancreatic duct

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pankaj Tyagi; A. S. Puri; S. Sachdeva

    2009-01-01

    A 34-year-old lady was referred to us after an episode of acute biliary pancreatitis which was diagnosed three months back, and resolved on conservative treatment. She again became symptomatic with abdominal discomfort after one month. There was no history of vomiting, dyspnea, jaundice, fever, weight loss or anorexia. Her laboratory parameters were: Hb 12 gm, leukocyte count 8600\\/cmm, S. amylase

  15. Effects of pancreatic duct ligation and aging on acute taurocholate-induced pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wataru Kimura; Kenji Okubo; Ilsoo Han; Setsuko Kanai; Akira Matsushita; Tetsuichiro Muto; Kyoko Miyasaka

    1996-01-01

    Summary\\u000a Conclusion  \\u000a When taurocholate was injected into the common bile duct, high ductal pressure due to ligation of the pancreatic duct did\\u000a not produce more damage in the pancreas of both old rats and young adult rats, and levels of pancreatic enzymes in portal\\u000a venous effluent were lower in old rats than in younger rats\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Background  The effects of ligation of

  16. Biliary Stent Migration to Hepatic Duct–Case Report of a Late Complication

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad Alizadeh, Amir Houshang; Donboli, Kianoush; Khodakarami, Mehran; Baghbani, Salar; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrieval of proximally migrated biliary plastic stents may be technically challenging and sometimes unsuccessful. Here we report the case of a 59-year-old woman with a migrated biliary stent in the right hepatic duct, which was diagnosed after the patient presented with cholangitis. The patient presented with constant abdominal pain in the right upper quadrant lasting for two days, along with nausea and bilious vomiting. The stent was retrieved by a polypectomy snare after failure of biliary basket and forceps. We performed a novel procedure for extraction of a migrated plastic stent, by using a polypectomy snare. PMID:25733945

  17. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Due to Splenic Artery Aneurysm Pancreatic Duct Fistula in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Blumgart, Leslie H.

    1993-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to splenic artery aneurysm pancreatic duct fistula in chronic pancreatitis is rare. It is, however, important to diagnose this condition particularly in patients having chronic pancreatitis, since it may result in a life-threatening situation. The diagnosis is usually difficult to establish and it may take repeated admissions for intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding until the real source is recognized. Clinical attacks of epigastric pain followed by GI-bleeding 30–40 minutes later are characteristic. Occasionally these attacks are followed by transient jaundice. The present case report describes this rare complication and reviews the current literature. PMID:8268107

  18. Safety and Efficacy of Radiofrequency Ablation in the Management of Unresectable Bile Duct and Pancreatic Cancer: A Novel Palliation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Barojas, Paola; Bakhru, Mihir R.; Habib, Nagy A.; Ellen, Kristi; Millman, Jennifer; Jamal-Kabani, Armeen; Gaidhane, Monica; Kahaleh, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has replaced photodynamic therapy for premalignant and malignant lesions of the esophagus. However, there is limited experience in the bile duct. The objective of this pilot study was to assess the safety and efficacy of RFA in malignant biliary strictures. Methods: Twenty patients with unresectable malignant biliary strictures underwent RFA with stenting between June 2010 and July 2012. Diameters of the stricture before and after RFA, immediate and 30 day complications and stent patency were recorded prospectively. Results. A total of 25 strictures were treated. Mean stricture length treated was 15.2?mm (SD = 8.7?mm, Range = 3.5–33?mm). Mean stricture diameter before RFA was 1.7?mm (SD = 0.9?mm, Range = 0.5–3.4?mm) while the mean diameter after RFA was 5.2?mm (SD = 2?mm, Range = 2.6–9?mm). There was a significant increase of 3.5?mm (t = 10.8, DF = 24, P value = <.0001) in the bile duct diameter post RFA. Five patients presented with pain after the procedure, but only one developed mild post-ERCP pancreatitis and cholecystitis. Conclusions: Radiofrequency ablation can be a safe palliation option for unresectable malignant biliary strictures. A multicenter randomized controlled trial is required to confirm the long term benefits of RFA and stenting compared to stenting alone. PMID:23690775

  19. Application of “Papillary-Like Main Pancreatic Duct Invaginated” Pancreaticojejunostomy for Normal Soft Pancreas Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bo; Xu, Jin; Liu, Chen; Long, Jiang; Liu, Liang; Xu, Yongfeng; Wu, Chuntao; Luo, Guopei; Ni, Quanxing; Li, Min; Yu, Xianjun

    2013-01-01

    Pancreaticojejunostomy is the key procedure of pancreaticoduodenectomy. Our study introduced a new pancreaticojejunal (PJ) anastomosis named “papillary-like main pancreatic duct invaginated” pancreaticojejunostomy. Nighty-two patients underwent pancreaticojejunostomy with either conventional duct-to-mucosa pancreaticojejunostomy or the new “papillary-like main pancreatic duct invaginated” techniques were analyzed retrospectively from January 2010 to September 2012. The incidence of pancreatic fistula was 15.7% (8/51) for the “papillary-like main pancreatic duct invaginated” group and 19.5% (8/41) for the duct-to-mucosa fashion respectively. It is noteworthy that the rate of grade B/C postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) in the “papillary-like main pancreatic duct invaginated” group was significantly lower than that of the duct-to-mucosa group (P = 0.039). There were no differences in the incidence of postoperative morbidity and mortality such as postoperative hemorrhage, delayed gastric emptying or remnant pancreatitis. The “papillary-like main pancreatic duct invaginated” pancreaticojejunostomy could provide a feasible option to pancreatic surgeons for patients with normal soft pancreas. PMID:23797701

  20. Laparoscopic resection of a pancreatic serous cystadenoma preserving the integrity of main pancreatic duct: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Pitiakoudis, Michail; Oikonomou, Anastasia; Tsalikidis, Christos; Kouklakis, Georgios; Botaitis, Sotirios; Simopoulos, Constantinos

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic serous cystadenomas are rare benign cystic neoplasms. Extended operations are unnecessary for serous cystadenomas and minimally invasive surgery should be performed. Laparoscopic pancreatic procedures are under evaluation. We present a case of a 79-year-old Greek woman with symptomatic cholelithiasis and a serous pancreatic cystadenoma located at the neck of the pancreas. In the occasion of a standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy the pancreatic mass was resected with a novel minimally invasive laparoscopic method preserving the integrity of the main pancreatic duct and the whole pancreas. Laparoscopic resection is a feasible, safe and effective treatment of benign pancreatic tumors, in experienced hands under proper indications. PMID:19830064

  1. Establishment of three-dimensional cultures of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angelica M. Gutierrez-Barrera; David G. Menter; James L. Abbruzzese; Shrikanth A. G.. Reddy

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cultures of epithelial cells offer singular advantages for studies of morphogenesis or the role of cancer genes in oncogenesis. In this study, as part of establishing a 3D culture system of pancreatic duct epithelial cells, we compared human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDE-E6E7) with pancreatic cancer cell lines. Our results show, that in contrast to cancer cells, HPDE-E6E7

  2. Lethal post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis following fully covered metal stent placement in distal biliary obstruction due to unresectable cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Itoi, Takao; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Reina; Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Sofuni, Atsushi

    2013-05-01

    Biliary self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) is the preferred and first-line therapy for unresectable malignant biliary obstruction. To date, several reports have revealed the relatively high incidence of acute complications such as pancreatitis and cholecystitis due to mechanical stent compression. In the present case, we encountered fatal pancreatitis following fully covered metal stent placement. An 85-year-old man had middle bile duct strictures due to cholangiocarcinoma. A 10-mm diameter fully covered SEMS was placed across the papilla for biliary decompression. Laboratory data and physical evidence the following day revealed acute pancreatitis. Therefore, antibiotics and protein degeneration enzyme inhibitors were given. However, his condition did not improve. Two days after the procedure, we removed the stent and returned him to his original hospital. Serum amylase level decreased below 400 mg/dL 6 h after the procedure. However, the acute pancreatitis worsened. Although we treated the patient in the intensive care unit, he died 32 days after the second admission. PMID:23617661

  3. Feasibility of biodegradable PLGA common bile duct stents: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyi; Liu, Tongjun; Liu, Shaohui; Zhang, Kai; Shen, Zhen; Li, Yuxin; Jing, Xiabin

    2009-05-01

    The current study investigates the feasibility of using a biodegradable polymeric stent in common bile duct (CBD) repair and reconstruction. Here, poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, molar ratio LA/GA = 80/20) was processed into a circular tube- and dumbbell-shaped specimens to determine the in vitro degradation behavior in bile. The morphology, weight loss, and molecular weight changes were then investigated in conjunction with evaluations of the mechanical properties of the specimen. Circular tube-shaped PLGA stents with X-ray opacity were subsequently used in common bile duct exploration (CBDE) and primary suturing in canine models. Next, X-ray images of CBD stents in vivo were compared and levels of serum liver enzymes and a histological analysis were conducted after stent transplantation. The results showed that the PLGA stents exhibited the required biomedical properties and spontaneously disappeared from CBDs in 4-5 weeks. The degradation period and function match the requirements in repair and reconstruction of CBDs to support the duct, guide bile drainage, and reduce T-tube-related complications. PMID:19132510

  4. Medical devices; gastroenterology-urology devices; classification of pancreatic drainage stent and delivery system. Final order.

    PubMed

    2014-05-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the pancreatic drainage stent and delivery system into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order, and will be part of the codified language for the pancreatic drainage stent and delivery system classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:24873019

  5. Analysis of K-ras gene mutation in hyperplastic duct cells of the pancreas without pancreatic disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Tada; M Ohashi; Y Shiratori; T Okudaira; Y Komatsu; T Kawabe; H Yoshida; R Machinami; K Kishi; M Omata

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We and others have previously shown that the mutation of K-ras codon 12 was found in the majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The mutation has also been identified in the pancreatic duct with mucous cell hyperplasia in association with chronic pancreatitis. Ductal hyperplasia is also frequently found in the pancreas free from pancreatic carcinoma or chronic pancreatitis. The

  6. Evidence of Notch pathway activation in the ectatic ducts of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bhanot, Uk; Köhntop, R; Hasel, C; Möller, P

    2008-02-01

    Ductal concretions in chronic pancreatitis (CP) are one of the causes of ductal obstruction, resulting in pancreatic ductal hypertension (PDH) and duct ectasia. Ductal epithelium subjected to chronic stress by PDH may undergo molecular alterations, thereby not only initiating and sustaining the inflammatory process but also activating molecules that have transforming potential. Acino-ductal metaplasia and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) are frequently seen in CP. Using laser capture microdissection, cDNA microarrays and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, we found an altered Notch pathway in the ectatic ducts of CP. The microarray data was further validated by real-time PCR. We also found elevated transcripts of Notch receptors, Notch1 and Notch3 in microdissected ectatic ducts of CP. The Notch pathway ligands, Jagged/Delta-like and a Notch target, HES-related repressor protein (HERP), were up-regulated in ectatic compared to normal pancreatic ducts, while another target of Notch, hairy/enhancer of split (HES), was down-regulated. The transcripts of Delta-like1 and Jagged1 were increased 3.7-fold and 1.3-fold, respectively, while those of HERP1 were elevated 2.4-fold in the ectatic ducts of CP, compared to normal ducts. Immunohistochemistry showed that Jagged1 was not expressed in normal pancreatic ducts, while it was highly expressed in ectatic ducts. This pattern of Notch component alteration in ectatic ducts was mimicked to some extent in vitro in a human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cell line, when subjected to a pressure of 200 mmHg for 24 h. Therefore, we conclude that in the ectatic ducts of CP, PDH activates signalling pathways such as Notch, which have transforming potential. PMID:18069660

  7. Pancreatic Serous Cystadenoma with Compression of the Main Pancreatic Duct: An Unusual Entity

    PubMed Central

    Truant, Stéphanie; Izgarevic, D.; Maunoury, Vincent; Buob, David; Bulois, Philippe; Ernst, Olivier; Huet, Guillemette; Zerbib, Philippe; Pruvot, François-René

    2011-01-01

    Serous cystadenoma is a common benign neoplasm that can be managed without surgery in asymptomatic patients provided that the diagnosis is certain. We describe a patient, whose pancreatic cyst exhibited a radiological appearance distinct from that of typical serous cystadenoma, resulting in diagnostic difficulties. CT and MRI showed a 10?cm-polycystic tumor with upstream dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (MPD), suggestive of intraductal papillary mucinous tumor (IPMT). Ultrasonographic aspect and EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration gave arguments for serous cystadenoma. ERCP showed a communication between cysts and the dilated MPD, compatible with IPMT. The patient underwent left pancreatectomy with splenectomy. Pathological examination concluded in a serous cystadenoma, with only a ductal obstruction causing proximal dilatation. PMID:21436987

  8. Electrophysiological study of transport systems in isolated perfused pancreatic ducts: properties of the basolateral membrane

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Novak; R. Greger

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of pancreatic HCO3- transport, a perfused preparation of isolated intra-and interlobular ducts (i.d. 20–40 µm) of rat pancreas was developed. Responses of the epithelium to changes in the bath ionic concentration and to addition of transport inhibitors was monitored by electrophysiological techniques. In this report some properties of the basolateral membrane of pancreatic duct

  9. SLC26 anion exchangers of guinea pig pancreatic duct: molecular cloning and functional characterization

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Andrew K.; Shmukler, Boris E.; Vandorpe, David H.; Reimold, Fabian; Heneghan, John F.; Nakakuki, M.; Akhavein, Arash; Ko, Shigeru; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The secretin-stimulated human pancreatic duct secretes HCO3?-rich fluid essential for normal digestion. Optimal stimulation of pancreatic HCO3? secretion likely requires coupled activities of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) anion channel and apical SLC26 Cl?/HCO3? exchangers. However, whereas stimulated human and guinea pig pancreatic ducts secrete ?140 mM HCO3? or more, mouse and rat ducts secrete ?40–70 mM HCO3?. Moreover, the axial distribution and physiological roles of SLC26 anion exchangers in pancreatic duct secretory processes remain controversial and may vary among mammalian species. Thus the property of high HCO3? secretion shared by human and guinea pig pancreatic ducts prompted us to clone from guinea pig pancreatic duct cDNAs encoding Slc26a3, Slc26a6, and Slc26a11 polypeptides. We then functionally characterized these anion transporters in Xenopus oocytes and human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. In Xenopus oocytes, gpSlc26a3 mediated only Cl?/Cl? exchange and electroneutral Cl?/HCO3? exchange. gpSlc26a6 in Xenopus oocytes mediated Cl?/Cl? exchange and bidirectional exchange of Cl? for oxalate and sulfate, but Cl?/HCO3? exchange was detected only in HEK 293 cells. gpSlc26a11 in Xenopus oocytes exhibited pH-dependent Cl?, oxalate, and sulfate transport but no detectable Cl?/HCO3? exchange. The three gpSlc26 anion transporters exhibited distinct pharmacological profiles of 36Cl? influx, including partial sensitivity to CFTR inhibitors Inh-172 and GlyH101, but only Slc26a11 was inhibited by PPQ-102. This first molecular and functional assessment of recombinant SLC26 anion transporters from guinea pig pancreatic duct enhances our understanding of pancreatic HCO3? secretion in species that share a high HCO3? secretory output. PMID:21593449

  10. The effect of biliary stenting on difficult common bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Arabul, Mahmut; Celik, Mustafa; Alper, Emrah; Unsal, Belk?s

    2014-01-01

    Introduction If common bile duct (CBD) stones (choledocholithiasis) are left untreated, they may cause increases in morbidity and mortality due to several conditions. Aim In this study, using transient biliary stenting following the failure of an initial endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) session, we aimed to show the effects of making the CBD stones smaller and easier to remove in the following session. Material and methods In 156 of 1300 (12%) patients with CBD stones, who underwent balloon screening and/or basket lithotripsy following ERCP and CBD cannulation, it was not possible to remove the stones in the first session. Of these 156 patients, 64 (4.9%) were further followed and tested following transient biliary stenting. Results In the last ERCP following biliary stenting, the maximum stone sizes and stone indices were decreased in 54 (83%) patients and stone fragmentation was observed in 46 (72%) patients. Complete and incomplete removal was obtained in 40 (62.5%) and 24 (37.5%) patients, respectively. Conclusions Biliary stenting, fragmentation and the reduction in the size of difficult common bile duct stones caused by the first session of ERCP may increase the chance of success in the next session of ERCP. PMID:25061492

  11. A Unique Use of a Double-Pigtail Plastic Stent: Correction of Kinking of the Common Bile Duct Due to a Metal Stent

    PubMed Central

    Kuwatani, Masaki; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Abe, Yoko; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    A 72-year-old man with jaundice by ampullary adenocarcinoma was treated at our hospital. For biliary decompression, a transpapillary, fully covered, self-expandable metal stent (FCSEMS) was deployed. Four days later, the patient developed acute cholangitis. Endoscopic carbon dioxide cholangiography revealed kinking of the common bile duct above the proximal end of the FCSEMS. A 7-F double-pigtail plastic stent was therefore placed through the FCSEMS to correct the kink, straightening the common bile duct (CBD) and improving cholangitis. This is the first report of a unique use of a double-pigtail plastic stent to correct CBD kinking. The placement of a double-pigtail plastic stent can correct CBD kinking, without requiring replacement or addition of a FCSEMS, and can lead to cost savings. PMID:25721004

  12. A unique use of a double-pigtail plastic stent: correction of kinking of the common bile duct due to a metal stent.

    PubMed

    Kuwatani, Masaki; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Abe, Yoko; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-03-15

    A 72-year-old man with jaundice by ampullary adenocarci-noma was treated at our hospital. For biliary decompression, a transpapillary, fully covered, self-expandable metal stent (FCSEMS) was deployed. Four days later, the patient devel-oped acute cholangitis. Endoscopic carbon dioxide cholan-giography revealed kinking of the common bile duct above the proximal end of the FCSEMS. A 7-F double-pigtail plastic stent was therefore placed through the FCSEMS to correct the kink, straightening the common bile duct (CBD) and im-proving cholangitis. This is the first report of a unique use of a double-pigtail plastic stent to correct CBD kinking. The place-ment of a double-pigtail plastic stent can correct CBD kink-ing, without requiring replacement or addition of a FCSEMS, and can lead to cost savings. (Gut Liver, 2015;9:251-252). PMID:25721004

  13. Partial pancreatic head resection for intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma originating in a branch of the duct of santorini.

    PubMed

    Nakagohri, T; Konishi, M; Inoue, K; Izuishi, K; Kinoshita, T

    2002-01-01

    We report partial pancreatic head resection of intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma originating in a branch of the duct of Santorini. The tumor was located in the ventral part of pancreatic head at a distance from the Wirsung duct. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography accurately showed the communication between the duct of Santorini and the cystic tumor, and was useful for determining the part of the pancreas to be resected. Both the duct of Wirsung and the duct of Santorini were preserved. Partial pancreatic head resection would play an important role in surgical management of low-grade malignant neoplasm. PMID:12403944

  14. Squamoid Cystosis of Pancreatic Ducts: A Variant of a Newly-Described Cystic Lesion, with Evidence for an Obstructive Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Wai Chin; Wang, Huamin; Prieto, Victor G.; Fleming, Jason B.; Abraham, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 40-year-old man who was found to have a cystic mass in the pancreatic tail during workup for weight loss and abdominal discomfort. Although computed tomography scan showed a single cyst associated with dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, gross and histologic examination of the distal pancreatectomy specimen actually revealed a central cyst that was surrounded by multiple smaller cystic spaces. This distinctive appearance was formed from extensive cystic dilatation and squamous metaplasia of the native pancreatic duct system. Further, a traumatic neuroma was discovered near the junction between normal and abnormal parenchyma. We believe that this case represents a variant of the newly-described squamoid cyst of pancreatic ducts which we term squamoid cystosis of pancreatic ducts. The presence of chronic pancreatitis and a traumatic neuroma supports the hypothesis that squamoid cysts are non-neoplastic lesions arising from prior duct obstruction. PMID:25276318

  15. Rescue ERCP and insertion of a small-caliber pancreatic stent to prevent the evolution of severe post-ERCP pancreatitis: a case-controlled series

    Microsoft Academic Search

    László Madácsy; Gábor Kurucsai; Ildikó Joó; Szilárd Gódi; Roland Fejes; András Székely

    2009-01-01

    Introduction  Recently prophylactic placement of a trans-sphincteric pancreatic stent has successfully been applied to prevent post-endoscopic\\u000a retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis. Rescue ERCP and emergency application of small-caliber pancreatic\\u000a stents during the early course of post-ERCP pancreatitis as a possible endoscopic therapy has not been reported yet.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  All patients who underwent ERCP were hospitalized for at least 24 h, with routine laboratory testing

  16. Biliary stents in malignant obstructive jaundice due to pancreatic carcinoma: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miguel R. Arguedas; Gustavo H. Heudebert; Aaron A. Stinnett; C. Mel Wilcox

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:Obstructive jaundice frequently complicates pancreatic carcinoma and is associated with complications such as malabsorption, coagulopathy, progressive hepatocellular dysfunction, and cholangitis in addition to disabling pruritus, which greatly interferes with terminal patients’ quality of life. Endoscopic placement of biliary stents decreases the risk of these complications and is considered the procedure of choice for palliation for patients with unresectable tumors. We

  17. Concomitant pancreatic adenocarcinoma in a patient with branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Law, Joanna K; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Weiss, Matthew J; Lennon, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    Branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (BD-IPMN) are pre-malignant pancreatic cystic lesions which carry a small risk of malignant transformation within the cyst. Guidelines exist with respect to surveillance of the cysts using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). There are reports that patients with IPMNs are at increased risk of developing pancreatic adenocarcinoma, which arises in an area separate to the IPMNs. We present two cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma arising within the parenchyma, distinct from the IPMN-associated cyst, identified with EUS. This case report highlights that patients with BD-IPMN are at increased risk for pancreatic adenocarcinoma separate from the cyst and also the importance for endosonographers to carefully survey the rest of the pancreatic parenchyma separate from the cyst in order to identify small pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PMID:25083095

  18. Concomitant pancreatic adenocarcinoma in a patient with branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Law, Joanna K; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Weiss, Matthew J; Lennon, Anne Marie

    2014-07-21

    Branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (BD-IPMN) are pre-malignant pancreatic cystic lesions which carry a small risk of malignant transformation within the cyst. Guidelines exist with respect to surveillance of the cysts using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and/or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). There are reports that patients with IPMNs are at increased risk of developing pancreatic adenocarcinoma, which arises in an area separate to the IPMNs. We present two cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma arising within the parenchyma, distinct from the IPMN-associated cyst, identified with EUS. This case report highlights that patients with BD-IPMN are at increased risk for pancreatic adenocarcinoma separate from the cyst and also the importance for endosonographers to carefully survey the rest of the pancreatic parenchyma separate from the cyst in order to identify small pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PMID:25083095

  19. [Apropos of a case of acute pancreatitis revealing cystic dilatation of the common bile duct].

    PubMed

    Kabbaj, N; Ababou, A; el Fakir, Y; Amarouch, N; Dafiri, R; Sbihi, A; Imani, F

    1998-11-01

    Dilatation of the common bile duct is rarely caused by cystic formations. Though the pathogenesis is uncertain, congenital disorders have been suggested. Most cases are observed in small children (80% female predominance) with only 20% of the cases reported in adults. Clinical signs vary. Recurrent acute pancreatitis has been reported but is rare. New imaging techniques using CT-scan cholangiography and sometimes MR cholangiography have greatly improved the diagnostic approach. MR of the bile ducts is a recent noninvasive technique enabling an analysis of the biliopancreatic ducts without contrast injection into the bile. To our knowledge, cystic dilatation of the common bile duct has not been previously reported in the literature. We report an interesting case in a 25-year-old woman who developed an episode of acute pancreatitis during the post partum period. We describe the clinical aspects and the different imaging findings, including magnetic resonance cholangiography results. PMID:9846293

  20. Involution of the pancreas after ligation of the pancreatic ducts. I: a histological study.

    PubMed Central

    Pound, A. W.; Walker, N. I.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed histological study of pancreatic involution after ligation of the pancreatic duct is reported. Cytological evidence acinar cell damage is evident from the beginning and loss of zymogen granules occurs early. The acini diminish in size rapidly from the 36th hour to the 3rd day. The cell deletion appears to occur in 2 phases with apparently different characteristics. The first phase appears to be related to the initial cell damage. The letter phase is more general but of uncertain nature. Considerable proliferation of cells occurs in the ducts resulting, with the few remaining acinar cells, in duct-like structures which themselves undergo involution. The duct changes therefore are not passive but involve continued cell proliferation and cell death over a long period. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Figs. 5 and 6 Figs. 7 and 8 Figs. 9-10 PMID:7326214

  1. Feasibility of biodegradable PLGA common bile duct stents: An in vitro and in vivo study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoyi Xu; Tongjun Liu; Shaohui Liu; Kai Zhang; Zhen Shen; Yuxin Li; Xiabin Jing

    2009-01-01

    The current study investigates the feasibility of using a biodegradable polymeric stent in common bile duct (CBD) repair and\\u000a reconstruction. Here, poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, molar ratio LA\\/GA = 80\\/20) was processed into a circular tube- and dumbbell-shaped specimens to determine\\u000a the in vitro degradation behavior in bile. The morphology, weight loss, and molecular weight changes were then investigated\\u000a in conjunction with evaluations of

  2. Properties of the luminal membrane of isolated perfused rat pancreatic ducts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Novak; R. Greger

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate by what transport mechanism does HCO3- cross the luminal membrane of pancreatic duct cells, and how do the cells respond to stimulation with dibytyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP). For this purpose a newly developed preparation of isolated and perfused intra-and interlobular ducts of rat pancreas was used. Responses of the epithelium to

  3. Percutaneous Palliation of Pancreatic Head Cancer: Randomized Comparison of ePTFE/FEP-Covered Versus Uncovered Nitinol Biliary Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Krokidis, Miltiadis, E-mail: mkrokidis@hotmail.com [Guy's and St. Thomas' Hospitals, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Fanelli, Fabrizio ['La Sapienza' University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences (Italy); Orgera, Gianluigi [European Institute of Oncology, Unit of Interventional Radiology (Italy); Tsetis, Dimitrios [University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, Department of Radiology (Greece); Mouzas, Ioannis [University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, Department of Gastroenterology (Greece); Bezzi, Mario ['La Sapienza' University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences (Italy); Kouroumalis, Elias [University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, Department of Gastroenterology (Greece); Pasariello, Roberto ['La Sapienza' University of Rome, Department of Radiological Sciences (Italy); Hatzidakis, Adam [Medical School of Crete (Greece)

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene/fluorinated-ethylene-propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered stents with that of uncovered nitinol stents for the palliation of malignant jaundice caused by inoperable pancreatic head cancer. Eighty patients were enrolled in a prospective randomized study. Bare nitinol stents were used in half of the patients, and ePTFE/FEP-covered stents were used in the remaining patients. Patency, survival, complications, and mean cost were calculated in both groups. Mean patency was 166.0 {+-} 13.11 days for the bare-stent group and 234.0 {+-} 20.87 days for the covered-stent group (p = 0.007). Primary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months were 77.5, 69.8, and 69.8% for the bare-stent group and 97.5, 92.2, and 87.6% for the covered-stent group, respectively. Mean secondary patency was 123.7 {+-} 22.5 days for the bare-stent group and 130.3 {+-} 21.4 days for the covered-stent group. Tumour ingrowth occurred exclusively in the bare-stent group in 27.5% of cases (p = 0.002). Median survival was 203.2 {+-} 11.8 days for the bare-stent group and 247.0 {+-} 20 days for the covered-stent group (p = 0.06). Complications and mean cost were similar in both groups. Regarding primary patency and ingrowth rate, ePTFE/FEP-covered stents have shown to be significantly superior to bare nitinol stents for the palliation of malignant jaundice caused by inoperable pancreatic head cancer and pose comparable cost and complications. Use of a covered stent does not significantly influence overall survival rate; nevertheless, the covered endoprosthesis seems to offer result in fewer reinterventions and better quality of patient life.

  4. Compression of the Main Pancreatic Duct by the Intrapancreatic-Replaced Common Hepatic Artery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha-yeon; Kim, Min-jeong; Lim, Hyun Kyung

    2013-01-01

    We describe a unique case of a patient who presented with a linear, transverse, and incidentally-detected main pancreatic duct dilatation that was caused by the intrapancreatic-replaced common hepatic artery, detected on the MDCT, MRCP and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. We believe this case to be the first of its kind reported in the literature. PMID:23690706

  5. Biliopancreatic duct injection of ethanol as an experimental model of acute and chronic pancreatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Ethem; Atalay, Suleyman; Tolan, Huseyin Kerem; Yuksekdag, Sema; Yucel, Metin; Acar, Aylin; Basak, Fatih; Gunes, Pembegul; Bas, Gurhan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we described an easily reproducable experimental pancreatits model induced by biliopancreatic duct injection of ethyl alcohol. Seventy Wistar albino rats were divided equally into seven groups randomly: the control group (group 1), acute pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 2), 48% ethanol (group 3), 80% ethanol (group 4), chronic pancreatitis groups; induced by 20% ethanol (group 5), 48% ethanol (group 6) and by 80% ethanol (group 7). Acute pancreatitis groups were sacrified on postoperative day 3, while the control group and chronic pancreatitis groups were killed on postoperative day 7. Histopathologic evaluation was done, and P < 0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. All rats in group 3 developed acute pancreatitis (100%). Inflammatory infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, interstitial edema, and focal necrotic areas were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Similarly, all rats in group 6 developed chronic pancreatitis (100%). Interstitial fibrosis, lymphotic infiltration, ductal dilatation, acinar cell atrophy, periductal hyperplasia were seen in the pancreatic tissues. Mortality was seen only in group 7. The biliopancreatic ductal injection of 48% ethanol induced acute and chronic pancreatitis has 100% success rate. PMID:25785001

  6. Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction and bile duct microlithiasis in acute idiopathic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Elta, Grace H

    2008-01-01

    Although there are numerous causes of acute pancreatitis, an etiology cannot always be found. Two potential etiologies, microlithiasis and sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, are discussed in this review. Gallbladder microlithiasis, missed on transcutaneous ultrasound, is reported as the cause of idiopathic acute pancreatitis in a wide frequency range of 6%-80%. The best diagnostic technique for gallbladder microlithiasis is endoscopic ultrasound although biliary crystal analysis and empiric cholecystectomy remain as reasonable options. In contrast, in patients who are post-cholecystectomy, bile duct microlithiasis does not appear to have a role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction is present in 30%-65% of patients with idiopathic acute recurrent pancreatitis in whom other diagnoses have been excluded. It is unclear if this sphincter dysfunction was the original etiology of the first episode of pancreatitis although it appears to have a causative role in recurring episodes since sphincter ablation decreases the frequency of recurrent attacks. Unfortunately, this conclusion is primarily based on small retrospective case series; larger prospective studies of the outcome of pancreatic sphincterotomy for SOD-associated acute pancreatitis are sorely needed. Another problem with this diagnosis and its treatment is the concern over potential procedure related complications from endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), manometry and pancreatic sphincterotomy. For these reasons, patients should have recurrent acute pancreatitis, not a single episode, and have a careful informed consent before assessment of the sphincter of Oddi is undertaken. PMID:18286682

  7. The theory of 'persisting' common bile duct stones in severe gallstone pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Neoptolemos, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    There have been uncertainties as to the role of common bile duct (CBD) stones in severe gallstone pancreatitis. In order to resolve this, ERCP findings in 131 patients with acute pancreatitis were compared with predicted severity, clinical course and final outcome. Significant associations were found between 'persisting' CBD stones, coincidental acute cholangitis, predicted severity and actual outcome. There was evidence for acute obstruction of both the CBD and the pancreatic duct by CBD stones. The theory was therefore proposed that small migrating stones tend to initiate the attack, whereas larger 'persisting' stones tend to convert a mild attack into a severe attack. This hypothesis resolves previously irreconcilable theories and lends support to the use of urgent endoscopic sphincterotomy for treatment, but only in cases predicted to be severe. Images fig. 4 PMID:2802482

  8. Retrospective evaluation of endoscopic stenting of combined malignant common bile duct and gastric outlet-duodenum obstructions

    PubMed Central

    YU, JIANFENG; HAO, JIANYU; WU, DONGFANG; LANG, HAIBO

    2014-01-01

    Malignant dual obstruction in the common bile duct and gastric outlet-duodenum can cause difficulties in palliative treatment. The purpose of this study was to summarize our successful experience with the endoscopic stenting procedure for the palliative treatment of malignant biliary and gastric outlet-duodenum obstruction. Seventeen patients who underwent dual stenting procedures for the common bile duct and duodenum were retrospectively reviewed. The success rate of placement, palliative effect for biliary and duodenal obstruction, incidence of complication and restricture and stent patency were analyzed. Stent placement achieved a 100% success rate. Total bilirubin decreased from 263.4±62.5 to 157.6±25.1 ?mol/l, direct bilirubin decreased from 233.2±66.5 to 130.9±27.7 ?mol/l and alkaline phosphatase from 534.2±78.7 to 216.3±23.3 IU/l. The differences between the preoperative and postoperative results were statistically significant (P<0.01). The gastric outlet obstruction score increased significantly from 0.9±1.1 to 2.1±0.7 points (P<0.01). The general nutritional status of the patients was improved. No serious complications occurred in any of the patients, and the survival time of patients following stenting ranged between 70 and 332 days with a mean survival time of 192 days. In conclusion, our methodology for combined biliary and enteral stenting is highly effective for the palliation of malignant biliary and gastric outlet-duodenal obstruction. PMID:25187819

  9. Internal compared with external drainage of pancreatic duct during pancreaticoduodenectomy: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Guangxing; Xing, Qianzhe; Yuan, Qiang; Du, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare internal with external drainage of the pancreatic duct during pancreaticoduodenectomy with regard to the incidence of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) and other complications. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 316 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy with a placed drainage tube (external, n=128; internal, n=188) in the pancreatic duct from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2011 in Tianjin Third Central Hospital of China. The incidence of POPF and some other complications were compared. Results There was no difference in the incidence rates of POPF between those given an internal or external drainage tube (P=0.788), but POPF was more severe in the former (P=0.014). Intraperitoneal bleeding rate was also higher in the patients with internal drainage (P=0.040), but operative time and postoperative hospitalization were longer in those with external drainage (P=0.002 and P=0.007, respectively). There was no difference between the groups with regard to the incidence rates of gastrointestinal bleeding, delayed gastric emptying, pulmonary infection, or incision infection and in-hospital mortality. Conclusions External drainage of the pancreatic duct during pancreaticoduodenectomy can decrease the severity of POPF, but operative time and postoperative hospitalization will be extended. PMID:25035654

  10. Endoscopic ultrasound guided biliary and pancreatic duct interventions

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, David; Byrne, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    When endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography fails to decompress the pancreatic or biliary system, alternative interventions are required. In this situation, endosonography guided cholangio-pancreatography (ESCP), percutaneous radiological therapy or surgery can be considered. Small case series reporting the initial experience with ESCP have been superseded by comprehensive reports of large cohorts. Although these reports are predominantly retrospective, they demonstrate that endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided biliary and pancreatic interventions are associated with high levels of technical and clinical success. The procedural complication rates are lower than those seen with percutaneous therapy or surgery. This article describes and discusses data published in the last five years relating to EUS-guided biliary and pancreatic intervention. PMID:25400865

  11. Comparative phenotypic studies of duct epithelial cell lines derived from normal human pancreas and pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, N; Furukawa, T; Kobari, M; Tsao, M S

    1998-07-01

    We have investigated the mRNA/protein expression of several tyrosine kinase receptors, growth factors, and p16INK4A cyclin inhibitor in cell lines derived from normal human pancreatic duct epithelium (HPDE) and compared them with those of five pancreatic ductal carcinoma cell lines. Cultured HPDE cells express low levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), erbB2, transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha, Met/hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF). They also expressed high levels of amphiregulin but did not express EGF and cripto. The expression levels were similar in primary normal HPDE cells and those expressing transfected E6E7 genes of human papilloma virus-16, but their immortalization appeared to enhance the expression of EGFR and Met/HGFR. In comparison, pancreatic carcinoma cell lines commonly demonstrated overexpression of EGFR, erbB2, TGF-alpha, Met/HGFR, VEGF, and KGF, but they consistently showed marked down-regulation of amphiregulin mRNA expression. In contrast to all carcinoma cell lines that showed deletions of the p16 gene, HPDE cells consistently demonstrated normal p16 genotype and its mRNA expression. This is the first report that compares the phenotypic expression of cultured pancreatic ductal carcinoma cells with epithelial cell lines derived from normal human pancreatic ducts. The findings confirm that malignant transformation of human pancreatic duct cells commonly results in a deregulation of expression of various growth factors and receptors. PMID:9665487

  12. In vitro Modeling of Human Pancreatic Duct Epithelial Cell Transformation Defines Gene Expression Changes Induced by K-ras Oncogenic Activation in Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jiaying Qian; Jiangong Niu; Ming Li; Paul J. Chiao

    Genetic analysis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and their putative precursor lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanIN), has shown a multistep molecular para- digm for duct cell carcinogenesis. Mutational activation or inactivation of the K-ras, p16INK4A, Smad4, and p53 genes occur at progressive and high frequencies in these lesions. Oncogenic activation of the K-ras gene occurs in >90% of pancreatic ductal carcinoma

  13. Santorinicele containing a pancreatic duct stone in a patient with incomplete pancreas divisum.

    PubMed

    Joo, Kwang Ro; Bang, Sung Jo; Shin, Jung Woo; Kim, Do Ha; Park, Neung Hwa

    2004-10-31

    Santorinicele, a focal cystic dilatation of the distal duct of Santorini, has been suggested as a possible cause of the relative stenosis of the accessory papilla, is associated with complete pancreas divisum, which results in acute episodes of pancreatitis or pain. This report describes a case of a santorinicele, which was initially detected by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy as a polypoid mass, in a patient with recurrent abdominal pain. The mass was subsequently proved to be a santorinicele containing a pancreatic duct stone associated with incomplete pancreas divisum on endoscopic retrograde pancreatography. To the best of our knowledge this is believed to be the first description of a santorinicele associated with these characteristic findings. PMID:15515212

  14. Experiments to optimize enzyme substitution therapy in pancreatic duct-ligated pigs.

    PubMed

    Kammlott, E; Karthoff, J; Stemme, K; Gregory, P; Kamphues, J

    2005-01-01

    Ligation of the pancreatic duct in pigs leads to severe maldigestion and malabsorption of crude nutrients. Supplementation with 24 capsules of Creon (Solvay Pharmaceuticals GmbH, Hannover, Germany) per meal led to an increased digestibility of crude nutrients. With regard to optimization of the treatment of EPI no essential improvements can be achieved by adding omeprazol or lecithin to the diet. In pancreatic duct-ligated pigs the isolated addition of omeprazol led to an increase of the pre-caecal digestibility of crude fat and organic matter. With additional enzyme substitution, the application of omeprazol did not result in an improved fat digestibility. Isolated addition of lecithin to the diet resulted in a reduced total digestibility of crude fat. Offering the diet twice a day and using a higher frequency of enzyme applications (four or six instead of only two applications) had no effects on the digestibilty of crude fat or organic matter. According to the observations in pancreatic duct-ligated pigs, the addition of missing enzymes to the diet led to the best treatment results in EPI. Administration of omeprazol or a higher feeding frequency as well as the application of enzymes in small proportion of the whole meal or dosages given consecutively over the day showed no advantages. Furthermore, the present study suggests that the addition of lecithin cannot be recommended in EPI, when given diets with butter as the predominant fat source as in human dietetics. PMID:15787979

  15. Effects of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin via claudin-4 on normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells and cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroshi Yamaguchi; Takashi Kojima; Tatsuya Ito; Daisuke Kyuno; Yasutoshi Kimura; Masafumi Imamura; Koichi Hirata; Norimasa Sawada

    The tight junction protein claudin-4 is frequently overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and is also a receptor for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE). The cytotoxic effects of CPE are thought to be useful as a novel therapeutic tool for pancreatic cancer.\\u000a However, the responses to CPE via claudin-4 remain unknown in normal human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells. We introduced\\u000a the human

  16. Regulation of tight junctions in human normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Takashi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the regulation of tight junction molecules in normal human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells and pancreatic cancer cells, we introduced the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene into HPDE cells in primary culture and compared them to pancreatic cancer cell lines. The hTERT-transfected HPDE cells were positive for PDE markers and expressed claudin-1, claudin-4, claudin-7, and claudin-18, occludin, tricellulin, marvelD3, JAM-A, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, and ZO-2. The tight junction molecules, including claudin-4 and claudin-18 of normal HPDE cells, were in part regulated via a protein kinase C signal pathway by transcriptional control. In addition, claudin-18 in normal HPDE cells and pancreatic cancer cells was markedly induced by a PKC activator, and claudin-18 in pancreatic cancer cells was also modified by DNA methylation. In the marvel family of normal HPDE cells and pancreatic cancer cells, tricellulin was upregulated via a c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway, and marvelD3 was downregulated during Snail-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:22671593

  17. Laparoscopic Common Bile Duct Exploration in Pregnancy With Acute Gallstone Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young W.; Chung, Mathew H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: We present a case in which a laparoscopic common bile duct exploration was performed safely in a pregnant patient with acute gallstone pancreatitis. Case Report: A 25-year-old female, gravida 4 para 3, at 14-weeks gestation presented to her obstetrician with complaints of epigastric pain radiating to the back. She was otherwise healthy with no past medical or surgical history. A physical examination revealed a healthy young female with no evidence of jaundice and in no acute distress. An abdominal examination was remarkable for a gravid abdomen with mild tenderness to palpation in her epigastrium and negative Murphy's sign. The patient safely underwent a laparoscopic common bile duct exploration after a laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. Conclusion: This case illustrates the role of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration in the diagnosis and treatment of possible choledocholithiasis in a pregnant patient. PMID:16709365

  18. Establishment of three-dimensional cultures of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M; Menter, David G; Abbruzzese, James L; Reddy, Shrikanth A G

    2007-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cultures of epithelial cells offer singular advantages for studies of morphogenesis or the role of cancer genes in oncogenesis. In this study, as part of establishing a 3D culture system of pancreatic duct epithelial cells, we compared human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDE-E6E7) with pancreatic cancer cell lines. Our results show, that in contrast to cancer cells, HPDE-E6E7 organized into spheroids with what appeared to be apical and basal membranes and a luminal space. Immunostaining experiments indicated that protein kinase Akt was phosphorylated (Ser473) and CTMP, a negative Akt regulator, was expressed in both HPDE-E6E7 and cancer cells. However, a nuclear pool of CTMP was detectable in HPDE-E6E7 cells that showed a dynamic concentrated expression pattern, a feature that further distinguished HPDE-E637 cells from cancer cells. Collectively, these data suggest that 3D cultures of HPDE-E6E7 cells are useful for investigating signaling and morphological abnormalities in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:17512909

  19. Establishment of three-dimensional cultures of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 426, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Menter, David G. [Department of Thoracic Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Abbruzzese, James L. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 426, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Reddy, Shrikanth A.G. [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 426, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)]. E-mail: sa08366@wotan.mdacc.tmc.edu

    2007-07-06

    Three-dimensional (3D) cultures of epithelial cells offer singular advantages for studies of morphogenesis or the role of cancer genes in oncogenesis. In this study, as part of establishing a 3D culture system of pancreatic duct epithelial cells, we compared human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDE-E6E7) with pancreatic cancer cell lines. Our results show, that in contrast to cancer cells, HPDE-E6E7 organized into spheroids with what appeared to be apical and basal membranes and a luminal space. Immunostaining experiments indicated that protein kinase Akt was phosphorylated (Ser473) and CTMP, a negative Akt regulator, was expressed in both HPDE-E6E7 and cancer cells. However, a nuclear pool of CTMP was detectable in HPDE-E6E7 cells that showed a dynamic concentrated expression pattern, a feature that further distinguished HPDE-E637 cells from cancer cells. Collectively, these data suggest that 3D cultures of HPDE-E6E7 cells are useful for investigating signaling and morphological abnormalities in pancreatic cancer cells.

  20. Can pancreatic duct-derived progenitors be a source of islet regeneration?

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Bing [Department of Endocrinology, First Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China)] [Department of Endocrinology, First Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China); Zhan, Xiao-Rong, E-mail: xiaorongzhan@sina.com [Department of Endocrinology, First Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China)] [Department of Endocrinology, First Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China); Yi, Ran [Department of Endocrinology, First Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China)] [Department of Endocrinology, First Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China); Yang, Baofeng [Department of Pharmacology, State Key Laboratory of Biomedicine and Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China)] [Department of Pharmacology, State Key Laboratory of Biomedicine and Pharmacology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Hei Long Jiang Province 150001 (China)

    2009-06-12

    The regenerative process of the pancreas is of interest because the main pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus is an inadequate number of insulin-producing {beta}-cells. The functional mass of {beta}-cells is decreased in type 1 diabetes, so replacing missing {beta}-cells or triggering their regeneration may allow for improved type 1 diabetes treatment. Therefore, expansion of the {beta}-cell mass from endogenous sources, either in vivo or in vitro, represents an area of increasing interest. The mechanism of islet regeneration remains poorly understood, but the identification of islet progenitor sources is critical for understanding {beta}-cell regeneration. One potential source is the islet proper, via the dedifferentiation, proliferation, and redifferentiation of facultative progenitors residing within the islet. Neogenesis, or that the new pancreatic islets can derive from progenitor cells present within the ducts has been reported, but the existence and identity of the progenitor cells have been debated. In this review, we focus on pancreatic ductal cells, which are islet progenitors capable of differentiating into islet {beta}-cells. Islet neogenesis, seen as budding of hormone-positive cells from the ductal epithelium, is considered to be one mechanism for normal islet growth after birth and in regeneration, and has suggested the presence of pancreatic stem cells. Numerous results support the neogenesis hypothesis, the evidence for the hypothesis in the adult comes primarily from morphological studies that have in common the production of damage to all or part of the pancreas, with consequent inflammation and repair. Although numerous studies support a ductal origin for new islets after birth, lineage-tracing experiments are considered the 'gold standard' of proof. Lineage-tracing experiments show that pancreatic duct cells act as progenitors, giving rise to new islets after birth and after injury. The identification of differentiated pancreatic ductal cells as an in vivo progenitor for pancreatic {beta}-cells has implications for a potentially important, expandable source of new islets for diabetic replenishment therapy.

  1. A case report of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas with remarkable intraductal tumor growth into the main pancreatic duct

    PubMed Central

    Okazaki, Mitsuyoshi; Makino, Isamu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Hayashi, Hironori; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a case of anaplastic carcinoma of the pancreas with remarkable intraductal tumor growth into the main pancreatic duct. A 76-year-old male was referred to our hospital for treatment of a pancreatic tumor. Preoperative examinations revealed a poorly defined tumor in the main pancreatic duct in the body of the pancreas, accompanied with severe dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, which was diagnosed as an intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm. We performed distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. The pathological examination revealed that the tumor consisted of a mixture of anaplastic carcinoma (giant cell type) and adenocarcinoma in the pancreas. There was a papillary projecting tumor composed of anaplastic carcinoma in the dilated main pancreatic duct. The patient is now receiving chemotherapy because liver metastasis was detected 12 mo after surgery. In this case, we could observe a remarkable intraductal tumor growth into the main pancreatic duct. We also discuss the pathogenesis and characteristics of this rare tumor with specific tumor growth. PMID:24574758

  2. Stented versus nonstented pancreaticojejunostomy after pancreatoduodenectomy: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Roder, J D; Stein, H J; Böttcher, K A; Busch, R; Heidecke, C D; Siewert, J R

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare morbidity and mortality rates of stented versus nonstented pancreaticojejunostomy after partial pancreatoduodenectomy. BACKGROUND DATA: Despite a marked reduction in the mortality rate after partial pancreatoduodenectomy in recent years, leakage of the pancreaticojejunostomy still occurs in 5% to 25% of patients and remains the major source of complications. METHODS: The authors compared the morbidity and mortality rates of 85 consecutive patients who had a partial pancreatoduodenectomy with (n = 44) or without (n = 41) temporary stented external drainage of the pancreatic duct between 1994 and 1997. RESULTS: A pancreatic fistula was diagnosed in 3 of the 44 patients (6.8%) with stents versus 12 of the 41 patients (29.3%) without stents. Surgical reintervention was necessary in 1 of the 3 patients with a pancreatic fistula in the stented group and 3 of the 12 patients with a pancreatic fistula in the nonstented group. There were two deaths after surgery, both in the nonstented group. The median hospital stay after surgery was 13 days in patients with stents and 29 days in patients without stents. CONCLUSION: In this nonrandomized prospective observational study, temporary external drainage of the pancreatic duct with a PVC tube significantly reduced the leakage rate of the pancreaticojejunostomy as well as the duration of hospital stay after partial pancreatoduodenectomy. Although promising, these observations require confirmation by further studies. Images Figure 1. PMID:9923798

  3. Endoscopic transluminal pancreatic necrosectomy using a self-expanding metal stent and high-flow water-jet system.

    PubMed

    Hritz, István; Fejes, Roland; Székely, András; Székely, Iván; Horváth, László; Sárkány, Agnes; Altorjay, Aron; Madácsy, László

    2013-06-21

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and a pancreatic abscess are the most severe complications of acute pancreatitis. Surgery in such critically ill patients is often associated with significant morbidity and mortality within the first few weeks after the onset of symptoms. Minimal invasive approaches with high success and low mortality rates are therefore of considerable interest. Endoscopic therapy has the potential to offer safe and effective alternative treatment. We report here on 3 consecutive patients with infected walled-off pancreatic necrosis and 1 patient with a pancreatic abscess who underwent direct endoscopic necrosectomy 19-21 d after the onset of acute pancreatitis. The infected pancreatic necrosis or abscess was punctured transluminally with a cystostome and, after balloon dilatation, a non-covered self-expanding biliary metal stent was placed into the necrotic cavity. Following stent deployment, a nasobiliary pigtail catheter was placed into the cavity to ensure continuous irrigation. After 5-7 d, the metal stent was removed endoscopically and the necrotic cavity was entered with a therapeutic gastroscope. Endoscopic debridement was performed via the simultaneous application of a high-flow water-jet system; using a flush knife, a Dormia basket, and hot biopsy forceps. The transluminal endotherapy was repeated 2-5 times daily during the next 10 d. Supportive care included parenteral antibiotics and jejunal feeding. All patients improved dramatically and with resolution of their septic conditions; 3 patients were completely cured without any further complications or the need for surgery. One patient died from a complication of prolonged ventilation severe bilateral pneumonia, not related to the endoscopic procedure. No procedure related complications were observed. Transluminal endoscopic necrosectomy with temporary application of a self-expanding metal stent and a high-flow water-jet system shows promise for enhancing the potential of this endoscopic approach in patients with walled-off pancreatic necrosis and/or a pancreatic abscess. PMID:23801873

  4. Improving patient and user safety during endoscopic investigation of the pancreatic and biliary ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, John E.; Melville, C. David; Lee, Cameron M.; Saunders, Michael D.; Burkhardt, Matthew R.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Endoscopic investigation of the main pancreatic duct and biliary ducts is called endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and carries a risk of pancreatitis for the patient. During ERCP, a metal guidewire is inserted into the pancreatobiliary duct from a side-viewing large endoscope within the duodenum. To verify correct placement of the ERCP guidewire, an injection of radiopaque dye is required for fluoroscopic imaging, which exposes the patient and clinical team to x-ray radiation. A safer and more effective means to access the pancreatobiliary system can use direct optical imaging, although the endoscope diameter and stiffness will be significantly larger than a guidewire's. To quantify this invasiveness before human testing, a synthetic force-sensing pancreas was fabricated and attached to an ERCP training model. The invasiveness of a new, 1.7-mm diameter, steerable scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) was compared to the standard ERCP guidewire of 0.89-mm (0.035") diameter that is not steerable. Although twice as large and significantly stiffer than the ERCP guidewire, the SFE generated lower or significantly less average force during insertion at all 4 sensor locations (P<0.05) within the main pancreatic duct. Therefore, the addition of steering and forward visualization at the tip of the endoscope reduced the invasiveness of the in vitro ERCP procedure. Since fluoroscopy is not required, risks associated with dye injection and x-ray exposure can be eliminated when using direct optical visualization. Finally, the SFE provides wide-field high resolution imaging for image-guided interventions, laser-based fluorescence biomarker imaging, and spot spectral analysis for future optical biopsy.

  5. [Invasive endoscopy or surgery for pancreatic disorders?].

    PubMed

    Pap, Akos

    2008-12-01

    Endoscopic double papillotomy occupied the place of surgical transduodenal double sphincteroplasty for disorders of papilla of Vater or chronic pancreatitis several years ago. Endoscopic cystoenterostomy and cystogastrostomy can also replace surgery in the treatment of pseudocysts and walled-of necrosis even in cases of severe acute pancreatitis with/or without sepsis. In chronic pancreatitis endotherapy may be the treatment of choice at first, although surgical techniques give somewhat better long-term results for pain relief. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, stone resolution or extraction and multiple pancreatic stents without aggressive balloon dilatation can progressively calibrate dominant stricture of the main pancreatic duct without further damage, ischemia or obstruction of side branches. Relapse-free period becomes longer (also after stents removal) if alcohol consumption and smoking are stopped definitively. Well-controlled, randomised studies are still needed to demonstrate clinical advantage of multiple endoscopic stent placement in comparison to surgery. PMID:19042184

  6. Serous adenoma of the pancreas with multiple microcysts communicating with the pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Samel, S; Horst, F; Becker, H; Brinck, U; Schwörer, H; Ramadori, G; Oestmann, J W

    1998-01-01

    The rare neoplastic cystic adenomas of the pancreas form two groups of tumors: macrocystic mucinous and microcystic serous adenomas. Both entities show specific radiologic and histologic features. Several recent case reports, however, suggest some diversity within the group of microcystic serous adenomas. We present the case of a young man operated because of epigastric pain for 12 months and a palpable microcystic tumor of the pancreatic head. Multiple cysts communicating with branches of the pancreatic duct in an alveolar-like pattern were demonstrated on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Histologic examination of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis of a serous adenoma of the pancreas. The tumor morphology in this case may suggest a ductal origin of microcystic serous adenomas. PMID:9830581

  7. Differentiating Branch Duct and Mixed IPMN in Endoscopically Collected Pancreatic Cyst Fluid via Cytokine Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda S.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Banks, Peter A.; Sainani, Nisha I.; Kadiyala, Vivek; Suleiman, Shadeah; Conwell, Darwin L.; Paulo, Joao A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Differentiating branch duct from mixed intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN) is problematic, but clinically important as mixed IPMNs are managed surgically, while some BD-IPMN may be followed. Inflammatory mediator proteins (IMPs) have been implicated in acute and chronic inflammatory and malignant pancreatic diseases. Aim. To compare IMP profile of pancreatic cyst fluid collected endoscopically from BD-IPMN and mixed IPMN. Methods. Pancreatic cyst fluid from ten patients (5 BD-IPMN and 5 mixed IPMN) was collected by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Concentrations of 89 IMPs in these samples were determined using a multiplexed bead-based microarray protein assay and compared between BD-IPMN and mixed IPMN. Results. Eighty-six of 89 IMPs were detected in at least one of the 10 samples. Fourteen IMPs were detected only in mixed IPMN, while none were only in BD-IPMN. Of these, TGF-?1 was most prevalent, present in 3 of 5 mixed IPMNs. Seventy-two IMPs were detected in both BD-IPMN and mixed IPMNs. Of these, only G-CSF (P < 0.05) was present in higher concentrations in mixed IPMNs. Conclusion. TGF-?1 and G-CSF detected in endoscopically collected pancreatic cyst fluid are potential diagnostic biomarkers capable of distinguishing mixed IPMN from BD-IPMN. PMID:23326260

  8. A human cancer xenograft model utilizing normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells conditionally transformed with defined oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Inagawa, Yuki; Yamada, Kenji; Yugawa, Takashi; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Esaki, Minoru; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Aoki, Kazunori; Saya, Hideyuki; Kiyono, Tohru

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are considered to arise through neoplastic transformation of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDECs). In order to evaluate the biological significance of genetic and epigenetic alterations in PDACs, we isolated primary HPDECs and established an in vitro carcinogenesis model. Firstly, lentivirus-mediated transduction of KRAS(G12V), MYC and human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6/E7 under the control of a tetracyclin-inducible promoter efficiently immortalized and transformed primary HPDECs, which gave rise to adenocarcinomas subcutaneously in an immune-deficient mouse xenograft model, depending on expression of the four genes. The tumors regressed promptly upon shutting-off the oncogenes, and the remaining tissues showed histological features corresponding to normal ductal structures with simple columnar epithelium. Reexpression of the oncogenes resulted in development of multiple PDACs through pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like structures. We also succeeded in efficient immortalization of primary HPDECs with transduction of mutant CDK4, cyclin D1 and TERT. The cells maintained a normal diploid status and formed duct-like structures in a three-dimensional culture. In combination with p53 silencing, KRAS(G12V) alone was sufficient to fully transform the immortalized HPDECs, and MYC markedly accelerated the development of tumors. Our PDAC model supports critical roles of KRAS mutations, inactivation of the p53 and p16-pRB pathways, active telomerase and MYC expression in pancreatic carcinogenesis and thus recapitulates many features of human PDAC development. The present system with reversible control of oncogene expression enabled de novo development of PDAC from quasinormal human tissues preformed subcutaneously in mice and might be applicable to carcinogenesis models in many organ sites. PMID:24858378

  9. Duct ligation and pancreatic islet blood flow in rats: physiological growth of islets does not affect islet blood perfusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leif Jansson; Birgitta Bodin; Orjan Kallskog; Arne Andersson

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate islet blood-flow changes during stimulated growth of the islet organ without any associated functional impairment of islet function. Design: A duct ligation encompassing the distal two-thirds of the pancreas was performed in adult, male Sprague - Dawley rats. Methods: Pancreatic islet blood flow was measured in duct-ligated and sham-operated rats 1,

  10. The accessory pancreatic ducts of the starling Sturnus vulgaris: an ultrastructural and light microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Vinnicombe, S J; Kendall, M D

    1983-01-01

    Wild starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) were utilised for a study of the small accessory pancreatic ducts that pass from the pancreas to the loop of the duodenum. These ducts do not appear to have been described before in the literature. Each duct was composed of an epithelial lining of a main cell type, which had small numbers of two other cell types intermixed. A lamina propria consisting of a loose collagenous network, richly endowed with a thick nerve plexus, separated the epithelium from the muscle coat. The muscle consisted of inner longitudinal, middle transverse and outermost spiral layers. This was surrounded by a dense collagenous tunica adventitia, and the ducts were accompanied by large blood vessels. The main columnar cells of the epithelium had a strong PAS positivity, and an alcian blue-positive reaction at high molarities of magnesium chloride (greater than 0.5 M). This indicated the presence of mucopolysaccharides with a high degree of sulphation, such as heparan sulphate. Both of the staining reactions were limited to a fine apical surface reaction which probably did not extend into the cells themselves. At the electron microscope level it could be seen that the surface coat corresponded to a filamentous layer overlying short stubby microvilli on the apical surface of the epithelium. Numerous apical electron-dense inclusion granules did not appear to participate in the histochemical reaction. Comparisons of these findings with work on the main ducts of the pancreas in other species have been made and discussed. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:6630045

  11. Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tandan, Manu; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP who have failed to respond to medical therapy and require intervention. PMID:24115811

  12. Multiple small "imaging" branch-duct type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) in familial pancreatic cancer: indicator for concomitant high grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia?

    PubMed

    Bartsch, D K; Dietzel, K; Bargello, M; Matthaei, E; Kloeppel, G; Esposito, I; Heverhagen, J T; Gress, T M; Slater, E P; Langer, P

    2013-03-01

    Most screening programs for familial pancreatic cancer are currently based on endoscopic ultrasonography and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cystic lesions, especially those suspicious for small intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the branch ducts, can be visualized in up to 40 % of individuals at risk, but their pathological importance in the setting of FPC is yet not well established. Individuals at risk from a prospective screening program for familial pancreatic cancer with small "imaging" IPMNs of the branch-duct type (BD-IPMN) who underwent pancreatic resection were analysed regarding clinico-pathological data and the locations of pancreatic lesions. Five of 125 individuals at risk who underwent screening had multiple small (size 2-10 mm) unicystic lesions and/or multicystic single lesions in the pancreatic body and tail suspicious for BD-IPMNs upon MRI imaging and decided to undergo surgical resection after interdisciplinary counselling, although none fulfilled the consensus criteria for IPMN resection. Histological examination revealed BD-IPMNs with low or moderate dysplasia of the gastric type in combination with multifocal PanIN2 and PanIN3 lesions in 4 individuals. The remaining patient had only tiny ductectasias in the pancreatic tail with multifocal PanIN 2 lesions in the entire gland and one PanIN3 lesion in the pancreatic head. Intriguingly, the location of the most dysplastic histological lesions (PanIN3) did not correspond to the preoperatively detected lesions and were not visible in preoperative imaging. In the setting of FPC, the presence of multiple small "imaging" BD-IPMNs may indicate the presence of high-grade PanIN lesions elsewhere in the pancreas. PMID:23179793

  13. Endoscopic therapy in chronic pancreatitis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Seicean, Andrada; Vultur, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy in chronic pancreatitis (CP) aims to provide pain relief and to treat local complications, by using the decompression of the pancreatic duct and the drainage of pseudocysts and biliary strictures, respectively. This is the reason for using it as first-line therapy for painful uncomplicated CP. The clinical response has to be evaluated at 6–8 weeks, when surgery may be chosen. This article reviews the main possibilities of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) therapies. Endotherapy for pancreatic ductal stones uses ultrasound wave lithotripsy and sometimes additional stone extractions. The treatment of pancreatic duct strictures consists of a single large stenting for 1 year. If the stricture persists, simultaneous multiple stents are applied. In case of unsuccessful ERCP, the EUS-guided drainage of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) or a rendezvous technique can solve the ductal strictures. EUS-guided celiac plexus block has limited efficiency in CP. The drainage of symptomatic or complicated pancreatic pseudocysts can be performed transpapillarily or transgastrically/transduodenally, preferably by EUS guidance. When the biliary stricture is symptomatic or progressive, multiple plastic stents are indicated. In conclusion, as in many fields of symptomatic treatment, endoscopy remains the first choice, either by using ERCP or EUS-guided procedures, after consideration of a multidisciplinary team with endoscopists, surgeons, and radiologists. However, what is crucial is establishing the right timing for surgery. PMID:25565876

  14. Endoscopic transpancreatic septotomy as a precutting technique for difficult bile duct cannulation

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lin; Li, Quan-Peng; Zhu, Ming-Hui; Ge, Xian-Xiu; Yu, Hong; Wang, Fei; Ji, Guo-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the technique of transpancreatic septotomy (TS) for cannulating inaccessible common bile ducts in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). METHODS: Between May 2012 and April 2013, 1074 patients were referred to our department for ERCP. We excluded 15 patients with previous Billroth II gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y anastomosis, duodenal stenosis, or duodenal papilla tumor. Among 1059 patients who underwent ERCP, there were 163 patients with difficult bile duct cannulation. Pancreatic guidewire or pancreatic duct plastic stent assistance allowed for successful ERCP completion in 94 patients. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 69 failed patients (36 transpancreatic septotomies and 33 needle-knife sphincterotomies). RESULTS: Of the 69 patients who underwent precut papillotomy, common bile duct cannulation was successfully achieved in 67. The success rates in the TS and needle knife sphincterotomy (NKS) groups were 97.2% (35/36) and 96.9% (32/33), respectively, which were not significantly different (P > 0.05). Complications occurred in 11 cases, including acute pancreatitis (n = 6), bleeding (n = 2), and cholangitis (n = 3). The total frequency of complications in the TS group was lower than that in the NKS group (8.3% vs 24.2%, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Pancreatic guidewire or pancreatic duct plastic stent assistance improves the success rate of selective bile duct cannulation in ERCP. TS and NKS markedly improve the success rate of selective bile duct cannulation in ERCP. TS precut is safer as compared with NKS.

  15. Pancreatic cancer cells and normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells express an autocrine catecholamine loop that is activated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors ?3, ?5 and ?7

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H; Al-Wadei, Hussein AN; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in developed countries. Smoking is an established risk factor for this malignancy but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Previous reports have provided evidence that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and beta-adrenergic receptors (?-ARs) stimulate the growth and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. But a potential cooperation of these two receptor families in the regulation of pancreatic cancer has not been studied to date. Using two pancreatic cancer cell lines and immortalized pancreatic duct epithelia in vitro, our current data show, that all three cell lines synthesized and released the catecholamine neurotransmitters noradrenaline and adrenaline upon exposure to nicotine and that this activity was regulated by ?3, ?5, and ?7-nAChRs. In accord with the established function of these catecholamines as ?-AR agonists, nicotine-induced cell proliferation was blocked by the ?-AR antagonist propranolol. Nicotine-induced proliferation was also abolished by the ?7-nAChR antagonist ?-bungarotoxin while catecholamine production in response to nicotine was blocked by gene knockdown of the ?3, ?5, and ?7-nAChRs. The nicotinic agonists acetylcholine, nicotine, and its nitrosated carcinogenic derivative NNK induced the phosphorylation of CREB, ERK, Src and AKT and these responses were inhibited by propranolol. Our findings identify this hitherto unknown autocrine catecholamine loop as an important regulatory cascade in pancreatic cancer that may prove a promising new target for cancer intervention. PMID:22188668

  16. Electrophysiological study of transport systems in isolated perfused pancreatic ducts: properties of the basolateral membrane.

    PubMed

    Novak, I; Greger, R

    1988-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of pancreatic HCO3- transport, a perfused preparation of isolated intra- and interlobular ducts (i.d. 20-40 microns) of rat pancreas was developed. Responses of the epithelium to changes in the bath ionic concentration and to addition of transport inhibitors was monitored by electrophysiological techniques. In this report some properties of the basolateral membrane of pancreatic duct cells are described. The transepithelial potential difference (PDte) in ducts bathed in HCO3(-)-free and HCO3(-)-containing solution was -0.8 and -2.6 mV, respectively. The equivalent short circuit current (Isc) under similar conditions was 26 and 50 microA . cm-2. The specific transepithelial resistance (Rte) was 88 omega cm2. In control solutions the PD across the basolateral membrane (PDbl) was -63 +/- 1 mV (n = 314). Ouabain (3 mmol/l) depolarized PDbl by 4.8 +/- 1.1 mV (n = 6) within less than 10 s. When the bath K+ concentration was increased from 5 to 20 mmol/l, PDbl depolarized by 15.9 +/- 0.9 mV (n = 50). The same K+ concentration step had no effect on PDbl if the ducts were exposed to Ba2+, a K+ channel blocker. Application of Ba2+ (1 mmol/l) alone depolarized PDbl by 26.4 +/- 1.4 mV (n = 19), while another K+ channel blocker TEA+ (50 mmol/l) depolarized PDbl only by 7.7 +/- 2.0 mV (n = 9). Addition of amiloride (1 mmol/l) to the bath caused 3-4 mV depolarization of PDbl. Furosemide (0.1 mmol/l) and SITS (0.1 mmol/l) had no effect on PDbl. An increase in the bath HCO3- concentration from 0 to 25 mmol/l produced fast and sustained depolarization of PDbl by 8.5 +/- 1.0 mV (n = 149). It was investigated whether the effect of HCO3- was due to a Na+-dependent transport mechanism on the basolateral membrane, where the ion complex transferred into the cell would be positively charged, or whether it was due to decreased K+ conductance caused by lowered intracellular pH. Experiments showed that the HCO3- effect was present even when the bath Na+ concentration was reduced to a nominal value of 0 mmol/l. Similarly, the HCO3- effect remained unchanged after Ba2+ (5 mmol/l) was added to the bath. The results indicate that on the basolateral membrane of duct cells there is a ouabain sensitive (Na+ + K+)-ATPase, a Ba2+ sensitive K+ conductance and an amiloride sensitive Na+/H+ antiport. The HCO3- effect on PDbl is most likely due to rheogenic anion exit across the luminal membrane. PMID:3353213

  17. KRAS oncogene mutations suggest a common histogenetic origin for pleomorphic giant cell tumor of the pancreas, osteoclastoma of the pancreas, and pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher D Gocke; David J Dabbs; Floyd A Benko; Jan F Silverman

    1997-01-01

    Giant cell neoplasms of the pancreas are rare tumors of uncertain histogenesis. Mutation of the KRAS oncogene is common in typical pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma. We have analyzed DNA from five pancreatic tumors with giant cells for mutations in the KRAS oncogene and found alterations of the second position of codon 12 in each case (four G > A transitions and

  18. Incidence of Synchronous and Metachronous Pancreatic Carcinoma in 168 Patients with Branch Duct Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Satoshi Tanno; Yasuhiro Nakano; Yoshiaki Sugiyama; Kazumasa Nakamura; Junpei Sasajima; Kazuya Koizumi; Madoka Yamazaki; Tomoya Nishikawa; Yusuke Mizukami; Nobuyuki Yanagawa; Tsuneshi Fujii; Takeshi Obara; Toshikatsu Okumura; Yutaka Kohgo

    2010-01-01

    Background\\/Aims: Although branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas (BD-IPMN) are being diagnosed with increasing frequency, the incidence of concomitant pancreatic carcinoma (PC) is not well known. We investigated the incidence and clinical features of synchronous and metachronous PC in patients with BD-IPMN. Methods: We studied 168 BD-IPMN patients diagnosed by various imaging modalities, including endoscopic retrograde pancreatography,

  19. Endogenous praecaecal and total tract losses of nitrogen in pancreatic duct-ligated minipigs.

    PubMed

    Mößeler, Anne; Gregory, Peter Colin; Loock, Harry; Beyerbach, Martin; Kamphues, Josef

    2015-04-01

    The pancreatic duct-ligated minipig (PL) is an established model of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) with a significant decrease of nutrient digestibility. This study aimed to quantify and compare endogenous losses of nitrogen (N) (ileal and faecal) in minipigs receiving an almost N-free diet. Altogether, 12 Göttingen minipigs (7 PL and 5 control animals) fitted with an re-entrant ileo-caecal fistula were used. In Study 1, ileal digesta was collected over a period of 12 h on seven consecutive days, including one 24 h collection, when animals were fed a diet containing 0.49 g N/kg dry matter (DM). In Study 2, faeces were collected for 10 consecutive days. In Group PL, the amount and DM content of ileal digesta were higher (p < 0.05), while N concentration was lower than in the Control. The ileo-caecal N flux [g/kg DM intake] was about 2.5 times higher in Group PL (5.47 ± 1.15) than in the Control (1.91 ± 0.59) (p < 0.05). The amount of faeces did not differ, but faecal N losses were higher in Group PL (p < 0.05). Endogenous faecal N losses [g N/kg DM intake] of the Control group (1.17 ± 0.72) were comparable with earlier studies, while those of Group PL were 2.6 times higher (3.09 ± 1.34). In contrast, urinary excretion of N did not differ between the Control and Group PL. In conclusion, PEI caused markedly increased endogenous N losses. Therefore, the impact of reduced digestibility of nutrients on endogenous N losses might be relevant for apparent protein digestibility rates and should be taken into account. PMID:25690557

  20. Congenital Variants and Anomalies of the Pancreas and Pancreatic Duct: Imaging by Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreaticography and Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Erden, Ay?e; Türko?lu, Mehmet Akif; Yener, Özlem

    2013-01-01

    Though congenital anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct are relatively uncommon and they are often discovered as an incidental finding in asymptomatic patients, some of these anomalies may lead to various clinical symptoms such as recurrent abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. Recognition of these anomalies is important because these anomalies may be a surgically correctable cause of recurrent pancreatitis or the cause of gastric outlet obstruction. An awareness of these anomalies may help in surgical planning and prevent inadvertent ductal injury. The purpose of this article is to review normal pancreatic embryology, the appearance of ductal anatomic variants and developmental anomalies of the pancreas, with emphasis on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography and multidetector computed tomography. PMID:24265565

  1. Stenting of the arterial duct combined with banding of the pulmonary arteries and atrial septectomy or septostomy: a new approach to palliation for the hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J L Gibbs; C Wren; K G Watterson; S Hunter; J R Hamilton

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the feasibility of pulmonary artery banding, atrial septectomy or septostomy, and percutaneous stenting of the arterial duct in babies with the hypoplastic left heart syndrome. PATIENTS--Four infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. SETTING--Two supraregional paediatric cardiac centres. METHODS--Ductal patency was maintained initially with prostaglandin E. Banding of the proximal branch pulmonary arteries was performed through a median sternotomy

  2. A Novel Biodegradable Biliary Stent in the Normal Duct Hepaticojejunal Anastomosis: an 18-month Follow-up in a Large Animal Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johanna M. Laukkarinen; Juhani A. Sand; Pierce Chow; Hanne Juuti; Minna Kellomäki; Päivi Kärkkäinen; Jorma Isola; Sidney Yu; Satchithanantham Somanesan; Irene Kee; In Chin Song; Teck Hin Ng; Isto H. Nordback

    2007-01-01

    Creating a well-functioning hepaticojejunostomy (HJ) anastomosis with nondilated bile ducts remains a challenge. Our aim was to study the use in a large animal model of a novel, braided polylactide barium\\u000a sulfate biodegradable biliary stent (BDBS) without external connection and with no need for later removal. Fifty swine were\\u000a randomly operated on for Roux-Y HJ with or without BDBS in

  3. Endoscopic stent therapy for dominant extrahepatic bile duct strictures in primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. W. Marc van Milligen de Wit; Jeroen van Bracht; Erik A. J. Rauws; E. Anthony Jones; Guido N. J. Tytgat; Kees Huibregtse

    1996-01-01

    Background: In 15% to 20% of patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis, a dominant stricture of the extrahepatic bile ducts may be responsible for declining results of serum biochemical liver tests and may contribute to symptoms such as jaundice, cholangitis, pruritus, and right upper quadrant pain.Methods: Retrospectively, over the period 1985 to 1994, we evaluated 25 patients who had been treated

  4. Loss of canonical Smad4 signaling promotes KRAS driven malignant transformation of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lisa; Radulovich, Nikolina; Zhu, Chang-Qi; Wang, Dennis; To, Christine; Ibrahimov, Emin; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in North America. Activating KRAS mutations and Smad4 loss occur in approximately 90% and 55% of PDAC, respectively. While their roles in the early stages of PDAC development have been confirmed in genetically modified mouse models, their roles in the multistep malignant transformation of human pancreatic duct cells have not been directly demonstrated. Here, we report that Smad4 represents a barrier in KRAS-mediated malignant transformation of the near normal immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cell line model. Marked Smad4 downregulation by shRNA in KRAS (G12V) expressing HPDE cells failed to cause tumorigenic transformation. However, KRAS-mediated malignant transformation occurred in a new HPDE-TGF-? resistant (T?R) cell line that completely lacks Smad4 protein expression and is resistant to the mito-inhibitory activity of TGF-?. This transformation resulted in tumor formation and development of metastatic phenotype when the cells were implanted orthotopically into the mouse pancreas. Smad4 restoration re-established TGF-? sensitivity, markedly increased tumor latency by promoting apoptosis, and decreased metastatic potential. These results directly establish the critical combination of the KRAS oncogene and complete Smad4 inactivation in the multi-stage malignant transformation and metastatic progression of normal human HPDE cells. PMID:24386371

  5. Loss of Canonical Smad4 Signaling Promotes KRAS Driven Malignant Transformation of Human Pancreatic Duct Epithelial Cells and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Lisa; Radulovich, Nikolina; Zhu, Chang-Qi; Wang, Dennis; To, Christine; Ibrahimov, Emin; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in North America. Activating KRAS mutations and Smad4 loss occur in approximately 90% and 55% of PDAC, respectively. While their roles in the early stages of PDAC development have been confirmed in genetically modified mouse models, their roles in the multistep malignant transformation of human pancreatic duct cells have not been directly demonstrated. Here, we report that Smad4 represents a barrier in KRAS-mediated malignant transformation of the near normal immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cell line model. Marked Smad4 downregulation by shRNA in KRASG12V expressing HPDE cells failed to cause tumorigenic transformation. However, KRAS-mediated malignant transformation occurred in a new HPDE-TGF-? resistant (T?R) cell line that completely lacks Smad4 protein expression and is resistant to the mito-inhibitory activity of TGF-?. This transformation resulted in tumor formation and development of metastatic phenotype when the cells were implanted orthotopically into the mouse pancreas. Smad4 restoration re-established TGF-? sensitivity, markedly increased tumor latency by promoting apoptosis, and decreased metastatic potential. These results directly establish the critical combination of the KRAS oncogene and complete Smad4 inactivation in the multi-stage malignant transformation and metastatic progression of normal human HPDE cells. PMID:24386371

  6. [Successful intervention with a longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy for chronic pancreatitis due to obstruction of the pancreatogastrostomy after pancreatoduodenectomy].

    PubMed

    Miura, Takayuki; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Ito, Kei; Ito, Hiromichi; Kanno, Atsushi; Satoh, Kenichi; Akada, Masanori; Rikiyama, Toshiki; Katayose, Yu; Egawa, Shinichi; Shimosegawa, Tohru; Unno, Michiaki

    2010-10-01

    A 50-year-old man with a cancer of the papilla of Vater underwent pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy reconstructed with pancreatogastrostomy in 2002. He began to complain of upper abdominal and back pain in April 2008. Abdominal CT scan revealed pancreatolithiasis with dilatation of the remnant main pancreatic duct. An upper intestinal endoscopy could not discern the orifice of the pancreatic duct. He was treated by transgastric EUS-guided drainage of the pancreatic duct several times, and ESWL for pancreatolithiasis. However, he had repeated pancreatitis. Surgical intervention was carried out to treat the obstructive pancreatitis in April 2009. Longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy was performed without resection of the obstructive pancreatogastrostomy. The postoperative recovery was uneventful, and the patient remains asymptomatic after the second operation. We concluded that the longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy is a safe and effective alternative for chronic pancreatitis after stenotic pancreatico-digestive tract anastomosis following pancreatoduodenectomy, especially for cases in which endoscopic stenting is ineffective. PMID:20938118

  7. Effects of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin via claudin-4 on normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kojima, Takashi; Ito, Tatsuya; Kyuno, Daisuke; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Imamura, Masafumi; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2011-09-01

    The tight junction protein claudin-4 is frequently overexpressed in pancreatic cancer, and is also a receptor for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE). The cytotoxic effects of CPE are thought to be useful as a novel therapeutic tool for pancreatic cancer. However, the responses to CPE via claudin-4 remain unknown in normal human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells. We introduced the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene into HPDE cells in primary culture as a model of normal HPDE cells in vitro. hTERT-HPDE cells treated with or without 10% FBS and pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1, BXPC3, HPAF-II and HPAC were treated with CPE. In Western blotting, the expression of claudin-4 protein in hTERT-HPDE cells treated with 10% FBS was as high as it was in all of the pancreatic cancer cell lines. In hTERT-HPDE cells with or without 10% FBS, cytotoxicity was not observed at any concentration of CPE, whereas in all pancreatic cancer cell lines, CPE had a dose-dependent cytotoxic effect. In hTERT-HPDE cells with 10% FBS, claudin-4 was localized in the apical-most regions, where there are tight junction areas, in which in all pancreatic cancer cell lines claudin-4 was found not only in the apical-most regions but also at basolateral membranes. In hTERT-HPDE cells with 10% FBS after treatment with CPE, downregulation of barrier function and claudin-4 expression at the membranes was observed. In HPAC cells, the sensitivity to CPE was significantly decreased by knockdown of claudin-4 expression using siRNA compared to the control. These findings suggest that, in normal HPDE cells, the lack of toxicity of CPE was probably due to the localization of claudin-4, which is different from that of pancreatic cancer cells. hTERT-HPDE cells in this culture system may be a useful model of normal HPDE cells not only for physiological regulation of claudin-4 expression but also for developing safer and more effective therapeutic methods targeting claudin-4 in pancreatic cancer. PMID:21573709

  8. Ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head: a focus on current diagnostic and surgical concepts.

    PubMed

    Ouaïssi, Mehdi; Giger, Urs; Louis, Guillaume; Sielezneff, Igor; Farges, Olivier; Sastre, Bernard

    2012-06-28

    Complete surgical resection still remains the only possibility of curing pancreatic cancer, however, only 10% of patients undergo curative surgery. Pancreatic resection currently remains the only method of curing patients, and has a 5-year overall survival rate between 7%-34% compared to a median survival of 3-11 mo for unresected cancer. Pancreatic surgery is a technically demanding procedure requiring highly standardized surgical techniques. Nevertheless, even in experienced hands, perioperative morbidity rates (delayed gastric emptying, pancreatic fistula etc.) are as high as 50%. Different strategies to reduce postoperative morbidity, such as different techniques of gastroenteric reconstruction (pancreatico-jejunostomy vs pancreatico-gastrostomy), intraoperative placement of a pancreatic main duct stent or temporary sealing of the main pancreatic duct with fibrin glue have not led to a significant improvement in clinical outcome. The perioperative application of somatostatin or its analogues may decrease the incidence of pancreatic fistulas in cases with soft pancreatic tissue and a small main pancreatic duct (< 3 mm). The positive effects of external pancreatic main duct drainage and antecolic gastrointestinal reconstruction have been observed to decrease the rate of pancreatic fistulas and delayed gastric emptying, respectively. Currently, the concept of extended radical lymphadenectomy has been found to be associated with higher perioperative morbidity, but without any positive impact on overall survival. However, there is growing evidence that portal vein resections can be performed with acceptable low perioperative morbidity and mortality but does not achieve a cure. PMID:22791941

  9. Neogenesis and proliferation of {beta}-cells induced by human betacellulin gene transduction via retrograde pancreatic duct injection of an adenovirus vector

    SciTech Connect

    Tokui, Yae [Department of Internal Medicine and Molecular Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2-B5, Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: ytokui@imed2.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kozawa, Junji [Department of Internal Medicine and Molecular Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2-B5, Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yamagata, Kazuya [Department of Internal Medicine and Molecular Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2-B5, Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Zhang, Jun [Department of Internal Medicine and Molecular Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2-B5, Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ohmoto, Hiroshi [Carna Biosciences, Inc., 5-5-2 KIBC511, Minatojima-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Tochino, Yoshihiro [Department of Internal Medicine and Molecular Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2-B5, Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Okita, Kohei; Iwahashi, Hiromi [Department of Internal Medicine and Molecular Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2-B5, Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Namba, Mitsuyoshi [Division of Diabetes and Metabolism, Internal Medicine Department, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1, Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya 663-8501 (Japan); Shimomura, Iichiro [Department of Internal Medicine and Molecular Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2-B5, Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro [Department of Internal Medicine and Molecular Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2-B5, Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]|[Division of Diabetes and Metabolism, Internal Medicine Department, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1, Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya 663-8501 (Japan)

    2006-12-01

    Betacellulin (BTC) has been shown to have a role in the differentiation and proliferation of {beta}-cells both in vitro and in vivo. We administered a human betacellulin (hBTC) adenovirus vector to male ICR mice via retrograde pancreatic duct injection. As a control, we administered a {beta}-galactosidase adenovirus vector. In the mice, hBTC protein was mainly overexpressed by pancreatic duct cells. On immunohistochemical analysis, we observed features of {beta}-cell neogenesis as newly formed insulin-positive cells in the duct cell lining or islet-like cell clusters (ICCs) closely associated with the ducts. The BrdU labeling index of {beta}-cells was also increased by the betacellulin vector compared with that of control mice. These results indicate that hBTC gene transduction into adult pancreatic duct cells promoted {beta}-cell differentiation (mainly from duct cells) and proliferation of pre-existing {beta}-cells, resulting in an increase of the {beta}-cell mass that improved glucose tolerance in diabetic mice.

  10. Survivin Is Required for Beta-Cell Mass Expansion in the Pancreatic Duct-Ligated Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Qinfeng; Wang, Xiaojing; Zhu, Jiayu; Xu, Kuangfeng; Okada, Hitoshi; Wang, Rennian; Woo, Minna

    2012-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Pancreatic beta-cell mass expands through adulthood under certain conditions. The related molecular mechanisms are elusive. This study was designed to determine whether surviving (also known as Birc5), which is transiently expressed perinatally in islets, was required for beta-cell mass expansion in the pancreatic duct-ligated mouse model. Methods Mice with beta cell–specific deletion of survivin (RIPCre+survivinfl/fl) and their control littermates (RIPCre+survivin+/+) were examined to determine the essential role of survivin in partial pancreatic duct ligation (PDL)-induced beta-cell proliferation, function and survival. Results Resurgence of survivin expression occurred as early as day 3 post-PDL. By day 7 post-PDL, control mice showed significant expansion of beta-cell mass and increase in beta-cell proliferation and islet number in the ligated tail of the pancreas. However, mice deficient in beta-cell survivin showed a defect in beta-cell mass expansion and proliferation with a marked attenuation in the increase of total islet number, largely due to an impairment in the increase in number of larger islets while sparing the increase in number of small islets in the ligated tail of pancreas, resulting in insufficient insulin secretion and glucose intolerance. Importantly however, beta cell neogenesis and apoptosis were not affected by the absence of survivin in beta cells after PDL. Conclusions/Interpretation Our results indicate that survivin is essential for beta-cell mass expansion after PDL. Survivin appears to exhibit a preferential requirement for proliferation of preexisting beta cells. PMID:22870272

  11. Frey operation for chronic pancreatitis associated with pancreas divisum: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Skórzewska, Magdalena; Romanowicz, Tomasz; Mielko, Jerzy; Kurylcio, Andrzej; Pertkiewicz, Jan; Zymon, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Pancreas divisum (PD) is the most common congenital anomaly of the pancreas, which increases susceptibility to recurrent pancreatitis. Usually, after failure of initial endoscopic therapies, surgical treatment combining pancreatic resection or drainage is used. The Frey procedure is used for chronic pancreatitis, but it has not been reported to be applied in an adult patient with PD-associated pancreatitis. The purpose of the paper was to describe effective treatment of this rare condition by the Frey procedure after failure of interventional endoscopic treatment. A 39-year-old female patient was initially treated for recurrent acute pancreatitis. After endoscopic diagnosis of PD, the minor duodenal papilla was incised and a plastic stent was inserted into the dorsal pancreatic duct. During the following 36 months, the patient was hospitalised several times because of recurrent episodes of pancreatitis. Thereafter, local resection of the pancreatic head combined with lateral pancreaticojejunostomy was performed with no complications. After 54 months of follow-up, the patient demonstrates abnormal glucose metabolism, with a need for enzyme supplementation, and she is free of pain. Local resection of the pancreatic head combined with lateral pancreaticojejunostomy (Frey procedure) offers a favourable outcome after failure of endoscopic papillotomy and duct stenting for pancreatitis associated with PD. PMID:25097717

  12. Functional coupling of apical Cl-/HCO3- exchange with CFTR in stimulated HCO3- secretion by guinea pig interlobular pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A K; Yamamoto, A; Nakakuki, M; Kondo, T; Alper, S L; Ishiguro, H

    2009-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal epithelium produces a HCO(3)(-)-rich fluid. HCO(3)(-) transport across ductal apical membranes has been proposed to be mediated by both SLC26-mediated Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange and CFTR-mediated HCO(3)(-) conductance, with proportional contributions determined in part by axial changes in gene expression and luminal anion composition. In this study we investigated the characteristics of apical Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange and its functional interaction with Cftr activity in isolated interlobular ducts of guinea pig pancreas. BCECF-loaded epithelial cells of luminally microperfused ducts were alkalinized by acetate prepulse or by luminal Cl(-) removal in the presence of HCO(3)(-)-CO(2). Intracellular pH recovery upon luminal Cl(-) restoration (nominal Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange) in cAMP-stimulated ducts was largely inhibited by luminal dihydro-DIDS (H(2)DIDS), accelerated by luminal CFTR inhibitor inh-172 (CFTRinh-172), and was insensitive to elevated bath K(+) concentration. Luminal introduction of CFTRinh-172 into sealed duct lumens containing BCECF-dextran in HCO(3)(-)-free, Cl(-)-rich solution enhanced cAMP-stimulated HCO(3)(-) secretion, as calculated from changes in luminal pH and volume. Luminal Cl(-) removal produced, after a transient small depolarization, sustained cell hyperpolarization of approximately 15 mV consistent with electrogenic Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange. The hyperpolarization was inhibited by H(2)DIDS and potentiated by CFTRinh-172. Interlobular ducts expressed mRNAs encoding CFTR, Slc26a6, and Slc26a3, as detected by RT-PCR. Thus Cl(-)-dependent apical HCO(3)(-) secretion in pancreatic duct is mediated predominantly by an Slc26a6-like Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger and is accelerated by inhibition of CFTR. This study demonstrates functional coupling between Cftr and Slc26a6-like Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange activity in apical membrane of guinea pig pancreatic interlobular duct. PMID:19342507

  13. Functional coupling of apical Cl?/HCO3? exchange with CFTR in stimulated HCO3? secretion by guinea pig interlobular pancreatic duct

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, A. K.; Yamamoto, A.; Nakakuki, M.; Kondo, T.; Alper, S. L.; Ishiguro, H.

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal epithelium produces a HCO3?-rich fluid. HCO3? transport across ductal apical membranes has been proposed to be mediated by both SLC26-mediated Cl?/HCO3? exchange and CFTR-mediated HCO3? conductance, with proportional contributions determined in part by axial changes in gene expression and luminal anion composition. In this study we investigated the characteristics of apical Cl?/HCO3? exchange and its functional interaction with Cftr activity in isolated interlobular ducts of guinea pig pancreas. BCECF-loaded epithelial cells of luminally microperfused ducts were alkalinized by acetate prepulse or by luminal Cl? removal in the presence of HCO3?-CO2. Intracellular pH recovery upon luminal Cl? restoration (nominal Cl?/HCO3? exchange) in cAMP-stimulated ducts was largely inhibited by luminal dihydro-DIDS (H2DIDS), accelerated by luminal CFTR inhibitor inh-172 (CFTRinh-172), and was insensitive to elevated bath K+ concentration. Luminal introduction of CFTRinh-172 into sealed duct lumens containing BCECF-dextran in HCO3?-free, Cl?-rich solution enhanced cAMP-stimulated HCO3? secretion, as calculated from changes in luminal pH and volume. Luminal Cl? removal produced, after a transient small depolarization, sustained cell hyperpolarization of ?15 mV consistent with electrogenic Cl?/HCO3? exchange. The hyperpolarization was inhibited by H2DIDS and potentiated by CFTRinh-172. Interlobular ducts expressed mRNAs encoding CFTR, Slc26a6, and Slc26a3, as detected by RT-PCR. Thus Cl?-dependent apical HCO3? secretion in pancreatic duct is mediated predominantly by an Slc26a6-like Cl?/HCO3? exchanger and is accelerated by inhibition of CFTR. This study demonstrates functional coupling between Cftr and Slc26a6-like Cl?/HCO3? exchange activity in apical membrane of guinea pig pancreatic interlobular duct. PMID:19342507

  14. Pneumoperitoneum Caused by Transhepatic Air Leak After Metallic Biliary Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jei Hee; Lee, Deok Hee; Yu, Jeong-Sik [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, YongDong Severance Hospital, 146-92 Dokok-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se Joon [Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, YongDong Severance Hospital, 146-92 Dokok-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Woo-Cheol; Kim, Ki Whang [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, YongDong Severance Hospital, 146-92 Dokok-Dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-11-15

    A self-expanding metallic biliary stent was placed for palliation of a common bile duct obstruction in a 68-year-old male with unresectable pancreatic head cancer 3 days after initial percutaneous right transhepatic catheter decompression. The stent crossed the ampulla of Vater. Three days later, the stent was balloon-dilated and the percutaneous access was removed. At removal, a small contrast leak from the transhepatic tract was seen. Three days later, pneumoperitoneum was found with symptoms of peritoneal irritation and fever. A widely open sphincter of Oddi caused by the metallic stent, accompanied by delayed sealing of the transhepatic tract, may have caused the air and bile leakage into the peritoneal space. This case shows that pneumoperitoneum may occur without ductal tear or bowel injury, with a biliary stent crossing the ampulla of Vater.

  15. Development of intrapancreatic transplantable model of pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma in Syrian golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Egami, H; Tomioka, T; Tempero, M; Kay, D; Pour, P M

    1991-03-01

    Intrapancreatic and subcutaneous (SC) inoculation of cultured pancreatic cancer cells, derived from an induced primary pancreatic cancer in a Syrian hamster, resulted in tumor take in all recipient hamsters. The intrapancreatic allografts grew rapidly, were invasive, and metastasized into the lymph nodes and liver in 2 of 9 cases. In comparison, SC tumors grew relatively slower and formed a large encapsulated mass without invasion and metastases. Histologically, tumors of both sites showed fairly well-differentiated adenocarcinomas of ductal/ductular type resembling the induced primary cancer. Similar to the primary induced pancreatic cancers, tumor cells of both allografts expressed blood-group-related antigens, including A, B, H, Le(b), Le(y), Le(x), and tumor-associated antigen TAG-72. The tumor cells did not express Le(a), CA 19-9, 17-1A, or DU-PAN-2. The expression of these antigens was retained in the metastases and presented the same patterns of reactivity as the allografts. Thus intrapancreatic transplantation provides a rapid model for production of pancreatic cancer with morphologic similarities to human pancreatic cancer. PMID:2000935

  16. Impact of Sox9 Dosage and Hes1-mediated Notch Signaling in Controlling the Plasticity of Adult Pancreatic Duct Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Shinichi; Furuyama, Kenichiro; Horiguchi, Masashi; Aoyama, Yoshiki; Tsuboi, Kunihiko; Sakikubo, Morito; Goto, Toshihiko; Hirata, Koji; Tanabe, Wataru; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Uemoto, Shinji; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    In the adult pancreas, there has been a long-standing dispute as to whether stem/precursor populations that retain plasticity to differentiate into endocrine or acinar cell types exist in ducts. We previously reported that adult Sox9-expressing duct cells are sufficiently plastic to supply new acinar cells in Sox9-IRES-CreERT2 knock-in mice. In the present study, using Sox9-IRES-CreERT2 knock-in mice as a model, we aimed to analyze how plasticity is controlled in adult ducts. Adult duct cells in these mice express less Sox9 than do wild-type mice but Hes1 equally. Acinar cell differentiation was accelerated by Hes1 inactivation, but suppressed by NICD induction in adult Sox9-expressing cells. Quantitative analyses showed that Sox9 expression increased with the induction of NICD but did not change with Hes1 inactivation, suggesting that Notch regulates Hes1 and Sox9 in parallel. Taken together, these findings suggest that Hes1-mediated Notch activity determines the plasticity of adult pancreatic duct cells and that there may exist a dosage requirement of Sox9 for keeping the duct cell identity in the adult pancreas. In contrast to the extended capability of acinar cell differentiation by Hes1 inactivation, we obtained no evidence of islet neogenesis from Hes1-depleted duct cells in physiological or PDL-induced injured conditions. PMID:25687338

  17. Relationship between papillary fibrosis and patency of the accessory pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Stimec, Bojan; Alempijevic, Tamara; Micev, Marjan; Milicevic, Miroslav; Ille, Tatjana; Kovacevic, Nada; Bulajic, Mirko

    2005-04-01

    A study of structure and function of the minor duodenal papilla was carried out on 36 autopsy specimens of the human duodenopancreas. An original perfusion method with manometric control was developed for testing the minor papilla patency, i.e. resistency to intraductal pressure. According to this test, all the specimens were classified as: Type I: non-patent (45%); Type II: patent under normal, physiological pressure (36%); and Type III: patent under increased pressure (19%). After that, the whole minor papilla specimens underwent longitudinal sectioning with HE staining. Light microscopy showed various degrees of fibrosis (mild-45%, moderate-29%, and severe-26%). The correlation between the fibrosis and the patency was significant: papillae with lower degrees of fibrosis were more patent and vice versa. Further, the pancreatic tissue in the Santorini segment of the pancreatic head followed the same manner. No apparent sphincter of the minor papilla was found in any of the specimens analyzed. PMID:15900693

  18. Deep Sequencing of Cancer-Related Genes Revealed GNAS Mutations to Be Associated with Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms and Its Main Pancreatic Duct Dilation

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shinichi; Fukasawa, Mitsuharu; Maekawa, Shinya; Kadokura, Makoto; Miura, Mika; Shindo, Hiroko; Takahashi, Ei; Sato, Tadashi; Enomoto, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background To clarify the genetic mutations associated with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) and IPMN-related pancreatic tumours, we conducted cancer-related gene profiling analyses using pure pancreatic juice and resected pancreatic tissues. Methods Pure pancreatic juice was collected from 152 patients [nine with a normal pancreas, 22 with chronic pancreatitis (CP), 39 with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and 82 with IPMN], and resected tissues from the pancreas were collected from 48 patients (six IPMNs and 42 PDACs). The extracted DNA was amplified by multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting 46 cancer-related genes containing 739 mutational hotspots. The mutations were analysed using a semiconductor-based DNA sequencer. Results Among the 46 cancer-related genes, KRAS and GNAS mutations were most frequently detected in both PDAC and IPMN cases. In pure pancreatic juice, GNAS mutations were detected in 7.7% of PDAC cases and 41.5% of IPMN cases (p<0.001 vs. others). All PDAC cases with GNAS mutations (n?=?3) were accompanied by IPMN. Multivariate analysis revealed that GNAS mutations in IPMN cases were associated with dilated main pancreatic ducts (MPD, p?=?0.016), while no statistically independent associations with clinical variables were observed for KRAS mutations. In the resected pancreatic tissues, GNAS mutations were detected in 50% of PDAC cases concomitant with IPMN, 33.3% of PDAC cases derived from IPMN, and 66.7% of IPMN cases, while no GNAS mutations were detected in cases of PDAC without IPMN. Conclusions The GNAS mutation was specifically found in the cases with IPMN and it was speculated that some PDACs might be influenced by the concomitant but separately-located IPMN in their pathogenic mechanism. Furthermore, the GNAS mutation was significantly associated with MPD dilatation in IPMN cases, suggesting its role in mucus hypersecretion. PMID:24897499

  19. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation for Clearance of Occluded Metal Stent in Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Madhava, E-mail: madhava.pai@imperial.ac.uk [Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College, HPB Unit, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom); Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina [University Hospital Brno Bohunice, Department of Radiology (Czech Republic); Doros, Attila [Semmelweis University, Radiology Unit, Department of Transplantation and Surgery (Hungary); Quaretti, Pietro [IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Department of Radiology (Italy); Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina [University of Bologna, Department of Radiology, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi (Italy); Habib, Nagy, E-mail: nagy.habib@imperial.ac.uk [Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College, HPB Unit, Department of Surgery (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-11

    PurposeThe major complication occurring with biliary stents is stent occlusion, frequently seen because of tumour in-growth, epithelial hyperplasia, and sludge deposits, resulting in recurrent jaundice and cholangitis. We report a prospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency (RF) ablation to clear the blocked metal stents in patients with malignant biliary obstruction using a novel bipolar RF catheter.MethodsNine patients with malignant biliary obstruction and blocked metal stents were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary RF ablation through the blocked metal stent following external biliary decompression with an internal–external biliary drainage.ResultsAll nine patients had their stent patency restored successfully without the use of secondary stents. Following this intervention, there was no 30-day mortality, haemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the nine patients, six are alive and three patients are dead with a median follow-up of 122 (range 50–488) days and a median stent patency of 102.5 (range 50–321) days. Six patients had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. Three patients with stent blockage at 321, 290, and 65 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and repeat ablation.ConclusionsIn this selective group of patients, it appears that this new approach is safe and feasible. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  20. Transjugular Insertion of Biliary Stents (TIBS) in Two Patients with Malignant Obstruction, Ascites, and Coagulopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Amygdalos, Michael A.; Haskal, Ziv J.; Cope, Constantin [Department of Interventional Radiology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kadish, Steven L.; Long, William B. [Department of Interventional Endoscopy, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    1996-03-15

    Two patients with pancreatic malignancies presented with biliary obstruction which could not be treated from an endoscopic approach. Standard transhepatic biliary drainage was relatively contraindicated because of moderate ascites and coagulopathy related to underlying liver disease. In one patient, a transjugular, transvenous approach was used to deliver a Wallstent endoprosthesis across the distal common bile duct obstruction in a single step procedure. In the second case, a previously placed biliary Wallstent was revised with an additional stent from a similar approach. Transjugular biliary catheterization offers a valuable alternative approach for primary stent placement or revision in patients with contraindication to standard transhepatic drainage.

  1. Tropical pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, John M

    2002-07-01

    Tropical pancreatitis is an uncommon cause of acute, and often chronic, relapsing pancreatitis. Patients present with abdominal pain, weight loss, pancreatic calcifications, and glucose intolerance or diabetes mellitus. Etiologies include a protein-calorie malnourished state, a variety of exogenous food toxins, pancreatic duct anomalies, and a possible genetic predisposition. Chronic cyanide exposure from the diet may contribute to this disease, seen often in India, Asia, and Africa. The pancreatic duct of these patients often is markedly dilated, and may contain stones, with or without strictures. The risk of ductal carcinoma with this disease is accentuated. Treatment may be frustrating, and may include pancreatic enzymes, duct manipulations at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, octreotide, celiac axis blocks for pain control, or surgery via drainage and/or resection. PMID:12080228

  2. Techniques for cytologic sampling of pancreatic and bile duct lesions: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Brugge, William R.; De Witt, John; Klapman, Jason B.; Ashfaq, Raheela; Shidham, Vinod; Chhieng, David; Kwon, Richard; Baloch, Zubair; Zarka, Matthew; Staerkel, Gregg

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology, including indications for endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy, techniques of the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, terminology and nomenclature of pancreatobiliary disease, ancillary testing, and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of literature, discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology website [www.papsociety.org]. This document presents the results of these discussions regarding the use of sampling techniques in the cytological diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic lesions. This document summarizes the current state of the art for techniques in acquiring cytology specimens from the biliary tree as well as solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas. PMID:25191516

  3. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Shah, R J; Martin, S P

    2000-04-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) has been used for diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic diseases for over 20 years. ERCP has been most intensely investigated for acute biliary pancreatitis. Randomized trials have proven that its use will decrease morbidity and have suggested a decrease in mortality for patients with severe gallstone pancreatitis. ERCP is also valuable in detecting and treating main pancreatic duct leaks with transpapillary stenting. Symptomatic pseudocysts, which may be seen in either acute or chronic pancreatitis, can be drained via the papilla or through creation of a cystogastrostomy or cystoduodenostomy with a needle-knife sphincterotome. Endoscopic treatment of patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis presumed due to pancreas divisum and sphincter of Oddi dysfunction remains controversial. Dominant pancreatic strictures or calculi in the setting of chronic pancreatitis may be treated with stenting and removal of calculi to improve abdominal pain. Finally, diagnosis of pancreatic cancer by brush cytology and palliative management of biliary obstruction with various plastic and expandable metal sents have simplified management of this difficult problem. PMID:10981015

  4. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) prevents the induction of nicotinic receptor-regulated signaling by chronic ethanol in pancreatic cancer cells and normal duct epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wadei, Mohammed H.; Al-Wadei, Hussein A.N.; Schuller, Hildegard M.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a high mortality rate and alcoholism is a risk factor independent of smoking. We have shown that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) regulate pancreatic ductal epithelia and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells in an autocrine fashion by stimulating their production of the stress neurotransmitters noradrenaline and adrenaline that signal through beta-adrenergic receptors (?-ARs). Our current study has investigated the modulation of this autocrine regulatory loop by chronic ethanol and explored the potential prevention of these effects by ?-amino butyric acid (GABA). Using MTT assays, cell migration assays, western blotting, immunoassays, and gene knockdown of individual nAChRs in two PDAC cell lines and in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial cells, our data show that treatment for seven days with ethanol induced the protein expression and sensitivity of nAChRs ?3, ?5 and ?7 resulting in increased production of noradrenaline and adrenaline which drive proliferation and migration via cAMP-dependent signaling downstream of ?-ARs. Treatment with GABA prevented all of these responses to chronic ethanol, reducing cell proliferation and migration below base levels in untreated cells. Our findings suggest that alcoholism induces multiple cAMP-dependent PDAC stimulating signaling pathways by up-regulating the protein expression and sensitivity of nAChRs that regulate stress neurotransmitter production. Moreover, our data identify GABA as a promising agent for the prevention of PDAC in individuals at risk due to chronic alcohol consumption. PMID:23213073

  5. Transcriptional control of tight junction proteins via a protein kinase C signal pathway in human telomerase reverse transcriptase-transfected human pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kojima, Takashi; Ito, Tatsuya; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Imamura, Masafumi; Son, Seiichi; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Murata, Masaki; Nagayama, Minoru; Nobuoka, Takayuki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2010-08-01

    In human pancreatic cancer, integral membrane proteins of tight junction claudins are abnormally regulated, making these proteins promising molecular diagnostic and therapeutic targets. However, the regulation of claudin-based tight junctions remains unknown not only in the pancreatic cancer cells but also in normal human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells. To investigate the regulation of tight junction molecules including claudins in normal HPDE cells, we introduced the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene into HPDE cells in primary culture. The hTERT-transfected HPDE (hTERT-HPDE) cells were positive for the pancreatic duct epithelial markers such as CK7, CK19, and carbonic anhydrase isozyme 2 and expressed epithelial tight junction molecules claudin-1, -4, -7 and, -18, occludin, JAM-A, ZO-1, ZO-2, and tricellulin. By treatment with fetal bovine serum or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), the tight junction molecules were up-regulated at the transcriptional level via a protein kinase C (PKC) signal pathway. A PKC-alpha inhibitor, Gö6976, prevented up-regulation of claudin-4 by TPA. Furthermore, a PKC-delta inhibitor, rottlerin, prevented up-regulation of claudin-7, occludin, ZO-1, and ZO-2 by TPA. By GeneChip analysis, up-regulation of the transcription factor ELF3 was observed in both fetal bovine serum- and TPA-treated cells. Treatment with small interfering RNAs of ELF3 prevented up-regulation of claudin-7 by TPA. These data suggest that tight junctions of normal HPDE cells were at least in part regulated via a PKC signal pathway by transcriptional control. PMID:20566751

  6. [Endoscopic transpapillary interventions in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, I M; Pylypchuk, V I; Hedzyk, S M

    2014-03-01

    The results of treatment of 12 patients, suffering complicated forms of chronic pancreatitis (CHP), in a General Surgery Department of Ivano-Frankivsk regional clinical hospital in 2011 - 2013 yrs, were analyzed. There were 10 (83.3%) men and 2 (16.7%) women, ageing 22-57 yrs old. Previously 6 (50%) patients were treated for an acute necrotic pancreatitis. The changes in a pancreatic duct (PD) type IV in accordance to Cambridge classification was established in 7 patients, type III--in 3, type IIa--in 2, type IIb--in 1. Virsungolitoextraction with previous pneumodilatation without stenting of PD was accomplished in 4 patients, stenting with pneumodilatation for stricture of PD--in 6, stenting for defect in PD--in 2. Good and satisfactory results were achieved in all the patients. The pain syndrome was absent in 10 (83.3%) patients, 2 (16.7%)--suffered from periodic moderate pain in epigastric region. Endoscopic interventions on the PD must be considered the first stage of surgical treatment in patients with CHP. They must be applied wider due to their reduced invasiveness than open procedures. Open operative intervention must be considered as a second stage of surgical treatment in patients with previous unfair or ineffective endoscopic treatment. PMID:25097992

  7. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pancreatitis in children include physical injury, certain medications, gallstones, or problems in the anatomy of the ducts ( ... some treatable causes of acute pancreatitis. These include gallstone disease, high blood calcium, high blood triglycerides, and ...

  8. Analysis of risk factors for postoperative pancreatic fistula following pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi-Yu; Zhang, Wen-Zhi; Xia, Hong-Tian; Leng, Jian-Jun; Wan, Tao; Liang, Bin; Yang, Tao; Dong, Jia-Hong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore the morbidity and risk factors of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) following pancreaticoduodenectomy. METHODS: The data from 196 consecutive patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy, performed by different surgeons, in the General Hospital of the People’s Liberation Army between January 1st, 2013 and December 31st, 2013 were retrospectively collected for analysis. The diagnoses of POPF and clinically relevant (CR)-POPF following pancreaticoduodenectomy were judged strictly by the International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula Definition. Univariate analysis was performed to analyze the following factors: patient age, sex, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, serum CA19-9 level, history of jaundice, serum albumin level, blood loss volume, pancreatic duct diameter, pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, pancreatic drainage and pancreaticojejunostomy. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the main independent risk factors for POPF. RESULTS: POPF occurred in 126 (64.3%) of the patients, and the incidence of CR-POPF was 32.7% (64/196). Patient characteristics of age, sex, BMI, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, serum CA19-9 level, history of jaundice, serum albumin level, blood loss volume, pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy and pancreaticojejunostomy showed no statistical difference related to the morbidity of POPF or CR-POPF. Pancreatic duct diameter was found to be significantly correlated with POPF rates by univariate analysis and multivariate regression analysis, with a pancreatic duct diameter ? 3 mm being an independent risk factor for POPF (OR = 0.291; P = 0.000) and CR-POPF (OR = 0.399; P = 0.004). The CR-POPF rate was higher in patients without external pancreatic stenting, which was found to be an independent risk factor for CR-POPF (OR = 0.394; P = 0.012). Among the entire patient series, there were three postoperative deaths, giving a total mortality rate of 1.5% (3/196), and the mortality associated with pancreatic fistula was 2.4% (3/126). CONCLUSION: A pancreatic duct diameter ? 3 mm is an independent risk factor for POPF. External stent drainage of pancreatic secretion may reduce CR-POPF mortality and POPF severity. PMID:25516663

  9. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Bilio-pancreatic Drainage.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, Marc; Bories, Erwan; Téllez-Ávila, Félix I

    2012-10-01

    The echoendoscopic biliary drainage is an option to treat obstructive jaundices when endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) drainage fails. These procedures compose alternative methods to the side of surgery and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, and it was only possible by the continuous development and improvement of echoendoscopes and accessories. The development of linear sectorial array echoendoscopes in early 1990 brought a new approach to diagnostic and therapeutic dimension on echoendoscopy capabilities, opening the possibility to perform punction over direct ultrasonografic view. Despite of the high success rate and low morbidity of biliary drainage obtained by ERCP, difficulty could be found at the presence of stent tumor ingrown, tumor gut compression, periampullary diverticula and anatomic variation. The echoendoscopic technique starts performing punction and contrast of the left biliary tree. When performed from gastric wall, the access is made through hepatic segment III. From duodenum, direct common bile duct punction. Diathermic dilatation of the puncturing tract is required using a 6-Fr cystostome and a plastic or metal stent is introducted. The techincal success of hepaticogastrostomy is near 98%, and complications are present in 20%: pneumoperitoneum, choleperitoneum, infection and stent disfunction. To prevent bile leakage, we have used the 2-stent techniques. The first stent introduced was a long uncovered metal stent (8 or 10 cm) and inside this first stent a second fully covered stent of 6 cm was delivered to bridge the bile duct and the stomach. Choledochoduodenostomy overall success rate is 92%, and described complications include, in frequency order, pneumoperitoneum and focal bile peritonitis, present in 14%. By the last 10 years, the technique was especially performed in reference centers, by ERCP experienced groups, and this seems to be a general guideline to safer procedure execution. The ideal approach for pancreatic pseudocyst (PPC) puncture combines endos-copy with real time endosonography using an interventional echoendoscope. Several authors have described the use of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) longitudinal scanners for guidance of transmural puncture and drainage procedures. The same technique could be used to access a dilated pancreatic duct in cases in which the duct cannot be drained by conventional ERCP because of complete obstruction. PMID:24949349

  10. [Endoscopic management of severe pancreatic and biliary diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Lamblin, G; Desjeux, A; Grimaud, J-C; Merot, T; Alessandrini, P; Barthet, M

    2008-10-01

    Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts and choledocal lithiasis is a first-line treatment in adults. Nevertheless, due to technical difficulties such a management is not always feasible in children. This series reports our results in the management of pancreatic and biliary diseases in children. Seven children, two months to 12 years old, underwent endoscopic management of pancreatic and biliary diseases. Two of them had choledocal lithiasis with jaundice or acute pancreatitis, two had pancreatic pseudocyst due to abdominal traumatism, two had chronic pancreatitis with a communicating pseudocyst in one case, and one had a biliary leakage after traumatism. All the endoscopic treatments were performed under general anesthesia. In six cases, the duodenoscope was a regular one with a large operating channel (Olympus TJF 160; Japan) employed for children aged 33 months to 12 years. In the case of the two months child, a "rendez-vous" technique was performed with a percutaneous approach of the common bile duct followed by an endoscopic sphincteroclasy using an axial endoscope allowing the extraction of a choledocal stone. In two cases, post-traumatic pancreatic pseudocysts (eight and 12 year-old children) were managed with the transgastric insertion of two double pig-tail stents. In two cases, children with chronic pancreatitis (38 months and 12 years old) were managed with pancreatic sphincterotomy. Biliary leakage in an 11-year-old child was managed with biliary sphincterotomy and stenting. All the children became symptom-free without any procedural complications with an 11 months median follow-up. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic and biliary diseases is possible in children like in adults with the same procedures and results. PMID:18538966

  11. Dasatinib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride Alone in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-06

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  12. Narrow portion of the terminal choledochus is a cause of upstream biliary dilatation in patients with anomalous union of the pancreatic and biliary ducts

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Tatsuya; Shirai, Yoshio; Wakai, Toshifumi; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Sakata, Jun; Hatakeyama, Katsuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the pathogenesis of biliary dilatation associated with anomalous union of the pancreatic and biliary ducts (AUPBD). METHODS: Direct cholangiopancreatograms of 350 adult patients with or with suspicion of hepatobiliary or pancreatic disorders were reviewed. AUPBD was diagnosed cholangiopancreatographically, when the pancreaticobiliary ductal union was located above the narrow distal segment of the bile duct, which represents the action of the sphincter of Oddi. The narrow portion of the terminal choledochus was defined as symmetrical stricture of the common bile duct just above the pancreaticobiliary ductal union. RESULTS: AUPBD was found in 36 patients. Among ch-olangiopancreatographic features, the narrow portion of the terminal choledochus was the most pathognomonic for AUPBD (accuracy, 98%); it was present in 29 (81%) patients with AUPBD, but was not found in any patients without AUPBD. Among patients with AUPBD, biliary dilatation (>10 mm) was more frequent in those with the narrow portion of the terminal choledochus (23/29) than in those without (2/7; P = 0.018) AUPBD. Among the patients with both AUPBD and the narrow portion of the terminal choledochus, there was a strong negative correlation between the minimum diameter of the narrow portion and the maximum diameter of the choledochus (r = -0.78, P<0.001), suggesting that the degree of biliary narrowing at the narrow portion correlates with that of upstream biliary dilatation. CONCLUSION: The narrow portion of the terminal choledochus, a pathognomonic radiologic feature of AUPBD, may be a cause of biliary dilatation in patients with AUPBD. PMID:16425423

  13. Evaluation of a New Modification of Pancreaticogastrostomy after Pancreaticoduodenectomy: Anastomosis of the Pancreatic Duct to the Gastric Mucosa with Invagination of the Pancreatic Remnant End into the Posterior Gastric Wall for Patients with Cancer Head of Pancreas and Periampullary Carcinoma in terms of Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula Formation

    PubMed Central

    Abd El Maksoud, Walid

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives. Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) remains the main problem after pancreaticoduodenectomy and determines to a large extent the final outcome. We describe a new modification of pancreaticogastrostomy which combines duct to mucosa anastomosis with suturing the pancreatic capsule to posterior gastric wall and then invaginating the pancreatic remnant into the posterior gastric wall. This study was designed to assess the results of this new modification of pancreaticogastrostomy. Methods. The newly modified pancreaticogastrostomy was applied to 37 consecutive patients after pancreaticoduodenectomy for periampullary cancer (64.86%) or cancer head of the pancreas (35.14%). Eighteen patients (48.65%) had a soft pancreatic remnant, 13 patients (35.14%) had firm pancreatic remnant, and 6 patients (16.22%) had intermediate texture of pancreatic remnant. Rate of mortality, early postoperative complications, and hospital stay were also reported. Results. Operative mortality was zero and morbidity was 29.73%. Only three patients (8.11%) developed pancreatic leaks; they were treated conservatively. Eight patients (16.1%) had delayed gastric emptying, one patient (2.70%) had minor hemorrhage, one patient (2.70%) had biliary leak, and four patients (10.81%) had superficial wound infection. Conclusions. The new modified pancreatogastrostomy seems safe and reliable with low rate of POPF. However, further prospective controlled trials are essential to support these results. PMID:25302117

  14. Severe complications with irreversible electroporation of the pancreas in the presence of a metallic stent: a warning of a procedure that never should be performed

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Anders; Karlson, Britt-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an ablation technique that is being investigated as a potential treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, many of these patients have a metallic stent in the bile duct, which is recognized as a contraindication for IRE ablation. We report a case in which an IRE ablation in the region of the pancreatic head was performed on a patient with a metallic stent which led to severe complications. After the treatment, the patient suffered from several complications including perforation of the duodenum and transverse colon, and bleeding from a branch of the superior mesenteric artery which eventually lead to her death. Therefore, we believe it is important to be aware of this if an IRE ablation close to a metallic stent is considered. PMID:25535573

  15. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the bile duct with gastric and duodenal fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Man Yong; Yu, Dong Wook; Hong, Seung Goun

    2014-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the bile duct is still rare and not yet understood despite of its increased incidence and similar clinicopathologic characteristics compared with IPMN of the pancreas. The fistula formation into other organs can occur in IPMN, especially the pancreatic type. To our knowledge, only two cases of IPMN of the bile duct with a choledochoduodenal fistula were reported and we have recently experienced a case of IPMN of the bile duct penetrating into two neighboring organs of the stomach and duodenum presenting with abdominal pain and jaundice. Endoscopy showed thick mucin extruding from two openings of the fistulas. Endoscopic suction of thick mucin using direct peroral cholangioscopy with ultra-slim endoscope through choledochoduodenal fistula was very difficult and ineffective because of very thick mucin and next endoscopic suction through the stent after prior insertion of biliary metal stent into choledochogastric fistula also failed. Pathologic specimen obtained from the proximal portion of the choledochogastric fistula near left intrahepatic bile duct through the metal stent showed a low grade adenoma. The patient declined the surgical treatment due to her old age and her abdominal pain with jaundice was improved after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage with the irrigation of N-acetylcysteine three times daily for 10 d. PMID:25031793

  16. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the bile duct with gastric and duodenal fistulas.

    PubMed

    Hong, Man Yong; Yu, Dong Wook; Hong, Seung Goun

    2014-07-16

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the bile duct is still rare and not yet understood despite of its increased incidence and similar clinicopathologic characteristics compared with IPMN of the pancreas. The fistula formation into other organs can occur in IPMN, especially the pancreatic type. To our knowledge, only two cases of IPMN of the bile duct with a choledochoduodenal fistula were reported and we have recently experienced a case of IPMN of the bile duct penetrating into two neighboring organs of the stomach and duodenum presenting with abdominal pain and jaundice. Endoscopy showed thick mucin extruding from two openings of the fistulas. Endoscopic suction of thick mucin using direct peroral cholangioscopy with ultra-slim endoscope through choledochoduodenal fistula was very difficult and ineffective because of very thick mucin and next endoscopic suction through the stent after prior insertion of biliary metal stent into choledochogastric fistula also failed. Pathologic specimen obtained from the proximal portion of the choledochogastric fistula near left intrahepatic bile duct through the metal stent showed a low grade adenoma. The patient declined the surgical treatment due to her old age and her abdominal pain with jaundice was improved after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage with the irrigation of N-acetylcysteine three times daily for 10 d. PMID:25031793

  17. Palliative Portal Vein Stent Placement in Malignant and Symptomatic Extrinsic Portal Vein Stenosis or Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Novellas, Sebastien [Hopital Archet, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (France); Denys, Alban, E-mail: Alban.Denys@chuv.ch; Bize, Pierre, E-mail: pierrebize@bluewin.c [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland); Brunner, Philippe; Motamedi, Jean Paul [Hopital Archet, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (France); Gugenheim, Jean [Hopital Archet, Department of Surgery (France); Caroli, Francois-Xavier [Hopital Archet, Department of Medical Oncology (France); Chevallier, Patrick [Hopital Archet, Department of Radiology and Interventional Radiology (France)

    2009-05-15

    This article evaluates the results of portal vein (PV) stent placement in patients with malignant extrinsic lesions stenosing or obstructing the PV and causing symptomatic PV hypertension (PVHT). Fourteen patients with bile duct cancer (n = 7), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 4), or another cancer (n = 3) underwent percutaneous transhepatic portal venous stent placement because of gastroesophageal or jejunal varices (n = 9), ascites (n = 7), and/or thrombocytopenia (n = 2). Concurrent tumoral obstruction of the main bile duct was treated via the transhepatic route in the same session in four patients. Changes in portal venous pressure, complications, stent patency, and survival were evaluated. Mean {+-} standard deviation (SD) gradient of portal venous pressure decreased significantly immediately after stent placement from 11.2 mmHg {+-} 4.6 to 1.1 mmHg {+-} 1.0 (P < 0.00001). Three patients had minor complications, and one developed a liver abscess. During a mean {+-} SD follow-up of 134.4 {+-} 123.3 days, portal stents remained patent in 11 patients (78.6%); stent occlusion occurred in 3 patients, 2 of whom had undergone previous major hepatectomy. After stent placement, PVHT symptoms were relieved in four (57.1%) of seven patients who died (mean survival, 97 {+-} 71.2 days), and relieved in six (85.7%) of seven patients still alive at the end of follow-up (mean follow-up, 171.7 {+-} 153.5 days). Stent placement in the PV is feasible and relatively safe. It helped to relieve PVHT symptoms in a single session.

  18. Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Adarsh M.; Mosko, Jeffrey D.; Berzin, Tyler M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis remains the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). It is reported to occur in 2–10% of unselected patient samples and up to 40% of high-risk patients. The purpose of this article is to review the evidence behind the known risk factors for post-ERCP pancreatitis, as well as the technical and medical approaches developed to prevent it. There have been many advances in identifying the causes of this condition. Based on this knowledge, a variety of preventive strategies have been developed and studied. The approach to prevention begins with careful patient selection and performing ERCP for specific indications, while considering alternative diagnostic modalities when appropriate. Patients should also be classified by high-risk factors such as young age, female sex, suspected sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, a history of post-ERCP pancreatitis, and normal serum bilirubin, all of which have been identified in numerous research studies. The pathways of injury that are believed to cause post-ERCP pancreatitis eventually lead to the common endpoint of inflammation, and these individual steps can be targeted for preventive therapies through procedural techniques and medical management. This includes the use of a guide wire for cannulation, minimizing the number of cannulation attempts, avoiding contrast injections or trauma to the pancreatic duct, and placement of a temporary pancreatic duct stent in high-risk patients. Administration of rectal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) in high-risk patients is the proven pharmacological measure for prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis. The evidence for or against numerous other attempted therapies is still unclear, and ongoing investigation is required. PMID:25406464

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... During this operation, the doctor will cut the gallbladder or bile duct and sew it to the small intestine to create a new pathway around the blocked area. Endoscopic stent placement: If the tumor is blocking the bile duct, surgery may be done to put in a stent ( ...

  20. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Oregovomab Followed By Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Nelfinavir Mesylate in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-01

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  1. A Multicenter, Prospective Study of a New Fully Covered Expandable Metal Biliary Stent for the Palliative Treatment of Malignant Bile Duct Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Bret T.; Kahaleh, Michel; Kozarek, Richard A.; Loren, David; Gupta, Kapil; Kowalski, Thomas; Freeman, Martin; Chen, Yang K.; Branch, Malcolm S.; Edmundowicz, Steven; Gluck, Michael; Binmoeller, Kenneth; Baron, Todd H.; Shah, Raj J.; Kinney, Timothy; Ross, William; Jowell, Paul; Carr-Locke, David

    2013-01-01

    Background and Study Aims. Endoscopic placement of self-expanding metal stents (SEMSs) is indicated for palliation of inoperable malignant biliary obstruction. A fully covered biliary SEMS (WallFlex Biliary RX Boston Scientific, Natick, USA) was assessed for palliation of extrahepatic malignant biliary obstruction. Patients and Methods. 58 patients were included in this prospective, multicenter series conducted under an FDA-approved IDE. Main outcome measurements included (1) absence of stent occlusion within six months or until death, whichever occurred first and (2) technical success, need for reintervention, bilirubin levels, stent patency, time to stent occlusion, and adverse events. Results. Technical success was achieved in 98% (57/58), with demonstrated acute removability in two patients. Adequate clinical palliation until completion of followup was achievedin 98% (54/55) of evaluable patients, with 1 reintervention due to stent obstruction after 142 days. Mean total bilirubin decreased from 8.9?mg/dL to 1.2?mg/dL at 1 month. Device-related adverse events were limited and included 2 cases of cholecystitis. One stent migrated following radiation therapy. Conclusions. The WallFlex Biliary fully covered stent yielded technically successful placement with uncomplicated acute removal where required, appropriate reduction in bilirubin levels, and low rates of stent migration and occlusion. This SEMS allows successful palliation of malignant extrahepatic biliary obstruction. PMID:23606835

  2. Insulin and Glucagon Impairments in Relation with Islet Cells Morphological Modifications Following Long Term Pancreatic Duct Ligation in the Rabbit – A Model of Non-insulin-dependent Diabete

    PubMed Central

    Daumas, M.; Chanh, A. Pham Huu; Lasserre, B.; Hollande, E

    2001-01-01

    Plasma levels of glucose, insulin and glucagon were measured at various time intervals after pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) in rabbits. Two hyperglycemic periods were observed: one between 15–90 days (peak at 30 days of 15.1 ± 1.2mmol/l, p < 0.01), and the other at 450 days (11.2 ± 0.5 mmol/l, p < 0.02). The first hyperglycemic episode was significantly correlated with both hypoinsulinemia (41.8 ± 8pmol/l, r= –0.94, p < 0.01) and hyperglucagonemia (232 ± 21ng/l, r=0.95, p < 0.01). However, the late hyperglycemic phase (450 days), which was not accompanied by hypoinsulinemia, was observed after the hyperglucagonemia (390 days) produced by abundant immunostained A-cells giving rise to a 3-fold increase in pancreatic glucagon stores. The insulin and glucagon responses to glucose loading at 180, 270 and 450 days reflected the insensitivity of B- and A-cells to glucose. The PDL rabbit model with chronic and severe glycemic disorders due to the predominant role of glucagon mimicked key features of the NIDDM syndrome secondary to exocrine disease. PMID:12369713

  3. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Braganza, Joan M; Lee, Stephen H; McCloy, Rory F; McMahon, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive fibroinflammatory disease that exists in large-duct (often with intraductal calculi) or small-duct form. In many patients this disease results from a complex mix of environmental (eg, alcohol, cigarettes, and occupational chemicals) and genetic factors (eg, mutation in a trypsin-controlling gene or the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator); a few patients have hereditary or autoimmune disease. Pain in the form of recurrent attacks of pancreatitis (representing paralysis of apical exocytosis in acinar cells) or constant and disabling pain is usually the main symptom. Management of the pain is mainly empirical, involving potent analgesics, duct drainage by endoscopic or surgical means, and partial or total pancreatectomy. However, steroids rapidly reduce symptoms in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis, and micronutrient therapy to correct electrophilic stress is emerging as a promising treatment in the other patients. Steatorrhoea, diabetes, local complications, and psychosocial issues associated with the disease are additional therapeutic challenges. PMID:21397320

  4. Deciphering Autoimmune Pancreatitis, a Great Mimicker: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sageer, Mohammed; Sterling, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is an atypical chronic inflammatory pancreatic disease that appears to involve autoimmune mechanisms. In recent years, AIP has presented as a new clinical entity with its protean pancreaticobiliary and systemic presentations. Its unique pathology and overlap of clinical and radiological features and absence of serological markers foster the disease's unique position. We report a case of diffuse type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis with obstructive jaundice managed with biliary sphincterotomy, stent placement, and corticosteroids. A 50-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our hospital with epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, and jaundice. Workup showed elevated liver function tests (LFT) suggestive of obstructive jaundice, MRCP done showed diffusely enlarged abnormal appearing pancreas with loss of normal lobulated contours, and IgG4 antibody level was 765?mg/dL. EUS revealed a diffusely hypoechoic and rounded pancreatic parenchyma with distal common bile duct (CBD) stricture and dilated proximal CBD and common hepatic duct (CHD). ERCP showed tight mid to distal CBD stricture that needed dilatation, sphincterotomy, and placement of stent that led to significant improvement in the symptoms and bilirubin level. Based on clinical, radiological, and immunological findings, a definitive diagnosis of AIP was made. Patient was started on prednisone 40?mg/day and she clinically responded in 4 weeks. PMID:25705529

  5. Gallstone pancreatitis secondary to a pathological cystic duct stump in a setting of chronic pain syndrome: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Jamish; Tan, Jeffrey; Gandhi, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman presented with epigastric pain. She was a patient with chronic pain syndrome and had visited the emergency department several times over the past year. She did not drink alcohol. She had a laparoscopic cholecystectomy for gallstone pancreatitis 4?years ago. Her lipase was 2020 with normal bilirubin. MR cholangiopancreatography revealed a cystic structure resembling a gallbladder in the gallbladder fossa. This was in connection with the biliary system. The structure also contained stones. A review of the histology did confirm the gallbladder had been removed. She proceeded to have a laparoscopic re-cholecystectomy and made an unremarkable recovery. PMID:25766443

  6. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  7. Wirsung and Santorini: The Men Behind the Ducts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giancarlo Flati; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2002-01-01

    During the 16th and 17th centuries, several important discoveries were accomplished by anatomists whose contribution has enlightened the most important anatomic structures of the pancreas. Following the earliest discoveries, researchers of several medical specialities further investigated the ductal pancreatic system. The accessory pancreatic duct with its minor papilla, the main pancreatic duct and the papilla major along with the confluence

  8. Transcatheter Closure of a Chronic Iatrogenic Arteriovenous Fistula Between the Carotid Artery and the Brachiocephalic Vein with an Amplatzer Duct Occluder in Combination with a Carotid Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Stasek, Josef, E-mail: stasek@fnhk.c [Charles University Prague, Cardiocenter of University Hospital Hradec Kralove, 1st Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Lojik, Miroslav [Charles University Prague, Cardiocenter of University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Bis, Josef [Charles University Prague, Cardiocenter of University Hospital Hradec Kralove, 1st Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Horak, David [Regional Hospital Liberec, Department of Cardiology (Czech Republic); Dusek, Jaroslav [Charles University Prague, Cardiocenter of University Hospital Hradec Kralove, 1st Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Brtko, Miroslav; Polansky, Pavel [Charles University Prague, Cardiocenter of University Hospital Hradec Kralove, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Faculty of Medicine Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Babu, Anush; Vojacek, Jan [Charles University Prague, Cardiocenter of University Hospital Hradec Kralove, 1st Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic)

    2009-05-15

    We report an original method of transcatheter closure of an arteriovenous fistula using the combination of an Amplatzer PDA occluder and a carotid stent. The fistula was between the left carotid artery and the brachiocephalic vein. The patient had significant left-to-right shunt and was highly symptomatic. Due to the large orifice and pseudoaneurysmatic enlargement of the fistula, we had to use a large Amplatzer PDA occluder and the protruding part of the PDA device disk had to be covered with a carotid stent. The fistula was completely closed. The patient stopped having symptoms and, 2 years after the procedure, the effect persists.

  9. Combined use of videoendoscopy and X-ray imaging for improved monitoring of stenting application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cysewska-Sobusiak, A. R.; Sowier, A.; Skrzywanek, P.

    2005-09-01

    The subject of this paper concerns advanced techniques of procedures and imaging used in minimally invasive surgery and in non-operable cases of the alimentary tract tumor therapy. Examples of videoendoscopy and X-ray imaging used for the application of stents (prostheses) and catheters allowing for the performance of diagnostic and endo-therapeutic procedures are described. The possibility was indicated to elaborate a new method of proceeding in tumor therapy in the patients for whom the methods used so far were ineffective. In the paper examples of combined imaging the application of metallic stents and plastic catheters allowing for the performance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are presented. The cases shown refer to tumor located in the esophagus and in the bile and pancreatic ducts.

  10. [Groove pancreatitis: a rare segmental form of chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Brihier, Hélène; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Boytchev, Isabelle; Kuoch, Viseth; Lorand, Isabelle; Lazure, Thierry; Buffet, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of segmental chronic pancreatitis which is localized within the head of the pancreas, the duodenum and the common bile duct. Symptoms are due to common bile duct stenosis or duodenal stenosis. Radiologically, there is a pancreatic mass, which hinders differential diagnosis with pancreatic carcinoma. We report here a case of groove pancreatitis observed in a 41-year-old man treated by pancreatoduodenectomy. Histological features of the groove scar were noted. Our case and cases reported in the literature lead to hypotheses concerning the pathogenesis and clinical, biological, and radiological features suggestive of the diagnosis. PMID:12193865

  11. Whipple made simple for surgical pathologists: orientation, dissection, and sampling of pancreaticoduodenectomy specimens for a more practical and accurate evaluation of pancreatic, distal common bile duct, and ampullary tumors.

    PubMed

    Adsay, N Volkan; Basturk, Olca; Saka, Burcu; Bagci, Pelin; Ozdemir, Denizhan; Balci, Serdar; Sarmiento, Juan M; Kooby, David A; Staley, Charles; Maithel, Shishir K; Everett, Rhonda; Cheng, Jeanette D; Thirabanjasak, Duangpeng; Weaver, Donald W

    2014-04-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) specimens present a challenge for surgical pathologists because of the relative rarity of these specimens, combined with the anatomic complexity. Here, we describe our experience on the orientation, dissection, and sampling of PD specimens for a more practical and accurate evaluation of pancreatic, distal common bile duct (CBD), and ampullary tumors. For orientation of PDs, identification of the "trapezoid," created by the vascular bed at the center, the pancreatic neck margin on the left, and the uncinate margin on the right, is of outmost importance in finding all the pertinent margins of the specimen including the CBD, which is located at the upper right edge of this trapezoid. After orientation, all the margins can be sampled. We submit the uncinate margin entirely as a perpendicular inked margin because this adipose tissue-rich area often reveals subtle satellite carcinomas that are grossly invisible, and, with this approach, the number of R1 resections has doubled in our experience. Then, to ensure proper identification of all lymph nodes (LNs), we utilize the orange-peeling approach, in which the soft tissue surrounding the pancreatic head is shaved off in 7 arbitrarily defined regions, which also serve as shaved samples of the so-called "peripancreatic soft tissue" that defines pT3 in the current American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM. With this approach, our LN count increased from 6 to 14 and LN positivity rate from 50% to 73%. In addition, in 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas there are grossly undetected microfoci of carcinoma. For determination of the primary site and the extent of the tumor, we believe bisectioning of the pancreatic head, instead of axial (transverse) slicing, is the most revealing approach. In addition, documentation of the findings in the duodenal surface of the ampulla is crucial for ampullary carcinomas and their recent site-specific categorization into 4 categories. Therefore, we probe both the CBD and the pancreatic duct from distal to the ampulla and cut the pancreatic head to the ampulla at a plane that goes through both ducts. Then, we sample the bisected pancreatic head depending on the findings of the case. For example, for proper staging of ampullary carcinomas, it is imperative to take the sections perpendicular to the duodenal serosa at the "groove" area, as ampullary carcinomas often extend to this region. Amputative (axial) sectioning of the ampulla, although good for documentation of the peri-Oddi spread of the intra-ampullary tumors, unfortunately disallows documentation of mucosal spread of the papilla of Vater tumors (those arising from the edge of the ampulla, where the ducts transition to duodenal mucosa and extending) into the neighboring duodenum. Axial sectioning also often fails to document tumor spread to the "groove" area. In conclusion, knowledge of the gross characteristics of the anatomic hallmarks is essential for proper dissection of PD specimens. The approach described above allows practical and accurate documentation and staging of pancreas, distal CBD, and ampullary cancers. PMID:24451278

  12. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/? pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  13. Unilateral multiple metallic stent-in-stent for a case of hilar biliary cancer: an alternative stenting strategy.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kishida, Yoshihiro; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Kakushima, Naomi; Tanaka, Masaki; Takizawa, Kohei; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    The stenting strategy has been discussed in cases with unresectable hilar bile duct cancer (HBDC). We describe here a case of HBDC, 4 cm in size, invading the right portal vein and hepatic artery, which was only treated with repeated metallic stent placement, and the patient survived for a long period (51 months). Against Bismuth type-IV hilar biliary stricture, our strategy was to maintain the drainage of the largest, viable hepatic area (>50% of total liver) by unilateral multiple stent-in-stent. PMID:24976285

  14. Role of stents and laser therapy in biliary strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    The most frequent primary cancers causing malignant obstructive jaundice were pancreatic cancer (57%), hilar biliary cancer (19% including metastatic disease), nonhilar biliary cancer (14%) and papillary cancer (10%). Endoscopic stenting has widely replaced palliative surgery for malignant biliary obstruction because of its lower risk and cost. Self-expandable metal stents are the preferred mode of palliation for hilar malignancies. Plastic stents have a major role in benign biliary strictures. Major complications and disadvantages associated with metallic stents include high cost, cholangitis. malposition, migration, unextractability, and breakage of the stents, pancreatitis and stent dysfunction. Dysfunction due to tumor ingrowth can be relieved by thermal methods (argon plasma coagulator therapy). We present a concise review of the efficacy of metallic stents for palliation of malignant strictures.

  15. Groove pancreatitis associated with true pancreatic cyst.

    PubMed

    Sanada, Yuichi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Kunita, Satoko; Jinushi, Kazuto; Matsuura, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of groove pancreatitis (GP) associated with a true pancreatic cyst. An 81-year-old man who had suffered epigastric pain for 4 months was referred to Saisekai Kure Hospital. Computed tomography and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography showed a cystic lesion in the groove area of the pancreas. Serum amylase elevation and imaging findings suggested GP due to the cyst. Six weeks of medical treatment did not improve the clinical symptoms. Therefore, pancreatoduodenectomy was performed. Histologic examination revealed a true cyst with intraluminal necrosis, which produced a protein plug that obstructed the Santorini duct. The parenchyma surrounding the groove area showed marked fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration. GP due to true pancreatic cyst was diagnosed. Although GP is usually caused by overconsumption of alcohol, which leads to changes in the pancreatic juice and the ultimate blockage of pancreatic outflow, the histologic features in our patient suggest that true pancreatic cyst stands as a secondary cause of GP. PMID:17653641

  16. Current status of endotherapy for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kwek, B E; Ang, T L; Maydeo, A

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is associated with varied morphological complications, including intraductal stones, main pancreatic ductal strictures, distal biliary strictures and pseudocysts. Endoscopic therapy provides a less invasive alternative to surgery. In addition, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy improves the success rate of endoscopic clearance of intraductal stones. However, recent data from randomised trials have shown better long-term outcomes with surgical drainage for obstructive pancreatic ductal disease. In patients with distal biliary strictures, stent insertion leads to good immediate drainage, but after stent removal, recurrent narrowing is common. Endoscopic drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts has excellent outcome and should be accompanied by pancreatic ductal stenting when a ductal communication is evident. In those who remain symptomatic, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided coeliac plexus block may provide effective but short-term pain relief. In this review, we present the current evidence for the role of endotherapy in the management of patients with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25630314

  17. Hepato-biliary-enteric stent drainage as palliative treatment for proximal malignant obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hao; Liang, Zhang; Yin, Tian-sheng; Xie, Yan; Li, De-wei

    2014-03-01

    The proximal malignant obstructive jaundice remains one of the most challenging problems for hepato-biliary surgeons. Particularly when the findings preclude surgical resection at exploration, the next decision seems hard to make. A novel palliative treatment called "hepato-biliary-enteric stent drainage" was designed for these proximal malignant obstructive jaundice patients. Hepato-biliary-enteric stent drainage was performed with silicone tube whose diameter was determined according to the degree of dilated biliary ducts, and the proximal end of the tube was placed to intrahepatic ducts as far as possible, the distal end was placed across the duodenal papilla. Between February 2011 and August 2012, 23 patients with the proximal malignant obstructive jaundice of unresectable tumors at exploration received hepato-biliary-enteric stent drainage. Patient's liver function results, symptoms, complications, and survival time were documented. The bilirubin levels of all 23 patients had a considerable and persistent decrease after operation and remained low or normal before death except for four cases of recurrent jaundice (two resulted from migration of tube and other two resulted from hepatocellular carcinoma extensively involving liver parenchyma). After effective drainage, clinical symptoms of cholangitis such as fever or pain were markedly relieved. No procedure-related bleeding, bile leakage, pancreatitis were observed. The median survival time was 212 days, half-year and 1-year survival rate were 56.5 and 21.7%, respectively. Hepato-biliary-enteric stent drainage with less expense, less complications, and easy operation may be an ideal option for patients with unresectable malignancy in the hilar region at exploration. PMID:24464214

  18. Polymeric photosensitizer-embedded self-expanding metal stent for repeatable endoscopic photodynamic therapy of cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bae, Byoung-chan; Yang, Su-Geun; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Don Haeng; Na, Kun; Kim, Joon Mee; Costamagna, Guido; Kozarek, Richard A; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Deviere, Jacques; Seo, Dong Wan; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2014-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new therapeutic approach for the palliative treatment of malignant bile duct obstruction. In this study, we designed photosensitizer-embedded self-expanding nonvascular metal stent (PDT-stent) which allows repeatable photodynamic treatment of cholangiocarcinoma without systemic injection of photosensitizer. Polymeric photosensitizer (pullulan acetate-conjugated pheophorbide A; PPA) was incorporated in self-expanding nonvascular metal stent. Residence of PPA in the stent was estimated in buffer solution and subcutaneous implantation on mouse. Photodynamic activity of PDT-stent was evaluated through laserexposure on stent-layered tumor cell lines, HCT-116 tumor-xenograft mouse models and endoscopic intervention of PDT-stent on bile duct of mini pigs. Photo-fluorescence imaging of the PDT-stent demonstrated homogeneous embedding of polymeric Pheo-A (PPA) on stent membrane. PDT-stent sustained its photodynamic activities at least for 2 month. And which implies repeatable endoscopic PDT is possible after stent emplacement. The PDT-stent after light exposure successfully generated cytotoxic singlet oxygen in the surrounding tissues, inducing apoptotic degradation of tumor cells and regression of xenograft tumors on mouse models. Endoscopic biliary in-stent photodynamic treatments on minipigs also suggested the potential efficacy of PDT-stent on cholangiocarcinoma. In vivo and in vitro studies revealed our PDT-stent, allows repeatable endoscopic biliary PDT, has the potential for the combination therapy (stent plus PDT) of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:25043500

  19. Acute idiopathic pancreatitis: clinical and diagnostic contribution.

    PubMed

    Forte, A; Montesano, G; Gallinaro, L; Bertagni, A; Turano, R; Hueck, S; Illuminati, G

    1997-01-01

    Acute idiopathic pancreatitis is a term used when no underlying cause can be identified on routine investigations. However more specialized investigations, such as endoscopic, endoscopic retrocolangio pancreopathy (CPRE), may detect aetiological factors, particularly biliary sludge and pancreatic duct abnormalities. The authors, reviewing the current literature, report their caseload of idiopathic pancreatitis. They conclude that CPRE is indicated if ultrasonography shows a calibre of the common duct at the superior limits of normal values and in each idiopathic recurrent AP. PMID:9444796

  20. Percutaneous Endoscopic Retrieval and Replacement of a Knitted (Ultraflex) Biliary Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-01 (Japan); Kobayashi, Masami [Department of Radiology, Tottori University Hospital, 36-1 Nishimachi, Yonago 683 (Japan); Tanigawa, Noboru; Okuda, Yoshikazu; Mishima, Kazuya; Ohmura, Naoto; Kobayashi, Midori [Department of Radiology, University Hospital of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-01 (Japan)

    1997-09-15

    A knitted (Ultraflex) biliary stent became obstructed after 5 months causing recurrent jaundice in a 92-year-old man with pancreatic cancer. The obstructed stent was successfully removed percutaneously by retrieval forceps under guidance by an 8.4 Fr fiberoptic biliary endoscope. A new stent was placed. No complications were encountered.

  1. Pancreatic Stellate Cell Activation and MMP Production in Experimental Pancreatic Fibrosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tokuyasu Yokota; Woody Denham; Kenric Murayama; Carolyn Pelham; Raymond Joehl; Richard H. Bell

    2002-01-01

    Background. The early events in pancreatic fibrosis are poorly understood. We examined the production of collagen and matrix metalloproteinases as well as the activation of pancreatic stellate cells in a rodent model of pancreatic fibrosis.Materials and methods. Pancreatitis was induced in rats by hyperstimulation with cerulein (50 ?g\\/kg\\/day ip) and concurrent pancreatic duct obstruction (SHOP model) for 96 h (n

  2. A Magnetic Retrieval System for Stents in the Pancreaticobiliary Tree

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pádraig Cantillon-Murphy; Marvin Ryou; Sohail N. Shaikh; Dan Azagury; Michele Ryan; Christopher C. Thompson; Jeffrey H. Lang

    2010-01-01

    Clinical endoscopic intervention of the pancreaticobiliary tree [endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)] often concludes with the insertion of a temporary plastic stent to reduce the risk of post-ERCP complications by promoting continued flow of bile and pancreatic fluids. This stent is later removed once the patient has fully recovered, but today this necessitates a second endoscopic intervention. The final goal of

  3. Preventing Post-ERCP Pancreatitis: Where Are We?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pier Alberto Testoni; Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    Summary Acute pancreatitis still represents the most common complication after procedures involving Vater's papilla; the reported incidence of this complication varies from less than 1% up to 40%. Attempts at preventing post-ERCP pancreatitis have been carried out using technical measures, pharmacological prophylaxis, or patient selection. Balloon sphincter of Oddi dilatation, difficult papillary cannulation, pancreatic sphincterotomy and multiple pancreatic duct injections

  4. Pancreatic trauma: A concise review

    PubMed Central

    Debi, Uma; Kaur, Ravinder; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sinha, Anindita; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the pancreas is rare and difficult to diagnose. In contrast, traumatic injuries to the liver, spleen and kidney are common and are usually identified with ease by imaging modalities. Pancreatic injuries are usually subtle to identify by different diagnostic imaging modalities, and these injuries are often overlooked in cases with extensive multiorgan trauma. The most evident findings of pancreatic injury are post-traumatic pancreatitis with blood, edema, and soft tissue infiltration of the anterior pararenal space. The alterations of post-traumatic pancreatitis may not be visualized within several hours following trauma as they are time dependent. Delayed diagnoses of traumatic pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of pancreatic injuries because early recognition of the disruption of the main pancreatic duct is important. We reviewed our experience with the use of various imaging modalities for diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma. PMID:24379625

  5. Groove pancreatitis and pancreatic heterotopia in the minor duodenal papilla.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Denis; Vibert, Eric; Yzet, Thierry; Geslin, Guillaume; Bartoli, Eric; Manaouil, David; Delcenserie, Richard; Brevet, Marie; Dupas, Jean-Louis; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2005-05-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of segmental chronic pancreatitis that involves the anatomic space between the head of the pancreas, the duodenum, and the common bile duct. We report 2 cases of groove pancreatitis with pancreatic heterotopia in the minor papilla. Patients were a 44-year-old woman and a 47-year-old man. Both had a past history of alcohol consumption and presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, and weight loss caused by duodenal stenosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed thickening of the duodenal wall and enlargement of the pancreatic head in both patients. In 1 patient, ultrasound endoscopy showed a dilated duct in the head of the pancreas. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed to rule out pancreatic adenocarcinoma and because of the severity of the symptoms. In both cases, gross and microscopic examinations showed fibrous scar of the groove area. The Santorini duct was dilated and contained protein plugs in both patients, with abscesses in 1 of them. In both cases, there were microscopic foci of heterotopic pancreas with mild fibrosis in the wall of the minor papilla. Groove pancreatitis is often diagnosed in middle-aged alcoholic men presenting with clinical symptoms caused by duodenal stenosis. The pathogenesis of this rare entity could be because of disturbance of the pancreatic secretion through the minor papilla. Pancreatitis in heterotopic pancreas located in the minor papilla and chronic consumption of alcohol seem to be important pathogenic factors. PMID:15841034

  6. Bile-Pancreatic Juice Exclusion Increases p38MAPK Activation and TNF-? Production in Ligation-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isaac Samuel; Smita Zaheer; Asgar Zaheer

    2005-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is associated with stress kinase activation and cytokine production. We hypothesize that bile-pancreatic juice exclusion activates p38MAPK and induces TNF-? production in ligation-induced acute pancreatitis. We compared rats with 1–3 h of duct ligation, duct ligation with duodenal bile-pancreatic juice replacement from a donor rat, and sham operation. Pancreatic homogenates were analyzed as follows: (a) Immunoblots using phospho-specific

  7. [Successful endoscopic removal of pancreatic catheter after Whipple resection being effective for improving repeated pancreatitis-a case report].

    PubMed

    Shigoka, Hiroaki; Ukita, Takeo; Nambu, Tomoko; Omuta, Shigefumi; Endo, Takuro; Maetani, Iruru

    2009-02-01

    A 54-year-old man had repeated pancreatitis since three years after pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PpPD) and reconstruction by the modified Child method. Since abdominal pain appeared after meals, a pancreatic duct tube was removed endoscopically, which resulted in an improvement. It has been postulated that a pancreatic duct tube, used at the anastomosis between the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract, is spontaneously dislodged or creates a spatial gap with the wall of the main pancreatic duct enough to let the pancreatic juice outflow. However, endoscopic removal of the tube remained in place was significantly effective. We here discussed this case with reference of previous published reports. PMID:19194097

  8. Endoscopic Placement of Metal Stents in Treating Patients With Cancer- Related Duodenal Obstruction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-31

    Colorectal Cancer; Constipation, Impaction, and Bowel Obstruction; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Pancreatic Cancer; Quality of Life; Small Intestine Cancer

  9. Airway Stenting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yukihito Saito; Hiroji Imamura

    2005-01-01

    Interventional pulmonology, otherwise known as “airway stenting,” has developed in the field of pulmonary medicine focused on using advanced bronchoscopic techniques to treat airway disorders. Tracheobronchial disorders can be caused by malignant or benign tumors, extrinsic compression, postintubation tracheal injuries, tracheobronchomalacia, or sequelae after tracheostomy. Tracheobronchial prostheses, known as airway stents, are used to palliate the effects of large airway

  10. Does Rectal Indomethacin Eliminate the Need for Prophylactic Pancreatic Stent Placement in Patients Undergoing High-Risk ERCP? Post hoc Efficacy and Cost-Benefit Analyses Using Prospective Clinical Trial Data

    PubMed Central

    Elmunzer, B. Joseph; Higgins, Peter D.R.; Saini, Sameer D.; Scheiman, James M.; Parker, Robert A.; Chak, Amitabh; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Mosler, Patrick; Hayward, Rodney A.; Elta, Grace H.; Korsnes, Sheryl J.; Schmidt, Suzette E.; Sherman, Stuart; Lehman, Glen A.; Fogel, Evan L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES A recent large-scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated that rectal indomethacin administration is effective in addition to pancreatic stent placement (PSP) for preventing post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP) in high-risk cases. We performed a post hoc analysis of this RCT to explore whether rectal indomethacin can replace PSP in the prevention of PEP and to estimate the potential cost savings of such an approach. METHODS We retrospectively classified RCT subjects into four prevention groups: (1) no prophylaxis, (2) PSP alone, (3) rectal indomethacin alone, and (4) the combination of PSP and indomethacin. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for imbalances in the prevalence of risk factors for PEP between the groups. Based on these adjusted PEP rates, we conducted an economic analysis comparing the costs associated with PEP prevention strategies employing rectal indomethacin alone, PSP alone, or the combination of both. RESULTS After adjusting for risk using two different logistic regression models, rectal indomethacin alone appeared to be more effective for preventing PEP than no prophylaxis, PSP alone, and the combination of indomethacin and PSP. Economic analysis revealed that indomethacin alone was a cost-saving strategy in 96% of Monte Carlo trials. A prevention strategy employing rectal indomethacin alone could save approximately $150 million annually in the United States compared with a strategy of PSP alone, and $85 million compared with a strategy of indomethacin and PSP. CONCLUSIONS This hypothesis-generating study suggests that prophylactic rectal indomethacin could replace PSP in patients undergoing high-risk ERCP, potentially improving clinical outcomes and reducing healthcare costs. A RCT comparing rectal indomethacin alone vs. indomethacin plus PSP is needed. PMID:23295278

  11. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP). PMID:25469024

  12. Can a Wire-Guided Cannulation Technique Increase Bile Duct Cannulation Rate and Prevent Post-ERCP Pancreatitis?: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincenzo Cennamo; Lorenzo Fuccio; Rocco M Zagari; Leonardo H Eusebi; Liza Ceroni; Liboria Laterza; Carlo Fabbri; Franco Bazzoli

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:The most common technique used to achieve primary deep biliary cannulation is the standard contrast-assisted method. To increase the success rate and reduce the risk of complications, a wire-guided cannulation strategy has been proposed. Prospective studies provided conflicting results as to whether the wire-guided cannulation technique increases the cannulation rate and reduces post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (post-ERCP) pancreatitis risk compared with

  13. Effect of NYD-SP27 down-regulation on ATP-induced Ca 2+-dependent pancreatic duct anion secretion in cystic fibrosis cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin Xia Zhu; Ning Yang; Hu Zhu; Yiu Wa Chung; Hsiao Chang Chan

    2007-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that NYD-SP27 is a novel inhibitory PLC isoform expressed endogenously in human pancreas and upregulated in CFPAC-1 cells. The present study investigated the effect of NYD-SP27 down-regulation on the ATP-stimulated and Ca2+-dpendent pancreatic anion secretion by CFPAC-1 cell line using short-circuit current (ISC) recording. NYD-SP27 antisense-transfected CFPAC-1 (AT-CF) cells exhibited a significantly higher basal transmembrane potential

  14. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed to be involved in the underlying immune reaction. IgG4 antibodies have two unique biological functions, Fab-arm exchange and a rheumatoid factor-like activity, both of which may play immune-defensive roles. However, the exact role of IgG4 in this disease still remains to be clarified. It seems important to recognize this unique entity given that the disease is treatable with steroids. PMID:22151922

  15. Endoscopic ultrasonography in the management of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer diagnosis and management has been enhanced with the application of endoscopic ultrasound. The close proximity of the pancreas to the stomach and duodenum permits detailed imaging with intraluminal ultrasonography and staging of pancreatic tumors. EUS directed fine needle aspiration and injection may be successfully employed with patients with pancreatic cancer. Expandable metal stents can palliate patients with obstruction of the pancreaticobiliary tract as well as the gastroduodenum. The efficacy of EUS in the management of pancreatic cancer is critically reviewed.

  16. Surgical treatment of the pancreatic stump: preventive strategies of pancreatic fistula after pancreatoduodenectomy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    TERSIGNI, R.; CAPALDI, M.; IALONGO, P.; GRILLO, L.R.; ANSELMO, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The institutions with high volume of pancreatic surgery report morbidity rate from 30% to 50% and mortality less than 5% after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). At the present, the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality is pancreatic fistula (PF). Aim The purpose of the study is to identify the most important clinical factors which may predict PF development and eventually suggest alternative approaches to the pancreatic stump management. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis of a clinical data base of a tertiary care Hospital was performed. From 2002 to 2012 a single Surgeon prospectively performed 150 pancreaticoduodenectomies for cancer. Four different techniques were used: end to end pancreaticojejunostomy, end to side pancreaticojejunostomy, pancreatic duct occlusion and duct to mucosa anastomosis. The intraoperative gland texture was classified as soft, firm and hard. The duct size was preoperatively (CT scan) and intraoperatively recorded and classified: < 3 mm small, 3–6 mm medium, > 6 mm large. The histopathological characteristic of the gland fibrosis was graduate as low 1, moderate 2, high 3. Conclusion Relationships between pre and intraoperative duct size measurement, pancreatic texture and pancreatic fibrosis grading were highly significant. Small duct and soft pancreas with low grade fibrosis are the most important risk factors for pancreatic fistula development. The proper selection of pancreatic stump management or the decision to refer the high risk patients to high volume Center can be suggested by the elevated correspondence of pre and intraoperative duct diameter with the related pancreatic fibrosis grade and gland consistency. Preoperative assessment of the pancreatic duct makes possible to predict the risk of pancreatic fistula. PMID:25419587

  17. Clinical evaluation, imaging studies, indications for cytologic study and preprocedural requirements for duct brushing studies and pancreatic fine-needle aspiration: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Douglas; Schmidt, C. Max; Al-Haddad, Mohammad; Barthel, James S.; Ljung, Britt-Marie; Merchant, Nipun B.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Shaaban, Akram M.; Simeone, Diane; Pitman, Martha Bishop; Layfield, Lester J.

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreaticobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques for EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature to be used for pancreaticobiliary disease, ancillary testing and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on expertise of the authors, literature review, discussions of the draft document at national and international meetings and synthesis of online comments of the draft document. This document selectively presents the results of these discussions. This document summarizes recommendations for the clinical and imaging work-up of pancreatic and biliary tract lesions along with indications for cytologic study of these lesions. Prebrushing and FNA requirements are also discussed. PMID:25191515

  18. Expression of the calcium-binding protein S100P is regulated by bone morphogenetic protein in pancreatic duct epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Shin; Satoh, Kennichi; Hirota, Morihisa; Fujibuchi, Wataru; Kanno, Atsushi; Umino, Jun; Ito, Hiromichi; Satoh, Akihiko; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Kume, Kiyoshi; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2009-01-01

    We previously reported that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-4 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition in a pancreatic cancer cell line. To further investigate the detailed molecular mechanism of BMP action in pancreatic cancer, we carried out comprehensive microarray analysis in Panc-1 cells. The microarray analysis elucidated novel BMP target genes, and among them, the calcium-binding protein S100P was identified as an upregulated gene. S100P induction by BMP4 was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis in Panc-1 and HPDE cells. Short interfering RNA-based knockdown of S100P expression sufficiently repressed BMP4-induced cell migration in Panc-1 cells. Because Panc-1 and HPDE cells express wild-type Smad4, we hypothesized that Smad4 might be indispensable for S100P induction by BMP4. S100P induction by BMP4 was not observed in the Smad4-null cell line BxPC3, and was sufficiently attenuated in short interfering RNA-based Smad4-knockdown Panc-1 cells. Interestingly, detailed promoter analysis revealed that upregulation of S100P by BMP4 was independent of the Smad-binding element, indicating that an additional unknown downstream factor of the Smad4-dependent pathway is necessary for this induction. These findings are the first of their kind, and this Smad4-dependent regulation of S100P by BMP signaling might explain the migratory mechanism of cancer cells, which is still unknown. PMID:19018761

  19. Partial pancreatic head resection for pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nakagohri, Toshio; Konishi, Masaru; Inoue, Kazuto; Nakamura, Takayuki; Kinoshita, Taira

    2003-01-01

    We report partial pancreatic head resection for pancreatic metastasis of renal cell carcinoma. A 71-year-old man was admitted to our hospital without any complaint. Contrast-enhanced computed tomographic showed a hypervascular tumor 1.5 cm in diameter in the head of the pancreas. We performed partial head resection preserving the duct of Wirsung and the duct of Santorini. He is presently alive and well without any evidence of recurrent disease 18 months after the operation. Isolated pancreatic metastasis of renal cell carcinoma enables surgeons to perform partial pancreatic head resection in selected cases. PMID:14696506

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis in an 11-year-old boy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rania Refaat; Marc Harth; Petra Proschek; Sebastian Lindemayr; Thomas J. Vogl

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of histopathologically proven autoimmune pancreatitis in an 11-year-old boy. Abdominal US and MRI showed\\u000a a focal swelling of the pancreatic head, the latter also showing delayed contrast enhancement. There was diffuse irregular\\u000a pancreatic duct narrowing, compression of the intrapancreatic common bile duct, and mild proximal biliary dilatation on MR\\u000a cholangiopancreatography. Laboratory results revealed normal serum IgG

  1. Pancreatic Bicarbonate Secretion Involves Two Proton Pumps*

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Ivana; Wang, Jing; Henriksen, Katrine L.; Haanes, Kristian A.; Krabbe, Simon; Nitschke, Roland; Hede, Susanne E.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas secretes fluid rich in digestive enzymes and bicarbonate. The alkaline secretion is important in buffering of acid chyme entering duodenum and for activation of enzymes. This secretion is formed in pancreatic ducts, and studies to date show that plasma membranes of duct epithelium express H+/HCO3? transporters, which depend on gradients created by the Na+/K+-ATPase. However, the model cannot fully account for high-bicarbonate concentrations, and other active transporters, i.e. pumps, have not been explored. Here we show that pancreatic ducts express functional gastric and non-gastric H+-K+-ATPases. We measured intracellular pH and secretion in small ducts isolated from rat pancreas and showed their sensitivity to H+-K+ pump inhibitors and ion substitutions. Gastric and non-gastric H+-K+ pumps were demonstrated on RNA and protein levels, and pumps were localized to the plasma membranes of pancreatic ducts. Quantitative analysis of H+/HCO3? and fluid transport shows that the H+-K+ pumps can contribute to pancreatic secretion in several species. Our results call for revision of the bicarbonate transport physiology in pancreas, and most likely other epithelia. Furthermore, because pancreatic ducts play a central role in several pancreatic diseases, it is of high relevance to understand the role of H+-K+ pumps in pathophysiology. PMID:20978133

  2. Duct closure

    DOEpatents

    Vowell, Kennison L. (Canoga Park, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A closure for an inclined duct having an open upper end and defining downwardly extending passageway. The closure includes a cap for sealing engagement with the open upper end of the duct. Associated with the cap are an array of vertically aligned plug members, each of which has a cross-sectional area substantially conforming to the cross-sectional area of the passageway at least adjacent the upper end of the passageway. The plug members are interconnected in a manner to provide for free movement only in the plane in which the duct is inclined. The uppermost plug member is attached to the cap means and the cap means is in turn connected to a hoist means which is located directly over the open end of the duct.

  3. Diarrhoea due to pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Brelian, Daniel; Tenner, Scott

    2012-10-01

    The exocrine pancreas provides essential digestive enzymes necessary for the proper breakdown and absorption of ingested food in humans. Any disruption of this process can lead to malabsorption and resultant diarrhoea. Typically, disruption of over 90 percent of the pancreatic parenchyma is needed to result in diarrhoea. This disruption can result from widespread pancreatic necrosis in acute pancreatitis, fibrotic replacement of the parenchyma as seen in chronic pancreatitis and in patients with pancreatic cancer where normal tissue is replaced by tumour and/or the pancreatic duct becomes obstructed. Several uncommon tumours of the pancreas can also cause diarrhoea through the secretion of hormones. This article will explore each of these diseases, including the pathogenesis and treatment. PMID:23384807

  4. Acute Obstructive Suppurative Pancreatic Ductitis in an Asymptomatic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Clifford D.

    2015-01-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative pancreatic ductitis (AOSPD), defined as suppuration from the pancreatic duct without associated pseudocyst, abscess, or necrosis, is a rare complication of chronic pancreatitis. We present the first case of AOSPD in an asymptomatic patient with a polymicrobial infection and review the literature on this rare clinical entity. PMID:25688269

  5. Cystic pancreatic lymphangioma.

    PubMed

    Gure?, Nazim; Gurluler, Ercument; Alim, Altan; Berber, Ibrahim; Gurkan, Alihan

    2012-04-12

    Lymphangioma of the pancreas is a rare benign tumor of lymphatic origin. Retroperitoneal lymphangiomas account for 1% of all lymphangiomas. Herein, we report a case of cystic pancreatic lymphangioma diagnosed in 34 year-old female patient who was hospitalized for a slight pain in the epigastrium and vomiting. Radiological imaging revealed a large multiloculated cystic abdominal mass with enhancing septations involving the upper retroperitoneum. During the laparoscopic surgery, a well circumscribed polycystic tumor was completely excised preserving the pancreatic duct. The patient made a complete recovery and is disease-free 12 months postoperatively. PMID:22826784

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Gene delivery to pancreatic exocrine cells in vivo

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    via ducts. In 2 major pancreatic pathologies, pancreatitis and pancreas cancer, the acinar cells are the most com- mon form of pancreas cancer from which 95% are pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC). PDACRESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Gene delivery to pancreatic exocrine cells in vivo and in vitro

  7. A New Technique to Assist in Difficult Bile Duct Cannulation at the Time of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Devonshire, David A.; Cunningham, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Background and Objectives: At the time of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, deep cannulation of the bile duct is a prerequisite to be able to provide endoscopic therapy. We describe a simple technique to assist in difficult bile duct cannulation. Methods: If the pancreatic duct is easily entered but the bile duct cannot be accessed, a guidewire is advanced into the pancreatic duct, and the cannulating catheter is removed leaving the tip of the wire in the mid pancreatic duct. Alongside the pancreatic wire, a catheter, preloaded with a second wire, is advanced via the channel of the endoscope. With the first wire in the pancreatic duct, the second wire is advanced above it in the anticipated bile duct axis. Results: We have used this technique in 12 cases and succeeded in 10. No complications occurred. Discussion: Inserting a pancreatic wire can assist in bile duct cannulation, by straightening and stabilizing the papilla. The use of this new technique can reduce the need for precut sphincterotomy, with its inherent increased risks of pancreatitis, bleeding, and perforation. The approach proposed by us can assist in any difficult bile duct cannulation, but it can be particularly useful when dealing with a papilla that is very prominent with a tortuous intraduodenal segment or a papilla located in a duodenal diverticulum. PMID:15984715

  8. Migrated biliary stent causing perforation of sigmoid colon and pelvic abscess.

    PubMed

    Mady, Raafat Fadly; Niaz, Osamah Saad; Assal, Mohamed Moustafa

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopically placed biliary stents are a well-established procedure for the treatment of benign and malignant causes of obstructive jaundice. A plastic stent is usually inserted in patients with obstructive jaundice due to pancreatic cancer as a short-term procedure. Stent migration has been reported as a complication, although in most cases the stent will pass through or remain in the bowel lumen for a period of time. In rare cases, the stent may cause sigmoid perforation and pelvic abscess formation, especially in patients with sigmoid diverticulae or abdominal adhesions due to previous surgery. We present a patient with sigmoid perforation and pelvic abscess due to distal migration of a biliary stent placed to decompress a pancreatic head carcinoma. PMID:25870211

  9. Modern management of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, James

    2013-04-01

    It is imperative for gastroenterologists to understand the different formations of bile duct stones and the various medical treatments available. To minimize the complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), it is critical to appropriately assess the risk of bile duct stones before intervention. Biliary endoscopists should be comfortable with the basic techniques of stone removal, including sphincterotomy, mechanical lithotripsy, and stent placement. It is important to be aware of advanced options, including laser and electrohydraulic stone fragmentation, and papillary dilatation for problematic cases. The timing and need for ERCP in those who require a cholecystectomy is also a consideration. PMID:23540960

  10. Prognostic intraoperative factors in severe acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Popa, CC

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a serious disease. Triggered by the local inflammation of the pancreas, it can cause inflammation in various organs and systems in the body. It is important to identify severe forms of acute pancreatitis with an increased morbidity and mortality rate. Lately, internationally, numerous clinical and paraclinical factors predicting the severity of acute pancreatitis have been proposed. The purpose of the study is to identify the prognostic intraoperative factors of severity. The prospective study was conducted over a period of four years, between 2007 and 2010 and included 238 patients treated in a surgical clinic in Bucharest. 103 patients experienced a severe form of acute pancreatitis, which means 67.95% of all operations practiced. We monitored intraoperative factors, in particular: the presence and/ or the extent of pancreatic necrosis, common bile duct lithiasis and intraperitoneal fluid, parameters proposed to become statistically prognostic factors in the development and long-term morbidity of acute pancreatitis. The presence and/ or extension of necrosis was identified in the histopathology only in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. 71.43% of the patients with common bile duct lithiasis and 73.91% of the patients with inflammatory intraperitoneal fluid had severe acute pancreatitis. Most patients who developed postoperative complications (86.49%) or who required a surgical intervention (85.71%), presented a severe form of the disease. Conclusions: pancreatic necrosis, common bile duct lithiasis and intraperitoneal fluid may contribute to a more precise prediction of severity, as confirmed by international literature.

  11. [A case of groove pancreatitis with a characteristic pathologic feature].

    PubMed

    Park, Kwang Hyuk; Yoo, Kyo Sang; Chung, Yong Woo; Kim, Kyoung Oh; Park, Cheol Hee; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Park, Choong Kee

    2007-03-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis in which scarring is found mainly in the groove between the head of the pancreas, duodenum, and common bile duct. The pathogenesis of groove pancreatitis is still unclear but seems to be caused by the disturbance of pancreatic outflow through Santorini duct. It is often difficult to differentiate preoperatively between groove pancreatitis and pancreatic head carcinoma. Whereas conservative management is effective, some patients with duodenal obstruction may undergo Whipple's operation. A few cases of groove pancreatitis have been reported in Korea, and they were diagnosed only by clinical and radiological features. We experienced a case of groove pancreatitis who needed a surgical management because of severe duodenal obstruction. We report the case with a review of its characteristic pathologic findings. PMID:18172349

  12. Inflammatory macrophages in pancreatic acinar cell metaplasia and initiation of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Geou-Yarh; Storz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The roles of inflammatory macrophages in pancreatic tissue and the development of pancreatic cancer have not been well characterized. Recently it was shown that inflammatory macrophages, besides their function in clearing dead cells, also initiate pancreatic acinar cell metaplasia to duct-like progenitor cells. While in pancreatitis this is a reversible process, in context of an oncogenic stimulus this process is irreversible and can lead to the formation of precancerous lesions. Recent work now indicates that acquisition of an activating Kras mutation in acinar cells initiates signaling that leads to chemoattraction of M1-poliarized macrophages. This oncogene-caused chronic microinflammation can accelerate the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancers.

  13. Autoimmune pancreatitis: a surgical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Perez, David; Vaquero, Eva C; Ayuso, Juan R; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is defined as a particular form of pancreatitis that often manifests as obstructive jaundice associated with a pancreatic mass or an obstructive bile duct lesion, and that has an excellent response to corticosteroid treatment. The prevalence of AIP worldwide is unknown, and it is considered as a rare entity. The clinical and radiological presentation of AIP can mimic bilio-pancreatic cancer, presenting difficulties for diagnosis and obliging the surgeon to balance decision-making between the potential risk presented by the misdiagnosis of a deadly disease against the desire to avoid unnecessary major surgery for a disease that responds effectively to corticosteroid treatment. In this review we detail the current and critical points for the diagnosis, classification and treatment for AIP, with a special emphasis on surgical series and the methods to differentiate between this pathology and bilio-pancreatic cancer. PMID:25066570

  14. Computed tomographic appearance of resectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y. (Univ. of Tokyo, Japan); Araki, T.; Tasaka, A.; Maruyama, M.

    1982-06-01

    Thirteen patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma were examined by computed tomography (CT). Nine had a mass, 2 had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, 1 appeared to have ductal dilatation, and 1 had no sign of abnormality. Resectable carcinoma was diagnosed retrospectively in 8 cases, based on the following criteria: a mass with a distinct contour, frequently containing a tiny or irregular low-density area and accompanied by dilatation of the caudal portion of the main pancreatic duct without involvement of the large vessels, liver, or lymph nodes. Including unresectable cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and obstructive jaundice from causes other than cancer, the false-positive rate was less than 6%. However, a small cancer without change in pancreatic contour is difficult to detect with CT.

  15. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  16. Endoscopic stenting for post-transplant biliary stricture: usefulness of a novel removable covered metal stent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bing HuDao-jian; Dao-jian Gao; Feng-hai Yu; Tian-tian Wang; Ya-min Pan; Xiao-ming Yang

    2011-01-01

    Background  Endoscopic management of biliary anastomotic stricture (AS) following liver transplantation (LT) remains challenging. There\\u000a are no dedicated self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) for this setting.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A short fully covered SEMS (FCSEMS) with a retrieval suture was designed. Between July 2008 and June 2010, 13 patients with\\u000a post-LT AS had this FCSEMS placed endoscopically, keeping the whole stent inside the bile duct

  17. Stenting the ductus arteriosus: Case selection, technique and possible complications

    PubMed Central

    Alwi, Mazeni

    2008-01-01

    Ductal stenting is an attractive alternative to conventional shunt surgery in duct dependent congenital heart disease as it avoids thoracotomy and its related problems. With today's generation of coronary stents which have better profile, flexibility and trackability, ductal stenting may be achieved safely and with considerably less difficulty than previously described. As in Blalock-Taussig (BT) shunt, ductal stenting is indicated mainly in duct-dependent cyanotic lesions chiefly in the neonatal period. Unlike the Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) as an isolated lesion, the ductus in cyanotic heart disease has a remarkable morphologic variability. The ductus tends to arise more proximally under the aortic arch, giving rise to a vertical ductus or occasionally it may arise from the subclavian artery. It also tends to be long and sometimes very tortuous, rendering stent implantation technically impossible. The ductus in these patients may also insert onto one of the branch pulmonary arteries with some stenosis at the site of insertion. The ductus in Tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia (TOF-PA) tend to exhibit these morphologic features and to a lesser degree in transposition of great arteries with ventricular septal defect and pulmonary atresia (TGA-VSD-PA) and the more complex forms of univentricular hearts. In the preliminary angiographic evaluation, it is important to delineate these morphologic features as the basis for case selection. Ductal stenting may be done by the retrograde femoral artery route or the antegrade transvenous route depending on the ductus morphology and the underlying cardiac lesion. The detailed techniques and essential hardware are described. Finally, major potential complications of the procedure are described. Acute stent thrombosis is the most serious and potentially catastrophic. Emergent treatment with thrombolytic therapy and mechanical disruption of thrombus are required. With proper case selection, appropriate technique and the right hardware ductal stenting provides reasonable short-medium term palliation in duct-dependent cyanotic heart disease. PMID:20300236

  18. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  19. [Annular pancreas with high confluence of pancreaticobiliary ducts in an adult].

    PubMed

    Kodama, Ryo; Watanabe, Takayuki; Maruyama, Masahiro; Ito, Tetsuya; Yoneda, Suguru; Maruyama, Masafumi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Tanaka, Eiji

    2011-09-01

    A man in his 80's was admitted complaining of epigastralgia, and acute pancreatitis was diagnosed. Abdominal CT and MRI showed enlargement of the pancreatic head encircling the descending part of the duodenum and a duodenal diverticulum. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) revealed annular pancreas and high confluence of pancreaticobiliary ducts. Annular pancreas had been reported to have associated with a broad spectrum of pancreatic anomalies, few cases of annular pancreas coexisting with high confluence of pancreaticobiliary ducts, or pancreaticobiliary maljunction have been reported. Combination of both anomalies was interesting from the view point of embryology. We report a rare case of annular pancreas with high confluence of pancreaticobiliary ducts. PMID:21892000

  20. Otaru consensus on biliary stenting for unresectable distal malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Irisawa, Atsushi; Katanuma, Akio; Itoi, Takao

    2013-05-01

    Endoscopic biliary drainage with biliary stent placement is the treatment of choice for palliation in patients with malignant biliary obstruction caused by unresectable neoplasms. Various biliary stent designs have become available, but lack of a clear consensus persists on the use of covered versus uncovered metal stents in malignant distal bile duct obstructions, and plastic versus metal stents. In 2012, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy indicated guidelines for biliary stenting. Accordingly, the consensus meeting for biliary stenting was held at the Endoscopic Forum Japan 2012, and four selected statements related to stent placement for distal malignant biliary obstruction were discussed to produce a consensus. Two of four statements (related to the usefulness of self-expandable metallic stents, and reintervention after stenting) were agreed upon by almost all participants. Nevertheless, our opinions were divided on the other two statements (necessity of sphincterotomy for stenting, and covered metal stent versus uncovered metal stent). We herein report the results of the meeting, and present proposed new statements via discussion. PMID:23617650

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Lindkvist, Björn

    2013-11-14

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an important cause of maldigestion and a major complication in chronic pancreatitis. Normal digestion requires adequate stimulation of pancreatic secretion, sufficient production of digestive enzymes by pancreatic acinar cells, a pancreatic duct system without significant outflow obstruction and adequate mixing of the pancreatic juice with ingested food. Failure in any of these steps may result in pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, which leads to steatorrhea, weight loss and malnutrition-related complications, such as osteoporosis. Methods evaluating digestion, such as fecal fat quantification and the (13)C-mixed triglycerides test, are the most accurate tests for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, but the probability of the diagnosis can also be estimated based on symptoms, signs of malnutrition in blood tests, fecal elastase 1 levels and signs of morphologically severe chronic pancreatitis on imaging. Treatment for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency includes support to stop smoking and alcohol consumption, dietary consultation, enzyme replacement therapy and a structured follow-up of nutritional status and the effect of treatment. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is administered in the form of enteric-coated minimicrospheres during meals. The dose should be in proportion to the fat content of the meal, usually 40-50000 lipase units per main meal, and half the dose is required for a snack. In cases that do not respond to initial treatment, the doses can be doubled, and proton inhibitors can be added to the treatment. This review focuses on current concepts of the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. PMID:24259956

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lindkvist, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an important cause of maldigestion and a major complication in chronic pancreatitis. Normal digestion requires adequate stimulation of pancreatic secretion, sufficient production of digestive enzymes by pancreatic acinar cells, a pancreatic duct system without significant outflow obstruction and adequate mixing of the pancreatic juice with ingested food. Failure in any of these steps may result in pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, which leads to steatorrhea, weight loss and malnutrition-related complications, such as osteoporosis. Methods evaluating digestion, such as fecal fat quantification and the 13C-mixed triglycerides test, are the most accurate tests for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, but the probability of the diagnosis can also be estimated based on symptoms, signs of malnutrition in blood tests, fecal elastase 1 levels and signs of morphologically severe chronic pancreatitis on imaging. Treatment for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency includes support to stop smoking and alcohol consumption, dietary consultation, enzyme replacement therapy and a structured follow-up of nutritional status and the effect of treatment. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is administered in the form of enteric-coated minimicrospheres during meals. The dose should be in proportion to the fat content of the meal, usually 40-50000 lipase units per main meal, and half the dose is required for a snack. In cases that do not respond to initial treatment, the doses can be doubled, and proton inhibitors can be added to the treatment. This review focuses on current concepts of the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. PMID:24259956

  3. Metallic stents in malignant biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Rieber, Andrea; Brambs, Hans-Juergen [University of Ulm, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany)

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. Retrospective analysis of our results with metallic stent placement for malignant biliary strictures. We sought to determine parameters that influence stent patency. Methods. A total of 95 Wallstents were implanted in 65 patients (38 men, 27 women; mean age, 65.1 years) with malignant biliary obstruction. Serum bilirubin levels were assessed in 48 patients; the mean value prior to intervention was 15.0 mg/dl. Results. In 12 patients (21%) complications occurred as a result of percutaneous transhepatic drainage. Stent implantation was complicated in 13 patients, but was possible in all patients. A significant decrease in bilirubin level was seen in 83.3% of patients following stent implantation. Approximately 30% of patients developed recurrent jaundice after a mean 97.1 days. In 9 patients (15%) the recurrent jaundice was caused by stent occlusion due to tumor growth. The mean follow-up was 141.8 days, the mean survival 118.7 days. Patients with cholangiocarcinomas and gallbladder carcinomas had the best results. Worse results were seen in patients with pancreatic tumors and with lymph node metastases of colon and gastric cancers. Conclusions. The main predictive factors for occlusion rate and survival are the type of primary tumor, tumor stage, the decrease in bilirubin level, and the general condition of the patient.

  4. Recurrent acute pancreatitis due to a santorinicele in a young patient.

    PubMed

    Khan, S A; Chawla, T; Azami, R

    2009-05-01

    A cystic dilatation of the terminal portion of the minor pancreatic duct (duct of Santorini) is referred to as a santorinicele. It is usually associated with pancreas divisum and has been suggested to be a cause of relative stenosis of the minor papilla, often leading to recurrent pancreatitis. While this anomaly has been reported in the paediatric population, it is more commonly found in the elderly. We present a 27-year-old woman with recurrent acute pancreatitis attributed to a santorinicele with a dorsal duct-exclusive pancreatic drainage. PMID:19495498

  5. Duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction in pediatric living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Okajima, Hideaki; Inomata, Yukihiro; Asonuma, Katsuhiro; Ueno, Mikako; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Takeichi, Takayuki; Kodera, Atsushi; Yoshimoto, Kazuhiko; Ohya, Yuki

    2005-08-01

    The results of duct-to-duct biliary reconstruction in six pediatric patients who received a living donor liver transplant aged from 2 months to 11 yr old are reported. The graft was either entire or a part of the left lateral segments. The orifice of the bile duct of the graft was anastomosed to the recipients' hepatic duct in an end-to-end fashion by interrupted suture using 6-0 absorbable material. A transanastomotic external stent tube (4 Fr) was passed through the stump of the recipients' cystic duct. Mean time for reconstruction was 24 min. All the recipients survived the operation and reinitiated oral intake on postoperative day 3. There were no early biliary complications. One 5-yr-old boy suffered from an anastomotic stenosis 9 months after transplantation. He underwent re-anastomosis by Roux-en Y (R-Y) procedure and recovered uneventfully. Duct-to-duct anastomosis in pediatric living donor liver transplantation has benefits while the complication rate is comparable to R-Y reconstruction. PMID:16048608

  6. Biomedical engineering in design and application of nitinol stents with shape memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryklina, E. P.; Khmelevskaya, I. Y.; Morozova, Tamara V.; Prokoshkin, S. D.

    1996-04-01

    Our studies in the field of endosurgery in collaboration with the physicians of the National Research Center of Surgery of the Academy of Medical Sciences are carried out beginning in 1983. These studies laid the foundation for the new direction of X-ray surgery--X-ray Nitinol stenting of vessels and tubular structures. X-ray nitinol stents are unique self-fixing shells based on the shape memory effect and superelasticity of nickel-titanium alloys self- reconstructed under human body temperature. Applied for stenting of arteries in cases of stenosis etc., bile ducts in cases of benign and malignant stenoses, digestive tract in cases of oesophageal cancer and cervical canal uterus in cases of postsurgical atresiss and strictures of uterine. The purpose of stenting is restoration of the shape of artery or tubular structure by a cylinder frame formation. The especially elaborated original method of stenting allows to avoid the traditional surgical operation, i.e. the stenting is performed without blood, narcosis and surgical knife. The stent to be implanted is transported into the affected zone through the puncture under the X-ray control. Clinical applications of X-ray endovascular stenting has been started in March 1984. During this period nearly 400 operations on stenting have been performed on femoral, iliac, brachio-cephalic, subclavian arteries, bile ducts, tracheas, digestive tract and cervical canal uterus.

  7. Endoscopic Therapy in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Damien Meng Yew

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a debilitating disease that can result in chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and other related complications. The main aims of treatment are to control symptoms, prevent disease progression, and correct any complications. A multidisciplinary approach involving medical, endoscopic, and surgical therapy is important. Endoscopic therapy plays a specific role in carefully selected patients as primary interventional therapy when medical measures fail or in patients who are not suitable for surgery. Endoscopic therapy is also used as a bridge to surgery or as a means to assess the potential response to pancreatic surgery. This review addresses the role of endoscopic therapy in relief of obstruction of the pancreatic duct (PD) and bile du ct, closure of PD leaks, and drainage of pseudocysts in CP. The role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block for pain in chronic pancreatitis is also discussed. PMID:22205838

  8. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Kazushige; Fukui, Toshiro; Matsushita, Mitsunobu; Takaoka, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    Although the pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis remains unclear, this report presents recent evidence of the clinical aspects of this disease: mild abdominal symptoms, usually without acute attacks of pancreatitis; occasional presence of obstructive jaundice; elevated levels of serum gammaglobulin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, or IgG4; presence of autoantibodies; diffuse enlargement of the pancreas; irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct (sclerosing pancreatitis), often with intrapancreatic biliary stenosis or coexisting biliary lesions (sclerosing cholangitis similar to primary sclerosing cholangitis) seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography; fibrotic changes with lymphocyte and IgG4-positive plasmacyte infiltration and obliterative phlebitis; occasional association with other systemic lesions (such as sialadenitis), retroperitoneal fibrosis, and interstitial renal tubular disorders; and response to steroid therapy. Based upon these findings, several sets of diagnostic criteria have been proposed. Further studies and international consensus for diagnostic criteria and pathogenetic mechanisms are needed. PMID:21904518

  9. Unilateral versus bilateral endoscopic biliary stenting for malignant hilar biliary strictures.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Ichiro; Mukai, Tsuyoshi; Moriwaki, Hisataka

    2013-05-01

    The present review compared unilateral versus bilateral stenting in order to determine the optimal stenting strategy for malignant hilar biliary strictures based on the previous literature. The role of preoperative biliary drainage prior to liver resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma remains under discussion. However, in Japan, endoscopic placement of single nasobiliary drainage in the future remnant hepatic lobe is currently considered the most suitable method. In most unresectable cases, unilateral stenting appears to be adequate for ameliorating jaundice. It is technically easier and less expensive than bilateral stenting, with reintervention for stent dysfunction also being considerably easier. However, contrast medium injection into undrained bile ducts is associated with uncontrolled cholangitis and poor prognosis. To prevent this complication, bilateral stenting may be preferred to unilateral stenting. Additionally, previous studies have demonstrated bilateral stenting to be associated with longer stent patency as compared to unilateral stenting. We consider that further large-scale studies are required to clarify whether unilateral or bilateral stenting is a better therapeutic technique for malignant hilar biliary stricture. PMID:23617655

  10. Gene Expression Profiles in Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia Reflect the Effects of Hedgehog Signaling on Pancreatic Ductal Epithelial Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nijaguna B. Prasad; Andrew V. Biankin; Noriyoshi Fukushima; Anirban Maitra; Surajit Dhara; Abdel G. Elkahloun; Ralph H. Hruban; Michael Goggins; Steven D. Leach

    Invasive pancreatic cancer is thought to develop through a series of noninvasive duct lesions known as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN). We used cDNA microarrays interrogating 15,000 transcripts to identify 49 genes that were differentially expressed in microdissected early PanIN lesions (PanIN-1B\\/2) compared with microdissected normal duct epithelium. In this analysis, a cluster of extrapancreatic foregut markers, including pepsinogen C, MUC6,

  11. Novel biliary self-expanding metal stents: indications and applications.

    PubMed

    Blero, Daniel; Huberty, Vincent; Devière, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    Endoscopic insertion of a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) through a malignant common bile duct stricture is the first line of palliation for malignant jaundice. Patency of these stents remains a major concern. SEMS dysfunction can result from tumor ingrowth, overgrowth and/or clogging. Initial SEMS modifications involved covering the central part of the stent in order to reduce ingrowth and ultimately increase patency. Fully covered stents became available shortly after reports of their use in human patients. The potential removability and radial strength of SEMS have led to evaluation of their use in new indications including benign biliary strictures, post sphincterotomy bleeding and perforation. Other aspects of development include the addition of features such as anti-reflux valves, drug elution and spontaneous biodegradability. These aspects and their clinical implications are reviewed and discussed. PMID:25231201

  12. Mucin-hypersecreting intraductal neoplasms of the pancreas: A precursor to cystic pancreatic malignancies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James A Madura; Eric A Wiebke; Thomas J Howard; Oscar W Cummings; Meredith T Hull; Stuart Sherman; Glen A Lehman

    1997-01-01

    Background. Mucin-hypersecreting intraductal pancreatic neoplasms were first described in 1982 and have been observed in increasing numbers since. They are observed primarily by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and are characterized by an intraductal papillary neoplasm that secretes thick mucin, causing pancreatic duct dilatation and obstructive pancreatitis.Methods. Twenty patients are presented, 14 male and six female, with an average age of

  13. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  14. Review of pancreatic trauma.

    PubMed Central

    Glancy, K E

    1989-01-01

    In reviewing the literature on pancreatic trauma (1,984 cases), I found that it resulted from penetrating trauma in 73% and blunt trauma in 27% of cases. Associated injuries were common (average 3.0 per patient). Increased mortality was associated with shotgun wounds, an increasing number of associated injuries, the proximity of the injury to the head of the pancreas, preoperative shock, and massive hemorrhage. High mortality was found for total pancreatectomy, duct reanastomosis, and lack of surgical treatment, with lower mortality for Roux-en-Y anastomoses, suture and drainage, distal pancreatectomy, and duodenal exclusion and diverticulization techniques. Most patients required drainage only. The preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is difficult, with the diagnosis usually made during surgical repair for associated injuries. Blood studies such as amylase levels, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, and plain radiographs are not reliable. Computed tomographic scanning may be superior, but data are limited. PMID:2669347

  15. Development of the islets, exocrine pancreas, and related ducts in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Pisces: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Morrison, Carol M; Pohajdak, Bill; Tam, Janet; Wright, James R

    2004-09-01

    Pancreatic development and the relationship of the islets with the pancreatic, hepatic, and bile ducts were studied in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, from hatching to the onset of maturity at 7 months. The number of islets formed during development was counted, using either serial sections or dithizone staining of isolated islets. There was a general increase in islet number with both age and size. Tilapia housed in individual tanks grew more quickly and had more islets than siblings of the same age left in crowded conditions. The pancreas is a compact organ in early development, and at 1 day posthatch (dph) a single principal islet, positive for all hormones tested (insulin, SST-14, SST-28, glucagon, and PYY), is partially surrounded by exocrine pancreas. However, the exocrine pancreas becomes more disseminated in older fish, following blood vessels along the mesenteries and entering the liver to form a hepatopancreas. The epithelium of the pancreatic duct system from the intercalated ducts to the main duct entering the duodenum was positive for glucagon and SST-14 in 8 and 16 dph tilapia. Individual insulin-immunopositive cells were found in one specimen. At this early stage in development, therefore, the pancreatic duct epithelial cells appear to be pluripotent and may give rise to the small islets found near the pancreatic ducts in 16-37 dph tilapia. Glucagon, SST-14, and some PPY-positive enteroendocrine cells were present in the intestine of the 8 dph larva and in the first part of the intestine of the 16 dph juvenile. Glucagon and SST-14-positive inclusions were found in the apical cytoplasm of the mid-gut epithelium of the 16 dph tilapia. These hormones may have been absorbed from the gut lumen, since they are produced in both the pancreatic ducts and the enteroendocrine cells. At least three hepatic ducts join the cystic duct to form the bile duct, which runs alongside the pancreatic duct to the duodenum. PMID:15281064

  16. Groove pancreatitis: a brief review of a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    DeSouza, Karyn; Nodit, Laurentia

    2015-03-01

    Groove pancreatitis is an uncommon, yet well-described, type of focal chronic pancreatitis, affecting "the groove"-the area between the head of the pancreas, the duodenum, and the common bile duct. Men aged 40 to 50 years are most commonly affected, with a history of alcohol abuse frequently disclosed. Clinical manifestations are similar to other forms of chronic pancreatitis, and vomiting secondary to duodenal stenosis is the main feature. It is postulated that pancreatitis in the groove area arises from obstruction of pancreatic juices in the ductal system, causing fibrosis and stasis with resultant inflammation of surrounding structures. The minor papilla is frequently the anatomic area of preferential involvement. Groove pancreatitis poses diagnostic challenges, forming a "pseudotumor" that mimics pancreatic carcinoma. The distinction is important, although often impossible to make because of their similar presentation, with groove pancreatitis usually affecting younger patients. Most patients are successfully treated with pancreaticoduodenectomy when definitive pathologic diagnoses can be made. PMID:25724040

  17. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

  18. Chronic pancreatitis of the pancreatic remnant is an independent risk factor for pancreatic fistula after distal pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an ongoing debate about the best closure technique after distal pancreatectomy (DP). The aim of the closure is to prevent the formation of a clinically relevant post-operative pancreatic fistula (POPF). Stapler technique seems to be equal compared with hand-sewn closure of the remnant. For both techniques, a fistula rate of approximately 30% has been reported. Methods We retrospectively analyzed our DPs between 01/2000 and 12/2010. In all cases, the pancreatic duct was over sewn with a separately stitched ligation of the pancreatic duct (5*0 PDS) followed by a single-stitched hand-sewn closure of the residual pancreatic gland. The POPF was classified according to the criteria of the International Study Group for Pancreatic Fistula (ISGPF). Univariate and multivariate analyses of potential risk factors for the formation of POPF were performed. Indications for operations included cystic tumors (n = 53), neuroendocrine tumors (n = 27), adenocarcinoma (n = 22), chronic pancreatitis (n = 9), metastasis (n = 6), and others (n = 7). Results During the period, we performed 124 DPs (? = 74, ? = 50). The mean age was 57.5 years (18–82). The POPF rates according to the ISGPF criteria were: no fistula, 54.8% (n = 68); grade A, 24.2% (n = 30); grade B, 19.3% (n = 24); and grade C, 1.7% (n = 2). Therefore, in 21.0% (n = 26) of the cases, a clinically relevant pancreatic fistula occurred. The mean postoperative stay was significantly higher after grade B/C fistula (26.3 days) compared with no fistula/grade A fistula (13.7 days) (p < 0.05). The uni- and multivariate analyses showed chronic pancreatitis of the pancreatic remnant to be an independent risk factor for the development of POPF (p = 0.004 OR 7.09). Conclusion By using a standardized hand-sewn closure technique of the pancreatic remnant after DP with separately stitched ligation of the pancreatic duct, a comparably low fistula rate can be achieved. Signs of chronic pancreatitis of the pancreatic remnant may represent a risk factor for the development of a pancreatic fistula after DP and therefore an anastomosis of the remnant to the intestine should be considered. PMID:25127883

  19. [Stent, endovascular prosthesis, net or strut? What would British dentist Charles Stent (1807-1885) have to say on all this?].

    PubMed

    Lukenda, Josip; Biocina-Lukenda, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The word stent appears in the Index Medicus as of 1952, while in Croatian articles as of 1993. The origin of the word has been attributed to British dentist Charles. T. Stent (1807-1885), maker of the compound for dental impressions (Stent's compound). Viennese surgeon, Johannes F. S. Esser (1877-1946) used the compound in plastic surgery of the face calling it an eponym Stent's mould. During the 1950's, William H. ReMine and John H. Grindlay used Stent's principle for omentum lined plastic tubes in the bile duct of a dog. The development of today's vascular stents began in 1912 when French Nobel Prize winner Alexis Carrel (1873-1944) implanted glass tubes in the arteries of dogs. The first metal spirals were implanted in the arteries of dogs by Charles T. Dotter (1920-1985), while the first stents in human arteries were implanted by French doctors Ulrich Sigwart and Jacques Puel in Toulouse in 1986. Some authors claim that the origin of the word stent is associated with the Scotish word stynt or stent, meaning stretched out river fishing nets. PMID:19348354

  20. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence K. Gates

    1999-01-01

    Opinion statement  The term “hereditary pancreatitis,” as it is currently used and understood, should probably be amended to “autosomal dominant\\u000a hereditary pancreatitis.” The recent discovery of the association between minor variants of the CFTR gene and chronic pancreatitis\\u000a without significant pulmonary pathology has introduced the concept of autosomal recessive hereditary pancreatitis. The autosomal\\u000a dominant form is relatively rare. It is characterized

  1. Ducts isolated from the pancreas of CFTR-null mice secrete fluid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Pascua; Mónica García; M. Paz Fernández-Salazar; M. Pilar Hernández-Lorenzo; José J. Calvo; William H. Colledge; R. Maynard Case; Martin C. Steward; José I. San Román

    2009-01-01

    The pancreatic pathology in cystic fibrosis (CF) is normally attributed to the failure of ductal fluid secretion resulting\\u000a from the lack of functional CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). However, murine models of CF show little or no\\u000a pancreatic pathology. To resolve this dichotomy we analysed the transport mechanisms involved in fluid and electrolyte secretion\\u000a by pancreatic ducts isolated from CFTR-null

  2. Ducted turbine theory with right angled ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren-Gow, S.; Jamieson, P.; Graham, J. M. R.

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the use of an inviscid approach to model a ducted turbine - also known as a diffuser augmented turbine - and a comparison of results with a particular one-dimensional theory. The aim of the investigation was to gain a better understanding of the relationship between a real duct and the ideal diffuser, which is a concept that is developed in the theory. A range of right angled ducts, which have a rim for a 90° exit angle, were modelled. As a result, the performance of right angled ducts has been characterised in inviscid flow. It was concluded that right angled ducts cannot match the performance of their associated ideal diffuser and that the optimum rotor loading for these turbines varies with the duct dimensions.

  3. Duct joining system

    DOEpatents

    Proctor, John P. (44 Glen Dr., Fairfax, CA 94930); deKieffer, Robert C. (Boulder, CO)

    2001-01-01

    A duct joining system for providing an air-tight seal and mechanical connection for ducts and fittings is disclosed. The duct joining system includes a flexible gasket affixed to a male end of a duct or fitting. The flexible gasket is affixed at an angle relative to normal of the male end of the duct. The female end of the other duct includes a raised bead in which the flexible gasket is seated when the ducts are properly joined. The angled flexible gasket seated in the raised bead forms an air-tight seal as well as fastens or locks the male end to the female end. Alternatively, when a flexible duct is used, a band clamp with a raised bead is clamped over the female end of the flexible duct and over the male end of a fitting to provide an air tight seal and fastened connection.

  4. Duct Joining System

    DOEpatents

    Proctor, John P. (Fairfax, CA)

    2001-02-27

    A duct joining system for providing an air-tight seal and mechanical connection for ducts and fittings is disclosed. The duct joining system includes a flexible gasket affixed to a male end of a duct or fitting. The flexible gasket is affixed at an angle relative to normal of the male end of the duct. The female end of the other duct includes a raised bead in which the flexible gasket is seated when the ducts are properly joined. The angled flexible gasket seated in the raised bead forms an air-tight seal as well as fastens or locks the male end to the female end. Alternatively, when a flexible duct is used, a band clamp with a raised bead is clamped over the female end of the flexible duct and over the male end of a fitting to provide an air tight seal and fastened connection.

  5. Prospective randomized trial comparing Tannenbaum Teflon and standard polyethylene stents in distal malignant biliary stenosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vittorio Terruzzi; Umberto Comin; Federico De Grazia; Gian Luigi Toti; Alessandro Zambelli; Sandro Beretta; Giorgio Minoli

    2000-01-01

    Background:  Our aim was to compare the clinical efficacy of the Tannenbaum (TB) biliary prostheses, a recently designed Teflon stent without side holes, with the Cotton-Huibregtse (CH) polyethylene stent. Methods:  Fifty-seven patients (26 men, mean age 75.5 years) with unresectable malignant tumors and distal biliary stenosis were included (38 pancreatic head cancer, 17 cholangiocarcinoma, 2 ampullary cancer). Patients were prospectively

  6. Chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review We review selected important clinical observations reported in 2012. Recent findings Celiac disease is a risk factor for pancreatitis. Patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis likely have chronic pancreatitis, do not benefit from pancreatic sphincterotomy, and may not benefit from biliary sphincterotomy. Analysis of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) images with an artificial neural network (ANN) program may improve chronic pancreatitis diagnosis compared with clinical interpretation of images. In a multicenter, randomized controlled trial of chronic pancreatitis patients, 90 000 USP U of pancreatin with meals decreased fat malabsorption compared with placebo. Detection of visceral pain in chronic pancreatitis predicts pain relief from various treatments, but nonvisceral pain due to altered central pain processing may respond to agents such as pregabalin. Predictors of surgical pain relief include onset of symptoms less than 3 years and preoperatively no opioid use and less than five endoscopic procedures. Total pancreatectomy for presumed painful chronic pancreatitis remains controversial. Summary Celiacs are at risk for pancreatitis. The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis may be enhanced by ANN analysis of EUS imaging. Treatment of fat malabsorption requires 90 000 USP U of lipase with meals. Relief of pain from organ directed treatment of chronic pancreatitis may depend upon timing of interventions and whether pain is visceral or nonvisceral. PMID:23852141

  7. Duct to islet-cell differentiation and islet growth in the pancreas of duct-ligated adult rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. N. Wang; G. Klöppel; L. Bouwens

    1995-01-01

    Summary  We investigated the growth of islet beta and alpha cells in adult rats which had undergone partial pancreatic duct ligation. Whereas the non-ligated head portion of the pancreas remained unaffected in terms of histology and cell population dynamics, the ligated tail part of the pancreas showed pronounced changes in histology and cell growth. These changes included replacement of exocrine acini

  8. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) refers to a clinical entity characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis which occurs on more than one occasion. Recurrence of pancreatitis generally occurs in a setting of normal morpho-functional gland, however, an established chronic disease may be found either on the occasion of the first episode of pancreatitis or during the follow-up. The aetiology of ARP can be identified in the majority of patients. Most common causes include common bile duct stones or sludge and bile crystals; sphincter of oddi dysfunction; anatomical ductal variants interfering with pancreatic juice outflow; obstruction of the main pancreatic duct or pancreatico-biliary junction; genetic mutations; alcohol consumption. However, despite diagnostic technologies, the aetiology of ARP still remains unknown in up to 30% of cases: in these cases the term “idiopathic” is used. Because occult bile stone disease and sphincter of oddi dysfunction account for the majority of cases, cholecystectomy, and eventually the endoscopic biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy are curative in most of cases. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy appeared to be a curative procedure per se in about 80% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid oral treatment alone has also been reported effective for treatment of biliary sludge. In uncertain cases toxin botulin injection may help in identifying some sphincter of oddi dysfunction, but this treatment is not widely used. In the last twenty years, pancreatic endotherapy has been proven effective in cases of recurrent pancreatitis depending on pancreatic ductal obstruction, independently from the cause of obstruction, and has been widely used instead of more aggressive approaches. PMID:25493002

  9. Elevated DNA damage response in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Osterman, Michael; Kathawa, Deion; Liu, Diangang; Guo, Huan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Mo; Yu, Xiaochun; Li, Fei

    2014-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and intractable human malignant tumors and a leading cause of cancer-related death across the world, with incidence equaling mortality. Because of the extremely high malignance, this disease is usually diagnosed at its advanced stage and recurs even after surgical excision. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is generally thought to arise from pathological changes of pancreatic duct, and the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma accounts for more than 90 % of malignant neoplasms of the pancreas. To date, scientists have revealed several risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including smoking, family history, and aging. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Meanwhile, more mutations of DNA damage response factors have been identified in familial pancreatic cancers, implying a potential link between DNA damage and pancreatic cancer. DNA damage is a recurring phenomenon in our bodies which could be induced by exogenous agents and endogenous metabolism. Accumulated DNA lesions cause genomic instability which eventually results in tumorigenesis. In this study, we showed obvious DNA damages existed in human pancreatic cancer, which activated DNA damage response and the DNA repair pathway including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, DNA-PK, CHK1, and CHK2. The persistent DNA damage in pancreatic tissue may be the source for its tumorigenesis. PMID:25002126

  10. Enteral stenting for gastric outlet obstruction and afferent limb syndrome following pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Wilson T.; Fehmi, Syed M.; Lowy, Andrew M.; Savides, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstruction of the afferent or efferent limbs of a gastrojejunal anastomosis is a potential complication after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) resulting in either gastric outlet obstruction or afferent limb syndrome. The use of self-expanding metal stents for the management of anastomotic strictures after resection of pancreatic cancer has not been well studied. We present four such cases and review published data regarding this population. Methods Retrospective chart review and literature search. Outcomes were summarized with descriptive statistics. Results At our institution, 4 patients underwent metal stent placement for gastrojejunal obstruction after PD for pancreatic cancer. Enteral stents were placed in two patients across the afferent limb, in one patient across the efferent limb, and in another patient across both limbs. Similar cases in the literature revealed that the anastomotic stricture was malignant in 26 of 27 cases. Clinical improvement occurred in 88%. Afferent limb syndrome was successfully treated in 5 of 6 cases. Median survival was 3.5 months after stent placement. Conclusions Effective palliation of both gastric outlet obstruction and afferent limb syndrome after PD can be provided with enteral stenting. Gastrojejunal strictures after PD for pancreatic cancer are usually malignant with median survival of 3.5 months after stent placement. PMID:25332208

  11. Bile Duct Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... carry the bile to your small intestine. Different diseases can block the bile ducts and cause a ... liver failure. A rare form of bile duct disease called biliary atresia occurs in infants. It is ...

  12. Management of gallstone pancreatitis during pregnancy and the postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Block, P; Kelly, T R

    1989-05-01

    In a 22 year study, 21 women had acute pancreatitis develop during pregnancy (11 women) or within six weeks post partum (ten women). Gallstones were the cause of the pancreatitis in all. Operation during the acute attack of pancreatitis was required in only two. Acute pancreatitis subsided in the remaining 19 patients; they were operated upon during the second trimester or the early postpartum period. During pregnancy, surgical treatment for gallstone pancreatitis should consist of cholecystectomy and exploration of the common bile duct without operative cholangiography. During the postpartum period, operative cholangiography is used to determine whether or not exploration of the common bile duct is necessary. Acute pancreatitis associated with pregnancy is "gallstone" pancreatitis; there is no evidence that pregnancy is a specific etiologic factor in pancreatitis. As opposed to nonoperative treatment of symptomatic gallstone pancreatitis in pregnancy, which is accompanied by maternal morbidity or fetal mortality, surgical treatment during the optimal time of the second trimester or early postpartum period was associated with no maternal morbidity or fetal mortality and no recurrent pancreatitis. PMID:2711296

  13. Transcystic Approach to Laparoscopic Common Bile Duct Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Zhewei; Huang, Xia; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: One-stage laparoscopic management for common bile duct stones in patients with gallbladder stones has gained wide acceptance. We developed a novel technique using a transcystic approach for common bile duct exploration as an alternative to the existing procedures. Methods: From April 2010 to June 2012, 9 consecutive patients diagnosed with cholelithiasis and common bile duct stones were enrolled in this study. The main inclusion criteria included no upper abdominal surgical history and the presence of a stone measuring <5 mm. After the gallbladder was dissected free from the liver connections in a retrograde fashion, the fundus of the gallbladder was extracted via the port incision in the right epigastrium. The choledochoscope was inserted into the gallbladder through the small opening in the fundus of the gallbladder extracorporeally and was advanced toward the common bile duct via the cystic duct under the guidance of both laparoscopic imaging and endoscopic imaging. After stones were retrieved under direct choledochoscopic vision, a drainage tube was placed in the subhepatic space. Results: Of 9 patients, 7 had successful transcystic common bile duct stone clearance. A narrow cystic duct and the unfavorable anatomy of the junction of the cystic duct and common bile duct resulted in losing access to the common bile duct. No bile leakage, hemobilia, or pancreatitis occurred. Wound infection occurred in 2 patients. Transient epigastric colic pain occurred in 2 patients and was relieved by use of anisodamine. A transient increase in the amylase level was observed in 3 patients. Short-term follow-up did not show any recurrence of common bile duct stones. Conclusion: Our novel transcystic approach to laparoscopic common bile duct exploration is feasible and efficient. PMID:25516702

  14. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Home Cancers Selected for Study Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Last Updated: May 15, 2013 What is pancreatic cancer?Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic cancer, making up more than

  15. Utility of Stent-Grafts in Treatment of Porto-Biliary Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Peynircioglu, Bora; Cwikiel, Wojciech [University of Michigan Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States)], E-mail: cwikiel@med.umich.edu

    2006-12-15

    A porto-biliary fistula causing hemobilia is a known complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). We present two patients with hemobilia secondary to porto-biliary fistula, treated successfully by percutaneous placement of stent-grafts. In one case, the stent-graft was placed in the bile duct, and in the other case, it was placed in the intrahepatic portal vein branch. Hemobilia stopped and there were no complications except a small area of hepatic infarction, distal to the stent-graft in the portal vein.

  16. Placement of 125I seed strands and stents for a type IV Klatskin tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Yang, Zheng-Qiang; Shi, Hai-Bin; Liu, Shen; Zhou, Wei-Zhong; Zhao, Lin-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report a new technique that consists of placing two 125I seed strands and two stents in the right and left intrahepatic bile ducts for the treatment of hilar cholangiocarcinoma. A 75-year-old man presented with jaundice and was diagnosed with Bismuth type IV Klatskin tumor. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation and a soft tissue mass in the hepatic hilum. Because curative surgical resection was not possible, we placed 125I seed strands and stents in the right and left intrahepatic bile ducts. Three months later, abdominal CT showed less intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation than before the procedure. This technique was feasible and could be considered for the treatment of patients with Bismuth type IV tumors. PMID:25574114

  17. Materials for metallic stents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takao Hanawa

    2009-01-01

    Stents are expandable tubes of metallic mesh that were developed to address the negative sequelae of balloon angioplasty and\\u000a are currently used in cardiovascular medicine. In this review, the use of particular metals to make stents is discussed from\\u000a the viewpoint of materials engineering. The properties and characteristics of metals used for stents, such as stainless steels,\\u000a nickel-titanium alloys, tantalum,

  18. Technique of reintervention for stent dysfunction in patients with malignant hilar biliary stricture.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yoshinobu; Ishida, Yusuke; Ushijima, Tomoyuki; Sugiyama, Gen; Sata, Michio

    2013-05-01

    At present, the endoscopic approach is the most commonly adopted method for stenting in patients with unresectable malignant hilar biliary stricture. This procedure is important, as it determines the quality of life and prognosis of the patient. Regarding the quality of the stent material, self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) are expected to show longer-term stent patency than plastic stents (PS), and their use as devices of first choice has been increasing. However, complications such as stent occlusion due to tumor ingrowth or biliary sludge formation occur at a considerably high frequency, necessitating reintervention in a considerable number of patients. In the case of dysfunction of an implanted PS, the stent is removed, and the lumen of the bile duct is cleaned, followed by placement of a new stent. In the event of dysfunction of a SEMS, cleaning of the lumen of the SEMS and placement of a second stent (PS is preferable) are carried out. Nevertheless, the results have not been entirely gratifying. Development of SEMS or PS suited to multidisciplinary treatment that would enable uncomplicated reintervention is anticipated. PMID:23617657

  19. Outcomes of nonresected main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Daudé, Mathieu; Muscari, Fabrice; Buscail, Camille; Carrère, Nicolas; Otal, Philippe; Selves, Janick; Buscail, Louis; Bournet, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare characteristics and outcomes of resected and nonresected main-duct and mixed intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas (IPMN). METHODS: Over a 14-year period, 50 patients who did not undergo surgery for resectable main-duct or mixed IPMN, for reasons of precluding comorbidities, age and/or refusal, were compared with 74 patients who underwent resection to assess differences in rates of survival, recurrence/occurrence of malignancy, and prognostic factors. All study participants had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct by ? 5 mm, with or without dilatation of the branch ducts. Some of the nonsurgical patients showed evidence of mucus upon perendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic ultrasound and/or after fine needle aspiration. For the surgical patients, pathologic analysis of resected specimens confirmed a diagnosis of IPMN with involvement of the main pancreatic duct or of both branch ducts as well as the main pancreatic duct. Clinical and biologic follow-ups were conducted for all patients at least annually, through hospitalization or consultation every six months during the first year of follow-up, together with abdominal imaging analysis (magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography or computed tomography) and, if necessary, endoscopic ultrasound with or without fine needle aspiration. RESULTS: The overall five-year survival rate of patients who underwent resection was significantly greater than that for the nonsurgical patients (74% vs 58%; P = 0.019). The parameters of age (< 70 years) and absence of a nodule were associated with better survival (P < 0.05); however, the parameters of main pancreatic duct diameter > 10 mm, branch duct diameter > 30 mm, or presence of extra pancreatic cancers did not significantly influence the prognosis. In the nonsurgical patients, pancreatic malignancy occurred in 36% of cases within a mean time of 33 mo (median: 29 mo; range: 8-141 mo). Comparison of the nonsurgical patients who experienced disease progression with those who did not progress showed no significant differences in age, sex, symptoms, subtype of IPMN, or follow-up period; only the size of the main pancreatic duct was significantly different between these two sub-groups, with the nonsurgical patients who experienced progression showing a greater diameter at the time of diagnosis (> 10 mm). CONCLUSION: Patients unfit for surgery have a 36% greater risk of developing pancreatic malignancy of the main-duct or mixed IPMN within a median of 2.5 years.

  20. Materials for metallic stents.

    PubMed

    Hanawa, Takao

    2009-01-01

    Stents are expandable tubes of metallic mesh that were developed to address the negative sequelae of balloon angioplasty and are currently used in cardiovascular medicine. In this review, the use of particular metals to make stents is discussed from the viewpoint of materials engineering. The properties and characteristics of metals used for stents, such as stainless steels, nickel-titanium alloys, tantalum, cobalt-chromium alloys, and magnesium alloys, are explained. In addition, problems and disadvantages related to metallic stents and their possible solutions are given. PMID:19536623

  1. Polyurethane-Covered Nitinol Strecker Stents as Primary Palliative Treatment of Malignant Biliary Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kanasaki, Shuzo; Furukawa, Akira [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Otsu Shiga, 520-2192 (Japan); Kane, Teruyuki [Department of Internal Medicine, Yujinkai Yamazaki Hospital, Takegahana-cho 80, Hikone Shiga (Japan); Murata, Kiyoshi [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Otsu Shiga, 520-2192 (Japan)

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of the polyurethane-covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the treatment of patients with malignant biliary obstruction.Methods: Twenty-three covered stents produced by us were placed in 18 patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Jaundice was caused by cholangiocarcinoma (n = 5), pancreatic cancer (n = 6), gallbladder cancer (n = 4), metastatic lymph nodes (n = 2), and tumor of the papilla (n 1).Results: The mean patency period of the stents was 37.5 weeks (5-106 weeks). Recurrent obstructive jaundice occurred in two patients (11%). Adequate biliary drainage over 50 weeks or until death was achieved in 17 of 18 patients (94.4%). Late cholangitis was observed in two patients whose stents bridged the ampulla of Vater. Other late severe complications were not encountered.Conclusion: Although more study is necessary, our results suggest the clinical efficacy of our covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the management of obstructive jaundice caused by malignant diseases.

  2. Endovascular Exclusion of Visceral Artery Aneurysms with Stent-Grafts: Technique and Long-Term Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto, E-mail: albertorebonato@libero.it; Greco, Laura; Citone, Michele; David, Vincenzo [S. Andrea, University Hospital 'La Sapienza', Interventional Radiology Unit, Radiology Department (Italy)

    2008-01-15

    This paper describes four cases of visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs) successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafts and discusses the endovascular approach to VAAs and the long-term results. Four balloon expandable stent-grafts were used to treat three splenic artery aneurysms and one bleeding common hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm. The percutaneous access site and the materials were chosen on the basis of CT angiography findings. In all cases the aneurysms were successfully excluded. In one case a splenic infarction occurred, with nonrelevant clinical findings. At 16- to 24-month follow-up three patients had patent stents and complete exclusion and shrinkage of the aneurysms. One patient died due to pancreatitis and sepsis, 16 days after successful stenting and exclusion of a bleeding pseudoaneurysm. We conclude that endovascular treatment using covered stent-grafts is a valid therapeutic option for VAAs. Multislice CT preoperative study helps in planning stent-graft positioning.

  3. Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase regulates pancreatic ductal, but not ??cell, regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Cheng?Ho; Miller, Amber; Panopoulos, Andreas; Hao, Ergeng; Margolis, Robert; Terskikh, Alexey; Levine, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) is expressed in stem/progenitor cells in some adult tissues, where it has been implicated in diverse biological processes, including the control of cell proliferation. Here, we described studies on its role in adult pancreatic regeneration in response to injury induced by duct ligation and ??cell ablation. MELK expression was studied using transgenic mice expressing GFP under the control of the MELK promoter, and the role of MELK was studied using transgenic mice deleted in the MELK kinase domain. Pancreatic damage was initiated using duct ligation and chemical beta?cell ablation. By tracing MELK expression using a MELK promoter?GFP transgene, we determined that expression was extremely low in the normal pancreas. However, following duct ligation and ??cell ablation, it became highly expressed in pancreatic ductal cells while remaining weakly expressed in ??cells and ?? cells. In a mutant mouse in which the MELK kinase domain was deleted, there was no effect on pancreatic development. There was no apparent effect on islet regeneration, either. However, following duct ligation there was a dramatic increase in the number of small ducts, but no change in the total number of duct cells or duct cell proliferation. In vitro studies indicated that this was likely due to a defect in cell migration. These results implicate MELK in the control of the response of the pancreas to injury, specifically controlling cell migration in normal and transformed pancreatic duct cells. PMID:25194022

  4. Abstract In view of the evidence for a role for extracellu-lar ATP in both pancreatic endocrine and exocrine func-

    E-print Network

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    Abstract In view of the evidence for a role for extracellu- lar ATP in both pancreatic endocrine with age af- ter birth. In contrast, the greatest expression of P2Y1 in cells from the duct system endocrine and exo- crine functions. The pancreatic duct and acinar cells se- crete most of the fluid

  5. Pancreatic panniculitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick R Dahl; W. P Daniel Su; Kip C Cullimore; Charles H Dicken

    1995-01-01

    Background: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic disease.Objective: Our purpose was to study the clinical and histopathologic features of this disease.Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of 11 patients.Results: In five patients subcutaneous fat necrosis preceded the diagnosis of pancreatic disease by

  6. Palliative Percutaneous Jejunal Stent for Patients with Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Satoru; Ochi, Yasuo; Yasuda, Akira; Sakamoto, Masaki; Takahashi, Hideki; Akamo, Yoshimi; Takeyama, Hiromitsu

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal obstruction is a common preterminal event in patients with gastric and pancreatic cancer who often undergo palliative bypass surgery. Although endoscopic palliation with self-expandable metallic stents has emerged as a safe and effective alternative to surgery, experience with this technique remains limited. In particular, a proximal jejunal obstruction requires more technical expertise than a duodenal obstruction. Palliative treatment modalities include both surgical and nonsurgical approaches. In this report, we describe the successful placement of self-expandable metallic stents at the proximal jejunum using a combination of percutaneous endoscopic, intraoperative, and transstomal stenting. Usually endoscopy is not indicated in cases of proximal jejunal obstruction, but some cases may require palliative endoscopy instead of bypass operation. PMID:20651969

  7. A case of undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas mimicking main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN).

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yuichi; Nakamichi, Rei; Kamata, Noriko; Miyake, Hideo; Fujino, Masahiko; Itoh, Shigeki

    2015-03-01

    We report here a rare case of undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas mimicking main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. In an 80-year-old woman, an approximately 8-mm papillary mass was incidentally detected at the downstream edge of a dilatated main pancreatic duct lumen on CT and MRI. Main pancreatic duct dilatation in the pancreatic body and tail and parenchymal atrophy were observed in the upstream of the mass. Histopathologically, the tumor protruded into the downstream edge of the dilatated main pancreatic duct lumen in the pancreatic body. The tumor cells had highly atypical nuclei and abundant polymorphic structures, and showed positive staining for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, which led to the diagnosis of undifferentiated carcinoma. A total of 13 cases of undifferentiated carcinoma with intraductal tumor growth have been reported to date. The case report by Bergmann et al. has been the smallest in histopathological specimen, and the present case is the smallest in size detected by radiological images. Since early undifferentiated carcinoma of the pancreas can resemble those of main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm in cross-sectional images, we have to consider undifferentiated carcinoma in the differential diagnosis of the solitary and papillary mass with low contrast enhancement in early phase in the main pancreatic duct. PMID:25526684

  8. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  9. Endoscopic management of bile duct stones: residual bile duct stones after surgery, cholangitis, and "difficult stones".

    PubMed

    Karsenti, D

    2013-06-01

    Endoscopic treatment has become, according to the latest recommendations, the standard treatment for common bile duct stones (CBDS), although in certain situations, surgical clearance of the common duct at the time of laparoscopic cholecystectomy is still considered a possible alternative. The purpose of this article is not to compare endoscopic with surgical treatment of CBDS, but to describe the various techniques of endoscopic treatment, detailing their preferential indications and the various treatment options that must sometimes be considered when faced with "difficult calculi" of the CBD. The different techniques of lithotripsy and the role of biliary drainage with plastic or metallic stents will be detailed as well as papillary balloon dilatation and particularly the technique of sphincterotomy with macrodilatation of the sphincter of Oddi (SMSO), a recently described approach that has changed the strategy for endoscopic management of CBDS. Finally, the overall strategy for endoscopic management of CBDS, with description of different techniques, will be exposed. PMID:23817008

  10. Vascular Complications of Pancreatitis: Role of Interventional Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lopera, Jorge E.

    2012-01-01

    Major vascular complications related to pancreatitis can cause life-threatening hemorrhage and have to be dealt with as an emergency, utilizing a multidisciplinary approach of angiography, endoscopy or surgery. These may occur secondary to direct vascular injuries, which result in the formation of splanchnic pseudoaneurysms, gastrointestinal etiologies such as peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal varices, and post-operative bleeding related to pancreatic surgery. In this review article, we discuss the pathophysiologic mechanisms, diagnostic modalities, and treatment of pancreatic vascular complications, with a focus on the role of minimally-invasive interventional therapies such as angioembolization, endovascular stenting, and ultrasound-guided percutaneous thrombin injection in their management. PMID:22563287

  11. Prevention of Postendoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Pancreatitis: The Endoscopic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Song, Byeong Jun

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is the most frequent and distressing complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Many recent studies have reported the use of pharmacological agents to reduce post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP); however, the most effective agents have not been established. Reduction in the incidence of PEP in high-risk patients has been reported through specific cannulation techniques such as guide wire-assisted cannulation and the use of pancreatic stents. The present review focuses on ERCP techniques for the prevention of PEP. PMID:24944984

  12. Pancreatic and biliary secretion are both altered in cystic fibrosis pigs

    PubMed Central

    Giriyappa, Radhamma; Meyerholz, David K.; Griffin, Michelle; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Abu-El-Haija, Marwa; Stoltz, David A.; Ludwig, Paula; Pezzulo, Alejandro; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Taft, Peter; Welsh, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The pancreas, liver, and gallbladder are commonly involved in cystic fibrosis (CF), and acidic, dehydrated, and protein-rich secretions are characteristic findings. Pancreatic function studies in humans have been done by sampling the jejunal fluid. However, it has been difficult to separately study the function of pancreatic and biliary systems in humans with CF, because jejunal fluid contains a mixture of bile and pancreatic fluids. In contrast, pancreatic and biliary ducts open separately into the porcine intestine; therefore, biliary and pancreatic fluid can be individually analyzed in CF pigs. We studied newborn wild-type (WT) and CF pigs and found that CFTR was localized to the pancreatic ducts. We collected bile and pancreatic fluid and analyzed pancreatic enzymes with activity assays and immunoblot. Pancreatic enzyme expression was significantly decreased in CF compared with WT pigs. The volume and pH of pancreatic fluid were significantly lower and protein concentration was >5-fold higher in CF pigs. Secretin stimulation increased pancreatic fluid volume and pH in WT, but not CF, pigs. Baseline bile volume did not differ between WT and CF pigs, but volume did not increase in response to secretin in CF pigs. Bile pH was lower and protein concentration was twofold higher in CF pigs. These results indicate that pancreatic and biliary secretions are altered in CF pigs. Abnormal pancreatic and biliary secretion in CF may have important implications in disease pathogenesis. PMID:22936270

  13. PANCREATIC CANCER 14. PANCREATIC CANCER

    E-print Network

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    common cancer in Ireland, accounting for 2.6% of all malignant neoplasms, excluding non-melanoma skin.7% 1.8% % of all new cancer cases excluding non-melanoma skin cancer 2.6% 2.5% 2.8% 2.5% 2.3% 2PANCREATIC CANCER 125 14. PANCREATIC CANCER 14.1. SUMMARY Pancreatic cancer was the eleventh most

  14. Lactoferrin in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chun Xiang Jin; Tetsuo Hayakawa; Motoji Kitagawa; Hiroshi Ishiguro

    2009-01-01

    Summary The present review is focused on the clinical significance of lactoferrin in pancreatic secretions and stone formation in chronic pancreatitis, and of serum anti-lactoferrin antibody in autoimmune pancreatitis. Lactoferrin secretion is increased in pancreatic secretions in calcified and non-calcified chronic pancreatitis. Lactoferrin, pancreatic stone protein and trypsin are present in pancreatic stones. We cannot conclude which protein is more

  15. Biliary Tree Stem Cells, Precursors to Pancreatic Committed Progenitors: Evidence for Possible Life-long Pancreatic Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunfang; Lanzoni, Giacomo; Carpino, Guido; Cui, Cai-Bin; Dominguez-Bendala, Juan; Wauthier, Eliane; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Oikawa, Tsunekazu; Pileggi, Antonello; Gerber, David; Furth, Mark E.; Alvaro, Domenico; Gaudio, Eugenio; Inverardi, Luca; Reid, Lola M.

    2013-01-01

    Peribiliary glands (PBGs) in bile duct walls, and pancreatic duct glands (PDGs) associated with pancreatic ducts, in humans of all ages, contain a continuous, ramifying network of cells in overlapping maturational lineages. We show that proximal (PBGs)-to-distal (PDGs) maturational lineages start near the duodenum with cells expressing markers of pluripotency (NANOG,OCT4,SOX2), proliferation (Ki67), self-replication (SALL4), and early hepato-pancreatic commitment (SOX9,SOX17,PDX1,LGR5), transitioning to PDG cells with no expression of pluripotency or self-replication markers, maintenance of pancreatic genes (PDX1), and expression of markers of pancreatic endocrine maturation (NGN3,MUC6,insulin). Radial-axis lineages start in PBGs near the ducts’ fibromuscular layers with stem cells and end at the ducts’ lumens with cells devoid of stem cell traits and positive for pancreatic endocrine genes. Biliary tree-derived cells behaved as stem cells in culture under expansion conditions, culture plastic and serum-free Kubota’s Medium, proliferating for months as undifferentiated cells, whereas pancreas-derived cells underwent only ?8-10 divisions, then partially differentiated towards an islet fate. Biliary tree-derived cells proved precursors of pancreas’ committed progenitors. Both could be driven by 3-dimensional conditions, islet-derived matrix components and a serum-free, hormonally defined medium for an islet fate (HDM-P), to form spheroids with ultrastructural, electrophysiological and functional characteristics of neoislets, including glucose regulatability. Implantation of these neoislets into epididymal fat pads of immuno-compromised mice, chemically rendered diabetic, resulted in secretion of human C-peptide, regulatable by glucose, and able to alleviate hyperglycemia in hosts. The biliary tree-derived stem cells and their connections to pancreatic committed progenitors constitute a biological framework for life-long pancreatic organogenesis. PMID:23847135

  16. Biliary tree stem cells, precursors to pancreatic committed progenitors: evidence for possible life-long pancreatic organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunfang; Lanzoni, Giacomo; Carpino, Guido; Cui, Cai-Bin; Dominguez-Bendala, Juan; Wauthier, Eliane; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Oikawa, Tsunekazu; Pileggi, Antonello; Gerber, David; Furth, Mark E; Alvaro, Domenico; Gaudio, Eugenio; Inverardi, Luca; Reid, Lola M

    2013-09-01

    Peribiliary glands (PBGs) in bile duct walls, and pancreatic duct glands (PDGs) associated with pancreatic ducts, in humans of all ages, contain a continuous, ramifying network of cells in overlapping maturational lineages. We show that proximal (PBGs)-to-distal (PDGs) maturational lineages start near the duodenum with cells expressing markers of pluripotency (NANOG, OCT4, and SOX2), proliferation (Ki67), self-replication (SALL4), and early hepato-pancreatic commitment (SOX9, SOX17, PDX1, and LGR5), transitioning to PDG cells with no expression of pluripotency or self-replication markers, maintenance of pancreatic genes (PDX1), and expression of markers of pancreatic endocrine maturation (NGN3, MUC6, and insulin). Radial-axis lineages start in PBGs near the ducts' fibromuscular layers with stem cells and end at the ducts' lumens with cells devoid of stem cell traits and positive for pancreatic endocrine genes. Biliary tree-derived cells behaved as stem cells in culture under expansion conditions, culture plastic and serum-free Kubota's Medium, proliferating for months as undifferentiated cells, whereas pancreas-derived cells underwent only approximately 8-10 divisions, then partially differentiated towards an islet fate. Biliary tree-derived cells proved precursors of pancreas' committed progenitors. Both could be driven by three-dimensional conditions, islet-derived matrix components and a serum-free, hormonally defined medium for an islet fate (HDM-P), to form spheroids with ultrastructural, electrophysiological and functional characteristics of neoislets, including glucose regulatability. Implantation of these neoislets into epididymal fat pads of immunocompromised mice, chemically rendered diabetic, resulted in secretion of human C-peptide, regulatable by glucose, and able to alleviate hyperglycemia in hosts. The biliary tree-derived stem cells and their connections to pancreatic committed progenitors constitute a biological framework for life-long pancreatic organogenesis. PMID:23847135

  17. Pyogenic pancreatic abscess mimicking pancreatic neoplasm: a four-case series.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Seo, Eui Keun; Kang, Eun Seok; Kim, Keun Mo; Oh, Young Min; Cho, Byung Ha; Kim, Hyung Woo; Ji, Myoung Jin; Jeong, Ji Won; Park, Seon Mee

    2015-04-25

    A pyogenic pancreatic abscess mimicking pancreatic neoplasm in the absence of acute pancreatitis is rare. We report four patients who each presented with a pancreatic mass at the pancreas head or body without acute pancreatitis. The presenting symptoms were abdominal pain, fever, or weight loss. Abdominal CT scans showed low-density round masses at the pancreas head or body with/without lymphadenopathy. In each case, a PET-CT scan showed a mass with a high SUV, indicating possible malignancy. Comorbid diseases were identified in all patients: chronic pancreatitis and thrombus at the portal vein, penetrating duodenal ulcer, distal common bile duct stenosis, and diabetes mellitus. Diagnoses were performed by laparoscopic biopsy in two patients and via EUS fine needle aspiration in one patient. One patient revealed a multifocal microabscess at the pancreatic head caused by a deep-penetrating duodenal ulcer. He was treated with antibiotics and a proton-pump inhibitor. The clinical symptoms and pancreatic images of all the patients were improved using conservative management. Infective causes should be considered for a pancreatic mass mimicking malignancy. PMID:25896161

  18. Stent intussusception after thromboaspiration through a platinum chrome stent: a particular case of longitudinal stent deformation.

    PubMed

    Mila, Rafael; Vignolo, Gustavo; Trujillo, Pedro

    2014-04-12

    The need to improve stent deliverability has led to the development of thinner and more flexible stents. However, there is concern about decreased longitudinal strength. The number of longitudinal stent deformation reports has dramatically increased. We report a case of stent longitudinal deformation after thromboaspiration through a new generation platinum chrome bare metal stent. Images show an "intussusception effect," an extreme form of the previously described "concertina deformation," as the mechanism of shortening. Since stent technology is constantly evolving, newer devices will probably be designed to have less susceptibility to longitudinal stent deformation. PMID:24729027

  19. Endoscopic management of difficult common bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Trikudanathan, Guru; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Parsi, Mansour A

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopy is widely accepted as the first treatment option in the management of bile duct stones. In this review we focus on the alternative endoscopic modalities for the management of difficult common bile duct stones. Most biliary stones can be removed with an extraction balloon, extraction basket or mechanical lithotripsy after endoscopic sphincterotomy. Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation with or without endoscopic sphincterotomy or mechanical lithotripsy has been shown to be effective for management of difficult to remove bile duct stones in selected patients. Ductal clearance can be safely achieved with peroral cholangioscopy guided laser or electrohydraulic lithotripsy in most cases where other endoscopic treatment modalities have failed. Biliary stenting may be an alternative treatment option for frail and elderly patients or those with serious co morbidities. PMID:23345939

  20. Differentiating Autoimmune Pancreatitis from Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma using Dual-phase Computed Tomography: An Inter-observer Study

    PubMed Central

    Zaheer, Atif; Singh, Vikesh K.; Akshintala, Venkata S.; Kawamoto, Satomi; Tsai, Salina D.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study features on dual phase CT that help differentiate autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) from pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA). Methods The CTs of 32 patients with AIP were matched with equal number of PA and independently evaluated by 3 radiologists who assigned a diagnosis of AIP, PA, or unsure. Interobserver agreement between radiologists was evaluated using kappa statistics. Results The mean accuracy for diagnosing AIP and PA was 68% and 83%, respectively. There was moderate agreement between radiologists (?: 0.58, p<0.0001). The most common findings for AIP: CBD stricture (63%), bile duct wall hyperenhancement (47%), and diffuse parenchymal enlargement (41%). The most common findings for PA: Focal mass (78%, ?: 0.58, p<0.0001) and pancreatic ductal dilatation (69%, ?: 0.7, p<0.0001). Findings helpful for diagnosing AIP were diffuse enlargement, parenchymal atrophy as well as absence of pancreatic duct dilatation and focal mass. Findings helpful for diagnosing PA were focal mass and pancreatic ductal dilatation. Misdiagnosis of PA in patients with AIP was due to focal mass, pancreatic duct dilatation and pancreatic atrophy and AIP in patients with PA was due to absence of atrophy, presence of diffuse enlargement and peripancreatic halo. Conclusion Diffuse enlargement, hypoenhancement and characteristic peripancreatic halo are strong indicators for a diagnosis of AIP. Radiologists demonstrated moderate agreement in distinguishing AIP from PA on the basis of CT imaging. PMID:24424563

  1. U.S. Food and Drug Administration and off-label use of expandable metal biliary stents within the peripheral vasculature.

    PubMed

    Yustein, Aron S; Schultz, Daniel; Neuland, Carolyn; Buckles, David S; Nipper, Joshua C; Stephenson, Rebecca A; Gonzalez, Gema

    2008-07-01

    Expandable metal stents are used to maintain the patency of compromised ducts, lumens, and vessels. As medical devices, there products are regulated by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). During the past several years, the FDA has become aware of the increasing prevalence of off-label use of expandable metal stents cleared for biliary use within the peripheral vasculature. The authors provide an overview of how the FDA regulates medical devices and expandable stents and summarize safety issues reported to the Agency with regard to the off-label use of these biliary stents. PMID:18672491

  2. Lightweight Valve Closes Duct Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournier, Walter L.; Burgy, N. Frank

    1991-01-01

    Expanding balloon serves as lightweight emergency valve to close wide duct. Uninflated balloon stored in housing of duct. Pad resting on burst diaphragm protects balloon from hot gases in duct. Once control system triggers valve, balloon inflates rapidly to block duct. Weighs much less than does conventional butterfly, hot-gas, or poppet valve capable of closing duct of equal diameter.

  3. Dual-phase CT findings of groove pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Zaheer, Atif; Haider, Maera; Kawamoto, Satomi; Hruban, Ralph H.; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Groove pancreatitis is a rare focal form of chronic pancreatitis that occurs in the pancreaticoduodenal groove between the major and minor papillae, duodenum and pancreatic head. Radiologic appearance and clinical presentation can result in suspicion of malignancy rendering pancreaticoduodenectomy inevitable. This study reports dual phase CT findings in a series of 12 patients with pathology proven groove pancreatitis. Materials and methods Retrospective review of preoperative CT findings in 12 patients with histologically proven groove pancreatitis after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Size, location, attenuation, presence of mass or cystic components in the pancreas, groove and duodenum, calcifications, duodenal stenosis and ductal changes were recorded. Clinical data, laboratory values, endoscopic ultrasonographic and histopathological findings were collected. Results Soft tissue thickening in the groove was seen in all patients. Pancreatic head, groove and duodenum were all involved in 75% patients. A discrete lesion in the pancreatic head was seen in half of the patients, most of which appeared hypodense on both arterial and venous phases. Cystic changes in pancreatic head were seen in 75% patients. Duodenal involvement was seen in 92% patients including wall thickening and cyst formation. The main pancreatic duct was dilated in 7 patients, with an abrupt cut off in 3 and a smooth tapering stricture in 4. Five patients had evidence of chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcifications. Conclusion Presence of mass or soft tissue thickening in the groove with cystic duodenal thickening is highly suggestive of groove pancreatitis. Recognizing common radiological features may help in diagnosis and reduce suspicion of malignancy. PMID:24935140

  4. Acute Pancreatitis after Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Hershberger, Richard C., E-mail: rihershberger@lumc.edu; Bornak, Arash; Aulivola, Bernadette; Mannava, Krishna [Loyola University Chicago Medical Center, Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: We describe a case of severe acute pancreatitis after percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) and review the literature for the occurrence of this complication. Materials and Methods: A 53-year-old man with a history of bilateral external iliac artery stent placement sought care for acute onset of lifestyle-limiting left claudication. Angiography confirmed left external iliac stent occlusion, and PMT with the AngioJet Xpeedior catheter (Possis Medical, Minneapolis MN) was performed. Results: After PMT of the occluded external iliac artery, a residual in-stent stenosis required the placement of a second iliac stent. The procedure was complicated by severe acute pancreatitis. Other causes of pancreatitis were eliminated during the patient's hospital stay. A literature review revealed nine cases of acute pancreatitis after PMT. Conclusion: Although rare, pancreatitis can be a devastating complication of PMT. The development of pancreatitis seems to be related to the products of extensive hemolysis triggering an inflammatory process. To prevent this complication, we recommend that close attention be paid to the duration and extent of PMT, thereby avoiding extensive hemolysis and subsequent complications.

  5. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided endoscopic treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts and walled-off necrosis: New technical developments

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Barbara; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2014-01-01

    In the last decades, the treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts and necrosis occurring in the clinical context of acute and chronic pancreatitis has shifted towards minimally invasive endoscopic interventions. Surgical procedures can be avoided in many cases by using endoscopically placed, Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided techniques and drainages. Endoscopic ultrasound enables the placement of transmural plastic and metal stents or nasocystic tubes for the drainage of peripancreatic fluid collections. The development of self-expanding metal stents and exchange free delivering systems have simplified the drainage of pancreatic fluid collections. This review will discuss available therapeutic techniques and new developments. PMID:25473173

  6. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided endoscopic treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts and walled-off necrosis: new technical developments.

    PubMed

    Braden, Barbara; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2014-11-21

    In the last decades, the treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts and necrosis occurring in the clinical context of acute and chronic pancreatitis has shifted towards minimally invasive endoscopic interventions. Surgical procedures can be avoided in many cases by using endoscopically placed, Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided techniques and drainages. Endoscopic ultrasound enables the placement of transmural plastic and metal stents or nasocystic tubes for the drainage of peripancreatic fluid collections. The development of self-expanding metal stents and exchange free delivering systems have simplified the drainage of pancreatic fluid collections. This review will discuss available therapeutic techniques and new developments. PMID:25473173

  7. Drug-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaodong; Wu, Tim; Robich, Michael P; Wang, Xingwei; Wu, Hao; Buchholz, Bryan; McCarthy, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is currently a leading cause of death worldwide. Drug-eluting stents (DESs) have been dominant for the treatment of CAD in the interventional cardiology world owing to their efficacy in significantly reducing restenosis. However, late stage stent thrombosis has become a major concern. Stent platform, drug delivery vehicle and type of drug are three parts of DES and each part affects the performance of the DES. Aiming to provide a clue for the design of future DES, this review focuses on the development of the three major components of DES and their roles in restenosis and thrombosis PMID:20827317

  8. Intraductal papillary-mucinous tumors of the pancreas: Clinicopathologic features, outcome, and nomenclature. Members of the Pancreas Clinic, and Pancreatic Surgeons of Mayo Clinic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    EV Loftus; BA Olivares-Pakzad; KP Batts; MC Adkins; DH Stephens; MG Sarr; EP DiMagno

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Intraductal papillary-mucinous tumor (IPMT) of the pancreatic ducts is increasingly recognized. This study investigated if clinical, imaging, or, histological features predicated outcome, formulated a treatment algorithm, and clarified relationships among IPMT, mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas (MCN), and chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: The medical records, radiographs, and pathological specimens of 15 patients with IPMT (dilated main pancreatic

  9. Type 1 Autoimmune Pancreatitis Can Transform into Chronic Pancreatitis: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study of 73 Japanese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Arakura, Norikazu; Ozaki, Yayoi; Watanabe, Takayuki; Ito, Tetsuya; Yoneda, Suguru; Maruyama, Masafumi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2013-01-01

    Some patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) form pancreatic stones suggestive of transformation into chronic pancreatitis (CP). The present study examined the underlying risk factors and mechanism of AIP progression to confirmed CP. We compared the clinical and laboratory parameters of subjects who progressed to confirmed CP with those of the subjucts who did not in a cohort of 73 type 1 AIP patients. A total of 16 (22%) AIP patients progressed to CP. Univariate analysis revealed that relapse was significantly more frequent in the progression group, and multivariate analysis indicated that pancreatic head swelling (OR 12.7, P = 0.023) and nonnarrowing of the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic body (OR 12.6, P = 0.001) were significant independent risk factors for progression to CP. Kaplan-Meier testing showed that the progression rate to CP was approximately 10% at 3 years and 30% at 10 years in total AIP patients and 30% at 3 years and 60% at 10 years in subjects with both risk factors. AIP with pancreatic head swelling and a history of relapse may cause pancreatic juice stagnation and nonnarrowing of the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic body, which can progress to advanced stage chronic pancreatitis. PMID:23762066

  10. What is the role of endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Avula, Haritha; Sherman, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) can have debilitating clinical course due to chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition and related complications. Medical, endoscopic and surgical treatment of CP should aim at control of symptoms, prevention of progression of the disease and correction of complications. Endoscopic management plays a specific role in carefully selected patients as primary interventional therapy when medical measures fail or in high-risk surgical candidates. Endotherapy for CP is utilized also as a bridge to surgery or to assess potential response to pancreatic surgery. In this review we address the role of endotherapy for the relief of obstruction of the pancreatic duct (PD) and bile duct, closure of PD leaks and drainage of pseudocysts in the setting of CP. In addition, endotherapy for relief of pancreatic pain by endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block for CP is discussed. PMID:21180616

  11. Adenomas of the common bile duct in familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Mao-Lin; Pan, Jun-Yong; Bai, Yan-Nan; Lai, Zhi-De; Chen, Zhong; Wang, Yao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or Gardner’s syndrome is often accompanied by adenomas of the stomach and duodenum. We experienced a case of adenomas of the common bile duct in a 40-year-old woman with FAP presenting with acute cholangitis. Only 8 cases of adenomas or adenocarcinoma of the common bile duct have been reported in the literature in patients with FAP or Gardner’s syndrome. Those patients presented with acute cholangitis or pancreatitis. Local excision or Whipple procedure may be the reasonable surgical option. PMID:25780319

  12. Advanced Duct Sealing Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2003-08-01

    Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have typically shown that these seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been testing sealant durability for several years. Typical duct tape (i.e. fabric backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) was found to fail more rapidly than all other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing of five UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (three cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The first test involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars, and sheet metal ''collar-to-plenum joints'' pressurized with 200 F (93 C) air. The second test consisted of baking duct tape specimens in a constant 212 F (100 C) oven following the UL 181B-FX ''Temperature Test'' requirements. Additional tests were also performed on only two tapes using sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints. Since an unsealed flexible duct joint can have a variable leakage depending on the positioning of the flexible duct core, the durability of the flexible duct joints could not be based on the 10% of unsealed leakage criteria. Nevertheless, the leakage of the sealed specimens prior to testing could be considered as a basis for a failure criteria. Visual inspection was also documented throughout the tests. The flexible duct core-to-collar joints were inspected monthly, while the sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints were inspected weekly. The baking test specimens were visually inspected weekly, and the durability was judged by the observed deterioration in terms of brittleness, cracking, flaking and blistering (the terminology used in the UL 181B-FX test procedure).

  13. Duct Tape Durability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2004-04-01

    Duct leakage is a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums, or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections, a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that taped seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been testing sealant durability for several years using accelerated test methods and found that typical duct tape (i.e., cloth-backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) fails more rapidly than other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing over two years for four UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (two cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The tests involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars. Periodic air leakage tests and visual inspection were used to document changes in sealant performance. After two years of testing, the flex-to-collar connections showed little change in air leakage, but substantial visual degradation from some products. A surprising experimental result was failure of most of the clamps used to mechanically fasten the connections. This indicates that the durability of clamps also need to be addressed ensure longevity of the duct connection. An accelerated test method developed during this study has been used as the basis for an ASTM standard (E2342-03).

  14. Mayo Clinic researchers decode origin of inflammation-driven pancreatic cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida have revealed the process by which chronic inflammation of the pancreas, pancreatitis, morphs into pancreatic cancer. They say their findings point to ways to identify pancreatitis patients at risk of pancreatic cancer and to potential drug therapies that might reverse the process. The study, published online in The Journal of Cell Biology, maps how inflammation pushes acinar cells in the pancreas — those that produce digestive enzymes — to transform into duct-like cells. As these cells change, they can acquire mutations that can result in further progression to pancreatic cancer.

  15. Pancreatic pseudocysts – when and how to treat?

    PubMed Central

    Aghdassi, Alexander A.; Mayerle, Julia; Kraft, Matthias; Sielenkämper, Andreas W.; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are a well-known complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis, with a higher incidence in the latter. Currently several classification systems are in use that are based on the origin of the pseudocyst, their relation to pancreatic duct anatomy and a possible pseudocyst–duct communication. Diagnosis is accomplished most often by CT scanning, by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) or by ultrasound, and rapid progress in the improvement of diagnostic tools has enabled detection with high sensitivity and specificity. There are different therapeutic strategies: endoscopic transpapillary or transmural drainage, percutaneous catheter drainage, or open surgery. The feasibility of endoscopic drainage is highly dependent on the anatomy and topography of the pseudocyst, but provides high success and low complication rates. Percutaneous drainage is used for infected pseudocysts. However, its usefulness in chronic pancreatitis-associated pseudocysts is questionable. Internal drainage and pseudocyst resection are frequently used as surgical approaches with a good overall outcome, but a somewhat higher morbidity and mortality compared with endoscopic intervention. We therefore conclude that pseudocyst treatment in chronic pancreatitis can be effectively achieved by both endoscopic and surgical means. PMID:18333098

  16. Pancreatic carcinoma in fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes: An eastern India perspective.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Dutta, Deep; Biswas, Kaushik; Sanyal, Triranjan; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2012-12-01

    Fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) is a rare cause of diabetes (<1%) of uncertain etiology associated with >100-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We present 3 patients of FCPD with pancreatic cancer who had long duration of diabetes (19 years, 25 years, and 28 years, respectively), all of whom presented with anorexia, weight loss, and worsened glycemic control. Patient-1 in addition presented with deep venous thrombosis. All the 3 patients had evidence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Computerized tomography (CT) abdomen revealed atrophic pancreas, dilated pancreatic ducts, and multiple calculi in the head, body, and tail of pancreas in all of them. Patient-1 had 38 mm × 38 mm × 32 mm mass in the tail of pancreas with multiple target lesions were seen in the right lobe of liver. Patient-2 had a mass in the tail of pancreas (46 × 34 × 31 mm) encasing the celiac plexus and superior mesenteric artery infiltrating the splenic hilum and splenic flexure of colon. Patient-3 also had a mass in the tail of pancreas (33 × 31 × 22 mm), with multiple target lesions in the liver, suggestive of metastasis. All patients had elevated serum CA19-9 (828.8, 179.65, and 232 U/L, respectively; normal <40 U/L). Patients of FCPD with anorexia, weight loss, worsening of glycemic control should be evaluated to rule out pancreatic cancer. Studies are warranted to evaluate CA19-9 as a screening tool for diagnosing pancreatic cancer at an earlier stage in FCPD. PMID:23565475

  17. Pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm--where is the challenge?

    PubMed

    Fritz, Stefan; Hackert, Thilo; Büchler, Markus W

    2015-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are increasingly recognized due to the widespread use of modern abdominal imaging technologies. The majority of these lesions display pseudocysts and mucinous cystic neoplasms. In contrast to pseudocysts, it is well established that mucinous cystic neoplasms of the pancreas exhibit a significant potential for malignant transformation over time. Among mucinous cystic tumors, the most frequently observed entity is pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). IPMNs are characterized by cystic dilation of pancreatic ducts and the production of mucus and by an adenoma-carcinoma sequence eventually culminating in invasive carcinoma in some patients. Due to the high risk of harboring malignancy, there is international consensus that IPMNs with involvement of the main pancreatic duct should be recommended for surgical resection. To date, the indication for surgery of branch-duct IPMNs is controversially discussed because of the overall lower risk of malignant transformation compared to main-duct IPMNs. Particularly for small and asymptomatic side-branch IPMNs, the indication for surgical resection remains challenging. In addition to the international consensus guidelines, a number of potential preoperative features predicting malignant transformation have been discussed recently. Moreover, novel surgical pancreatic parenchyma-sparing techniques such as enucleations or segmental pancreatic resections have been reported in order to treat IPMNs. The present article aims to demonstrate the current scientific knowledge in this field and to highlight the current controversy. PMID:25531503

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Recently, with the rapid scanning time and improved image quality, outstanding advances in magnetic resonance (MR) methods have resulted in an increase in the use of MRI for patients with a variety of pancreatic neoplasms. MR multi-imaging protocol, which includes MR cross-sectional imaging, MR cholangiopancreatography and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography, integrates the advantages of various special imaging techniques. The non-invasive all-in-one MR multi-imaging techniques may provide the comprehensive information needed for the preoperative diagnosis and evaluation of pancreatic neoplasms. Pancreatic neoplasms include primary tumors and pancreatic metastases. Primary tumors of the pancreas may be mainly classified as ductal adenocarcinomas, cystic tumors and islet cell tumors (ICT). Pancreatic adenocarcinomas can be diagnosed in a MRI study depending on direct evidence or both direct and indirect evidence. The combined MRI features of a focal pancreatic mass, pancreatic duct dilatation and parenchymal atrophy are highly suggestive of a ductal adenocarcinoma. Most cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are either microcystic adenomas or mucinous cystic neoplasms. Intraductal papillary mucinous tumors are the uncommon low-grade malignancy of the pancreatic duct. ICT are rare neoplasms arising from neuroendocrine cells in the pancreas or the periampullary region. ICT are classified as functioning and non-functioning. The most frequent tumors to metastasize to the pancreas are cancers of the breast, lung, kidney and melanoma. The majority of metastases present as large solitary masses with well-defined margins. PMID:17650223

  19. Protein C Activation during the Initial Phase of Experimental Acute Pancreatitis in the Rabbit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. H. Ottesen; E. M. Bladbjerg; M. Osman; S. B. Lausten; N. O. Jacobsen; J. Gram; S. L. Jensen

    1999-01-01

    Background: Disturbances of coagulation and fibrinolysis are well-known systemic effects of acute necrotising pancreatitis (ANP). The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate the initial events in the haemostatic activation during ANP in an animal model with relevance to the human situation. Methods: ANP was introduced in 7 rabbits by infusion of chenodeoxycholic acid in the pancreatic duct. Seven

  20. Does Nitric Oxide Protect from Microcirculatory Disturbances in Experimental Acute Pancreatitis in Rats?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Dobosz; Z. Wajda

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential role of nitric oxide (NO) on the microcirculation in experimental acute pancreatitis in rats. Twenty-five rats were divided into the following groups: group A (5 rats) = control; group B (5 rats) = acute pancreatitis induced by retrograde taurocholate infusion into the pancreatobiliary duct without treatment; group C (5 rats)

  1. Influence of shock on development of infection during acute pancreatitis in the rat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norbert S. F. Runkel; Gregory S. Smith; Liliana F. Rodriguez; Mark T. LaRocco; Frank G. Moody; Thomas A. Miller

    1992-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that hypovolemic shock elicits or promotes the development of infection during acute pancreatitis. Pancreatitis was induced in rats by ligation of the common biliopancreatic duct; nonlaparotomized animals served as controls. After 24 hr, the animals were subjected to either sham-shock (instrumented only) or to shock by withdrawal of blood through a femoral artery line by

  2. Process for making electroformed stents

    DOEpatents

    Hines, Richard A. (Stilwell, KS)

    2000-02-01

    This invention is directed to an expandable stent useful for implantation into an artery or the like. The stents are made using electroforming techniques in which an electrically-conductive mandrel is coated with a suitable resist material, after which the resist is exposed to an appropriate light pattern and frequency so as to form a stent pattern in the resist. The mandrel is then electroplated with a suitable stent material. The mandrel is etched away once a sufficient layer of stent material is deposited, leaving a completed stent.

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis: an illustrated guide to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Proctor, R D; Rofe, C J; Bryant, T J C; Hacking, C N; Stedman, B

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) remains one of the rarer forms of pancreatitis but has become increasingly well recognized and widely diagnosed as it is an important differential, particularly due to the dramatic response to appropriate therapy. It is now best considered as part of a multisystem disease and the notion of "IgG4-related systemic sclerosing disease" has become widely recognized as the number of extra-pancreatic associations of AIP grows. More recently AIP has been classified into two subtypes: lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP) and idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) with distinct geographical, age and sex distributions for the two subtypes, in addition to different pathological characteristics. The role of imaging is crucial in AIP and should be considered in conjunction with clinical, serological, and histopathological findings to make the diagnosis. Radiologists are uniquely placed to raise the possibility of AIP and aid the exclusion of significant differentials to allow the initiation of appropriate management and avoidance of unnecessary intervention. Radiological investigation may reveal a number of characteristic imaging findings in AIP but appearances can vary considerably and the focal form of AIP may appear as a pancreatic mass, imitating pancreatic carcinoma. This review will illustrate typical and atypical appearances of AIP on all imaging modes. Emphasis will be placed on the imaging features that are likely to prove useful in discriminating AIP from other causes prior to histopathological confirmation. In addition, examples of relevant differential diagnoses are discussed and illustrated. PMID:23177083

  4. Aircraft Inlet Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    After studying three Tech Briefs reports on NASA submerged duct technology developed for high performance aircraft, Wilhelm Cashen was able to adapt the technology to the induction intercooler system of turbocharged lightplanes. In lightplane installations, the submerged ducts introduce cool "ram" air to the propulsion system for greater operating efficiency.

  5. Loft duct project report

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.R.

    1993-06-01

    On October 16, 1992, during a routine examination of the loft of Building 332, the Building Coordinator observed cracks in the welds of the duct work that services the fume hoods for Rooms 1313, 1321, and 1329. Further examination revealed cracks in the weld of the duct work that services the gloveboxes in Rooms 1321 and 1329. Upon discovery of the cracked welds, facility management immediately took the following two actions: Because one crack in the fume hood exhaust extended 70% around the duct circumference, a 1-ton chain fall was used to secure the duct to the roof support structure to prevent the duct from falling if the duct completely fractured. The Facility Manager suspended plutonium handling operations in the gloveboxes and work in the fume hoods in the affected rooms until the situation could be thoroughly investigated. Building 332 is ventilated by drawing conditioned air from the building hallways into the laboratories, hoods, and gloveboxes. This air is filtered through two sets of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters before being exhausted from the facility. Figure 1 is a schematic of the typical air flow pattern for the facility. All affected duct work is located in the loft of the facility or pressure zone 4. This ducting is fabricated from 12-, 14- and 16-gauge, 304 stainless-steel sheet stock and joined by the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process.

  6. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that are high in carbohydrates and low in protein and fat. Pancreatic enzymes such as Creon, Pancrease, and Violiase are helpful in providing improved digestion and a reduction in diarrhea and pain for ...

  7. Quantification of pancreatic stiffness on intraoperative ultrasound elastography and evaluation of its relationship with postoperative pancreatic fistula.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Masahide; Watanabe, Jota; Kushihata, Fumiki; Tohyama, Taiji; Kuroda, Taira; Koizumi, Mitsuhito; Kumagi, Teru; Hisano, Yoshiko; Sugita, Atsuro; Takada, Yasutsugu

    2015-03-01

    "Soft pancreas" has often been reported as a predictive factor for postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) after pancreatectomy. However, pancreatic stiffness is judged subjectively by surgeons, without objective criteria. In the present study, pancreatic stiffness was quantified using intraoperative ultrasound elastography, and its relevance to POPF and histopathology was investigated. Forty-one patients (pancreatoduodenectomy, 30; distal pancreatectomy, 11) who underwent intraoperative elastography during pancreatectomy were included. The elastic ratio was determined at the pancreatic resection site (just above the portal vein) and at the remnant pancreas (head or tail). Correlations between the incidence of POPF and patient characteristics, operative variables, and the elastic ratio were examined. In addition, the relationship between the elastic ratio and the percentage of the exocrine gland at the resection stump was investigated. For pancreatoduodenectomy patients, main pancreatic duct diameter < 3.2 mm and elastic ratio < 2.09 were significant risk factors for POPF. In addition, the elastic ratio, but not main pancreatic duct diameter, was significantly associated with the percentage of exocrine gland area at the pancreatic resection stump. Pancreatic stiffness can be quantified using intraoperative elastography. Elastography can be used to diagnose "soft pancreas" and may thus be useful in predicting the occurrence of POPF. PMID:25785334

  8. Gene Expression Profiling of Microdissected Pancreatic Ductal Carcinomas Using High-Density DNA Microarrays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Grützmann; Christian Pilarsky; Ole Ammerpohl; Jutta Lüttges; Armin Böhme; Bence Sipos; Melanie Foerder; Ingo Alldinger; Beatrix Jahnke; Hans Konrad Schackert; Holger Kalthoff; Bernd Kremer; Günter Klöppel; Hans Detlev Saeger

    2004-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains an important cause of malignancy-related death and is the eighth most common cancer with the lowest overall 5-year relative survival rate. To identify new molecular markers and candidates for new therapeutic regimens, we investigated the gene expression profile of microdissected cells from 11 normal pancreatic ducts, 14 samples of PDAC, and 4 well-characterized pancreatic cancer

  9. Endoscopic Treatment of Pancreatic Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal. PMID:24944986

  10. Stent Thrombosis After Successful Sirolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Allen Jeremias; Brett Sylvia; Jonathan Bridges; Ajay J. Kirtane; Brian Bigelow; Duane S. Pinto; Kalon K. L. Ho; David J. Cohen; Lawrence A. Garcia; Donald E. Cutlip

    2011-01-01

    Background—Stent thrombosis (ST) is a rare but devastating complication of coronary stent implantation, occurring in 0.5% to 1.9% of patients with bare metal stents. The incidence of ST with drug-eluting stents is less well studied, particularly among patients outside of clinical trials. Methods and Results—The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and potential risk factors for ST

  11. Endoscopic prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Park, Do Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP) is not an uncommon adverse event but may be an avoidable complication. Although pancreatitis of severe grade is reported in 0.1%-0.5% of ERCP patients, a serious clinical course may be lethal. For prevention of severe PEP, patient risk stratification, appropriate selection of patients using noninvasive diagnostic imaging methods such as magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), and avoidance of unnecessary invasive procedures, are important measures to be taken before any procedure. Pharmacological prevention is also commonly attempted but is usually ineffective. No ideal agent has not yet been found and the available data conflict. Currently, rectal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used to prevent PEP in high-risk patients, but additional studies using larger numbers of subjects are necessary to confirm any prophylactic effect. In this review, we focus on endoscopic procedures seeking to prevent or decrease the severity of PEP. Among various cannulation methods, wire-guided cannulation, precut fistulotomy, and transpancreatic septostomy are reviewed. Prophylactic pancreatic stent placement, which is the best-known prophylactic method, is reviewed with reference to the ideal stent type, adequate duration of stent placement, and stent-related complications. Finally, we comment on other treatment alternatives, and make the point that further advances in EUS-guided techniques may afford useful PEP prophylaxis. PMID:25469026

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  13. ePTFE/FEP-Covered Metallic Stents for Palliation of MalignantBiliary Disease: Can Tumor Ingrowth Be Prevented?

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzidakis, Adam, E-mail: adamhatz@med.uoc.gr; Krokidis, Miltiadis [University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, Department of Radiology (Greece); Kalbakis, Kostantinos [University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, Oncology Clinic (Greece); Romanos, Jiannis [University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, Clinic for Oncologic Surgery (Greece); Petrakis, Ioannis [University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, Clinic for General Surgery (Greece); Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas [University Hospital of Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, Department of Radiology (Greece)

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. To determine the application and clinical effectiveness of ePTFE/FEP-covered metallic stents for palliation of malignant biliary disease, and to evaluate the efficiency of stent coverage in preventing tumor ingrowth. Methods. During a 3-year period, 36 patients with malignant obstructive jaundice were treated with ePTFE/FEP-covered stents, with or without proximal side holes. The stricture was located in the lower common bile duct (CBD) in 18 cases, the upper CBD in 9, the lower common hepatic duct (CHD) in 6, and the upper CHD in 3 patients. Results.Thirty-seven covered stents were percutaneously implanted. The technical success rate was 97%. Reintervention was required in 6 cases. The 30-day mortality rate was 40%, not procedure-related. Mean survival was 128 days. Primary patency rates were 100%,55.5%, and 25% at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively, while the assisted patency rate was 100% at 12 months. Stents without side holes had higher primary patency rates compared with those with side holes, where occlusion was always due to tumor ingrowth. Tumor ingrowth did not occur in the completely covered stents. No stent dysfunction due to sludge incrustation was found.Complications were 1 case of arterial laceration that occurred during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, and a subcapsular hematoma and 1 case of bile peritonitis, that both occurred during primary stenting. No complications followed the secondary stenting technique. Conclusion. ePTFE/FEP-covered metallic stents are safe and effective for palliation of malignant biliary disease. The presence of the ePTFE/FEP coating is likely to prevent from tumor ingrowth.

  14. STATE OF CALIFORNIA DUCT LEAKAGE TEST EXISTING DUCT SYSTEM

    E-print Network

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA DUCT LEAKAGE TEST ­ EXISTING DUCT SYSTEM CEC-CF-6R-MECH-21-HERS (Revised 03 System (Page 1 of 4) Site Address: Enforcement Agency: Permit Number: Registration Number 2010 Enter the Duct System Name or Identification/Tag: Enter the Duct System Location or Area Served

  15. Palliation of Malignant Biliary and Duodenal Obstruction with Combined Metallic Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Akinci, Devrim, E-mail: akincid@hotmail.com; Akhan, Okan; Ozkan, Fuat; Ciftci, Turkmen; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay; Ozmen, Mustafa N. [Hacettepe University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

    2007-11-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of palliation of malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction with combined metallic stenting under fluoroscopy guidance. Materials and Methods. A retrospective analysis of 9 patients (6 men and 3 women) who underwent biliary and duodenal stenting was performed. The mean age of patients was 61 years (range: 42-80 years). The causes of obstruction were pancreatic carcinoma in 7 patients, cholangiocellular carcinoma in one, and duodenal carcinoma in the other. Biliary and duodenal stents were placed simultaneously in 4 patients. In other 5 patients dudodenal stents were placed after biliary stenting when the duodenal obstruction symptoms have developed. In two patients duodenal stents were advanced via transgastric approach. Results. Technical success rate was 100 %. After percutaneous biliary drainage and stenting bilirubin levels decreased to normal levels in 6 patients and in remaining 3 patients mean reduction of 71% in bilirubin levels was achieved. Tumoral ingrowth occurred in one patient and percutaneous biliary restenting was performed 90 days after the initial procedure. Of the 9 patients, 6 patients were able to tolerate solid diet, whereas 2 patients could tolerate liquid diet and one patient did not show any improvement. Mean survival periods were 111 and 73 days after biliary and duodenal stenting, respectively. Conclusion. Combined biliary and duodenal stent placement which can be performed under fluoroscopic guidance without assistance of endoscopy is feasible and an effective method of palliation of malignant biliary and duodenal obstructions. If transoral and endoscopic approaches fail, percutaneous gastrostomy route allows duodenal stenting.

  16. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, C; Hofmann, B T; Wolters-Eisfeld, G; Bockhorn, M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that the current standard therapeutic options for pancreatic cancer are not adequate and still do not meet the criteria to cure patients suffering from this lethal disease. Although research over the past decade has shown very interesting and promising new therapeutic options for these patients, only minor clinical success was achieved. Therefore, there is still an urgent need for new approaches that deal with early detection and new therapeutic options in pancreatic cancer. To provide optimal care for patients with pancreatic cancer, we need to understand better its complex molecular biology and thus to identify new target molecules that promote the proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer cells. In spite of significant progress in curing cancers with chemotherapy, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most resistant solid tumour cancers and many studies suggest that drug-resistant cancer cells are the most aggressive with the highest relapse and metastatic rates. In this context, activated Notch signalling is strongly linked with chemoresistance and therefore reflects a rational new target to circumvent resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Here, we have focused our discussion on the latest research, current therapy options and recently identified target molecules such as Notch-2 and the heparin-binding growth factor midkine, which exhibit a wide range of cancer-relevant functions and therefore provide attractive new therapeutic target molecules, in terms of pancreatic cancer and other cancers also. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24024905

  17. Heterotopic pancreatic pseudocyst radiologically mimicking gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Sarsenov, Dauren; T?rnaks?z, Mehmet Bülent; Do?rul, Ahmet Bülent; Tanas, Özlem; Gedikoglu, Gökhan; Abbaso?lu, Osman

    2015-03-01

    Heterotopic pancreas is a relatively common variant of foregut embryologic dystopia that can be described as pancreatic tissue found outside the normal anatomic location, being independent from vascular supply of normal pancreas. Having all features of pancreatic tissue except for the major duct structures, this ectopic tissue may be clinically recognized when pathologic changes take place. Inflammation, hemorrhagic or obstructive states, and eventually malignancy-related problems may become a diagnostic challenge for clinician and finally lead to consequences of misdiagnosis. In this article we will discuss a case of heterotopic pancreatic tissue located in gastric cardia, which was diagnosed preoperatively as gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PMID:25785332

  18. Pancreatic tumor margin detection by oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Zou, Jun; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Kuczynski, John; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    In surgical treatment of pancreatic cancers, the effectiveness of the procedures largely depends on the ability to completely and precisely remove the malignant tumors. We present the ex-vivo use of oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (OIRDS) to detect and differentiate normal from neoplastic tissue. An OIRDS probe has been constructed to provide scattering and absorption information of the pancreatic tissue. To reveal the physiological origin of the difference in these optical signatures, the optical scattering coefficients were extracted along the pancreatic duct with 1-cm spacing. Experimental results show that OIDRS was able to successfully determinate the tumor margins based on the higher optical scattering on malignant tissue.

  19. Computer Aided Duct Design

    E-print Network

    Clark, W. H.

    1994-01-01

    The circular slide rule is the industry standard for duct design. It is the simplest, most convenient way to take into account the many variables of ductwork analysis. The slide rule, however, is also relatively inaccurate. This means the ductwork...

  20. Miniprobe EUS in management of pancreatic pseudocyst

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Paola; Romeo, Erminia; Rea, Francesca; Torroni, Filippo; Caldaro, Tamara; Federici di Abriola, Giovanni; Foschia, Francesca; Caloisi, Claudia; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Dall'Oglio, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts (PP) arise from trauma and pancreatitis; endoscopic gastro-cyst drainage (EGCD) under endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in symptomatic PP is the treatment of choice. Miniprobe EUS (MEUS) allows EGCD in children. We report our experience on MEUS-EGCD in PP, reviewing 13 patients (12 children; male:female = 9:3; mean age: 10 years, 4 mo; one 27 years, malnourished male Belardinelli-syndrome; PP: 10 post-pancreatitis, 3 post-traumatic). All patients underwent ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Conservative treatment was the first option. MEUS EGCD was indicated for retrogastric cysts larger than 5 cm, diameter increase, symptoms or infection. EGCD (stent and/or nasogastrocystic tube) was performed after MEUS (20-MHz-miniprobe) identification of place for diathermy puncture and wire insertion. In 8 cases (61.5%), there was PP disappearance; one, surgical duodenotomy and marsupialization of retro-duodenal PP. In 4 cases (31%), there was successful MEUS-EGCD; stent removal after 3 mo. No complications and no PP relapse in 4 years of mean follow-up. MEUS EGCD represents an option for PP, allowing a safe and effective procedure. PMID:23678380

  1. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%. PMID:24950816

  2. Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zacharia, George S.; Antony, Rajany; Kolassery, Sandesh; Ramachandran, Thazhath M.

    2014-01-01

    Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) remains a rarity despite the high incidence of tuberculosis in many of the African and Asian countries. Presentation as discrete pancreatic mass often masquerades as pancreatic neoplasm and diagnosis may require histology. Extra-hepatic portal hypertension due to splenic vein thrombosis complicating pancreatic TB has been reported in the literature. We report here a case of isolated pancreatic TB with pancreatic head mass mimicking neoplasm with extra-hepatic portal hypertension. The possibility of TB should be considered in the list of differential diagnoses of pancreatic mass and an endoscopic, ultrasound-guided biopsy might help to clinch the diagnosis of this potentially curable disease. PMID:24759351

  3. The relationship of anatomic variation of pancreatic ductal system and pancreaticobiliary diseases.

    PubMed

    Bang, Seungmin; Suh, Jung Hoon; Park, Byung Kyu; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Chung, Jae Bock

    2006-04-30

    The aims of this study were to identify the morphological diversities and anatomical variations of pancreatic ductal system and to define the relationships between pancreatic ductal systems, pancreaticobiliary diseases, and procedure- related complications, including post-ERCP pancreatitis. This study included 582 patients in whom both pancreatic duct (PD) and common bile duct were clearly visible by ERCP. PD systems were categorized into four types according to the relationship between common bile duct and PD. In types A and B, Wirsung duct formed the main PD. In type C, Wirsung duct did not form the main PD. If PD system did not fall into any of these three types, it was categorized as type D. The distribution of types among pancreatic ducts examined was as follows: type A: 491 cases (84.4%), type B: 56 cases (9.6%), type C: 20 cases (3.4%), and type D: 15 cases (2.6%). The anomalous anatomic variations of PD systems were divided into migration, fusion, and duplication anomalies. PD anomalies were noted in 51 patients, of which 19 (3.3%) were fusion anomalies (12 complete pancreas divisum, 7 incomplete pancreas divisum), and 32 (5.5%) were duplication anomalies (5 number variations, 27 form variations). No significant relationships between various PD morphologies and pancreaticobiliary diseases were found. However, post- ERCP hyperamylasemia was more frequently found in types C (41.7%), D (50%) and A (19.8%) than in type B (9.4%). In summary, whether Wirsung duct forms the main PD and the presence or absence of the opening of the Santorini duct are both important factors in determining the development of pancreatitis and hyperamylasemia after ERCP. PMID:16642555

  4. A case of cholecystohepatic duct with atrophic common hepatic duct

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, A; Hankins, J

    2003-01-01

    Background Cholecystohepatic ducts are rare congenital variants of the biliary tree. Case outline An 81-year-old woman presented with biliary colic and elevated liver function tests. An ERCP demonstrated a common bile duct stone and stricture of the common hepatic duct. An operative cholangiogram demonstrated an atrophic common hepatic duct and retrograde filling of the gallbladder through a large cholecystoheptic duct. The patient had a cholecystectomy and reconstructive cholecystohepatic duct jejunostomy. Discussion This case demonstrates a rare congenital anomaly where the gallbladder fills retrograde during an intraoperative cholangiogram despite clipping of the cystic duct. The major path of biliary drainage was through a large cholecystoheptic duct similar to a gallbladder interposition; however, the common hepatic duct was still present but atrophic. This anomaly has not been described previously. PMID:18332999

  5. Extraintestinal manifestations of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostic-Milosavljevic, Mirjana; Jovanovic, Ivan; Krstic, Miodrag

    2012-01-01

    The term autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was first used in Japan in 1995 to describe a newly recognized form of chronic pancreatitis, after the description of Yoshida and colleagues. But Sarles in 1961, first described a form of idiopathic chronic inflammatory sclerosis of the pancreas, suspected to be due to an autoimmune process. AIP has become a widely accepted term because clinical, serologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings suggest an autoimmune mechanism. Most affected patients have hypergammaglobulinemia and increased serum levels of IgG, particularly IgG4. Recently published International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria for Autoimmune Pancreatitis include Guidelines of the International Association of Pancreatology, classifying AIP into types 1 and 2, using five cardinal features of AIP, namely imaging of pancreatic parenchyma and duct, serology, other organ involvement, pancreatic histology, and an optional criterion of response to steroid therapy. Extrapancreatic presentations can include sclerosing cholangitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis, sclerosing sialadenitis (Küttner tumor), lymphadenopathy, nephritis, and interstitial pneumonia. Increased IgG4+ plasma cell infiltrate has been reported in sclerosing lesions from other organ sites, including inflammatory pseudotumors of the liver, breast, mediastinum, orbit, and aorta, and it has been observed with hypophysitis and IgG4-associated prostatitis. Abundant IgG4+ plasma cells were also confirmed in Riedel thyroiditis, sclerosing mesenteritis, and inflammatory pseudotumor of the orbit and stomach. Extrapancreatic lesions could be synchronously or metachronously diagnosed with AIP, sharing the same pathological conditions, showing also a favorable result to corticosteroid therapy and distinct differentiation between IgG4-related diseases from the inherent lesions of the corresponding organs. PMID:22722443

  6. Synchronous pancreatic solid pseudopapillary neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Masami; Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Yamashita, Tomohiro; Nakagohri, Toshio; Nakamura, Naoya

    2013-06-01

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) is a rare and low-grade malignant pancreatic neoplasm composed of poorly cohesive monomorphic neoplastic cells forming solid and pseudopapillary structures with frequent hemorrhagic-cystic degeneration. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a pancreatic exocrine tumor composed of intraductal papillary growth of mucin containing neoplastic cells in the main pancreatic duct or its major branches. In the case presented here, a 53-year-old, Japanese man was found to have multiple cystic lesions and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct in the neck of the pancreas. Histological examination revealed a main-duct and branch-duct type IPMN, of the gastric-type, involving the neck of the pancreas, associated with a 0.5 cm SPN in the caudal side of the IPMN. We diagnosed this case as synchronous SPN and IPMN. As far as we know, only one other case of synchronous SPN and IPMN has been reported. Both the present case and the previously reported case showed abnormal nuclear expression of ?-catenin in SPN, whereas IPMN showed no abnormal nuclear expression. These results suggest that ?-catenin abnormality is not a common pathogenetic factor of synchronous SPN and IPMN. PMID:23745041

  7. Epigenetic silencing of EYA2 in pancreatic adenocarcinomas promotes tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Hong, Seung-Mo; Hu, Chaoxin; Omura, Noriyuki; Young, Angela; Kim, Haeryoung; Yu, Jun; Knight, Spencer; Ayars, Michael; Griffith, Margaret; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Maitra, Anirban; Goggins, Michael

    2014-01-01

    To identify potentially important genes dysregulated in pancreatic cancer, we analyzed genome-wide transcriptional analysis of pancreatic cancers and normal pancreatic duct samples and identified the transcriptional coactivator, EYA2 (Drosophila Eyes Absent Homologue-2) as silenced in the majority of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the role of epigenetic mechanisms of EYA2 gene silencing in pancreatic cancers, performed in vitro and in vivo proliferation and migration assays to assess the effect of EYA2 silencing on tumor cell growth and metastasis formation, and expression analysis to identify genes transcriptionally regulated by EYA2. We found loss of tumoral Eya2 expression in 63% of pancreatic cancers (120/189 cases). Silencing of EYA2 expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines correlated with promoter methylation and histone deacetylation and was reversible with DNA methyltransferase and HDAC inhibitors. EYA2 knockdown in pancreatic cancer cell lines increased cell proliferation. Compared to parental pancreatic cancer cells, pancreatic cancers stably-expressing EYA2 grew more slowly and had fewer metastases in orthotopic models. The transcriptional changes after stable expression of EYA2 in pancreatic cancer cells included induction of genes in the TGFbeta pathway. Epigenetic silencing of EYA2 is a common event in pancreatic cancers and stable expression EYA2 limits the growth and metastases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:24810906

  8. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with rendezvous cannulation reduces pancreatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Swahn, Fredrik; Regnér, Sara; Enochsson, Lars; Lundell, Lars; Permert, Johan; Nilsson, Magnus; Thorlacius, Henrik; Arnelo, Urban

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether rendezvous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is associated with less pancreatic damage, measured as leakage of proenzymes, than conventional ERCP. METHODS: Patients (n = 122) with symptomatic gallstone disease, intact papilla and no ongoing inflammation, were prospectively enrolled in this case-control designed study. Eighty-one patients were subjected to laparoscopic cholecystectomy and if intraoperative cholangiography suggested common bile duct stones (CBDS), rendezvous ERCP was performed intraoperatively (n = 40). Patients with a negative cholangiogram constituted the control group (n = 41). Another 41 patients with CBDS, not subjected to surgery, underwent conventional ERCP. Pancreatic proenzymes, procarboxypeptidase B and trypsinogen-2 levels in plasma, were analysed at 0, 4, 8 and 24 h. The proenzymes were determined in-house with a double-antibody enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Pancreatic amylase was measured by an enzymatic colourimetric modular analyser with the manufacturer’s reagents. All samples were blinded at analysis. RESULTS: Post ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) occurred in 3/41 (7%) of the patients cannulated with conventional ERCP and none in the rendezvous group. Increased serum levels indicating pancreatic leakage were significantly higher in the conventional ERCP group compared with the rendezvous ERCP group regarding pancreatic amylase levels in the 4- and 8-h samples (P = 0.0015; P = 0.03), procarboxypeptidase B in the 4- and 8-h samples (P < 0.0001; P < 0.0001) and trypsinogen-2 in the 24-hour samples (P = 0.03). No differences in these markers were observed in patients treated with rendezvous cannulation technique compared with patients that underwent cholecystectomy alone (control group). Post procedural concentrations of pancreatic amylase and procarboxypeptidase B were significantly correlated with pancreatic duct cannulation and opacification. CONCLUSION: Rendezvous ERCP reduces pancreatic enzyme leakage compared with conventional ERCP cannulation technique. Thus, laparo-endoscopic technique can be recommended with the ambition to minimise the risk for post ERCP pancreatitis. PMID:24106403

  9. Dedicated bifurcation stents

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Ajith Ananthakrishna; Jayaraman, Balachander

    2012-01-01

    Bifurcation percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is still a difficult call for the interventionist despite advancements in the instrumentation, technical skill and the imaging modalities. With major cardiac events relate to the side-branch (SB) compromise, the concept and practice of dedicated bifurcation stents seems exciting. Several designs of such dedicated stents are currently undergoing trials. This novel concept and pristine technology offers new hope notwithstanding the fact that we need to go a long way in widespread acceptance and practice of these gadgets. Some of these designs even though looks enterprising, the mere complex delivering technique and the demanding knowledge of the exact coronary anatomy makes their routine use challenging. PMID:22572498

  10. A comparison of two common bile duct ligation methods to establish hepatopulmonary syndrome animal models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Chen, B; Chen, Y; Zu, B; Yi, B; Lu, K

    2015-01-01

    The major drawback of the current common bile duct ligation (CBDL)-induced hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) animal model is the extremely high mortality rate that hinders experimental studies. The purpose of this study was to investigate an improved method of CBDL with the goal of developing a simple and reproducible rat HPS model after a single CBDL treatment. Two groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent separate methods of CBDL: (1) the upper common bile duct ligation (UCBDL) group (n?=?40), in which the first ligature was made near the junction of the hepatic ducts, and the second ligature was made above the entrance of the pancreatic duct; (2) the middle of the common bile duct ligation (MCBDL) group (n?=?40), in which the first ligature was made in the middle of the common bile duct, and the second ligature was made above the entrance of the pancreatic duct. The CBDL-induced HPS rats were evaluated by pulse oximeter, arterial blood analysis, histopathology, and cerebral uptake of intravenous technetium-99m-labeled albumin macroaggregates (which reflects intrapulmonary vascular dilation). The mortality rates of the UCBDL group and the MCBDL group were 42.5% and 77.5%, respectively (P?

  11. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    PubMed Central

    Habashi, Samir; Draganov, Peter V

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are complications of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Initial diagnosis is accomplished most often by cross-sectional imaging. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration has become the preferred test to help distinguish pseudocyst from other cystic lesions of the pancreas. Most pseudocysts resolve spontaneously with supportive care. The size of the pseudocyst and the length of time the cyst has been present are poor predictors for the potential of pseudocyst resolution or complications, but in general, larger cysts are more likely to be symptomatic or cause complications. The main two indications for some type of invasive drainage procedure are persistent patient symptoms or the presence of complications (infection, gastric outlet or biliary obstruction, bleeding). Three different strategies for pancreatic pseudocysts drainage are available: endoscopic (transpapillary or transmural) drainage, percutaneous catheter drainage, or open surgery. To date, no prospective controlled studies have compared directly these approaches. As a result, the management varies based on local expertise, but in general, endoscopic drainage is becoming the preferred approach because it is less invasive than surgery, avoids the need for external drain, and has a high long-term success rate. A tailored therapeutic approach taking into consideration patient preferences and involving multidisciplinary team of therapeutic endoscopist, interventional radiologist and pancreatic surgeon should be considered in all cases. PMID:19115466

  12. Pancreatic Enzymes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the formation of toxic substances due to incomplete digestion of proteins. Increased risk for intestinal infections. Amylase Amylase breaks down carbohydrates (starch) into sugars which are more easily absorbed by the body. This ... needed for digestion. Having an insufficient amount of pancreatic enzymes is ...

  13. Polyorethaoe-covered nitinol strecker stents as primary palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shuzo Kanasaki; Akira Furukawa; Teruyuki Kane; Kiyoshi Murata

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of the polyure-thane-covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the treatment of patients with malignant\\u000a biliary obstruction.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods: Twenty-three covered stents produced by us were placed in 18 patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Jaundice was caused\\u000a by cholangiocarcinoma (n=5), pancreatic Cancer (n=6), gallbladder Cancer (n=4), metastatic lymph nodes (n=2), and tumor of the papilla (n=1).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Resulrs:

  14. Stent-Graft Treatment for Bleeding Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm After Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kojiro, E-mail: kojiro@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Mori, Yoshine; Komada, Tomohiro; Matsushima, Masaya; Ota, Toyohiro; Naganawa, Shinji [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    We report two cases of intraperitoneal bleeding from superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pseudoaneurysm after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic head carcinoma. In both cases, a stent-graft was deployed on the main SMA to exclude pseudoaneurysm and to preserve blood flow to the bowel. Bleeding stopped after the procedure. One patient was able to be discharged but died from carcinoma recurrence 4 months later. The other patient died of sepsis and stent-graft infection 5 months later. These patients remained free of intraperitoneal rebleeding during the follow-up period.

  15. Oblique Bile Duct Predisposes to the Recurrence of Bile Duct Stones

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Pavel; von Figura, Guido; Gruss, Regina; Jareis, Katja-Marlen; Stiehl, Adolf; Kulaksiz, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Study Aims Bile stones represent a highly prevalent condition and abnormalities of the biliary tree predispose to stone recurrence due to development of biliary stasis. In our study, we assessed the importance of an altered bile duct course for stone formation. Patients and Methods 1,307 patients with choledocholithiasis in the absence of any associated hepatobiliary disease who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) between 2002 and 2009 were analysed. The angle enclosed between the horizontal portion of the common bile duct (CBD) and the horizontal plane was measured (angle ?). Oblique common bile duct (OCBD) was defined as a CBD with angle ?<45°. Results 103 patients (7.9%) were found to harbour OCBD and these were compared to 104 randomly selected control subjects. Compared to controls, OCBD patients were (i) significantly older (72±13 vs. 67±13, p<0.00001); (ii) more frequently underwent a cholecystectomy (p?=?0.02) and biliary surgery (p?=?0.003) prior to the diagnosis and (iii) more often developed chronic pancreatitis (p?=?0.04) as well as biliary fistulae (p?=?0.03). Prior to and after ERCP, OCBD subjects displayed significantly elevated cholestatic parameters and angle ? negatively correlated with common bile duct diameter (r?=?-0.29, p?=?0.003). OCBD subjects more often required multiple back-to-back ERCP sessions to remove bile stones (p?=?0.005) as well as more ERCPs later on due to recurrent stone formation (p<0.05). Conclusion OCBD defines a novel variant of the biliary tree, which is associated with chronic cholestasis, hampers an efficient stone removal and predisposes to recurrence of bile duct stones. PMID:23365676

  16. Synchronous gallbladder and pancreatic cancer associated with pancreaticobiliary maljunction

    PubMed Central

    Rungsakulkij, Narongsak; Boonsakan, Paisarn

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with chronic intermittent abdominal pain without jaundice; abdominal ultrasonography showed thickening of the gallbladder wall and dilatation of the bile duct. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography showed pancreatobiliary maljunction with proximal common bile duct dilatation. Pancreatobiliary maljunction was diagnosed. A computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed suspected gallbladder cancer and distal common bile duct obstruction. A pancreatic head mass was incidentally found intraoperative. Radical cholecystectomy with pancreatoduodenectomy was performed. The pathological report showed gallbladder cancer that was synchronous with pancreatic head cancer. In the pancreatobiliary maljunction with pancreatobiliary reflux condition, double primary cancer of the pancreatobiliary system should be awared. PMID:25339838

  17. Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma of the Extrahepatic Bile Duct Diagnosed by Preoperative Biopsy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Emiri; Tsujimoto, Akiko; Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Sudo, Kentaro; Hara, Taro; Kainuma, Osamu; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Itami, Makiko; Yamaguchi, y

    2014-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was admitted because of obstructive jaundice. Computed tomography revealed a stricture in the lower bile duct with enhanced bile duct wall. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) revealed a tapering stenosis at the lower bile duct. Transpapillary histological biopsy using biopsy forceps through ERCP was performed; the diagnosis of signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) of the bile duct was established. Regional lymph node enlargement and distant metastases were not detected on diagnostic imaging. Pancreaticoduodenectomy with pylorus preservation was performed. Histological examination of the resected specimen confirmed SRCC of the extrahepatic bile duct coexisting with adenocarcinoma (ADC) of the extrahepatic bile duct with negative resection margins. However, tumor cells directly invaded the pancreatic parenchyma and the muscle layer of the duodenum, prompting us to administer adjuvant chemotherapy to the patient, with no sign of tumor recurrence at 1-year follow-up. Almost all tumors originating from the extrahepatic bile duct are ADC and other histological variants are rare. Of these, SRCC is extremely rare and only four cases have been reported. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report regarding the preoperative diagnosis of SRCC of the bile duct. Current reports indicate that younger age and Asian ethnicity are the clinical features of SRCC of the extrahepatic bile duct. Immunohistochemical staining of CK7, CK20 and MUC2 may be useful for predicting prognosis. Chemotherapy has not resulted in increased survival rates and only surgical resection currently serves as a curative treatment. PMID:25520605

  18. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    Stages of Pancreatic Cancer Key Points for This Section Tests and procedures to stage pancreatic cancer are usually done at the same ... III Stage IV Tests and procedures to stage pancreatic cancer are usually done at the same time as ...

  19. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? Cancer of the pancreas is a genetic ... found in cigarette smoke. The genetics of hereditary pancreatic cancer is a focus of research at Johns Hopkins. ...

  20. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 View/Download: Small: 533x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 Description: Stage IV pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  1. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  2. Pancreatic Cancer: Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Ablation or embolization treatments for pancreatic cancer Surgery for pancreatic cancer There are 2 general types ... and risks of such surgery carefully. Potentially curative surgery Fewer than 1 in 5 pancreatic cancers appear ...

  3. Pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic serous cystadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seung Goun; Kim, Jae Seon; Joo, Moon Kyung; Lee, Kwang Gyun; Kim, Key Hyeon; Oh, Cho Rong; Park, Jong-Jae; Bak, Young-Tae

    2009-01-01

    Solitary pancreatic involvement of tuberculosis is rare, especially in an immunocompetent individual, and it may be misdiagnosed as pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Pancreatic cystic neoplasms are being identified in increasing numbers, probably because of the frequent use of radiology and advances in endoscopic techniques. However, they are composed of a variety of neoplasms with a wide range of malignant potential, and it is often difficult to differentiate pancreatic tuberculosis mimicking cystic neoplasms from benign or malignant pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Non-surgical diagnosis of pancreatic tuberculosis is inconclusive and continues to be a challenge in many cases. If so, then laparotomy should be employed to establish the diagnosis. Therefore, pancreatic tuberculosis should be kept in mind during the differential diagnosis of solitary cystic masses in the pancreas. We report a patient who had solitary pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic serous cystadenoma. PMID:19248204

  4. Patent arterial duct.

    PubMed

    Forsey, Jonathan T; Elmasry, Ola A; Martin, Robin P

    2009-01-01

    Patent arterial duct (PAD) is a congenital heart abnormality defined as persistent patency in term infants older than three months. Isolated PAD is found in around 1 in 2000 full term infants. A higher prevalence is found in preterm infants, especially those with low birth weight. The female to male ratio is 2:1. Most patients are asymptomatic when the duct is small. With a moderate-to-large duct, a characteristic continuous heart murmur (loudest in the left upper chest or infraclavicular area) is typical. The precordium may be hyperactive and peripheral pulses are bounding with a wide pulse pressure. Tachycardia, exertional dyspnoea, laboured breathing, fatigue or poor growth are common. Large shunts may lead to failure to thrive, recurrent infection of the upper respiratory tract and congestive heart failure. In the majority of cases of PAD there is no identifiable cause. Persistence of the duct is associated with chromosomal aberrations, asphyxia at birth, birth at high altitude and congenital rubella. Occasional cases are associated with specific genetic defects (trisomy 21 and 18, and the Rubinstein-Taybi and CHARGE syndromes). Familial occurrence of PAD is uncommon and the usual mechanism of inheritance is considered to be polygenic with a recurrence risk of 3%. Rare families with isolated PAD have been described in which the mode of inheritance appears to be dominant or recessive. Familial incidence of PAD has also been linked to Char syndrome, familial thoracic aortic aneurysm/dissection associated with patent arterial duct, and familial patent arterial duct and bicuspid aortic valve associated with hand abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and confirmed with transthoracic echocardiography. Assessment of ductal blood flow can be made using colour flow mapping and pulsed wave Doppler. Antenatal diagnosis is not possible, as PAD is a normal structure during antenatal life. Conditions with signs and symptoms of pulmonary overcirculation secondary to a left-to-right shunt must be excluded. Coronary, systemic and pulmonary arteriovenous fistula, peripheral pulmonary stenosis and ventricular septal defect with aortic regurgitation and collateral vessels must be differentiated from PAD on echocardiogram. In preterm infants with symptomatic heart failure secondary to PAD, treatment may be achieved by surgical ligation or with medical therapy blocking prostaglandin synthesis (indomethacin or ibuprofen). Transcatheter closure of the duct is usually indicated in older children. PAD in preterm and low birth weight infants is associated with significant co-morbidity and mortality due to haemodynamic instability. Asymptomatic patients with a small duct have a normal vital prognosis but have a lifetime risk of endocarditis. Patients with moderate-to-large ducts with significant haemodynamic alterations may develop irreversible changes to pulmonary vascularity and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:19591690

  5. Mechanical Characteristics of Composite Knitted Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuda, Takanori, E-mail: tkdtknr@gmail.com; Shomura, Yuzo; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji [Kansai Medical University Hirakata Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Komemushi, Atsushi [Kansai Medical University Takii Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Kojima, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Satoshi [Kansai Medical University Hirakata Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2009-09-15

    We used metal wires and fibers to fabricate a composite knitted stent and then compare the mechanical characteristics of this stent with those of a pure metallic stent of the same construction in order to develop a stent that offers a comparable degree of expandability as metallic stents but can be used for highly curved lesions that cannot be treated using metallic stents. We fabricated two types of composite knitted stent (N-Z stents), using nitinol wire with a diameter of 0.12 mm and polypara-phenylene-benzobisoxazole (PBO) multifilament fiber (Zyron AS; Toyobo, Osaka, Japan). Stents were knitted into a cylindrical shape using the same textile pattern as a Strecker stent. Two loop lengths (L) of nitinol wire were used in the N-Z stents: L = 1.84 mm (N-Z stent L = 1.84) and L = 2.08 mm (N-Z stent L = 2.08). For the sake of comparison, we fabricated a metallic stent of nitinol using the same textile pattern (N-N stent L = 1.92). We applied a radial compression force diametrically to each stent and applied a bending force diametrically at the free end of a stent with one end fixed in order to evaluate the relationship between stent elasticity and load values. In addition, we macroscopically evaluated the generation of kinks when the stent was bent 180{sup o}. The radial compressive force when the stent diameter was reduced by 53% was 6.44 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 1.84, 6.14 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 4.96 N in the case of N-N stent L = 1.92 mm. The composite stent had a radial compressive force higher than that of a metallic stent. The restoring force to longitudinal direction at a 90{sup o} bending angle was 0.005 N for N-Z stent L = 1.84, 0.003 N for N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 0.034 N for N-N stent L = 1.92. The restoring force of the composite stent was significantly lower. Finally, the composite stent generated no definitive kinks at a bending angle of 180{sup o}, regardless of loop length. However, the N-N stent clearly produced kinks, causing blockage of the inner cavity. In conclusion, the use of a metal and fiber composite in the construction of a knitted stent ensures an expansion performance comparable to that of metallic stents, while providing better kink resistance.

  6. Endoscopic approaches for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is characterized by diffuse pancreatic enlargement and irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). Immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) associated with AIP frequently appears as a bile duct stricture. Therefore, it is important to differentiate AIP and IgG4-SC from pancreatic cancer and cholangiocarcinoma or primary sclerosing cholangitis, respectively. Endoscopy plays a central role in the diagnosis of AIP and IgG4-SC because it provides imaging of the MPD and bile duct strictures as well as the ability to obtain tissue samples for histological evaluations. Diffuse irregular narrowing of MPD on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is rather specific to AIP, but localized narrowing of the MPD is often difficult to differentiate from MPD stenosis caused by pancreatic cancer. A long stricture (>1/3 the length of the MPD) and lack of upstream dilatation from the stricture (<5?mm) might be key features of AIP on ERCP. Some cholangiographic features, such as segmental strictures, stric tures of the lower bile duct, and long strictures with prestenotic dilatation, are more common in IgG4-SC than in cholangiocarcinoma. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) reveals diffuse hypoechoic pancreatic enlargement, sometimes with hypoechoic inclusions, in patients with AIP. In addition, EUS-elastography and contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS have been developed with promising results. The usefulness of EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration has been increasingly recognized for obtaining adequate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of AIP. Further improvement of endoscopic procedures and devices will contribute to more accurate diagnosis of AIP and IgG4-SC. PMID:25115499

  7. A Nonpancreatic Source of the Proteolytic-enzyme Amidase and Bacteriology in Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Keynes, W. Milo

    1980-01-01

    In previous studies of human and experimental acute pancreatitis, three main assumptions have been made. First, that the disease is due to activation of pancreatic proteolytic enzymes in the pancreas with resulting “autodigestion” of the gland. Second, that interstitial pancreatitis is a mild form of hemorrhagic pancreatitis into which it may progress, and third, that bacteria play little part, if any, in the initiation of the disease. These assumptions are now questioned. In the present study in dogs, levels of proteolytic enzymes in blood, thoracicduct lymph and peritoneal fluid were measured using benzoylarginine amide. Raised levels of amidase were found in hemorrhagic, but not with interstitial, pancreatitis, and biochemical examination of amidase suggested it was not a pancreatic protease, but with its broad specificity and stability derived from bacteria. Addition of antibiotic to the blind duodenal loop in hemorrhagic pancreatitis reduced the level of blood amidase, but Trasylol given intravenously did not, nor did it inhibit amidase in vitro. In all animals, histological examination was made of the pancreas at time of death. On bacteriology, it is concluded that experimental interstitial pancreatitis results from damage to the pancreatic duct system without infection, and haemorrhagic pancreatitis mainly from reflux of bacteria into the pancreatic ducts from the duodenum. Only bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Clostridium welchii that produce proteolytic enzymes and cytotoxins appear to be able to cause haemorrhagic pancreatitis, and these bacteria may explain the release of vasoactive polypeptides and the vascular effects. In hemorrhagic pancreatitis such bacteria were found in the pancreas, but none in interstitial pancreatitis. Evidence is given to suggest that pancreatic proteolytic enzymes are unlikely to cause the cell necrosis which is a pathological feature of hemorrhagic pancreatitis, and that “autodigestion” is likewise unlikely to be a cause of this condition. An extrapancreatic source of proteolytic enzymes from bacteria is now suggested in haemorrhagic pancreatitis, and more attention to bacteriology in human acute pancreatitis is urgently needed. Amidase levels were highest in peritoneal fluid, suggesting a rationale for peritoneal lavage in the treatment of acute pancreatitis, and it is unlikely that Trasylol can give any benefit. The assessment of treatment of acute pancreatitis will be unsatisfactory as long as the proportion of haemorrhagic to interstitial pancreatitis in any series is not known accurately. PMID:6987958

  8. Direct stent implantation without predilatation using the multilink stent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dimitrios Pentousis; Yves Guérin; François Funck; Hong Zheng; Marcel Toussaint; Thierry Corcos; Xavier Favereau

    1998-01-01

    The standard coronary stent implantation technique requires routine predilatation of the target lesion with a balloon catheter. In this study, we prospectively studied the feasibility and efficiency of elective coronary stent implantation without predilatation. In 94 patients who presented with various ischemic syndromes, direct implantation of 100 balloon expandable ACS MultiLink stents (7 over-the-wire, 93 rapid exchange) was attempted in

  9. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the experimental measurements was applied to evaluate particle losses in supply and return duct runs. Model results suggest that duct losses are negligible for particle sizes less than 1 {micro}m and complete for particle sizes greater than 50 {micro}m. Deposition to insulated ducts, horizontal duct floors and bends are predicted to control losses in duct systems. When combined with models for HVAC filtration and deposition to indoor surfaces to predict the ultimate fates of particles within buildings, these results suggest that ventilation ducts play only a small role in determining indoor particle concentrations, especially when HVAC filtration is present. However, the measured and modeled particle deposition rates are expected to be important for ventilation system contamination.

  10. Dynamic instability of ducts conveying fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Y. Y.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element analysis was used to study dynamic instability in ducts conveying high speed fluids. Ducts examined include cantilevered curved, flexibly supported, arbitrarily shaped, and composite duct systems. Partial differential equations were used to study the duct systems.

  11. Treatment Options for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer Treatment (PDQ®) Treatment Options for Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer Treatment of localized extrahepatic bile duct cancer may include ...

  12. Nasopalatine Duct Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Dedhia, Pratik; Dedhia, Shely; Dhokar, Amol; Desai, Ankit

    2013-01-01

    The nasopalatine cyst is the most common epithelial and nonodontogenic cyst of the maxilla. The cyst originates from epithelial remnants from the nasopalatine duct. The cells may be activated spontaneously during life or are eventually stimulated by the irritating action of various agents (infection, etc.). It is different from a radicular cyst. The definite diagnosis should be based on clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings. The treatment is enucleation of the cystic tissue, and only in rare cases a marsupialisation needs to be performed. A case of a nasopalatine duct cyst in a 35-year-old male is reviewed. The typical radiologic and histological findings are presented. PMID:24307954

  13. Turbofan Duct Propagation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, Justin H.; Posey, Joe W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The CDUCT code utilizes a parabolic approximation to the convected Helmholtz equation in order to efficiently model acoustic propagation in acoustically treated, complex shaped ducts. The parabolic approximation solves one-way wave propagation with a marching method which neglects backwards reflected waves. The derivation of the parabolic approximation is presented. Several code validation cases are given. An acoustic lining design process for an example aft fan duct is discussed. It is noted that the method can efficiently model realistic three-dimension effects, acoustic lining, and flow within the computational capabilities of a typical computer workstation.

  14. Wave reflection at a stent.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Antonio; García, Javier; Manuel, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    A simple analytical expression has been derived to calculate the characteristics of a wave that reflects at a stent implanted in a uniform vessel. The stent is characterized by its length and the wave velocity in the stented region. The reflected wave is proportional to the time derivative of the incident wave. The reflection coefficient is a small quantity of the order of the length of the stent divided by the wavelength of the unstented vessel. The results obtained coincide with those obtained numerically by Charonko et al. The main simplifications used are small amplitude of the waves so that equations can be linearized and that the length of the stent is small enough so that the values of the wave functions are nearly uniform along the stent. Both assumptions hold in typical situations. PMID:23516957

  15. Immunoreactivity of N-terminal fragment of gastrin-releasing peptide as histochemical marker for pancreatobiliary duct-type cells.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Y; Nagura, H; Watanabe, K; Yanaihara, N

    1984-01-01

    Immunoreactivity of the N-terminal fragment of porcine gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) was found, using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique, to be a good histochemical marker for the following normal human pancreatobiliary duct-type cells: epithelial cells of the intra- and extra-hepatic bile ducts, gallbladder, papilla vateri and intra- and extralobular pancreatic ducts, centroacinar cells of the pancreas, and accessory gland cells of the large pancreatobiliary duct system. These cells were stained with antiserum R-6902 which recognizes both the N- and C-terminal portions of porcine GRP; antiserum R-6903 with a specificity to the C-terminal fragment of porcine GRP failed to stain the cells. Duct-type cells in other human adult organs were almost negative with both antisera. The N-terminal fragment of the GRP of monkey and pig pancreatobiliary duct cells also showed immunoreactivity, whereas those of dog, pika, rat, chicken, frog, and trout did not. Immunoabsorption experiments confirmed that the immunoreactivity of human pancreatobiliary duct-type cells belonged to the N-terminal portion of porcine GRP. Under electron microscopy, the antigen was shown to be localized diffusely in the cytosol and partially in the nucleoplasm of the duct-type cells that contained no endocrine granules. Immunostaining with R-6902 serum was found to be useful in identifying duct-type cells in inflamed and/or fibrosing pancreatobiliary tissues. Most cells of a benign pancreatic duct tumor (microcystic adenoma) were positive with R-6902 serum. Mucosal cells of the fetal gastric antrum and intestine and some cancer cells of the stomach and colon also stained with R-6902 serum; adenocarcinoma cells and hyperplastic duct cells of the pancreatobiliary tree frequently showed less stainability. The significance of the specific detection of neuropeptide immunoreactivity on non-neuroendocrine duct-type cells is discussed. PMID:6363818

  16. What Is Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bile duct adenocarcinomas develop from the mucous gland cells that line the inside of the duct. Other types of bile duct cancers are much less common. These include sarcomas, lymphomas, and small cell cancers. This document does not discuss these other ...

  17. Nitinol Stents for Palliative Treatment of Malignant Obstructive Jaundice: Should We Stent the Sphincter of Oddi in Every Case?

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzidakis, Adam A.; Tsetis, Dimitris; Chrysou, Evangelia [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71500 Heraklion-Stavrakia, Crete (Greece); Sanidas, Elias [Clinic for Surgical Oncology, University Hospital Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71500 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Petrakis, John [Clinic for General Surgery, University Hospital Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71500 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas C. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital Heraklion, Medical School of Crete, 71500 Heraklion-Stavrakia, Crete (Greece)

    2001-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the necessity of metallic stenting of the sphincter of Oddi in malignant obstructive jaundice when the tumor is more than 2 cm from the papilla of Vater.Methods: Sixty-seven self-expandable biliary stents were used in 60 patients with extrahepatic lesions of the common hepatic or common bile duct and with the distal margin of the tumor located more than 2 cm from the papilla of Vater. Stents were placed above the papilla in 30 cases (group A) and in another 30 with their distal part protruding into the duodenum (group B).Results: The 30-day mortality was 15%, due to the underlying disease. The stent occlusion rate was 17% after a mean period of 4.3 months. No major complications were noted. Average survival was 132 days for group A and 140 days for group B. In group A, 19 patients survived {<=} 90 days and in eight of these, cholangitis occurred at least once. Of 11 patients in group A with survival > 90 days, only two developed cholangitis. In group B, 13 patients who survived {<=} 90 days had no episodes of cholangitis and in 17 with survival > 90 days, cholangitis occurred in three. There is a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) regarding the incidence of cholangitis in favor of group A.Conclusions: In patients with extrahepatic lesions more than 2 cm from the papilla and with a relative poor prognosis ({<=} 3 months), due to more advanced disease or to a worse general condition, the sphincter of Oddi should also be stented in order to reduce the postprocedural morbidity.

  18. Endocrine pancreatic insufficiency secondary to chronic herpesvirus pancreatitis in a cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus).

    PubMed

    Phalen, David N; Falcon, Michelle; Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K

    2007-06-01

    A cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus) examined because of weight loss, polydipsia, and polyuria was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus based on the presence of glucosuria and marked hyperglycemia. Medical attempts to manage the diabetes mellitus were unsuccessful, and the bird was euthanatized. Histopathologic examination of the pancreas revealed a chronic active pancreatitis with herpesviral inclusions in many of the pancreatic acinar and duct cells. Psittacid herpesvirus-1 (PsHV-1) DNA was amplified from the lesion by polymerase chain reaction. Sequencing of the amplicon showed it to be the genotype 1 variant, which is most commonly associated with Pacheco's disease, an acute rapidly fatal systemic infection. The findings in this case suggest that the PsHV-1 genotype may also cause a localized disease of the pancreas. Infection with this virus should be considered as a differential diagnosis in birds with pancreatitis with or without diabetes mellitus. PMID:18065136

  19. Small Arteriovenous Malformation of the Common Bile Duct Causing Hemobilia in a Patient with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Sadao, E-mail: hayashi@m.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Baba, Yasutaka; Ueno, Kazuto; Nakajo, Masayuki [Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2008-07-15

    We report a 54-year-old male patient with arteriovenous malformation located at the common bile duct and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. The patient was treated as gallstone pancreatitis at first. Three days after endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD) for biliary drainage to subside gallstone pancreatitis, hemobilia was drained from the ENBD tube and the serum hemoglobin level gradually decreased. Cholangioscopy and angiography revealed that hemobilia was due to a small arteriovenous malformation located at the common bile duct. Subsequently, the patient was successfully treated by endovascular intervention.

  20. Stenting of the ductus arteriosus and banding of the pulmonary arteries: basis for various surgical strategies in newborns with multiple left heart obstructive lesions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I Michel-Behnke; H Akintuerk; I Marquardt; M Mueller; J Thul; J Bauer; K J Hagel; J Kreuder; P Vogt; D Schranz

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To present an institutional experience with stent placement in the arterial duct combined with bilateral banding of the pulmonary artery branches as a basis for various surgical strategies in newborns with hypoplastic left heart obstructive lesions.Design: Observational study.Setting: Paediatric heart centre in a university hospital.Patients: 20 newborns with various forms of left heart obstructive lesions and duct dependent systemic

  1. PPAR-gamma knockout in pancreatic epithelial cells abolishes the inhibitory effect of rosiglitazone on caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, C Y; Duan, S Z; Usher, M G; Mortensen, R M

    2007-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) agonists, such as the thiazolidinediones (TZDs), decrease acute inflammation in both pancreatic cell lines and mouse models of acute pancreatitis. Since PPAR-gamma agonists have been shown to exert some of their actions independent of PPAR-gamma, the role of PPAR-gamma in pancreatic inflammation has not been directly tested. Furthermore, the differential role of PPAR-gamma in endodermal derivatives (acini, ductal cells, and islets) as opposed to the endothelial or inflammatory cells is unknown. To determine whether the effects of a TZD, rosiglitazone, on caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis are dependent on PPAR-gamma in the endodermal derivatives, we created a cell-type specific knock out of PPAR-gamma in pancreatic acini, ducts, and islets. PPAR-gamma knockout animals show a greater response in some inflammatory genes after caerulein challenge. The anti-inflammatory effect of rosiglitazone on edema, macrophage infiltration, and expression of the proinflammatory cytokines is significantly decreased in pancreata of the knockout animals compared with control animals. However, rosiglitazone retains its effect in the lungs of the pancreatic-specific PPAR-gamma knockout animals, likely due to direct anti-inflammatory effect on lung parenchyma. These data show that the PPAR-gamma in the pancreatic epithelia and islets is important in suppressing inflammation and is required for the anti-inflammatory effects of TZDs in acute pancreatitis. PMID:17463185

  2. The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

  3. Autoimmune pancreatitis in the context of IgG4-related disease: Review of imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Leslie K; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2014-01-01

    Current understanding of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) recognizes a histopathological subtype of the disease to fall within the spectrum of IgG4-related disease. Along with clinical, laboratory, and histopathological data, imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of AIP, and more broadly, within the spectrum of IgG4-related disease. In addition to the defined role of imaging in consensus diagnostic protocols, an array of imaging modalities can provide complementary data to address specific clinical concerns. These include contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for pancreatic parenchymal lesion localization and characterization, endoscopic retrograde and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (ERCP and MRCP) to assess for duct involvement, and more recently, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to assess for extra-pancreatic sites of involvement. While the imaging appearance of AIP varies widely, certain imaging features are more likely to represent AIP than alternate diagnoses, such as pancreatic cancer. While nonspecific, imaging findings which favor a diagnosis of AIP rather than pancreatic cancer include: delayed enhancement of affected pancreas, mild dilatation of the main pancreatic duct over a long segment, the “capsule” and “penetrating duct” signs, and responsiveness to corticosteroid therapy. Systemic, extra-pancreatic sites of involvement are also often seen in AIP and IgG4-related disease, and typically respond to corticosteroid therapy. Imaging by CT, MR, and PET also play a role in the diagnosis and monitoring after treatment of involved sites. PMID:25386067

  4. Cornice Duct System

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Place; Chuck Ladd

    2004-10-29

    SYNERGETICS, INC., has designed, developed, and tested an air handling duct system that integrates the air duct with the cornice trim of interior spaces. The device has the advantage that the normal thermal losses from ducts into unconditioned attics and crawl spaces can be totally eliminated by bringing the ducts internal to the conditioned space. The following report details work conducted in the second budget period to develop the Cornice Duct System into a viable product for use in a variety of residential or small commercial building settings. A full-scale prototype has been fabricated and tested in a laboratory test building at the Daylighting Facility at North Carolina State University., Based on the results of that testing, the prototype design as been refined, fabricated, installed, and extensively tested in a residential laboratory house. The testing indicates that the device gives substantially superior performance to a standard air distribution system in terms of energy performance and thermal comfort. Patent Number US 6,511,373 B2 has been granted on the version of the device installed and tested in the laboratory house. (A copy of that patent is attached.) Refinements to the device have been carried through two additional design iterations, with a particular focus on reducing installation time and cost and refining the air control system. These new designs have been fabricated and tested and show substantial promise. Based on these design and testing iterations, a final design is proposed as part of this document. That final design is the basis for a continuation in part currently being filed with the U.5, Patent office.

  5. The histopathology of PRSS1 hereditary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Aatur D; Pai, Reetesh K; Kant, Jeffrey A; Bartholow, Tanner L; Zeh, Herbert J; Lee, Kenneth K; Wijkstrom, Martin; Yadav, Dhiraj; Bottino, Rita; Brand, Randall E; Chennat, Jennifer S; Lowe, Mark E; Papachristou, Georgios I; Slivka, Adam; Whitcomb, David C; Humar, Abhinav

    2014-03-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant disorder with 80% penetrance and variable expressivity. The vast majority of cases have been linked to mutations within the cationic trypsinogen gene, also referred to as serine protease 1 (PRSS1). Other than inheritance, PRSS1 pancreatitis has been considered clinically and pathologically indistinguishable from other etiologies of chronic pancreatitis. However, to date, the histologic findings of PRSS1 pancreatitis have not been well described. We, therefore, collected pancreatic specimens from 10 PRSS1 patients of various ages and examined their clinicopathologic features. Patients at the time of resection ranged in age from 9 to 66 years (median, 29 y), with a slight female predominance (60%). All patients reported a history of intermittent abdominal pain, with an age of onset ranging from infancy to 21 years of age. Examination of the gross and microscopic findings suggested a sequential pattern of changes with increasing patient age. In pediatric patients (n=4), although in most cases the pancreas was grossly normal, there was microscopic variation in lobular size and shape. Although the central portions of the pancreas displayed parenchymal loss accompanied by loose perilobular and interlobular fibrosis, the periphery was remarkable for replacement by mature adipose tissue. These changes were more developed in younger adults (n=2), in whom fatty replacement seemed to extend from the periphery to the central portions of the pancreas. With older patients (n=4), the pancreas showed marked atrophy and extensive replacement by mature adipose tissue with scattered islets of Langerhans and rare acinar epithelium concentrated near the main pancreatic duct. In summary, PRSS1 hereditary pancreatitis is characterized by progressive lipomatous atrophy of the pancreas. PMID:24525505

  6. The Histopathology of PRSS1 Hereditary Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Aatur D.; Pai, Reetesh K.; Kant, Jeffrey A.; Bartholow, Tanner L.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Lee, Kenneth K.; Wijkstrom, Martin; Yadav, Dhiraj; Bottino, Rita; Brand, Randall E.; Chennat, Jennifer S.; Lowe, Mark E.; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Slivka, Adam; Whitcomb, David C.; Humar, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant disorder with 80% penetrance and variable expressivity. The vast majority of cases have been linked to mutations within the cationic trypsinogen gene, also referred to as serine protease 1 (PRSS1). Other than inheritance, PRSS1 pancreatitis has been considered clinically and pathologically indistinguishable from other etiologies of chronic pancreatitis. However, to date, the histologic findings of PRSS1 pancreatitis have not been well described. We, therefore, collected pancreatic specimens from 10 PRSS1 patients of various ages and examined their clinicopathologic features. Patients at the time of resection ranged in age from 9 to 66 years (median, 29 y), with a slight female predominance (60%). All patients reported a history of intermittent abdominal pain, with an age of onset ranging from infancy to 21 years of age. Examination of the gross and microscopic findings suggested a sequential pattern of changes with increasing patient age. In pediatric patients (n=4), although in most cases the pancreas was grossly normal, there was microscopic variation in lobular size and shape. Although the central portions of the pancreas displayed parenchymal loss accompanied by loose perilobular and interlobular fibrosis, the periphery was remarkable for replacement by mature adipose tissue. These changes were more developed in younger adults (n=2), in whom fatty replacement seemed to extend from the periphery to the central portions of the pancreas. With older patients (n=4), the pancreas showed marked atrophy and extensive replacement by mature adipose tissue with scattered islets of Langerhans and rare acinar epithelium concentrated near the main pancreatic duct. In summary, PRSS1 hereditary pancreatitis is characterized by progressive lipomatous atrophy of the pancreas. PMID:24525505

  7. Inflammatory Mechanisms Contributing to Pancreatic Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Farrow, Buckminster; Sugiyama, Yuko; Chen, Andy; Uffort, Ekong; Nealon, William; Mark Evers, B

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Pancreatic cancer is the most deadly of all gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies, yet relatively little is known regarding mechanisms of tumor development including the role of inflammation. Summary Background Data: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) increases the risk of developing cancer by 10- to 20-fold; mediators of the chronic inflammatory process and the surrounding fibrotic stroma likely support a transformation to malignancy, yet the exact mechanisms remain undefined. The purpose of our present study was to determine potential inflammatory components in epithelial and stromal cells that may contribute to both CP and pancreatic cancers. Methods: Specimens of normal pancreas, CP, and pancreatic cancer were examined using laser-capture microdissection (LCM), gene array, and immunohistochemistry. Results: Gene array analysis from LCM-dissected tissues demonstrated: (i) increased expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8), an activator of the inflammatory factor nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B), and (ii) decreased expression of I?B (an inhibitor of NF-?B) in CP ductal cells compared with normal ducts. Compared with CP, cancers demonstrated: (i) increased expression of tumor related genes including S100A4, cyclin E1, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, and (ii) expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2, a pro-invasive factor for tumor cells, which was not present in the CP stroma. Increased staining of both the p50 NF-?B subunit and IKK? kinase (a protein that allows activation of NF-?B) was noted in CP and cancers. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that similar inflammatory components and downstream effectors are present in CP and pancreatic cancers. Importantly, these findings suggest that a common pathway for pancreatic cancer development may be through a chronic inflammatory process including stroma formation. These findings may lead to novel strategies for pancreatic cancer prophylaxis based on inhibition of inflammatory mediators. PMID:15166955

  8. Nasal packing and stenting

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Nasal packs are indispensable in ENT practice. This study reviews current indications, effectiveness and risks of nasal packs and stents. In endoscopic surgery, nasal packs should always have smooth surfaces to minimize mucosal damage, improve wound healing and increase patient comfort. Functional endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery allows the use of modern nasal packs, since pressure is no longer required. So called hemostatic/resorbable materials are a first step in this direction. However, they may lead to adhesions and foreign body reactions in mucosal membranes. Simple occlusion is an effective method for creating a moist milieu for improved wound healing and avoiding dryness. Stenting of the frontal sinus is recommended if surgery fails to produce a wide, physiologically shaped drainage path that is sufficiently covered by intact tissue. PMID:22073095

  9. Prognosis of cancer with branch duct type IPMN of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Itoi, Takao; Sofuni, Atsushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Kurihara, Toshio; Ishii, Kentaro; Tsuji, Shujiro; Umeda, Junko; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Kasuya, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To examine the coexistence of metachronous and synchronous cancer in branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas (IPMN). METHODS: We reviewed the records of 145 patients with branch duct IPMN between January 1991 and April 2008 and assessed the relationship between IPMN and intra- or extra-pancreatic carcinoma and the outcome of IPMN. RESULTS: The mean observation period was 55.9 ± 45.3 mo. Among the 145 patients, the frequency of extra-pancreatic cancer was 29.0%. The frequency of gastric cancer, colon cancer, breast cancer, and pancreatic cancer were 25.5%, 15.7%, 13.7%, and 9.8%, respectively. Twenty (13.8%) of the patients died. The cause of death was extra-pancreatic carcinoma in 40%, pancreatic cancer in 25%, IPMN per se in 20%, and benign disease in 15% of the patients. CONCLUSION: The prognosis for IPMN depends not on the IPMN per se, but on the presence of intra- or extra-pancreatic cancer. PMID:20397268

  10. Carotid artery stenting: which stent for which lesion?

    PubMed

    Bosiers, Marc; Deloose, Koen; Verbist, Jürgen; Peeters, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The different geometries and working principles of carotid stents (nitinol or cobalt chromium, open- or closed-cell configuration) provide each product with unique functional properties. The individual characteristics of each device may make it an attractive choice in one circumstance but render it less desirable in other situations. In approximately 75% of all procedures, all types of stents will achieve similar outcomes, making adequate device selection unnecessary. For the remaining quarter, careful preoperative screening is mandatory. In addition to eventual access issues, the choice of the optimal carotid stent depends mainly on arterial anatomy and lesion morphology. When treating a tortuous anatomy, stents with a flexible and comformable open-cell configuration are preferred. In arteries with a significant mismatch between common carotid artery and internal carotid artery diameter, cobalt chromium (Elgiloy) or tapered nitinol stents are selected. Lesions with suspected high emboligenicity are best covered with stents with a closed-cell configuration, whereas highly calcified lesions need treatment with nitinol stents. Thorough knowledge of the characteristics, advantages and disadvantages, and working principles of the different available stents is mandatory to optimally select the materials to be used for patients eligible for carotid revascularization. PMID:16229793

  11. Biliary stenting in advanced malignancy: an analysis of predictive factors for survival

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Mehran; Khanom, Koudeza; Ma, Yuk Ting; Punia, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Stenting of the biliary tree is a common palliative procedure to relieve obstructive jaundice in advanced malignancy. Although effective in relief of biliary obstruction and palliation of symptoms, little information is available on predictive factors for survival post-procedure. This retrospective study sought to assess factors influencing post-procedure survival in cancer patients after biliary stenting. Methods Case notes of all patients from a regional academic cancer center, who underwent biliary stenting for obstructive jaundice related to malignancy during 2008 and 2009 were reviewed. We collected epidemiological, biochemical, treatment and survival data on all patients. We used Kaplan–Meyer analysis to assess survival from day of first biliary stenting (adjusted for cancer types), and the Cox proportional hazards model for univariate and multivariate analysis. Results One hundred and ninety-four patients were included in the final analysis. Most cases were related to pancreatic cancer or cholangiocarcinoma (89 and 46 cases respectively). Median survival for all patients was 143 days. In multivariate analysis serum albumin ?34 g/L at the time of procedure (hazard ratio 0.573; 95% confidence interval 0.424–0.773, P<0.001) and chemotherapy post-stent (hazard ratio 0.636; 95% confidence interval 0.455–0.889, P=0.008) were two independent prognostic factors predicting a better survival post-stenting. The 30 day mortality post-procedure in the 194 patients was 12%. Conclusion This study suggests that stenting of the biliary tree in cases of malignant obstruction allows durable palliation of symptoms even in cases where further active chemotherapy treatment is not possible. However, the better outcome observed in patients with albumin ?34 g/L and those receiving chemotherapy post-stent requires further validation. PMID:25525389

  12. A Rare Anomaly of Biliary System: MRCP Evidence of a Cystic Duct Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Goya, Cemil; Arslan, Mehmet Serif; Hamidi, Cihad; Kuday, Suzan; Okur, Mehmet Hanifi; Aydogdu, Bahattin

    2014-01-01

    Cystic duct cysts are a rare congenital anomaly. While the other bile duct cysts (choledochus and the intrahepatic bile ducts) are classified according to the classification described by Tadoni, there is no classification method described by the cystic duct cysts, although it is claimed that the cystic duct cysts may constitute a new “Type 6” category. Only a limited number of patients with cystic duct cysts have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis is usually made in the neonatal period or during childhood. The clinical symptoms are nonspecific and usually include pain in the right upper quadrant and jaundice. The condition may also present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholelithiasis, or pancreatitis. In our case, the abdominal ultrasonography (US) performed on a 6-year-old female patient who presented with pain in the right upper quadrant pointed out an anechoic cyst at the neck of the gall bladder. Based on the magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) results, a cystic dilatation was diagnosed in the cystic duct. The aim of this case-report presentation was to discuss the US and MRCP findings of the cystic dilatation of cystic duct, which is an extremely rare condition, in the light of the literature information. PMID:24987540

  13. The pancreatic head is larger than often assumed.

    PubMed

    Pirri, C; Cui, X W; De Molo, C; Ignee, A; Schreiber-Dietrich, D G; Dietrich, C F

    2013-04-01

    Reference values for B-mode abdominal ultrasound are controversially discussed in the literature mainly due to the lack of data and non-standardized examination techniques. A cohort of 100 patients was prospectively examined. Patients with hepatobiliary diseases including gallstones, acute or chronic pancreatitis (n = 13) and non-adequate visualization (n = 10) were excluded from statistical analysis. Therefore, 77 patients were analyzed including 52 female and 25 male healthy subjects regarding the biliopancreatic system (median age ± SD: 56 ± 18 years [minimum: 22 and maximum 93 years]). The mean value of the cranio-caudal diameter of the pancreatic head was 49 ± 10 [26 - 77] mm(mean ± SD [minimum - maximum]) which is larger than usually reported except in one study. The size of the pancreatic head is often larger than assumed which is of importance to know to exclude pancreatic pathology below the level of the common bile duct. PMID:23585270

  14. Duodenum-preserving resection and Roux-en-Y pancreatic jejunostomy in benign pancreatic head tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chun-Hui; Tao, Ming; Jia, Yi-Mu; Xiong, Jing-Wei; Zhang, Tong-Lin; Xiu, Dian-Rong

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the feasibility of partial pancreatic head resection and Roux-en-Y pancreatic jejunostomy for the treatment of benign tumors of the pancreatic head (BTPH). From November 2006 to February 2009, four patients (three female and one male) with a mean age of 34.3 years (range: 21-48 years) underwent partial pancreatic head resection and Roux-en-Y pancreatic jejunostomy for the treatment of BTPH (diameters of 3.2-4.5 cm) using small incisions (5.1-7.2 cm). Preoperative symptoms include one case of repeated upper abdominal pain, one case of drowsiness and two cases with no obvious preoperative symptoms. All four surgeries were successfully performed. The mean operative time was 196.8 min (range 165-226 min), and average blood loss was 138.0 mL (range: 82-210 mL). The mean postoperative hospital stay was 7.5 d (range: 7-8 d). In one case, the main pancreatic duct was injured. Pathological examination confirmed that one patient suffered from mucinous cystadenoma, one exhibited insulinoma, and two patients had solid-pseudopapillary neoplasms. There were no deaths or complications observed during the perioperative period. All patients had no signs of recurrence of the BTPH within a follow-up period of 48-76 mo and had good quality of life without diabetes. Partial pancreatic head resection with Roux-en-Y pancreatic jejunostomy is feasible in selected patients with BTPH. PMID:25469053

  15. Fatigue and durability of Nitinol stents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. R. Pelton; V. Schroeder; M. R. Mitchell; Xiao-Yan Gong; M. Barney; S. W. Robertson

    2008-01-01

    Nitinol self-expanding stents are effective in treating peripheral artery disease, including the superficial femoral, carotid, and renal arteries. However, fracture occurrences of up to 50% have been reported in some stents after one year. These stent fractures are likely due to in vivo cyclic displacements. As such, the cyclic fatigue and durability properties of Nitinol-based endovascular stents are discussed in

  16. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  17. End-to-side pancreaticojejunostomy without stitches in the pancreatic stump.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Daisuke; Hirota, Masahiko; Yagi, Yasushi; Baba, Hideo

    2013-07-01

    In patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy, leakage from the pancreatic anastomosis remains an important cause of morbidity and contributes to prolonged hospitalization and mortality. Recently, a new end-to-end pancreaticojejunostomy technique without the use of any stitches through the pancreatic texture or pancreatic duct has been developed. In this novel anastomosis technique, the pancreatic stump is first sunk into deeply and tightened with a purse string in the bowel serosa. We modified this method in an end-to-side manner to complete the insertion of the pancreatic stump into the jejunum, independent of the size of the pancreas or the jejunum. We tested this new anastomosis technique in four pilot patients and compared their outcomes with four control patients who underwent traditional pancreaticojejunostomy. No severe pancreatic fistulas were observed in either group. There were no differences in morbidity or hospital stay between the groups. This new method can be performed safely and is expected to minimize leakage from pancreaticojejunostomies. PMID:23052756

  18. A new pathological scoring method for adrenal injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenhong; Hui, Yuanjian; Yu, Jia; Wang, Weixing; Xu, Sheng; Chen, Chen; Xiong, Xincheng

    2014-12-01

    These studies investigated the appearance and function of adrenal glands in rats with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and established a new histopathological score to evaluate adrenal histopathological changes. Severe acute pancreatitis relied on retrograde infusion of 5% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct. The damage of SAP was estimated by serum amylase, secretory phospholipase A2 and pancreatic histopathology. Light and electron microscopy of adrenal gland, and the levels of serum corticosterone were investigated. These results showed that the generally ascending trend of adrenal pathological score was inversely proportional to the generally descending trend of serum corticosterone levels, but parallel with the changes of pancreatic histopathology. Herein, the new adrenal histopathological score was effective in the evaluation of adrenal injury following SAP. It may indirectly reflect the variation of serum cortisol levels and the severity of pancreatitis to a certain extent. PMID:24947411

  19. Ureteral stents: new ideas, new designs

    PubMed Central

    Al-Aown, Abdulrahman; Kyriazis, Iason; Kallidonis, Panagiotis; Kraniotis, Pantelis; Rigopoulos, Christos; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Petsas, Theodore; Liatsikos, Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    Ureteral stents represent a minimally invasive alternative to preserve urinary drainage whenever ureteral patency is deteriorated or is under a significant risk to be occluded due to extrinsic or intrinsic etiologies. The ideal stent that would combine perfect long-term efficacy with no stent-related morbidity is still lacking and stent usage is associated with several adverse effects that limit its value as a tool for long-term urinary drainage. Several new ideas on stent design, composition material and stent coating currently under evaluation, foreseen to eliminate the aforementioned drawbacks of ureteral stent usage. In this article we review the currently applied novel ideas and new designs of ureteral stents. Moreover, we evaluate potential future prospects of ureteral stent development adopted mostly by the pioneering cardiovascular stent industry, focusing, however, on the differences between ureteral and endothelial tissue. PMID:21789086

  20. Hemodynamically Driven Stent Strut Design

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Juan M.; Davies, Peter F.

    2010-01-01

    Stents are deployed to physically reopen stenotic regions of arteries and to restore blood flow. However, inflammation and localized stent thrombosis remain a risk for all current commercial stent designs. Computational fluid dynamics results predict that nonstreamlined stent struts deployed at the arterial surface in contact with flowing blood, regardless of the strut height, promote the creation of proximal and distal flow conditions that are characterized by flow recirculation, low flow (shear) rates, and prolonged particle residence time. Furthermore, low shear rates yield an environment less conducive for endothelialization, while local flow recirculation zones can serve as micro-reaction chambers where procoagulant and pro-inflammatory elements from the blood and vessel wall accumulate. By merging aerodynamic theory with local hemodynamic conditions we propose a streamlined stent strut design that promotes the development of a local flow field free of recirculation zones, which is predicted to inhibit thrombosis and is more conducive for endothelialization. PMID:19472055

  1. Split ureteral stent after ureteroureterostomy.

    PubMed

    Hidas, Guy; McLorie, Gordon; McAleer, Irene

    2013-08-01

    Ipsilateral ureteroureterostomy is a well documented surgical approach to duplicated collecting systems associated with obstruction or Vesicoureteral reflux. Indwelling stents are employed in these procedures, to facilitate unobstructed flow across the anastomosis, to minimize anastomotic leak, and to assist in aligning the repair. Positioning of the ureteral stent is controversial. Some advocate placement of the stent to the recipient ureter across the suture line to prevent anastomotic stricture. Others prefer placing the stent along the donor ureter in order to facilitate drainage of the moiety that was originally obstructed. We describe a technique that allows drainage both ureters by using a single stent that has been split at its proximal end just across the U-U anastomosis. PMID:23523181

  2. Complicated bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  3. EUS-Guided Bile Duct Drainage (EUBD) in 95 Patients.

    PubMed

    Will, U; Fueldner, F; Kern, C; Meyer, F

    2014-05-22

    Purpose: Bile duct stenting during ERCP has long been established as the gold standard for the treatment of biliary obstruction. However, when the ampulla cannot be reached or bile duct cannulation fails, percutaneous or surgical drainage is performed. The study aimed to investigate the feasibility and long-term outcome of a potential alternative intervention, EUS-guided transluminal biliary drainage (EUBD), in a representative number of patients. Materials and Methods: All patients undergoing EUBD were included in a prospectively collected single-center database over a 10-year period. Feasibility was characterized by technical and clinical success, including long-term follow-up data. Results: From IV/2002 - XI/2012, 10?832 EUS and 8756 ERCP procedures were performed. Simultaneously, 223 PTCD and 95 EUBD were performed. Cholangiography was achieved in 93/95 patients (97.9?%). However, in one patient stone extraction was executed by means of the rendezvous technique. Therefore, drainage was not necessary. Intention to treat with EUS-guided drainage was given in 80/94 patients (86.9?%) using different techniques depending on anatomical variations and requirements. The cause of bile duct obstruction could not be cured in 77 patients (malignancy). In 18 patients, a benign (n?=?15) or unknown etiology (n?=?3) of bile duct stenosis was found. The complication rate was 15.7?% (mortality, 1.1?%; n?=?1/95). The follow-up ranged from 3?-?60 months with reintervention in 3 patients. Conclusion: EUBD is a promising therapy for bile duct obstruction in patients predominantly with malignant diseases. Using EUBD, an excellent interventional approach is available for long-term internal drainage to prevent percutaneous drainage (PTCD). EUS-guided drainage is challenging and needs extraordinary interventional expertise, preferentially in tertiary gastroenterological and endoscopic centers. PMID:24854133

  4. Lacrimal duct cyst abscess.

    PubMed

    Dharmasena, Aruna; Sobajo, Cassandra; Irion, Luciane; Ataullah, Sajid

    2014-12-01

    Cystic dilatation within the lacrimal gland is thought to be related to chronic inflammation and scarring of the lacrimal gland ductules. We review the literature and discuss a case and of lacrimal duct cyst suppuration presenting with visual loss, external ophthalmoplegia, proptosis and ptosis. To our knowledge, only one other report of a lacrimal ductal cyst abscess has been reported in the literature so far. PMID:25208223

  5. Invasive ductal adenocarcinoma arising from pancreatic heterotopia in rectum: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Mahmoud; Rashid, Asif; Maru, Dipen

    2010-12-01

    Pancreatic heterotopia has been described at several abdominal and intrathoracic locations, most commonly in the stomach and upper part of the small intestine. Its occurrence in the rectum is unusual, and malignant transformation in the rectum has not been reported. We report a case of ductal adenocarcinoma arising in a rectal pancreatic heterotopia in a 42-year-old woman with delayed local recurrence. The tumor was composed of well to moderately differentiated ductal adenocarcinoma infiltrating through the full thickness of the anorectal wall with extension into the vaginal septum. A focus of ectopic pancreas consisting of exocrine acini and small ducts adjacent to the tumor with some ducts showing mild to severe dysplasia reminiscent of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia was also observed. Although our literature search found 31 documented reports of tumors arising in the heterotopic pancreas, the present case is the first case of ductal adenocarcinoma arising in a focus of pancreatic heterotopia in the rectum. PMID:20869744

  6. Groove Pancreatitis: Spectrum of Imaging Findings and Radiology-Pathology Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Siva P.; Salaria, Safia N.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the “groove” between the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are strong associations with long-term alcohol abuse, functional obstruction of the duct of Santorini, and Brunner gland hyperplasia. CONCLUSION Unfortunately, differentiating groove pancreatitis from malignancy on the basis of imaging features, clinical presentation, or laboratory markers can be extraordinarily difficult, and the vast majority of these patients ultimately undergo a pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure) because of an inability to completely exclude malignancy. In certain cases, however, the imaging features on CT and MRI can allow the radiologist to prospectively suggest the correct diagnosis. PMID:23789694

  7. Pancreatic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    McFaul, C D; Vitone, L J; Campbell, F; Azadeh, B; Hughes, M L; Garvey, C J; Ghaneh, P; Neoptolemos, J P

    2004-01-01

    Pancreatic hamartoma is a rare benign lesion and may be mistaken for a malignancy, as demonstrated by two cases. The first case was a 29-year-old man who presented with a 7-month history of intermittent upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting and a 15-kg weight loss. CT and MRI revealed a mass in the head of the pancreas. The second case was a 62-year-old man who presented with a 2-year history of intermittent abdominal pain, vomiting and a 25-kg weight loss. Although positron emission tomography was normal, CT revealed thickening of the duodenal wall and endoluminal ultrasonography revealed a tumour in the head of the pancreas. Both patients recovered from uneventful Kausch-Whipple pancreatoduodenectomy (in the first patient, it was pylorus-preserving), and in each case the histological diagnosis was hamartoma. Pancreatic hamartoma can present with vague, non-specific symptoms which, despite modern diagnostic tools, can be difficult to diagnose. Surgical resection with histopathological examination is required to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:15340246

  8. Moulded calculus of common bile duct mimicking a stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Brocki, Marian; ?migielski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Bile duct stenosis, in most cases, appears to be the consequence of pancreatic head, ampulla of Vater and bile duct tumours, cholangitis sclerosans, as well as iatrogenic damages, which may all be diagnosed during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In very rare cases the restriction may result from an atypically shaped wedged stone. This situation creates many diagnostic problems, which in the majority of cases can be solved using imaging studies. However, in some patients even a significant extension of diagnostic procedures may not lead to a correct diagnosis. We present a diagnostically difficult case of a deposit imitating restriction. We present a 70-year-old woman with common bile duct restriction undiagnosed despite several ultrasound examinations (USG), computed tomography (CT), double magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Only after the third ERCP examination a fragmented, by formerly introduced prosthesis, deposit, imitating narrowing, was revealed. Identification of bile duct deposits depends on their composition, localisation and the imaging techniques used. Pigment calculi with atypical shape, bile density, air density or surrounding tissue density are very difficult to diagnose. Thus, the sensitivity of common bile duct stone detection in USG, CT, MRCP and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is 5–88%; 6–88%; 73–97%; and 84–98%, respectively. Moreover, ERCP may not diagnose the character of the restriction even in 5.2% up to 30% of the patients. Consequently, assessment of diagnosis in a number of patients is difficult. A deposit imitating common bile duct (CBD) restriction is a rare, difficult to diagnose phenomenon, which should be taken into account during differential diagnosis of CBD restrictions. PMID:25061493

  9. Pancreatic body adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine tumor characteristics: A case report

    PubMed Central

    TAJIMA, HIDEHIRO; KITAGAWA, HIROHISA; SHOJI, MASATOSHI; WATANABE, TOSHIFUMI; NAKANUMA, SHINICHI; OKAMOTO, KOICHI; SAKAI, SEISHO; KINOSHITA, JUN; MAKINO, ISAMU; FURUKAWA, HIROYUKI; NAKAMURA, KEISHI; HAYASHI, HIRONORI; OYAMA, KATSUNOBU; INOKUCHI, MASAFUMI; NAKAGAWARA, HISATOSHI; MIYASHITA, TOMOHARU; ITOH, HIROSHI; TAKAMURA, HIROYUKI; NINOMIYA, ITASU; FUSHIDA, SACHIO; FUJIMURA, TAKASHI; OHTA, TETSUO; SATOH, HIROHIDE; IKEDA, HIROKO; HARADA, KENICHI; NAKANUMA, YASUNI

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old female with pancreatic body cancer underwent a distal pancreatectomy. The tumor was a moderately- to poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Tumor growth filled the dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD) and infiltrated the surrounding area. Six months later, metastases to the left diaphragm and MPD of the remnant pancreatic head were detected. Chemoradiotherapy was administered, but the patient succumbed 22 months after surgery. An autopsy demonstrated that a moderately- to poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma had arisen from the pancreatic head and infiltrated the duodenum and bile duct. Huge liver metastases and multiple peritoneal disseminations were also present. Microscopically, a portion of the tumor had a pseudo-rosette appearance in the adenocarcinoma component, while another section showed characteristics of a neuroendocrine tumor (NET) immunohistochemically. The original surgically-resected tumor also showed NET characteristics immunohistochemically. It is therefore necessary to search for NET components in pancreatic cancer with atypical growth and metastases, even when adenocarcinoma has been diagnosed histologically. PMID:24944667

  10. Characterization of Pancreatic Serous Cystadenoma on Dual-Phase Multidetector Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Linda C.; Singhi, Aatur D.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to characterize pancreatic serous cystadenomas on dual-phase multidetector computed tomography in a surgical series. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective review of pre-operative dual-phase multidetector computed tomographic scans from 68 patients with surgically resected and pathologically confirmed pancreatic serous cystadenomas. Results Pancreatic serous cystadenomas were most commonly found in the tail (39%). The mean (SD) axial dimension was 4.5 (2.7) cm. A total of 36% contained internal calcifications. Dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (14%) and pancreatic parenchymal atrophy (11%) were uncommon. The mean (SD) attenuation of components with the highest attenuation was 49.1 (35.0) Hounsfield units on the arterial phase and 48.5 (33.4) Hounsfield units on the portal venous phase. Only 20% of neoplasms demonstrated “classic” morphology, as defined by multiple thin nonenhancing septations, calcifications, as well as the absence of main pancreatic duct dilatation and vascular involvement. Conclusions Only 20% of surgically resected serous cystadenomas fulfilled classic morphology. Attenuation was helpful in differentiating serous cystadenomas from insulinomas and other cystic pancreatic masses, but it was not helpful in differentiation from pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Morphologic features were more helpful in differentiating serous cystadenomas from malignant masses. PMID:24632937

  11. CXCL12 Chemokine Expression Suppresses Human Pancreatic Cancer Growth and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ishan; Zimmerman, Noah P.; Mackinnon, A. Craig; Tsai, Susan; Evans, Douglas B.; Dwinell, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an unsolved health problem with nearly 75% of patients diagnosed with advanced disease and an overall 5-year survival rate near 5%. Despite the strong link between mortality and malignancy, the mechanisms behind pancreatic cancer dissemination and metastasis are poorly understood. Correlative pathological and cell culture analyses suggest the chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a biological role in pancreatic cancer progression. In vivo roles for the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in pancreatic cancer malignancy were investigated. CXCR4 and CXCR7 were consistently expressed in normal and cancerous pancreatic ductal epithelium, established cell lines, and patient-derived primary cancer cells. Relative to healthy exocrine ducts, CXCL12 expression was pathologically repressed in pancreatic cancer tissue specimens and patient-derived cell lines. To test the functional consequences of CXCL12 silencing, pancreatic cancer cell lines stably expressingthe chemokine were engineered. Consistent with a role for CXCL12 as a tumor suppressor, cells producing the chemokine wereincreasingly adherent and migration deficient in vitro and poorly metastatic in vivo, compared to control cells. Further, CXCL12 reintroduction significantly reduced tumor growth in vitro, with significantly smaller tumors in vivo, leading to a pronounced survival advantage in a preclinical model. Together, these data demonstrate a functional tumor suppressive role for the normal expression of CXCL12 in pancreatic ducts, regulating both tumor growth andcellulardissemination to metastatic sites. PMID:24594697

  12. HCO 3 - Transport in a Mathematical Model of the Pancreatic Ductal Epithelium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Sohma; M. A. Gray; Y. Imai; B. E. Argent

    2000-01-01

    We have used computer modeling to investigate how pancreatic duct cells can secrete a fluid containing near isotonic (~140 mm) NaHCO3. Experimental data suggest that NaHCO3 secretion occurs in three steps: (i) accumulation of HCOх across the basolateral membrane of the duct cell by Na(HCO3)n cotransporters, Na+\\/H+ exchangers and proton pumps; (ii) secretion of HCOх across the luminal membrane on

  13. A Mathematical Model of the Pancreatic Ductal Epithelium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y. Sohma; M. A. Gray; Y. Imai; B. E. Argent

    1996-01-01

    .   A mathematical model of the HCO?\\u000a \\u000a 3-secreting pancreatic ductal epithelium was developed using network thermodynamics. With a minimal set of assumptions, the\\u000a model accurately reproduced the experimentally measured membrane potentials, voltage divider ratio, transepithelial resistance\\u000a and short-circuit current of nonstimulated ducts that were microperfused and bathed with a CO2\\/HCO?\\u000a \\u000a 3-free, HEPES-buffered solution, and also the intracellular pH of duct

  14. Electrohydraulic lithotripsy as an highly effective method for complete large common bile duct stone clearance

    PubMed Central

    Aswakul, Pitulak; Kachintorn, Udom

    2013-01-01

    The removal of common bile duct (CBD) stones is commonly performed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), which has an 85–90% success rate. Thus, 10–15% of CBD stones, specifically large ones, cannot be completely removed using standard techniques and are therefore managed conservatively by sequential biliary stenting or using other techniques such as electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EH L). The aim of the present paper was to determine the outcomes of these different methods for the removal of large CBD stones in the patients who failed to clear the CBD after initial attempt and to identify the factors which might associated with patients who would fail for sequential biliary stenting. We retrospectively reviewed 439 patients who underwent ERC for stone removal in our institute. In this study, 36 cases and 7 cases were included in the sequential biliary stenting and intraductal EH L groups, respectively, with rates of complete CBD clearance of 86.1% and 100%, respectively. On average, 2.8 and 1.3 sessions were required before complete stone removal in the biliary stenting and EH L groups, respectively. The number of complications during follow-up was higher in biliary stenting than in intraductal EH L patients. The factors associated with failure to complete CBD stone clearance in the biliary stenting group were no change in CBD stone size 9 weeks after the first biliary stenting attempt and failure of balloon sphincteroplasty. EH L was an effective and safe procedure for acheivement of complete CBD clearance especially for large CBD stone. PMID:24147232

  15. Present and future of endovascular SFA treatment: stents, stent-grafts, drug coated balloons and drug coated stents.

    PubMed

    Bosiers, M; Deloose, K; Verbist, J; Peeters, P

    2008-04-01

    The current evolution towards treating more complex femoropopliteal lesions as seen in the renewed TASC II recommendations clearly reflects the continuous evolutions in femoropopliteal stent design. Recent stent design improvements focus on decreasing stent fractures rates which can negatively impact patency rates. By rearranging strut alignment towards helical connecting bridges or full helical stent designs, stent designers have successfully improved the fracture resistance of their stents. The superior fracture resistance of the latest stent generation in combination with the production of long nitinol stents of up to 20 cm in length allow that more difficult and complex lesions can be treated endovascularly. The continuous perfection of nitinol stent platforms followed by the transfer of coronary technologies (e.g. active coatings) towards peripheral devices might broaden the indications for the minimal invasive strategy towards TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC) II C&D lesions. PMID:18431335

  16. Polyorethaoe-covered nitinol strecker stents as primary palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kanasaki, Shuzo; Furukawa, Akira [Shiga University of Medical Science, Department of Radiology (Japan); Kane, Teruyuki [Yujinkai Yamazaki Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine (Japan); Murata, Kiyoshi [Shiga University of Medical Science, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of the polyure-thane-covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the treatment of patients with malignant biliary obstruction.Methods: Twenty-three covered stents produced by us were placed in 18 patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Jaundice was caused by cholangiocarcinoma (n=5), pancreatic Cancer (n=6), gallbladder Cancer (n=4), metastatic lymph nodes (n=2), and tumor of the papilla (n=1).Resulrs: The mean patency period of the Stents was 37.5 weeks (5-106 weeks). Recurrent obstructive jaundice occurred in two patients (11%). Adequate biliary drainage over 50 weeks or until death was achieved in 17 of 18 patients (94.4%). Late cholangitis was observed in two patients whose stents bridged the ampulla of Vater. Other late severe complications were not encountered.Conclusion: Although more study is necessary, our results suggest the clinical efficacy of our covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the management of obstructive jaundice caused by malignant diseases.

  17. A meta-analysis of the effect of preoperative biliary stenting on patients with obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengyi; Yan, Guirong; Li, Zhiming; Tzeng, Chi-Meng

    2014-11-01

    The goal of this study was to systematically review the effects of biliary stenting on postoperative morbidity and mortality of patients with obstructive jaundice. PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and other relevant databases were searched by computer and manually for published and unpublished studies on the impact of preoperative biliary drainage on patients with obstructive jaundice from 2000 to the present day. Two investigators independently selected the studies according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, extracted the data, and assessed the quality of the selected studies. Meta-analysis was performed to compare postoperative morbidity and mortality of patients between the drainage and nondrainage groups.Compared with the nondrainage group, the overall mortality, overall morbidity, infectious morbidity, incidence of wound infection, intra-abdominal abscess, pancreatic fistulas, bile leak, and delayed gastric emptying in the drainage group were not significantly different. Compared with the nondrainage group, the drainage group had a drainage time of <4 weeks with an increased overall morbidity by 7% to 23%; however, the overall morbidity of the drainage group with a drainage time >4 weeks was not significantly different. Compared with the nondrainage group, the overall mortality of the drainage group using metal stents and plastic stents as internal drainage devices was reduced by 0.5% to 6%, whereas that of the drainage group using plastic stent devices was not significantly different.In summary, preoperative drainage should be applied selectively. The drainage time should be >4 weeks, and metal stents should be used for internal drainage. PMID:25474436

  18. ADH-1, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic or Biliary Tract Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Gallbladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer

  19. Adult pancreatic hemangioma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    NAITO, YOSHIKI; NISHIDA, NAOYO; NAKAMURA, YASUHIRO; TORII, YOSHIKUNI; YOSHIKAI, HIROSHI; KAWANO, HIROSHI; AKIYAMA, TETSUJI; SAKAI, TERUFUMI; TANIWAKI, SATORU; TANAKA, MASAYA; KURODA, HISASHI; HIGAKI, KOICHI

    2014-01-01

    Vascular neoplasms of the pancreas are extremely rare and usually manifest as symptomatic, cystic lesions. This study presents a case that includes the clinicopathologic information used to discriminate pancreatic hemangioma from other types of cystic lesion of the pancreas. A 40-year-old female visited hospital with a chief complaint of abdominal pain. The serum CEA and CA19-9 levels of the patient were within the normal limits. An abdominal computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging showed a 100-mm mass lesion in the body and tail of the pancreas, and the tumor extended toward the retroperitoneum and surrounded the splenic vein. The lesion was subsequently resected. Macroscopically, it was a multiloculated cyst with intracystic hemorrhage. Microscopically, the lesion was composed of numerous, heterogeneous cysts lined by a flattened single layer of cells without significant atypia. Notably, numerous neoplastic vessels extended into the interlobular septa of the pancreas and surrounded the main pancreatic duct. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the lining cells expressed CD31 and CD34. The lesion was diagnosed as adult pancreatic hemangioma. Surgical treatment may be required when a direct contact between the lesion and the pancreatic tissue is demonstrated using imaging. PMID:25013478

  20. Surgical techniques and results in pancreatic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tydén, G; Bolinder, J

    1989-10-01

    A major stumbling block preventing success with pancreatic transplantation has been the handling of the exocrine secretion from the pancreatic graft. As a consequence, numerous surgical techniques have been evaluated such as duct ligation, free intraperitoneal drainage, ductal filling with polymers, exocrine diversion to the urinary tract, to the bowel and to the stomach. Also, because of problems encountered with the duodenum, segmental body-and-tail pancreatic grafts have been used for many years. However, it seems today that mainly two different techniques for pancreatic transplantation remain. In both whole pancreaticoduodenal grafts are used with a vascular supply from the coeliac axis and the portal vein. The exocrine drainage is either to the urinary tract by means of a side-to-side anastomosis between donor duodenum and recipient urinary bladder, or to the bowel by a side-to-side anastomosis between donor duodenum and recipient proximal jejunum. With both these techniques the technical complications have been much reduced and as a consequence the graft survival rates are now approaching those obtained with the transplantation of the liver, heart and kidney. PMID:2701724

  1. Acute pancreatitis and development of pancreatic pseudo cyst after extra corporeal shock wave lithotripsy to a left renal calculus: A rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mylarappa, Prasad; Javali, Tarun; Prathvi; Ramesh, D.

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is considered the standard of care for the treatment of small upper ureteric and renal calculi. A few centers have extended its use to the treatment of bile duct calculi and pancreatic calculi. The complication rates with SWL are low, resulting in its wide spread acceptance and usage. However, some of the serious complications reported in 1% of patients include acute pancreatitis, perirenal hematoma, urosepsis, venous thrombosis, biliary obstruction, bowel perforation, lung injury, rupture of aortic aneurysm and intracranial hemorrhage. To our knowledge, only six cases of acute pancreatitis or necrotizing pancreatitis following SWL have been documented in the literature. Herein, we report a rare case of acute pancreatitis and formation of a pseudo cyst following SWL for left renal pelvic calculus. PMID:24497695

  2. Biodegradable stents in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente; Moreno-de-Vega, Vicente; Marín, Ingrid; Boix, Jaume

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable stents (BDSs) are an attractive option to avoid ongoing dilation or surgery in patients with benign stenoses of the small and large intestines. The experience with the currently the only BDS for endoscopic placement, made of Poly-dioxanone, have shown promising results. However some aspects should be improved as are the fact that BDSs lose their radial force over time due to the degradable material, and that can cause stent-induced mucosal or parenchymal injury. This complication rate and modest clinical efficacy has to be carefully considered in individual patients prior to placement of BDSs. Otherwise, the price of these stents therefore it is nowadays an important limitation. PMID:24605020

  3. [Coronary stents: 30 years of medical progress].

    PubMed

    Silvain, Johanne; Cayla, Guillaume; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Fargeot, Catherine; Montalescot, Gilles

    2014-03-01

    The history of interventional cardiology has been marked by several technologic revolutions since the late 1970s. The first key step was the use of inflatable balloon angioplasty as an alternative to CABG surgery for coronary revascularization, followed by intracoronary delivery of bare metal stent (BMS) and drug eluting stents (DES) to drastically reduce intracoronary restenosis observed with BMS. Improved stents platforms and polymers (absorbable or biocompatible) led to a dramatic reduction in the rate of late stent thrombosis. Self-expanding stents are now available to improve stent a position especially in acute myocardial infarction. The emergence of new fully bioabsorbable stents that can be combined with antiproliferative drugs is the ongoing revolution. A new generation of stents is continuously improving and likely to become the ideal stent for coronary revascularization in the near future. PMID:24685222

  4. Targeting tight junctions during epithelial to mesenchymal transition in human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kyuno, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Ito, Tatsuya; Kono, Tsuyoshi; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Imamura, Masafumi; Konno, Takumi; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa; Kojima, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide and there is an urgent need to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the mortality of patients with this disease. In pancreatic cancer, some tight junction proteins, including claudins, are abnormally regulated and therefore are promising molecular targets for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. Claudin-4 and -18 are overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions. Claudin-4 is a high affinity receptor of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE). The cytotoxic effects of CPE and monoclonal antibodies against claudin-4 are useful as novel therapeutic tools for pancreatic cancer. Claudin-18 could be a putative marker and therapeutic target with prognostic implications for patients with pancreatic cancer. Claudin-1, -7, tricellulin and marvelD3 are involved in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of pancreatic cancer cells and thus might be useful as biomarkers during disease. Protein kinase C is closely related to EMT of pancreatic cancer and regulates tight junctions of normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells and the cancer cells. This review focuses on the regulation of tight junctions via protein kinase C during EMT in human pancreatic cancer for the purpose of developing new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25152584

  5. Stopping duct quacks: Longevity of residential duct sealants

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

    2000-08-01

    Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that these seals tend to fail over time periods ranging from days to years. We have used several test methods over the last few years to evaluate the longevity of duct sealants when subjected to temperatures and pressures representative of those found in the field. Traditional cloth duct tapes have been found to significantly under-perform other sealants and have been banned from receiving duct tightness credits in California's energy code (California Energy Commission 1998). Our accelerated testing apparatus has been redesigned since its first usage for improved performance. The methodology is currently under consideration by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as a potential new test method. This report will summarize the set of measurements to date, review the status of the test apparatus and test method, and summarize the applications of these results to codes and standards.

  6. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography: Comparison of two- and three-dimensional sequences for the assessment of pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    LIU, KEFU; XIE, PING; PENG, WEIJUN; ZHOU, ZHENGRONG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) for the assessment of pancreatic cystic lesions. Between February 2009 and December 2011, 35 patients that had been diagnosed with pancreatic cystic lesions, which was confirmed by surgery and pathology, underwent pre-operative 2D or 3D MRCP for pre-operative evaluation. In the present study, the quality of these 2D and 3D MRCP images, the visualization of the features of the cystic lesions, visualization of the pancreatic main duct and prediction of ductal communication with the cystic lesions were evaluated and compared using statistical software. The 3D MRCP images were determined to be of higher quality compared with the 2D MRCP images. The features of the cystic lesions were visualized better on 3D MRCP compared with 2D MRCP. The same capability for the visualization of the segment of the pancreatic main duct was exhibited by 3D and 2D MRCP. There was no significant difference between the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values of 2D and 3D MRCP, which assessed the prediction of communication between cystic lesions and the pancreatic main duct. It was concluded that, compared with 2D MRCP, 3D MRCP provides an improved assessment of pancreatic cystic lesions, but does not exhibit an improved capability for the visualization of the pancreatic main duct or for the prediction of communication between cystic lesions and the pancreatic main duct. PMID:25789068

  7. Holding X-Ray Film Inside Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulthuis, Ronald V.; Pierce, Darryl

    1988-01-01

    Radiographic inspection of welds in walls of nonmagnetic ducts made easy by new film holder. X-Ray film inside duct held by interior and exterior magnets. Tether used to move holder and to retrieve it from inside duct.

  8. Tear-Duct Obstruction and Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Trauma to the eye area or an eye injury that lacerates (cuts through) the tear ducts also could block a duct, but reconstructive surgery at the time of the accident or injury may prevent this. Signs of Blocked Tear Ducts ...

  9. Bile Duct (Cholangiocarcinoma) Cancer: Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cancer Next Topic Chemotherapy for bile duct cancer Radiation therapy for bile duct cancer Radiation therapy uses ... of radiation for bile duct cancer. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) This type of radiation therapy uses ...

  10. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... alternative sites, such as muscle tissue or another organ. [ Top ] What are the benefits and risks of pancreatic islet allo-transplantation? The benefits of pancreatic islet allo-transplantation include ...

  11. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a signi?cant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  12. Analysis of the stent expansion in a stenosed artery using finite element method: application to stent versus stent study.

    PubMed

    Imani, S Misagh; Goudarzi, A M; Ghasemi, S E; Kalani, A; Mahdinejad, J

    2014-10-01

    In this article, finite element method is used to investigate the mechanical behavior of a stent and to determine the biomechanical interaction between the stent and the artery in a stenting procedure. The main objective of this study is to reach to a model close to a real condition of coronary stent placement. Unlike most of the models proposed in the literature, all the steps of the deployment of a stent in the stenotic vessel (i.e. pressure increasing, constant load pressure and pressure decreasing) are simulated in this article to show the behavior of the stent in different stages of implantation. The results indicate that the first step of deployment, that is, pressure increasing, plays a main role in the success of stent implantation. So that, in order to compare the behavior of different types of stents, it is sufficient to compare their behavior at the end of pressure increasing step. In order to show the application of the findings in stent versus stent studies, three commercially available stents (the Palmaz-Schatz, Multi-Link and NIR stents) are modeled and their behavior is compared at the end of pressure increasing step. The effect of stent design on the restenosis rate is investigated. According to the findings, the possibility of restenosis is lower for Multi-Link and NIR stents in comparison with Palmaz-Schatz stent which is in good agreement with clinical results. Therefore, the testing methodology outlined here is proposed as a simple and economical alternative for "stent versus stent" complicated clinical trials. PMID:25406228

  13. Everolimus-eluting stents in interventional cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Jacob C; Rideout, Phillip; Steinberg, Daniel H

    2012-01-01

    Bare metal stents have a proven safety record, but limited long-term efficacy due to in-stent restenosis. First-generation drug-eluting stents successfully countered the restenosis rate, but were hampered by concerns about their long-term safety. Second generation drug-eluting stents have combined the low restenosis rate of the first generation with improved long-term safety. We review the evolution of drug-eluting stents with a focus on the safety, efficacy, and unique characteristics of everolimus-eluting stents. PMID:22910420

  14. Successful redeployment of an unexpanded coronary stent.

    PubMed

    McGinnity, J G; Glazier, J J; Spears, J R; Rogers, C; Turi, Z G

    1998-05-01

    We report on treatment of a patient in whom failure to deploy the distal portion of a Palmaz-Schatz stent occurred but was not recognized. After an unstable course, the patient underwent repeat coronary angiography, at which time the stent was rewired and redilated. Full deployment of the stent with restoration of TIMI grade 3 flow was achieved. The putative cause of the problem, incomplete deployment of the stent because of inadvertent advancement of the stent delivery sheath, should be avoided, and needs to be recognized if it occurs. Crossing and redilating the stent is possible, although technically difficult. PMID:9600524

  15. Pancreatic function assessment.

    PubMed

    Laterza, L; Scaldaferri, F; Bruno, G; Agnes, A; Boškoski, I; Ianiro, G; Gerardi, V; Ojetti, V; Alfieri, S; Gasbarrini, A

    2013-01-01

    Several non invasive tests are available to assess pancreatic function, but no one is routinely used in clinical practice to diagnose chronic pancreatitis, due to their poor sensitivity in diagnosing mild pancreatic insufficiency. (13)C breath tests share the same limits of the other non invasive functional tests, but the mixed triglyceride breath test seems to be useful in finding the correct dosage of enzyme substitutive therapy to prevent malnutrition in patients with known pancreatic insufficiency. PMID:24443071

  16. Advances in Ureteral Stent Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral stents are commonly used in urolithiasis patients for relief of obstruction or in association with stone treatments such as ureteroscopy and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. There are currently many different bulk materials and coatings available for the manufacture of ureteral stents, however the ideal material has yet to be discovered. All potential biomaterials must undergo rigorous physical and biocompatibility testing before commercialization and use in humans. Despite significant advances in basic science research involving biocompatibility issues and biofilm formation, infection and encrustation remain associated with the use of biomaterials in the urinary tract. There have been many significant advances in the design of ureteral stents in recent years and these will be highlighted along with a discussion of future aspects of biomaterials and use of stents in association with urolithiasis.

  17. Drug-eluting stent coatings.

    PubMed

    Puskas, Judit E; Muñoz-Robledo, Lyn G; Hoerr, Robert A; Foley, John; Schmidt, Steven P; Evancho-Chapman, Michelle; Dong, Jinping; Frethem, Chris; Haugstad, Greg

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of coronary stents from a polymer scientist's view point, and presents the first results of an interdisciplinary team assembled for the development of new stent systems. Poly(styrene-b-isobutylene-b-styrene) block copolymer (SIBS), a nanostructured thermoplastic elastomer, is used in clinical practice as the drug-eluting polymeric coating on the Taxus coronary stent (trademark of Boston Scientific Co.). Our group has been developing new architectures comprising of arborescent (dendritic) polyisobutylene cores (D_SIBS), which were shown to be as biocompatible as SIBS. ElectroNanospray (Nanocopoeia Inc.) was used to coat test coupons and coronary stents with selected D(S)IBS polymers loaded with dexamethasone, a model drug. The surface topology varied from smooth to nanosized particulate coating. This paper will demonstrate how drug release profiles were influenced by both the molecular weight of the polyisobutylene core and spraying conditions of the polymer-drug mixture. PMID:20049810

  18. Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to an Incarcerated Paraoesophageal Hernia: A Rare Cause for a Common Problem

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, Kathryn; Campbell, William; Taylor, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This is a rare case report of acute pancreatitis secondary to a massive incarcerated paraoesophageal hernia. The pathogenesis resulted from obstruction of the distal pancreatic duct after displacement of the pancreatic head and body into the thorax as part of a Type IV paraoesophageal hernia. Although this condition is rare, the patient made steady progress following laparotomy and open repair of hernia. She made a good recovery after prompt therapy, therefore, this report can be a guide to the diagnosis and treatment of similar conditions. PMID:24653652

  19. Classification of pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Sarner; P B Cotton

    1984-01-01

    An international group of doctors interested in pancreatic disease met in Cambridge in March 1983, under the auspices of the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, to discuss the classification of pancreatitis in the light of developments that have taken place in the 20 years since the crucial conference in Marseille.

  20. Successful transcloacal ureteral stent removal.

    PubMed

    Ficko, Zita; Herrick, Benjamin W; Herz, Daniel B; Pais, Vernon M

    2012-12-01

    We report a percutaneous transcloacal approach for removal of a ureteral stent in a 15-year-old girl with a cloacal anomaly, spinal dysraphism, and complex pelvic anatomy, including a bicornuate uterus, reconstructed hindgut neobladder, and duplicated left pelvic kidney. The patient had undergone 3 previous unsuccessful attempts at stent removal, 2 endoscopic attempts by way of her neobladder, and 1 percutaneous transcloacal attempt before successful removal. PMID:23206786

  1. Prevalence of Incidental Pancreatic Cysts on 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Patricia Bedesco; Puchnick, Andrea; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Goldman, Suzan Menasce

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain the prevalence of pancreatic cysts detected incidentally on 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen and correlate this prevalence with patient age and gender; assess the number, location, and size of these lesions, as well as features suspicious for malignancy; and determine the prevalence of incidentally detected dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). Methods Retrospective analysis of 2,678 reports of patients who underwent abdominal MRI between January 2012 and June 2013. Patients with a known history of pancreatic conditions or surgery were excluded, and the remaining 2,583 reports were examined for the presence of pancreatic cysts, which was then correlated with patient age and gender. We also assessed whether cysts were solitary or multiple, as well as their location within the pancreatic parenchyma, size, and features suspicious for malignancy. Finally, we calculated the prevalence of incidental MPD dilatation, defined as MPD diameter ? 2.5 mm. Results Pancreatic cysts were detected incidentally in 9.3% of patients (239/2,583). The prevalence of pancreatic cysts increased significantly with age (p<0.0001). There were no significant differences in prevalence between men and women (p=0.588). Most cysts were multiple (57.3%), distributed diffusely throughout the pancreas (41.8%), and 5 mm or larger (81.6%). In 12.1% of cases, cysts exhibited features suspicious for malignancy. Overall, 2.7% of subjects exhibited incidental MPD dilatation. Conclusions In this sample, the prevalence of pancreatic cysts detected incidentally on 3T MRI of the abdomen was 9.3%. Prevalence increased with age and was not associated with gender. The majority of cysts were multiple, diffusely distributed through the pancreatic parenchyma, and ? 5 mm in size; 12.1% were suspicious for malignancy. An estimated 2.7% of subjects had a dilated MPD. PMID:25798910

  2. A new design metal stent (Flamingo stent) for palliation of malignant dysphagia: a prospective study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter D. Siersema; Wim C. J. Hop; Mark van Blankenstein; Jan Dees

    2000-01-01

    Background: Metal stents are not superior to conventional endoprostheses with respect to the incidence of recurrent dysphagia because of tumor ingrowth with uncovered stents and migration with their covered counterparts. To overcome these limitations, a partially covered (inside-out covering) metal stent with a conical shape and a varying braiding angle of the mesh along its length, the Flamingo stent, has been

  3. Concomitant pancreatic endocrine neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yoshie; Shinoda, Masahiro; Tanabe, Minoru; Tsujikawa, Hanako; Ueno, Akihisa; Masugi, Yohei; Oshima, Go; Nishiyama, Ryo; Tanaka, Masayuki; Mihara, Kisho; Abe, Yuta; Yagi, Hiroshi; Kitago, Minoru; Itano, Osamu; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Aiura, Koichi; Tanimoto, Akihiro; Sakamaoto, Michiie; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of concomitant pancreatic endocrine neoplasm (PEN) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). A 74-year-old man had been followed-up for mixed-type IPMN for 10 years. Recent magnetic resonance images revealed an increase in size of the branch duct IPMN in the pancreas head, while the dilation of the main pancreatic duct showed minimal change. Although contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any nodules in the branch duct IPMN, endoscopic ultrasound indicated a suspected nodule in the IPMN. A malignancy in the branch duct IPMN was suspected and we performed pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy with lymphadenectomy. The resected specimen contained a cystic lesion, 10 x 10 mm in diameter, in the head of the pancreas. Histological examination revealed that the dilated main pancreatic duct and the branch ducts were composed of intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma with mild atypia. No evidence of carcinoma was detected in the specimen. Incidentally, a 3-mm nodule consisting of small neuroendocrine cells was found in the main pancreatic duct. The cells demonstrated positive staining for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and glucagon but negative staining for insulin and somatostatin. Therefore, the 3-mm nodule was diagnosed as a PEN. Since the mitotic count per 10 high-power fields was less than 2 and the Ki-67 index was less than 2%, the PEN was pathologically classified as low-grade (G1) according to the 2010 World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Herein, we review the case and relevant studies in the literature and discuss issues related to the synchronous occurrence of the relatively rare tumors, PEN and IPMN. PMID:23517520

  4. Endocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas Angelopoulos; Christos Dervenis; Anastasia Goula; Grigorios Rombopoulos; Sarantis Livadas; Dimitrios Kaltsas; Victoria Kaltzidou; George Tolis

    2005-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is considered to be a rare cause of diabetes mellitus. However, in both the developed and developing world, there is an increasing number of patients suffering from pancreatitis probably due to lifestyle changes, which is partially associated with both social factors and the poor health status of immigrants. Owing to these circumstances, CP has evolved with one

  5. Characteristic Findings of Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Susumu; Kamisawa, Terumi; Koizumi, Satomi; Chiba, Kazuro; Tabata, Taku; Kuruma, Sawako; Kuwata, Go; Fujiwara, Takashi; Koizumi, Koichi; Arakawa, Takeo; Momma, Kumiko; Hara, Seiichi; Igarashi, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Diffuse or segmental irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct (MPD), as observed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), is a characteristic feature of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Methods ERCP findings were retrospectively examined in 40 patients with AIP in whom irregular narrowing of the MPD was detected near the orifice. The MPD opening sign was defined as the MPD within 1.5 cm from the orifice being maintained. The distal common bile duct (CBD) sign was defined as the distal CBD within 1.5 cm from the orifice being maintained. Endoscopic findings of a swollen major papilla and histological findings of specimens obtained from the major papilla were examined in 26 and 21 patients, respectively. Results The MPD opening sign was detected in 26 of the 40 patients (65%). The distal CBD sign was detected in 25 of the 32 patients (78%), which showed stenosis of the lower bile duct. The patients who showed the MPD opening sign frequently showed the distal CBD sign (p=0.018). Lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, but not dense fibrosis, was histologically detected in biopsy specimens obtained from the major papilla. Conclusions On ERCP, the MPD and CBD adjacent to the major papilla are frequently maintained in patients with AIP involving the pancreatic head. These signs are useful for diagnosing AIP on ERCP. PMID:25167792

  6. Two Cases of Immediate Stent Fracture after Zotarolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pil Hyung; Lee, Seung-Whan; Lee, Jong-Young; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Cheol Whan; Park, Duk-Woo; Park, Seong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation is currently the standard treatment for various types of coronary artery disease. However, previous reports indicate that stent fractures, which usually occur after a period of time from the initial DES implantation, have increased during the DES era; stent fractures can contribute to unfavorable events such as in-stent restenosis and stent thrombosis. In our present report, we describe two cases of zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture: one that was detected six hours after implementation, and the other case that was detected immediately after deployment. Both anatomical and technical risk factors contributed to these unusual cases of immediate stent fracture. PMID:25653706

  7. Role of Kasai procedure in surgery of hilar bile duct strictures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jin-Bo; Bai, Li-Shan; Hu, Zhi-Jian; Wu, Jun-Wei; Chai, Xin-Qun

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the application of the Kasai procedure in the surgical management of hilar bile duct strictures. METHODS: Ten consecutive patients between 2005 and 2011 with hilar bile duct strictures who underwent the Kasai procedure were retrospectively analyzed. Kasai portoenterostomy with the placement of biliary stents was performed in all patients. Clinical characteristics, postoperative complications, and long-term outcomes were analyzed. All patients were followed up for 2-60 mo postoperatively. RESULTS: Patients were classified according to the Bismuth classification of biliary strictures. There were two Bismuth III and eight Bismuth IV lesions. Six lesions were benign and four were malignant. Of the benign lesions, three were due to post-cholecystectomy injury, one to trauma, one to inflammation, and one to inflammatory pseudotumor. Of the malignant lesions, four were due to hilar cholangiocarcinoma. All patients underwent Kasai portoenterostomy with the placement of biliary stents. There were no perioperative deaths. One patient experienced anastomotic leak and was managed conservatively. No other complications occurred perioperatively. During the follow-up period, all patients reported a good quality of life. CONCLUSION: The Kasai procedure combined with biliary stents may be appropriate for patients with hilar biliary stricture that cannot be managed by standard surgical methods. PMID:22072856

  8. Invasive carcinoma derived from branch duct-type IPMN may be a more aggressive neoplasm than that derived from main duct-type IPMN.

    PubMed

    Okabayashi, Takehiro; Shima, Yasuo; Kosaki, Takuhiro; Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Kozuki, Akihito; Iiyama, Tastuo; Takezaki, Yuka; Kobayashi, Michiya; Nishimori, Isao; Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro

    2013-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the long-term follow-up results of patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and to estimate the degree of IPMN malignancy based on pathological and molecular features of resected specimens. The detection rate of IPMN has increased over the last decade; however, the management of this neoplasm remains controversial. This is particularly so for branch duct-type IPMN, which carries a high potential for malignancy and risk of recurrence. We retrospectively reviewed a single institution's prospective pancreatic resection database to identify IPMN patients who underwent pancreatectomy with curative intent. The clinicopathological variables of 100 patients resected for IPMN were analyzed with a detailed review of histopathological results (borderline lesions, non-invasive carcinoma and invasive carcinoma) to determine the grade of IPMN malignancy based on transforming growth factor (TGF)-?/SMAD4 signaling. The incidence of malignant change was significantly higher in patients with main duct-type IPMN (69.7%) compared with branch duct-type IPMN cases (17.9%). However, patients with an invasive carcinoma had a significantly worse outcome if it was derived from branch duct-type IPMN compared with those derived from main duct-type IPMN, and TGF-? mRNA expression was significantly increased in the former patient group. Immunohistochemistry also showed higher numbers of SMAD4-positive cells in patients with carcinoma derived from branch duct-type IPMN. Our results demonstrated that invasive carcinoma derived from branch duct-type IPMN is more aggressive than that derived from main duct-type IPMN, once invasive morphological change takes place. Determining TGF-? and/or SMAD4 status at initial diagnosis may be useful for stratifying IPMN patients into treatment regimens. PMID:23833648

  9. The impact of duct-to-duct interaction on the hex duct dilation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.J.; Chang, L.K.; Lahm, C.E.; Porter, D.L.

    1992-07-01

    Dilation of the hex duct is an important factor in the operational lifetime of fuel subassemblies in liquid metal fast reactors. It is caused primarily by the irradiation-enhanced creep and void swelling of the hex duct material. Excessive dilation may jeopardize subassembly removal from the core or cause a subassembly storage problem where the grid size of the storage basket is limited. Dilation of the hex duct in Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) limits useful lifetime because of these storage basket limitations. It is, therefore, important to understand the hex duct dilation behavior to guide the design and in-core management of fuel subassemblies in a way that excessive duct deformation can be avoided. To investigate the dilation phenomena, finite-element models of the hex duct have been developed. The inelastic analyses were performed using the structural analysis code, ANSYS. Both Type 316 and D9 austenitic stainless steel ducts are considered. The calculated dilations are in good agreement with profilometry measurements made after irradiation. The analysis indicates that subassembly interaction is an important parameter in addition to neutron fluence and temperature in determining hex duct dilation. 5 refs.

  10. The impact of duct-to-duct interaction on the hex duct dilation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.J.; Chang, L.K.; Lahm, C.E.; Porter, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Dilation of the hex duct is an important factor in the operational lifetime of fuel subassemblies in liquid metal fast reactors. It is caused primarily by the irradiation-enhanced creep and void swelling of the hex duct material. Excessive dilation may jeopardize subassembly removal from the core or cause a subassembly storage problem where the grid size of the storage basket is limited. Dilation of the hex duct in Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) limits useful lifetime because of these storage basket limitations. It is, therefore, important to understand the hex duct dilation behavior to guide the design and in-core management of fuel subassemblies in a way that excessive duct deformation can be avoided. To investigate the dilation phenomena, finite-element models of the hex duct have been developed. The inelastic analyses were performed using the structural analysis code, ANSYS. Both Type 316 and D9 austenitic stainless steel ducts are considered. The calculated dilations are in good agreement with profilometry measurements made after irradiation. The analysis indicates that subassembly interaction is an important parameter in addition to neutron fluence and temperature in determining hex duct dilation. 5 refs.

  11. Biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, G J; Gillespie, J; Guillou, P J

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of death from malignant disease in Western society. Apart from the fortunate few patients who present with a resectable small pancreatic adenocarcinoma, conventional treatment offers no hope of cure and has little palliative value. Over the past two decades major steps have been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic growth and neoplasia. This review sets out to explore these advances, firstly in the regulation of normal pancreatic growth, and secondly the mechanism which may be involved in malignant change of the exocrine pancreas. From an understanding of this new biology, new treatment strategies may be possible for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:1855689

  12. Acute non-traumatic pancreatitis in a patient with pancreas divisum: a case report.

    PubMed

    Anyfantakis, D; Partalis, N; Polimili, G; Kastanakis, S

    2013-09-15

    Pancreas divisum is a frequent congenital anatomical anomaly characterized by the failure of fusion of the ducts of Santorini and Wirsung during fetal development. Although the condition usually remains asymptomatic, it has been reported to be a predisposing factor of chronic and recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis. We report a case of acute non-traumatic pancreatitis in a 54-year-old Caucasian male with pancreas divisum. Diagnosis was established based on the findings from magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. The patient was managed conservatively and was discharged home having an uneventful clinical course after five days of hospitalization. Although the role of the pancreas in the induction of acute pancreatitis is still a matter of debate, physicians have to be aware about this prevalent pancreatic anatomic abnormality. Timely detection may help in the prevention of potential recurrent pancreatic reaction. PMID:24146696

  13. Acute non-traumatic pancreatitis in a patient with pancreas divisum: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Anyfantakis, D; Partalis, N; Polimili, G; Kastanakis, S

    2013-01-01

    Pancreas divisum is a frequent congenital anatomical anomaly characterized by the failure of fusion of the ducts of Santorini and Wirsung during fetal development. Although the condition usually remains asymptomatic, it has been reported to be a predisposing factor of chronic and recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis. We report a case of acute non-traumatic pancreatitis in a 54-year-old Caucasian male with pancreas divisum. Diagnosis was established based on the findings from magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. The patient was managed conservatively and was discharged home having an uneventful clinical course after five days of hospitalization. Although the role of the pancreas in the induction of acute pancreatitis is still a matter of debate, physicians have to be aware about this prevalent pancreatic anatomic abnormality. Timely detection may help in the prevention of potential recurrent pancreatic reaction. PMID:24146696

  14. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral stent is a...

  15. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral stent is a...

  16. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral stent is a...

  17. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral stent is a...

  18. 21 CFR 876.4620 - Ureteral stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 876.4620 Ureteral stent. (a) Identification. A ureteral stent is a...

  19. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Prosthetic Devices § 884.3900 Vaginal stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the...

  20. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Prosthetic Devices § 884.3900 Vaginal stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the...

  1. Preventing post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis: What can be done?

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Goran; Milosevic, Marko; Stimac, Davor; Zerem, Enver; Jovanovi?, Predrag; Blazevic, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP) is the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The incidence of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis varies substantially and is reported around 1%-10%, although there are some reports with an incidence of around 30%. Usually, PEP is a mild or moderate pancreatitis, but in some instances it can be severe and fatal. Generally, it is defined as the onset of new pancreatic-type abdominal pain severe enough to require hospital admission or prolonged hospital stay with levels of serum amylase two to three times greater than normal, occurring 24 h after ERCP. Several methods have been adopted for preventing pancreatitis, such as pharmacological or endoscopic approaches. Regarding medical prevention, only non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, namely diclofenac sodium and indomethacin, are recommended, but there are some other drugs which have some potential benefits in reducing the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis. Endoscopic preventive measures include cannulation (wire guided) and pancreatic stenting, while the adoption of the early pre-cut technique is still arguable. This review will attempt to present and discuss different ways of preventing post-ERCP pancreatitis. PMID:25632179

  2. Stent Thrombosis in the Modern Era A Pooled Analysis of Multicenter Coronary Stent Clinical Trials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donald E. Cutlip; Donald S. Baim; Kalon K. L. Ho; Jeffrey J. Popma; Alexandra J. Lansky; David J. Cohen; Joseph P. Carrozza; Manish S. Chauhan; Orlando Rodriguez; Richard E. Kuntz

    2010-01-01

    B or higher after stenting (OR, 3.7; 95% CI, 1.9 to 7.7), total stent length (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.2 to 1.5 per 10 mm), and final minimal lumen diameter within the stent (OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.2 to 0.7 per 1 mm). Stent thrombosis was documented by angiography in 45 patients (0.7%). Clinical consequences of angiographic stent thrombosis included

  3. Impact of Stent Design on In-Stent Stenosis in a Rabbit Iliac Artery Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Grenacher, L.; Stampfl, U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Arnegger, F. U. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery (Germany); Rehnitz, C.; Thierjung, H. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Stampfl, S. [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Berger, I. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Pathology (Germany); Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of stent design on in-stent stenosis in rabbit iliac arteries. Four different types of stent were implanted in rabbit iliac arteries, being different in stent design (crown or wave) and strut thickness (50 or 100 {mu}m). Ten stents of each type were implanted. Each animal received one crown and one wave stent with the same strut thickness. Follow-up was either 12 weeks (n = 10 rabbits) or 24 weeks (n = 10 rabbits). Primary study end points were angiographic and microscopic in-stent stenosis. Secondary study end points were vessel injury, vascular inflammation, and stent endothelialization. Average stent diameter, relative stent overdilation, average and minimal luminal diameter, and relative average and maximum luminal loss were not significantly different. However, a trend to higher relative stent overdilation was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents. A trend toward higher average and minimal luminal diameter and lower relative average and maximum luminal loss was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 100 {mu}m. Neointimal height, relative luminal area stenosis, injury score, inflammation score, and endothelialization score were not significantly different. However, a trend toward higher neointimal height was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 50 {mu}m and a follow-up of 24 weeks. In conclusion, in this study, crown stents seem to trigger neointima. However, the optimized radial force might equalize the theoretically higher tendency for restenosis in crown stents. In this context, also more favorable positive remodeling in crown stents could be important.

  4. Single-institution validation of the international consensus guidelines for treatment of branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuyuki Nagai; Ryuichiro Doi; Tatsuo Ito; Atsushi Kida; Masayuki Koizumi; Toshihiko Masui; Yoshiya Kawaguchi; Kohei Ogawa; Shinji Uemoto

    2009-01-01

    Background  The international consensus guidelines (the guidelines) for management of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs)\\u000a of the pancreas recommend surgical resection of branch duct IPMNs with any of the following features: cyst size >30 mm, mural\\u000a nodules, main pancreatic duct diameter >6 mm, positive cytology, and symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness\\u000a of these guidelines for resection of

  5. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  6. [Portal vein stenting as a bridge to chemotherapy for perihilar cancer with portal vein stenosis - a case report].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tadashi; Kanazawa, Akishige; Shimizu, Sadatoshi; Sakae, Masayuki; Kurihara, Shigeaki; Tashima, Tetsuzo; Deguchi, Sota; Goto, Wataru; Kotsuka, Masaya; Ishikawa, Akira; Yoshii, Mami; Nakajima, Takayoshi; Mori, Yukihiro; Ohira, Go; Tachimori, Akiko; Tamamori, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Inoue, Toru; Yamashita, Yoshito; Nishiguchi, Yukio

    2014-11-01

    The stenting strategy for portal vein stenosis in cases with unresectable hilar malignancies reduces portal hypertension and maintains portal vein blood flow. This not only improves quality of life, but also leads to aggressive therapy with anticancer agents. A 65-year-old woman presented with painless jaundice 8 months after left hemihepatectomy with lymph node dissection for intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma. Seven months after biliary stenting for bile duct stenosis, progressing pancytopenia and ascites were noted. Imaging studies revealed portal vein stenosis by the tumor at the hepatic hilum. Percutaneous transhepatic portal vein stent placement was performed, and pancytopenia and ascites improved immediately thereafter. Chemotherapy for recurrence of intrahepatic cholangiocellular carcinoma at the hepatic hilum has been initiated, and the patient has been alive 15 months since. PMID:25731245

  7. Repositioning of Covered Stents: The Grip Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, John Martin, E-mail: johnkirby@ireland.com [McMaster University Medical Center (Canada); Guo Xiaofeng [McGill University (Canada); Midia, Mehran [McMaster University Medical Center (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Retrieval and repositioning of a stent deployed beyond its intended target region may be a difficult technical challenge. Materials and Methods: A balloon-mounted snare technique, a variant of the coaxial loop snare technique, is described. Results: The technique is described for the repositioning of a covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent and a covered biliary stent. Conclusion: The balloon-mounted snare technique is a useful technique for retrieval of migrated stents.

  8. Branch Duct Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kanwar Rupinder S Gill; Mario Pelaez-Luna; Andrew Keaveny; Timothy A Woodward; Micheal B Wallace; Suresh T Chari; Thomas C Smyrk; Naoki Takahashi; Jonathan E Clain; Michael J Levy; Randall K Pearson; Bret T Petersen; Mark D Topazian; Santhi S Vege; Michael Kendrick; Michael B Farnell; Massimo Raimondo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:In immunosuppressed patients with branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN-Br) associated with solid organ transplantation, the risk of major pancreatic surgery has to be weighed against the risk of progression to malignancy. Recent studies show that IPMN-Br without consensus indications for resection (CIR) can be followed conservatively. We analyzed the course of IPMN-Br in patients with and without solid

  9. Expression of MSX2 predicts malignancy of branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kennichi SatohShin; Shin Hamada; Atsushi Kanno; Morihisa Hirota; Jun Umino; Hiromichi Ito; Atsushi Masamune; Shinichi Egawa; Michiaki Unno; Tooru Shimosegawa

    2010-01-01

    Background  To distinguish malignant from benign branch duct (BD)-intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) still remains difficult.\\u000a Recently, we revealed that MSX2 was frequently expressed in pancreatic cancer and its expression was correlated with aggressive\\u000a behavior of the cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of MSX2 in IPMN development and whether its expression\\u000a would differentiate malignant from

  10. Nodal and Lefty signaling regulates the growth of pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, You-Qing; Sterling, Lori; Stotland, Aleksandr; Hua, Hong; Kritzik, Marcie; Sarvetnick, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Nodal and its antagonist, Lefty, are important mediators specifying the laterality of the organs during embryogenesis. Nodal signals through activin receptors in the presence of its co-receptor, Cripto. In the present study, we investigated the possible roles of Nodal and Lefty signaling during islet development and regeneration. We found that both Nodal and Lefty are expressed in the pancreas during embryogenesis and islet regeneration. In vitro studies demonstrated that Nodal inhibits, whereas Lefty enhances, the proliferation of a pancreatic cell line. In addition, we showed that Lefty-1 activates MAPK and Akt phosphorylation in these cells. In vivo blockade of endogenous Lefty using neutralizing Lefty-1 monoclonal antibody results in a significantly decreased proliferation of duct epithelial cells during islet regeneration. This is the first study to decipher the expression and function of Nodal and Lefty in pancreatic growth. Importantly, our results highlight a novel function of Nodal-Lefty signaling in the regulation of expansion of pancreatic cells. PMID:18393305

  11. The role of products of food digestion in the stimulation of pancreatic secretion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. V. Malkiman; S. I. Filippovich; V. N. Chernigovskii

    1958-01-01

    This investigation was carried out on dogs in whom the pancreatic duct was exteriorized by surgical operation. The quantity of the juice and the concentration of the enzymes (amylase, trypsin and lipase) secreted in response to different stimuli were determined. After establishing the normal values for the secretory function of the pancreas two-thirds to four-fifths of the stomach was resected

  12. Indiana U researchers find that blood test could help to diagnose pancreatic cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Indiana U researchers find that a blood test could help to diagnose pancreatic cancer. The disease is difficult to diagnose in early stages because the pancreas is hidden behind other organs such as the stomach, small intestine, liver, gallbladder, spleen and bile ducts.

  13. Favorable response after gemcitabine-radiotherapy for invasive pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Takanori; Igari, Kimihiro; Furuyama, Takaki; Ito, Hiromitsu; Mitsunori, Yusuke; Aihara, Arihiro; Kumagai, Yoichi; Iida, Michio; Odajima, Hajime; Tanaka, Shinji; Arii, Shigeki; Yamazaki, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of chemoradiotherapy for invasive pancreatic ductal carcinoma derived from an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) has not been established. The subject of the present report was a 53-year-old man admitted for the treatment of IPMN. The tumor, located in the pancreatic body, was of the mixed type of IPMN, and it involved the branch duct, where it was 38 mm in diameter, and the main duct, where it was 6 mm in diameter. Distal pancreatectomy was performed and the postoperative course was uneventful; however, histopathologic diagnosis revealed invasive ductal carcinoma with a positive surgical margin in the pancreatic duct. Although total pancreatectomy was recommended, chemoradiotherapy (50.4-Gy irradiation and gemcitabine) was preferred by the patient. At 9-month follow up, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a cystic mass at the surgical margin of the pancreas. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed a 44-mm cystic lesion with nodules in the remnant pancreas, on the basis of which he underwent total pancreatectomy. Pathologic examination of the resected specimen revealed absence of the epithelium at the surgical margin of the main pancreatic duct, and malignant cells were not detected. PMID:24229021

  14. Visualization of stent lumen in MR imaging: relationship with stent design and RF direction.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Seiichiro; Harimoto, Takashi; Hirose, Miyuki; Miyai, Masahiro; Hattori, Kengo; Kuroda, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Susumu; Inamura, Keiji; Kato, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) visualization of metallic stent lumens is possible if the stent structure counteracts eddy currents in the lumen induced by the radio frequency magnetic field, B(1). To examine the effectiveness of various stent designs in counteracting eddy currents, we anchored eight copper stent models and 2 commercially available nickel-titanium alloy (Nitinol) stents in a gel phantom, perpendicular or parallel to the direction of B(1). A mesh stent lumen showed hypointensity irrespective of its alignment relative to B(1). A solenoid stent lumen showed hypointensity with the stent axis parallel to B(1), but it had the same signal intensity as outside the lumen when perpendicular to B(1). A Moebius stent lumen showed no signal reduction, irrespective of alignment relative to B(1). Lumens of the commercially available stents showed hypointensity regardless of alignment relative to B(1). Computer simulation revealed that the signal intensities of the stents corresponded to magnetic flux densities of B(1) in the stents, which are modified by the structure of the stent. While in vivo MRI viewing of a Moebius stent lumen is likely possible regardless of axis alignment, inherent structural weakness may be problematic. As a more practical choice, the solenoid stent is easier to manufacture and generates no hypointensive signal when the axis is parallel to B(0). PMID:22729100

  15. The role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Venu, Rama P; Brown, Russell D; Halline, Allan G

    2002-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) plays a pivotal role in the management of patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis. Whereas endoscopic observation during ERCP permits recognition of abnormalities involving the major and minor duodenal papillae such as papillary tumors or choledochocele, radiographic evaluation enables the detection of structural abnormalities of pancreaticobiliary ducts like strictures or calculi. Sphincter of Oddi manometry, a technical advance of ERCP, is essential for the diagnosis of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, which may present clinically as recurrent pancreatitis. Because structural alterations of the pancreatic duct forms the hallmark of chronic pancreatitis, ERCP is highly sensitive and specific in diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. Apart from its diagnostic role, ERCP offers a variety of possibilities for therapeutic interventions in selected problems associated with pancreatitis. Endoscopic papillectomy and mucosal resection for tumors of the papilla, unroofing of a choledochocele, and sphincterotomy for sphincter ablation in sphincter of Oddi dysfunction are some of the therapeutic interventions possible during ERCP. Pancreatic ductal hypertension, which is considered to be the major pathophysiologic mechanism for disabling abdominal pain in chronic pancreatitis, also can be managed by ERCP-directed treatments. Pancreatic sphincterotomy, dilation of strictures, lithotripsy, extraction of calculi, and deployment of endoprosthesis constitute the commonly used therapeutic techniques in this situation. Besides offering a noninvasive alternative, these treatments are associated with a favorable clinical outcome comparable with that of operative treatments. Nevertheless, complications such as acute pancreatitis, bleeding, perforation, or sepsis may occur in 5% to 10% of patients undergoing these procedures. Therefore, careful selection of patients, appropriate preoperative care, and a team approach, including surgeon, interventional radiologist, and endoscopist, are important. PMID:11960071

  16. Carotid Artery Stenting versus Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C.; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Healthsponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  17. Biodegradation of the Copolymeric Polylactide Stent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eeva-Maija Hietala; Ulla-Stina Salminen; Anders Ståhls; Tero Välimaa; Paula Maasilta; Pertti Törmälä; Markku S. Nieminen; Ari L. J. Harjula

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of biodegradable polylactide as a stent material has not yet been fully established in small vessels such as arteries with a diameter <3 mm. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of a copolymeric polylactide (PLA96) stent. Appropriately sized spiral PLA96 stents were implanted into the infrarenal aortas of 20 rabbits. Intraoperative systemic heparinization

  18. Refining stent technologies for femoral interventions.

    PubMed

    Bosiers, M; Deloose, K; Callaert, J; Maene, L; Keirse, K; Verbist, J; Peeters, P

    2012-08-01

    Stents were created as a mechanical scaffold to prevent vessel recoil and luminal renarrowing after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). In femoropopliteal arteries, indication for stent implantation remains a topic much debated on, especially in long lesion configurations. Ever since the first stents were introduced on the market, in-stent restenosis (ISR) has been an important issue. The evolution in stent design has known a major progression in the last decades from the first generation of stents, plagued with high fracture rates and low primary patency rates, to the design of newer stents to tackle these outcomes. More flexible and longer stents decreased the high fracture rates and drug-eluting stents offered a solution to the restenosis rates by local drug application. The difficult recrossibility of the lesion because of the presence of a permanent vascular scaffold is an obstacle that the drug-coated balloon (DCB) overcomes. Future perspectives in the treatment of femoropopliteal lesions are found in the bioresorbable stent implantation. The bioresorbable stent combines the advantages of a drug-eluting scaffolding stent without the remainder of a foreign object in the long-term. Further investigations in this area will eventually evolve in the creation of a superior endovascular treatment modality with high long-term patency rates and minimal detriments. PMID:22854526

  19. PMR Graphite Engine Duct Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stotler, C. L.; Yokel, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the cost and weight advantages that could be obtained by utilizing the graphite/PMR15 material system to replace titanium in selected turbofan engine applications. The first component to be selected as a basis for evaluation was the outer bypass duct of the General Electric F404 engine. The operating environment of this duct was defined and then an extensive mechanical and physical property test program was conducted using material made by processing techniques which were also established by this program. Based on these properties, design concepts to fabricate a composite version of the duct were established and two complete ducts fabricated. One of these ducts was proof pressure tested and then run successfully on a factory test engine for over 1900 hours. The second duct was static tested to 210 percent design limit load without failure. An improved design was then developed which utilized integral composite end flanges. A complete duct was fabricated and successfully proof pressure tested. The net results of this effort showed that a composite version of the outer duct would be 14 percent lighter and 30 percent less expensive that the titanium duct. The other type of structure chosen for investigation was the F404 fan stator assembly, including the fan stator vanes. It was concluded that it was feasible to utilize composite materials for this type structure but that the requirements imposed by replacing an existing metal design resulted in an inefficient composite design. It was concluded that if composites were to be effectively used in this type structure, the design must be tailored for composite application from the outset.

  20. Interval Biliary Stent Placement Via Percutaneous Ultrasound Guided Cholecystostomy: Another Approach to Palliative Treatment in Malignant Biliary Tract Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, James, E-mail: drjames.harding@btinternet.com; Mortimer, Alex [North Bristol NHS Trust, Frenchay Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Kelly, Michael [North Bristol NHS Trust, Frenchay Hospital, Department of General Surgery (United Kingdom); Loveday, Eric [North Bristol NHS Trust, Frenchay Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a minimally invasive procedure for providing gallbladder decompression, often in critically ill patients. It can be used in malignant biliary obstruction following failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography when the intrahepatic ducts are not dilated or when stent insertion is not possible via the bile ducts. In properly selected patients, percutaneous cholecystostomy in obstructive jaundice is a simple, safe, and rapid option for biliary decompression, thus avoiding the morbidity and mortality involved with percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Subsequent use of a percutaneous cholecystostomy for definitive biliary stent placement is an attractive concept and leaves patients with no external drain. To the best of our knowledge, it has only been described on three previous occasions in the published literature, on each occasion forced by surgical or technical considerations. Traditionally, anatomic/technical considerations and the risk of bile leak have precluded such an approach, but improvements in catheter design and manufacture may now make it more feasible. We report a case of successful interval metal stent placement via percutaneous cholecystostomy which was preplanned and achieved excellent palliation for the patient. The pros and cons of the procedure and approach are discussed.

  1. Cholecystitis, cholelithiasis and common duct stenosis in children and adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, G W; O'Neill, J A; Holcomb, G W

    1980-01-01

    A study of 100 patients from 14 months through 18 years of age with extrahepatic biliary tract conditions who have been treated from 1950 through 1979 is reported. For discussion, these have been classified into four groups including acalculous cholecystitis, nonhemolytic cholelithiasis, hemolytic cholelithiasis and stenosis of the common duct. Ninety-nine patients were operated on and there were no deaths. Except for unusual contraindications, cholecystectomy is preferred for acute noncalculous cholecystitis. The largest number having gallstones were those patients (87%) without hemolytic disease. Only 13% had an associated hemolytic disorder. Cholecystectomy is the preferred treatment and common duct exploration is utilized when indicated. Six children with chronic relapsing pancreatitis secondary to stenosis of the ampulla of Vater and two with common duct stenosis are analyzed. Although extrahepatic biliary disorders are usually not considered in the differential diagnosis of children and adolescents with vague abdominal pain, it is evident by this large number of patients that there should be greater emphasis placed on earlier diagnosis in the future. PMID:6989334

  2. Heritable disorders of the bile ducts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Binita M. Kamath; David A. Piccoli

    2003-01-01

    Diseases of the bile ducts encompass a wide range of disorders. These include those disorders primarily affecting extra and intrahepatic bile ducts and those that may be classified as panbiliary. A simple classification of bile duct disorders is represented in Box 1. This discussion focuses on heritable disorders of the bile ducts. For a discussion of so-called ''isolated'' or ''sporadic''

  3. Characterization of FTR fuel duct tubes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Duncan; M. M. Paxton; J. L. Straalsund

    1976-01-01

    The mechanical and metallurgical properties of three FTR fuel ducts taken from the Cores 1 and 2 fuel duct production sequence are evaluated. Type 316 stainless steel, double vacuum melted with no scrap additions was used for the Cores 1 and 2 fuel ducts. The ducts were fabricated according to RDT Standard E6-20T. The finished parts were targeted to 20

  4. Timing of surgical drainage for pancreatic pseudocyst. Clinical and chemical criteria.

    PubMed Central

    Warshaw, A L; Rattner, D W

    1985-01-01

    Traditional concepts of managing pancreatic pseudocysts have changed with the advent of computerized tomography (CT) and ultrasound scanning, but new misconceptions related to spontaneous resolution have replaced some old ones. This report shows a difference in natural history and treatment requirements when pseudocysts are associated with acute versus chronic pancreatitis. There were 42 consecutive patients with pseudocysts treated over 5 years. Thirty-one were known alcoholics, two had gallstone pancreatitis, and nine had idiopathic pancreatitis. An attack of acute pancreatitis was identifiable within 2 months preceding in 22 patients, but there were only chronic symptoms in 20. Spontaneous resolution of the pseudocyst occurred in three patients (7%), all of whom had recent acute idiopathic pancreatitis, normal serum amylase levels, and pancreatograms showing normal pancreatic ducts freely communicating with the pseudocyst. Factors associated with failure to resolve included known chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic duct changes of chronic pancreatitis, persistence greater than 6 weeks, and thick walls (when seen) on scan. Nearly all (18/19) patients with known chronic pancreatitis had successful internal drainage of the pseudocysts immediately upon admission, whereas 6/20 patients with antecedent acute pancreatitis were found to require external drainage at the time surgery was eventually elected. Isoamylase analysis, performed on serum from 19 patients by means of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, detected the abnormal pancreatic isoamylase pattern described as "old amylase" in 15. When old amylase was present in the serum, internal drainage was always possible (14/14). In four of five patients whose serum contained no detectable old amylase, internal drainage was not possible regardless of the length of prior observation. There were four nonfatal complications arising from an acute pseudocyst during the wait for maturity. It is concluded that prolonged waiting is expensive and unnecessary for pseudocysts in chronic pancreatitis when there has been no recent acute attack. However, pseudocysts developing after identifiable acute pancreatitis should be observed in the safety of a hospital for up to 6 weeks to allow for either spontaneous resolution or maturation of the cyst wall. The appearance of old amylase in the serum suggests that the pseudocyst wall has achieved sufficient maturity to allow safe internal anastomosis. PMID:4073984

  5. Percutaneous coronary angioscopy and stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuser, Richard R.

    1994-05-01

    With the expanding array of therapies available for coronary intervention, the invasive cardiologist has many choices for treating a specific lesion in an individual patient. Certain types of lesions might respond more effectively with stents, particularly the rigid Palmax- Schatz device. Thrombus and dissection immediately following stent placement are associated with early occlusion, and the interventionist must be able to assess their presence pre- and post-stenting. Angiography is deficient in quantifying minimal disease and in defining lesion architecture and composition, as well as the plaque rupture and thrombosis associated with unstable angina. It is also imprecise in detecting dissection and thrombus. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) provides high-resolution images that delineate irregularities and other structures inside the lumen and within the vessel wall and surrounding tissues. Like angiography, IVUS has limited specificity for thrombus differentiation. Angioscopy is superior to angiography and IVUS in detecting thrombus and dissection. Angioscopy allows the clinician to assess the appearance of stent struts after deployment and at follow-up. This may aid in reducing acute complications as well as restenosis. Follow-up angioscopy of stents to detect thrombus or exposed struts may guide therapy in a patient who has clinical symptoms of restenosis.

  6. Main Bile Duct Stricture Occurring After Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro, E-mail: s-miyayama@fukui.saiseikai.or.jp; Yamashiro, Masashi; Okuda, Miho; Yoshie, Yuichi; Nakashima, Yoshiko; Ikeno, Hiroshi; Orito, Nobuaki [Fukuiken Saiseikai Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Notsumata, Kazuo; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Toya, Daisyu; Tanaka, Nobuyoshi [Fukuiken Saiseikai Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine (Japan); Matsui, Osamu [Kanazawa University Graduate School of Medical Science, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical course of main bile duct stricture at the hepatic hilum after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Among 446 consecutive patients with HCC treated by TACE, main bile duct stricture developed in 18 (4.0%). All imaging and laboratory data, treatment course, and outcomes were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had 1 to 2 tumors measuring 10 to 100 mm in diameter (mean {+-} SD 24.5 {+-} 5.4 mm) near the hepatic hilum fed by the caudate arterial branch (A1) and/or medial segmental artery (A4) of the liver. During the TACE procedure that caused bile duct injury, A1 was embolized in 8, A4 was embolized in 5, and both were embolized in 5 patients. Nine patients (50.0%) had a history of TACE in either A1 or A4. Iodized oil accumulation in the bile duct wall was seen in all patients on computed tomography obtained 1 week later. Bile duct dilatation caused by main bile duct stricture developed in both lobes (n = 9), in the right lobe (n = 3), in the left lobe (n = 4), in segment (S) 2 (n = 1), and in S3 (n = 1). Serum levels of alkaline phosphatase and {gamma}-glutamyltranspeptidase increased in 13 patients. Biloma requiring drainage developed in 2 patients; jaundice developed in 4 patients; and metallic stents were placed in 3 patients. Complications after additional TACE sessions, including biloma (n = 3) and/or jaundice (n = 5), occurred in 7 patients and were treated by additional intervention, including metallic stent placement in 2 patients. After initial TACE of A1 and/or A4, 8 patients (44.4%), including 5 with uncontrollable jaundice or cholangitis, died at 37.9 {+-} 34.9 months after TACE, and 10 (55.6%) have survived for 38.4 {+-} 37.9 months. Selective TACE of A1 and/or A4 carries a risk of main bile duct stricture at the hepatic hilum. Biloma and jaundice are serious complications associated with bile duct strictures.

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; illustration ...

  8. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  9. Articulated transition duct in turbomachine

    DOEpatents

    Flanagan, James Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2014-04-29

    Turbine systems are provided. A turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion and a downstream portion. The upstream portion extends from the inlet between an inlet end and an aft end. The downstream portion extends from the outlet between an outlet end and a head end. The turbine system further includes a joint coupling the aft end of the upstream portion and the head end of the downstream portion together. The joint is configured to allow movement of the upstream portion and the downstream portion relative to each other about or along at least one axis.

  10. Peripheral stent recovery after failed intracoronary delivery.

    PubMed

    Pan, M; Medina, A; Romero, M; Suárez de Lezo, J; Hernández, E; Pavlovic, D; Melián, F; Marrero, J; Cabrera, J A

    1992-11-01

    The Palmaz-Schatz stent can be successfully deployed in most patients. However, in a small percentage of instances a systemic embolism of the stent has been reported. In the present article we describe an easy and fast method of stent capture when detachment from the balloon has happened (pulling back the stent-loaded balloon into the guiding catheter or femoral sheath). In this situation we propose the use of the coronary guide-wire "as a guide" to capture coaxially the lost stent. This method allows for continuing the procedure without removal of the femoral sheath. PMID:1423581

  11. Endoscopic management and prevention of migrated esophageal stents

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Bruno da Costa; Retes, Felipe Alves; Medrado, Bruno Frederico; de Lima, Marcelo Simas; Pennacchi, Caterina Maria Pia Simione; Kawaguti, Fabio Shiguehissa; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Uemura, Ricardo Sato; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2014-01-01

    The use of self-expandable metallic stents has increased recently to palliate inoperable esophageal neoplasia and also in the management of benign strictures. Migration is one of the most common complications after stent placement and the endoscopist should be able to recognize and manage this situation. Several techniques for managing migrated stents have been described, as well as new techniques for preventing stent migration. Most stents have a “lasso” at the upper flange which facilitates stent repositioning or removal. An overtube, endoloop and large polypectomy snare may be useful for the retrieval of stents migrated into the stomach. External fixation of the stent with Shim’s technique is efficient in preventing stent migration. Suturing the stent to the esophageal wall, new stent designs with larger flanges and double-layered stents are promising techniques to prevent stent migration but they warrant validation in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:24567792

  12. Endoscopic management and prevention of migrated esophageal stents.

    PubMed

    Martins, Bruno da Costa; Retes, Felipe Alves; Medrado, Bruno Frederico; de Lima, Marcelo Simas; Pennacchi, Caterina Maria Pia Simione; Kawaguti, Fabio Shiguehissa; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Uemura, Ricardo Sato; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2014-02-16

    The use of self-expandable metallic stents has increased recently to palliate inoperable esophageal neoplasia and also in the management of benign strictures. Migration is one of the most common complications after stent placement and the endoscopist should be able to recognize and manage this situation. Several techniques for managing migrated stents have been described, as well as new techniques for preventing stent migration. Most stents have a "lasso" at the upper flange which facilitates stent repositioning or removal. An overtube, endoloop and large polypectomy snare may be useful for the retrieval of stents migrated into the stomach. External fixation of the stent with Shim's technique is efficient in preventing stent migration. Suturing the stent to the esophageal wall, new stent designs with larger flanges and double-layered stents are promising techniques to prevent stent migration but they warrant validation in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:24567792

  13. Turbofan aft duct suppressor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, A. A.; Motsinger, R. E.; Fiske, G. H.; Joshi, M. C.; Kraft, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Suppressions due to acoustic treatment in the annular exhaust duct of a model fan were theoretically predicted and compared with measured suppressions. The predictions are based on the modal analysis of sound propagation in a straight annular flow duct with segmented treatment. Modal distributions of the fan noise source (fan-stator interaction only) were measured using in-duct modal probes. The flow profiles were also measured in the vicinity of the modal probes. The acoustic impedance of the single degree of freedom treatment was measured in the presence of grazing flow. The measured values of mode distribution of the fan noise source, the flow velocity profile and the acoustic impedance of the treatment in the duct were used as input to the prediction program. The predicted suppressions, under the assumption of uniform flow in the duct, compared well with the suppressions measured in the duct for all test conditions. The interaction modes generated by the rotor-stator interaction spanned a cut-off ratio range from nearly 1 to 7.

  14. Inductive antenna stent: design, fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi Mohammadi, Abdolreza; Ali, Mohamed Sultan Mohamed; Lappin, Derry; Schlosser, Colin; Takahata, Kenichi

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and electromechanical characteristics of inductive stents developed for intelligent stent applications. The stents, fabricated out of 316L stainless-steel tubes using laser machining, are patterned to have zigzag loops without bridge struts, and when expanded, become a helix-like structure. Highly conductive metals such as copper and gold are coated on the stents to improve their inductive/antenna function. The Q-factor of the stent is shown to increase by a factor of 7 at 150 MHz with copper coating. The expansion of the stent from 2 to 4 mm diameter results in a 3.2× increase in the inductance, obtaining ˜1 µH at a similar frequency. The stent passivated by Parylene-C film is used to characterize its resonance in different media including saline. The copper-coated inductive stent exhibits a 2.4× radial stiffness for 1 mm strain as well as a 16× bending compliance compared with a commercial stent, each of which is potentially beneficial in preventing/mitigating stent failures such as recoil as well as enabling easier navigation through intricate blood vessels. The mechanical stiffness may be tailored by adjusting stent-wire thickness while maintaining necessary coating thickness to achieve particular mechanical requirements and high inductive performance simultaneously.

  15. Stent Evaluation with Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Yul

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been recently applied to investigate coronary artery disease in interventional cardiology. Compared to intravascular ultrasound, OCT is able to visualize various vascular structures more clearly with higher resolution. Several validation studies have shown that OCT is more accurate in evaluating neointimal tissue after coronary stent implantation than intravascular ultrasound. Novel findings on OCT evaluation include the detection of strut coverage and the characterization of neointimal tissue in an in-vivo setting. In a previous study, neointimal healing of stent strut was pathologically the most important factor associated with stent thrombosis, a fatal complication, in patients treated with drug-eluting stent (DES). Recently, OCT-defined coverage of a stent strut was proposed to be related with clinical safety in DES-treated patients. Neoatherosclerosis is an atheromatous change of neointimal tissue within the stented segment. Clinical studies using OCT revealed neoatherosclerosis contributed to late-phase luminal narrowing after stent implantation. Like de novo native coronary lesions, the clinical presentation of OCT-derived neoatherosclerosis varied from stable angina to acute coronary syndrome including late stent thrombosis. Thus, early identification of neoatherosclerosis with OCT may predict clinical deterioration in patients treated with coronary stent. Additionally, intravascular OCT evaluation provides additive information about the performance of coronary stent. In the near future, new advances in OCT technology will help reduce complications with stent therapy and accelerating in the study of interventional cardiology. PMID:23918554

  16. Management of Biliary Neoplastic Obstruction with Two Different Metallic Stents Implanted in One Session

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto; Fabiano, S., E-mail: sebas575@yahoo.it; Pipitone, Vincenzo; Spinelli, Alessio; Reale, Carlo Andrea; Colangelo, Vittorio; Pampana, Enrico; Romagnoli, Andrea; Simonetti, Giovanni [University of Rome 'Tor Vergata', Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology (Italy)

    2005-01-15

    The efficacy of the 'one-step' technique using two different metallic stents (Wallstent and Ultraflex) and associated rate of complications was studied in 87 patients with jaundice secondary to malignant biliary obstruction, with bilirubin level less than 15 mg/dl and Bismuth type 1 or 2 strictures. The study group, composed of 40 men and 47 women with a mean age of 59.4 years (range 37-81 years), was treated with a 'one-step' percutaneous transhepatic implantation of self-expanding stents. The cause of the obstruction was pancreatic carcinoma in 38 patients (44%), lymph node metastasis in 20 patients (23%), gallbladder carcinoma in 13 patients (15%), cholangiocarcinoma in 12 patients (14%) and ampullary carcinoma in four patients (5%). A significant reduction in jaundice was obtained in all but one patient, with a drop of total serum bilirubin level from a mean of 13.7 mg/dl to 4.3 mg/dl within the first 4 days. The mean postprocedural hospitalization period was 5.4 days in the Wallstent group and 6.4 days in the Ultraflex group. Mean survival rate was 7.8 months (Wallstent group) and 7.1 months (Ultraflex group). The use of both stents did not reveal any significant difference in parameters tested. The implantation of these self-expandable stents in one session, in selected patients, is clinically effective, devoid of important complications and cost-effective due to the reduction in hospitalization.

  17. Autophagy and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gukovsky, Ilya

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the exocrine pancreas that carries considerable morbidity and mortality; its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Recent findings from experimental models and genetically altered mice summarized in this review reveal that autophagy, the principal cellular degradative pathway, is impaired in pancreatitis and that one cause of autophagy impairment is defective function of lysosomes. We propose that the lysosomal/autophagic dysfunction is a key initiating event in pancreatitis and a converging point of multiple deranged pathways. There is strong evidence supporting this hypothesis. Investigation of autophagy in pancreatitis has just started, and many questions about the “upstream” mechanisms mediating the lysosomal/autophagic dysfunction and the “downstream” links to pancreatitis pathologies need to be explored. Answers to these questions should provide insight into novel molecular targets and therapeutic strategies for treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:22961802

  18. Review: Pancreatic ?-Cell Neogenesis Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Maryline; Tourrel-Cuzin, Cécile; Plachot, Cédric

    2004-01-01

    ?-cell neogenesis triggers the generation of new ?-cells from precursor cells. Neogenesis from duct epithelium is the most currently described and the best documented process of differentiation of precursor cells into ?-cells. It is contributes not only to ?-cell mass expansion during fetal and nonatal life but it is also involved in the maintenance of the ?-cell mass in adults. It is also required for the increase in ?-cell mass in situations of increase insulin demand (obesity, pregnancy). A large number of factors controlling the differentiation of ?-cells has been identified. They are classified into the following main categories: growth factors, cytokine and inflamatory factors, and hormones such as PTHrP and GLP-1. The fact that intestinal incretin hormone GLP-1 exerts a major trophic role on pancreatic ?-cells provides insights into the possibility to pharmacologically stimulate ?-cell neogenesis. This could have important implications for the of treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Transdifferentiation, that is, the differentiation of already differentiated cells into ?-cells, remains controversial.However, more and more studies support this concept. The cells, which can potentially “transdifferentiate” into ?-cells, can belong to the pancreas (acinar cells) and even islets, or originate from extra-pancreatic tissues such as the liver. Neogenesis from intra-islet precursors also have been proposed and subpopulations of cell precursors inside islets have been described by some authors. Nestin positive cells, which have been considered as the main candidates, appear rather as progenitors of endothelial cells rather than ?-cells and contribute to angiogenesis rather than neogenesis. To take advantage of the different differentiation processes may be a direction for future cellular therapies. Ultimately, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in ?-cell neogenesis will allow us to use any type of differentiated and/or undifferentiated cells as a source of potential cell precursors. PMID:15203882

  19. How Is Pancreatic Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is low blood glucose with high levels of insulin and C-peptide. Other pancreatic hormones, such as gastrin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide, and VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide) ...

  20. Nutrition in Acute Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hemant M. Kocher; Christos Dervenis; Attila Oláh; William R. Murray; Barry Clements; Clement W. Imrie

    \\u000a Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common diseases in gastroenterology\\/surgery. The incidence of acute pancreatitis ranges\\u000a from 10 to 46 per 100,000 people per year. Recent studies have suggested a slightly higher incidence of acute pancreatitis\\u000a at 56.5 per 100,000 people, which may be linked to socioeconomic deprivation (Ellis et al. 2009). Two percent of all hospital\\u000a admissions are

  1. [Pigtail stent for gallbladder drainage].

    PubMed

    Boogerd, L S F Noor; Perk, Lars E; van Acker, Gijs J D

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage is a new, relatively non-invasive treatment for patients with symptomatic gallbladder disease and a high surgery risk. Placement of an internal pigtail stent is an alternative treatment for percutaneous gallbladder drainage. This procedure can be performed in patients with a temporary contra-indication - in preparatory process to a cholecystectomy - as well as in patients with a prolonged contra-indication where the pigtail stent can remain in situ for a longer period of time. This technique appears to be an effective and safe procedure for patients with acute cholecystitis or symptomatic gallbladder disease and a high surgery risk. PMID:25052353

  2. Pancreatic Pseudocyst: Therapeutic Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, A. K.; Tiwary, Satyendra K.; Kumar, Puneet

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocyst develops in both acute and chronic pancreatitis. It is an entity likely to either remain asymptomatic or develop devastating complications. Despite being diagnosed easily, treatment exercise is still at crossroads whether in the form of internal or external drainage or endoscopic, laparoscopic, or open intervention with a good radiological guidance. The therapeutic dilemma whether to treat a patient with a pancreatic pseudocyst, as well as when and with what technique, is a difficult one. This paper is intended to get information about diagnostic and therapeutic exercises most appropriate for acute and chronic pancreatic pseudocyst. PMID:22577595

  3. Pancreatitis, pregnancy and gallstones.

    PubMed

    McKay, A J; O'Neill, J; Imrie, C W

    1980-01-01

    In an 18 year hospital experience of over 500 patients with primary acute pancreatitis, 20 developed the disease either while pregnant (7 patients) or within five months of pregnancy (13 patients). Eighteen of the 20 patients had gallstones and adequate biliary surgery abolished further attacks of pancreatitis. Only two patients had surgery during the acute phase of their illness. The single fetal death was associated with early surgical intervention and there were no maternal deaths. We found no evidence of a specific link between pregnancy and pancreatitis but there is a marked association between pancreatitis and gallstones. PMID:7362789

  4. Loss of HNF6 expression correlates with human pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Pekala, Kelly R.; Ma, Xidi; Kropp, Peter A.; Petersen, Christine P.; Hudgens, Courtney W.; Chung, Christine H.; Shi, Chanjuan; Merchant, Nipun; Maitra, Anirban; Means, Anna L.; Gannon, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Normal pancreatic epithelium progresses through various stages of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) in the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Transcriptional regulation of this progression is poorly understood. In mouse, the Hnf6 transcription factor is expressed in ductal cells and at lower levels in acinar cells of the adult pancreas, but not in mature endocrine cells. Hnf6 is critical for terminal differentiation of the ductal epithelium during embryonic development and for pancreatic endocrine cell specification. We previously showed that, in mice, loss of Hnf6 from the pancreatic epithelium during organogenesis results in increased duct proliferation and altered duct architecture, increased periductal fibrosis and acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. Here we show that decreased expression of HNF6 is strongly correlated with increased severity of PanIN lesions in samples of human pancreata and is absent from >90% of PDAC. Mouse models in which cancer progression can be analyzed from the earliest stages that are seldom accessible in humans support a role for Hnf6 loss in progression from early to late stage PanIN and PDAC. In addition, gene expression analyses of human pancreatic cancer reveal decreased expression of HNF6 and its direct and indirect target genes compared to normal tissue and up-regulation of genes that act in opposition to HNF6 and its targets. The negative correlation between HNF6 expression and pancreatic cancer progression suggests that HNF6 maintains pancreatic epithelial homeostasis in humans, and that its loss contributes to the progression from PanIN to ductal adenocarcinoma. Insight on the role of HNF6 in pancreatic cancer development could lead to its use as a biomarker for early detection and prognosis. PMID:24638272

  5. Comparison of a new polytetrafluoroethylene-covered metallic stent to a noncovered stent in canine ureters.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hwan-Hoon; Lee, Seung Hwa; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Hong Suk; Kim, Young Sik; Kang, Byung Chul; Frisoli, Joan K; Razavi, Mahmood K

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a newly designed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered metallic stent in the ureter by comparing its effectiveness with that of the noncovered stent in a canine model. We placed 14 stents in the ureters of seven mongrel dogs that weighed 30-40 kg each. The covered and noncovered stents were deployed in the right and left ureters, respectively, of six dogs. In the seventh dog, a covered stent and a double-J catheter were inserted in the right ureter, and a covered stent only was inserted in the left ureter. The first six dogs were sacrificed at 5, 10, and 15 weeks after deployment of the stents (two for each follow-up period), and the seventh dog was sacrificed at 30 weeks. There was no migration or poor expansion of any of the stents observed on plain radiography. On intravenous pyelogram and retrograde pyelogram, all of the covered stents at each follow-up period had patent lumens at the stented segments without hydronephrosis, and the passage of contrast material through it was well preserved. The noncovered stents in the dogs sacrificed at 5 and 10 weeks and one of the two dogs sacrificed at 15 weeks showed near-complete occlusion of the stent lumen due to ingrowth of the soft tissue, and severe hydronephrosis was also noted. The noncovered stent in the other dog sacrificed at 15 weeks showed the passage of contrast material without hydronephrosis, but the lumen of the stent was still nearly occluded by the soft tissue. There was no evidence of hydronephrosis or passage disturbance of the contrast material in both ureters of the dog sacrificed at 30 weeks. We conclude that the newly designed PTFE-covered stent effectively prevented the luminal occlusion caused by urothelial hyperplasia compared to the near-total occlusion of the noncovered stents, and no migration of the covered stents was noted. PMID:18214599

  6. Comparison of a New Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Metallic Stent to a Noncovered Stent in Canine Ureters

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hwan-Hoon, E-mail: chungmic@korea.ac.kr; Lee, Seung Hwa; Cho, Sung Bum [Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hong Suk [Korea University, Ansan Hospital, Department of Urology (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Sik [Korea University, Ansan Hospital, Department of Pathology (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Byung Chul [Ewha Women's University, Mokdong Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Frisoli, Joan K.; Razavi, Mahmood K. [Stanford University Medical Center, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a newly designed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered metallic stent in the ureter by comparing its effectiveness with that of the noncovered stent in a canine model. We placed 14 stents in the ureters of seven mongrel dogs that weighed 30-40 kg each. The covered and noncovered stents were deployed in the right and left ureters, respectively, of six dogs. In the seventh dog, a covered stent and a double-J catheter were inserted in the right ureter, and a covered stent only was inserted in the left ureter. The first six dogs were sacrificed at 5, 10, and 15 weeks after deployment of the stents (two for each follow-up period), and the seventh dog was sacrificed at 30 weeks. There was no migration or poor expansion of any of the stents observed on plain radiography. On intravenous pyelogram and retrograde pyelogram, all of the covered stents at each follow-up period had patent lumens at the stented segments without hydronephrosis, and the passage of contrast material through it was well preserved. The noncovered stents in the dogs sacrificed at 5 and 10 weeks and one of the two dogs sacrificed at 15 weeks showed near-complete occlusion of the stent lumen due to ingrowth of the soft tissue, and severe hydronephrosis was also noted. The noncovered stent in the other dog sacrificed at 15 weeks showed the passage of contrast material without hydronephrosis, but the lumen of the stent was still nearly occluded by the soft tissue. There was no evidence of hydronephrosis or passage disturbance of the contrast material in both ureters of the dog sacrificed at 30 weeks. We conclude that the newly designed PTFE-covered stent effectively prevented the luminal occlusion caused by urothelial hyperplasia compared to the near-total occlusion of the noncovered stents, and no migration of the covered stents was noted.

  7. MR Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Stents: In Vitro Evaluation of 22 Different Stent Types.

    PubMed

    Burg, Matthias C; Bunck, Alexander C; Seifarth, Harald; Buerke, Boris; Kugel, Harald; Hesselmann, Volker; Köhler, Michael; Heindel, Walter; Maintz, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate stent lumen visibility of a large sample of different peripheral arterial (iliac, renal, carotid) stents using magnetic resonance angiography in vitro. Materials and Methods. 21 different stents and one stentgraft (10 nitinol, 7 316L, 2 tantalum, 1 cobalt superalloy, 1 PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1 platinum alloy) were examined in a vessel phantom (vessel diameters ranging from 5 to 13?mm) filled with a solution of Gd-DTPA. Stents were imaged at 1.5 Tesla using a T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence. Image analysis was performed measuring three categories: Signal intensity in the stent lumen, lumen visibility of the stented lumen, and homogeneity of the stented lumen. The results were classified using a 3-point scale (good, intermediate, and poor results). Results. 7 stents showed good MR lumen visibility (4x nitinol, 2x tantalum, and 1x cobalt superalloy). 9 stents showed intermediate results (5x nitinol, 2x 316L, 1x PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1x platinum alloy) and 6 stents showed poor results (1x nitinol, and 5x 316L). Conclusion. Stent lumen visibility varies depending on the stent material and type. Some products show good lumen visibility which may allow the detection of stenoses inside the lumen, while other products cause artifacts which prevent reliable evaluation of the stent lumen with this technique. PMID:22091380

  8. MR Angiography of Peripheral Arterial Stents: In Vitro Evaluation of 22 Different Stent Types

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Matthias C.; Bunck, Alexander C.; Seifarth, Harald; Buerke, Boris; Kugel, Harald; Hesselmann, Volker; Köhler, Michael; Heindel, Walter; Maintz, David

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate stent lumen visibility of a large sample of different peripheral arterial (iliac, renal, carotid) stents using magnetic resonance angiography in vitro. Materials and Methods. 21 different stents and one stentgraft (10 nitinol, 7 316L, 2 tantalum, 1 cobalt superalloy, 1 PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1 platinum alloy) were examined in a vessel phantom (vessel diameters ranging from 5 to 13?mm) filled with a solution of Gd-DTPA. Stents were imaged at 1.5 Tesla using a T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence. Image analysis was performed measuring three categories: Signal intensity in the stent lumen, lumen visibility of the stented lumen, and homogeneity of the stented lumen. The results were classified using a 3-point scale (good, intermediate, and poor results). Results. 7 stents showed good MR lumen visibility (4x nitinol, 2x tantalum, and 1x cobalt superalloy). 9 stents showed intermediate results (5x nitinol, 2x 316L, 1x PET + cobalt superalloy, and 1x platinum alloy) and 6 stents showed poor results (1x nitinol, and 5x 316L). Conclusion. Stent lumen visibility varies depending on the stent material and type. Some products show good lumen visibility which may allow the detection of stenoses inside the lumen, while other products cause artifacts which prevent reliable evaluation of the stent lumen with this technique. PMID:22091380

  9. PRSS1_p.Leu81Met mutation results in autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Li, Yue-Ming; Hong, Guo-Lin; Xu, Zhi-Feng; Liu, Qi-Cai; He, Qing-Liang; Lin, Li-Qing; Weng, Shao-Huang

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To describe protease serine 1 (PRSS1) gene mutations in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and the clinical features of AIP. METHODS: Fourteen patients with AIP, 56 with other chronic pancreatitis, 254 with pancreatic cancer and 120 normal controls were studied. The mutations and polymorphisms of four genes involved with pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer, PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR and MEN1, were sequenced. The pathogenic mechanism of AIP was investigated by comparing the wild-type expression system with the p.81Leu?Met mutant expression system. RESULTS: Two novel mutations (p.81Leu?Met and p.91Ala?Ala) were found in PRSS1 gene from four patients with AIP. PRSS1_p.81Leu?Met mutation led to a trypsin display reduction (76.2%) combined with phenyl agarose (Ca2+ induced failure). Moreover, the ratio of trypsin/amylase in patients with AIP was higher than in the patients with pancreatic cancer and other pancreatitis. A large number of lymphocytes and plasma cells were found in the bile ducts accompanied by hyperplasia of myofibroblasts. CONCLUSION: Autoimmune pancreatitis may be related to PRSS1 gene mutations. PMID:23745036

  10. Inhibition of Ras signalling reduces neutrophil infiltration and tissue damage in severe acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Changhui; Merza, Mohammed; Luo, Lingtao; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment is known to be a rate-limiting step in mediating tissue injury in severe acute pancreatitis (AP). However, the signalling mechanisms controlling inflammation and organ damage in AP remain elusive. Herein, we examined the role of Ras signalling in AP. Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with a Ras inhibitor (farnesylthiosalicylic acid, FTS) before infusion of taurocholate into the pancreatic duct. Pancreatic and lung tissues as well as blood were collected 24h after pancreatitis induction. Pretreatment with FTS decreased serum amylase levels by 82% and significantly attenuated acinar cell necrosis, tissue haemorrhage and oedema formation in taurocholate-induced pancreatitis. Inhibition of Ras signalling reduced myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels in the inflamed pancreas by 42%. In addition, administration of FTS decreased pancreatic levels of CXC chemokines as well as circulating levels of interleukin-6 and high-mobility group box 1 in animals exposed to taurocholate. Moreover, treatment with FTS reduced taurocholate-induced MPO levels in the lung. Inhibition of Ras signalling had no effect on neutrophil expression of Mac-1 in mice with pancreatitis. Moreover, FTS had no direct impact on trypsin activation in isolated pancreatic acinar cells. These results indicate that Ras signalling controls CXC chemokine formation, neutrophil recruitment and tissue injury in severe AP. Thus, our findings highlight a new signalling mechanism regulating neutrophil recruitment in the pancreas and suggest that inhibition of Ras signalling might be a useful strategy to attenuate local and systemic inflammation in severe AP. PMID:25460024

  11. Duodenal patch and sphincterotomy: modification of an old technique to prevent graft pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grochowiecki, T; Szmidt, J; Galazka, Z; Nazarewski, S; Madej, K; Frunze, S; Jakimowicz, T; Wojtaszek, M; Pietrasik, K; Swiech-Zarzycka, A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to preliminarily evaluate the duodenal patch technique combined with open sphincterotomy in terms of prevention of graft pancreatitis. From April 2003 to March 2005, 17 simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantations were performed using this technique. All recipients are alive with good renal transplant function. Directly after sphincterotomy in 16 pancreatic grafts a good outflow of clear pancreatic juice and a lessening of graft tenseness were observed during surgery. In two transplants an additional sphincterotomy of the Santorini duct sphincter was necessary. In one recipient no pancreatic juice secretion was observed and insulin independence was not obtained. This graft was explanted shortly afterward. In 13 recipients no graft pancreatic or peripancreatic fluid collection requiring intervention was observed. Of the three recipients who developed graft pancreatitis, two required graft pancreatectomy. In conclusion, Sphincterotomy facilitates pancreatic juice outflow by reducing intraoperative graft edema, which could lead to subsequent inflammation. Further studies on the factors inducing graft pancreatitis are necessary to eliminate this severe complication. PMID:16504722

  12. Imaging diagnosis of pancreatic cancer: A state-of-the-art review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Sun; Lee, Jeong Min

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the deadliest cancers worldwide, and has a poor, five-year survival rate of 5%. Although complete surgical resection is the only curative therapy for pancreatic cancer, less than 20% of newly-diagnosed patients undergo surgical resection with a curative intent. Due to the lack of early symptoms and the tendency of pancreatic adenocarcinoma to invade adjacent structures or to metastasize at an early stage, many patients with pancreatic cancer already have advanced disease at the time of their diagnosis and, therefore, there is a high mortality rate. To improve the patient survival rate, early detection of PC is critical. The diagnosis of PC relies on computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), or biopsy or fine-needle aspiration using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Although multi-detector row computed tomography currently has a major role in the evaluation of PC, MRI with MRCP facilitates better detection of tumors at an early stage by allowing a comprehensive analysis of the morphological changes of the pancreas parenchyma and pancreatic duct. The diagnosis could be improved using positron emission tomography techniques in special conditions in which CT and EUS are not completely diagnostic. It is essential for clinicians to understand the advantages and disadvantages of the various pancreatic imaging modalities in order to be able to make optimal treatment and management decisions. Our study investigates the current role and innovative techniques of pancreatic imaging focused on the detection of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24976723

  13. In Vivo and In Situ Evaluation of a Wireless Magnetoelastic Sensor Array for Plastic Biliary Stent Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Green, Scott R.; Kwon, Richard S.; Elta, Grace H.; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the in vivo and in situ evaluation of a system that wirelessly monitors the accumulation of biliary sludge in a plastic biliary stent. The sensing element, located within the stent, is a passive array of magnetoelastic resonators that is queried by a wireless electromagnetic signal. The in vivo and in situ testing uses commercially-available plastic biliary stents, each enhanced with an array of ribbon sensors (formed from Metglas™ 2826MB). The sensor array is approximately 70 mm long and contains individual resonators that are 1 mm in width and have lengths of 10 mm, 14 mm, and 20 mm. The array is anchored into the 2.8 mm inner-diameter stent using a thermal staking technique. For the in situ testing, an instrumented stent is placed in various locations within the abdominal cavity of a female domestic swine carcass to evaluate the wireless range of the system; these results show that a wireless signal can be obtained from a range of at least 7.5 cm from a sensor array covered in bile. The in vivo testing includes the endoscopic implantation of an instrumented stent into the bile duct of a swine. After implantation, the swine was housed for a period of 4 weeks, during which the animal showed no ill effects and followed the expected growth curve from 29 kg to 42 kg. At the conclusion of the in vivo test, the animal was euthanized, and the instrumented stent explanted and examined. The results presented in this paper indicate that the monitoring system does not adversely affect the health of the animal and can feasibly provide sufficient wireless range after implantation. PMID:23460136

  14. Polymer/metal adhesion in hybrid cardiovascular stent

    E-print Network

    Mohan, Karthik

    2009-05-15

    Angioplasty over the years has proven to be an excellent substitute for open heart surgery where an artery/vien, blocked by atherosclerosis, is expanded using a stent. Metallic and coated metallic stents have been used for angioplasty. Metal stents...

  15. Evaluation of diagnostic cytology via endoscopic naso-pancreatic drainage for pancreatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Tomoyuki; Kitamura, Katsuya; Yamamiya, Akira; Ishii, Yu; Sato, Yoshiki; Nomoto, Tomohiro; Ikegami, Akitoshi; Yoshida, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the usefulness of cytology of the pancreatic juice obtained via the endoscopic naso-pancreatic drainage tube (ENPD-C). METHODS: ENPD was performed in cases where a diagnosis could not be made other than by using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and in cases of pancreatic neoplasms or cystic tumors, including intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) suspected to have malignant potential. 35 patients (21 males and 14 females) underwent ENPD between January 2007 and June 2013. The pancreatic duct was imaged and the procedure continued in one of ENPD-C or ENPD-C plus brush cytology (ENPD-BC). We checked the cytology result and the final diagnosis. RESULTS: The mean patient age was 69 years (range, 48-86 years). ENPD-C was performed in 24 cases and ENPD-C plus brush cytology (ENPD-BC) in 11 cases. The ENPD tube was inserted for an average of 3.5 d. The final diagnosis was confirmed on the basis of the resected specimen in 18 cases and of follow-up findings at least 6 mo after ENPD in the 18 inoperable cases. Malignancy was diagnosed in 21 cases and 14 patients were diagnosed as having a benign condition. The ratios of class V/IV:III:II/I?findings were 7:7:7 in malignant cases and 0:3:11 in benign cases. The sensitivity and specificity for all patients were 33.3% and 100%, respectively. The cytology-positive rate was 37.5% (6/16) for pancreatic cancer. For IPMN cases, the sensitivity and specificity were 33% and 100%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Sensitivity may be further increased by adding brush cytology. Although we can diagnosis cancer in cases of a positive result, the accuracy of ENPD-C remains unsatisfactory. PMID:25132920

  16. Pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pradeep Bansal; Amnon Sonnenberg

    1995-01-01

    Background & Aims: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) maintains a computerized file of all hospital discharges since 1970. In taking advantage of this large database, the present study aimed to determine whether pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Methods: A case control study compared the occurrence of pancreatitis in 2639 patients with pancreatic cancer and a matched

  17. Surgery for periampullary and pancreatic carcinoma: a Liverpool experience.

    PubMed Central

    Kingsnorth, A. N.

    1997-01-01

    The development of a single-surgeon specialist referral practice for pancreatic surgery which evolved over an 8 year period is described. Source of referral, protocol for patient management, and operative strategy are outlined. Preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), endoscopic sphincterotomy, and stent placement where possible (85% of cases), high-resolution contrast-enhanced CT and standard pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy with a unique reconstructive technique were employed. In 105 patients receiving curative resection for pancreatic or periampullary tumours, the overall operative mortality was 4.8% and overall morbidity 26%. Actuarial 5-year survival rates were 11% for pancreatic carcinoma and 34% for ampullary carcinoma. Resectability rate was 81% without the use of time-consuming and expensive imaging techniques for staging such as laparoscopy, intraoperative ultrasound or laparoscopic ultrasound. No specific regimen of perioperative chemoirradiation was utilised over the study period. To achieve comparable results it is recommended that patients should be referred to regional specialist surgeons in whose hands mortality and morbidity is low, costs reduced and training of pancreatic surgeons can be undertaken. PMID:9244068

  18. Reintervention for occluded biliary metal stent for patients with malignant distal biliary stricture.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kei; Ogawa, Takahisa; Horaguchi, Jun; Koshita, Shinsuke; Fujita, Naotaka

    2013-05-01

    A metal stent has a longer stent patency than a plastic stent in patients with unresectable malignant distal biliary stricture. However, treatment for stent dysfunction of a metal stent remains unresolved. A review of reported articles regarding reintervention for metal stent dysfunction showed that causes of stent dysfunction included tumor ingrowth/overgrowth, stone/sludge/food impaction, and stent migration. Cleaning of the stent is associated with an early relapse of stent dysfunction. Additional placement of a covered metal stent is expected to have a longer stent patency than that of other stents such as uncovered metal stents or plastic stents. It is recommended that occluded covered metal stents be removed if possible. Stent trimming with argon plasma coagulation is sometimes useful for the treatment of stent displacement. No strategy for occluded metal stents has been established yet. Further clinical trials regarding proper treatments are necessary. PMID:23617663

  19. Multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Clores, Michael J; Thosani, Amar; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions are commonly encountered today with the routine use of cross-sectional imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The majority of patients discovered to have a pancreatic cyst are completely asymptomatic; yet the presence of such a finding instills fear in the minds of both patient and physician, as the concern for malignant transformation to pancreatic cancer is great despite the relatively low overall likelihood of cyst progression. Not all cysts in the pancreas represent pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCNs), and not all PCNs have significant malignant potential. Mucinous PCNs are the most concerning, as these lesions have the greatest potential for cancerous transformation to adenocarcinoma. Within the group of mucinous PCNs, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) involving the main pancreatic duct are the most worrisome, and surgical resection should be pursued if the patient has appropriate operative risks. IPMN lesions involving the branch ducts, and mucinous cystadenomas, have a lower likelihood for malignancy, and they may be closely followed for the development of any worrisome or high-risk features. Surveillance of known PCNs is performed with a combination of CT, MRI and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) may be used to assess cyst fluid cytology, and also to detect cyst fluid amylase level, carcinoembryonic antigen level, and DNA molecular analysis in certain cases. The presence or absence of specific cyst morphological features, as well as the cyst fluid analysis, is what enables the physician to guide the patient towards continued surveillance, versus the pursuit of surgical resection. PMID:24520195

  20. Pancreatitis in cats.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids. PMID:23148855

  1. Management of cystic and solid pancreatic incidentalomas: a review analysis.

    PubMed

    Karatzas, T; Dimitroulis, D; Charalampoudis, P; Misiakos, E P; Vasileiadis, I; Kouraklis, G

    2013-01-01

    Incidentally discovered pancreatic lesions that are asymptomatic have become much more common in recent years. It is important to characterize these lesions and to determine which patients can be safely observed and which should undergo an operation, as a substantial proportion of them might be malignant or premalignant. This review focus on the diagnostic approach and management of the different types of cystic and solid incidental pancreatic lesions based on appropriate clinical input, imaging screening and histological criteria. The task of developing guidelines to deal with an incidentally found pancreatic lesion, however, is much more complex and controversial than with other organs incidentalomas. In most series, pancreatic incidentalomas (PIs) <2 cm and of cystic appearance are likely to be benign, whereas those >2 cm are usually premalignant or malignant. Serous cystadenomas can reach very large size and are usually benign lesions. The presence of a solid mass or a mural nodule in a cystic lesion along with main pancreatic duct dilatation, thick septations and biliary obstruction are considered features suspicious of malignancy. Mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are malignant or lesions of malignant potential and need surgical exploration. Solid lesions are much more likely to be premalignant or malignant and most of patients will undergo resection. The decision to operate rather than follow a solid lesion is a matter of tumor size and of clinical judgment based on the age and patient comorbidities. The present study should serve as a general guide and not applied as strict principles. Key words: cystic pancreatic incidentalomas, diagnostic approach, management, solid pancreatic incidentalomas. PMID:23613384

  2. Roles of Cav3.2 and TRPA1 channels targeted by hydrogen sulfide in pancreatic nociceptive processing in mice with or without acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yuka; Fujimura, Mayuko; Nishimura, Sachiyo; Tsubota, Maho; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), formed by multiple enzymes, including cystathionine-?-lyase (CSE), targets Ca(v)3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels (T channels) and transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), facilitating somatic pain. Pancreatitis-related pain also appears to involve activation of T channels by H(2)S formed by the upregulated CSE. Therefore, this study investigates the roles of the Ca(v)3.2 isoform and/or TRPA1 in pancreatic nociception in the absence and presence of pancreatitis. In anesthetized mice, AP18, a TRPA1 inhibitor, abolished the Fos expression in the spinal dorsal horn caused by injection of a TRPA1 agonist into the pancreatic duct. As did mibefradil, a T-channel inhibitor, in our previous report, AP18 prevented the Fos expression following ductal NaHS, an H(2)S donor. In the mice with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, the referred hyperalgesia was suppressed by NNC 55-0396 (NNC), a selective T-channel inhibitor; zinc chloride; or ascorbic acid, known to inhibit Ca(v)3.2 selectively among three T-channel isoforms; and knockdown of Ca(v)3.2. In contrast, AP18 and knockdown of TRPA1 had no significant effect on the cerulein-induced referred hyperalgesia, although they significantly potentiated the antihyperalgesic effect of NNC at a subeffective dose. TRPA1 but not Ca(v)3.2 in the dorsal root ganglia was downregulated at a protein level in mice with cerulein-induced pancreatitis. The data indicate that TRPA1 and Ca(v)3.2 mediate the exogenous H(2)S-induced pancreatic nociception in naïve mice and suggest that, in the mice with pancreatitis, Ca(v)3.2 targeted by H(2)S primarily participates in the pancreatic pain, whereas TRPA1 is downregulated and plays a secondary role in pancreatic nociceptive signaling. PMID:25267397

  3. Biliary reflux detection in anomalous union of the pancreatico-biliary duct patients

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Suk Keu; Lee, Seung Wha; Cha, Sang Hoon; Chung, Hwan Hoon; Je, Bo Kyung; Kim, Baek Hyun; Hyun, Jong Jin

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate the imaging findings of biliopancreatic and pancreatico-biliary reflux in patients with anomalous union of the pancreatico-biliary duct (AUPBD) on gadoxetic acid-enhanced functional magnetic resonance cholangiography (fMRC). METHODS: This study included six consecutive patients (two men and four women; mean age 47.5 years) with AUPBD. All subjects underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP); one subject also underwent bile sampling of the common bile duct (CBD) to measure the amylase level because his gadoxetic acid-enhanced fMRC images showed evidence of pancreatico-biliary reflux of pancreatic secretions. Of the five patients with choledochal cysts, four underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. RESULTS: The five cases of choledochal cysts were classified as Todani classification?I. In three of the six patients with AUPBD, injected contrast media reached the distal CBD and pancreatic duct on delay images, suggesting biliopancreatic reflux. In two of these six patients, a band-like filling defect was noted in the CBD on pre-fatty meal images, which decreased in size on delayed post-fatty meal images, suggesting pancreatico-biliary reflux of pancreatic secretions, and the bile sampled from the CBD in one patient had an amylase level of 113?000 IU/L. In one of the six patients with AUPBD, contrast media did not reach the distal CBD due to multiple CBD stones. CONCLUSION: Gadoxetic acid-enhanced fMRC successfully demonstrated biliopancreatic reflux of bile and pancreatico-biliary reflux of pancreatic secretions in patients with AUPBD with and without choledochal cysts. PMID:22408355

  4. Safety, efficacy and costs associated with direct coronary stenting compared with stenting after predilatation

    PubMed Central

    IJsselmuiden, A.; Serruys, P.W.; Tangelder, G.J.; Slagboom, T.; van der Wieken, R.; Kiemeneij, F.; Laarman, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives Comparison of the in-hospital success rates, procedural costs and short-term clinical outcomes of direct stenting versus stenting after balloon predilatation. Methods Altogether, 400 patients with angina pectoris and/or myocardial ischaemia due to coronary stenoses in a single native vessel were randomised to either direct stenting or stenting after predilatation. Baseline characteristics were evenly distributed between the two groups. Results Procedural success rates were similar (96.0% direct stenting group vs. 94.5% predilatation) as well as final successful stent implantation (98.3 vs. 97.8%), while the primary success rate of direct stenting alone was 88.3%, p=0.01. In multivariate analysis, angiographic lesion calcification was an independent predictor of unsuccessful direct stenting (odds ratio 7.1, 95% confidence interval 2.8-18.2, p<0.0001). Rates of troponin I rises >0.15 ?g/l, used as a measure of distal embolisation, were similar in both groups (17.8 vs. 17.1%). Rates of major adverse cardiac events at 30 days were 4.5% in the direct stenting group versus 5.5% in the predilated group (ns). Direct stenting was associated with savings in fluoroscopy time, and angiographic contrast agent use, and a reduction in utilisation of angioplasty balloons (0.4 vs. 1.17 balloons per patient, p<0.001). Mean per patient procedural costs associated with direct stenting versus predilatation were €2545±914 versus €2763±842 (p=0.01), despite the implantation of more stents in the directly stented group. Conclusion Compared with a strategy of stenting preceded by balloon predilatation, direct stenting was equally safe and effective, with similar in-hospital and 30-day clinical outcomes, and modest procedural cost-savings. A calcified lesion predicted unsuccessful direct stenting. PMID:25696356

  5. Bare-Metal Stents Versus Drug-Eluting Stents for Primary Angioplasty: Long-Term Outcome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emilio Di Lorenzo; Giannignazio Carbone; Luigi Sauro; Alfredo Casafina; Michele Capasso; Rosario Sauro

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention (PCI) is the most used myocardial revascularization technique for patients\\u000a with coronary artery disease. Primary PCI with stent implantation is widely considered the gold standard for the treatment\\u000a of ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. Coronary stents, compared with balloon angioplasty, have reduced focal lesion\\u000a restenosis. To reduce in-stent restenosis, drug-eluting stents (DES) were designed to locally release

  6. Radioactive stents delay but do not prevent in-stent neointimal hyperplasia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Patrick Kay; Alexander J. Wardeh; Ken Kozuma; A. H. M. Knook; A. Thury; P. W. J. C. Serruys; D. P. Foley; P. C. Levendag; Giessen van der W. J; G. Sianos

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Restenosis after conventional stenting is almost exclusively caused by neointimal hyperplasia. Beta-particle-emitting radioactive stents decrease in-stent neointimal hyperplasia at 6-month follow-up. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the 1-year outcome of (32)P radioactive stents with an initial activity of 6 to 12 microCi using serial quantitative coronary angiography and volumetric ECG-gated 3D intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). METHODS AND

  7. Bronchobiliary Fistula Treated by Self-expanding ePTFE-Covered Nitinol Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel [University of Tor Vergata, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology (Italy)], E-mail: danielkonda@yahoo.com; Tisone, Giuseppe [University of Tor Vergata, Department of Surgery (Italy); Pipitone, Vincenzo [University of Tor Vergata, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology (Italy); Anselmo, Alessandro [University of Tor Vergata, Department of Surgery (Italy); Simonetti, Giovanni [University of Tor Vergata, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Interventional Radiology (Italy)

    2005-12-15

    A 71-year-old man, who had undergone right hepatectomy extended to the caudate lobe with terminolateral Roux-en-Y left hepatojejunostomy for a Klatskin tumor, developed bilioptysis 3 weeks postoperatively due to bronchobiliary fistula. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography revealed a non-dilated biliary system with contrast medium extravasation to the right subphrenic space through a resected anomalous right posterior segmental duct. After initial unsuccessful internal-external biliary drainage, the fistula was sealed with a VIATORR covered self-expanding nitinol stent-graft placed with its distal uncovered region in the hepatojejunal anastomosis and the proximal ePTFE-lined region in the left hepatic duct. A 10-month follow-up revealed no recurrence of bilioptysis and confirmed the complete exclusion of the bronchobiliary fistula.

  8. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for secondary periampullary cancer following extrahepatic bile duct cancer resection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hun; Choi, Seong Ho; Heo, Jin Seok

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study addressed the feasibility and effect of surgical treatment of metachronous periampullary carcinoma after resection of the primary extrahepatic bile duct cancer. The performance of this secondary curative surgery is not well-documented. Methods We reviewed, retrospectively, the medical records of 10 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) for secondary periampullary cancer following extrahepatic bileduct cancer resection from 1995 to 2011. Results The mean age of the 10 patients at the second operation was 61 years (range, 45-70 years). The primary cancers were 7 hilar cholangiocarcinomas, 2 middle common bile duct cancers, and one cystic duct cancer. The secondary cancers were 8 distal common bile duct cancers and 2 carcinomas of the ampulla of Vater. The second operations were 6 Whipple procedures and 4 pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomies. The mean interval between primary treatment and metachronous periampullary cancer was 20.6 months (range, 3.4-36.6 months). The distal resection margin after primary resection was positive for high grade dysplasia in one patient. Metachronous tumor was confirmed by periampullary pathology in all cases. Four of the 10 patients had delayed gastric emptying (n = 2) or pancreatic fistula (n = 2) after reoperation. There were no perioperative deaths. Median survival after PD was 44.6 months (range, 8.5-120.5 months). Conclusion Based on the postoperative survival rate, PD may provide an acceptable protocol for resection in patients with metachronous periampullary cancer after resection of the extrahepatic bile duct cancer. PMID:25114889

  9. What Are the Key Statistics about Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for bile duct cancer? What are the key statistics about bile duct cancer? Bile duct cancer is ... it is when it is found. For survival statistics, see the section “ Survival statistics for bile duct ...

  10. Diagnosis and management of relapsing pancreatitis associated with cystic neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Brugge, William R

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important causes of relapsing pancreatitis is a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. These low grade malignancies may cause pancreatitis by obstructing or communicating with a pancreatic duct. Patients with relapsing pancreatitis and a focal fluid fluid collection should be investigated for the possibility of a mucinous cystic neoplasm. Cross sectional imaging can provide a diagnosis with the imaging findings of a low attenuation cystic lesion containing mural calcification (CT scanning) or a lobular T2 enhancing lesion (MRCP). Endoscopic ultrasound can provide more detailed imaging with the ability to guide fine needle aspiration of the cyst fluid. Cyst fluid analysis can provide a diagnosis of a mucinous cystic lesion with the combination of cytology (mucinous epithelium), elevated carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and the presence of DNA mutations. Management of these patients consists of surgical resection and monitoring in patients not able to withstand surgery. PMID:18286685

  11. Page kidney due to a renal pseudocyst in a setting of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Aswani, Yashant; Anandpara, Karan Manoj; Hira, Priya

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are notorious for their extension beyond the normal confines of the pancreatic bed due to dissection of the enzymatic pseudocyst fluid along fascial planes. Such collections of pancreatic juice may compress the kidney. Extension of the pseudocyst into the perirenal space is, however, uncommon. We report a case of pseudocyst of pancreas lying in the subcapsular plane of the left kidney with a patent communication with the pancreatic duct (pancreaticorenal fistula). The compressive effect of the pseudocyst on the kidney compromised intrarenal perfusion as evidenced by a faint nephrogram but a normal renal artery. This led to renin-angiotensin-aldosterone mediated hypertension-the Page kidney phenomenon. Extensive literature search revealed our case to be the only one to describe such an occurrence. PMID:25618881

  12. Endocrine function after immunosuppression of pancreatic allograft by ionizing irradiation in the primate

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Laker, L.; Els, D.; Weideman, A.; Wolfe-Coote, S.; Du Toit, L.B.

    1986-05-01

    The object of this preliminary study was to evaluate the endocrine function after heterotopic intraperitoneal segmental pancreatic allotransplantation with unligated duct in irradiated, totally pancreatectomized primates. All allograft recipients received, pre- and peroperative donor-specific blood transfusions and peroperative external irradiation from a linear accelerator; 200 rads was administered weekly and increased to a total dose of 1,500 rads. Pancreatic transplantation was performed between 2 and 6 weeks after completion of irradiation and preoperative blood transfusions. As previously reported, only minimal pancreatic allograft survival was achieved following preoperative irradiation. One recipient remained normoglycaemic for greater than 100 days after transplantation, the longest surviving pancreatic allograft recipient reported from this laboratory. Intravenous glucose tolerance test results in this recipient revealed normoglycaemia, reduced K-value, hypoinsulinaemia, normal glucagon response, reduced C-peptide values, and moderate glucose intolerance. Aortography and electron-microscopic examination of allograft biopsy tissue confirmed the presence of a functioning allograft.

  13. Review of stents for the carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Bosiers, M; Deloose, K; Verbist, J; Peeters, P

    2006-04-01

    The individual characteristics of a stent may make it an attractive choice in some circumstances, but render it a less desirable option in others. The applicability depends primarily on the arterial anatomy and the specific details of the lesion being treated. A careful assessment by the interventionalist is required to select the proper type of stent that is of appropriate size. Certainly, personal preferences and familiarity with a specific device may legitimately influence the decision to choose one stent over another. Finally, stent design can play a role in the selection procedure. Although carotid stents are often functionally equivalent in the clinical setting and have been used successfully to treat a wide variety of lesions, a basic knowledge of stent geometry can contribute to make up your mind in certain carotid cases. PMID:16572084

  14. Prevention of stent thrombosis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Reejhsinghani, Risheen; Lotfi, Amir S

    2015-01-01

    Stent thrombosis is an uncommon but serious complication which carries with it significant mortality and morbidity. This review analyzes the entity of stent thrombosis from a historical and clinical perspective, and chronicles the evolution of this condition through the various generations of stent development, from bare metal to first-generation, second-generation, and third-generation drug-eluting stents. It also delineates the specific risk factors associated with stent thrombosis and comprehensively examines the literature related to each of these risks. Finally, it highlights the preventative strategies that can be garnered from the existing data, and concludes that a multifactorial approach is necessary to combat the occurrence of stent thrombosis, with higher risk groups, such as patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction, meriting further research. PMID:25657588

  15. [Late coronary stent thrombosis and clopidogrel].

    PubMed

    Varvarovský, I; Matejka, J; Herman, A

    2007-10-01

    The existence of late coronary stent thrombosis is a topical issue in cardiology today. The synoptic article discusses current definition of the above phenomenon, its delimitation in time and actual incidence. Based on data from available observation and randomised studies, long-term safety of conventional bare metal and drug-eluting stents is evaluated, as well as the safety profile following implantation. The length of thienopyridin treatment after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) varies according to the type of stent used. While a conventional bare metal stent (BMS) implant provides long-term safety with one month treatment, the implantation of a drug-eluting stent (DES) should be complemented with a 12-month period of clopidogrel administration. This approach may be in the future influenced by further progress in drug-eluting stents development and by prospectively acquired information on long-term administration of clopidogrel to such patients. PMID:18072434

  16. Pancreatic growth and cell turnover in the rat fed raw soya flour

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, P.S.; Morgan, R.G. (Univ. of Western Australia, Nedlands (Australia))

    1982-08-01

    Growth and differentiation of the pancreatic acinar cell was studied in rats fed raw soya flour (RSF) for up to a year. A second group of rats were fed a control diet. After 1 week of RSF feeding there was a 200% increase in tissue RNA and weight, indicating initial hypertrophy, which was maintained for the 1-year study period. By the second week and over the remainder of the period studied there was also a marked increase in total DNA, suggesting hyperplasia. Cell turnover, as measured by the rate of incorporation of 3H-thymidine into pancreatic DNA, was significantly higher in RSF-fed animals only from the second to fourth weeks; it then returned to control values. Autoradiography showed an 18-fold increase in duct cell labeling at the end of the first week and an 11-fold increase by the end of the second week. Acinar cell labeling doubled from the second to the twelfth week. These studies confirm previous reports that RSF produces pancreatic hypertrophy and hyperplasia. They furthermore show that there is initially marked stimulation of DNA synthesis in the duct cell compartment. The results suggest that cells with the morphologic characteristics of duct cells may be the precursors of acinar cells in hyperplastic pancreatic tissue.

  17. Hepatocyte Growth Factor Signaling in Intrapancreatic Ductal Cells Drives Pancreatic Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Ryan M.; Delous, Marion; Bosch, Justin A.; Ye, Lihua; Robertson, Morgan A.; Hesselson, Daniel; Stainier, Didier Y. R.

    2013-01-01

    In a forward genetic screen for regulators of pancreas development in zebrafish, we identified donuts908, a mutant which exhibits failed outgrowth of the exocrine pancreas. The s908 mutation leads to a leucine to arginine substitution in the ectodomain of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) tyrosine kinase receptor, Met. This missense mutation impedes the proteolytic maturation of the receptor, its trafficking to the plasma membrane, and diminishes the phospho-activation of its kinase domain. Interestingly, during pancreatogenesis, met and its hgf ligands are expressed in pancreatic epithelia and mesenchyme, respectively. Although Met signaling elicits mitogenic and migratory responses in varied contexts, normal proliferation rates in donut mutant pancreata together with dysmorphic, mislocalized ductal cells suggest that met primarily functions motogenically in pancreatic tail formation. Treatment with PI3K and STAT3 inhibitors, but not with MAPK inhibitors, phenocopies the donut pancreatic defect, further indicating that Met signals through migratory pathways during pancreas development. Chimera analyses showed that Met-deficient cells were excluded from the duct, but not acinar, compartment in the pancreatic tail. Conversely, wild-type intrapancreatic duct and “tip cells” at the leading edge of the growing pancreas rescued the donut phenotype. Altogether, these results reveal a novel and essential role for HGF signaling in the intrapancreatic ducts during exocrine morphogenesis. PMID:23935514

  18. Pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm in a patient with Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Meghan R; Jayaraj, Arjun; Xiong, Wei; Yeh, Matthew M; Raskind, Wendy H; Pillarisetty, Venu G

    2015-03-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a mucin-producing epithelial neoplasm that carries a risk of progression to invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes such as MSH2 that lead to microsatellite instability and increased risk of tumor formation. Although families with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of pancreatic cancer, a clear connection between Lynch syndrome and IPMN has not been drawn. We present a report of a 58 year-old Caucasian woman with multiple cancers and a germline mutation of MSH2 consistent with Lynch syndrome. A screening abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a dilated main pancreatic duct and cystic ductular structure in the uncinate process that were consistent with IPMN of the main pancreatic duct on excision. Immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction of the patient's pancreas specimen did not reveal microsatellite instability or mismatch repair gene loss of expression or function. Our findings may be explained by the fact that loss of mismatch repair function and microsatellite instability is a late event in neoplastic transformation. Given the relative rarity of main duct IPMN, its appearance in the setting of somatic MSH2 mutation suggests that IPMN may fit into the constellation of Lynch syndrome related malignancies. PMID:25759555

  19. Pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm in a patient with Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Meghan R; Jayaraj, Arjun; Xiong, Wei; Yeh, Matthew M; Raskind, Wendy H; Pillarisetty, Venu G

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a mucin-producing epithelial neoplasm that carries a risk of progression to invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes such as MSH2 that lead to microsatellite instability and increased risk of tumor formation. Although families with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of pancreatic cancer, a clear connection between Lynch syndrome and IPMN has not been drawn. We present a report of a 58 year-old Caucasian woman with multiple cancers and a germline mutation of MSH2 consistent with Lynch syndrome. A screening abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a dilated main pancreatic duct and cystic ductular structure in the uncinate process that were consistent with IPMN of the main pancreatic duct on excision. Immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction of the patient’s pancreas specimen did not reveal microsatellite instability or mismatch repair gene loss of expression or function. Our findings may be explained by the fact that loss of mismatch repair function and microsatellite instability is a late event in neoplastic transformation. Given the relative rarity of main duct IPMN, its appearance in the setting of somatic MSH2 mutation suggests that IPMN may fit into the constellation of Lynch syndrome related malignancies.

  20. Performance Study of a Ducted Fan System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrego, Anita I.; Bulaga, Robert W.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation was completed in the NASA Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel with the objective of determining the performance characteristics of a ducted fan. The model was an annular duct with a 38-in diameter, 10-in chord, and a 5-bladed fixed-pitch fan. Model variations included duct angle of attack, exit vane flap length, flap deflection angle, and duct chord length. Duct performance data were obtained for axial and forward flight test conditions. Axial flow test data showed figure of merit decreases with increasing advance ratio. Forward flight data showed an increasing propulsive force with decreasing duct angle of attack. Exit vane flap deflection angle and flap chord length were shown to be an effective way of providing side force. Extending the duct chord did not effect the duct performance.