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Sample records for pancreatic duct stent

  1. Covered Metal Stenting for Malignant Lower Biliary Stricture with Pancreatic Duct Obstruction: Is Endoscopic Sphincterotomy Needed?

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Kazunari; Okuse, Chiaki; Suetani, Keigo; Michikawa, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Otsubo, Takehito; Itoh, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To evaluate the need for endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) before covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS) deployment for malignant lower biliary stricture with pancreatic duct obstruction. Methods. This study included 79 patients who underwent CSEMS deployment for unresectable malignant lower biliary stricture with pancreatic duct obstruction. Treatment outcomes and complications were compared between 38 patients with EST before CSEMS deployment (EST group) and 41 without EST (non-EST group). Results. The technical success rates were 100% in both the EST and the non-EST group. The incidence of pancreatitis was 2.6% in the EST, and 2.4% in the non-EST group (P = 0.51). The incidences of overall complications were 18.4% and 14.6%, respectively, (P = 0.65). Within the non-EST groups, the incidence of pancreatitis was 0% in patients with fully covered stent deployment and 3.6% in those with partially covered stent deployment (P = 0.69). In the multivariate analysis, younger age (P = 0.003, OR 12) and nonpancreatic cancer (P = 0.001, OR 24) were significant risk factors for overall complications after CSEMS deployment. EST was not identified as a risk factor. Conclusions. EST did not reduce the incidence of pancreatitis after CSEMS deployment in patients of unresectable distal malignant obstruction with pancreatic duct obstruction. PMID:24324486

  2. Treatment of Common Bile Duct Obstruction by Pancreatic Cancer Using Various Stents: Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Toshifumi; Hirai, Ritsuko; Kitagawa, Mutsuo; Takehira, Yasunori; Yamada, Masami; Tamakoshi, Katsutoshi; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Kanamori, Masao

    2002-10-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of various means of stenting in patients with biliary obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer in a retrospective analysis. Methods: Sixty-two patients with biliary obstruction due to unresectable pancreatic cancer underwent biliary stenting. On the basis of the findings obtained by percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography(10 patients) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (52 patients),the site of obstruction was distal to the hilar confluence,predominantly especially in the middle to lower third of the common bile duct. Polyurethane-covered Wallstents (9 mm in diameter) we reinserted in 13 patients, while uncovered Wallstents (10 mm in diameter)were used in 10 patients and plastic stents (10 Fr and 12 Fr) were used in 39 patients. Results: Stenting was successful in 34 patients (87.2%) treated with plastic stents and in 22 patients(95.7%) treated with Wallstents. Effective biliary drainage was achieved in 32 out of 34 patients (94.1%) treated with plastic stents and in 21 out of 22 patients (95.5%) treated with Wallstents. The cumulative patency rate was significantly higher for the uncovered and covered Wallstents compared to plastic stents, but was not significantly higher for covered than for uncovered Wallstents. Stentocclusion occurred in 23 patients (70%; all by clogging) from the plastic stent group, in two patients (22%; by tumor ingrowth) from the uncovered Wallstent group, and in one patient (9%; by clogging) from the covered Wallstent group. The survival rate showed no significant difference among the three stent groups. Conclusion: The Wallstent is effective for long-term palliation in patients with obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer invading the middle to lower part of the common bile duct. The covered Wallstent can prevent tumor ingrowth, a problem with the uncovered Wallstent. However, it may be necessary to take measures to prevent the migration or clogging of covered Wallstents.

  3. Biliary and pancreatic stenting: Devices and insertion techniques in therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Arena, Monica; Iabichino, Giuseppe; Consolo, Pierluigi; Opocher, Enrico; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    Stents are tubular devices made of plastic or metal. Endoscopic stenting is the most common treatment for obstruction of the common bile duct or of the main pancreatic duct, but also employed for the treatment of bilio-pancreatic leakages, for preventing post- endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis and to drain the gallbladder and pancreatic fluid collections. Recent progresses in techniques of stent insertion and metal stent design are represented by new, fully-covered lumen apposing metal stents. These stents are specifically designed for transmural drainage, with a saddle-shape design and bilateral flanges, to provide lumen-to-lumen anchoring, reducing the risk of migration and leakage. This review is an update of the technique of stent insertion and metal stent deployment, of the most recent data available on stent types and characteristics and the new applications for biliopancreatic stents. PMID:26862364

  4. Proximal migration of a 5 French pancreatic stent during bile stone extraction: a successful retrieval using mini-snare.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Sheng; Zhao, Qiu; Fan, Yan; Wu, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic stents are used for a variety of conditions during therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography (ERCP). Pancreatic duct stenting reduces the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis and facilitate bilitary cannulation in difficult cases. Proximal migration of a pancreatic stent during bile duct stone extraction is an infrequent event, but its management can be technically challenging. We present a case that a double flanged pancreatic stent (5 French (Fr), 5 cm) was placed to facilitate the bilitary cannulation during the bile duct stone extraction. The pancreatic duct stent migrated into the proximal pancreas duct at the end of the bile duct stone clearance. After two unsuccessful attempts to remove the impacted stent with a balloon catheter and forceps, wire-guided endoscopic snare retrieval was conducted. Firstly, a guide wire was placed in the pancreatic duct and a soft mini-snare was passed over the guide wire. Then, the mini-snare was advanced into the proximal pancreatic duct over the guide wire and the proximally migrated stent was removed successfully with the mini-snare. Wire-guided endoscopic snare retrieval of proximally migrated pancreatic stents is safe and effective. The successful case of the retrieval with mini-snare provides another option for proximal migration retrieval of pancreatic stent retrieval. Further studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness and elucidate its associated complications. PMID:24714023

  5. Outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Mangiavillano, Benedetto; Pagano, Nico; Baron, Todd H; Luigiano, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic stenting has become a widely method for the management of various malignant and benign pancreatico-biliary disorders. Biliary and pancreatic stents are devices made of plastic or metal used primarily to establish patency of an obstructed bile or pancreatic duct and may also be used to treat biliary or pancreatic leaks, pancreatic fluid collections and to prevent post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis. In this review, relevant literature search and expert opinions have been used to evaluate the outcome of stenting in biliary and pancreatic benign and malignant diseases. PMID:26290631

  6. Acute Cholecystitis Caused by Malignant Cystic Duct Obstruction: Treatment with Metallic Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Yamashiro, Masashi; Takeda, Taro; Aburano, Hiroyuki; Komatsu, Tetsuya; Sanada, Taku; Kosaka, Shotaro; Toya, Daisyu; Matsui, Osamu

    2008-07-15

    We report the successful management of acute cholecystitis using cystic duct stent placement in 3 patients with inoperable malignant cystic duct obstruction (2 cholangiocarcinoma and 1 pancreatic carcinoma). All patients underwent stent placement in the bile duct, using an uncovered stent in 2 and a covered stent in 1, to relieve jaundice occurring 8-184 days (mean 120 days) before the development of acute cholecystitis. The occluded cystic duct was traversed by a microcatheter and a stent was implanted 4-17 days (mean 12 days) after cholecystostomy. Acute cholecystitis was improved after the procedure in all patients. Two patients died 3 and 10 months later, while 1 has survived without cholecystitis for 22 months after the procedure to date.

  7. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E.; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L.; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E.; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F.; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  8. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  9. Complete pancreatic duct disruption in an isolated pancreatic injury: successful endoscopic management

    PubMed Central

    Kottapalli, Dilip Chakravarty; Devashetty, Sreenivasa; Suryanarayana, Vishwanath Reddapagari; Kilari, Mounika; Ismail, Mohamed Dawood; Mathew, Praveen; Chetty, Praveen Kumar Arjuna

    2016-01-01

    Isolated pancreatic injury is uncommon and the management is challenging. Presentation is mostly delayed in such cases. We report a case of 26-year-old male, who was referred to our centre due to blunt abdominal trauma of 48 h duration with pain abdomen and vomiting. He was haemodynamically stable and was subjected to endoscopy after few hours of admission, but failed to cannulate the main pancreatic duct. Successful stenting was performed after 3 days of admission in the second attempt. He made an uneventful recovery and remains well 2 months after the injury. Management of isolated pancreatic injuries with complete duct disruption is challenging. Endoscopic management is an attractive minimally invasive option which avoids the need for surgery. Further studies are required regarding the selection of patients, safety and long-term outcome. PMID:26989493

  10. Stenting of the Cystic Duct in Benign Disease: A Definitive Treatment for the Elderly and Unwell

    SciTech Connect

    Hersey, N.; Goode, S. D.; Peck, R. J. Lee, F.

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThere have been few case reports describing cystic duct stent insertion in the management of acute cholecystitis secondary to benign disease with no case series published to date. We present our series demonstrating the role of cystic duct stents in managing benign gallbladder disease in those patients unfit for surgery.Materials and MethodsThirty three patients unfit for surgery in our institution underwent cystic duct stent insertion for the management of acute cholecystitis in the period June 2008 to June 2013. Patients underwent a mixture of transperitoneal and transhepatic gallbladder puncture. The cystic duct was cannulated with a hydrophilic guidewire which was subsequently passed through the common bile duct and into the duodenum. An 8Fr 12-cm double-pigtail stent was placed with the distal end lying within the duodenum and the proximal end within the gallbladder.ResultsTen patients presented with gallbladder perforation, 21 patients with acute cholecystitis, 1 with acute cholangitis and 1 with necrotising pancreatitis. The technical success rate was 91 %. We experienced a 13 % complication rate with 3 % mortality rate at 30 days.ConclusionCystic duct stent insertion can be successfully used to manage acute cholecystitis, gallbladder empyema or gallbladder perforations in those unfit for surgery and should be considered alongside external gallbladder drainage as a definitive mid-term treatment option.

  11. Post-sialendoscopy ductoplasty by salivary duct stent placements.

    PubMed

    Su, Chin-Hui; Lee, Kuo-Sheng; Tseng, Te-Ming; Hung, Shih-Han

    2016-01-01

    With damage to a duct or papilla after sialendoscopy, a stent may be necessary to prevent re-stenosis and for maintaining the salivary duct open after complete sialendoscopy. However factors affecting outcomes and complications after stent placement remain unclear. This study aimed to report preliminary experiences in salivary duct stent placement after sialendoscopy. Data from 35 procedures in 33 patients who received sialendoscopy with salivary duct stent placements at Mackay Memorial Hospital between October 2013 and June 2014 were recorded and compared for clinical data, as well as procedural techniques, findings, and outcomes. In the 35 stent placement procedures, the hypospadias silastic stent tubes were used in 27 and the Fr. 5 pediatric feeding tubes were used in the remaining eight. When the hypospadias silastic stent tubes were used for stenting, the stent obstruction and irritation rates were higher compared to those who used the Fr. 5 pediatric feeding tube (100 vs. 0 % and 67 vs. 33 %, respectively). None of the stents secured by a 5-0 nylon suture were complicated by dislocation but when the stents were secured by 6-0 nylon sutures, the dislocation rate went as high as 47.4 %. The duration needed for salivary duct stent placement might be potentially shortened to only 2 weeks. If a salivary duct stent is intended to be placed for a certain period before its scheduled removal, a suture strength equivalent or stronger than the 5-0 nylon suture should be considered for stent fixation. PMID:25567347

  12. Immortalization of bovine pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Marino, L R; Cotton, C U

    1996-04-01

    Pancreatic duct cell lines have been isolated from a number of animal and human tumors, but none appear to express ion transport properties expected for differentiated pancreatic duct epithelial cells. We sought to generate an immortalized ductal cell line from well-differentiated primary cultures of bovine pancreatic duct epithelium. Epithelial cells from the main duct of the bovine pancreas were isolated and immortalized by transfection with a DNA construct encoding simian virus 40 large T antigen. A single clone (BPD1) survived negative selection and was maintained in culture for > 100 passages over 2 yr. The cells grow readily in culture as monolayers and express several properties characteristic of differentiated pancreatic ductal epithelium. The cells do not appear to form a functional tight junction complex, since the transepithelial resistance of the monolayer cultures grown on a permeable support is < 10 omega.cm2. Northern blot analysis revealed that the cells continue to express simian virus 40 large T antigen and contain significant levels of mRNA for proteins thought to be important in transepithelial bicarbonate secretion [carbonic anhydrase II, Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, Na+/H+ exchanger, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)]. In vivo pancreatic ductal secretion is stimulated by the peptide hormone secretin. The secretin receptor is expressed and functionally coupled to adenylate cyclase in the immortalized cells, since secretin caused a dose-dependent accumulation of adenosine 3'5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP; approximately 20-fold increase over basal levels) with a mean effective concentration of 15 nM. Elevation of intracellular cAMP by exposure of the cells to forskolin (10 microM) or secretin (0.1 microM) increase plasma membrane Cl- permeability, most likely mediated by activation of CFTR. The results of these studies demonstrate that the pancreatic duct cell line (BPD1) retains several properties exhibited by the secretory epithelial cells that line the pancreatic ductal tree. This cell line should prove useful for studies of expression, function, and regulation of pancreatic duct cell proteins. PMID:8928798

  13. Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS)-Guided Pancreatic Duct Drainage: The Basics of When and How to Perform EUS-Guided Pancreatic Duct Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher G.; Waxman, Irving; Siddiqui, Uzma D.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances in endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic duct drainage (EUS-PDD) remains a technically challenging procedure. Technical success rates are greater than 70%; however, the average rate of adverse events is nearly 20%, which increases to 55% when stent migration is included. Until recently, a significant difficulty with this technique was the absence of dedicated devices. Proper patient selection is of utmost importance, and EUS-PDD should be reserved for patients who have failed endoscopic retrograde pancreatography. Furthermore, EUS-PDD must be performed by experienced endoscopists who are familiar with the technique. The most common indications include chronic pancreatitis induced strictures and stones, disconnected pancreatic ducts, inaccessible ampulla, and post-surgical altered anatomy. This manuscript will review the accessories used, techniques employed, and published literature reporting outcomes as well as adverse events regarding EUS-PDD. PMID:27012290

  14. Pancreatic Stenting Reduces Post-ERCP Pancreatitis and Biliary Sepsis in High-Risk Patients: A Randomized, Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hai-En; Li, Qi-Xiang; Wang, Wei; Ou, Wei-Lin; Xia, Harry Hua-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is an established treatment modality for bile duct disorders, but patients have a risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) and biliary sepsis. Aim. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of pancreatic stent for prophylaxis of PEP and biliary sepsis in high-risk patients with complicating common bile duct (CBD) disorders. Methods. Two hundred and six patients with complicating confirmed or suspected CBD disorders were randomly assigned to receive ERCP with pancreatic stenting (experimental group) or without stenting (control group). Primary outcome measure was frequency of PEP, and secondary outcome measures included operative time, blood loss, postoperative recovery times, and other ERCP-associated morbidities. Results. Baseline age, sex, CBD etiology, concomitant medical/surgical conditions, cannulation difficulty, and ERCP success were comparable between the two groups (all P > 0.05). Compared to the control group, the experimental group had a significantly lower frequency of PEP (7.7% versus 17.7%, P < 0.05) and positive bile microbial culture (40.4% versus 62.7%, P < 0.05). However, the two groups were similar in operative time, blood loss, postoperative recovery times, and other ERCP-associated morbidities (all P > 0.05). Conclusions. Pancreatic stenting can reduce the occurrence of PEP and biliary sepsis in high-risk patients with complicating CBD disorders but does not increase other ERCP-associated morbidities. This trial is registered with the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (registration identifier ChiCTR-OCH-14005134). PMID:27057161

  15. Endoscopic Retrieval Technique of Proximally Migrated Pancreatic Stents: A Retrospective Study in a Tertiary Centre

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Jin, Zheng; Wu, Jia-chuan; Bie, Li-ke; Gong, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Background. There were scarce trials concerning the treatments and outcomes of proximal pancreatic stent migration. Herein, we did a retrospective study to discuss this problem from an endoscopist's point of view. Patients and Methods. From January 2009 to June 2014, patients with proximally migrated pancreatic duct stents were identified. Their clinical information was viewed. Retrieval techniques, success rates, and adverse events were analyzed. Results. A total of 36 procedures were performed in 34 patients; the median age of the patients was 53 years, with 17 males and 17 females. Eight patients' pancreatic duct stents could still be seen in the major or minor papilla and were pulled out with a snare forceps or a grasping forceps; in the remaining 28 procedures, the management was somewhat thorny; the retrieval called for several devices. Final success was achieved in 31 patients. No adverse event was observed in the process of ERCP procedures, 5 patients developed post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP), 1 patient got infection, and 1 patient had haemorrhage. Conclusions. Endoscopic retrieval of migrated pancreatic stent is safe and less invasive; nonetheless, attention should be paid so as to reduce the incidence and degree of related adverse events, especially PEP. PMID:25918523

  16. Chronic pancreatic pain successfully treated by endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreaticogastrostomy using fully covered self-expandable metallic stent

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Arunchai; Aswakul, Pitulak; Prachayakul, Varayu

    2016-01-01

    One of the most common symptoms presenting in patients with chronic pancreatitis is pancreatic-type pain. Obstruction of the main pancreatic duct in chronic pancreatitis can be treated by a multitude of therapeutic approaches, ranging from pharmacologic, endoscopic and radiologic treatments to surgical interventions. When the conservative treatment approaches fail to resolve symptomatic cases, however, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography with pancreatic duct drainage is the preferred second approach, despite its well-recognized drawbacks. When the conventional transpapillary approach fails to achieve the necessary drainage, the patients may benefit from application of the less invasive endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided pancreatic duct interventions. Here, we describe the case of a 42-year-old man who presented with severe abdominal pain that had lasted for 3 mo. Computed tomography scanning showed evidence of chronic obstructive pancreatitis with pancreatic duct stricture at genu. After conventional endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography failed to eliminate the symptoms, EUS-guided pancreaticogastrostomy (PGS) was applied using a fully covered, self-expandable, 10-mm diameter metallic stent. The treatment resolved the case and the patient experienced no adverse events. EUS-guided PGS with a regular biliary fully covered, self-expandable metallic stent effectively and safely treated pancreatic-type pain in chronic pancreatitis. PMID:27099862

  17. Chronic pancreatic pain successfully treated by endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreaticogastrostomy using fully covered self-expandable metallic stent.

    PubMed

    Chang, Arunchai; Aswakul, Pitulak; Prachayakul, Varayu

    2016-04-16

    One of the most common symptoms presenting in patients with chronic pancreatitis is pancreatic-type pain. Obstruction of the main pancreatic duct in chronic pancreatitis can be treated by a multitude of therapeutic approaches, ranging from pharmacologic, endoscopic and radiologic treatments to surgical interventions. When the conservative treatment approaches fail to resolve symptomatic cases, however, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography with pancreatic duct drainage is the preferred second approach, despite its well-recognized drawbacks. When the conventional transpapillary approach fails to achieve the necessary drainage, the patients may benefit from application of the less invasive endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided pancreatic duct interventions. Here, we describe the case of a 42-year-old man who presented with severe abdominal pain that had lasted for 3 mo. Computed tomography scanning showed evidence of chronic obstructive pancreatitis with pancreatic duct stricture at genu. After conventional endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography failed to eliminate the symptoms, EUS-guided pancreaticogastrostomy (PGS) was applied using a fully covered, self-expandable, 10-mm diameter metallic stent. The treatment resolved the case and the patient experienced no adverse events. EUS-guided PGS with a regular biliary fully covered, self-expandable metallic stent effectively and safely treated pancreatic-type pain in chronic pancreatitis. PMID:27099862

  18. Percutaneous Transcholecystic Placement of an ePTFE/FEP-Covered Stent in the Common Bile Duct

    SciTech Connect

    Krokidis, Miltiadis E.; Hatzidakis, Adam A.

    2010-06-15

    We report the case of a 78-year-old male patient with obstructive jaundice due to a pancreatic head neoplasm. The patient's general condition did not permit an endoscopic approach and the presence of diffuse liver metastases prohibited hepatic puncture for percutaneous biliary drainage, therefore the transcolecystic transperitoneal approach was decided to be the safest decompression route. Through a gallbladder access, a Viabil-covered stent with a mesh extension was placed in the distal common bile duct, without complications. The patient died 8 months later without signs of stent dysfunction or necessity of reintervention. Transcholecystic transperitoneal access is a safe option when diffuse liver metastases prohibit the transhepatic approach, even in cases where placement of a covered stent is considered necessary.

  19. Evaluation of Polyurethane Nasolacrimal Duct Stents: In Vivo Studies in New Zealand Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, K.E. Grabolle, B.; Urbach, H.; Tolba, R.; Schild, H.; Paulsen, F.

    2006-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic and biological effects of different polyurethane nasolacrimal duct stents in an animal model. Fifteen polyurethane nasolacrimal duct stents (n = 5 mushroom-type stents, n = 5 newly designed S-shaped TearLeader stents without hydrophilic coating, and n = 5 S-shaped TearLeader stents with hydrophilic coating) were implanted in the nasolacrimal ducts of eight unaffected New Zealand rabbits. One nasolacrimal system served as control. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed at 1-, 2-, and 4-week intervals, then after a 3-month interval, after which the animals were euthanized. All stents were implanted without major periprocedural complications. The stents proved to be patent by the end of the procedure. During follow-up, all mushroom-type stents were occluded at 4 weeks. None of these stents opened to forced irrigation. Clinically, all rabbits demonstrated severe dacryocystitis. Three out of five TearLeader stents without hydrophilic coating were blocked at 4 weeks; one out of five was open to irrigation. Best results were observed in the stent group with hydrophilic coating. Follow-up dacryocystography demonstrated patent stents in nasolacrimal ducts of all animals after 4 weeks. In only one of five cases, the coated stent became partially occluded after 2 months. These animals were free of clinical symptoms. After 3 months, at least three out of five stents still opened to forced irrigation and only one stent was completely blocked. Dislocation of the stents was not observed. Refinement of the stent surface and stent design improves the results of nasolacrimal duct stenting in this animal model. Implantation of hydrophilic-coated S-shaped stents is highly superior to conventional mushroom-type stents and noncoated stent types. Hydrophilic coating seems to prevent foreign-body reactions, resulting in maximized stent patency.

  20. Ultrasound imaging of the mouse pancreatic duct using lipid microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, B.; McKeown, K. R.; Skovan, B.; Ogram, E.; Ingram, P.; Ignatenko, N.; Paine-Murrieta, G.; Witte, R.; Matsunaga, T. O.

    2012-03-01

    Research requiring the murine pancreatic duct to be imaged is often challenging due to the difficulty in selectively cannulating the pancreatic duct. We have successfully catheterized the pancreatic duct through the common bile duct in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice and imaged the pancreatic duct with gas filled lipid microbubbles that increase ultrasound imaging sensitivity due to exquisite scattering at the gas/liquid interface. A SCID mouse was euthanized by CO2, a midline abdominal incision made, the common bile duct cut at its midpoint, a 2 cm, 32 gauge tip catheter was inserted about 1 mm into the duct and tied with suture. The duodenum and pancreas were excised, removed in toto, embedded in agar and an infusion pump was used to instill normal saline or lipid-coated microbubbles (10 million / ml) into the duct. B-mode images before and after infusion of the duct with microbubbles imaged the entire pancreatic duct (~ 1 cm) with high contrast. The microbubbles were cavitated by high mechanical index (HMI) ultrasound for imaging to be repeated. Our technique of catheterization and using lipid microbubbles as a contrast agent may provide an effective, affordable technique of imaging the murine pancreatic duct; cavitation with HMI ultrasound would enable repeated imaging to be performed and clustering of targeted microbubbles to receptors on ductal cells would allow pathology to be localized accurately. This research was supported by the Experimental Mouse Shared Service of the AZ Cancer Center (Grant Number P30CA023074, NIH/NCI and the GI SPORE (NIH/NCI P50 CA95060).

  1. Long term treatment of biliary stricture due to chronic pancreatitis with a metallic stent.

    PubMed

    Hastier, P; Buckley, J M; Peten, E P; Dumas, R; Delmont, J

    1999-07-01

    The exact role of endoprostheses in the management of chronic pancreatitis-associated biliary strictures has not yet been clearly established. We report an unusual case of a patient with this condition who was treated for an unexpectedly long term with a self-expanding metallic endoprosthesis. There has only been one previous report of the use of metallic stents in this situation. It appears that metallic endoprostheses may have a role to play in the management of selected patients who have chronic pancreatitis-associated bile duct stricture. PMID:10406264

  2. Current Trends in Preoperative Biliary Stenting in Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jinkins, Lindsay J.; Parmar, Abhishek D.; Han, Yimei; Duncan, Casey B.; Sheffield, Kristin M.; Brown, Kimberly M.; Riall, Taylor S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sufficient evidence suggests that preoperative biliary stenting is associated with increased complication rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. METHODS Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked Medicare claims data (1992–2007) were used to identify patients with pancreatic cancer who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. We evaluated trends in the use of preoperative biliary stenting, timing of physician visits relative to stenting, and time to surgical resection and symptoms in stented and unstented patients. RESULTS Pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed in 2,573 patients. 52.6% of patients underwent preoperative biliary stenting (N=1,354). Of these, 75.3% underwent endoscopic stenting only, 18.9% received a percutaneous stent, and 5.8% underwent both procedures. The overall stenting rate increased from 29.6% of patients in 1992–95 to 59.1% in 2004–07 (p<0.0001). Preoperative stenting was more common in patients with jaundice, cholangitis, pruritus, or coagulopathy (p<0.05 for all). 77.7% of stented patients had a stent placed prior to seeing a surgeon. Stenting prior to surgical consultation was associated with longer indwelling stent time compared to stenting after surgical consultation (37.3 vs. 27.0 days, p<0.0001). In addition, stented patients had longer times from surgeon visit to pancreatectomy than those who were not stented (24.2 days vs. 17.2 days, p< 0.0001). CONCLUSION Use of preoperative biliary stenting doubled from 1992–2007 despite evidence that stenting is associated with increased perioperative infectious complications. The majority of stenting occurred prior to surgical consultation and is associated with significant delay in time to operation. Surgeons should be involved early in order to prevent unnecessary stenting and improve outcomes. PMID:23889947

  3. PHYSIOLOGY AND PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF BICARBONATE SECRETION BY PANCREATIC DUCT EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    ISHIGURO, HIROSHI; YAMAMOTO, AKIKO; NAKAKUKI, MIYUKI; YI, LANJUAN; ISHIGURO, MARIKO; YAMAGUCHI, MAKOTO; KONDO, SHIHO; MOCHIMARU, YUKA

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT HCO3–-rich fluid in the pancreatic juice (2~3 L/day) is secreted by epithelial cells lining the pancreatic duct tree, while digestive enzymes are secreted by acinar cells with a small amount of Cl–-rich fluid. Ductal HCO3– secretion is not only regulated by gastrointestinal hormones and cholinergic nerves but is also influenced by luminal factors: intraductal pressure, Ca2+ concentration, pathological activation of protease and bile reflux. The maximum HCO3– concentration of the juice under secretin stimulation reaches 140–150 mM. Thus pancreatic duct cells secrete HCO3– against a ~7-fold concentration gradient. HCO3– secretion critically depends on the activity of CFTR, a cAMP-dependent anion channel localized in the apical membrane of various epithelia. In the proximal part of pancreatic ducts close to acinar cells HCO3– secretion across the apical membrane is largely mediated by SLC26A6 Cl–-HCO3– exchanger. In distal ducts where the luminal HCO3– concentration is already high, most of the HCO3– secretion is mediated by HCO3– conductance of CFTR. CFTR is the causative gene for cystic fibrosis. Loss of function due to severe mutations in both alleles causes typical cystic fibrosis characterized by dehydrated, thick, and viscous luminal fluid/mucus in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, pancreatic duct, and vas deferens. A compound heterozygote of mutations/polymorphisms (causing a mild dysfunction of CFTR) involves a risk of developing CFTR-related diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. In cystic fibrosis and certain cases of chronic pancreatitis, the pancreatic duct epithelium secretes a small amount of fluid with neutral~acidic pH, which causes an obstruction of the duct lumen by a protein plug or viscous mucus. PMID:22515107

  4. Portal annular pancreas: the pancreatic duct ring sign on MRCP

    PubMed Central

    Lath, Chinar O.; Agrawal, Dilpesh S.; Timins, Michael E.; Wein, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Portal annular pancreas is a rare pancreatic variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends and fuses to the dorsal surface of the body of the pancreas by surrounding the portal vein. It is asymptomatic, but it can be mistaken for a pancreatic head mass on imaging and could also have serious consequences during pancreatic surgery, if unrecognized. We report this case of a 53-year-old female patient who was diagnosed to have portal annular pancreas on the basis of an unusual course (ring appearance) of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, not described earlier in the radiology literature. PMID:26649117

  5. Filling defects in the pancreatic duct on endoscopic retrograde pancreatography.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A J; Carmody, T J; Schmalz, M J; Wiedmeyer, D A; Stewart, E T

    1992-12-01

    Filling defects in the pancreatic duct are a frequent finding during endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) and have a variety of causes. Some filling defects may be artifactual or related to technical factors and, once their origin is recognized, can be disregarded. Others may be due to acute changes of pancreatitis and should prompt more careful injection of contrast material into the duct. Intraluminal masses may represent calculi or a neoplasm, either of which may require surgery or endoscopic intervention. The exact nature of these filling defects may not be apparent on radiographs, and other studies may be needed. This article reviews our approach to the evaluation of filling defects in the pancreatic duct. PMID:1442383

  6. Somatostatin prevents acute pancreatitis after pancreatic duct sphincter hydrostatic balloon dilation in patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Guelrud, M; Mendoza, S; Viera, L; Gelrud, D

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether prophylactic somatostatin infusion can prevent pancreatitis after hydrostatic balloon dilation of the pancreatic duct sphincter segment in 16 patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis. This study demonstrated that prophylactic administration of somatostatin before, during, and after the procedure diminished the incidence and severity of acute pancreatitis. We recommend consideration of such prophylaxis in patients undergoing this procedure. PMID:1672278

  7. Progenitor cell niches in the human pancreatic duct system and associated pancreatic duct glands: an anatomical and immunophenotyping study.

    PubMed

    Carpino, Guido; Renzi, Anastasia; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Franchitto, Antonio; Onori, Paolo; Overi, Diletta; Rossi, Massimo; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Alvaro, Domenico; Reid, Lola M; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic duct glands (PDGs) are tubule-alveolar glands associated with the pancreatic duct system and can be considered the anatomical counterpart of peribiliary glands (PBGs) found within the biliary tree. Recently, we demonstrated that endodermal precursor niches exist fetally and postnatally and are composed functionally of stem cells and progenitors within PBGs and of committed progenitors within PDGs. Here we have characterized more extensively the anatomy of human PDGs as novel niches containing cells with multiple phenotypes of committed progenitors. Human pancreata (n = 15) were obtained from cadaveric adult donors. Specimens were processed for histology, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. PDGs were found in the walls of larger pancreatic ducts (diameters > 300 μm) and constituted nearly 4% of the duct wall area. All of the cells identified were negative for nuclear expression of Oct4, a pluripotency gene, and so are presumably committed progenitors and not stem cells. In the main pancreatic duct and in large interlobular ducts, Sox9(+) cells represented 5-30% of the cells within PDGs and were located primarily at the bottom of PDGs, whereas rare and scattered Sox9(+) cells were present within the surface epithelium. The expression of PCNA, a marker of cell proliferation, paralleled the distribution of Sox9 expression. Sox9(+) PDG cells proved to be Pdx1(+) /Ngn3(+/-) /Oct4A(-) . Nearly 10% of PDG cells were positive for insulin or glucagon. Intercalated ducts contained Sox9(+) /Pdx1(+) /Ngn3(+) cells, a phenotype that is presumptive of committed endocrine progenitors. Some intercalated ducts appeared in continuity with clusters of insulin-positive cells organized in small pancreatic islet-like structures. In summary, PDGs represent niches of a population of Sox9(+) cells exhibiting a pattern of phenotypic traits implicating a radial axis of maturation from the bottoms of the PDGs to the surface of pancreatic ducts. Our results complete the anatomical background that links biliary and pancreatic tracts and could have important implications for the common patho-physiology of biliary tract and pancreas. PMID:26610370

  8. Experimental Study of Poly-l-Lactic Acid Biodegradable Stents in Normal Canine Bile Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kiyosei Yoshioka, Tetsuya; Furuichi, Kinya; Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Anai, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Morimoto, Kengo; Uchida, Hideo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to clarify the advantages of biodegradable stents in terms of mucosal reaction and biodegradation after placement. We designed a biodegradable stent and assessed stent degradation and changes in the normal bile ducts of dogs. Methods: The biodegradable stent is a balloon-expandable Z stent consisting of poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) with a diameter of 6 mm and a length of 15 mm. We assessed four groups of three beagle dogs each at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months of follow-up. After evaluating stent migration by radiography and stent and bile duct patency by cholangiography, the dogs were sacrificed to remove the bile duct together with the stent. The bile duct lumen was examined macroscopically and histologically, and the stent degradation was examined macroscopically and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Bile duct obstruction was absent and none of the stents migrated. Macroscopic evaluation showed moderate endothelial proliferation in the bile ducts at the implant sites at 3 and 6 months and a slight change at 9 months. Slight mononuclear cell infiltration was histologically identified at all time points and epithelial hyperplasia that was moderate at 3 months was reduced to slight at 6 and 9 months. Stent degradation was macroscopically evident in all animals at 9 months and was proven by SEM in two dogs at 6 months and in all of them at 9 months. Conclusions: Our results suggest that PLLA bioabsorbable stents seems to be useful for implantation in the biliary system with further investigation.

  9. Repair of a salivary duct fistula in a horse without using a stent.

    PubMed

    Vos, N J; Vos, A

    2007-02-01

    A salivary duct fistula in a horse was repaired surgically without using a stent. Seventeen months after the operation the skin incision had healed without complications and the fistula had not recurred. PMID:17277298

  10. Endoscopic-assisted retrieval of retained lacrimal stent material in congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction without dacryocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Ng, Danny Siu-Chun; Chan, Edwin; Tong, Fu Man; Chow, Shun Kit; Ko, Simon Tak-Chuen

    2016-04-01

    We report a 3-year-old child with history of congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction who failed lacrimal probing and underwent bicanalicular intubation. Removal of stent from the superior punctum was unsuccessful and it was trapped in the lacrimal sac. We performed endonasal endoscopic-assisted retrieval of retained stent material without necessitating dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). There was no recurrence of infection and nasolacrimal duct obstruction symptoms during 6 months of follow-up. PMID:26838355

  11. A suspicious pancreatic mass in chronic pancreatitis: pancreatic actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    de Clerck, F; Laukens, P; De Wilde, V; Vandeputte, L; Cabooter, M; Van Huysse, J; Orlent, H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a chronic infection of the pancreas caused by the suppurative Gram-positive bacterium Actinomyces. It has mostly been described in patients following repeated main pancreatic duct stenting in the context of chronic pancreatitis or following pancreatic surgery. This type of pancreatitis is often erroneously interpreted as pancreatic malignancy due to the specific invasive characteristics of Actinomyces. Case. A 64-year-old male with a history of chronic pancreatitis and repeated main pancreatic duct stenting presented with weight loss, fever, night sweats, and abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a mass in the pancreatic tail, invading the surrounding tissue and resulting in splenic vein thrombosis. Resectable pancreatic cancer was suspected, and pancreatic tail resection was performed. Postoperative findings revealed pancreatic actinomycosis instead of neoplasia. Conclusion. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a rare type of infectious pancreatitis that should be included in the differential diagnosis when a pancreatic mass is discovered in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and prior main pancreatic duct stenting. Our case emphasizes the importance of pursuing a histomorphological confirmation. PMID:25705533

  12. Non Operative Approach to Isolated Traumatic Pancreatic Duct Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Dharap, Satish B

    2016-01-01

    Management of isolated traumatic pancreatic duct disruption remains challenging due to associated morbidity and mortality. Two children with isolated pancreatic ductal disruption were treated conservatively. Both developed a pseudocyst which resolved spontaneously due to the atrophy of the distal pancreas in a five-year-old girl while remained persistent and was treated by endoscopic cystogastrostomy in an eight-year-old boy. Non-operative management may be pursued in patients with pancreatic ductal injury in the hope of a pseudocyst formation which may spontaneously resolve or may be treated later with a minimally invasive procedure. However, the literature review precludes its practice as a standard due to high incidence of associated complications of non-operative management.

  13. Incidental finding of elongated ventral duct in a case of pancreatic divisum mimicking double pancreatic ducts on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography-a rare normal variant.

    PubMed

    Arora, Richa; Rani, Y Jyotsna

    2015-10-01

    Anatomic variations and developmental anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct are often noticed as an incidental finding on imaging. However, knowledge of these variants may prove to be crucial during surgery as it may prevent unintentional ductal injury. We report a case of pancreatic divisum with codominant ventral duct mimicking double pancreatic ducts along with the elongated uncinate process of pancreas. It was picked incidentally on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) done to rule out cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis. It is a rare anatomic variant and to the best of our knowledge has not been reported so far. PMID:26682149

  14. Incidental finding of elongated ventral duct in a case of pancreatic divisum mimicking double pancreatic ducts on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticographya rare normal variant

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Y. Jyotsna

    2015-01-01

    Anatomic variations and developmental anomalies of the pancreas and pancreatic duct are often noticed as an incidental finding on imaging. However, knowledge of these variants may prove to be crucial during surgery as it may prevent unintentional ductal injury. We report a case of pancreatic divisum with codominant ventral duct mimicking double pancreatic ducts along with the elongated uncinate process of pancreas. It was picked incidentally on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP) done to rule out cholelithiasis and choledocholithiasis. It is a rare anatomic variant and to the best of our knowledge has not been reported so far. PMID:26682149

  15. Zebrafish sox9b is crucial for hepatopancreatic duct development and pancreatic endocrine cell regeneration.

    PubMed

    Manfroid, Isabelle; Ghaye, Aurélie; Naye, François; Detry, Nathalie; Palm, Sarah; Pan, Luyuan; Ma, Taylur P; Huang, Wei; Rovira, Meritxell; Martial, Joseph A; Parsons, Michael J; Moens, Cecilia B; Voz, Marianne L; Peers, Bernard

    2012-06-15

    Recent zebrafish studies have shown that the late appearing pancreatic endocrine cells are derived from pancreatic ducts but the regulatory factors involved are still largely unknown. Here, we show that the zebrafish sox9b gene is expressed in pancreatic ducts where it labels the pancreatic Notch-responsive cells previously shown to be progenitors. Inactivation of sox9b disturbs duct formation and impairs regeneration of beta cells from these ducts in larvae. sox9b expression in the midtrunk endoderm appears at the junction of the hepatic and ventral pancreatic buds and, by the end of embryogenesis, labels the hepatopancreatic ductal system as well as the intrapancreatic and intrahepatic ducts. Ductal morphogenesis and differentiation are specifically disrupted in sox9b mutants, with the dysmorphic hepatopancreatic ducts containing misdifferentiated hepatocyte-like and pancreatic-like cells. We also show that maintenance of sox9b expression in the extrapancreatic and intrapancreatic ducts requires FGF and Notch activity, respectively, both pathways known to prevent excessive endocrine differentiation in these ducts. Furthermore, beta cell recovery after specific ablation is severely compromised in sox9b mutant larvae. Our data position sox9b as a key player in the generation of secondary endocrine cells deriving from pancreatic ducts in zebrafish. PMID:22537488

  16. Pancreatico-enteric fistula post pancreatic duct ligation for delayed haemorrhage complicating pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Adarsh; Noaman, Islam; Mahfouz, Ahmed; Khawar, Mahwish; Khalaf, Hatem; Elaffandi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic fistula remains the main cause for postoperative morbidity following pancreaticoduodenectomy. The coincidence of sentinel bleed prior to post pancreatectomy haemorrhage (PPH) and pancreatic fistula is associated with very high mortality. Presentation of case We report a case of pancreaticoduodenectomy complicated by postoperative leak and hematemesis. Severe delayed haemorrhage from the pancreatico-jejunostomy necessitated re-laparotomy and complete disconnection of the pancreatic anastomosis. Hemodynamic instability precluded a pancreatectomy or creation of a new anastomosis. A follow up MRI done 3 weeks after the patient’s discharge demonstrated a fistulous tract causing a communication between both the pancreatic and biliary systems and the enteric loop. Discussion Spontaneous development a pancreatico-enteric fistula despite ligation of the pancreatic duct and complete disconnection of the pancreatic anastomosis has never been reported in literature to date. Conclusion Pancreatic duct occlusion may be considered over a completion pancreatectomy or revisional pancreatic anastomosis in hemodynamically unstable and challenging cases. PMID:26921533

  17. Feasibility of biodegradable PLGA common bile duct stents: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyi; Liu, Tongjun; Liu, Shaohui; Zhang, Kai; Shen, Zhen; Li, Yuxin; Jing, Xiabin

    2009-05-01

    The current study investigates the feasibility of using a biodegradable polymeric stent in common bile duct (CBD) repair and reconstruction. Here, poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, molar ratio LA/GA = 80/20) was processed into a circular tube- and dumbbell-shaped specimens to determine the in vitro degradation behavior in bile. The morphology, weight loss, and molecular weight changes were then investigated in conjunction with evaluations of the mechanical properties of the specimen. Circular tube-shaped PLGA stents with X-ray opacity were subsequently used in common bile duct exploration (CBDE) and primary suturing in canine models. Next, X-ray images of CBD stents in vivo were compared and levels of serum liver enzymes and a histological analysis were conducted after stent transplantation. The results showed that the PLGA stents exhibited the required biomedical properties and spontaneously disappeared from CBDs in 4-5 weeks. The degradation period and function match the requirements in repair and reconstruction of CBDs to support the duct, guide bile drainage, and reduce T-tube-related complications. PMID:19132510

  18. Inadvertent ligation of the main pancreatic duct: an extremely rare complication of choledochal cyst excision.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sukanta; Khamrui, Sujan

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic ductal injury is rare during choledochal cyst excision. Most cases present in the immediate postoperative period with pancreatic fistula or acute pancreatitis are managed conservatively. But, inadvertent ligation of the main pancreatic duct with subsequent recurrent pancreatitis and upstream dilatation of the pancreatic duct requiring a pancreatic ductal drainage operation has not been reported in the English literature. A 23-year-old female patient presented with recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain for about 16 months. She had a history of type-1 choledochal cyst excision 18 months back. She was evaluated with abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). MRCP showed hugely dilated main pancreatic duct with normal hepaticojejunostomy anastomosis. There was no residual cyst. MRCP findings were suggestive of stricture of the main pancreatic duct due to previous surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic ductal decompression failed. The patient was treated successfully with pancreaticogastrostomy. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. The patient was well at 24-month follow-up. PMID:25972658

  19. Pancreatic duct compliance following secretin stimulation: A novel EUS diagnostic tool for chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Timothy B.; Purich, Edward D.; Gordon, Stuart R.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) evaluation of pancreatic duct compliance following secretin-stimulation (sEUS) along with EUS morphologic examination (EUS) and duodenal fluid [HCO3-] measurement (ePFT) in one endoscopic session has not been reported as a means of evaluating for chronic pancreatitis (CP). We evaluated the feasibility of the combined examination and compare EUS measurements of pancreatic ductal compliance with duodenal [HCO3-] for diagnosing CP. METHODS Prospective case series of patients with suspected CP who underwent combined EUS, sEUS and ePFT examination in one endoscopic session. The main outcome measures were the feasibility of performing the combination examination and the correlation between ductal compliance and duodenal fluid [HCO3-] measurement. RESULTS All examinations were completed in one endoscopic session and there were no complications in 35 patients. Although there was a trend toward less change from baseline head and body ductal diameter in patients with CP, only the percent change from baseline in the tail was significant (CP 144.3% vs. normal 240.9%, p<0.01). Regression analysis demonstrated fair correlation between maximum change in ductal diameter and duodenal [HCO3-] (r2=0.27). CONCLUSIONS Combined EUS, sEUS, and ePFTs is feasible and safe, with preliminary results demonstrating positive correlation between pancreatic ductal compliance and duodenal fluid [HCO3-]. PMID:21926934

  20. Successful Closure and Embolization of a Fistula Between the Pancreatic Duct and a Pseudocyst Using Ethibloc

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, Arno; Keulers, Peter; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1997-09-15

    We successfully achieved complete regression of a pancreatic pseudocyst after Ethibloc embolization of a fistula between the cyst and the pancreatic duct. Previous treatment by percutaneous drainage over 6 weeks had failed. Treatment with a somatostatin analog had not been undertaken.

  1. A unique use of a double-pigtail plastic stent: correction of kinking of the common bile duct due to a metal stent.

    PubMed

    Kuwatani, Masaki; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Abe, Yoko; Kawahata, Shuhei; Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Kubo, Kimitoshi; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2015-03-01

    A 72-year-old man with jaundice by ampullary adenocarci-noma was treated at our hospital. For biliary decompression, a transpapillary, fully covered, self-expandable metal stent (FCSEMS) was deployed. Four days later, the patient devel-oped acute cholangitis. Endoscopic carbon dioxide cholan-giography revealed kinking of the common bile duct above the proximal end of the FCSEMS. A 7-F double-pigtail plastic stent was therefore placed through the FCSEMS to correct the kink, straightening the common bile duct (CBD) and im-proving cholangitis. This is the first report of a unique use of a double-pigtail plastic stent to correct CBD kinking. The place-ment of a double-pigtail plastic stent can correct CBD kink-ing, without requiring replacement or addition of a FCSEMS, and can lead to cost savings. PMID:25721004

  2. Limited Role for Biliary Stent as Surrogate Fiducial Marker in Pancreatic Cancer: Stent and Intratumoral Fiducials Compared

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, Astrid van der; Lens, Eelco; Wognum, Silvia; Jong, Rianne de; Hooft, Jeanin E. van; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Because of low soft-tissue contrast of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), fiducial markers are often used for radiation therapy patient setup verification. For pancreatic cancer patients, biliary stents have been suggested as surrogate fiducials. Using intratumoral fiducials as standard for tumor position, this study aims to quantify the suitability of biliary stents for measuring interfractional and respiratory-induced position variations of pancreatic tumors. Methods and Materials: Eleven pancreatic cancer patients with intratumoral fiducials and a biliary stent were included in this study. Daily CBCT scans (243 in total) were registered with a reference CT scan, based on bony anatomy, on fiducial markers, and on the biliary stent, respectively. We analyzed the differences in tumor position (ie, markers center-of-mass position) among these 3 registrations. In addition, we measured for 9 patients the magnitude of respiratory-induced motion (MM) of the markers and of the stent on 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) and determined the difference between these 2 magnitudes (ΔMM). Results: The stent indicated tumor position better than bony anatomy in 67% of fractions; the absolute difference between the markers and stent registration was >5 mm in 46% of fractions and >10 mm in 20% of fractions. Large PTV margins (superior-inferior direction, >19 mm) would be needed to account for this interfractional position variability. On 4DCT, we found in superior-inferior direction a mean ΔMM of 0.5 mm (range, –2.6 to 4.2 mm). Conclusions: For respiratory-induced motion, the mean ΔMM is small, but for individual patients the absolute difference can be >4 mm. For interfractional position variations, a stent is, on average, a better surrogate fiducial than bony anatomy, but large PTV margins would still be required. Therefore, intratumoral fiducials are recommended for online setup verification for all pancreatic patients scheduled for radiation therapy, including patients with a biliary stent.

  3. New tapered metallic stent for unresectable malignant hilar bile duct obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Yuji; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Nishikawa, Takao; Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Sasaki, Reina; Sakamoto, Dai; Watanabe, Yuto; Nakamura, Masato; Yasui, Shin; Mikata, Rintaro; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To examine the usefulness of a new tapered metallic stent (MS) in patients with unresectable malignant hilar bile duct obstruction. METHODS: This new tapered MS was placed in 11 patients with Bismuth II or severer unresectable malignant hilar bile duct obstruction, as a prospective study. The subjects were six patients with bile duct carcinoma, three with gallbladder cancer, and two with metastatic bile duct obstruction. Stenosis morphology was Bismuth II: 7, IIIa: 3, and IV: 1. UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN000004758). RESULTS: MS placement was 100% (11/11) successful. There were no procedural accidents. The mean patency period was 208.401 d, the median survival period was 142.000 d, and the mean survival period was 193.273 d. Occlusion rate was 36.4% (4/11); the causes of occlusion were ingrowth and overgrowth in 2 patients each, 18.2%, respectively. Patients with occlusion underwent endoscopic treatment one more time and all were treatable. CONCLUSION: The tapered MS proved useful in patients with unresectable malignant hilar bile duct obstruction because it provided a long patency period, enabled re-treatment by re-intervention, and no procedural accidents occurred. PMID:26488025

  4. Induction of chronic pancreatitis by pancreatic duct ligation activates BMP2, apelin, and PTHrP expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Rastellini, Cristiana; Han, Song; Bhatia, Vandanajay; Cao, Yanna; Liu, Ka; Gao, Xuxia; Ko, Tien C; Greeley, George H; Falzon, Miriam

    2015-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a devastating disease with no treatments. Experimental models have been developed to reproduce the parenchyma and inflammatory responses typical of human CP. For the present study, one objective was to assess and compare the effects of pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) to those of repetitive cerulein (Cer)-induced CP in mice on pancreatic production of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2), apelin, and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). A second objective was to determine the extent of cross talk among pancreatic BMP2, apelin, and PTHrP signaling systems. We focused on BMP2, apelin, and PTHrP since these factors regulate the inflammation-fibrosis cascade during pancreatitis. Findings showed that PDL- and Cer-induced CP resulted in significant elevations in expression and peptide/protein levels of pancreatic BMP2, apelin, and PTHrP. In vivo mouse and in vitro pancreatic cell culture experiments demonstrated that BMP2 stimulated pancreatic apelin expression whereas apelin expression was inhibited by PTHrP exposure. Apelin or BMP2 exposure inhibited PTHrP expression, and PTHrP stimulated upregulation of gremlin, an endogenous inhibitor of BMP2 activity. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) stimulated PTHrP expression. Together, findings demonstrated that PDL- and Cer-induced CP resulted in increased production of the pancreatic BMP2, apelin, and PTHrP signaling systems and that significant cross talk occurred among pancreatic BMP2, apelin, and PTHrP. These results together with previous findings imply that these factors interact via a pancreatic network to regulate the inflammation-fibrosis cascade during CP. More importantly, this network communicated with TGF-β, a key effector of pancreatic pathophysiology. This novel network may be amenable to pharmacologic manipulations during CP in humans. PMID:26229008

  5. Laparoscopic Longitudinal Pancreaticojejunostomy Using Barbed Sutures: an Efficient and Secure Solution for Pancreatic Duct Obstructions in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Hong, Tae Ho

    2016-04-01

    We describe our laparoscopic longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy (LPJ) technique using barbed sutures to manage a pancreatic duct obstruction. We performed laparoscopic longitudinal anterior pancreaticojejunostomy using barbed sutures (3-0 absorbable wound closure device, V-Loc™, Covidien, Minneapolis, MN, USA) in 11 patients who presented with signs of a pancreas ductal obstruction and chronic pancreatitis. The surgical outcomes and follow-up records at the outpatient department were reviewed, and the effectiveness and feasibility of this method were analyzed. Mean patient age was 54.4 ± 9.5 years, and pancreatic duct stones were removed from all patients without conversion to laparotomy. Overall operative time was 200.7 ± 56.4 min, and estimated blood loss was 42.2 ± 11.2 ml. No pancreatic anastomosis leakage or postoperative bleeding was detected. Mean length of hospital stay was 6.5 ± 0.8 days, and mean time to start a soft diet was 4.8 ± 0.7 days. No patient complained of postoperative abdominal pain, and all patients recovered without significant complications or relapse of pancreatitis. The follow-up period was 4-21 months. Our new laparoscopic longitudinal anterior pancreaticojejunostomy technique (Puestow procedure) using barbed sutures is a potentially efficient and minimally invasive procedure for patients who suffer from pancreatic duct obstruction and chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26691145

  6. SLC26 anion exchangers of guinea pig pancreatic duct: molecular cloning and functional characterization

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Andrew K.; Shmukler, Boris E.; Vandorpe, David H.; Reimold, Fabian; Heneghan, John F.; Nakakuki, M.; Akhavein, Arash; Ko, Shigeru; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The secretin-stimulated human pancreatic duct secretes HCO3−-rich fluid essential for normal digestion. Optimal stimulation of pancreatic HCO3− secretion likely requires coupled activities of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) anion channel and apical SLC26 Cl−/HCO3− exchangers. However, whereas stimulated human and guinea pig pancreatic ducts secrete ∼140 mM HCO3− or more, mouse and rat ducts secrete ∼40–70 mM HCO3−. Moreover, the axial distribution and physiological roles of SLC26 anion exchangers in pancreatic duct secretory processes remain controversial and may vary among mammalian species. Thus the property of high HCO3− secretion shared by human and guinea pig pancreatic ducts prompted us to clone from guinea pig pancreatic duct cDNAs encoding Slc26a3, Slc26a6, and Slc26a11 polypeptides. We then functionally characterized these anion transporters in Xenopus oocytes and human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. In Xenopus oocytes, gpSlc26a3 mediated only Cl−/Cl− exchange and electroneutral Cl−/HCO3− exchange. gpSlc26a6 in Xenopus oocytes mediated Cl−/Cl− exchange and bidirectional exchange of Cl− for oxalate and sulfate, but Cl−/HCO3− exchange was detected only in HEK 293 cells. gpSlc26a11 in Xenopus oocytes exhibited pH-dependent Cl−, oxalate, and sulfate transport but no detectable Cl−/HCO3− exchange. The three gpSlc26 anion transporters exhibited distinct pharmacological profiles of 36Cl− influx, including partial sensitivity to CFTR inhibitors Inh-172 and GlyH101, but only Slc26a11 was inhibited by PPQ-102. This first molecular and functional assessment of recombinant SLC26 anion transporters from guinea pig pancreatic duct enhances our understanding of pancreatic HCO3− secretion in species that share a high HCO3− secretory output. PMID:21593449

  7. Successive breaks in biliary stents.

    PubMed

    Espinel, Jesús; Pinedo, Eugenia; Ojeda, Vanesa; Guerra, María

    2016-04-01

    A 64 year-old male, was diagnosed with obstructive jaundice due to a well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with liver metastases. The patient underwent endoscopic placement of covered self-expanding biliary stent (10x60 mm, Hanaro) by ERCP. He was admitted with cholangitis one year later. The following ERCP revealed a fractured stent with loss of the distal end (duodenal) and partial migration of the remaining stent to the common bile duct. The fragmented stent was removed from the common bile duct and a new, similar one was inserted. Four months later the patient was admitted with cholangitis. A new ERCP was done and biliary stent was also fragmented. It was removed and an uncovered stent (Wallflex) was inserted. PMID:27065248

  8. Pancreatitis-Induced Extrahepatic Portal Vein Stenosis Treated by Percutaneous Transhepatic Stent Placement: a Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Maleux, G. Vaninbroukx, J.; Verslype, C.; Vanbeckevoort, D.; Hootegem, P. van; Nevens, F.

    2003-08-15

    One month after onset of an acute biliary pancreatitis, a 75-year-old man developed refractory ascites. Duplex ultrasound and CT scan revealed a focal stenosis of the extrahepatic portal vein as confirmed by transhepatic direct portography. In the same session, this stenosis, responsible for symptomatic prehepaticportal hypertension, was successfully dilated and stented and afterwards a residual pressure gradient of 1 mmHg over the stented segment was measured. One week after the stenting procedure the patient was free of ascites and control physical and biochemical examination one year later is completely normal.

  9. Immortalized bovine pancreatic duct cells become tumorigenic after transfection with mutant k-ras.

    PubMed

    Löhr, M; Müller, P; Zauner, I; Schmidt, C; Trautmann, B; Thévenod, F; Capellá, G; Farré, A; Liebe, S; Jesenofsky, R; Jesnowski, R

    2001-06-01

    Mutation of the K-ras gene is thought to be an early and important event in pancreatic carcinogenesis. In order to study the role of this molecular alteration in the transition from the normal to the neoplastic pancreatic cell, bovine pancreatic duct cells were first immortalized by SV40 large T antigen (Ag) complementary (c)DNA transfection and then transfected with a mutated K-ras gene. As did primary duct cells, the immortalized duct cells (more than 100 passages) expressed cytokeratins, carbonic anhydrase type-II, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and multidrug resistance (mdr). They grew as a single layer after transplantation under plastic domes and formed three-dimensional structures resembling ducts when grown on Matrigel. Cell growth was stimulated by insulin, epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha, but cells did not respond to gastrin and CCK-8. They did not form colonies in soft agar nor did they form tumors in nude mice. Immortalized cells transfected with mutated K-ras acquired the ability to form tumors after orthotopic injection into the nude mouse pancreas. It is concluded that SV 40 immortalized bovine pancreatic PMID:11469690

  10. CD56-positive cells with or without synaptophysin expression are recognized in the pancreatic duct epithelium: a study with adult and fetal tissues and specimens from chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Masayoshi; Notohara, Kenji; Tsukayama, Choutatsu; Mizuno, Ryuichirou; Okada, Shigeru

    2003-12-01

    We observed the distribution of CD56+ epithelial cells in the pancreatic duct system using 25 fetal, one infantile, 3 normal adult, 4 diabetic, and 8 chronically inflamed pancreatic tissue samples. In the early stage of gestation (12 to 17 weeks), CD56+ cells were commonly seen in the immature tubular structures. They were often continuous to pancreatic islets, and their distribution was similar to that of synaptophysin (Syn)+ cells, suggesting that they are precursors of islet neogenesis. Their number decreased in proportion to gestational age. Instead, from 24 weeks of gestation, luminal cell clusters that were common in interlobular ducts revealed CD56+. These cell clusters were unrelated to islet neogenesis and Syn expression. Similar CD56+ luminal cell clusters were also observed in cases of chronic pancreatitis, whereas they were scarce in normal adult and diabetic tissues. CD56+ cells were also occasionally seen in intralobular ducts, intercalated ducts, and centroacinar cells in cases of chronic pancreatitis. We conclude that there are two types of CD56+ epithelial cells in the pancreatic duct system: CD56+ endocrine cells are numerous during the early stage of gestation, when islet neogenesis appears, while CD56+ luminal cells may represent developmental and regenerative changes of pancreatic ducts. PMID:14726964

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided placement of AXIOS stent for drainage of pancreatic fluid collections.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) have conventionally been treated with surgery, percutaneous drainage, or with the more recently established endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage modality. Currently, endoscopic plastic or metallic stents are used for PFC drainage. Plastic stents present issues with stent migration and premature occlusion requiring frequent stent exchanges or placement of additional stents. Metallic stents are tubular and may migrate, resulting in inefficient drainage, content leakage, retrieval and replacement, and possible mucosal injury. The aim of this review was to summarize and evaluate the clinical and technical effectiveness of EUS-guided placement of the recently developed AXIOS stent, a lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent (LASEMS)for PFC drainage. A literature review was performed to identify the studies describing this technique. In this review article we have summarized case series or reports describing EUS-guided LASEMS placement. The indications, techniques, limitations and complications reported are discussed. A total of 298 patients were included across all studies described thus far in the literature. Overall, a 97% technical success rate and a 96% clinical success rate have been reported. Early and late complications related to the placement or removal of LASEMS have been reported, however few cases have presented life-threatening results. EUS-guided PFC drainage and LASEMS placement can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of selected patients. PMID:27065729

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided placement of AXIOS stent for drainage of pancreatic fluid collections

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A.; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) have conventionally been treated with surgery, percutaneous drainage, or with the more recently established endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage modality. Currently, endoscopic plastic or metallic stents are used for PFC drainage. Plastic stents present issues with stent migration and premature occlusion requiring frequent stent exchanges or placement of additional stents. Metallic stents are tubular and may migrate, resulting in inefficient drainage, content leakage, retrieval and replacement, and possible mucosal injury. The aim of this review was to summarize and evaluate the clinical and technical effectiveness of EUS-guided placement of the recently developed AXIOS stent, a lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent (LASEMS)for PFC drainage. A literature review was performed to identify the studies describing this technique. In this review article we have summarized case series or reports describing EUS-guided LASEMS placement. The indications, techniques, limitations and complications reported are discussed. A total of 298 patients were included across all studies described thus far in the literature. Overall, a 97% technical success rate and a 96% clinical success rate have been reported. Early and late complications related to the placement or removal of LASEMS have been reported, however few cases have presented life-threatening results. EUS-guided PFC drainage and LASEMS placement can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of selected patients. PMID:27065729

  13. Extrapancreatic organ impairment during acute pancreatitis induced by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction. Effect of N-acetylcysteine

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Manuel A; Ramudo, Laura; De Dios, Isabel

    2007-01-01

    Summary Multiple organ failure is frequently associated with acute pancreatitis (AP). Our aim was to study pulmonary, hepatic and renal complications developed in the course of AP experimentally induced in rats by bile-pancreatic duct obstruction (BPDO), differentiating the complications caused by AP itself, from those directly caused by bile duct obstruction (BDO), after ligating the choledocus. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was administered as a therapeutic approach. Myeloperoxidase activity revealed neutrophil infiltration in lungs from 12 h after BDO, even if AP was not triggered. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity indicated hepatocyte death from 48 h after BDO, and from 24 h following BPDO-induced AP onwards, an effect delayed until 48 h by NAC treatment. Rats with single cholestasis (BDO) and rats with BPDO-induced AP showed a significant increase in plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin concentration from 12 h onwards, whose values were reduced by NAC treatment at early BPDO. No renal failure was found during 120 h of bile-pancreatic obstruction. Our results showed lung and liver impairment as a result of BDO, even if AP does not develop. Pancreatic damage and extrapancreatic complications during AP induced by BPDO were palliated by NAC treatment. PMID:17877536

  14. Activation of pancreatic-duct-derived progenitor cells during pancreas regeneration in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wan-Chun; Rukstalis, J. Michael; Nishimura, Wataru; Tchipashvili, Vaja; Habener, Joel F.; Sharma, Arun; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The adult pancreas has considerable capacity to regenerate in response to injury. We hypothesized that after partial pancreatectomy (Px) in adult rats, pancreatic-duct cells serve as a source of regeneration by undergoing a reproducible dedifferentiation and redifferentiation. We support this hypothesis by the detection of an early loss of the ductal differentiation marker Hnf6 in the mature ducts, followed by the transient appearance of areas composed of proliferating ductules, called foci of regeneration, which subsequently form new pancreatic lobes. In young foci, ductules express markers of the embryonic pancreatic epithelium – Pdx1, Tcf2 and Sox9 – suggesting that these cells act as progenitors of the regenerating pancreas. The endocrine-lineage-specific transcription factor Neurogenin3, which is found in the developing embryonic pancreas, was transiently detected in the foci. Islets in foci initially resemble embryonic islets in their lack of MafA expression and lower percentage of β-cells, but with increasing maturation have increasing numbers of MafA+ insulin+ cells. Taken together, we provide a mechanism by which adult pancreatic duct cells recapitulate aspects of embryonic pancreas differentiation in response to injury, and contribute to regeneration of the pancreas. This mechanism of regeneration relies mainly on the plasticity of the differentiated cells within the pancreas. PMID:20663919

  15. Outcomes in percutaneous stenting of non-hepato-biliary/pancreatic malignant jaundice.

    PubMed

    Meller, M T; Arts, G R J; Dean, J R

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study is to review the practice and outcomes at our institution of percutaneous transhepatic placement of metallic biliary stents for non-hepato-biliary/pancreatic (non-HBP) malignant obstructive jaundice. A retrospective review was performed of the records of all patients undergoing transhepatic stenting for non-HBP malignant obstructive jaundice over a 7-year period. A total of 25 patients were successfully stented and linear regression analysis of a variety of demographic, clinical and laboratory markers against survival was performed. Survival after stenting varied from 1 to 1354 days (median 58, mean 152). An initial bilirubin level less than 300 micromol/L (P=0.01) and a reduction of greater than 50% in bilirubin post stenting (P=0.02) were strong predictors of improved survival. Older patients survived longer than younger ones (P<0.01). There was a weak association of survival with an albumin>30 g/L (P=0.06), but no statistically significant correlation with creatinine or haemoglobin levels or active tumour treatment after stenting. There were few major complications from the procedures. Transhepatic metallic biliary stenting for non-HBP malignant biliary obstruction is a safe and effective procedure, and with careful patient selection, significant periods of survival and palliation of jaundice can be achieved. PMID:19708950

  16. A novel protein isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor transforms human pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chakedis, Jeffery; French, Randall; Babicky, Michele; Jaquish, Dawn; Howard, Haleigh; Mose, Evangeline; Lam, Raymond; Holman, Patrick; Miyamoto, Jaclyn; Walterscheid, Zakk; Lowy, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The MST1R gene is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer producing elevated levels of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor protein. While mutations in MST1R are rare, alternative splice variants have been previously reported in epithelial cancers. We report the discovery of a novel RON isoform discovered in human pancreatic cancer. Partial splicing of exons 5 and 6 (P5P6) produces a RON isoform that lacks the first extracellular immunoglobulin-plexin-transcription (IPT) domain. The splice variant is detected in 73% of pancreatic adenocarcinoma patient derived xenografts and 71% of pancreatic cancer cell lines. Peptides specific to RON P5P6 detected in human pancreatic cancer specimens by mass spectrometry confirms translation of the protein isoform. The P5P6 isoform is found to be constitutively phosphorylated, present in the cytoplasm, and it traffics to the plasma membrane. Expression of P5P6 in immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells activates downstream AKT, and in human pancreatic epithelial nestin-expressing (HPNE) cells activates both the AKT and MAPK pathways. Inhibiting RON P5P6 in HPDE cells using a small molecule inhibitor BMS-777607 blocked constitutive activation and decreased AKT signaling. P5P6 transforms NIH3T3 cells and induces tumorigenicity in HPDE cells. Resultant HPDE-P5P6 tumors develop a dense stromal compartment similar to that seen in pancreatic cancer. In summary, we have identified a novel and constitutively active isoform of the RON tyrosine kinase receptor that has transforming activity and is expressed in human pancreatic cancer. These findings provide additional insight into the biology of the RON receptor in pancreatic cancer and are clinically relevant to the study of RON as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26477314

  17. Percutaneous Palliation of Pancreatic Head Cancer: Randomized Comparison of ePTFE/FEP-Covered Versus Uncovered Nitinol Biliary Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Krokidis, Miltiadis; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Orgera, Gianluigi; Tsetis, Dimitrios; Mouzas, Ioannis; Bezzi, Mario; Kouroumalis, Elias; Pasariello, Roberto; Hatzidakis, Adam

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical effectiveness of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene/fluorinated-ethylene-propylene (ePTFE/FEP)-covered stents with that of uncovered nitinol stents for the palliation of malignant jaundice caused by inoperable pancreatic head cancer. Eighty patients were enrolled in a prospective randomized study. Bare nitinol stents were used in half of the patients, and ePTFE/FEP-covered stents were used in the remaining patients. Patency, survival, complications, and mean cost were calculated in both groups. Mean patency was 166.0 {+-} 13.11 days for the bare-stent group and 234.0 {+-} 20.87 days for the covered-stent group (p = 0.007). Primary patency rates at 3, 6, and 12 months were 77.5, 69.8, and 69.8% for the bare-stent group and 97.5, 92.2, and 87.6% for the covered-stent group, respectively. Mean secondary patency was 123.7 {+-} 22.5 days for the bare-stent group and 130.3 {+-} 21.4 days for the covered-stent group. Tumour ingrowth occurred exclusively in the bare-stent group in 27.5% of cases (p = 0.002). Median survival was 203.2 {+-} 11.8 days for the bare-stent group and 247.0 {+-} 20 days for the covered-stent group (p = 0.06). Complications and mean cost were similar in both groups. Regarding primary patency and ingrowth rate, ePTFE/FEP-covered stents have shown to be significantly superior to bare nitinol stents for the palliation of malignant jaundice caused by inoperable pancreatic head cancer and pose comparable cost and complications. Use of a covered stent does not significantly influence overall survival rate; nevertheless, the covered endoprosthesis seems to offer result in fewer reinterventions and better quality of patient life.

  18. [Damage to the epithelium of the pancreatic duct following pancreatography (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Stolte, M; Bürner, W; Wachhausen, H; Koch, H

    1981-02-01

    Following pancreatography with x-ray contrast-medium used for clinical ERP the epithelium of the pancreatic duct was examined histologically, under the scanning electron and under the transmission electron microscope in 15 cats. Immediately following pancreaticography severe edematous lesions of the epithelium are to be seen, e. g. loss of microvilli, acute apical edema of the cells, single-cell-necrosis and erosive defects. 24 hours after pancreaticography some of the animals still manifest high-grade hydropic damage to the ductal epithelium, including rupture of the apical cell-membrane focal lysis of cytoplasm, irreversible mitochondrial lesions and initial degeneration of the nucleus. In the morphogenesis of such lesions in addition to the mechanical stressing of the pancreatic duct system and the physical and chemical properties of the contrast-medium, in particular an eventual damage to the Papilla Vateri with consecutive lowering of the emptying of the ducts, play an important role. By administering secretin to accelerate the emptying of the duct system, damage to the ductal epithelium can largely be avoided by shortening the duration of contact of the contrast medium with the epithelium. PMID:7234022

  19. Establishment of three-dimensional cultures of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M.; Menter, David G.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Reddy, Shrikanth A.G. . E-mail: sa08366@wotan.mdacc.tmc.edu

    2007-07-06

    Three-dimensional (3D) cultures of epithelial cells offer singular advantages for studies of morphogenesis or the role of cancer genes in oncogenesis. In this study, as part of establishing a 3D culture system of pancreatic duct epithelial cells, we compared human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDE-E6E7) with pancreatic cancer cell lines. Our results show, that in contrast to cancer cells, HPDE-E6E7 organized into spheroids with what appeared to be apical and basal membranes and a luminal space. Immunostaining experiments indicated that protein kinase Akt was phosphorylated (Ser473) and CTMP, a negative Akt regulator, was expressed in both HPDE-E6E7 and cancer cells. However, a nuclear pool of CTMP was detectable in HPDE-E6E7 cells that showed a dynamic concentrated expression pattern, a feature that further distinguished HPDE-E637 cells from cancer cells. Collectively, these data suggest that 3D cultures of HPDE-E6E7 cells are useful for investigating signaling and morphological abnormalities in pancreatic cancer cells.

  20. Can pancreatic duct-derived progenitors be a source of islet regeneration?

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Bing; Zhan, Xiao-Rong; Yi, Ran; Yang, Baofeng

    2009-06-12

    The regenerative process of the pancreas is of interest because the main pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus is an inadequate number of insulin-producing {beta}-cells. The functional mass of {beta}-cells is decreased in type 1 diabetes, so replacing missing {beta}-cells or triggering their regeneration may allow for improved type 1 diabetes treatment. Therefore, expansion of the {beta}-cell mass from endogenous sources, either in vivo or in vitro, represents an area of increasing interest. The mechanism of islet regeneration remains poorly understood, but the identification of islet progenitor sources is critical for understanding {beta}-cell regeneration. One potential source is the islet proper, via the dedifferentiation, proliferation, and redifferentiation of facultative progenitors residing within the islet. Neogenesis, or that the new pancreatic islets can derive from progenitor cells present within the ducts has been reported, but the existence and identity of the progenitor cells have been debated. In this review, we focus on pancreatic ductal cells, which are islet progenitors capable of differentiating into islet {beta}-cells. Islet neogenesis, seen as budding of hormone-positive cells from the ductal epithelium, is considered to be one mechanism for normal islet growth after birth and in regeneration, and has suggested the presence of pancreatic stem cells. Numerous results support the neogenesis hypothesis, the evidence for the hypothesis in the adult comes primarily from morphological studies that have in common the production of damage to all or part of the pancreas, with consequent inflammation and repair. Although numerous studies support a ductal origin for new islets after birth, lineage-tracing experiments are considered the 'gold standard' of proof. Lineage-tracing experiments show that pancreatic duct cells act as progenitors, giving rise to new islets after birth and after injury. The identification of differentiated pancreatic ductal cells as an in vivo progenitor for pancreatic {beta}-cells has implications for a potentially important, expandable source of new islets for diabetic replenishment therapy.

  1. Improving patient and user safety during endoscopic investigation of the pancreatic and biliary ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, John E.; Melville, C. David; Lee, Cameron M.; Saunders, Michael D.; Burkhardt, Matthew R.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    Endoscopic investigation of the main pancreatic duct and biliary ducts is called endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), and carries a risk of pancreatitis for the patient. During ERCP, a metal guidewire is inserted into the pancreatobiliary duct from a side-viewing large endoscope within the duodenum. To verify correct placement of the ERCP guidewire, an injection of radiopaque dye is required for fluoroscopic imaging, which exposes the patient and clinical team to x-ray radiation. A safer and more effective means to access the pancreatobiliary system can use direct optical imaging, although the endoscope diameter and stiffness will be significantly larger than a guidewire's. To quantify this invasiveness before human testing, a synthetic force-sensing pancreas was fabricated and attached to an ERCP training model. The invasiveness of a new, 1.7-mm diameter, steerable scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) was compared to the standard ERCP guidewire of 0.89-mm (0.035") diameter that is not steerable. Although twice as large and significantly stiffer than the ERCP guidewire, the SFE generated lower or significantly less average force during insertion at all 4 sensor locations (P<0.05) within the main pancreatic duct. Therefore, the addition of steering and forward visualization at the tip of the endoscope reduced the invasiveness of the in vitro ERCP procedure. Since fluoroscopy is not required, risks associated with dye injection and x-ray exposure can be eliminated when using direct optical visualization. Finally, the SFE provides wide-field high resolution imaging for image-guided interventions, laser-based fluorescence biomarker imaging, and spot spectral analysis for future optical biopsy.

  2. Impact of pancreatic stent caliber on post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram pancreatitis rates in patients with confirmed sphincter of Oddi dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Jayapal; Kim, Hwasoon; Reddy, Kartika; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Wilcox, C Mel

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite proven clinical benefit, there are no studies that have examined the relationship between pancreatic stent caliber and its impact on PEP [post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram (ERCP) pancreatitis] in high-risk patients. Aim To study the relationship between stent caliber and PEP rates in patients with confirmed sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD). Methods A retrospective review was conducted of ERCPs in patients with SOD from 2002 to 2012 from a prospectively maintained, Institutional Review Board approved database. Results A total of 243/7659 (3.2%) patients underwent 3Fr or 5Fr pancreatic stent placement following sphincterotomy for manometry-proven SOD. Of these, 133 (54.7%) underwent 3Fr stent placement, while 110 (45.3%) underwent 5Fr stent placement. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics, demographics, and previous cholecystectomy. Cannulation and stent placement success rates were 100% in both groups. There was no significant difference in rates of PEP and overall complications, 12% versus 12.7%; P = 0.89 and 13.5% versus 15.5%; P = 0.54, between the 3Fr and 5Fr cohorts, respectively. There were more mild PEP rates recorded in 5Fr group (93% vs 56% P = 0.0549) that was not statistically significant. Conclusions There appears to be no relationship between stent characteristics and the risk or severity of PEP in patients with manometrically proven SOD. PMID:24617703

  3. Characterization of differentiated Syrian golden hamster pancreatic duct cells maintained in extended monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Hubchak, S; Mangino, M M; Reddy, M K; Scarpelli, D G

    1990-09-01

    Epithelial cells isolated from fragments of hamster pancreas interlobular ducts were freed of fibroblast contamination by plating them on air-dried collagen, maintaining them in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's (DME):F12 medium supplemented with growth factors, and selecting fibroblast-free aggregates of duct cells with cloning cylinders. Duct epithelial cells plated on rat type I collagen gel and maintained in DME:F12 supplemented with Nu Serum IV, bovine pituitary extract, epidermal growth factor, 3,3',5-triiodothyronine, dexamethasone, and insulin, transferrin, selenium, and linoleic acid conjugated to bovine serum albumin (ITS+), showed optimal growth as monolayers with a doubling time of about 20 h and were propagated for as long as 26 wk. Early passage cells consisted of cuboidal cells with microvilli on their apical surface, complex basolateral membranes, numerous elongated mitochondria, and both free and membrane-bound ribosomes. Cells grown as monolayers for 3 mo. were more flattened and contained fewer apical microvilli, mitochondria, and profiles of rough surfaced endoplasmic reticulum; in addition, there were numerous autophagic vacuoles. Functional characteristics of differentiated pancreatic duct cells which were maintained during extended monolayer culture included intracellular levels of carbonic anhydrase and their capacity to generate cyclic AMP (cAMP) after stimulation by 1 X 10(-6) M secretin. From 5 to 7 wk in culture, levels of carbonic anhydrase remained stable but after 25 to 26 wk decreased by 1.9-fold. At 5 to 7 wk of culture, cyclic AMP increased 8.7-fold over basal levels after secretin stimulation. Although pancreatic duct cells cultured for 25 to 26 wk showed lower basal levels of cAMP, they were still capable of generating significant levels of cAMP after exposure to secretin with a 7.0-fold increase, indicating that secretin receptors and the adenyl cyclase system were both present and functional. These experiments document that pancreatic duct monolayer cultures can be maintained in a differentiated state for up to 6 mo. and suggest that this culture system may be useful for in vitro physiologic and pathologic studies. PMID:2121705

  4. Autocrine Stimulation of Human Pancreatic DuctLike Development by Soluble Isoforms of Epimorphin in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Lasse; Lerch, Markus M.; Hirai, Yohei; Kruse, Marie-Luise; Schmiegel, Wolff; Kalthoff, Holger

    2001-01-01

    Epimorphin was recently described as a mesenchymal factor modulating morphogenesis of murine mammary ducts, skin, liver, and lung in vitro. In this study epimorphin was analyzed in a human, pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line (A818-6) which develops single layer epithelial hollow spheres resembling normal pancreatic ductal structures in vitro. Soluble 34- and 31-kD isoforms of epimorphin were found in the culture supernatant of A818-6 cells. In lysates of A818-6 cells we detected the 34-and 31-kD isoforms and the dimers, and in lysates of fibroblasts the 150-kD tetramers of epimorphin additionally. A neutralizing monoclonal antibody against epimorphin (MC-1) efficiently blocked the development of hollow sphere structures from A818-6 cells. Coculture of A818-6 cells with fibroblasts stimulated the development of hollow sphere structures in general and increased differentiation in 56-d-old hollow spheres. A818-6 hollow sphere development in the presence of fibroblasts was also blocked by MC-1. In this novel system for human duct-like differentiation of pancreatic epithelial cells, we provide evidence for an autocrine and paracrine function of epimorphin as a major mediator for morphogenesis. PMID:11238448

  5. Stent grafting of acute hepatic artery bleeding following pancreatic head resection.

    PubMed

    Stoupis, Christoforos; Ludwig, Karin; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Do, Dai-Do; Triller, Juergen

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the potential of hepatic artery stent grafting in cases of acute hemorrhage of the gastroduodenal artery stump following pancreatic head resection. Five consecutive male patients were treated because of acute, life-threatening massive bleeding. Instead of re-operation, emergency angiography, with the potential of endovascular treatment, was performed. Because of bleeding from the hepatic artery, a stent graft (with the over-the-wire or monorail technique) was implanted to control the hemorrhage by preserving patency of the artery. The outcome was evaluated. In all cases, the hepatic artery stent grafting was successfully performed, and the bleeding was immediately stopped. Clinically, immediately after the procedure, there was an obvious improvement in the general patient condition. There were no immediate procedure-related complications. Completion angiography (n=5) demonstrated control of the hemorrhage and patency of the hepatic artery and the stent graft. Although all patients recovered hemodynamically, three individuals died 2 to 10 days after the procedure. The remaining two patients survived, without the need for re-operation. Transluminal stent graft placement in the hepatic artery is a safe and technically feasible solution to control life-threatening bleeding of the gastroduodenal artery stump. PMID:16932877

  6. Pancreatico-pericardial fistula as a complication of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Camille Anne; Wilcox, C Mel

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatico-pericardial fistula is an extremely rare complication of chronic pancreatitis. We present a case of a 58-year-old man who presented with syncope. Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a pericardial effusion with tamponade physiology. Pericardiocentesis and pericardial fluid analysis demonstrated a lipase level of 2321 U/L. Subsequently, an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was performed, confirming the presence of a pancreatico-pericardial fistula (PPF) from the distal body of the pancreas. A pancreatic duct stent was placed across the duct disruption on two separate occasions; however, despite stent placement, the patient continued to re-accumulate pericardial fluid and deteriorated. While rare, PPFs may complicate chronic pancreatitis, may not respond to pancreatic duct stenting and may portend a poor prognosis. PMID:24627800

  7. Comparison of somatostatin distribution in pancreatic duct ligated rats and streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Wakasugi, H; Ibayashi, H

    1983-10-01

    The somatostatin content in the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract was examined in normal, streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic and pancreatic duct ligation (PDL) rats. The somatostatin content in the pancreas and gastric antrum in the STZ-diabetic group showed a higher concentration compared with those in the normal control group (p less than 0.001). The somatostatin content in the duodenum in the PDL group showed a higher concentration compared with those in the sham-operated group (p less than 0.02). There was no significant increase in the lower gastrointestinal tract in the normal, STZ and PDL groups. These facts suggest that the concentration of somatostatin varies according to tissues and organs and that the distribution of somatostatin in chronic pancreatic injury caused by PDL is different from that in diabetes mellitus cases or controls. PMID:6140201

  8. Reprogramming Mouse Cells With a Pancreatic Duct Phenotype to Insulin-Producing ?-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takatsugu; Cavelti-Weder, Claudia; Caballero, Francisco; Lysy, Philippe A; Guo, Lili; Sharma, Arun; Li, Weida; Zhou, Qiao; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C

    2015-06-01

    Reprogramming technology has opened the possibility of converting one cell type into another by forced expression of transgenes. Transduction of adenoviral vectors encoding 3 pancreatic transcription factors, Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA, into mouse pancreas results in direct reprogramming of exocrine cells to insulin-producing ?-like cells. We hypothesized that cultured adult pancreatic duct cells could be reprogrammed to become insulin-producing ?-cells by adenoviral-mediated expression of this same combination of factors. Exocrine were isolated from adult mouse insulin 1 promoter (MIP)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice to allow new insulin-expressing cells to be detected by GFP fluorescence. Cultured cells were transduced by an adenoviral vector carrying a polycistronic construct Ngn3/Pdx1/MafA/mCherry (Ad-M3C) or mCherry sequence alone as a control vector. In addition, the effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, exendin-4 (Ex-4) on the reprogramming process were examined. GFP(+) cells appeared 2 days after Ad-M3C transduction; the reprogramming efficiency was 8.6 2.6% by day 4 after transduction. Ad-M3C also resulted in increased expression of ?-cell markers insulin 1 and 2, with enhancement by Ex-4. Expression of other ?-cell markers, neuroD and GLP-1 receptor, were also significantly up-regulated. The amount of insulin release into the media and insulin content of the cells were significantly higher in the Ad-M3C-transduced cells; this too was enhanced by Ex-4. The transduced cells did not secrete insulin in response to increased glucose, indicating incomplete differentiation to ?-cells. Thus, cultured murine adult pancreatic cells with a duct phenotype can be directly reprogrammed to insulin-producing ?-like cells by adenoviral delivery of 3 pancreatic transcription factors. PMID:25836667

  9. Endoscopic transluminal pancreatic necrosectomy using a self-expanding metal stent and high-flow water-jet system

    PubMed Central

    Hritz, István; Fejes, Roland; Székely, András; Székely, Iván; Horváth, László; Sárkány, Ágnes; Altorjay, Áron; Madácsy, László

    2013-01-01

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and a pancreatic abscess are the most severe complications of acute pancreatitis. Surgery in such critically ill patients is often associated with significant morbidity and mortality within the first few weeks after the onset of symptoms. Minimal invasive approaches with high success and low mortality rates are therefore of considerable interest. Endoscopic therapy has the potential to offer safe and effective alternative treatment. We report here on 3 consecutive patients with infected walled-off pancreatic necrosis and 1 patient with a pancreatic abscess who underwent direct endoscopic necrosectomy 19-21 d after the onset of acute pancreatitis. The infected pancreatic necrosis or abscess was punctured transluminally with a cystostome and, after balloon dilatation, a non-covered self-expanding biliary metal stent was placed into the necrotic cavity. Following stent deployment, a nasobiliary pigtail catheter was placed into the cavity to ensure continuous irrigation. After 5-7 d, the metal stent was removed endoscopically and the necrotic cavity was entered with a therapeutic gastroscope. Endoscopic debridement was performed via the simultaneous application of a high-flow water-jet system; using a flush knife, a Dormia basket, and hot biopsy forceps. The transluminal endotherapy was repeated 2-5 times daily during the next 10 d. Supportive care included parenteral antibiotics and jejunal feeding. All patients improved dramatically and with resolution of their septic conditions; 3 patients were completely cured without any further complications or the need for surgery. One patient died from a complication of prolonged ventilation severe bilateral pneumonia, not related to the endoscopic procedure. No procedure related complications were observed. Transluminal endoscopic necrosectomy with temporary application of a self-expanding metal stent and a high-flow water-jet system shows promise for enhancing the potential of this endoscopic approach in patients with walled-off pancreatic necrosis and/or a pancreatic abscess. PMID:23801873

  10. [The effect of intraductal duct occlusion with a fast hardening amino acid solution in acute animal experimental pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Clemens, M; Jost, J O; Meyer, J; Kloppenburg, C

    1982-05-01

    The effect of the occlusion of the pancreatic duct system by Ethibloc was studied in cases of acute pancreatitis in animal experiments. Application of 4,5 ml Ethibloc leads to high significant reduction of amylase increase. The favourable effect is markedly reduced after application of 9 ml Ethibloc. A partial excretory function could be demonstrated also after disintegration of Ethibloc. Histological follow-up shows a progredient fibrotic atrophy of pancreas parenchyma. PMID:6179721

  11. Multiple Cancers of the Biliary Tract and Pancreatic Duct after Cholecystectomy for Gallbladder Cancer in a Patient with Pancreaticobiliary Maljunction.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kazuya; Sasajima, Junpei; Kawamoto, Toru; Sugiyama, Yoshiaki; Muto, Mizue; Muto, Momotaro; Ishikawa, Chisato; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the rare case of a 76-year-old woman who underwent cholecystectomy with bile duct resection for advanced gallbladder cancer associated with pancreaticobiliary maljunction (PBM) and subsequently developed multiple cancers of the pancreaticobiliary system (the distal bile duct, intrahepatic duct and pancreatic duct) after the operation. We performed conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) using a side-viewing scope to evaluate the masses in the distal bile duct and the pancreatic duct. We also performed ERCP using double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) to observe the mass in the intrahepatic duct. It was possible to directly observe the lesion using DBE and to perform a biopsy under visual control. All lesions were correctly diagnosed by the combination of ERCP using different endoscopes. The present case suggests that it is necessary to pay close attention (with regard to carcinogenesis) to the whole pancreaticobiliary system in patients with PBM. In addition, the combination of ERCP using DBE and a side-viewing scope may be useful for making a precise diagnosis in patients with altered biliary anatomy who have multiple cancers of the pancreaticobiliary system. PMID:26781013

  12. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm involving pancreaticobiliary maljunction and an aberrant pancreatic duct draining into the stomach: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kinowaki, Yuko; Takazawa, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Noriko; Ishikawa, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) are characterized by the growth of epithelial components with mucin production in the main pancreatic duct, or a large branch. We report a case of intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma (IPMC) of the pancreatic head, complicated by pancreaticobiliary maljunction (PBM) and an aberrant pancreatic duct draining into the stomach. A 50-year-old man with malaise and jaundice was found to have a mass in the pancreatic head at a local hospital. He was clinically diagnosed with IPMC with invasion to the stomach and duodenum after extensive endoscopic and radiological evaluation and a pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Histologically, most of the lesion exhibited proliferation of atypical glands, with irregular papillary and villoglandular structures lined by mucinous columnar epithelium, which extended intraepithelially along the dilated pancreatic duct wall. Tumor cells spread into the duodenal wall formed mucous nodules. The pancreatic ducts of this lesion uniquely showed two malformations; PBM, and an aberrant pancreatic duct opening to the gastric wall. This case was rare in the sense that IPMC extended into such unique structures. We report a case of IPMC with rare localization. The pathogenesis of this type of tumor in an abnormal pancreatic duct will be discussed. PMID:26611763

  13. Detection of glycocalyx of the pancreatic acinar cells in rats by intraductal injections of different markers into the pancreatic duct system.

    PubMed

    Jonas, L; Putzke, H P; Lal, A

    1986-01-01

    The glycocalyx of the pancreatic acinar cells might play a role in the pathogenesis of ductally induced pancreatitis. The detection of luminar glycocalyx of pancreatic acinar and ductular cells succeeded by injections of different markers, such as ruthenium red, lanthanum hydroxide, tannic acid, colloidal iron or ferritin in the pancreatic duct system. The markers enter also the interstitium by local ruptures in the junctional complexes and cause a contrastation of basolateral glycocalyx as well as the basal lamina and of collagen fibres. There were differences between the apical and basolateral glycocalyx that are discussed with supposed differences of physicochemical properties and of different composition of carbohydrates as well as of specialized functions of membrane compartments. PMID:2426734

  14. Bile Duct Disruption Following Radiofrequency Ablation: Successful Repair Using a Covered Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Philip M.; Hare, Christopher M.B. Lees, William R.

    2004-08-15

    Persistent biliary leaks, whether iatrogenic or secondary to malignancy, often present a difficult management problem. Recent reports have suggested a role for covered metallic stents in this context. We describe the successful use of a covered stent to seal a persistent biliary leak following radiofrequency ablation of colorectal liver metastases.

  15. Past, Present, and Future of Gastrointestinal Stents: New Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Metal Stents and Future Developments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Seung; Chung, Moon Jae

    2016-01-01

    Innovations in stent technology and technological advances in endoscopic ultrasonography have led to rapid expansion of their use in the field of gastrointestinal diseases. In particular, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stent insertion has been used for the management of pancreatic fluid collection, bile duct drainage, gallbladder decompression, and gastric bypass. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided drainage of intra-abdominal fluid collections using a plastic or metal stent is well established. Because of the various limitations—such as stent migration, injury and bleeding in the lumen—recently developed, fully covered self-expanding metal stents or lumen-apposing metal stents have been introduced for those fluids management. This article reviews the recent literature on newly developed endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stents and the efficacy thereof. PMID:27000424

  16. Long-term culture and immortalization of epithelial cells from normal adult human pancreatic ducts transfected by the E6E7 gene of human papilloma virus 16.

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, T.; Duguid, W. P.; Rosenberg, L.; Viallet, J.; Galloway, D. A.; Tsao, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers in humans. The majority of these cancers arise from the pancreatic duct epithelium. Research into the pathogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma has largely relied on animal models. In vitro models of pancreatic carcinogenesis using propagable cultured epithelial cells derived from the pancreatic ducts of rats and hamsters have been described. A human model, however, has been nonexistent due to the unavailability of propagable cultured duct epithelial cells derived from normal human pancreas. We report here a reproducible method for the long-term culture of pancreatic duct epithelial cells derived from normal and benign adult human pancreata by infection with a retrovirus containing the E6 and E7 genes of the human papilloma virus 16. One of these cell lines has become immortal and has propagated continuously for more than 20 passages. They remain anchorage dependent in their growth and nontumorigenic in nude mice. These cell lines and the methodology described here to establish them may provide new avenues for in vitro studies of the roles played by duct epithelium in human pancreatic diseases and cancers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8669463

  17. An intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel is important for secretion in pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikio; Wang, Jing; Hede, Susanne E; Novak, Ivana

    2012-07-15

    Potassium channels play a vital role in maintaining the membrane potential and the driving force for anion secretion in epithelia. In pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, the identity of K(+) channels has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis of functional K(+) channels in rodent and human pancreatic ducts (Capan-1, PANC-1, and CFPAC-1) using molecular and electrophysiological techniques. RT-PCR analysis revealed mRNAs for KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNH5, KCNT1, and KCNT2, as well as KCNN4 coding for the following channels: KVLQT1; HERG; EAG2; Slack; Slick; and an intermediate-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (IK) channel (K(Ca)3.1). The following functional studies were focused on the IK channel. 5,6-Dichloro-1-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazole-2-one (DC-EBIO), an activator of IK channel, increased equivalent short-circuit current (I(sc)) in Capan-1 monolayer, consistent with a secretory response. Clotrimazole, a blocker of IK channel, inhibited I(sc). IK channel blockers depolarized the membrane potential of cells in microperfused ducts dissected from rodent pancreas. Cell-attached patch-clamp single-channel recordings revealed IK channels with an average conductance of 80 pS in freshly isolated rodent duct cells. These results indicated that the IK channels may, at least in part, be involved in setting the resting membrane potential. Furthermore, the IK channels are involved in anion and potassium transport in stimulated pancreatic ducts. PMID:22555847

  18. Immunohistochemical analysis of changes in signaling pathway activation downstream of growth factor receptors in pancreatic duct cell carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nhu-An; Schwock, Joerg; Iakovlev, Vladimir; Pond, Greg; Hedley, David W; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2008-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) involves multi-stage development of molecular aberrations affecting signaling pathways that regulate cancer growth and progression. This study was performed to gain a better understanding of the abnormal signaling that occurs in PDAC compared with normal duct epithelia. Methods We performed immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray of 26 PDAC, 13 normal appearing adjacent pancreatic ductal epithelia, and 12 normal non-PDAC ducts. We compared the levels of 18 signaling proteins including growth factor receptors, tumor suppressors and 13 of their putative downstream phosphorylated (p-) signal transducers in PDAC to those in normal ductal epithelia. Results The overall profiles of signaling protein expression levels, activation states and sub-cellular distribution in PDAC cells were distinguishable from non-neoplastic ductal epithelia. The ERK pathway activation was correlated with high levels of S2448p-mTOR (100%, p = 0.05), T389p-S6K (100%, p = 0.02 and S235/236p-S6 (86%, p = 0.005). Additionally, T389p-S6K correlated with S727p-STAT3 (86%, p = 0.005). Advanced tumors with lymph node metastasis were characterized by high levels of S276p-NFκB (100%, p = 0.05) and S9p-GSK3β (100%, p = 0.05). High levels of PKBβ/AKT2, EGFR, as well as nuclear T202/Y204p-ERK and T180/Y182p-p38 were observed in normal ducts adjacent to PDAC compared with non-cancerous pancreas. Conclusion Multiple signaling proteins are activated in pancreatic duct cell carcinogenesis including those associated with the ERK, PKB/AKT, mTOR and STAT3 pathways. The ERK pathway activation appears also increased in duct epithelia adjacent to carcinoma, suggesting tumor micro-environmental effects. PMID:18254976

  19. Endoscopic therapy in chronic pancreatitis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Seicean, Andrada; Vultur, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy in chronic pancreatitis (CP) aims to provide pain relief and to treat local complications, by using the decompression of the pancreatic duct and the drainage of pseudocysts and biliary strictures, respectively. This is the reason for using it as first-line therapy for painful uncomplicated CP. The clinical response has to be evaluated at 6–8 weeks, when surgery may be chosen. This article reviews the main possibilities of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) therapies. Endotherapy for pancreatic ductal stones uses ultrasound wave lithotripsy and sometimes additional stone extractions. The treatment of pancreatic duct strictures consists of a single large stenting for 1 year. If the stricture persists, simultaneous multiple stents are applied. In case of unsuccessful ERCP, the EUS-guided drainage of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) or a rendezvous technique can solve the ductal strictures. EUS-guided celiac plexus block has limited efficiency in CP. The drainage of symptomatic or complicated pancreatic pseudocysts can be performed transpapillarily or transgastrically/transduodenally, preferably by EUS guidance. When the biliary stricture is symptomatic or progressive, multiple plastic stents are indicated. In conclusion, as in many fields of symptomatic treatment, endoscopy remains the first choice, either by using ERCP or EUS-guided procedures, after consideration of a multidisciplinary team with endoscopists, surgeons, and radiologists. However, what is crucial is establishing the right timing for surgery. PMID:25565876

  20. Stent

    MedlinePlus

    ... kinds of stents. Most are made of a metal or plastic mesh-like material. However, stent grafts are made of fabric. They are used in larger arteries. An intraluminal coronary artery ... self-expanding, metal mesh tube. It is placed inside a coronary ...

  1. Palliation double stenting for malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LIANG; XU, HAITAO; ZHANG, YUBAO

    2016-01-01

    The surgical management of patients with malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction is complex. Tumor excision is no longer possible in the majority of patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and duodenal obstruction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intraluminal dual stent placement in malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction. In total, 20 patients with malignant obstructive jaundice and duodenal obstruction, including 6 with pancreatic carcinoma, 11 with cholangiocarcinoma, 1 with duodenal carcinoma and 2 with abdominal lymph node metastasis, were treated with intraluminal stent placement. Bile duct obstruction with late occurrence of duodenal obstruction was observed in 16 cases, and duodenal obstruction followed by a late occurrence of bile duct obstruction was observed in 3 cases, while, in 1 case, bile duct obstruction and duodenal obstruction occurred simultaneously. After X-ray fluoroscopy revealed obstruction in the bile duct and duodenum, stents were placed into the respective lumens. Percutaneous transhepatic placement was employed for the biliary stent, while the duodenal stent was placed perioraly. The clinical outcomes, including complications associated with the procedures and patency of the stents, were evaluated. The biliary and duodenal stents were successfully implanted in 18 patients and the technical success rate was 90% (18/20). A total of 39 stents were implanted in 20 patients. In 2 cases, duodenal stent placement failed following biliary stent placement. Duodenal obstruction remitted in 15 patients, and 1 patient succumbed to aspiration pneumonia 5 days after the procedure. No severe complications were observed in any other patient. The survival time of the 18 patients was 5–21 months (median, 9.6 months), and 6 of those patients survived for >12 months. The present study suggests that X-ray fluoroscopy-guided intraluminal stent implantation is an effective procedure for the treatment of malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction. PMID:26889267

  2. Loss of Canonical Smad4 Signaling Promotes KRAS Driven Malignant Transformation of Human Pancreatic Duct Epithelial Cells and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Lisa; Radulovich, Nikolina; Zhu, Chang-Qi; Wang, Dennis; To, Christine; Ibrahimov, Emin; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in North America. Activating KRAS mutations and Smad4 loss occur in approximately 90% and 55% of PDAC, respectively. While their roles in the early stages of PDAC development have been confirmed in genetically modified mouse models, their roles in the multistep malignant transformation of human pancreatic duct cells have not been directly demonstrated. Here, we report that Smad4 represents a barrier in KRAS-mediated malignant transformation of the near normal immortalized human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cell line model. Marked Smad4 downregulation by shRNA in KRASG12V expressing HPDE cells failed to cause tumorigenic transformation. However, KRAS-mediated malignant transformation occurred in a new HPDE-TGF-? resistant (T?R) cell line that completely lacks Smad4 protein expression and is resistant to the mito-inhibitory activity of TGF-?. This transformation resulted in tumor formation and development of metastatic phenotype when the cells were implanted orthotopically into the mouse pancreas. Smad4 restoration re-established TGF-? sensitivity, markedly increased tumor latency by promoting apoptosis, and decreased metastatic potential. These results directly establish the critical combination of the KRAS oncogene and complete Smad4 inactivation in the multi-stage malignant transformation and metastatic progression of normal human HPDE cells. PMID:24386371

  3. A resected case of symptomatic acinar cell cystadenoma of the pancreas displacing the main pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Haruyoshi; Hatsuno, Tsuyoshi; Kinoshita, Mitsuru; Hasegawa, Kazuya; Ishihara, Hiromasa; Takano, Nao; Shimoyama, Satofumi; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Masato; Ichihara, Shu; Kanda, Mitsuro; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Ken

    2016-12-01

    Acinar cell cystadenoma (ACA) of the pancreas has been newly recognized as an entity by the World Health Organization (WHO) definition (2010), and its pathogenesis has not been known adequately because of the rarity. Here, we report a case of a 22-year-old female who had been followed up for a cystic lesion at the tail of the pancreas pointed out by a screening computed tomography (CT) scan 7 years ago. The tumor grew in size from 3.3 to 5.1 cm in diameter for 6 years (0.3 cm per year). Particularly, it rapidly grew up to 6.3 cm in the latest 3 months in concurrence with the emergence of epigastralgia. A contrasted CT scan revealed the irregularly formed, multilocular cystic tumor having thin septum and calcification. The intratumoral magnetic resonance imaging intensity in the T1 and T2 weighted images were low and high, respectively. No communications between the tumor and the main pancreatic duct (MPD) were found, but the tumor displaced the MPD. She underwent surgical resection because the tumor was growing, turned symptomatic, and it seemed difficult to be diagnosed correctly until totally biopsied. Spleen-preserved distal pancreatectomy was performed. It was pathologically diagnosed as ACA; the cyst was lined by cells with normal acinar differentiation; cuboidal cells with round, basally oriented nuclei and eosinophilic granules in its apical cytoplasm. The abdominal pain has disappeared, and no recurrences have been found during a 5-year follow-up. Clinicians are recommended to consider an ACA as one of differential diagnoses of cystic tumors of the pancreas to provide appropriate diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:27108123

  4. A novel biodegradable biliary stent in the normal duct hepaticojejunal anastomosis: an 18-month follow-up in a large animal model.

    PubMed

    Laukkarinen, Johanna M; Sand, Juhani A; Chow, Pierce; Juuti, Hanne; Kellomäki, Minna; Kärkkäinen, Päivi; Isola, Jorma; Yu, Sidney; Somanesan, Satchithanantham; Kee, Irene; Song, In Chin; Ng, Teck Hin; Nordback, Isto H

    2007-06-01

    Creating a well-functioning hepaticojejunostomy (HJ) anastomosis with nondilated bile ducts remains a challenge. Our aim was to study the use in a large animal model of a novel, braided polylactide barium sulfate biodegradable biliary stent (BDBS) without external connection and with no need for later removal. Fifty swine were randomly operated on for Roux-Y HJ with or without BDBS in the anastomosis, and followed up (dynamic biligraphy, x-ray, serum determinations, anastomosis inner diameter, and histology) for 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. During the follow-up, one nonstented animal died because of anastomotic leakage. In x-ray BDBS was seen in place until 1.5 months in all of the stented animals. In the nonstented animals HJ anastomosis inner diameter was decreased at 18 months [6.3 (5.0-7.0) mm vs 7.4 (7.0-9.0) mm, p = 0.05] and liver clearance reduced at 12 and 18 months compared to stented animals. Serum liver values and liver and bile duct histology did not differ between the groups. We conclude that this novel BDBS is easy to insert into the HJ anastomosis with nondilated ducts. It is nontoxic, dissolves safely, and may be associated with a larger and better draining anastomosis at 18-month follow-up. These results encourage us to proceed to clinical studies. PMID:17436052

  5. [Murder for a duct. Wirsüng and Hoffmann: the true story of the discovery of the main pancreatic duct].

    PubMed

    Giardiello, Cristiano; Trojaniello, Biagio; Giardiello, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    The Authors reconstruct the vicissitudes that led to the murder of Georg Wirsüng on the evening of 22nd August 1643 in Padua. Among the motives for the murder, it was later assumed, was jealousy over the discovery of the main pancreatic duct. The Authors recall that this discovery, which removed the pancreas from the sphere of amorphous organs in order to correctly place it among the glands, was not originally made by the celebrated scientist himself but is attributable to his young co-worker Moritz Hoffmann. However, Georg Wirsüng had the merit of confirming and disclosing the discovery. This circumstance, which even today is not widely recognised among the scientific community, is worth remembering in the name of respect for the historical truth. PMID:18360992

  6. Transpapillary drainage of walled-off pancreatic necrosis – a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Smoczyński, Marian; Jabłońska, Anna; Adrych, Krystian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN) often coexists with disruption of the main pancreatic duct that manifests as a leak of contrast medium into the necrotic collection during endoscopic retrograde pancreatography. Aim To assess the efficacy and safety of treatment of patients with symptomatic WOPN and disruption of the main pancreatic duct, who underwent endoscopic transpapillary drainage as the only access to the necrosis cavity. Material and methods In 22 patients with symptomatic WOPN, active endoscopic transpapillary drainage was performed. During endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP), partial disruption of the main pancreatic duct was observed in 14 patients and complete disruption in 8 patients. After the active drainage was finished, a transpapillary pancreatic stent was inserted into the main pancreatic duct, which was later exchanged after 6, 12 and 24 months or when no extravasation of contrast from the pancreatic duct was observed. The results of treatment and complications were compared retrospectively. Results The mean duration of active drainage was 22 (range: 7–94) days. Complications of endotherapy occurred in 3/22 patients. The mean time of the main pancreatic duct stenting was 304 (range: 85–519) days. Success of endoscopic treatment of WOPN and pancreatic duct disruption was achieved in 20/22 patients. During a 1-year follow-up, recurrence of the collection was noted in 4/20 patients. Long-term success was achieved in 16/22 patients. Conclusions In patients with WOPN who cannot undergo transmural drainage when there is a communication between the necrotic collection and the main pancreatic duct, transpapillary access may be an effective and safe method of treatment. PMID:26865888

  7. [Variants of the duodenum-preserving proximal resection of the pancreas with narrow and broad pancreatic duct].

    PubMed

    Shchastnyĭ, A T

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of the proximal duodenum-preserving resection in 85 patients with CP with narrow and wide GPP has been carried out. Completed 39 proximal resections according to Beger with clinic modification and 46 in the Bern's version. Found statistically significant decrease in pain in both groups after surgery (p = 0.002). The data of Quality of life in both groups after the operation are comparable and are not statistically different. Beger operation with clinic modification and the Bern's version is equally effective in treatment patients with CP with both narrow and wide main pancreatic duct. PMID:22830228

  8. Fracture of Self-Expandable Metal Stent during Endoscopic Removal in Benign Biliary Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Kyu Re; Chung, Woo Chul; Lee, Kang-Moon; Yang, Jin Mo

    2013-01-01

    The endoscopic insertion of the self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) in benign biliary stricture has become an alternative to surgery. Fracture or migration of SEMS can occur rarely as complications. We report a case of fracture of SEMS during endoscopic retrieval in patients with chronic pancreatitis. In this case, broken stent was successfully removed with endoscopic ballooning of bile duct and with a snare device. PMID:23423882

  9. Purified Human Pancreatic Duct Cell Culture Conditions Defined by Serum-Free High-Content Growth Factor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Hoesli, Corinne A.; Johnson, James D.; Piret, James M.

    2012-01-01

    The proliferation of pancreatic duct-like CK19+ cells has implications for multiple disease states including pancreatic cancer and diabetes mellitus. The in vitro study of this important cell type has been hampered by their limited expansion compared to fibroblast-like vimentin+ cells that overgrow primary cultures. We aimed to develop a screening platform for duct cell mitogens after depletion of the vimentin+ population. The CD90 cell surface marker was used to remove the vimentin+ cells from islet-depleted human pancreas cell cultures by magnetic-activated cell sorting. Cell sorting decreased CD90+ cell contamination of the cultures from 34±20% to 1.3±0.6%, yielding purified CK19+ cultures with epithelial morphology. A full-factorial experimental design was then applied to test the mitogenic effects of bFGF, EGF, HGF, KGF and VEGF. After 6 days in test conditions, the cells were labelled with BrdU, stained and analyzed by high-throughput imaging. This screening assay confirmed the expected mitogenic effects of bFGF, EGF, HGF and KGF on CK19+ cells and additionally revealed interactions between these factors and VEGF. A serum-free medium containing bFGF, EGF, HGF and KGF led to CK19+ cell expansion comparable to the addition of 10% serum. The methods developed in this work should advance pancreatic cancer and diabetes research by providing effective cell culture and high-throughput screening platforms to study purified primary pancreatic CK19+ cells. PMID:22442738

  10. Pancreaticoureteral Fistula: A Rare Complication of Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hiren G.; Cavanagh, Yana; Shaikh, Sohail N.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that may result in progressive parenchymal damage and fibrosis which can ultimately lead to destruction of pancreatic tissue. Fistulas to the pleura, peritoneum, pericardium, and peripancreatic organs may form as a complications of pancreatitis. This case report describes an exceedingly rare complication, pancreaticoureteral fistula (PUF). Only two additional cases of PUF have been reported. However, they evolved following traumatic injury to the ureter or pancreatic duct. No published reports describe PUF as a complication of pancreatitis. Case Report: A 69-year-old Hispanic female with a past medical history of cholecystectomy, pancreatic pseudocyst, and recurrent episodes of pancreatitis presented with severe, sharp, and constant abdominal pain. Upon imaging, a fistulous tract was visualized between the left renal pelvis (at the level of an upper pole calyx) and the pancreatic duct and a ureteral stent was placed to facilitate fistula closure. Following the procedure, the patient attained symptomatic relief and oral intake was resumed. A left retrograde pyelogram was repeated 2 months after the initial stent placement and demonstrating no evidence of a persistent fistulous tract. Conclusion: Due to PUF's unclear etiology and possible variance of presentation, it is important for physicians to keep this rare complication of pancreatitis in mind, especially, when evaluating a patient with recurrent pancreatitis, urinary symptoms and abnormal imaging within the urinary collecting system and pancreas. PMID:27114974

  11. Neogenesis and proliferation of {beta}-cells induced by human betacellulin gene transduction via retrograde pancreatic duct injection of an adenovirus vector

    SciTech Connect

    Tokui, Yae . E-mail: ytokui@imed2.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kozawa, Junji; Yamagata, Kazuya; Zhang, Jun; Ohmoto, Hiroshi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Okita, Kohei; Iwahashi, Hiromi; Namba, Mitsuyoshi; Shimomura, Iichiro; Miyagawa, Jun-ichiro |

    2006-12-01

    Betacellulin (BTC) has been shown to have a role in the differentiation and proliferation of {beta}-cells both in vitro and in vivo. We administered a human betacellulin (hBTC) adenovirus vector to male ICR mice via retrograde pancreatic duct injection. As a control, we administered a {beta}-galactosidase adenovirus vector. In the mice, hBTC protein was mainly overexpressed by pancreatic duct cells. On immunohistochemical analysis, we observed features of {beta}-cell neogenesis as newly formed insulin-positive cells in the duct cell lining or islet-like cell clusters (ICCs) closely associated with the ducts. The BrdU labeling index of {beta}-cells was also increased by the betacellulin vector compared with that of control mice. These results indicate that hBTC gene transduction into adult pancreatic duct cells promoted {beta}-cell differentiation (mainly from duct cells) and proliferation of pre-existing {beta}-cells, resulting in an increase of the {beta}-cell mass that improved glucose tolerance in diabetic mice.

  12. Expression of area-specific M2-macrophage phenotype by recruited rat monocytes in duct-ligation pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Enqiao; Goto, Mataro; Ueta, Hisashi; Kitazawa, Yusuke; Sawanobori, Yasushi; Kariya, Taro; Sasaki, Masaru; Matsuno, Kenjiro

    2016-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis remains a disease of uncertain pathogenesis and no established specific therapy. Previously, we found a predominant increase and active proliferation of macrophages in the inflamed tissues of a rat duct-ligation pancreatitis model. To analyze the origin and possible role of these macrophages, we investigated their in situ cellular kinetics in a rat model of duct-ligation pancreatitis using a recently established method of multicolor immunostaining for macrophage markers and for proliferating cells with ethynyl deoxyuridine. To detect monocyte-derived macrophages, green fluorescent protein-transgenic (GFP(+)) leukocytes were transferred to monocyte-depleted recipients. In the inflamed pancreas, infiltrating macrophages were mainly two phenotypes, CD68(+)CD163(-) round cells and CD68(+)CD163(+) large polygonal cells, both of which showed active proliferation. In the interlobular area, the proportions of CD68(+)CD163(low) and CD68(+)CD163(high) cells increased over time. Most expressed the M2-macrophage markers CD206 and arginase 1. In contrast, in the interacinar area, CD68(+) cells did not upregulate CD163 and CD206, but ~30 % of them expressed the M1 marker nitric oxide synthase 2 on day 4. GFP(+)-recruited cells were primarily CD68(+)CD163(-) monocytes on day 1 and showed phenotypic changes similar to those of the monocyte non-depleted groups. In conclusion, infiltrating macrophages mostly formed two distinct subpopulations in different areas: monocyte-derived macrophages with the M2 phenotype in the interlobular area or non-M2 phenotype in the interacinar area. Involvement of resident macrophages might be minor in this model. These results are the first demonstration of an upregulated M2 phenotype in rat inflammatory monocytes, which may promote tissue repair. PMID:26860866

  13. Role of Fully Covered Self-Expandable Metal Stent for Treatment of Benign Biliary Strictures and Bile Leaks

    PubMed Central

    Pausawasadi, Nonthalee; Soontornmanokul, Tanassanee

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy by balloon dilation and placement of multiple large-bore plastic stents is the treatment of choice for benign biliary stricture. This approach is effective but it typically requires multiple endoscopic sessions given the short duration of stent patency. The endoscopic approach for treatment of bile leak involves the placement of a stent with or without biliary sphincterotomy. The self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) has traditionally been used for palliation of malignant biliary strictures given the long duration of stent patency owing to their larger stent diameter. Recently, SEMS has been used in a variety of benign biliary strictures and leaks, especially with the design of the covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS), which permits endoscopic-mediated stent removal. The use of CSEMS in benign biliary stricture could potentially result in a decrease in endoscopic sessions and it is technically easier when compared to placement of multiple plastic stents. However, complications such as cholecystitis due to blockage of cystic duct, stent migration, infection and pancreatitis have been reported. The potential subsegmental occlusion of contralateral intrahepatic ducts also limits the use of CSEMS in hilar stricture. Certain techniques and improvement of stent design may overcome these challenges in the future. Thus, CSEMS may be appropriate in only highly selected conditions, such as refractory benign biliary stricture, despite multiple plastic stent placement or difficult to treat bile duct stricture from chronic pancreatitis, and should not be used routinely. This review focuses on the use of fully covered self-expandable metal stent for benign biliary strictures and bile leaks. PMID:22563290

  14. A case of gallbladder cancer combined with ectopic individual opening of pancreatic and bile ducts to the duodenal bulb

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woohyung; Park, Ji-Ho; Kim, Ju-Yeon; Kwag, Seung-Jin; Park, Taejin; Jeong, Sang-Ho; Ju, Young-Tae; Jung, Eun-Jung; Lee, Young-Joon; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Hong, Soon-Chan

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic opening of the pancreatic and bile ducts (EOPBD) into the duodenal bulb is an extremely rare congenital anomaly with unknown clinical implications. We presented a case of gallbladder cancer with EOPBD into the duodenal bulb. A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital with intermittent right upper abdominal pain. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed individual EOPBD into the duodenal bulb with no papillary structure, and a focal nodular lesion in the gallbladder. A follow-up abdominal computed tomography scan 9 months later revealed a slight increase in the size of the fundal nodule, which was suspected as gallbladder cancer. An intraoperative frozen biopsy identified the nodular lesion as adenocarcinoma involving the cystic duct, and the patient underwent radical cholecystectomy including bile duct resection with hepaticojejunostomy. EOPBD is an extremely rare condition that can be associated with gallbladder malignancy as well as benign disease. Clinicians should follow up carefully and consider surgical treatment for suspected malignant lesions. PMID:26379734

  15. Gastro-pancreaticojejunostomy for treatment of pancreatic ductal obstruction in a post-Whipple procedure patient

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Pinto, Eduardo; Grimm, Ian S; Baron, Todd H

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a woman with a medical history of classic Whipple surgery who underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided pancreatic drainage due to smouldering acute pancreatitis secondary to an obstructing pancreatic ductal stone. A gastro-pancreaticojejunostomy anastomosis was created anterogradely, with dilation of both the anastomoses in the same procedure, with subsequent decompression of the pancreatic duct. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) is often impossible to perform in patients with post-Whipple procedure anatomy due to inaccessibility to the pancreaticojejunostomy anastomosis. EUS-guided pancreatic drainage may be offered in these patients in whom the pancreatic duct cannot be accessed at ERP. It has been used as a platform for access to and drainage of the pancreatic duct either by rendezvous or transmural drainage. However, only one of four patients achieve successful completion of the rendezvous procedure. There are limited data regarding safety and long-term outcome of this procedure, as well as scant guidelines on the optimal time for leaving stents in place. We believe definitive endoscopic therapy should be attempted, whenever possible, after relief of obstruction. In our case, we expect that stent occlusion is inevitable and that long-term drainage is possible due to drainage occurring between the stent and the stone. PMID:26697188

  16. [Chronic pancreatitis: nutrition and pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Mössner, J

    1998-11-11

    Therapy of chronic pancreatitis rests on five arms: Avoidance of alcohol, treatment of pain, replacement therapy for exocrine and endocrine insufficiency and adequate nutrition. Alcohol withdrawal improves pain and the patient's compliance. It also seems to retard the chronic inflammatory process. Therapy of pain depends on the pathomechanism of pain. There is a lack of prospective, controlled studies comparing various treatment regimens. Thus, treatment options are partly dependent on the experience of the physician taking care of the patient and include i.e. for pseudocysts: surgical vs percutaneous or endoscopic drainage; for stenosis of the main pancreatic duct close to the papilla: surgical vs endoscopic drainage (stents); for distal bile duct stenosis: endoscopic stents vs biliodigestive anastomosis vs pancreatic head resection; for pancreatic stones: extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy followed by endoscopic stone extraction vs surgery (pancreaticojejunostomy), finally for inflammatory tumor of the pancreatic head combined with pain with or without compression of the distal bile duct or duodenum: duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection vs Whipple resection. Patients with pain resistant to medical treatment may be candidates for a transcutaneous blockade of the plexus coeliacus or for epidural nerve blockade before one choses a surgical procedure. Application of pancreatic enzymes does not seem to have a major beneficial effect on pancreatic pain. Modification of nutrition has become less restrictive. Thanks to improved substitution with acid resistant porcine pancreatic extracts with high lipase activity, fat restriction is no longer of paramount importance. However, supply with sufficient calories is still difficult due to pain, inadequate compliance and hypermetabolism. PMID:9857767

  17. Successful transgastric pancreaticography and endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage of a disconnected pancreatic tail syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Will, Uwe; Fueldner, Frank; Goldmann, Bernhard; Mueller, Anne-Kathrin; Wanzar, Igor; Meyer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: We aim to demonstrate that endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided transgastric pancreaticography/drainage of the pancreatic duct is feasible and successful in healing a persisting pancreaticocutaneous fistula. Methods: By means of a case report, we describe the following alternative therapeutic procedure. A 76-year-old male had: (1) 10 surgical interventions because of necrotizing acute pancreatitis with a persisting pancreaticocutaneous fistula (volume 200–300 ml/day); (2) an unsuccessful attempt of transpapillary drainage (disrupted duct after necrosectomy). He then underwent a EUS-guided transluminal pancreaticography/drainage of the pancreatic duct. A transgastric puncture was performed followed by, insertion of a guide wire into the dilated tail segment, and expansion of the gastropancreaticostomy using a 10-Fr retriever. A 10-Fr Amsterdam prosthesis was then placed through the guide wire. Results: The procedure was both a technical and clinical success as indicated by fistula occlusion and sufficient internal drainage of the pancreatic juice via the gastropancreaticostomy. No severe complications such as bleeding, perforation stent occlusion or migration were observed during the 15-month follow-up. Conclusions: Transgastric pancreaticography and EUS-guided drainage of the enlarged pancreatic duct are elegant and feasible alternative options for the treatment of specific pancreatic lesions such as persisting pancreaticocutaneous fistula (complication after necrotizing pancreatitis), after pancreatic resective surgery, chronic pancreatitis and anomaly of the congenital pancreatic or postoperative gastrointestinal anatomy. Moreover, the procedure may represent a valid tool to avoid surgery and more invasive interventions. PMID:21765865

  18. [Wirsung's duct hemorrhage in chronic pancreatitis. Report of 4 cases and study of the literature].

    PubMed

    Le Neel, J C; Leborgne, J; Heloury, Y; Deret, C; Lavignolle, A; Malvy, P

    1984-11-01

    Hemorrhage from Wirsung's canal complicated chronic pancreatitis in 4 patients. Excision (2 cephalic and 1 corporeocaudal) in 3 cases provided successful results, the 4th patient dying from intraperitoneal rupture of the false cyst responsible for the hemorrhage, during recurrence of the latter after simple ligature. A literature review indicated pancreatic disease, mainly chronic, as the cause in 76.5% of the 64 cases documented. Diagnosis is difficult from clinical findings, and is dependent mainly on results of endoscopy and particularly retrograde catheterization of the papilla, while arteriography is essential for confirmation of the diagnosis and the site of the lesion, and for assisting choice of therapy. When a chronic pancreatitis exists, the only logical attitude is selective excision, mortality being minimal (5%). Embolization could be a valid method for ensuring hemostasis temporarily to allow delayed radical surgery. PMID:6335510

  19. Impact of Sox9 dosage and Hes1-mediated Notch signaling in controlling the plasticity of adult pancreatic duct cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Shinichi; Furuyama, Kenichiro; Horiguchi, Masashi; Aoyama, Yoshiki; Tsuboi, Kunihiko; Sakikubo, Morito; Goto, Toshihiko; Hirata, Koji; Tanabe, Wataru; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Uemoto, Shinji; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya

    2015-01-01

    In the adult pancreas, there has been a long-standing dispute as to whether stem/precursor populations that retain plasticity to differentiate into endocrine or acinar cell types exist in ducts. We previously reported that adult Sox9-expressing duct cells are sufficiently plastic to supply new acinar cells in Sox9-IRES-CreERT2 knock-in mice. In the present study, using Sox9-IRES-CreERT2 knock-in mice as a model, we aimed to analyze how plasticity is controlled in adult ducts. Adult duct cells in these mice express less Sox9 than do wild-type mice but Hes1 equally. Acinar cell differentiation was accelerated by Hes1 inactivation, but suppressed by NICD induction in adult Sox9-expressing cells. Quantitative analyses showed that Sox9 expression increased with the induction of NICD but did not change with Hes1 inactivation, suggesting that Notch regulates Hes1 and Sox9 in parallel. Taken together, these findings suggest that Hes1-mediated Notch activity determines the plasticity of adult pancreatic duct cells and that there may exist a dosage requirement of Sox9 for keeping the duct cell identity in the adult pancreas. In contrast to the extended capability of acinar cell differentiation by Hes1 inactivation, we obtained no evidence of islet neogenesis from Hes1-depleted duct cells in physiological or PDL-induced injured conditions. PMID:25687338

  20. Distal bile duct carcinomas and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas: postulating a common tumor entity.

    PubMed

    Schmuck, Rosa B; de Carvalho-Fischer, Cynthia V; Neumann, Christopher; Pratschke, Johann; Bahra, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    The set definition of distal cholangiocarcinomas and adenocarcinomas of the pancreatic head is challenged by their close anatomical relation, similar growth pattern, and corresponding therapeutic outcome. They show a mutual development during embryologic organ formation and share phenotypic characteristics. This review will highlight the similarities with regard to the common origin of their primary organs, histopathological similarities, and modern clinical management. Thus, we propose to subsume those entities under a common superfamily. PMID:26645826

  1. Non-operative management of a grade IV pancreatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Bharati; Hegde, Nishchit

    2014-01-01

    Isolated pancreatic transection with ductal disruption in blunt abdominal trauma is extremely rare. We report the case of a 14-year-old boy who suffered pancreatic transection at the junction of body and head of the pancreas; yet remarkably recovered after initial conservative management. He was periodically examined clinically and underwent regular abdominal ultrasonography. Nearly 6 months later, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with pancreatic duct stenting, pancreatic sphincterotomy and cystogastrostomy for the pseudocyst diagnosed during the follow-up period was performed. Acute surgical management of pancreatic transection is fraught with high mortality and morbidity. Through this effort, we highlight the successful role of non-operative management of a haemodynamically stable patient with grade IV pancreatic injury, thereby avoiding radical surgery in the acute stage and preserving exocrine and endocrine function. PMID:24788631

  2. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Pancreatitis What is the pancreas? What does it do? T he pancreas is an organ in the ... in maintaining normal blood sugar levels. What is pancreatitis? Pancreatitis is an inflammation, or swelling, of the ...

  3. Effectiveness of endoscopic self-expandable metal stent placement for afferent loop obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer recurrence after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Arata; Shiomi, Hideyuki; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Yagi, Yousuke; Kobayashi, Takashi; Shiomi, Yuuki; Takenaka, Mamoru; Hoshi, Namiko; Arisaka, Yoshifumi; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Azuma, Takeshi

    2015-04-01

    Afferent loop obstruction caused by cancer recurrence after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) can be managed by either surgical or nonsurgical treatment. The general condition of patients with recurrent pancreaticobiliary cancer is often not good enough for them to undergo surgery, so less invasive nonsurgical treatment is desirable. We report a case of a 66-year-old male who had undergone PD for pancreatic head adenocarcinoma 10 months previously and who presented at our hospital with fever and jaundice due to afferent loop obstruction caused by pancreatic cancer recurrence. An endoscopic self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) was placed for afferent loop obstruction without any complications. He quickly recovered after SEMS placement. He retained a good quality of life by receiving chemotherapy until his death due to cancer progression. Our case indicates that this method could be an easy, effective, safe, and less invasive treatment, which may confer a better quality of life for patients with afferent loop obstruction due to cancer recurrence after PD. PMID:25708451

  4. Deep Sequencing of Cancer-Related Genes Revealed GNAS Mutations to Be Associated with Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms and Its Main Pancreatic Duct Dilation

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shinichi; Fukasawa, Mitsuharu; Maekawa, Shinya; Kadokura, Makoto; Miura, Mika; Shindo, Hiroko; Takahashi, Ei; Sato, Tadashi; Enomoto, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background To clarify the genetic mutations associated with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) and IPMN-related pancreatic tumours, we conducted cancer-related gene profiling analyses using pure pancreatic juice and resected pancreatic tissues. Methods Pure pancreatic juice was collected from 152 patients [nine with a normal pancreas, 22 with chronic pancreatitis (CP), 39 with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and 82 with IPMN], and resected tissues from the pancreas were collected from 48 patients (six IPMNs and 42 PDACs). The extracted DNA was amplified by multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting 46 cancer-related genes containing 739 mutational hotspots. The mutations were analysed using a semiconductor-based DNA sequencer. Results Among the 46 cancer-related genes, KRAS and GNAS mutations were most frequently detected in both PDAC and IPMN cases. In pure pancreatic juice, GNAS mutations were detected in 7.7% of PDAC cases and 41.5% of IPMN cases (p<0.001 vs. others). All PDAC cases with GNAS mutations (n?=?3) were accompanied by IPMN. Multivariate analysis revealed that GNAS mutations in IPMN cases were associated with dilated main pancreatic ducts (MPD, p?=?0.016), while no statistically independent associations with clinical variables were observed for KRAS mutations. In the resected pancreatic tissues, GNAS mutations were detected in 50% of PDAC cases concomitant with IPMN, 33.3% of PDAC cases derived from IPMN, and 66.7% of IPMN cases, while no GNAS mutations were detected in cases of PDAC without IPMN. Conclusions The GNAS mutation was specifically found in the cases with IPMN and it was speculated that some PDACs might be influenced by the concomitant but separately-located IPMN in their pathogenic mechanism. Furthermore, the GNAS mutation was significantly associated with MPD dilatation in IPMN cases, suggesting its role in mucus hypersecretion. PMID:24897499

  5. Pneumoperitoneum Caused by Transhepatic Air Leak After Metallic Biliary Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jei Hee; Lee, Deok Hee; Yu, Jeong-Sik; Lee, Se Joon; Kwon, Woo-Cheol; Kim, Ki Whang

    2000-11-15

    A self-expanding metallic biliary stent was placed for palliation of a common bile duct obstruction in a 68-year-old male with unresectable pancreatic head cancer 3 days after initial percutaneous right transhepatic catheter decompression. The stent crossed the ampulla of Vater. Three days later, the stent was balloon-dilated and the percutaneous access was removed. At removal, a small contrast leak from the transhepatic tract was seen. Three days later, pneumoperitoneum was found with symptoms of peritoneal irritation and fever. A widely open sphincter of Oddi caused by the metallic stent, accompanied by delayed sealing of the transhepatic tract, may have caused the air and bile leakage into the peritoneal space. This case shows that pneumoperitoneum may occur without ductal tear or bowel injury, with a biliary stent crossing the ampulla of Vater.

  6. Management of pancreatic fluid collections: A comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tyberg, Amy; Karia, Kunal; Gabr, Moamen; Desai, Amit; Doshi, Rushabh; Gaidhane, Monica; Sharaiha, Reem Z; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-02-21

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) are a frequent complication of pancreatitis. It is important to classify PFCs to guide management. The revised Atlanta criteria classifies PFCs as acute or chronic, with chronic fluid collections subdivided into pseudocysts and walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN). Establishing adequate nutritional support is an essential step in the management of PFCs. Early attempts at oral feeding can be trialed in patients with mild pancreatitis. Enteral feeding should be implemented in patients with moderate to severe pancreatitis. Jejunal feeding remains the preferred route of enteral nutrition. Symptomatic PFCs require drainage; options include surgical, percutaneous, or endoscopic approaches. With the advent of newer and more advanced endoscopic tools and expertise, and an associated reduction in health care costs, minimally invasive endoscopic drainage has become the preferable approach. An endoscopic ultrasonography-guided approach using a seldinger technique is the preferred endoscopic approach. Both plastic stents and metal stents are efficacious and safe; however, metal stents may offer an advantage, especially in infected pseudocysts and in WOPN. Direct endoscopic necrosectomy is often required in WOPN. Lumen apposing metal stents that allow for direct endoscopic necrosectomy and debridement through the stent lumen are preferred in these patients. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography with pancreatic duct (PD) exploration should be performed concurrent to PFC drainage. PD disruption is associated with an increased severity of pancreatitis, an increased risk of recurrent attacks of pancreatitis and long-term complications, and a decreased rate of PFC resolution after drainage. Any pancreatic ductal disruption should be bridged with endoscopic stenting. PMID:26900288

  7. Management of pancreatic fluid collections: A comprehensive review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Tyberg, Amy; Karia, Kunal; Gabr, Moamen; Desai, Amit; Doshi, Rushabh; Gaidhane, Monica; Sharaiha, Reem Z; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) are a frequent complication of pancreatitis. It is important to classify PFCs to guide management. The revised Atlanta criteria classifies PFCs as acute or chronic, with chronic fluid collections subdivided into pseudocysts and walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN). Establishing adequate nutritional support is an essential step in the management of PFCs. Early attempts at oral feeding can be trialed in patients with mild pancreatitis. Enteral feeding should be implemented in patients with moderate to severe pancreatitis. Jejunal feeding remains the preferred route of enteral nutrition. Symptomatic PFCs require drainage; options include surgical, percutaneous, or endoscopic approaches. With the advent of newer and more advanced endoscopic tools and expertise, and an associated reduction in health care costs, minimally invasive endoscopic drainage has become the preferable approach. An endoscopic ultrasonography-guided approach using a seldinger technique is the preferred endoscopic approach. Both plastic stents and metal stents are efficacious and safe; however, metal stents may offer an advantage, especially in infected pseudocysts and in WOPN. Direct endoscopic necrosectomy is often required in WOPN. Lumen apposing metal stents that allow for direct endoscopic necrosectomy and debridement through the stent lumen are preferred in these patients. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography with pancreatic duct (PD) exploration should be performed concurrent to PFC drainage. PD disruption is associated with an increased severity of pancreatitis, an increased risk of recurrent attacks of pancreatitis and long-term complications, and a decreased rate of PFC resolution after drainage. Any pancreatic ductal disruption should be bridged with endoscopic stenting. PMID:26900288

  8. The Crosstalk between Nrf2 and TGF-β1 in the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Pancreatic Duct Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arfmann-Knübel, Sarah; Struck, Birte; Genrich, Geeske; Helm, Ole; Sipos, Bence; Sebens, Susanne; Schäfer, Heiner

    2015-01-01

    Nrf2 and TGF-β1 both affect tumorigenesis in a dual fashion, either by preventing carcinogen induced carcinogenesis and suppressing tumor growth, respectively, or by conferring cytoprotection and invasiveness to tumor cells during malignant transformation. Given the involvement of Nrf2 and TGF-β1 in the adaptation of epithelial cells to persistent inflammatory stress, e.g. of the pancreatic duct epithelium during chronic pancreatitis, a crosstalk between Nrf2 and TGF-β1 can be envisaged. By using premalignant human pancreatic duct cells (HPDE) and the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell line Colo357, we could show that Nrf2 and TGF-β1 independently but additively conferred an invasive phenotype to HPDE cells, whereas acting synergistically in Colo357 cells. This was accompanied by differential regulation of EMT markers like vimentin, Slug, L1CAM and E-cadherin. Nrf2 activation suppressed E-cadherin expression through an as yet unidentified ARE related site in the E-cadherin promoter, attenuated TGF-β1 induced Smad2/3-activity and enhanced JNK-signaling. In Colo357 cells, TGF-β1 itself was capable of inducing Nrf2 whereas in HPDE cells TGF-β1 per-se did not affect Nrf2 activity, but enhanced Nrf2 induction by tBHQ. In Colo357, but not in HPDE cells, the effects of TGF-β1 on invasion were sensitive to Nrf2 knock-down. In both cell lines, E-cadherin re-expression inhibited the proinvasive effect of Nrf2. Thus, the increased invasion of both cell lines relates to the Nrf2-dependent downregulation of E-cadherin expression. In line, immunohistochemistry analysis of human pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias in pancreatic tissues from chronic pancreatitis patients revealed strong Nrf2 activity already in premalignant epithelial duct cells, accompanied by partial loss of E-cadherin expression. Our findings indicate that Nrf2 and TGF-β1 both contribute to malignant transformation through distinct EMT related mechanisms accounting for an invasive phenotype. Provided a crosstalk between both pathways, Nrf2 and TGF-β1 mutually promote their tumorigenic potential, a condition manifesting already at an early stage during inflammation induced carcinogenesis of the pancreas. PMID:26226105

  9. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  10. Biliary hemostasis using an endoscopic plastic stent placement for uncontrolled hemobilia caused by transpapillary forceps biopsy (with video).

    PubMed

    Shinjo, Kunihiro; Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Toru; Kawata, Noboru; Uemura, Sunao; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    A 78-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for the examination and treatment of jaundice. A transpapillary forceps biopsy for a long distal bile duct stricture was performed using endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Immediately after the biopsy, massive bleeding was observed from the orifice of the papilla. Although hemobilia was pulsatile, an endoscopic biliary plastic stent placement was very effective in achieving hemostasis. However, a nasal biliary catheter was required because a blood clot clogged the stent on the following day. Although covered self-expandable metal stent (CSEMS) placement has been reported for achieving endoscopic hemostasis for bleeding, we chose to use a plastic stent to reduce the risk of post-procedure pancreatitis. The placement of both an endoscopic biliary plastic stent and a nasobiliary drainage catheter can be an alternative hemostatic tool to CSEMSs. PMID:26960930

  11. Transcriptional control of tight junction proteins via a protein kinase C signal pathway in human telomerase reverse transcriptase-transfected human pancreatic duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kojima, Takashi; Ito, Tatsuya; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Imamura, Masafumi; Son, Seiichi; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Murata, Masaki; Nagayama, Minoru; Nobuoka, Takayuki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa

    2010-08-01

    In human pancreatic cancer, integral membrane proteins of tight junction claudins are abnormally regulated, making these proteins promising molecular diagnostic and therapeutic targets. However, the regulation of claudin-based tight junctions remains unknown not only in the pancreatic cancer cells but also in normal human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE) cells. To investigate the regulation of tight junction molecules including claudins in normal HPDE cells, we introduced the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene into HPDE cells in primary culture. The hTERT-transfected HPDE (hTERT-HPDE) cells were positive for the pancreatic duct epithelial markers such as CK7, CK19, and carbonic anhydrase isozyme 2 and expressed epithelial tight junction molecules claudin-1, -4, -7 and, -18, occludin, JAM-A, ZO-1, ZO-2, and tricellulin. By treatment with fetal bovine serum or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), the tight junction molecules were up-regulated at the transcriptional level via a protein kinase C (PKC) signal pathway. A PKC-alpha inhibitor, Gö6976, prevented up-regulation of claudin-4 by TPA. Furthermore, a PKC-delta inhibitor, rottlerin, prevented up-regulation of claudin-7, occludin, ZO-1, and ZO-2 by TPA. By GeneChip analysis, up-regulation of the transcription factor ELF3 was observed in both fetal bovine serum- and TPA-treated cells. Treatment with small interfering RNAs of ELF3 prevented up-regulation of claudin-7 by TPA. These data suggest that tight junctions of normal HPDE cells were at least in part regulated via a PKC signal pathway by transcriptional control. PMID:20566751

  12. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation for Clearance of Occluded Metal Stent in Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Madhava; Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina; Doros, Attila; Quaretti, Pietro; Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina; Habib, Nagy

    2013-07-11

    PurposeThe major complication occurring with biliary stents is stent occlusion, frequently seen because of tumour in-growth, epithelial hyperplasia, and sludge deposits, resulting in recurrent jaundice and cholangitis. We report a prospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency (RF) ablation to clear the blocked metal stents in patients with malignant biliary obstruction using a novel bipolar RF catheter.MethodsNine patients with malignant biliary obstruction and blocked metal stents were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary RF ablation through the blocked metal stent following external biliary decompression with an internal–external biliary drainage.ResultsAll nine patients had their stent patency restored successfully without the use of secondary stents. Following this intervention, there was no 30-day mortality, haemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the nine patients, six are alive and three patients are dead with a median follow-up of 122 (range 50–488) days and a median stent patency of 102.5 (range 50–321) days. Six patients had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. Three patients with stent blockage at 321, 290, and 65 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and repeat ablation.ConclusionsIn this selective group of patients, it appears that this new approach is safe and feasible. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  13. Transjugular Insertion of Biliary Stents (TIBS) in Two Patients with Malignant Obstruction, Ascites, and Coagulopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Amygdalos, Michael A.; Haskal, Ziv J.; Cope, Constantin; Kadish, Steven L.; Long, William B.

    1996-03-15

    Two patients with pancreatic malignancies presented with biliary obstruction which could not be treated from an endoscopic approach. Standard transhepatic biliary drainage was relatively contraindicated because of moderate ascites and coagulopathy related to underlying liver disease. In one patient, a transjugular, transvenous approach was used to deliver a Wallstent endoprosthesis across the distal common bile duct obstruction in a single step procedure. In the second case, a previously placed biliary Wallstent was revised with an additional stent from a similar approach. Transjugular biliary catheterization offers a valuable alternative approach for primary stent placement or revision in patients with contraindication to standard transhepatic drainage.

  14. Spontaneous common bile duct perforation due to chronic pancreatitis, presenting as a huge cystic retroperitoneal mass: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ya?ar, Bekir; Kebap?, Mahmut

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous perforation of the bile duct, is a disease in which spontaneous perforation occurs in the wall of the extrahepatic or intrahepatic duct without any traumatic or iatrogenic injury and more often described in neonates. In this report, we present a 38-year-old female patient who underwent surgery due to an intraabdominal cystic mass. The diagnosis of spontaneous rupture of the common bile duct and huge retroperitoneal biloma was made by intraoperative abdominal exploration. The biloma was drained, ruptured portion of the common bile duct was primarily repaired over a T-tube. PMID:19918569

  15. Surgical Injury to the Mouse Pancreas through Ligation of the Pancreatic Duct as a Model for Endocrine and Exocrine Reprogramming and Proliferation.

    PubMed

    De Groef, Sofie; Leuckx, Gunter; Van Gassen, Naomi; Staels, Willem; Cai, Ying; Yuchi, Yixing; Coppens, Violette; De Leu, Nico; Heremans, Yves; Baeyens, Luc; Van de Casteele, Mark; Heimberg, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of pancreatic beta cells in vivo or ex vivo, or generation of beta cells by differentiation from an embryonic or adult stem cell, can provide new expandable sources of beta cells to alleviate the donor scarcity in human islet transplantation as therapy for diabetes. Although recent advances have been made towards this aim, mechanisms that regulate beta cell expansion and differentiation from a stem/progenitor cell remain to be characterized. Here, we describe a protocol for an injury model in the adult mouse pancreas that can function as a tool to study mechanisms of tissue remodeling and beta cell proliferation and differentiation. Partial duct ligation (PDL) is an experimentally induced injury of the rodent pancreas involving surgical ligation of the main pancreatic duct resulting in an obstruction of drainage of exocrine products out of the tail region of the pancreas. The inflicted damage induces acinar atrophy, immune cell infiltration and severe tissue remodeling. We have previously reported the activation of Neurogenin (Ngn) 3 expressing endogenous progenitor-like cells and an increase in beta cell proliferation after PDL. Therefore, PDL provides a basis to study signals involved in beta cell dynamics and the properties of an endocrine progenitor in adult pancreas. Since, it still remains largely unclear, which factors and pathways contribute to beta cell neogenesis and proliferation in PDL, a standardized protocol for PDL will allow for comparison across laboratories. PMID:26273954

  16. Pancreatic Exocrine Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... exocrine tumors. These tumors start in the exocrine cells of the pancreas. The following table describes the most common pancreatic exocrine tumors. TYPE DESCRIPTION Adenocarcinoma ... in the cells lining the pancreatic duct. Acinar Cell Carcinoma Acinar ...

  17. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26199449

  18. Dasatinib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride Alone in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-29

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  19. Analysis of risk factors for postoperative pancreatic fistula following pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi-Yu; Zhang, Wen-Zhi; Xia, Hong-Tian; Leng, Jian-Jun; Wan, Tao; Liang, Bin; Yang, Tao; Dong, Jia-Hong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore the morbidity and risk factors of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) following pancreaticoduodenectomy. METHODS: The data from 196 consecutive patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy, performed by different surgeons, in the General Hospital of the People’s Liberation Army between January 1st, 2013 and December 31st, 2013 were retrospectively collected for analysis. The diagnoses of POPF and clinically relevant (CR)-POPF following pancreaticoduodenectomy were judged strictly by the International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula Definition. Univariate analysis was performed to analyze the following factors: patient age, sex, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, serum CA19-9 level, history of jaundice, serum albumin level, blood loss volume, pancreatic duct diameter, pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, pancreatic drainage and pancreaticojejunostomy. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the main independent risk factors for POPF. RESULTS: POPF occurred in 126 (64.3%) of the patients, and the incidence of CR-POPF was 32.7% (64/196). Patient characteristics of age, sex, BMI, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, serum CA19-9 level, history of jaundice, serum albumin level, blood loss volume, pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy and pancreaticojejunostomy showed no statistical difference related to the morbidity of POPF or CR-POPF. Pancreatic duct diameter was found to be significantly correlated with POPF rates by univariate analysis and multivariate regression analysis, with a pancreatic duct diameter ≤ 3 mm being an independent risk factor for POPF (OR = 0.291; P = 0.000) and CR-POPF (OR = 0.399; P = 0.004). The CR-POPF rate was higher in patients without external pancreatic stenting, which was found to be an independent risk factor for CR-POPF (OR = 0.394; P = 0.012). Among the entire patient series, there were three postoperative deaths, giving a total mortality rate of 1.5% (3/196), and the mortality associated with pancreatic fistula was 2.4% (3/126). CONCLUSION: A pancreatic duct diameter ≤ 3 mm is an independent risk factor for POPF. External stent drainage of pancreatic secretion may reduce CR-POPF mortality and POPF severity. PMID:25516663

  20. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the bile duct with gastric and duodenal fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Man Yong; Yu, Dong Wook; Hong, Seung Goun

    2014-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) of the bile duct is still rare and not yet understood despite of its increased incidence and similar clinicopathologic characteristics compared with IPMN of the pancreas. The fistula formation into other organs can occur in IPMN, especially the pancreatic type. To our knowledge, only two cases of IPMN of the bile duct with a choledochoduodenal fistula were reported and we have recently experienced a case of IPMN of the bile duct penetrating into two neighboring organs of the stomach and duodenum presenting with abdominal pain and jaundice. Endoscopy showed thick mucin extruding from two openings of the fistulas. Endoscopic suction of thick mucin using direct peroral cholangioscopy with ultra-slim endoscope through choledochoduodenal fistula was very difficult and ineffective because of very thick mucin and next endoscopic suction through the stent after prior insertion of biliary metal stent into choledochogastric fistula also failed. Pathologic specimen obtained from the proximal portion of the choledochogastric fistula near left intrahepatic bile duct through the metal stent showed a low grade adenoma. The patient declined the surgical treatment due to her old age and her abdominal pain with jaundice was improved after percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage with the irrigation of N-acetylcysteine three times daily for 10 d. PMID:25031793

  1. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Bilio-pancreatic Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Giovannini, Marc; Bories, Erwan; Téllez-Ávila, Félix I.

    2012-01-01

    The echoendoscopic biliary drainage is an option to treat obstructive jaundices when endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) drainage fails. These procedures compose alternative methods to the side of surgery and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, and it was only possible by the continuous development and improvement of echoendoscopes and accessories. The development of linear sectorial array echoendoscopes in early 1990 brought a new approach to diagnostic and therapeutic dimension on echoendoscopy capabilities, opening the possibility to perform punction over direct ultrasonografic view. Despite of the high success rate and low morbidity of biliary drainage obtained by ERCP, difficulty could be found at the presence of stent tumor ingrown, tumor gut compression, periampullary diverticula and anatomic variation. The echoendoscopic technique starts performing punction and contrast of the left biliary tree. When performed from gastric wall, the access is made through hepatic segment III. From duodenum, direct common bile duct punction. Diathermic dilatation of the puncturing tract is required using a 6-Fr cystostome and a plastic or metal stent is introducted. The techincal success of hepaticogastrostomy is near 98%, and complications are present in 20%: pneumoperitoneum, choleperitoneum, infection and stent disfunction. To prevent bile leakage, we have used the 2-stent techniques. The first stent introduced was a long uncovered metal stent (8 or 10 cm) and inside this first stent a second fully covered stent of 6 cm was delivered to bridge the bile duct and the stomach. Choledochoduodenostomy overall success rate is 92%, and described complications include, in frequency order, pneumoperitoneum and focal bile peritonitis, present in 14%. By the last 10 years, the technique was especially performed in reference centers, by ERCP experienced groups, and this seems to be a general guideline to safer procedure execution. The ideal approach for pancreatic pseudocyst (PPC) puncture combines endos-copy with real time endosonography using an interventional echoendoscope. Several authors have described the use of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) longitudinal scanners for guidance of transmural puncture and drainage procedures. The same technique could be used to access a dilated pancreatic duct in cases in which the duct cannot be drained by conventional ERCP because of complete obstruction. PMID:24949349

  2. Surgical success rate comparison in functional nasolacrimal duct obstruction: simple lacrimal stent versus endoscopic versus external dacryocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Kyung; Paik, Ji-Sun; Yang, Suk-Woo

    2013-02-01

    Silicone tube intubation (STI) has been known as a standard treatment modality with functional nasolacrimal duct obstruction (FNDO). Recently, dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) is suggested for FNDO treatment. However, there are no data for comparison according to the surgical types in FNDO patients. This study aimed to compare success rates of three different lacrimal drainage surgeries in FNDO patients. Consecutive patients (153 eyes) who were treated with surgical intervention due to FNDO were analyzed. Patients were divided into three groups according to the type of surgery undertaken: STI, endoscopic DCR (Endo-DCR), and external DCR (Ext-DCR). Symptomatic improvements in epiphora were evaluated using the following scoring system: 1, complete resolution (indicative of success); 2, partial resolution; and 3, no resolution or worsening of the condition. At months 3 and 6, the Endo-DCR group had the highest success rate (84.4 and 81.3 %), but there were no statistically significant differences in epiphora scoring among the patients. Epiphora was significantly improved after surgery by week 2 in the Endo-DCR group (p = 0.0339) and by week 3 in the STI group (p = 0.0161). There were no patients in the Endo- or Ext-DCR group with a score of 3 at month 6, but 4 of 6 (3.7 %) in the STI group had score of 3 at month 6 and underwent additional DCR for epiphora. Our results suggest that Endo-DCR offers the highest success rates in FNDO treatments in terms of the rapid and complete resolution of epiphora. PMID:22566177

  3. Severe complications with irreversible electroporation of the pancreas in the presence of a metallic stent: a warning of a procedure that never should be performed.

    PubMed

    Månsson, Christopher; Nilsson, Anders; Karlson, Britt-Marie

    2014-12-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an ablation technique that is being investigated as a potential treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, many of these patients have a metallic stent in the bile duct, which is recognized as a contraindication for IRE ablation. We report a case in which an IRE ablation in the region of the pancreatic head was performed on a patient with a metallic stent which led to severe complications. After the treatment, the patient suffered from several complications including perforation of the duodenum and transverse colon, and bleeding from a branch of the superior mesenteric artery which eventually lead to her death. Therefore, we believe it is important to be aware of this if an IRE ablation close to a metallic stent is considered. PMID:25535573

  4. Severe complications with irreversible electroporation of the pancreas in the presence of a metallic stent: a warning of a procedure that never should be performed

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Anders; Karlson, Britt-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is an ablation technique that is being investigated as a potential treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, many of these patients have a metallic stent in the bile duct, which is recognized as a contraindication for IRE ablation. We report a case in which an IRE ablation in the region of the pancreatic head was performed on a patient with a metallic stent which led to severe complications. After the treatment, the patient suffered from several complications including perforation of the duodenum and transverse colon, and bleeding from a branch of the superior mesenteric artery which eventually lead to her death. Therefore, we believe it is important to be aware of this if an IRE ablation close to a metallic stent is considered. PMID:25535573

  5. Characterization of intraductal papillary neoplasm of bile duct with respect to histopathologic similarities to pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Nakanuma, Yasuni; Kakuda, Yuko; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Miyata, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Fukumura, Yuki; Sato, Yasunori; Sasaki, Motoko; Harada, Kenichi; Takase, Masaru

    2016-05-01

    Intraductal papillary neoplasm of bile duct (IPNB) is a papillary tumor covered by well-differentiated neoplastic epithelium with fine fibrovascular cores in the dilated bile ducts. It reportedly shows similarities to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of pancreas (IPMN), to various degrees. Herein, IPNB was pathologically analyzed by classifying 52 cases into 4 groups based on the histopathologic similarities to IPMN: group A (identical to IPMN, 19 cases), group B (similar to but slightly different from IPMN, 18 cases), group C (vaguely similar to IPMN, 5 cases), and group D (different from IPMN, 10 cases). In group A, intrahepatic and perihilar regions were mainly affected, most cases were of low/intermediate or high grade without invasion, and gastric type was the most common phenotype, followed by oncocytic and intestinal types. In groups C and D, perihilar and distal bile ducts were affected, almost all cases were of high grade with invasion, and most of them were of intestinal and pancreatobiliary phenotypes. Most group B cases were of intestinal phenotype, and all were of high grade with or without invasion. In conclusion, these 4 groups of IPNB showed unique pathologic features and behaviors. Group A cases were less aggressive and shared many features with IPMN, whereas group C and D cases were more aggressive and mainly found in perihilar and distal bile ducts. Group B resembling IPMN was intermediate between them. This classification may be useful in clinical practice and holds promise for a novel approach to analyze IPNB tumorigenesis. PMID:27067788

  6. Pancreatic Lesion: Malignancy or Abscess?

    PubMed

    Shulik, Oleg; Cavanagh, Yana; Grossman, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pancreatic abscesses are rare. They may be seen in patients with pancreatic inflammation or pancreatitis. Patients with pancreatic abscesses may have abdominal pain, fever, chills, and nausea/vomiting or an inability to eat. Presentation with alternate symptomatology is extremely unusual. CASE REPORT A 67-year-old Asian male presented with painless, afebrile obstructive jaundice and a CA 19-9 of 1732 IU. He was found to have a 3.1×2.4 cm low-density lesion in the head of the pancreas and the right lobe of the liver, suggesting malignancy. Surgical management was considered, however additional diagnostic workup, including an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), was performed to complete staging of the presumed mass. A smooth, 3-cm-long, tapering stricture was found it the common bile duct. It was stented from the common hepatic duct to the duodenum. Subsequent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) evaluation of the pancreatic head lesion revealed a drainable fluid collection that was aspirated and found to contain pyogenic material on pathology. The patient's symptoms resolved, and he was subsequently managed conservatively. A repeat ERCP confirmed complete resolution of the previously visualized cystic lesion. Interestingly, laboratory values showed concomitant normalization of CA 19-9 to 40 IU. CONCLUSIONS EUS-guided biopsy is not widely regarded as a required step before surgery, in the management of patients with pancreatic masses. It is generally reserved for determination of resectability or staging, and only utilized when clinically indicated. However, this practice may be associated with an inherently significant risk of misdiagnosis and subsequent unnecessary surgery, as illustrated by this case. Malignancy was initially suspected in our patient and surgical resection was recommended. Endoscopic measures were only pursued to complete staging. We propose that EUS-guided biopsy may be a crucial diagnostic step in the management algorithm of pancreatic lesions in selected patients. In addition, we encourage consideration of nonmalignant pancreatic collections in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic masses, especially when present in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:27188399

  7. One-step endosonography-guided drainage of a pancreatic pseudocyst: a new technique of stent delivery through the echo endoscope.

    PubMed

    Vilmann, P; Hancke, S; Pless, T; Schell-Hincke, J D; Henriksen, F W

    1998-10-01

    We report here the first case of a one-step endosonography(EUS)-guided pseudocyst drainage. A prototype large channel curved array echo endoscope (Pentax FG-38 UX) and a prototype delivery system for placement of an endoprosthesis was used for the procedure. The delivery system (GIP MedicinTechnik GmbH/Medi-Globe Corporation) consists of a handle part with a piston, a metal ring sheath, a plastic catheter with a diathermy needle and a double pigtail endoprosthesis (8.5 Fr). When mounted on the endoscope the endoprosthesis can be advanced out of the distal end of the endoscope. The introduction of the stent as well as the stent release can be monitored entirely by ultrasound. The procedure was tested in a 76-year-old woman with a pseudocyst measuring 60 mm in diameter located in the tail of the pancreas. The procedure was well tolerated by the patient, and there were no procedural complications. The advantage of a large channel echo endoscope and our new prototype delivery system is that the endoprosthesis can be inserted in to a pancreatic cyst guided exclusively by EUS without exchange of endoscopes, catheters or guide wires. Further studies are warranted. PMID:9865567

  8. Palliative Portal Vein Stent Placement in Malignant and Symptomatic Extrinsic Portal Vein Stenosis or Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Novellas, Sebastien; Denys, Alban Bize, Pierre; Brunner, Philippe; Motamedi, Jean Paul; Gugenheim, Jean; Caroli, Francois-Xavier; Chevallier, Patrick

    2009-05-15

    This article evaluates the results of portal vein (PV) stent placement in patients with malignant extrinsic lesions stenosing or obstructing the PV and causing symptomatic PV hypertension (PVHT). Fourteen patients with bile duct cancer (n = 7), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 4), or another cancer (n = 3) underwent percutaneous transhepatic portal venous stent placement because of gastroesophageal or jejunal varices (n = 9), ascites (n = 7), and/or thrombocytopenia (n = 2). Concurrent tumoral obstruction of the main bile duct was treated via the transhepatic route in the same session in four patients. Changes in portal venous pressure, complications, stent patency, and survival were evaluated. Mean {+-} standard deviation (SD) gradient of portal venous pressure decreased significantly immediately after stent placement from 11.2 mmHg {+-} 4.6 to 1.1 mmHg {+-} 1.0 (P < 0.00001). Three patients had minor complications, and one developed a liver abscess. During a mean {+-} SD follow-up of 134.4 {+-} 123.3 days, portal stents remained patent in 11 patients (78.6%); stent occlusion occurred in 3 patients, 2 of whom had undergone previous major hepatectomy. After stent placement, PVHT symptoms were relieved in four (57.1%) of seven patients who died (mean survival, 97 {+-} 71.2 days), and relieved in six (85.7%) of seven patients still alive at the end of follow-up (mean follow-up, 171.7 {+-} 153.5 days). Stent placement in the PV is feasible and relatively safe. It helped to relieve PVHT symptoms in a single session.

  9. Preoperative Diagnostic Angiogram and Endovascular Aortic Stent Placement for Appleby Resection Candidates: A Novel Surgical Technique in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Trabulsi, N.; Pelletier, J. S.; Abraham, C.; Vanounou, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the body and tail usually presents late and is typically unresectable. The modified Appleby procedure allows resection of pancreatic body carcinoma with celiac axis (CA) invasion. Given that the feasibility of this technique is based on the presence of collateral circulation, it is crucial to confirm the presence of an anatomical and functional collateral system. Methods. We here describe a novel technique used in two patients who were candidates for Appleby resection. We present their clinical scenario, imaging, operative findings, and postoperative course. Results. Both patients had a preoperative angiogram for assessment of anatomical circulation and placement of an endovascular stent to cover the CA. We hypothesize that this new technique allows enhancement of collateral circulation and helps minimize intraoperative blood loss when transecting the CA at its takeoff. Moreover, extra length on the CA margin may be gained, as the artery can be transected at its origin without the need for vascular clamp placement. Conclusion. We propose this novel technique in the preoperative management of patients who are undergoing a modified Appleby procedure. While further experience with this technique is required, we believe that it confers significant advantages to the current standard of care. PMID:26491217

  10. Gastrointestinal Stent Update

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The use of self-expanding metallic stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract, placed under radiologic imaging or endoscopic guidance, is the current treatment of choice for the palliation of malignant gastrointestinal outlet obstructions. Advances in metallic stent design and delivery systems have progressed to the stage where this treatment is now considered a minimally invasive therapy. Metallic stent placement will broaden further into the field of nonsurgical therapy for the gastrointestinal tract. To date, metallic stents placed in the esophagus, gastric outlet, colorectum, and bile ducts are not intended to be curative, but rather to provide a palliative treatment for obstructions. The evolution of metallic stent technology will render such procedures not only palliative but also therapeutic, by enabling local drug delivery, and the use of biodegradable materials will reduce procedure-related complications. PMID:21103290

  11. Transcatheter Closure of a Chronic Iatrogenic Arteriovenous Fistula Between the Carotid Artery and the Brachiocephalic Vein with an Amplatzer Duct Occluder in Combination with a Carotid Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Stasek, Josef; Lojik, Miroslav; Bis, Josef; Horak, David; Dusek, Jaroslav; Brtko, Miroslav; Polansky, Pavel; Babu, Anush; Vojacek, Jan

    2009-05-15

    We report an original method of transcatheter closure of an arteriovenous fistula using the combination of an Amplatzer PDA occluder and a carotid stent. The fistula was between the left carotid artery and the brachiocephalic vein. The patient had significant left-to-right shunt and was highly symptomatic. Due to the large orifice and pseudoaneurysmatic enlargement of the fistula, we had to use a large Amplatzer PDA occluder and the protruding part of the PDA device disk had to be covered with a carotid stent. The fistula was completely closed. The patient stopped having symptoms and, 2 years after the procedure, the effect persists.

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage for right hepatic bile duct obstruction: novel technical tips.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Takeshi; Sano, Tatsushi; Onda, Saori; Imoto, Akira; Masuda, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Kitano, Masayuki; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Inoue, Takuya; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) is not normally indicated for an obstructed right intrahepatic bile duct (IHBD). The technical feasibility and clinical efficacy of a novel technique of EUS-BD for right IHBD obstruction were evaluated. A total of 11 patients underwent drainage using either a left or a right biliary access route. The causes of obstructive jaundice were cholangiocarcinoma (n = 6), pancreatic cancer (n = 3), gastric cancer (n = 1), and colon cancer (n = 1). After placement of an uncovered metal stent to bridge the obstruction, a hepaticogastrostomy was completed using a covered stent. Mean procedure time was 33.9 ± 10.0 minutes. Technical and functional success were achieved in all patients, and no adverse events occurred. This novel method appears to be safe and effective for right IHBD obstruction. PMID:25264761

  13. Selective biliary cannulation techniques for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures and prevention of post- endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Shuntaro; Itoi, Takao

    2016-06-01

    Numerous endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) techniques have been reported to achieve selective biliary cannulation success. For standard biliary cannulation procedures, the wire-guided cannulation technique has been reported to reduce the rate of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) and increase the biliary cannulation success rate, although conflicting reports exist. The pancreatic or double-guidewire technique and several precut techniques have been reported as useful techniques in difficult biliary cannulation cases. Although ERCP is a useful endoscopic procedure, the risk of adverse events, particularly post-ERCP pancreatitis, is inevitable. Previous studies and analyses have revealed the risk factors for PEP. The efficacy of prophylactic pancreatic duct stent placement and the administration of rectal nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for preventing PEP has also been reported. Herein, we reviewed reports in the literature regarding the current status of selective biliary cannulation techniques and PEP prevention. PMID:26782710

  14. Combined use of videoendoscopy and X-ray imaging for improved monitoring of stenting application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cysewska-Sobusiak, A. R.; Sowier, A.; Skrzywanek, P.

    2005-09-01

    The subject of this paper concerns advanced techniques of procedures and imaging used in minimally invasive surgery and in non-operable cases of the alimentary tract tumor therapy. Examples of videoendoscopy and X-ray imaging used for the application of stents (prostheses) and catheters allowing for the performance of diagnostic and endo-therapeutic procedures are described. The possibility was indicated to elaborate a new method of proceeding in tumor therapy in the patients for whom the methods used so far were ineffective. In the paper examples of combined imaging the application of metallic stents and plastic catheters allowing for the performance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are presented. The cases shown refer to tumor located in the esophagus and in the bile and pancreatic ducts.

  15. Surgical Success in Chronic Pancreatitis: Sequential Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography and Surgical Longitudinal Pancreatojejunostomy (Puestow Procedure).

    PubMed

    Ford, Kathryn; Paul, Anu; Harrison, Phillip; Davenport, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Chronic pancreatitis (CP) can be a cause of recurrent, severe, disabling abdominal pain in children. Surgery has been suggested as a useful therapy, although experience is limited and the results unpredictable. We reviewed our experience of a two-stage protocol-preliminary endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and duct stenting, and if symptoms resolved, definitive surgical decompression by longitudinal pancreatojejunostomy (LPJ) (Puestow operation). Patients and Methods This is a single-center, retrospective review of children with established CP who underwent an LPJ between February 2002 and September 2012. A questionnaire was completed (incorporating visual analog scale pain and lifestyle scores) to assess functional outcome. Data are expressed as median (range). Results In this study, eight (M:F ratio of 4:4) children underwent an LPJ and one female child had a more limited pancreatojejunostomy anastomosis following preliminary ERCP and stent placement where possible. Diagnoses included hereditary pancreatitis (n = 3), idiopathic or structural pancreatitis (n = 5), and duct stricture following radiotherapy (n = 1). Median duct diameter presurgery was 5 (4-11) mm. Endoscopic placement of a Zimmon pancreatic stent was possible in six with relief of symptoms in all. Median age at definitive surgery was 11 (range, 7-17) years with a median postoperative stay of 9 (range, 7-12) days and a follow-up of 6 (range, 0.5-12) years. All children reported markedly reduced episodes of pain postprocedure. One developed diabetes mellitus, while three had exocrine deficiency (fecal elastase < 200 µg/g) requiring enzyme supplementation. The child with limited LPJ had symptomatic recurrence and required restenting and further surgery to widen the anastomosis to become pain free. Conclusion ERCP and stenting provide a therapeutic trial to assess possible benefit of a definitive duct drainage procedure. LPJ-the modified Puestow operation was safe and complication-free with good medium-term relief of symptoms. We were not able to identify a consistent etiology-associated outcome. PMID:25988745

  16. Lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J. , Benett

    1994-01-01

    A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic.

  17. Lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, R.J.; Benett, W.J.

    1994-04-26

    A lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of front surface lensing and reflective waveguiding is described. The duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side being lens-shaped and coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The four side surfaces are uncoated, preventing light from escaping by total internal reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials, and can be fabricated from inexpensive glass and plastic. 3 figures.

  18. 100 consecutive common duct explorations without mortality.

    PubMed

    Pappas, T N; Slimane, T B; Brooks, D C

    1990-03-01

    It has been suggested that the incidence of morbidity and mortality after common duct exploration no longer justifies its use in patients with a gallbladder in situ. Therefore endoscopic sphincterotomy has been advocated for removal of common duct stones before cholecystectomy in selected patients. The purpose of this study was to determine our current rate of retained common duct stones and the morbidity and mortality rates associated with common duct exploration. Charts of 100 consecutive patients who underwent cholecystectomy and common duct exploration from January 1982 through December 1986 were reviewed. Indications for duct exploration included jaundice, dilated common bile duct, gallstone pancreatitis, multiple small stones, and abnormal intraoperative cholangiogram. Common duct exploration was done by manual technique or choledochoscopy, as determined by the surgeon's preference. Only two patients required duodenotomy for extraction of difficult stones. There were no deaths in this series of consecutive common duct exploration. The total morbidity rate was 15.7%, which included a 5.3% incidence of retained common duct stones. There was a 7.4% major complication rate, including deep vein thrombosis, bleeding gastric ulcer, and pneumonia. The remaining complications were minor and did not prolong hospitalization. There was one wound infection and no postoperative pancreatitis. None of the complications were directly attributable to choledochotomy or duct exploration. All retained common duct stones were removed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or by angiographic basket and did not require reoperation. It is concluded that operative common duct exploration not requiring duodenotomy is safe and does not appreciably increase the incidence of complications after cholecystectomy. Endoscopic sphincterotomy continues to be the preferable alternative to operative common duct exploration for patients with retained common duct stones. PMID:2310236

  19. Alisertib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-20

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. Current status of endotherapy for chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kwek, Andrew Boon Eu; Ang, Tiing Leong; Maydeo, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is associated with varied morphological complications, including intraductal stones, main pancreatic ductal strictures, distal biliary strictures and pseudocysts. Endoscopic therapy provides a less invasive alternative to surgery. In addition, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy improves the success rate of endoscopic clearance of intraductal stones. However, recent data from randomised trials have shown better long-term outcomes with surgical drainage for obstructive pancreatic ductal disease. In patients with distal biliary strictures, stent insertion leads to good immediate drainage, but after stent removal, recurrent narrowing is common. Endoscopic drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts has excellent outcome and should be accompanied by pancreatic ductal stenting when a ductal communication is evident. In those who remain symptomatic, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided coeliac plexus block may provide effective but short-term pain relief. In this review, we present the current evidence for the role of endotherapy in the management of patients with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25630314

  1. Current status of endotherapy for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kwek, Andrew Boon Eu; Ang, Tiing Leong; Maydeo, Amit

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is associated with varied morphological complications, including intraductal stones, main pancreatic ductal strictures, distal biliary strictures and pseudocysts. Endoscopic therapy provides a less invasive alternative to surgery. In addition, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy improves the success rate of endoscopic clearance of intraductal stones. However, recent data from randomised trials have shown better long-term outcomes with surgical drainage for obstructive pancreatic ductal disease. In patients with distal biliary strictures, stent insertion leads to good immediate drainage, but after stent removal, recurrent narrowing is common. Endoscopic drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts has excellent outcome and should be accompanied by pancreatic ductal stenting when a ductal communication is evident. In those who remain symptomatic, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided coeliac plexus block may provide effective but short-term pain relief. In this review, we present the current evidence for the role of endotherapy in the management of patients with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25630314

  2. Role of stents and laser therapy in biliary strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    The most frequent primary cancers causing malignant obstructive jaundice were pancreatic cancer (57%), hilar biliary cancer (19% including metastatic disease), nonhilar biliary cancer (14%) and papillary cancer (10%). Endoscopic stenting has widely replaced palliative surgery for malignant biliary obstruction because of its lower risk and cost. Self-expandable metal stents are the preferred mode of palliation for hilar malignancies. Plastic stents have a major role in benign biliary strictures. Major complications and disadvantages associated with metallic stents include high cost, cholangitis. malposition, migration, unextractability, and breakage of the stents, pancreatitis and stent dysfunction. Dysfunction due to tumor ingrowth can be relieved by thermal methods (argon plasma coagulator therapy). We present a concise review of the efficacy of metallic stents for palliation of malignant strictures.

  3. Endoscopic extra-cavitary drainage of pancreatic necrosis with fully covered self-expanding metal stents (fcSEMS) and staged lavage with a high-flow water jet system

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ioana B.; Gutierrez, Juan P.; Ramesh, Jayapal; Wilcox, C. Mel; Mönkemüller, Klaus E.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To present a novel, less-invasive method of endoscopic drainage (ED) for walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WON).We describe the feasibility, success rate, and complications of combined ED extra-cavitary lavage and debridement of WON using a biliary catheter and high-flow water jet system (water pump). Patients and methods: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage was performed with insertion of two 7-Fr, 4-cm double pigtail stents. Subsequently a fully covered self-expanding metal stent (fcSEMS) was placed. The key aspect of the debridement was the insertion of a 5-Fr biliary catheter through or along the fcSEMS into the cavity, with ensuing saline lavage using a high-flow water jet system. The patients were then brought back for repeated, planned endoscopic lavages of the WON. No endoscopic intra-cavitary exploration was performed. Results: A total of 17 patients (15 men, 2 women; mean age 52.6, range 24 – 69; mean American Society of Anesthesiologists [ASA] score of 3) underwent ED of WON with this new method. The mean initial WON diameter was 9.5 cm, range 8 to 26 cm. The total number of ED was 84, range 2 to 13. The mean stenting period was 42.5 days. The mean follow-up was 51 days, range 3 to 370. A resolution of the WON was achieved in 14 patients (82.3 %). There were no major complications associated with this method. Conclusion: ED of complex WON with fcSEMS followed by repeated endoscopic extra-cavitary lavage and debridement using a biliary catheter and high-flow water jet system is a minimally invasive, feasible method with high technical and clinical success and minimal complications. PMID:26135660

  4. Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement in People with Cystic Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... utrition Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement In People With Cystic Fibrosis T he pancreas is a gland in the ... through a small duct, or passageway. In cystic fibrosis (CF), the ducts in the pan- creas become ...

  5. Receptor strategies in pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Grendell, J. H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of receptors on pancreatic acinar and duct cells regulate both pancreatic exocrine secretion and intracellular processes. These receptors are potential sites of action for therapeutic agents in the treatment of pancreatitis. Cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonists, which may reduce the level of metabolic "stress" on acinar cells, have been shown to mitigate the severity of acute pancreatitis in a number of models. Not all studies have shown a benefit, however, and differences may exist between different structural classes of antagonists. Because increased pancreatic stimulation due to loss of feedback inhibition of CCK has been proposed to contribute to the pain of some patients with chronic pancreatitis, CCK receptor antagonists could also be of benefit in this setting. Somatostatin and its analogs diminish pancreatic secretion of water and electrolytes and have been effective in treating pancreatic fistulas and pseudocysts. These agents are also being evaluated for their ability to reduce pain in chronic pancreatitis (perhaps by reducing ductal pressure by diminishing secretory volume) and mitigating the severity of acute pancreatitis (possibly by reducing the metabolic load on acinar cells). Recently described secretin receptor antagonists may also have therapeutic value as a means of selectively inhibiting pancreatic secretion of water and electrolytes. PMID:1340060

  6. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  7. Precursors to Pancreatic Cancer+

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban; Kern, Scott E.; Goggins, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is believed to arise from morphologically distinct non-invasive precursor lesions. These precursors include the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, the mucinous cystic neoplasm, and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are grossly visible mucin-producing epithelial neoplasms that arise in the main pancreatic duct or one of its branches. The cysts of mucinous cystic neoplasms do not communicate with the major pancreatic ducts and these neoplasms are characterized by a distinct ovarian-type stroma. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia is a microscopic lesion. This review focuses on the clinical significance of these three remarkable precursor lesions with emphasis on their clinical manifestations, detection, and treatment. PMID:17996793

  8. Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Yamabuki, Takumi; Ohara, Masanori; Kimura, Noriko; Okamura, Kunishige; Kuroda, Aki; Takahashi, Ryo; Komuro, Kazuteru; Iwashiro, Nozomu

    2014-01-01

    An unusual case of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (P-AVM) combined with esophageal cancer is reported. A 59-year-old man was admitted with upper abdominal pain. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed numerous strongly enhanced abnormal vessels and a hypovascular lesion in the area of the pancreatic tail. Angiographic study of the celiac artery confirmed racemose vascular networks in the tail of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography revealed narrowing and displacement of the main pancreatic duct in the tail of the pancreas. Screening esophagoscopy showed a 0-IIa+IIc type tumor in the lower thoracic esophagus. Histological examination of esophagoscopic biopsies showed squamous cell carcinoma. Based on these findings, P-AVM or pancreatic cancer and esophageal cancer were diagnosed. Video-assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy and distal pancreatectomy were performed. Histological examination of the resected pancreas revealed abundant abnormal vessels with intravascular thrombi. In addition, rupture of a dilated pancreatic duct with pancreatic stones and both severe atrophy and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma were observed. The final diagnoses were P-AVM consequent to severe chronic pancreatitis and esophageal carcinoma. The patient's postoperative course was relatively good. PMID:24574946

  9. Bile duct injury during cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, V K

    2015-08-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is the treatment of choice for gallstones, but is associated with increased risk of bile duct injury (BDI bile duct injury). If the BDI is detected during LC can be addressed immediately, if available hepatobiliary surgeon, but the easiest and safest procedure for the general surgeon is placing drains into subhepatic region and the transfer of acute BDI to controlled external biliary fistula (external Biliary fistula EBF). Most BDI is diagnosed when the postoperative period, when there is biliary leak. Therapy is a percutaneous catheter drainage and endoscopic stenting in the bile duct; early repair is not recommended. Repair in the form hepatico-jejunostomy (HJ) should be performed hepatobiliary surgeon at intervals of 46 weeks after it closes EBF. BDI is a frequent cause medico-legal actions and a substantial burden on health care costs. Most BDI can be avoided by adherence to the principles of safe cholecystectomy. PMID:26395953

  10. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  11. Tear-Duct Obstruction and Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... the type of stent used. Another treatment is balloon catheter dilation (DCP). In DCP, a balloon is inserted through an opening in the corner ... sterile solution to expand the tear duct. The balloon is then deflated and removed. Both of these ...

  12. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  13. Percutaneous Endoscopic Retrieval and Replacement of a Knitted (Ultraflex) Biliary Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masami; Tanigawa, Noboru; Okuda, Yoshikazu; Mishima, Kazuya; Ohmura, Naoto; Kobayashi, Midori

    1997-09-15

    A knitted (Ultraflex) biliary stent became obstructed after 5 months causing recurrent jaundice in a 92-year-old man with pancreatic cancer. The obstructed stent was successfully removed percutaneously by retrieval forceps under guidance by an 8.4 Fr fiberoptic biliary endoscope. A new stent was placed. No complications were encountered.

  14. Duct closure

    DOEpatents

    Vowell, Kennison L.

    1987-01-01

    A closure for an inclined duct having an open upper end and defining downwardly extending passageway. The closure includes a cap for sealing engagement with the open upper end of the duct. Associated with the cap are an array of vertically aligned plug members, each of which has a cross-sectional area substantially conforming to the cross-sectional area of the passageway at least adjacent the upper end of the passageway. The plug members are interconnected in a manner to provide for free movement only in the plane in which the duct is inclined. The uppermost plug member is attached to the cap means and the cap means is in turn connected to a hoist means which is located directly over the open end of the duct.

  15. Endoscopic Placement of Metal Stents in Treating Patients With Cancer- Related Duodenal Obstruction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-31

    Colorectal Cancer; Constipation, Impaction, and Bowel Obstruction; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Pancreatic Cancer; Quality of Life; Small Intestine Cancer

  16. Clinical evaluation, imaging studies, indications for cytologic study and preprocedural requirements for duct brushing studies and pancreatic fine-needle aspiration: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Douglas; Schmidt, C. Max; Al-Haddad, Mohammad; Barthel, James S.; Ljung, Britt-Marie; Merchant, Nipun B.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Shaaban, Akram M.; Simeone, Diane; Pitman, Martha Bishop; Layfield, Lester J.

    2014-01-01

    The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology has developed a set of guidelines for pancreaticobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy, techniques for EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature to be used for pancreaticobiliary disease, ancillary testing and postbiopsy management. All documents are based on expertise of the authors, literature review, discussions of the draft document at national and international meetings and synthesis of online comments of the draft document. This document selectively presents the results of these discussions. This document summarizes recommendations for the clinical and imaging work-up of pancreatic and biliary tract lesions along with indications for cytologic study of these lesions. Prebrushing and FNA requirements are also discussed. PMID:25191515

  17. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  18. Nasolacrimal Polyurethane Stent: Complications with CT Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Isabel T.; Paul, Laura; Grande, Carlos

    1998-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate initial results in patients with epiphora secondary to obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct treated by placement of a polyurethane stent, and to discuss the technical problems and complications arising during the procedure, with visualization of the anatomy of the drainage apparatus using computed tomography (CT). Methods: We inserted 20 polyurethane Song stents under fluoroscopic guidance after dacryocystography in 19 patients with grade 3-4 epiphora caused by idiopathic obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct. CT scans were obtained following stent placement in all patients. Results: We focus on the technical problems and complications that arose during these procedures. During negotiation of the guidewire past the obstruction at the level of the junction of the duct with the lacrimal sac, the guidewire created a false passage in a posterior suborbital direction in two cases and towards the posterior midline in another. In all cases the guidewire was withdrawn and reinserted through the proper anatomic route without further difficulty or complications. In two cases the stent was improperly positioned wholly or partially outside the nasolacrimal system (one medially, one posteriorly). In one case the stent was removed and reinserted; in the other it remains in place and functional. CT was performed in all these cases to ensure proper anatomic alignment and determine what had gone wrong. The epiphora was completely resolved in 13 cases and partially relieved in four; there were three cases of stent obstruction. Epistaxis of short duration (1 hr) occurred in seven patients and headache in one. Conclusions: Treatment of epiphora with polyurethane stents is a technique that is well tolerated by patients and achieves a high success rate, yet problems in placement may be encountered. Though no major consequences for patients are involved, cognizance of such difficulties is important to avoid incorrect positioning of stents.

  19. Laparoscopic transcystic duct balloon dilatation of the sphincter of Oddi.

    PubMed

    Carroll, B J; Phillips, E H; Chandra, M; Fallas, M

    1993-01-01

    Balloon dilatation of the sphincter of Oddi has been performed via a laparoscopic transcystic duct technique. Small common duct stones and stone debris have been successfully lavaged into the duodenum in 17 of 20 cases (85%) by this method. Postoperative hyperamylasemia was noted in four patients. Mild clinical pancreatitis was observed in three patients (15%). Further evaluation of this technique as an adjunct to laparoscopic common bile duct stone extraction is warranted. PMID:8272998

  20. Surgical treatment of the pancreatic stump: preventive strategies of pancreatic fistula after pancreatoduodenectomy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    TERSIGNI, R.; CAPALDI, M.; IALONGO, P.; GRILLO, L.R.; ANSELMO, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The institutions with high volume of pancreatic surgery report morbidity rate from 30% to 50% and mortality less than 5% after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). At the present, the most significant cause of morbidity and mortality is pancreatic fistula (PF). Aim The purpose of the study is to identify the most important clinical factors which may predict PF development and eventually suggest alternative approaches to the pancreatic stump management. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis of a clinical data base of a tertiary care Hospital was performed. From 2002 to 2012 a single Surgeon prospectively performed 150 pancreaticoduodenectomies for cancer. Four different techniques were used: end to end pancreaticojejunostomy, end to side pancreaticojejunostomy, pancreatic duct occlusion and duct to mucosa anastomosis. The intraoperative gland texture was classified as soft, firm and hard. The duct size was preoperatively (CT scan) and intraoperatively recorded and classified: < 3 mm small, 3–6 mm medium, > 6 mm large. The histopathological characteristic of the gland fibrosis was graduate as low 1, moderate 2, high 3. Conclusion Relationships between pre and intraoperative duct size measurement, pancreatic texture and pancreatic fibrosis grading were highly significant. Small duct and soft pancreas with low grade fibrosis are the most important risk factors for pancreatic fistula development. The proper selection of pancreatic stump management or the decision to refer the high risk patients to high volume Center can be suggested by the elevated correspondence of pre and intraoperative duct diameter with the related pancreatic fibrosis grade and gland consistency. Preoperative assessment of the pancreatic duct makes possible to predict the risk of pancreatic fistula. PMID:25419587

  1. [Early diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Shiratori, Keiko

    2006-07-01

    Case of pancreatic cancer have increased in number, and the number of deaths from that disease has reached 20,000 in recent years in Japan. Only a few patients with pancreatic cancer can be cured. However, the prognosis in small pancreatic cancer such as TS1 less than 2 cm is relatively good if radical surgical resection is performed. Therefore early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is important to improve the dismal prognosis. Although clinical symptoms are not reliable for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, 30% of TS1 patients have abdominal or back pain. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that familial history of pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, diabetes, obesity, and smoking are possible high-risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Serum pancreatic enzyme and tumor markers in terms of CA19-9 and CEA are measured first. Ultrasonography (US) should be performed as soon as possible. Not only tumors but also slightly dilated main pancreatic ducts and/or small simple cysts that may represent indirect changes due to pancreatic cancer can be detected with US. Enhanced computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic US are also useful. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography yields more detailed images of branch ducts, and the cytology of pancreatic juice can be determined following examination. Unfortunately, position-emission tomography is not a reliable method for the diagnosis of small tumors in the pancreas. Finally, TNM staging of pancreatic cancer is performed based on the results of these imaging examinations. PMID:16878407

  2. Computerized tomography in acute and chronic pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmar, J.A.; Matthews, C.C.; Bishop, L.A.

    1984-11-01

    Modern imaging techniques have revolutionized the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatitis, primarily demonstrating its complications. Computerized tomography (CT) is a more sensitive method than ultrasonography and pancreatic ductography. A chart review revealed 214 patients at our hospital with a discharge diagnosis of pancreatitis. Sixty patients had CT for evaluation of possible complications. Only five scans were normal. Of 37 cases of acute pancreatitis, 92% demonstrated localized or diffuse enlargement, and 65% showed loss of pancreatic outline. Other frequent findings included thickening of perirenal fascia (49%), ileus (43%), edema of mesentery (35%), and inflammatory exudate (32%). Abscess and pseudocyst were each detected in 8% of cases. In chronic pancreatitis 65% of patients showed localized or diffuse pancreatic enlargement. Atrophy of the gland (30%), calcification (30%), pseudocyst (26%), and dilated pancreatic ducts (17%) were also seen. CT is effective in evaluating pancreatitis and its complications. 14 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  3. A tunable delivery platform to provide local chemotherapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Indolfi, Laura; Ligorio, Matteo; Ting, David T; Xega, Kristina; Tzafriri, Abraham R; Bersani, Francesca; Aceto, Nicola; Thapar, Vishal; Fuchs, Bryan C; Deshpande, Vikram; Baker, Aaron B; Ferrone, Cristina R; Haber, Daniel A; Langer, Robert; Clark, Jeffrey W; Edelman, Elazer R

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most devastating and painful cancers. It is often highly resistant to therapy owing to inherent chemoresistance and the desmoplastic response that creates a barrier of fibrous tissue preventing transport of chemotherapeutics into the tumor. The growth of the tumor in pancreatic cancer often leads to invasion of other organs and partial or complete biliary obstruction, inducing intense pain for patients and necessitating tumor resection or repeated stenting. Here, we have developed a delivery device to provide enhanced palliative therapy for pancreatic cancer patients by providing high concentrations of chemotherapeutic compounds locally at the tumor site. This treatment could reduce the need for repeated procedures in advanced PDAC patients to debulk the tumor mass or stent the obstructed bile duct. To facilitate clinical translation, we created the device out of currently approved materials and drugs. We engineered an implantable poly(lactic-co-glycolic)-based biodegradable device that is able to linearly release high doses of chemotherapeutic drugs for up to 60 days. We created five patient-derived PDAC cell lines and tested their sensitivity to approved chemotherapeutic compounds. These in vitro experiments showed that paclitaxel was the most effective single agent across all cell lines. We compared the efficacy of systemic and local paclitaxel therapy on the patient-derived cell lines in an orthotopic xenograft model in mice (PDX). In this model, we found up to a 12-fold increase in suppression of tumor growth by local therapy in comparison to systemic administration and reduce retention into off-target organs. Herein, we highlight the efficacy of a local therapeutic approach to overcome PDAC chemoresistance and reduce the need for repeated interventions and biliary obstruction by preventing local tumor growth. Our results underscore the urgent need for an implantable drug-eluting platform to deliver cytotoxic agents directly within the tumor mass as a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:27082874

  4. Endoscopic ultrasonography in the management of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    Pancreatic cancer diagnosis and management has been enhanced with the application of endoscopic ultrasound. The close proximity of the pancreas to the stomach and duodenum permits detailed imaging with intraluminal ultrasonography and staging of pancreatic tumors. EUS directed fine needle aspiration and injection may be successfully employed with patients with pancreatic cancer. Expandable metal stents can palliate patients with obstruction of the pancreaticobiliary tract as well as the gastroduodenum. The efficacy of EUS in the management of pancreatic cancer is critically reviewed.

  5. Modern management of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, James

    2013-04-01

    It is imperative for gastroenterologists to understand the different formations of bile duct stones and the various medical treatments available. To minimize the complications of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), it is critical to appropriately assess the risk of bile duct stones before intervention. Biliary endoscopists should be comfortable with the basic techniques of stone removal, including sphincterotomy, mechanical lithotripsy, and stent placement. It is important to be aware of advanced options, including laser and electrohydraulic stone fragmentation, and papillary dilatation for problematic cases. The timing and need for ERCP in those who require a cholecystectomy is also a consideration. PMID:23540960

  6. Pancreatic fluid collections: What is the ideal imaging technique?

    PubMed Central

    Dhaka, Narendra; Samanta, Jayanta; Kochhar, Suman; Kalra, Navin; Appasani, Sreekanth; Manrai, Manish; Kochhar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) are seen in up to 50% of cases of acute pancreatitis. The Revised Atlanta classification categorized these collections on the basis of duration of disease and contents, whether liquid alone or a mixture of fluid and necrotic debris. Management of these different types of collections differs because of the variable quantity of debris; while patients with pseudocysts can be drained by straight-forward stent placement, walled-off necrosis requires multi-disciplinary approach. Differentiating these collections on the basis of clinical severity alone is not reliable, so imaging is primarily performed. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is the commonly used modality for the diagnosis and assessment of proportion of solid contents in PFCs; however with certain limitations such as use of iodinated contrast material especially in renal failure patients and radiation exposure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performs better than computed tomography (CT) in characterization of pancreatic/peripancreatic fluid collections especially for quantification of solid debris and fat necrosis (seen as fat density globules), and is an alternative in those situations where CT is contraindicated. Also magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is highly sensitive for detecting pancreatic duct disruption and choledocholithiasis. Endoscopic ultrasound is an evolving technique with higher reproducibility for fluid-to-debris component estimation with the added advantage of being a single stage procedure for both diagnosis (solid debris delineation) and management (drainage of collection) in the same sitting. Recently role of diffusion weighted MRI and positron emission tomography/CT with 18F-FDG labeled autologous leukocytes is also emerging for detection of infection noninvasively. Comparative studies between these imaging modalities are still limited. However we look forward to a time when this gap in literature will be fulfilled. PMID:26730150

  7. Comparison of pancreatic morphology and exocrine functional impairment in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, T; Braun, U; Leferink, S; Gilly, G; Lux, G

    1994-01-01

    A comparative analysis of pancreatic morphology and exocrine function was performed prospectively in 48 patients. All patients had transabdominal ultrasound, computed tomography, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography, and a secretin-caerulein test. Classification of ultrasound, computed tomography, and pancreatogram findings was based on the Cambridge classification. In 10 patients, no pancreatic duct changes were detected on pancreatography. Equivocal (Cambridge I), mild to moderate (Cambridge II), and considerable ductal changes (Cambridge III) were found in 10, 12, and 16 patients, respectively. Computed tomography and ultrasound changes were found to correlate in 40-50%, 67%, and 94-100% of patients with Cambridge I, II, and III abnormal duct morphology, respectively. In patients with a normal pancreatogram, no patient had a functional impairment. Seventy per cent of the patients with equivocal pancreatic duct changes had dissociated, and 30% global, pancreatic insufficiency, while 50% of those with mild to moderate abnormal duct morphology manifested dissociated, and 50% global, functional impairment. All patients with considerable pancreatic duct changes had global pancreatic insufficiency. The results of this study confirm that normal endoscopic retrograde pancreatographic findings and Cambridge III ductal changes on endoscopic retrograde pancreatography correlate extremely well with normal pancreatic function and advanced functional insufficiency, respectively. As diagnostic tools, ultrasound and computed tomography are as sensitive as pancreatography only in chronic pancreatitis with considerable morphological changes. PMID:7523260

  8. The inhibitory pathways of pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Péter; Rakonczay, Zoltán

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic duct cells secrete the HCO(3)(-) ions found in pancreatic juice. While the regulatory pathways that stimulate pancreatic ductal HCO(3)(-) secretion are well described, little is known about inhibitory pathways, apart from the fact that they exist. Nevertheless, such inhibitory pathways may be physiologically important in terms of limiting the hydrostatic pressure within the lumen of the duct, and in terms switching off pancreatic secretion after a meal. Methionine encephalin, insulin, somatostatin, peptide YY, substance P, basolaterally applied adenosine triphosphate, arginine vasopressin, 5-hydroxytryptamine and epidermal growth factor have all been shown to inhibit fluid and/or HCO(3)(-) secretion from pancreatic ducts. Importantly, most of these inhibitors have been shown to reduce secretion in isolated pancreatic ducts, so they must act directly on the ductal epithelium. This brief review provides an overview of our current knowledge of the inhibitors, and inhibitory pathways of pancreatic ductal secretion. SIGNALLING NETWORK FACTS: Methionine encephalin, insulin, somatostatin, peptide YY, substance P, basolaterally applied adenosine triphosphate, arginine vasopressin, 5-hydroxytryptamine and epidermal growth factor have all been shown to inhibit fluid and/or HCO(3)(-) secretion from pancreatic ducts. The inhibition of pancreatic secretion can be mediated by indirect (decreased cholinergic or increased adrenergic stimulation, decreased release of stimulatory hormones) and direct (inhibitory hormone or neurotransmitter acting on the duct cells) mechanisms. PMID:16996776

  9. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis-sonographic pictorial essay on four pediatric cases with acute biliary colic.

    PubMed

    Lynser, Donboklang; Marbaniang, Evarisalin

    2016-04-01

    Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis occur due to migration of the round worm ascaris lumbricoides through the bile duct orifice finally reaching the common bile duct, main pancreatic duct, intrahepatic ducts or gallbladder. These resulted in acute epigastric and right hypochondriac region colicky pain. Ultrasound is the investigation of choice in hepatobiliary ascariasis. We present here sonographic images on four pediatric patients with acute biliary colic. PMID:26690772

  10. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2011-03-01

    Pancreatic insufficiency is a major consequence of pancreatic diseases leading to a loss of pancreatic parenchyma, obstruction of the main pancreatic duct, decreased pancreatic stimulation, or acid-mediated inactivation of pancreatic enzymes. In addition, gastrointestinal and pancreatic surgical resections are frequent causes. Clinical manifestations include abdominal cramps, steatorrhea and malnutrition. Malnutrition, the main contributing factor of weight loss, has been related to a high morbidity and mortality secondary to an increased risk of malnutrition-related complications and cardiovascular events. Assessments of exocrine pancreatic function, such as fecal fat quantification and (13) C-triglyceride breath test, are the method of choice for diagnosis. In clinical practice, high-risk patient populations include those with severe necrotizing pancreatitis, gastrointestinal and pancreatic surgery, cancer of pancreas head, and those with pancreatic calcifications. Apart from relief of maldigestion-related symptoms, the main goal of pancreatic enzyme substitution therapy is to ensure a normal nutritional status. Therapy of pancreatic insufficiency is based on the oral administration of exogenous pancreatic enzymes. Restriction of fat intake, though traditionally important in conventional treatment, should be reconsidered. Enzyme substitution therapy should ideally mimic the physiological pattern of pancreatic exocrine secretion, and pancreatic enzymes in the form of enteric-coated minimicrospheres are considered as the most elaborated commercially available enzyme preparations. In general, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients after surgery may be managed similarly to patients with chronic pancreatitis. This review focuses on current perspectives in diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and practical suggestions on its clinical management. PMID:21323992

  11. T-EUS for Gastrointestinal Disorders: A Multicenter Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-31

    Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Biliary Stricture; Biliary Obstruction; Stent Obstruction; Proximal Duct Stricture; Distal Duct Stricture; Ampullary Cancer; Biliary Sphincter Stenosis; Impacted Stones; Chronic Pancreatitis; Peri-ampullary Diverticula; Altered Anatomy

  12. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI in Patients With Advanced Breast or Pancreatic Cancer With Metastases to the Liver or Lung

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Liver Metastases; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  13. Anatomy-shaped design of a fully-covered, biliary, self-expandable metal stent for treatment of benign distal biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Weigt, Jochen; Kandulski, Arne; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The treatment success of benign biliary strictures with fully covered metal stents (CSEMS) is altered by high stent dislocation rates. We aimed to evaluate a new stent design to prevent dislocation. Patients and methods: Patients with benign biliary strictures were treated with a newly designed double-coned stent (dcSEMS). Mechanical analysis of the new stent was performed and it was compared with a cylindrical stent. Results: A total of 13 dcCSEMS were implanted in 11 patients (2 female, 9 male, median age 47, range 33 – 71). All patients had distal biliary strictures due to chronic pancreatitis. No stent migration occurred. In all but one patient the stents were removed. One patient refused stent extraction and was lost to follow up. Stent occlusion occurred twice leading to cholangitis in both cases. The duration of stent treatment was 170 days (range 61 – 254). After extraction only one patient had early recurrent stricture and received the same stent again. Three stents showed minimal tissue granulation at the papilla. One stent presented ingrowth at the proximal end and was removed after implantation of a second fully covered stent. Mechanical examination revealed significantly lower radial expansion force of the new stent as compared to the cylindrical stent. Conclusions: The new stent design has a low rate of migration. Biomechanical properties may explain this effect. PMID:26793789

  14. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  15. Longitudinal stent deformation during coronary bifurcation stenting.

    PubMed

    Vijayvergiya, Rajesh; Sharma, Prafull; Gupta, Ankush; Goyal, Praveg; Panda, Prashant

    2016-03-01

    A distortion of implanted coronary stent along its longitudinal axis during coronary intervention is known as longitudinal stent deformation (LSD). LSD is frequently seen with newer drug eluting stents (DES), specifically with PROMUS Element stent. It is usually caused by impact of guide catheter tip, or following passage of catheters like balloon catheter, IVUS catheter, guideliner, etc. We hereby report a case of LSD during coronary bifurcation lesion intervention, using two-stents technique. Patient had acute stent thrombosis as a complication of LSD, which was successfully managed. PMID:26811144

  16. Eosinophilic Pancreatitis Diagnosed With Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Hina; Cabrera, Julio; Chi, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic pancreatitis (EP) is a rare clinical entity, and few cases have been reported. It usually presents on imaging as a pancreatic mass leading to common bile duct obstruction and jaundice. Since it can mimic a malignancy, eosinophilic pancreatitis is often diagnosed after “false positive” pancreatic resections. To our knowledge, we report the only known case of EP in which the diagnosis was made by fine needle aspiration and core biopsy of the pancreas during EUS, sparing the patient a surgical resection. After a steroid course, there was improvement of clinical symptoms. PMID:26203451

  17. A Minimally Invasive Approach for Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Shintaro Kuramoto, Kenmei; Itoh, Yutaka; Watanabe, Yoshika; Ueda, Toshisada

    2003-11-15

    Pancreas fistula is a well-known and severe complication of pancreaticoduodenectomy. It is difficult to control with conservative therapy, inducing further complications and severe morbidity. Until now, re-operation has been the only way to resolve pancreatic fistula causing complete dehiscence of the pancreatic-enteric anastomosis (complete pancreatic fistula). Percutaneous transgastric fistula drainage is one of the treatments for pancreatic fistula. This procedure allows both pancreas juice drainage and anastomosis re-construction at the same time. This is effective and minimally invasive but difficult to adapt to a long or complicated fistula. In particular, dilatation of the main pancreatic duct is indispensable. This paper reports the successful resolution of a postoperative pancreatic fistula by a two-way-approach percutaneous transgastric fistula drainage procedure. Using a snare catheter from the fistula and a flexible guidewire from the transgastric puncture needle, it can be performed either with or without main pancreatic duct dilatation.

  18. Pancreatic panniculitis.

    PubMed

    Garca-Romero, Diana; Vanaclocha, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an uncommon complication of pancreatic disease, most frequently pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The pathogenesis of the process remains unknown, but possibly the release of pancreatic enzymes may induce permeability of the microcirculation and cause fat necrosis. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis presents with tender, ill-defined, red-brown nodules in the lower extremities that may ulcerate and drain an oily substance and usually precedes pancreatic disease. The histopathologic picture consists of a mostly lobular panniculitis without vasculitis, with the presence of the typical ghost cells that correspond to necrotic and calcified adipocytes. Treatment should be directed at the underlying pancreatic disease. PMID:18793978

  19. Preoperative Biliary Drainage in Cases of Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Tomofumi; Sasaki, Tamito; Serikawa, Masahiro; Ishii, Yasutaka; Mouri, Teruo; Shimizu, Akinori; Kurihara, Keisuke; Tatsukawa, Yumiko; Miyaki, Eisuke; Kawamura, Ryota; Tsushima, Ken; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To elucidate the optimum preoperative biliary drainage method for patients with pancreatic cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). Material and Methods. From January 2010 through December 2014, 20 patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer underwent preoperative biliary drainage and NAC with a plastic or metallic stent and received NAC at Hiroshima University Hospital. We retrospectively analyzed delayed NAC and complication rates due to biliary drainage, effect of stent type on perioperative factors, and hospitalization costs from diagnosis to surgery. Results. There were 11 cases of preoperative biliary drainage with plastic stents and nine metallic stents. The median age was 64.5 years; delayed NAC occurred in 9 cases with plastic stent and 1 case with metallic stent (p = 0.01). The complication rates due to biliary drainage were 0% (0/9) with metallic stents and 72.7% (8/11) with plastic stents (p = 0.01). Cumulative rates of complications determined with the Kaplan-Meier method on day 90 were 60% with plastic stents and 0% with metallic stents (log-rank test, p = 0.012). There were no significant differences between group in perioperative factors or hospitalization costs from diagnosis to surgery. Conclusions. Metallic stent implantation may be effective for preoperative biliary drainage for pancreatic cancer treated with NAC. PMID:26880897

  20. Techniques of biliary reconstruction following bile duct resection (with video).

    PubMed

    Hirano, Satoshi; Tanaka, Eiichi; Tsuchikawa, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Joe; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Kato, Kentaro

    2012-05-01

    In several clinical situations, including resection of malignant or benign biliary lesions, reconstruction of the biliary system using the Roux-en-Y jejunum limb has been adopted as the standard procedure. The basic technique and the procedural knowledge essential for most gastroenterological surgeons are described in this article, along with a video supplement. Low complication rates involving anastomotic insufficiency or stricture can be achieved by using proper surgical techniques, even following small bile duct reconstruction. Using the ropeway method to stabilize the bile duct and jejunal limb allows precise mucosa-to-mucosa anastomosis with interrupted sutures of the posterior row of the anastomosis. Placement of a transanastomotic stent tube is the second step. The final step involves suturing the anterior row of the anastomosis. In contrast to the lower extrahepatic bile duct, the wall of the hilar or intrahepatic bile duct can be recognized within the fibrous connective tissue in the Glissonean pedicle. The portal side of the duct should be selected for the posterior wall during anastomosis owing to its thickness. Meticulous inspection to avoid overlooking small bile ducts could decrease the chance of postoperative intractable bile leakage. In reconstruction of small or fragile branches, a transanastomotic stent tube could work as an anchor for the anastomosis. PMID:22081253

  1. Duct Joining System

    DOEpatents

    Proctor, John P.

    2001-02-27

    A duct joining system for providing an air-tight seal and mechanical connection for ducts and fittings is disclosed. The duct joining system includes a flexible gasket affixed to a male end of a duct or fitting. The flexible gasket is affixed at an angle relative to normal of the male end of the duct. The female end of the other duct includes a raised bead in which the flexible gasket is seated when the ducts are properly joined. The angled flexible gasket seated in the raised bead forms an air-tight seal as well as fastens or locks the male end to the female end. Alternatively, when a flexible duct is used, a band clamp with a raised bead is clamped over the female end of the flexible duct and over the male end of a fitting to provide an air tight seal and fastened connection.

  2. Duct joining system

    DOEpatents

    Proctor, John P.; deKieffer, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    A duct joining system for providing an air-tight seal and mechanical connection for ducts and fittings is disclosed. The duct joining system includes a flexible gasket affixed to a male end of a duct or fitting. The flexible gasket is affixed at an angle relative to normal of the male end of the duct. The female end of the other duct includes a raised bead in which the flexible gasket is seated when the ducts are properly joined. The angled flexible gasket seated in the raised bead forms an air-tight seal as well as fastens or locks the male end to the female end. Alternatively, when a flexible duct is used, a band clamp with a raised bead is clamped over the female end of the flexible duct and over the male end of a fitting to provide an air tight seal and fastened connection.

  3. In Vivo Study of Polyurethane-Coated Gianturco-Rosch Biliary Z-Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Severini, Aldo; Mantero, Sara; Tanzi, Maria Cristina; Cigada, Alberto; Addis, Flaminio; Cozzi, Guido; Salvetti, Monica; Andreola, Salvatore; Motta, Antonella; Regalia, Enrico; Pulvirenti, Andrea; De Pedri, Enrico; Doci, Roberto

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: Prototypes of Gianturco-Rosch Z-stents coated with polycarbonate urethane (PCU) were placed in the biliary tree of pigs, in order to test their biomechanical behavior, stability, and biocompatibility. Methods: The stents were surgically implanted in the common bile duct of three pairs of pigs, which were killed after 1, 3, and 6 months respectively. Explanted livers from pigs of the same race, age, and size were used to provide comparative data. The bile ducts were radiologically and histopathologically examined; the stents were processed and examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results: No complications occurred and the animals showed a normal weight gain. The main bile duct appeared radiologically and macroscopically dilated, but the stents proved to be in place. Histologically, the bile duct epithelium was destroyed, but neither hyperplastic nor inflammatory fibrotic reactions of the wall were evident. Both the metallic structure and the polymeric coating of the stents were intact. A layer of organic material with a maximum thickness of approximately 3 {mu}m was evident on the inner surface of the stents. Conclusion: The present in vivo study demonstrates the biocompatibility, efficacy, and stability of PCU-coated Gianturco-Rosch stents in the biliary environment.

  4. Hiatus Hernia: A Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Shruti; Jawairia, Mahreema; Subramani, Krishnaiyer; Mustacchia, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is the herniation of elements of the abdominal cavity through the esophageal hiatus of the diaphragm. A giant HH with pancreatic prolapse is very rare and its causing pancreatitis is an even more extraordinary condition. We describe a case of a 65-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis secondary to pancreatic herniation. In these cases, acute pancreatitis may be caused by the diaphragmatic crura impinging upon the pancreas and leading to repetitive trauma as it crosses the hernia; intermittent folding of the main pancreatic duct; ischemia associated with stretching at its vascular pedicle; or total pancreatic incarceration. Asymptomatic hernia may not require any treatment, while multiple studies have supported the recommendation of early elective repair as a safer route in symptomatic patients. In summary, though rare, pancreatic herniation should be considered as a cause of acute pancreatitis. A high index of suspicion for complications is warranted in cases like these. PMID:27066077

  5. A Fatal Complication: Intestinal Perforation Secondary to Migration of a Biliary Stent

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, Gülay; Okur, Nazan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Stent insertion is widely performed to restore biliary drainage in hepatic, biliary, and pancreatic obstructive conditions. Intestinal perforation due to the migration of these stents is an extremely rare late-term complication that is associated with a high rate of mortality. The current report aimed at presenting the radiological findings of a case of extraluminal biliary stent migration into the pelvic region that caused intestinal perforation. Case Report We report a case of an 85-year-old male with a history of previous stent insertion who presented with a sudden – onset severe abdominal pain. An abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) revealed a tubular foreign body density, compatible with intestinal perforation due to migration of the biliary stent. Conclusions Biliary stent insertion becomes a more common procedure. This serious complication must always be remembered in patients presenting with abdominal pain after stent insertion. PMID:27141238

  6. Incidental intraoperative discovery of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor associated with chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a rare entity with an incidence between 2 per million to 5 per 100 000. Association with pancreatitis (acute or chronic) is rare and is considered to be determined by the tumoral obstruction of pancreatic ducts, but sometimes occurs without any apparent relationship between them. Non-functional neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are usually diagnosed when either very large or metastatic. Small ones are occasionally diagnosed when imagery is performed for other diagnostic reasons. Intraoperative discovery is even rarer and poses problems of differential diagnosis with other pancreatic tumors. Association with chronic pancreatitis is rare and usually due to pancreatic duct obstruction by the tumor. We describe the case of a patient with a small non-functioning neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreatic tail accidentally discovered during surgery for delayed traumatic splenic rupture associated with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. The tumor of 1.5cm size was well differentiated and confined to the pancreas, and was resected by a distal splenopancreatectomy. Conclusions Surgeons should be well aware of the rare possibility of a non-functional neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreas, associated with chronic pancreatitis, surgical resection being the optimal treatment for cure. Histopathology is of utmost importance to establish the correct diagnosis, grade of differentiation, malignancy and prognosis. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2114470176676003. PMID:23021468

  7. Hollow lensing duct

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Bibeau, Camille; Mitchell, Scott; Lang, John; Maderas, Dennis; Speth, Joel; Payne, Stephen A.

    2000-01-01

    A hollow lensing duct to condense (intensify) light using a combination of focusing using a spherical or cylindrical lens followed by reflective waveguiding. The hollow duct tapers down from a wide input side to a narrow output side, with the input side consisting of a lens that may be coated with an antireflective coating for more efficient transmission into the duct. The inside surfaces of the hollow lens duct are appropriately coated to be reflective, preventing light from escaping by reflection as it travels along the duct (reflective waveguiding). The hollow duct has various applications for intensifying light, such as in the coupling of diode array pump light to solid state lasing materials.

  8. Development of the islets, exocrine pancreas, and related ducts in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Pisces: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Morrison, Carol M; Pohajdak, Bill; Tam, Janet; Wright, James R

    2004-09-01

    Pancreatic development and the relationship of the islets with the pancreatic, hepatic, and bile ducts were studied in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, from hatching to the onset of maturity at 7 months. The number of islets formed during development was counted, using either serial sections or dithizone staining of isolated islets. There was a general increase in islet number with both age and size. Tilapia housed in individual tanks grew more quickly and had more islets than siblings of the same age left in crowded conditions. The pancreas is a compact organ in early development, and at 1 day posthatch (dph) a single principal islet, positive for all hormones tested (insulin, SST-14, SST-28, glucagon, and PYY), is partially surrounded by exocrine pancreas. However, the exocrine pancreas becomes more disseminated in older fish, following blood vessels along the mesenteries and entering the liver to form a hepatopancreas. The epithelium of the pancreatic duct system from the intercalated ducts to the main duct entering the duodenum was positive for glucagon and SST-14 in 8 and 16 dph tilapia. Individual insulin-immunopositive cells were found in one specimen. At this early stage in development, therefore, the pancreatic duct epithelial cells appear to be pluripotent and may give rise to the small islets found near the pancreatic ducts in 16-37 dph tilapia. Glucagon, SST-14, and some PPY-positive enteroendocrine cells were present in the intestine of the 8 dph larva and in the first part of the intestine of the 16 dph juvenile. Glucagon and SST-14-positive inclusions were found in the apical cytoplasm of the mid-gut epithelium of the 16 dph tilapia. These hormones may have been absorbed from the gut lumen, since they are produced in both the pancreatic ducts and the enteroendocrine cells. At least three hepatic ducts join the cystic duct to form the bile duct, which runs alongside the pancreatic duct to the duodenum. PMID:15281064

  9. What Is Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common type of bile duct cancer, accounting for more than half of all bile duct ... of bile duct cancer. The rest of this document refers only to cholangiocarcinomas. Benign bile duct tumors ...

  10. Groove Pancreatitis: A Rare form of Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Bharivi; Rzouq, Fadi; Saligram, Shreyas; Nawabi, Atta; Nicola, Marian; Dennis, Katie; Ernst, Carly; Abbaszadeh, Ali; Bonino, John; Olyaee, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the “groove” of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are the preferred imaging modalities. The treatment of choice is conservative although surgical intervention can sometimes be required. Case Report: A 57-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B presented with 4 days of epigastric pain. Abdominal exam revealed absent bowel sounds and epigastric tenderness. He had a creatinine of 1.72 mg/dL, potassium of 2.9 mmol/L, and a normal lipase level of 86 U/L. Liver enzymes and total bilirubin were normal. Computed tomography abdomen showed high-grade obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum without any obvious mass. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a mass at the duodenal bulb causing luminal narrowing, with biopsies negative for malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the region of the pancreatic head and descending duodenum. EUS revealed a 3 cm mass in the region of pancreatic head with irregular borders and no vascular invasion. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) was nondiagnostic. The patient then underwent a Whipple's procedure. Pathology of these specimens was negative for malignancy but was consistent with para-duodenal or groove pancreatitis. Conclusion: The low incidence of groove pancreatitis is partly due to lack of familiarity with the disease. Groove pancreatitis should be considered in the differential for patients presenting with pancreatic head lesions and no cholestatic jaundice, especially when a duodenal obstruction is present, and neither duodenal biopsies nor pancreatic head FNA confirm adenocarcinoma. PMID:26713302

  11. Recent developments in the treatment of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Tatsuhiro; Kawaratani, Hideto; Yoshiji, Hitoshi; Uemura, Masahito; Fukui, Hiroshi

    2008-06-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory condition characterized by repeated attacks of abdominal pain, and the destruction and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma which causes to reduced exocrine and endocrine functions. Alcohol is the most common cause of chronic pancreatitis. Although abstinence is usually considered a prerequisite for successful treatment of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, we often encounter patients who have repeated attacks from the compensated stage through the transitional stage. In alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, continued alcohol consumption causes changes in the digestive hormones and vagal nerve function that induce the pancreatic acinar cells to oversecrete protein, increasing the protein concentration and viscosity of the pancreatic juice. This induces protein sedimentation from the pancreatic juice and formation of protein plugs within the pancreatic duct, triggering repeated attacks of acute pancreatitis. The treatment of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis includes alleviation of symptoms, particularly abdominal pain, elimination of trigger factors, prevention of recurrence and disease progression, adjuvant therapies for pancreatic exocrine and endocrine failure. Recently, the main constituent proteins in these protein plugs have been identified, enabling trials of several therapies, such as the administration of secretin formulations and endoscopic removal. Bromhexine hydrochloride, a bronchial mucolytic, has an affinity for the pancreatic acinar cells, inducing them to secrete pancreatic juice of low viscosity. In this review, we summarize the most recent thoughts about alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, and the new treatments, and in particular, we present our findings concerning the efficacy of bromhexine hydrochloride in the treatment of this disease. PMID:19630718

  12. Repair of a Post-Hepatectomy Posterior Sectoral Duct Injury Secondary to Anomalous Bile Duct Anatomy Using a Novel Combined Surgical-Interventional Radiologic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Shanker, Beth-Ann; Eng, Oliver S.; Gendel, Vyacheslav; Nosher, John; Carpizo, Darren R.

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman with a completely transected posterior sectoral duct following extended hepatectomy underwent a combined operative procedure with interventional radiology and surgery to restore biliary-enteric drainage. The anterior and posterior sectoral ducts were identified, and catheters were inserted into both systems. The posterior sectoral catheter was placed intraoperatively through a preoperatively placed sheath, and a new tunnel was created through the regenerated liver surface. Biliary-enteric anastomoses were created over the stents. PMID:24159406

  13. [Endoscopic management of the complications of pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Coronel, Emmanuel; Czul, Frank; Gelrud, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Acute and chronic pancreatitis may lead to complications that prior the recent advancement of therapeutic endoscopy had to be treated with conventional surgery. The current techniques in interventional endoscopy allow us to access the pancreas and treat some of the complications in a minimally invasive way leading to less morbidity in our patients. Approximately 90% of acute pancreatitis episodes are edematous with early resolution of clinical symptoms and rarely leading to major complications. Patients with necrotizing pancreatitis are susceptible to local and systemic complications particularly in the setting of organ failure. On the other hand chronic pancreatitis is as a chronic inflammatory process that leads to fibrosis of the gland and in occasions to exocrine and/or endocrine insufficiency. The main objective of therapeutic endoscopy in chronic pancreatitis is to relief the obstruction and decreases the pressure in the pancreatic duct with the intention to alleviate abdominal pain. In this review we will address the indications and endoscopic techniques to treat the different complications of pancreatitis such as pseudo cyst drainage, walled off necrosis debridement, disconnected duct syndrome and different options for endoscopic therapy in chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24108377

  14. Localized Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhe; Tian, Rui; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease with clinical presentations that greatly mimic pancreatic cancer (PC). It is critical for clinicians to distinguish AIP from PC because their treatments and prognoses are entirely different. Typical images show characteristic features such as diffuse pancreatic swelling and strictures of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). However, AIP may present as a localized pancreatic mass, in which case it is very difficult to differentiate from PC. Here, we report a case of a 40-year-old man with computed tomography (CT) imaging studies confirming an area of low-density neoplasm in the uncinate process of the pancreas with dilation in the common biliary duct (CBD) and MPD. Increased uptake in the uncinate mass was observed by positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan, which strongly suggested PC. Further laboratory analyses showed a marked elevation of serum IgG4. Because there was not enough evidence to rule out a diagnosis of malignancy, a histopathological biopsy became the criterion standard. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided needle biopsy failed. As an alternative, a pancreaticoduodenectomy was conducted for the biopsy, and pathological analysis confirmed IgG4-related sclerotic chronic pancreatitis with moderate lymphoplasmacellular infiltration. We suggest that an accurate preoperative diagnosis for localized AIP with MPD and CBD obstructions mimicking PC is of great importance. Radiological imaging findings, particularly observations of diffused enlargement of the pancreas and delayed enhancement during the venous and portal phases, are essential for diagnosing AIP. Careful consideration should be given if serum IgG4 was taken as a special indicator for a differential diagnosis between AIP and PC. A history of IgG4-related diseases involving the biliary, lacrimal, salivary, retroperitoneal, renal, or pulmonary systems should also be highlighted. Thus, the pathology of extrapancreatic organs can be utilized as diagnostic evidence when the pathology for a pancreatic mass is not available, as in the case presented here. Furthermore, cautious use of hormone therapy is indicated for patients who cannot be ruled out as having PC. The results of future studies on localized AIP are eagerly awaited. PMID:26496272

  15. Biomedical engineering in design and application of nitinol stents with shape memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryklina, E. P.; Khmelevskaya, I. Y.; Morozova, Tamara V.; Prokoshkin, S. D.

    1996-04-01

    Our studies in the field of endosurgery in collaboration with the physicians of the National Research Center of Surgery of the Academy of Medical Sciences are carried out beginning in 1983. These studies laid the foundation for the new direction of X-ray surgery--X-ray Nitinol stenting of vessels and tubular structures. X-ray nitinol stents are unique self-fixing shells based on the shape memory effect and superelasticity of nickel-titanium alloys self- reconstructed under human body temperature. Applied for stenting of arteries in cases of stenosis etc., bile ducts in cases of benign and malignant stenoses, digestive tract in cases of oesophageal cancer and cervical canal uterus in cases of postsurgical atresiss and strictures of uterine. The purpose of stenting is restoration of the shape of artery or tubular structure by a cylinder frame formation. The especially elaborated original method of stenting allows to avoid the traditional surgical operation, i.e. the stenting is performed without blood, narcosis and surgical knife. The stent to be implanted is transported into the affected zone through the puncture under the X-ray control. Clinical applications of X-ray endovascular stenting has been started in March 1984. During this period nearly 400 operations on stenting have been performed on femoral, iliac, brachio-cephalic, subclavian arteries, bile ducts, tracheas, digestive tract and cervical canal uterus.

  16. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  17. Pseudocyst of the head of the pancreas: relationship to the duct of Santorini.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, M C

    1979-01-01

    A series of 14 patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis is presented which illustrates that cysts originating in the superior segment of the head of the pancreas communicate with the duct of Santorini which normally drains this area of the gland. Cysts in this location do not communicate with the major pancreatic duct (Wirsung) in most instances, and therefore may be overlooked in the standard retrograde drainage procedures employed to relieve pancreatic exocrine obstruction. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12. PMID:518172

  18. New stents for SFA.

    PubMed

    MINAR, E; SCHILLINGER, M

    2009-10-01

    Endovascular stent implantation was introduced to femoropopliteal procedures almost two decades ago. Initial results with balloon-expandable stainless steel stents and self expanding Elgiloy stents, however, were disappointing. In particular, recurrence rates after long-segment femoropopliteal stenting were rather high, in the range of 60% to 80% at 1 year. After years of stagnation, recent developments in femoropopliteal stent technology have been promising. Self-expanding nitinol stents have been evaluated in several prospective studies. Initial problems with stent fractures seem to be resolved using second-generation devices. The second generation of Nitinol stents have an enhanced flexibility particularly also in axial direction due to a reduction of cell interconnections and a more spiral orientation of the interconnections. However, until now there is no proof of any impact of the stent design on restenosis rate. Otherwise, stenting has been shown to be beneficial compared to balloon angioplasty especially in longer femoropopliteal lesions. The superior fracture resistance of the latest stent generation in combination with the production of long nitinol stents of up to 20 cm in length allow that more difficult and complex lesions can be treated endovascularly. The main unresolved problem with femoropopliteal stenting is the treatment of instent restenosis. Future concepts to further improve long-term patency after femoropopliteal stenting are therefore under investigation, including drug-eluting stents (DES), biodegradable stents, and coated stent-grafts. Stent grafts appear to be a viable option for the treatment of complex superficial femoral artery lesions, with comparable outcomes to prosthetic above-knee femoropopliteal bypass surgery. Concerning DES, we have to wait for the results of the ongoing studies. PMID:19741579

  19. A case study of a collision tumor composed of cancers of the bile duct and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hideki; Furukawa, Daisuke; Yazawa, Naoki; Masuoka, Yoshihito; Yamada, Misuzu; Tobita, Kosuke; Kawashima, Yohei; Ogawa, Masami; Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki; Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Nakagohri, Toshio

    2015-12-01

    In this case report, we describe the extremely rare case of a collision tumor comprising cancers of the bile duct and the pancreas. A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of obstructive jaundice. He was diagnosed with pancreatic head cancer, and we performed a pancreaticoduodenectomy with lymph node dissection. At laparotomy, there were two palpable masses in the vicinity of the confluence of the cystic duct and the head of the pancreas. The resected specimen demonstrated tumors at the confluence of the cystic duct and in the pancreatic head. Histopathological examination demonstrated a moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma in the pancreatic head and a well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma at the confluence of the cystic duct. Immunostaining was negative for p53 and MUC6 in the pancreatic head tumor; however, immunostaining was positive for both in the tumor located at the confluence of the cystic duct. The two tumors were histologically different and were diagnosed as collision cancer caused by the collision of the bile duct and pancreatic cancers. PMID:26943405

  20. Postburn pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, C M; Sheridan, R L; Schoenfeld, D A; Warshaw, A L; Tompkins, R G

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined the prevalence and complications of pancreatitis in severely burned patients. Factors predictive for the development of pancreatitis after burns are considered. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Pancreatitis has been documented at necropsy after burns; however, it is not clinically recognized as a common complication of burn injury. Recent improvements in survival rates could yield previously unrecognized complications, such as pancreatitis, particularly in those patients who previously would have not survived. The hypothesis is that pancreatitis is a frequent complication after major burn injury and causes significant morbidity for patients with large burns. METHODS: This retrospective review of adult patients with large burns examines postburn pancreatitis using stepwise logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Forty-nine of 121 (40%) patients developed hyperamylasemia or hyperlipasemia well after the admission period (23 +/- 3 days), and all enzyme abnormalities were temporally associated with emerging infections. Most of these patients (40/49, 82%) had symptoms of pancreatitis. Three patients (6%) had pancreatic pseudocysts or abscesses. Inhalation injury (p = 0.0001), associated trauma (p = 0.0311), and escharotomy (p = 0.0415) were risk factors for pancreatitis. Using Fischer's exact test, patients with pancreatitis had increased mortality and length of stay. Patients with high enzyme elevations and > or = 50% body surface area burned were at severe risk of pancreatic pseudocyst or abscess development (43%; 90% confidence interval of 23-77%). CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatitis is a frequent complication after large burn injuries. Patients at high risk for pancreatitis complications should receive surveillance examinations during their acute hospitalization. PMID:7543741

  1. Beta cells occur naturally in extrahepatic bile ducts of mice.

    PubMed

    Dutton, James R; Chillingworth, Naomi L; Eberhard, Daniel; Brannon, Claire R; Hornsey, Mark A; Tosh, David; Slack, Jonathan M W

    2007-01-15

    Insulin-secreting beta cells were thought to reside only in the pancreas. Here, we show that beta cells are also present in the extra-hepatic bile ducts of mice. They are characterised by insulin and C-peptide content, the presence of secretory granules that are immunoreactive for insulin, and the ducts exhibit glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Genetic lineage labelling shows that these beta cells arise from the liver domain rather than the pancreas and, by histological study, they appear to be formed directly from the bile duct epithelium in late embryogenesis. Other endocrine cell types (producing somatostatin and pancreatic polypeptide) are also found in close association with the bile-duct-derived beta cells, but exocrine pancreatic tissue is not present. This discovery of beta cells outside the mammalian pancreas has implications for regenerative medicine, indicating that biliary epithelium might offer a new source of beta cells for the treatment of diabetes. The finding also has evolutionary significance, because it is known that certain basal vertebrates usually form all of their beta cells from the bile ducts. The mammalian bile-duct-derived beta cells might therefore represent an extant trace of the evolutionary origin of the vertebrate beta cell. PMID:17179205

  2. Shrinking the Supply Chain for Implantable Coronary Stent Devices.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean S; O'Sullivan, Kevin J; Verdecchia, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Stenting treatments for the management of disease in the heart, arterial and venous systems, biliary ducts, urethras, ureters, oesophageal tract and prostate have made enormous technical advances since their introduction into clinical use. The progression from metallic to polymer based bio-absorbable stents, coupled with the advances in additive manufacturing techniques, present a unique opportunity to completely re-envision the design, manufacture, and supply chain of stents. This paper looks at current stenting trends and proposes a future where the stent supply chain is condensed from ~150 days to ~20 min. The Cardiologist therefore has the opportunity to become a designer, manufacturer and user with patients receiving custom stents specific to their unique pathology that will be generated, delivered and deployed in the Cath-lab. The paper will outline this potentially revolutionary development and consider the technical challenges that will need to be overcome in order to achieve these ambitious goals. A high level overview of the generating eluting stents in situ program-GENESIS-is outlined including some early experimental work. PMID:26438449

  3. Removal of a large stone growing around and encasing a plastic biliary stent: respect the ductal axis.

    PubMed

    Dokas, S; Kalampakas, A; Delivorias, P; Sion, M; Tsitouridis, I

    2009-04-01

    Plastic biliary stents are commonly used during Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP). The main indication for biliary stenting is benign or malignant obstruction. Plastic stents, among others, can be used as an escape route in patients with large common bile duct stones, or in cases of acute cholangitis with or without sphincterotomy to provide drainage until definitive treatment. Stent occlusion is the main disadvantage, limiting their patency to around 3 months, after which replacement is recommended. We present a case of a large, close to 2cm, stone developing around and encasing the proximal end of a plastic biliary stent. The stent/stone complex was successfully removed en bloc. The stent was placed in the common bile duct without sphincterotomy, and remained in situ for 2 years. The presented case highlights the importance of definitive treatment for common bile duct stones, the need to respect the ductal axis especially when dealing with large stones and the significance of biliary sphincterotomy during endoscopic interventions in the bile duct. PMID:18083076

  4. Value of Intraoperative Sonography in Pancreatic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Stefanie; Morgan, Tara; Poder, Liina; Shin, Lewis; Jeffrey, R Brooke; Aslam, Rizwan; Yee, Judy

    2015-07-01

    The utility of intraoperative sonography for pancreatic disease has been well described for detection and evaluation of neoplastic and inflammatory pancreatic disease. Intraoperative sonography can help substantially reduce surgical time as well as decrease potential injury to tissues and major structures. Imaging with sonography literally at the point of care--the surgeon's scalpel--can precisely define the location of pancreatic lesions and their direct relationship with surrounding structures in real time during surgery. This article highlights our experience with intraoperative sonography at multiple institutional sites for both open and laparoscopic surgical procedures. We use intraoperative sonography for a wide range of pancreatic disease to provide accurate localization and staging of disease, provide guidance for enucleation of nonpalpable, nonvisible tumors, and in planning the most direct and least invasive surgical approach, avoiding injury to the pancreatic duct or other vital structures. PMID:26112636

  5. Pancreatic tumors imaging: An update.

    PubMed

    Scialpi, Michele; Reginelli, Alfonso; D'Andrea, Alfredo; Gravante, Sabrina; Falcone, Giuseppe; Baccari, Paolo; Manganaro, Lucia; Palumbo, Barbara; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Currently, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) represent the mainstay in the evaluation of pancreatic solid and cystic tumors affecting pancreas in 80-85% and 10-15% of the cases respectively. Integration of US, CT or MR imaging is essential for an accurate assessment of pancreatic parenchyma, ducts and adjacent soft tissues in order to detect and to stage the tumor, to differentiate solid from cystic lesions and to establish an appropriate treatment. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of pancreatic tumors and the role of imaging in their diagnosis and management. In order to a prompt and accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of pancreatic lesions, it is crucial for radiologists to know the key findings of the most frequent tumors of the pancreas and the current role of imaging modalities. A multimodality approach is often helpful. If multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is the preferred initial imaging modality in patients with clinical suspicion for pancreatic cancer, multiparametric MRI provides essential information for the detection and characterization of a wide variety of pancreatic lesions and can be used as a problem-solving tool at diagnosis and during follow-up. PMID:26777740

  6. Management of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Giger, Urs; Stanga, Zeno; DeLegge, Mark H

    2004-02-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disorder that results in permanent impairment of the glandular anatomy of the pancreas with or without functional abnormalities. The pathogenesis of CP is usually unclear, except in the case of alcohol-induced disease. The most common symptoms of CP are abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss often requiring recurring hospitalization. Over time, pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction may develop as the disease progresses, and a variety of complications can occur. Among the possible complications are nutrient malabsorption and diabetes mellitus. The treatment of CP is difficult and challenging for every physician. Relieving pain is the first step in treating CP. This symptom needs to be controlled, often with narcotics, which can cause dependence. Diarrhea usually indicates the presence of steatorrhea, which is often treated with a high-calorie, high-protein, and low-fat diet to minimize symptoms of the underlying disease and to promote weight retention or gain. Pancreatic replacement therapy is used to combat maldigestion and malabsorption. Patients with diabetes may need insulin therapy for glycemic control. The use of parenteral nutrition for bowel rest is a standard approach in patients with symptomatic CP. The use of jejunal enteral feeding recently has been evaluated for efficacy in CP patients. The role of pancreatic endotherapy in the management of CP is evolving. Several reports have suggested that endoscopic therapy aimed at decompressing the obstructed pancreatic duct can be associated with pain relief in some patients. Surgery should be considered in patients who fail medical therapy. PMID:16215095

  7. Lightweight Valve Closes Duct Quickly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournier, Walter L.; Burgy, N. Frank

    1991-01-01

    Expanding balloon serves as lightweight emergency valve to close wide duct. Uninflated balloon stored in housing of duct. Pad resting on burst diaphragm protects balloon from hot gases in duct. Once control system triggers valve, balloon inflates rapidly to block duct. Weighs much less than does conventional butterfly, hot-gas, or poppet valve capable of closing duct of equal diameter.

  8. Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of pancreatic cancer, and it is now clear that pancreatic cancer is a disease of inherited (germ-line) and somatic gene mutations. The genes mutated in pancreatic cancer include KRAS2, p16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, and these are accompanied by a substantial compendium of genomic and transcriptomic alterations that facilitate cell cycle deregulation, cell survival, invasion, and metastases. Pancreatic cancers do not arise de novo, and three distinct precursor lesions have been identified. Experimental models of pancreatic cancer have been developed in genetically engineered mice, which recapitulate the multistep progression of the cognate human disease. Although the putative cell of origin for pancreatic cancer remains elusive, minor populations of cells with stem-like properties have been identified that appear responsible for tumor initiation, metastases, and resistance of pancreatic cancer to conventional therapies. PMID:18039136

  9. Biliary cirrhosis secondary to obstruction of the common bile duct by ectopic pancreas in a cow.

    PubMed

    Shimada, A; Iwata, K; Morita, T; Umemura, T; Yamaga, Y; Kagota, K

    1998-01-01

    A 10-year-old Japanese Black cow showed icterus with gradual emaciation for a period of 3 months. Ultrasonography demonstrated increased "echogenicity" of the entire liver, with marked dilatation of the gall-bladder. At necropsy, the common bile duct was found to be obstructed by focally thickened fibrous tissue adjacent to a flesh-like mass (9 x 4 x 4 mm) attached to the wall of the duct. The mass consisted of normal pancreatic tissue. The liver showed moderate fibrosis, with nodular regeneration of the hepatic tissue and bile duct hyperplasia. A diagnosis of biliary cirrhosis secondary to ectopic pancreas in the common bile duct was made. PMID:9500240

  10. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) refers to a clinical entity characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis which occurs on more than one occasion. Recurrence of pancreatitis generally occurs in a setting of normal morpho-functional gland, however, an established chronic disease may be found either on the occasion of the first episode of pancreatitis or during the follow-up. The aetiology of ARP can be identified in the majority of patients. Most common causes include common bile duct stones or sludge and bile crystals; sphincter of oddi dysfunction; anatomical ductal variants interfering with pancreatic juice outflow; obstruction of the main pancreatic duct or pancreatico-biliary junction; genetic mutations; alcohol consumption. However, despite diagnostic technologies, the aetiology of ARP still remains unknown in up to 30% of cases: in these cases the term “idiopathic” is used. Because occult bile stone disease and sphincter of oddi dysfunction account for the majority of cases, cholecystectomy, and eventually the endoscopic biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy are curative in most of cases. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy appeared to be a curative procedure per se in about 80% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid oral treatment alone has also been reported effective for treatment of biliary sludge. In uncertain cases toxin botulin injection may help in identifying some sphincter of oddi dysfunction, but this treatment is not widely used. In the last twenty years, pancreatic endotherapy has been proven effective in cases of recurrent pancreatitis depending on pancreatic ductal obstruction, independently from the cause of obstruction, and has been widely used instead of more aggressive approaches. PMID:25493002

  11. [Nutritional repercussions and management of chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Botella Romero, F; Alfaro Martínez, J J

    2008-05-01

    The pancreas is a retroperitoneal organ that releases water, bicarbonate and digestive enzymes by the main pancreatic duct (MPD) into the duodenum. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is typically caused, in adults, by chronic alcohol abuse and, less frequently hypertriglyceridemia, primary hyperparathyroidism or cystic fibrosis. Exocrine dysfunction results in malabsorption of fat and subsequent steatorrhea. Damage to pancreatic endocrine function is a late finding in CP and results in hyperglycaemia or overt diabetes mellitus. Care of patients with CP principally involves management of pain. A significant change in the pain pattern or the sudden onset of persistent symptoms suggests the need to rule out other potential etiologies, including peptic ulcer disease, biliary obstruction, pseudocysts, pancreatic carcinoma, and pancreatic duct stricture or stones, then is important to establish a secure diagnosis. Management of pain should then proceed in a judicious stepwise approach avoiding opioids dependence. Patients should be advised to stop alcohol intake. Fat malabsorption and other complications may also arise. Management of steatorrhea should begin with small meals and restriction in fat intake. Pancreatic enzyme supplements can relieve symptoms and reduce malabsorption in patients who do not respond to dietary restriction. Enzymes at high doses should be used with meals. Treatment with acid suppression to reduce inactivation of the enzymes from gastric acid are recommended. Supplementation with medium chain triglycerides and fat soluble vitamin replacement may be required. Management of other complications (such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction, pancreatic ascites, splenic vein thrombosis and pseudoaneurysms) often requires aggressive approach with the patient kept on total parenteral nutrition to minimize pancreatic stimulation. PMID:18714412

  12. Preoperative assessment and optimization in periampullary and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Myatra, S; Divatia, J V; Jibhkate, B; Barreto, G S; Shrikhande, S V

    2011-01-01

    Perioperative management of pancreatic and periampullary cancer poses a considerable challenge to the pancreatic surgeon, anesthesiologist, and the intensive care team. The preoperative surgical evaluation of a pancreatic lesion aims to define the nature of the lesion (malignant or benign), stage the tumor, and to determine resectability or other non-surgical treatment options. Patients are often elderly and may have significant comorbidities and malnutrition. Obstructive jaundice may lead to coagulopathy, infection, renal dysfunction, and adverse outcomes. Routine preoperative biliary drainage can result in higher complication rates, and metal stents may be preferred over plastic stents in selected patients with resectable disease. Judicious use of antibiotics and maintaining fluid volume preoperatively can reduce the incidence of infection and renal dysfunction, respectively. Perioperative fluid therapy with hemodynamic optimization using minimally invasive monitoring may help improve outcomes. Careful patient selection, appropriate preoperative evaluation and optimization can greatly contribute to a favorable outcome after major pancreatic resections. PMID:21248439

  13. Advanced Duct Sealing Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2003-08-01

    Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have typically shown that these seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been testing sealant durability for several years. Typical duct tape (i.e. fabric backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) was found to fail more rapidly than all other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing of five UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (three cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The first test involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars, and sheet metal ''collar-to-plenum joints'' pressurized with 200 F (93 C) air. The second test consisted of baking duct tape specimens in a constant 212 F (100 C) oven following the UL 181B-FX ''Temperature Test'' requirements. Additional tests were also performed on only two tapes using sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints. Since an unsealed flexible duct joint can have a variable leakage depending on the positioning of the flexible duct core, the durability of the flexible duct joints could not be based on the 10% of unsealed leakage criteria. Nevertheless, the leakage of the sealed specimens prior to testing could be considered as a basis for a failure criteria. Visual inspection was also documented throughout the tests. The flexible duct core-to-collar joints were inspected monthly, while the sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints were inspected weekly. The baking test specimens were visually inspected weekly, and the durability was judged by the observed deterioration in terms of brittleness, cracking, flaking and blistering (the terminology used in the UL 181B-FX test procedure).

  14. Duct Tape Durability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2004-04-01

    Duct leakage is a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums, or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections, a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that taped seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been testing sealant durability for several years using accelerated test methods and found that typical duct tape (i.e., cloth-backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) fails more rapidly than other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing over two years for four UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (two cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The tests involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars. Periodic air leakage tests and visual inspection were used to document changes in sealant performance. After two years of testing, the flex-to-collar connections showed little change in air leakage, but substantial visual degradation from some products. A surprising experimental result was failure of most of the clamps used to mechanically fasten the connections. This indicates that the durability of clamps also need to be addressed ensure longevity of the duct connection. An accelerated test method developed during this study has been used as the basis for an ASTM standard (E2342-03).

  15. [Stent, endovascular prosthesis, net or strut? What would British dentist Charles Stent (1807-1885) have to say on all this?].

    PubMed

    Lukenda, Josip; Biocina-Lukenda, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    The word stent appears in the Index Medicus as of 1952, while in Croatian articles as of 1993. The origin of the word has been attributed to British dentist Charles. T. Stent (1807-1885), maker of the compound for dental impressions (Stent's compound). Viennese surgeon, Johannes F. S. Esser (1877-1946) used the compound in plastic surgery of the face calling it an eponym Stent's mould. During the 1950's, William H. ReMine and John H. Grindlay used Stent's principle for omentum lined plastic tubes in the bile duct of a dog. The development of today's vascular stents began in 1912 when French Nobel Prize winner Alexis Carrel (1873-1944) implanted glass tubes in the arteries of dogs. The first metal spirals were implanted in the arteries of dogs by Charles T. Dotter (1920-1985), while the first stents in human arteries were implanted by French doctors Ulrich Sigwart and Jacques Puel in Toulouse in 1986. Some authors claim that the origin of the word stent is associated with the Scotish word stynt or stent, meaning stretched out river fishing nets. PMID:19348354

  16. Chronic Pancreatitis: Landmark Papers, Management Decisions, and Future.

    PubMed

    DiMagno, Eugene P; DiMagno, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    On May 16, 2015 at the invitation of the American Gastroenterological Association Institute Council E.P.D. presented a state-of-the-art lecture at Digestive Disease Week 2015. The aims were to discuss a selection of landmark papers in chronic pancreatitis (CP) that influence modern management and to conclude by suggesting some future directions. This is based on that presentation. We will specifically review the following: duct anatomy and pancreas divisum, description of chronic relapsing pancreatitis and its differentiation from recurrent acute pancreatitis and established CP (ECP), natural histories and gene discoveries of alcoholic, idiopathic and hereditary pancreatitis, development of pancreatic cancer in CP, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and calculation of dose and delivery of enzymes, endoscopic ultrasonography, and autoimmune pancreatitis. With some exceptions, we exclude basic science and surgery. PMID:27077713

  17. Endoscopic ultrasonography for evaluating patients with recurrent pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Maria Chiara; Arcidiacono, Paolo G; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) is still a complex diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in clinical practice. In up to 30% of cases of ARP, it is not possible to establish the etiology of the disease. In the other 70%, many factors play an etiological role in ARP: microlithiasis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD), pancreas divisum, hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, a choledochocele, annular pancreas, an anomalous pancreatobiliary junction, pancreatic tumors or chronic pancreatitis are diagnosed. EUS should be useful in ARP as it is sensitive for diagnosing bile duct stones, gallbladder sludge, pancreatic lesions, ductal abnormalities and chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) appears to be diagnostic in the majority of patients with previously unexplained pancreatitis, and offers an alternative to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) as the initial diagnostic test in patients with ARP. PMID:18286681

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hammami, Mohamed; Noomen, Faouzi; Toumi, Omar; Harzallah, Olfa; Mahmoudi, Ammar; Kallel, Wassim; Zouari, Khadija; Hamdi, Abdelaziz

    2011-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a particular type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology, it is an entity distinct from all others forms of chronic pancreatitis, characterized by clinical, histopathological, radiographic, serologic and therapeutic features. This benign disease resembles pancreatic carcinoma both clinically and radiographically. Case Report: A 27-year-old man presented with obstructive jaundice and evocative image of pancreatic tumor. A pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple operation) was performed and pathological examination of the specimen diagnosed AIP. Patient responded well to a course of corticosteroids with resolution of clinical and biological disorders. Conclusion: Accurate and timely diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis is particularly important because steroid therapy is effective and pancreatic resection is not necessary. PMID:22361500

  19. Surgical therapy in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Neal, C P; Dennison, A R; Garcea, G

    2012-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas which causes chronic pain, as well as exocrine and endocrine failure in the majority of patients, together producing social and domestic upheaval and a very poor quality of life. At least half of patients will require surgical intervention at some stage in their disease, primarily for the treatment of persistent pain. Available data have now confirmed that surgical intervention may produce superior results to conservative and endoscopic treatment. Comprehensive individual patient assessment is crucial to optimal surgical management, however, in order to determine which morphological disease variant (large duct disease, distal stricture with focal disease, expanded head or small duct/minimal change disease) is present in the individual patient, as a wide and differing range of surgical approaches are possible depending upon the specific abnormality within the gland. This review comprehensively assesses the evidence for these differing approaches to surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis. Surgical drainage procedures should be limited to a small number of patients with a dilated duct and no pancreatic head mass. Similarly, a small population presenting with a focal stricture and tail only disease may be successfully treated by distal pancreatectomy. Long-term results of both of these procedure types are poor, however. More impressive results have been yielded for the surgical treatment of the expanded head, for which a range of surgical options now exist. Evidence from level I studies and a recent meta-analysis suggests that duodenum-preserving resections offer benefits compared to pancreaticoduodenectomy, though the results of the ongoing, multicentre ChroPac trial are awaited to confirm this. Further data are also needed to determine which of the duodenum-preserving procedures provides optimal results. In relation to small duct/minimal change disease total pancreatectomy represents the only valid surgical option for the treatment of pain. Though previously dismissed as a valid treatment due to the resultant brittle diabetes, the advent of islet cell autotransplantation has enabled this procedure to produce excellent long-term results in relation to pain, endocrine status and quality of life. Given these excellent short- and long-term results of surgical therapy for chronic pancreatitis, and the poor symptom control provided by conservative and endoscopic treatment (coupled to near inevitable progression to exocrine and endocrine failure), it is likely that future years will see a further shift towards the earlier and more frequent surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis. Furthermore, the expansion of islet cell autotransplantation to a wider range of pancreatic resections has the potential to even further improve the outcomes of surgical treatment for this problematic yet increasingly common disease. PMID:23207614

  20. Ducted auroral kilometric radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1982-01-01

    Certain discrete, intense wave signals attributed to auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) were observed with ISEE-l while it was within the plasmaspheric shadow zone for direct propagation. It is believed that wave ducting by thin depletions of the plasma density aligned with the magnetic field accounts for such signals, and that their discrete nature is caused by the satellite intercepting individual ducts. These ducts, which were also observed as coincident decreases of the upper hybrid resonance frequency, appeared to be twenty-percent depletions roughly one hundred kilometers across. The AKR, which is emitted approximately perpendicular to the magnetic field, apparently entered these ducts equatorward of the source after the waves had been refracted parallel to the duct axis. A diffuse background was also observed which is consistent with the leakage from similar ducts at lower L-values. These observations establish the existence of ducted AKR, its signature on the satellite wave spectrograms, and new evidence for depletion ducts within the plasmasphere.

  1. The angle of pancreaticobiliary junction correlates with acute pancreatitis: a magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nian; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Dong, Guo-Li; Jing, Zong-Lin; Gao, Cai-Liang; Tang, Meng-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the correlation between the angle of the pancreaticobiliary junction (APJ) and the prevalence of acute pancreatitis using magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Materials and methods From February 2014 to October 2014, thirty two subjects with normal pancreas (group A) and 40 patients with acute pancreatitis (group B) who underwent MRCP were enrolled into our study. The type of biliary duct and main pancreatic duct joining the duodenal wall was reviewed and divided into V, B-P and P-B type. The V type is the pancreatic duct and biliary duct joining the duodenal wall without a common channel; the B-P type is the biliary duct draining into the pancreatic duct and forming a common channel; and the P-B type is the pancreatic duct draining into the biliary duct and forming a common channel. APJ was measured on MRCP. The correlation between the APJ and the prevalence of acute pancreatitis was analyzed. Results The APJ in group A was smaller than in group B (51.45°±13.51° vs. 65.76°±15.61°, P<0.05). According to the type of biliary duct and main pancreatic duct joining the duodenal wall, the prevalence of acute pancreatitis in the V type and in the B-P type was higher than in the P-B type (12/17 vs. 10/29, or 18/26 vs. 10/29, respectively, all P<0.05), whereas there were no significant difference for the prevalence of acute pancreatitis between the V type and B-P type (P>0.05). The APJ were 59.32°±20.04°, 60.22°±11.06°, 57.13°±17.27°, respectively in V type, B-P type and P-B type joining of main pancreatic duct (P>0.05). Conclusions A larger APJ is related to a higher prevalence of acute pancreatitis. PMID:26029643

  2. Endoscopic management of difficult common bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Trikudanathan, Guru; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Parsi, Mansour A

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopy is widely accepted as the first treatment option in the management of bile duct stones. In this review we focus on the alternative endoscopic modalities for the management of difficult common bile duct stones. Most biliary stones can be removed with an extraction balloon, extraction basket or mechanical lithotripsy after endoscopic sphincterotomy. Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation with or without endoscopic sphincterotomy or mechanical lithotripsy has been shown to be effective for management of difficult to remove bile duct stones in selected patients. Ductal clearance can be safely achieved with peroral cholangioscopy guided laser or electrohydraulic lithotripsy in most cases where other endoscopic treatment modalities have failed. Biliary stenting may be an alternative treatment option for frail and elderly patients or those with serious co morbidities. PMID:23345939

  3. Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase regulates pancreatic ductal, but not β-cell, regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheng-Ho; Miller, Amber; Panopoulos, Andreas; Hao, Ergeng; Margolis, Robert; Terskikh, Alexey; Levine, Fred

    2014-09-01

    The maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) is expressed in stem/progenitor cells in some adult tissues, where it has been implicated in diverse biological processes, including the control of cell proliferation. Here, we described studies on its role in adult pancreatic regeneration in response to injury induced by duct ligation and β-cell ablation. MELK expression was studied using transgenic mice expressing GFP under the control of the MELK promoter, and the role of MELK was studied using transgenic mice deleted in the MELK kinase domain. Pancreatic damage was initiated using duct ligation and chemical beta-cell ablation. By tracing MELK expression using a MELK promoter-GFP transgene, we determined that expression was extremely low in the normal pancreas. However, following duct ligation and β-cell ablation, it became highly expressed in pancreatic ductal cells while remaining weakly expressed in α-cells and β- cells. In a mutant mouse in which the MELK kinase domain was deleted, there was no effect on pancreatic development. There was no apparent effect on islet regeneration, either. However, following duct ligation there was a dramatic increase in the number of small ducts, but no change in the total number of duct cells or duct cell proliferation. In vitro studies indicated that this was likely due to a defect in cell migration. These results implicate MELK in the control of the response of the pancreas to injury, specifically controlling cell migration in normal and transformed pancreatic duct cells. PMID:25194022

  4. Pancreatic panniculitis.

    PubMed

    Rongioletti, F; Caputo, V

    2013-08-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis (PP) is a rare variant of panniculitis characterized by subcutaneous fat necrosis, that affects 0.3-3% of patients across a range of different pancreatic disorders. It presents with painful, tender, erythematous to violaceous nodules that may undergo spontaneous ulceration and discharge of an oily brown, viscous material, resulting from liquefactive necrosis of adipocytes. These lesions usually involve the lower extremities, although may also spread over the buttocks, trunk, arms and scalp. In addition to the skin, fat necrosis may involve periarticular, abdominal and intramedullary adipose tissue. In 40% of cases, skin manifestations can precede by 1 to 7 months the abdominal symptoms of pancreatic disease, which include mostly acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, more frequently of acinar cell type, and pancreatic abnormalities. Histopathologically, PP shows characteristic features of mostly lobular panniculitis with marked necrosis of adipocytes. The necrotic adipocytes with finely granular and basophilic material in the cytoplasm due to calcium deposits are known as "ghost adipocytes". The treatment of pancreatic panniculitis is directed to the underlying pancreatic disease. The prognosis is poor in cases associated with pancreatic carcinoma. When there is widespread and persistent disease, frequent relapses, or ulceration, the possibility of an occult carcinoma of the pancreas should be always considered. While describing three patients seen at the Dermatology Section of the University of Genova from 1990 to 2012, we highlight that, in addition to the rarity of the disease, the precise diagnosis requires adequate samples consisting in large-scalpel incisional biopsies of fully developed lesions. PMID:23900163

  5. Utility of Stent-Grafts in Treatment of Porto-Biliary Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Peynircioglu, Bora; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2006-12-15

    A porto-biliary fistula causing hemobilia is a known complication of percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). We present two patients with hemobilia secondary to porto-biliary fistula, treated successfully by percutaneous placement of stent-grafts. In one case, the stent-graft was placed in the bile duct, and in the other case, it was placed in the intrahepatic portal vein branch. Hemobilia stopped and there were no complications except a small area of hepatic infarction, distal to the stent-graft in the portal vein.

  6. Endoscopic stenting for inoperable malignant biliary obstruction: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zorrón Pu, Leonardo; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Baracat, Felipe Iankelevich; Mendonça, Ernesto Quaresma; Kondo, André; Luz, Gustavo Oliveira; Furuya Júnior, Carlos Kiyoshi; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze through meta-analyses the benefits of two types of stents in the inoperable malignant biliary obstruction. METHODS: A systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCT) was conducted, with the last update on March 2015, using EMBASE, CINAHL (EBSCO), MEDLINE, LILACS/CENTRAL (BVS), SCOPUS, CAPES (Brazil), and gray literature. Information of the selected studies was extracted in sight of six outcomes: primarily regarding dysfunction, complication and re-intervention rates; and secondarily costs, survival, and patency time. The data about characteristics of trial participants, inclusion and exclusion criteria and types of stents were also extracted. The bias was mainly assessed through the JADAD scale. This meta-analysis was registered in the PROSPERO database by the number CRD42014015078. The analysis of the absolute risk of the outcomes was performed using the software RevMan, by computing risk differences (RD) of dichotomous variables and mean differences (MD) of continuous variables. Data on RD and MD for each primary outcome were calculated using the Mantel-Haenszel test and inconsistency was qualified and reported in χ2 and the Higgins method (I2). Sensitivity analysis was performed when heterogeneity was higher than 50%, a subsequent assay was done and other findings were compiled. Student’s t-test was used for the comparison of weighted arithmetic means regarding secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Initial searching identified 3660 studies; 3539 were excluded through title, repetition, and/or abstract, while 121 studies were fully assessed and were excluded mainly because they did not compare self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) and plastic stents (PS), leading to thirteen RCT selected, with 13 articles and 1133 subjects meta-analyzed. The mean age was 69.5 years old, that were affected mostly by bile duct (proximal) and pancreatic tumors (distal). The preferred SEMS diameter used was the 10 mm (30 Fr) and the preferred PS diameter used was 10 Fr. In the meta-analysis, SEMS had lower overall stent dysfunction compared to PS (21.6% vs 46.8%, P < 0.00001) and fewer re-interventions (21.6% vs 56.6%, P < 0.00001), with no difference in complications (13.7% vs 15.9%, P = 0.16). In the secondary analysis, the mean survival rate was higher in the SEMS group (182 d vs 150 d, P < 0.0001), with a higher patency period (250 d vs 124 d, P < 0.0001) and a lower cost per patient (4193.98 vs 4728.65 Euros, P < 0.0985). CONCLUSION: SEMS are associated with lower stent dysfunction, lower re-intervention rates, better survival, and higher patency time. Complications and costs showed no difference. PMID:26715823

  7. An Update to Hepatobiliary Stents

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Brian T.; Birk, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic stent placement is a common primary management therapy for benign and malignant biliary strictures. However, continuous use of stents is limited by occlusion and migration. Stent technology has evolved significantly over the past two decades to reduce these problems. The purpose of this article is to review current guidelines in managing malignant and benign biliary obstructions, current endoscopic techniques for stent placement, and emerging stent technology. What began as a simple plastic stent technology has evolved significantly to include uncovered, partially covered, and fully covered self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) as well as magnetic, bioabsorbable, drug-eluting, and antireflux stents.1 PMID:26357636

  8. Expandable Metal Stents for the Palliation of Malignant Gastroduodenal Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Razzaq, Rubeena; Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; England, Ruth; Marriott, Angie; Martin, Derrick

    2001-09-15

    Purpose: Gastric outlet obstruction is a debilitating complication of upper gastrointestinal malignancy. We present our experience with insertion of self-expanding metal stents (SEMS).Methods: Twenty-eight patients were referred, stenting being attempted in 23. Two patients had esophageal Wallstents inserted through a gastrostomy; 21 had an endoscopic approach with enteral Wallstents.Results: One stent insertion failed, ten patients (45%) returned to a normal diet, ten patients (45%) managed semi-solid food and two patients (9%) had no significant improvement. No immediate complications were seen. One patient subsequently developed pancreatitis. Reintervention (4 stents, 1 jejunostomy, 1 gastro jejunostomy) was required in six of 22 patients (27%) for inadequate stent expansion (1), second stricture (2), stent migration (1), and tumor ingrowth (2). The mean survival was 95.4 days (SD 78.8 days, range 3-230 days). The mean follow-up time was 98.9 days (SD 86.7 days, range 3-309 days).Conclusions: SEMS are effective in palliating malignant gastric outlet obstruction. A combined endoscopic/fluoroscopic approach allows the most complete assessment of the stricture and removes the need for gastrostomy insertion. Careful assessment of the gastrointestinal tract distal to the lesion is important.

  9. Imaging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Part 1: acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Türkvatan, A; Erden, A; Türkoğlu, M A; Seçil, M; Yener, Ö

    2015-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas that may also involve surrounding tissues or remote organs. The Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was introduced in 1992 and divides patients into mild and severe groups based on clinical and biochemical criteria. Recently, the terminology and classification scheme proposed at the initial Atlanta Symposium have been reviewed and a new consensus statement has been proposed by the Acute Pancreatitis Classification Working Group. Generally, imaging is recommended to confirm the clinical diagnosis, investigate the etiology, and grade the extend and severity of the acute pancreatitis. Ultrasound is the first-line imaging modality in most centers for the confirmation of the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and the ruling out of other causes of acute abdomen, but it has limitations in the acute clinical setting. Computed tomography not only establishes the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, but also enables to stage severity of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging has earned an ever more important role in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. It is especially useful for imaging of patients with iodine allergies, characterizing collections and assessment of an abnormal or disconnected pancreatic duct. The purpose of this review article is to present an overview of the acute pancreatitis, clarify confusing terminology, underline the role of ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging according to the proper clinical context and compare the advantages and limitations of each modality. PMID:24512896

  10. Pyogenic pancreatic abscess mimicking pancreatic neoplasm: a four-case series.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jin; Seo, Eui Keun; Kang, Eun Seok; Kim, Keun Mo; Oh, Young Min; Cho, Byung Ha; Kim, Hyung Woo; Ji, Myoung Jin; Jeong, Ji Won; Park, Seon Mee

    2015-04-01

    A pyogenic pancreatic abscess mimicking pancreatic neoplasm in the absence of acute pancreatitis is rare. We report four patients who each presented with a pancreatic mass at the pancreas head or body without acute pancreatitis. The presenting symptoms were abdominal pain, fever, or weight loss. Abdominal CT scans showed low-density round masses at the pancreas head or body with/without lymphadenopathy. In each case, a PET-CT scan showed a mass with a high SUV, indicating possible malignancy. Comorbid diseases were identified in all patients: chronic pancreatitis and thrombus at the portal vein, penetrating duodenal ulcer, distal common bile duct stenosis, and diabetes mellitus. Diagnoses were performed by laparoscopic biopsy in two patients and via EUS fine needle aspiration in one patient. One patient revealed a multifocal microabscess at the pancreatic head caused by a deep-penetrating duodenal ulcer. He was treated with antibiotics and a proton-pump inhibitor. The clinical symptoms and pancreatic images of all the patients were improved using conservative management. Infective causes should be considered for a pancreatic mass mimicking malignancy. PMID:25896161

  11. Successful treatment with a covered stent and 6-year follow-up of biliary complication after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doros, Attila; Németh, Andrea; Deák, Akos Pál; Hartmann, Erika; Gerlei, Zsuzsa; Fazakas, János; Kóbori, László

    2010-04-01

    The role of covered stent in the management of biliary complications is not yet defined in liver transplant recipients. This Case Report presents a patient with anastomotic stricture and leakage with biloma treated with a covered stent 32 months following liver transplantation. Signs of in-stent restenosis developed 52 months following covered stent placement, which was resolved by balloon dilation. There were no complications during the interventions. The latest follow-up, at 69 months following primary and 19 months following secondary percutaneous intervention, shows a patent covered stent without any clinical or morphological sign of further restenosis. The clinical success with long-term follow-up data suggests that covered stent implantation can be a rational, minimally invasive option for simultaneous treatment of bile duct stenosis and bile leak following liver transplantation in selected cases. PMID:19333650

  12. Successful Treatment with a Covered Stent and 6-Year Follow-Up of Biliary Complication After Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Doros, Attila Nemeth, Andrea; Deak, Akos Pal; Hartmann, Erika; Gerlei, Zsuzsa; Fazakas, Janos; Kobori, Laszlo

    2010-04-15

    The role of covered stent in the management of biliary complications is not yet defined in liver transplant recipients. This Case Report presents a patient with anastomotic stricture and leakage with biloma treated with a covered stent 32 months following liver transplantation. Signs of in-stent restenosis developed 52 months following covered stent placement, which was resolved by balloon dilation. There were no complications during the interventions. The latest follow-up, at 69 months following primary and 19 months following secondary percutaneous intervention, shows a patent covered stent without any clinical or morphological sign of further restenosis. The clinical success with long-term follow-up data suggests that covered stent implantation can be a rational, minimally invasive option for simultaneous treatment of bile duct stenosis and bile leak following liver transplantation in selected cases.

  13. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  14. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  15. Pancreatic tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Kumar, Amit; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic tuberculosis is very rare, but recently, there has been a spurt in the number of reports on pancreatic involvement by tuberculosis. It closely mimics pancreatic cancer, and before the advent of better imaging modalities it was often detected as a histological surprise in patients resected for a presumed pancreatic malignancy. The usual presentation involves abdominal pain, loss of appetite and weight, jaundice which can be associated with cholestasis, fever and night sweats, palpable abdominal lump, and peripheral lymphadenopathy. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen is an important tool for evaluation of patients with pancreatic tuberculosis. This CT imaging yields valuable information about the size and nature of tubercular lesions along with the presence of ascites and lymphadenopathy. However, there are no distinctive features on CT that distinguish it from pancreatic carcinoma. Endoscopic ultrasound provides high resolution images of the pancreatic lesions as well as an opportunity to sample these lesions for cytological confirmation. The presence of granulomas is the most common finding on histological/cytological examination with the presence of acid fast bacilli being observed only in minority of patients. As there are no randomized or comparative studies on treatment of pancreatic tuberculosis it is usually treated like other forms of tuberculosis. Excellent cure rates are reported with standard anti tubercular therapy given for 6-12 months. PMID:26414325

  16. Polyurethane-Covered Nitinol Strecker Stents as Primary Palliative Treatment of Malignant Biliary Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kanasaki, Shuzo; Furukawa, Akira; Kane, Teruyuki; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of the polyurethane-covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the treatment of patients with malignant biliary obstruction.Methods: Twenty-three covered stents produced by us were placed in 18 patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Jaundice was caused by cholangiocarcinoma (n = 5), pancreatic cancer (n = 6), gallbladder cancer (n = 4), metastatic lymph nodes (n = 2), and tumor of the papilla (n 1).Results: The mean patency period of the stents was 37.5 weeks (5-106 weeks). Recurrent obstructive jaundice occurred in two patients (11%). Adequate biliary drainage over 50 weeks or until death was achieved in 17 of 18 patients (94.4%). Late cholangitis was observed in two patients whose stents bridged the ampulla of Vater. Other late severe complications were not encountered.Conclusion: Although more study is necessary, our results suggest the clinical efficacy of our covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the management of obstructive jaundice caused by malignant diseases.

  17. Bile Duct Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Bile Duct Cancer ... with Side Effects After Treatment Questions to Ask ...

  18. Differentiating Autoimmune Pancreatitis from Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma using Dual-phase Computed Tomography: An Inter-observer Study

    PubMed Central

    Zaheer, Atif; Singh, Vikesh K.; Akshintala, Venkata S.; Kawamoto, Satomi; Tsai, Salina D.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Fishman, Elliot K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study features on dual phase CT that help differentiate autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) from pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA). Methods The CTs of 32 patients with AIP were matched with equal number of PA and independently evaluated by 3 radiologists who assigned a diagnosis of AIP, PA, or unsure. Interobserver agreement between radiologists was evaluated using kappa statistics. Results The mean accuracy for diagnosing AIP and PA was 68% and 83%, respectively. There was moderate agreement between radiologists (κ: 0.58, p<0.0001). The most common findings for AIP: CBD stricture (63%), bile duct wall hyperenhancement (47%), and diffuse parenchymal enlargement (41%). The most common findings for PA: Focal mass (78%, κ: 0.58, p<0.0001) and pancreatic ductal dilatation (69%, κ: 0.7, p<0.0001). Findings helpful for diagnosing AIP were diffuse enlargement, parenchymal atrophy as well as absence of pancreatic duct dilatation and focal mass. Findings helpful for diagnosing PA were focal mass and pancreatic ductal dilatation. Misdiagnosis of PA in patients with AIP was due to focal mass, pancreatic duct dilatation and pancreatic atrophy and AIP in patients with PA was due to absence of atrophy, presence of diffuse enlargement and peripancreatic halo. Conclusion Diffuse enlargement, hypoenhancement and characteristic peripancreatic halo are strong indicators for a diagnosis of AIP. Radiologists demonstrated moderate agreement in distinguishing AIP from PA on the basis of CT imaging. PMID:24424563

  19. Investigations of ducted jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yule, A. J.; Damou, M.

    1991-07-01

    An attempt is made to obtain detailed information on ducted-jet flows for the testing of CFD modeling methods when applied to this type of flow. This goal was achieved for the case of ducted jets developing from a turbulent pipe flow in the nozzle. The results provide useful data that can be interpreted in terms of the physical structure of the turbulent flows.

  20. Endovascular Exclusion of Visceral Artery Aneurysms with Stent-Grafts: Technique and Long-Term Follow-up

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Michele; Rebonato, Alberto Greco, Laura; Citone, Michele; David, Vincenzo

    2008-01-15

    This paper describes four cases of visceral artery aneurysms (VAAs) successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafts and discusses the endovascular approach to VAAs and the long-term results. Four balloon expandable stent-grafts were used to treat three splenic artery aneurysms and one bleeding common hepatic artery pseudoaneurysm. The percutaneous access site and the materials were chosen on the basis of CT angiography findings. In all cases the aneurysms were successfully excluded. In one case a splenic infarction occurred, with nonrelevant clinical findings. At 16- to 24-month follow-up three patients had patent stents and complete exclusion and shrinkage of the aneurysms. One patient died due to pancreatitis and sepsis, 16 days after successful stenting and exclusion of a bleeding pseudoaneurysm. We conclude that endovascular treatment using covered stent-grafts is a valid therapeutic option for VAAs. Multislice CT preoperative study helps in planning stent-graft positioning.

  1. Prognostic significance of Ki-67 antigen and p53 protein expression in pancreatic duct carcinoma: a study of the monoclonal antibodies MIB-1 and DO-7 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumour material.

    PubMed Central

    Linder, S.; Parrado, C.; Falkmer, U. G.; Blåsjö, M.; Sundelin, P.; von Rosen, A.

    1997-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material from 57 patients in whom curative resection of pancreatic carcinoma had been attempted was analysed by an immunohistochemical procedure to estimate proliferation and p53 protein expression. Using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) MIB-1, which recognizes a Ki-67 epitope, the proliferating cell index (PCI, percentage of immunoreactive tumour nuclei) and proliferating cell area (PCA, percentage of immunoreactive tumour nuclear area) were calculated using an interactive image analysis system and were compared with semiquantitative scoring of stainability. MAb DO-7, which recognizes both wild- and mutant-type p53 protein, was used to assess p53 expression in the same material. MIB-1 stainings were of high quality in 53 tumours. The median PCI was 29.7% (range 0.5-82.1%) and the median PCA was 10.6% (range 0.0-36.5%). There was a close correlation between PCI and PCA (P < 0.0001). PCI and PCA values were in conformity with the semiquantitative scoring (P < 0.0001). The p53 immunohistochemical stainings were successful in 48 tumours and the protein was expressed in 22 (46%). High PCI values (> 45%, n = 14) correlated with shorter survival time (P < 0.01). PCA (P < 0.05) and the expression of p53 protein (P < 0.001) were independent prognostic variables. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9218733

  2. Minimally invasive treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts

    PubMed Central

    Zerem, Enver; Hauser, Goran; Loga-Zec, Svjetlana; Kunosi?, Suad; Jovanovi?, Predrag; Crnki?, Dino

    2015-01-01

    A pancreatic pseudocyst (PPC) is typically a complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis, trauma or pancreatic duct obstruction. The diagnosis of PPC can be made if an acute fluid collection persists for 4 to 6 wk and is enveloped by a distinct wall. Most PPCs regress spontaneously and require no treatment, whereas some may persist and progress until complications occur. The decision whether to treat a patient who has a PPC, as well as when and with what treatment modalities, is a difficult one. PPCs can be treated with a variety of methods: percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD), endoscopic transpapillary or transmural drainage, laparoscopic surgery, or open pseudocystoenterostomy. The recent trend in the management of symptomatic PPC has moved toward less invasive approaches such as endoscopic- and image-guided PCD. The endoscopic approach is suitable because most PPCs lie adjacent to the stomach. The major advantage of the endoscopic approach is that it creates a permanent pseudocysto-gastric track with no spillage of pancreatic enzymes. However, given the drainage problems, the monitoring, catheter manipulation and the analysis of cystic content are very difficult or impossible to perform endoscopically, unlike in the PCD approach. Several conditions must be met to achieve the complete obliteration of the cyst cavity. Pancreatic duct anatomy is an important factor in the prognosis of the treatment outcome, and the recovery of disrupted pancreatic ducts is the main prognostic factor for successful treatment of PPC, regardless of the treatment method used. In this article, we review and evaluate the minimally invasive approaches in the management of PPCs. PMID:26078561

  3. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  4. [Esophageal stenting complications].

    PubMed

    Smoliar, A N; Radchenko, Iu A; Nefedova, G A; Abakumov, M M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze esophageal stenting complications in case of cancer and benign diseases. It was investigated complications in 8 patients in terms from 7 days to 1 year after intervention. In 4 patients esophageal stenting was performed for constrictive esophageal cancer and compression with pulmonary cancer metastases into mediastinal lymphatic nodes. 2 patients had esophageal stenting for post-tracheostomy tracheo-esophageal fistula, 1 patient - for spontaneous esophageal rupture, 1 patient - for post-burn scar narrowing of esophagus and output part of the stomach. Severe patients' condition with tumor was determined by intensive esophageal bleeding in 2 cases, bilateral abscessed aspiration pneumonia, tumor bleeding, blood aspiration (1 case), posterior mediastinitis (1 case). Severe patients' condition with benign disease was associated with decompensated esophageal narrowing about proximal part of stent (1 case), increase of tracheo-esophageal fistula size complicated by aspiration pneumonia (1 case), stent migration into stomach with recurrence of esophago-mediastino-pleural fistula and pleural empyema (1 case), decompensated narrowing of esophagus and output part of the stomach (1 case). Patients with cancer died. And patients with benign diseases underwent multi-stage surgical treatment and recovered. Stenting is palliative method for patients with esophageal cancer. Patients after stenting should be under outpatient observation for early diagnosis of possible complications. Esophageal stenting in patients with benign diseases should be performed only by life-saving indications, in case of inability of other treatment and for the minimum necessary period. PMID:25589315

  5. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children/Pediatric > Chronic Pancreatitis in Children test Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? ... will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are children ...

  6. Minimally invasive image analysis of biliary-pancreatic structure for preoperative simulation.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takashi; Konishi, Kozo; Tanouez, Kazuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Hashizume, Makoto

    2014-09-01

    For preoperative assessment of the pancreatic tumors, we developed minimally invasive method to extract the pancreatic duct from multidetector row computed tomography (MD-CT) images and to visualize the biliarypancreatic structures, tumor and adjacent organs simultaneously using an image workstation. PMID:25436373

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Recently, with the rapid scanning time and improved image quality, outstanding advances in magnetic resonance (MR) methods have resulted in an increase in the use of MRI for patients with a variety of pancreatic neoplasms. MR multi-imaging protocol, which includes MR cross-sectional imaging, MR cholangiopancreatography and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography, integrates the advantages of various special imaging techniques. The non-invasive all-in-one MR multi-imaging techniques may provide the comprehensive information needed for the preoperative diagnosis and evaluation of pancreatic neoplasms. Pancreatic neoplasms include primary tumors and pancreatic metastases. Primary tumors of the pancreas may be mainly classified as ductal adenocarcinomas, cystic tumors and islet cell tumors (ICT). Pancreatic adenocarcinomas can be diagnosed in a MRI study depending on direct evidence or both direct and indirect evidence. The combined MRI features of a focal pancreatic mass, pancreatic duct dilatation and parenchymal atrophy are highly suggestive of a ductal adenocarcinoma. Most cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are either microcystic adenomas or mucinous cystic neoplasms. Intraductal papillary mucinous tumors are the uncommon low-grade malignancy of the pancreatic duct. ICT are rare neoplasms arising from neuroendocrine cells in the pancreas or the periampullary region. ICT are classified as functioning and non-functioning. The most frequent tumors to metastasize to the pancreas are cancers of the breast, lung, kidney and melanoma. The majority of metastases present as large solitary masses with well-defined margins. PMID:17650223

  8. Initial study of sediment antagonism and characteristics of silver nanoparticle-coated biliary stents in an experimental animal model

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yigeng; Xia, Mingfeng; Zhang, Shuai; Fu, Zhen; Wen, Qingbin; Liu, Feng; Xu, Zongzhen; Li, Tao; Tian, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Plastic biliary stents used to relieve obstructive jaundice are frequently blocked by sediment, resulting in loss of drainage. We prepared stents coated with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and compared their ability to resist sedimentation with Teflon stents in a beagle model of obstructive jaundice. Methods AgNP-coated Teflon biliary stents were prepared by chemical oxidation–reduction and evaluated in an obstructive jaundice model that was produced by ligation of common bile duct (CBD); animals were randomized to two equal groups for placement of AgNP-coated or Teflon control stents. Liver function and inflammatory index were found to be similar in the two groups, and the obstruction was relieved. Stents were removed 21 days after insertion and observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The AgNP coating was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA), and the composition of sediment was assayed by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Results Electron microscopy revealed a black, closely adherent AgNP stent coating, with thicknesses of 1.5–6 µm. Sediment thickness and density were greater on Teflon than on AgNP-coated stents. EDXA confirmed the stability and integrity of the AgNP coating before and after in vivo animal experimentation. FTIR spectroscopy identified stent sediment components including bilirubin, cholesterol, bile acid, protein, calcium, and other substances. Conclusion AgNP-coated biliary stents resisted sediment accumulation in this canine model of obstructive jaundice caused by ligation of the CBD. PMID:27217749

  9. Stent-graft treatment for extrahepatic portal vein hemorrhage after pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Igami, Tsuyoshi; Komada, Tomohiro; Mori, Yoshine; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Ebata, Tomoki; Naganawa, Shinji; Nagino, Masato

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of intraperitoneal hemorrhage from the extrahepatic portal vein after pancreaticoduodenectomy for distal bile duct carcinoma. A stent-graft was deployed from the superior mesenteric vein to the main portal vein using a transhepatic approach. After the procedure, the patient remained free of intraperitoneal hemorrhage and was discharged 2 months later. PMID:26137314

  10. Classification and Management of Pancreatic Pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Wan, Mei Hua; Xie, Kun-Lin; Li, Wei; Hu, Wei-Ming; Liu, Xu-Bao; Tang, Wen-Fu; Wu, Hong

    2015-06-01

    This article aims to elucidate the classification of and optimal treatment for pancreatic pseudocysts. Various approaches, including endoscopic drainage, percutaneous drainage, and open surgery, have been employed for the management of pancreatic pseudocysts. However, no scientific classification of pancreatic pseudocysts has been devised, which could assist in the selection of optimal therapy. We evaluated the treatment modalities used in 893 patients diagnosed with pancreatic pseudocysts according to the revision of the Atlanta classification in our department between 2001 and 2010. All the pancreatic pseudocysts have course of disease >4 weeks and have mature cysts wall detected by computed tomography or transabdominal ultrasonography. Endoscopic drainage, percutaneous drainage, or open surgery was selected on the basis of the pseudocyst characteristics. Clinical data and patient outcomes were reviewed. Among the 893 patients, 13 (1.5%) had percutaneous drainage. Eighty-three (9%) had type I pancreatic pseudocysts and were treated with observation. Ten patients (1%) had type II pseudocysts and underwent the Whipple procedure or resection of the pancreatic body and tail. Forty-six patients (5.2%) had type III pseudocysts: 44 (4.9%) underwent surgical internal drainage and 2 (0.2%) underwent endoscopic drainage. Five hundred six patients (56.7%) had type IV pseudocysts: 297 (33.3%) underwent surgical internal drainage and 209 (23.4%) underwent endoscopic drainage. Finally, 235 patients (26.3%) had type V pseudocysts: 36 (4%) underwent distal pancreatectomy or splenectomy and 199 (22.3%) underwent endoscopic drainage. A new classification system was devised, based on the size, anatomical location, and clinical manifestations of the pancreatic pseudocyst along with the relationship between the pseudocyst and the pancreatic duct. Different therapeutic strategies could be considered based on this classification. When clinically feasible, endoscopic drainage should be considered the optimal management strategy for pancreatic pseudocysts. PMID:26091462

  11. Microsurgical anastomosis of sperm duct by laser tissue soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, Martin M.; Teutu-Kengne, Alain-Fleury; Brkovic, Drasko; Henning, Thomas; Klee, Doris; Poprawe, Reinhart; Jakse, Gerhard

    2005-04-01

    Connection of small vessels is usually done by suturing which is very cumbersome. Laser tissue soldering can circumvent that obstacle if a handy procedure can be defined. Our principle approach consists of a bioresorbable hollow stent with an expected degradation time of 3 weeks in combination with laser soldering. The stent is to be fed into the vessel to stabilize both ends and should allow percolation immediately after joining. The stents are made of Poly(D,L-lactid-co-glycolid) and solder is prepared from bovine serum albumin (BSA) doped with Indocyanine green (ICG) as chromophore to increase the absorption of laser light. After insertion, solder is applied onto the outer surface of the vessel and coagulated by laser radiation. The wavelength of 810 nm of a diode laser fits favorably to absorption properties of tissue and solder such that heating up of tissue is limited to prevent from necrosis and wound healing complications. In our study the preparation of stents, the consistency and doping of solder, a beam delivery instrument and the irradiation conditions are worked out. In-vitro tests are carried out on sperm ducts of Sprague-Dowlae (SD) rats. Different irradiation conditions are investigated and a micro-optical system consisting of a lens and a reflecting prism to ensure simultaneous irradiation of front and back side of the vessels tested. Under these conditions, the short-term rupture strength of laser anastomosis revealed as high as those achieved by suturing.

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided transhepatic anterograde self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement across malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Tang, T; Binmoeller, K F; Sanchez-Yague, A; Shah, J N

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) for palliation of malignant obstruction may not be possible in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage methods may be useful in this setting. This study aimed to determine the outcomes of EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement across malignant strictures in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Over a 2-year period, procedural and outcomes data on all patients undergoing EUS-guided anterograde SEMS drainage after failed ERCP were prospectively entered into a database and reviewed. Five patients underwent EUS-guided anterograde SEMS. Indications included: advanced pancreatic cancer (n = 3), metastatic cancer (n = 1), and anastomotic stricture (n = 1). The biliary orifice could not be reached endoscopically due to duodenal stricture (n = 4) or inaccessible hepaticojejunostomy (n = 1). EUS-guided punctures were performed transgastrically into left intrahepatic ducts (n = 4) or transbulbar into the common bile duct (n = 1). Guide wires were passed and SEMS were successfully deployed across strictures in an anterograde fashion in all patients. Jaundice resolved and serum bilirubin levels decreased in all cases. No procedure-related complications were noted during a mean follow-up of 9.2 months. EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement appears to be a safe and efficient technique for palliation of biliary obstruction in patients with an endoscopically inaccessible biliary orifice. The procedure can be performed at the time of failed standard ERCP, and provides an alternative drainage option to percutaneous or surgical decompression and to EUS-guided creation of bilioenteric fistulae. PMID:20119894

  13. Pancreatic fistula following pancreatoduodenectomy. Evaluation of different surgical approaches in the management of pancreatic stump. Literature review.

    PubMed

    Conzo, G; Gambardella, C; Tartaglia, E; Sciascia, V; Mauriello, C; Napolitano, S; Orditura, M; De Vita, F; Santini, L

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatoduodenectomy is the gold standard operation for malignant and benign diseases of the pancreas and periampullary region. Even if improvements in intensive care management and surgical technique have dramatically reduced postoperative mortality after pancreatic surgery, morbidity remains high (30-50%), also in specialized pancreatic units. In order to reduce postoperative complications, particularly pancreatic fistula, different surgical techniques and their modifications have been proposed. In order to determine the better management of the pancreatic stump after pancreatoduodenectomy, the Authors analysed and compared derivative - pancreaticojejunal, pancreaticogastrostomy - vs no-derivative technique - pancreatic stump closure (duct ligation or mechanical suture, duct occlusion by fibrin glue or cyanoacrylate). A systematic research of the English literature, including major meta-analysis articles, clinical randomized trials, retrospective studies and systematic reviews was performed, analysing the risk factors and the incidence of short-medium term postoperative complications. Up to now, even if derivative procedures are preferred as gold standard the best method to deal a pancreatic stump is still controversial and remains matter of research. Pancreatic surgeons must have more than one technique for managing the pancreatic remnant. PMID:26118602

  14. Outcome of surgery for failed endoscopic extraction of common bile duct stones in elderly patients.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, B. R.; Lauri, A.; Horton, R.; Burroughs, A.; Dooley, J.

    1994-01-01

    Endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) is the treatment of choice for common bile duct stones in elderly patients. For those in whom endoscopic clearance of the common bile duct fails the treatment options include stenting, dissolution therapy and lithotripsy. Surgery is often avoided because of the reported high morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. We have reviewed the outcome of patients referred for surgery after failed endoscopic clearance of common bile duct stones. Over a 3-year period, 100 patients with common bile duct stones were referred specifically for endoscopic clearance of the common bile duct (median age 69 years, range 19-97 years). In seven patients duct clearance was possible without ES and in five patients ES was considered inappropriate. ES was attempted in 88 patients and was successful in 75 (85%). Of the 13 patients failing ES or stone removal, surgery was performed in nine and four were stented. Of patients having successful ES (n = 75), ten were referred for surgery because of incomplete duct clearance. Surgery was performed to obtain duct clearance in 19 patients (eight male, 11 female, median age 77 years, range 47-90 years). Of the 19, eight had previously undergone a cholecystectomy (42%) and 17 of the 19 had biliary tract drainage preoperatively (90%). The procedures performed consisted of choledocholithotomy in all plus cholecystectomy (11), choledochoduodenostomy (7) and choledochojejunostomy (7). There were no deaths and only one major complication. The median total inpatient stay was 26 days (range 14-75 days) and the median postoperative stay was 12 days (range 7-50 days). We would conclude that open surgery can be performed safely and effectively in elderly patients with retained bile duct stones. Images Figure 2 PMID:7979073

  15. Acute Pancreatitis after Percutaneous Mechanical Thrombectomy: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Hershberger, Richard C. Bornak, Arash; Aulivola, Bernadette; Mannava, Krishna

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: We describe a case of severe acute pancreatitis after percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) and review the literature for the occurrence of this complication. Materials and Methods: A 53-year-old man with a history of bilateral external iliac artery stent placement sought care for acute onset of lifestyle-limiting left claudication. Angiography confirmed left external iliac stent occlusion, and PMT with the AngioJet Xpeedior catheter (Possis Medical, Minneapolis MN) was performed. Results: After PMT of the occluded external iliac artery, a residual in-stent stenosis required the placement of a second iliac stent. The procedure was complicated by severe acute pancreatitis. Other causes of pancreatitis were eliminated during the patient's hospital stay. A literature review revealed nine cases of acute pancreatitis after PMT. Conclusion: Although rare, pancreatitis can be a devastating complication of PMT. The development of pancreatitis seems to be related to the products of extensive hemolysis triggering an inflammatory process. To prevent this complication, we recommend that close attention be paid to the duration and extent of PMT, thereby avoiding extensive hemolysis and subsequent complications.

  16. Identification and Manipulation of Biliary Metaplasia in Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    DelGiorno, Kathleen E.; Hall, Jason C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth K.; Pan, Fong Cheng; Halbrook, Christopher J.; Washington, M. Kay; Olive, Kenneth P.; Spence, Jason; Sipos, Bence; Wright, Christopher V. E.; Wells, James M.; Crawford, Howard C.

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Metaplasias often have characteristics of developmentally related tissues. Pancreatic metaplastic ducts are usually associated with pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The tuft cell is a chemosensory cell that responds to signals in the extracellular environment via effector molecules. Commonly found in the biliary tract, tuft cells are absent from normal murine pancreas. Using the aberrant appearance of tuft cells as an indicator, we tested if pancreatic metaplasia represents transdifferentiation to a biliary phenotype and what effect this has on pancreatic tumorigenesis. Methods We analyzed pancreatic tissue and tumors that developed in mice that express an activated form of Kras (KrasLSL−G12D/+;Ptf1aCre/+ mice). Normal bile duct, pancreatic duct, and tumor-associated metaplasias from the mice were analyzed for tuft cell and biliary progenitor markers, including SOX17, a transcription factor that regulates biliary development. We also analyzed pancreatic tissues from mice expressing transgenic SOX17 alone (ROSAtTa/+;Ptf1 CreERTM/+;tetO-SOX17) or along with activated Kras (ROSAtT a/+;Ptf1a CreERTM/+;tetO-SOX17;KrasLSL−G12D;+). Results Tuft cells were frequently found in areas of pancreatic metaplasia, decreased throughout tumor progression, and were absent from invasive tumors. Analysis of the pancreatobiliary ductal systems of mice revealed tuft cells in the biliary tract, but not the normal pancreatic duct. Analysis for biliary markers revealed expression of SOX17 in pancreatic metaplasia and tumors. Pancreas-specific overexpression of SOX17 led to ductal metaplasia along with inflammation and collagen deposition. Mice that overexpressed SOX17 along with KrasG12D had a greater degree of transformed tissue compared with mice expressing only KrasG12D. Immunofluorescence analysis of human pancreatic tissue arrays revealed the presence of tuft cells in metaplasia and early-stage tumors, along with SOX17 expression, consistent with a biliary phenotype. Conclusions Expression of KrasG12D and SOX17 in mice induces development of metaplasias with a biliary phenotype, containing tuft cells. Tuft cells express a number of tumorigenic factors that can alter the microenvironment. Expression of SOX17 induces pancreatitis and promotes KrasG12D-induced tumorigenesis in mice. PMID:23999170

  17. Pancreatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and in front of your spine. It produces juices that help break down food and hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Problems with the pancreas can lead to many health problems. These include Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the ...

  18. Pancreatic Enzymes

    MedlinePlus

    ... This fluid contains pancreatic enzymes to help with digestion and bicarbonate to neutralize stomach acid as it ... the formation of toxic substances due to incomplete digestion of proteins. Increased risk for intestinal infections. Amylase ...

  19. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of acute pancreatitis may include: Acute kidney failure Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) Buildup of fluid in the abdomen ( ascites ) Cysts or abscesses in the pancreas Heart failure Low blood pressure Repeat episodes of acute ...

  20. A novel biodegradable frontal sinus stent (MgNd2): a long-term animal study.

    PubMed

    Durisin, M; Seitz, J M; Reifenrath, J; Weber, C M; Eifler, R; Maier, H J; Lenarz, T; Klose, C

    2016-06-01

    The frontal sinus recess consists of anatomically narrow passages that are prone to stenosis in endonasal frontal sinus surgery for chronic sinus disease. Over the past 100 years, diverse frontal sinus stents have been developed and evaluated in clinical and animal studies. However, superinfection, formation of granulations tissue, stent dislocation and late stenosis of the duct have remained challenges and subject of debate in the literature. Currently developed biodegradable materials, including rare earth-containing magnesium alloys are promising candidates for application as temporary implant materials. The Mg 2 % wt Nd alloy (MgNd2) was used to design a nasal stent that fit the porcine anatomy. In the current study, we evaluate biocompatibility, biodegradation and functionality of a frontal sinus stent in 16 minipigs over 6 months. Intraoperative endoscopy revealed free stent lumen in all cases. Blood examination and clinical examinations indicated no systematic or local inflammation signs. The histopathology and elements analysis showed a very good biocompatibility. The μ-computed tomography-based volumetric analysis showed substantial stent degradation within 6 months. Our MgNd2 based stent appears to be a promising, solid basis for the development of a frontal sinus stent for clinical use. PMID:26341887

  1. Fictitious pancreatitis in choledochal cyst.

    PubMed

    Stringel, G; Filler, R M

    1982-08-01

    The classical presentation of choledocal cyst has been regarded as a triad of abdominal pain, jaundice and a palpable abdominal mass; unusual presentations include rupture of the choledocal cyst with bile peritonitis, pancreatitis and bleeding esophageal varices. We are reporting 3 children presenting clinically as recurrent acute pancreatitis with elevated serum amylase and found to have type I choledocal cyst. Despite elevated serum amylase there was no evidence of pancreatic inflammation at laparotomy. High amylase concentration was found in fluid contained within the cyst. This was probably responsible for the elevated serum amylase and also the inflammatory reaction seen in the wall of the choledocal cyst. These cases support the hypothesis that pancreatic reflux into the bile ducts is the etiological factor in the development of choledocal cyst. Our 3 cases were treated by cyst excision and have remained asymptomatic. The presence of hyperamylasemia should not delay appropriate surgical management. The treatment of choice is cyst excision, since it will eliminate factors contributing to the development of cholangitis and hyperamylasemia. PMID:6181241

  2. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic calculi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon; Lee, Dong Ki

    2014-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal. PMID:24944986

  3. Acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hotz, H G; Reber, H A

    1999-09-01

    Efforts to unravel the intracellular processes that occur in acute pancreatitis continue. In cerulein pancreatitis, new evidence supports the idea that a very early event is premature trypsinogen activation triggered by lysosomal cathepsin B. Clinicians persist in trying to identify more sensitive and specific prognostic signs of the severity of attacks of pancreatitis; one study suggests that computer-based neural networks may be an alternative to biochemical markers and clinical scoring systems. The systemic severity of episodes of pancreatitis seems to be related to a multitude of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines acting at sites distant from the pancreas. Selective blockade of some of these peptides (eg, endothelin-1 and platelet-activating factor) has decreased mortality and distant organ damage in animal models and may deserve clinical evaluation. Gene therapy may be more efficient than pharmacologic therapy in increasing anti-inflammatory cytokine (interleukin-10) levels. Clinical studies have further underlined the usefulness of prophylactic antibiotics in severe acute pancreatitis. Radiologic and endoscopic techniques may be alternatives to surgery for certain complications of pancreatitis (eg, infected necrosis and pseudocysts) in particular subsets of patients. PMID:17023979

  4. Spontaneous thoracic duct cyst.

    PubMed

    Ray, J; Braithwaite, D; Patel, P J

    2003-05-01

    Spontaneous and asymptomatic supraclavicular thoracic duct cysts (lymphoceles ) are rare. Only five cases have been reported so far. They are more common after surgery or trauma and have been reported in the abdomen, mediastinum, pelvis and neck. They must be differentiated from other neck cysts as failure to recognise their attachment may result in the disastrous consequence of chylothorax. A high index of suspicion is necessary, and diagnosis usually can be established by fine-needle aspiration and suitable imaging. This case is reported along with a review of the literature and management options, including that of inadvertent damage to the thoracic duct. PMID:12750920

  5. Turbofan Duct Propagation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lan, Justin H.; Posey, Joe W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The CDUCT code utilizes a parabolic approximation to the convected Helmholtz equation in order to efficiently model acoustic propagation in acoustically treated, complex shaped ducts. The parabolic approximation solves one-way wave propagation with a marching method which neglects backwards reflected waves. The derivation of the parabolic approximation is presented. Several code validation cases are given. An acoustic lining design process for an example aft fan duct is discussed. It is noted that the method can efficiently model realistic three-dimension effects, acoustic lining, and flow within the computational capabilities of a typical computer workstation.

  6. Endovascular Gene Delivery from a Stent Platform: Gene- Eluting Stents

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Ilia; Chorny, Michael; Adamo, Richard F; Forbes, Scott P; Corrales, Ricardo A; Alferiev, Ivan S; Levy, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    A synergistic impact of research in the fields of post-angioplasty restenosis, drug-eluting stents and vascular gene therapy over the past 15 years has shaped the concept of gene-eluting stents. Gene-eluting stents hold promise of overcoming some biological and technical problems inherent to drug-eluting stent technology. As the field of gene-eluting stents matures it becomes evident that all three main design modules of a gene-eluting stent: a therapeutic transgene, a vector and a delivery system are equally important for accomplishing sustained inhibition of neointimal formation in arteries treated with gene delivery stents. This review summarizes prior work on stent-based gene delivery and discusses the main optimization strategies required to move the field of gene-eluting stents to clinical translation. PMID:26225356

  7. [Non-surgical therapy of pancreatitis complications (pseudocyst, abscesses, stenoses)].

    PubMed

    Singer, M V; Forssmann, K

    1994-08-01

    Acute and chronic pseudocysts differ. Chronic pseudocysts develop during the evolution of chronic pancreatitis unrelated to a specific bout of clinically recognizable acute pancreatitis. Acute pseudocysts arise in conjunction with an episode of acute pancreatitis. Whereas until recently surgical therapy has been the standard treatment for acute (or chronic) pancreatic pseudocysts, a range of nonsurgical options has been developed. The most important nonsurgical treatment of all is to watch and wait. Pseudocysts following acute pancreatitis should be observed when they are truly asymptomatic and less than or equal to 6 cm in diameter and left alone if not increasing in size. Only if after a six-week observation period pancreatic pseudocysts increase in diameter and become symptomatic, percutaneous needle aspiration, catheter drainage or an endoscopic drainage procedure (cystogastrostomy/cystoduodenostomy) or ultimately operative drainage procedure should be considered. Antibiotic therapy should be considered for all patients presenting with pancreatic necrosis. They should be treated with drugs administered intravenously at the maximum recommended dose as early as possible after onset of symptoms, continued throughout at least the first two weeks of the disease. Moreover, they should be treated alone and/or in combination with antibiotics that are active against gram-negative organisms of intestinal origin, commonly isolated in necrotic tissue, pseudocysts and infected pancreatic abscesses, and that are capable of penetrating into the pancreatic juice and necrotic tissue (e.g. mezlocillin, cephalosporin, metronidazole). Removal of pancreatic stones and pancreatic stenosis by endoscopic procedures in the treatment of pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis is still not an established and generally accepted treatment. Controlled trials to validate stenting and ESWL in chronic pancreatitis are needed. PMID:8091055

  8. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.

    2002-09-01

    Exposure to airborne particles is detrimental to human health and indoor exposures dominate total exposures for most people. The accidental or intentional release of aerosolized chemical and biological agents within or near a building can lead to exposures of building occupants to hazardous agents and costly building remediation. Particle deposition in heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems may significantly influence exposures to particles indoors, diminish HVAC performance and lead to secondary pollutant release within buildings. This dissertation advances the understanding of particle behavior in HVAC systems and the fates of indoor particles by means of experiments and modeling. Laboratory experiments were conducted to quantify particle deposition rates in horizontal ventilation ducts using real HVAC materials. Particle deposition experiments were conducted in steel and internally insulated ducts at air speeds typically found in ventilation ducts, 2-9 m/s. Behaviors of monodisperse particles with diameters in the size range 1-16 {micro}m were investigated. Deposition rates were measured in straight ducts with a fully developed turbulent flow profile, straight ducts with a developing turbulent flow profile, in duct bends and at S-connector pieces located at duct junctions. In straight ducts with fully developed turbulence, experiments showed deposition rates to be highest at duct floors, intermediate at duct walls, and lowest at duct ceilings. Deposition rates to a given surface increased with an increase in particle size or air speed. Deposition was much higher in internally insulated ducts than in uninsulated steel ducts. In most cases, deposition in straight ducts with developing turbulence, in duct bends and at S-connectors at duct junctions was higher than in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence. Measured deposition rates were generally higher than predicted by published models. A model incorporating empirical equations based on the experimental measurements was applied to evaluate particle losses in supply and return duct runs. Model results suggest that duct losses are negligible for particle sizes less than 1 {micro}m and complete for particle sizes greater than 50 {micro}m. Deposition to insulated ducts, horizontal duct floors and bends are predicted to control losses in duct systems. When combined with models for HVAC filtration and deposition to indoor surfaces to predict the ultimate fates of particles within buildings, these results suggest that ventilation ducts play only a small role in determining indoor particle concentrations, especially when HVAC filtration is present. However, the measured and modeled particle deposition rates are expected to be important for ventilation system contamination.

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  10. Acute Pancreatitis (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pancreatitis. (See "Patient information: Gallstones (Beyond the Basics)" .) Alcoholic pancreatitis — Alcohol is a common cause of acute pancreatitis. Alcoholic pancreatitis is more common in individuals who have ...

  11. Common and unusual CT and MRI manifestations of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min-Jie; Li, Su; Liu, Yong-Guang; Jiao, Na

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the most common malignancy of the pancreas with high death rate. Preoperative imaging is crucial for the assessment of the disease and the planning of treatment. In this review, we discussed the common and unusual findings of pancreatic carcinoma. The common CT and MR findings include hypovascular mass, dilataion of upstream biliary and pancreatic ducts, invasion to adjacent structures and metastasis. The uncommon CT and MR findings include: a cystic mass, a mass without dilataion of upstream ducts, multiple masses or a lesion diffusively infiltrating most parts of the pancreas without distorting its configuration. PMID:23630658

  12. Postoperative Bile Duct Strictures: Management and Outcome in the 1990s

    PubMed Central

    Lillemoe, Keith D.; Melton, Genevieve B.; Cameron, John L.; Pitt, Henry A.; Campbell, Kurtis A.; Talamini, Mark A.; Sauter, Patricia A.; Coleman, JoAnn; Yeo, Charles J.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe the management and outcome after surgical reconstruction of 156 patients with postoperative bile duct strictures managed in the 1990s. Summary Background Data The management of postoperative bile duct strictures and major bile duct injuries remains a challenge for even the most skilled biliary tract surgeon. The 1990s saw a dramatic increase in the incidence of bile duct strictures and injuries from the introduction and widespread use of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Although the management of these injuries and short-term outcome have been reported, long-term follow-up is limited. Methods Data were collected prospectively on 156 patients treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital with major bile duct injuries or postoperative bile duct strictures between January 1990 and December 1999. With the exception of bile duct injuries discovered and repaired during surgery, all patients underwent preoperative percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and placement of transhepatic biliary catheters before surgical repair. Follow-up was conducted by medical record review or telephone interview during January 2000. Results Of the 156 patients undergoing surgical reconstruction, 142 had completed treatment with a mean follow-up of 57.5 months. Two patients died of reasons unrelated to biliary tract disease before the completion of treatment. Twelve patients (7.9%) had not completed treatment and still had biliary stents in place at the time of this report. Of patients who had completed treatment, 90.8% were considered to have a successful outcome without the need for follow-up invasive, diagnos tic, or therapeutic interventional procedures. Patients with reconstruction after injury or stricture after laparoscopic cholecystectomy had a better overall outcome than patients whose postoperative stricture developed after other types of surgery. Presenting symptoms, number of stents, interval to referral, prior repair, and length of postoperative stenting were not significant predictors of outcome. Overall, a successful outcome, without the need for biliary stents, was obtained in 98% of patients, including those requiring a secondary procedure for recurrent stricture. Conclusions Major bile duct injuries and postoperative bile duct strictures remain a considerable surgical challenge. Management with preoperative cholangiography to delineate the anatomy and placement of percutaneous biliary catheters, followed by surgical reconstruction with a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy, is associated with a successful outcome in up to 98% of patients. PMID:10973393

  13. Dynamic instability of ducts conveying fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Y. Y.

    1975-01-01

    A finite element analysis was used to study dynamic instability in ducts conveying high speed fluids. Ducts examined include cantilevered curved, flexibly supported, arbitrarily shaped, and composite duct systems. Partial differential equations were used to study the duct systems.

  14. Drug-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaodong; Wu, Tim; Robich, Michael P; Wang, Xingwei; Wu, Hao; Buchholz, Bryan; McCarthy, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is currently a leading cause of death worldwide. Drug-eluting stents (DESs) have been dominant for the treatment of CAD in the interventional cardiology world owing to their efficacy in significantly reducing restenosis. However, late stage stent thrombosis has become a major concern. Stent platform, drug delivery vehicle and type of drug are three parts of DES and each part affects the performance of the DES. Aiming to provide a clue for the design of future DES, this review focuses on the development of the three major components of DES and their roles in restenosis and thrombosis PMID:20827317

  15. Time course and cellular source of pancreatic regeneration following acute pancreatitis in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Elsaesser, H.P.A.; Adler, G.; Kern, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of the different cell types in the rat exocrine pancreas has been studied in a model of hormone-induced acute pancreatitis in which pancreatic edema, inflammation, and acinar cell destruction were induced within 12 h of infusion of supramaximal concentrations of cerulein (5 micrograms/kg/h). A sequential biochemical and structural analysis of the pancreas in daily intervals was combined with the autoradiographic quantitation of labeling indices of five cell populations following /sup 3/H-thymidine injection at days 1-7 after induction of pancreatitis. Desquamation of acinar cell apical cytoplasm and release of cytoplasmic segments into the acinar lumen on the first day following induction of pancreatitis led to formation of duct-like tubular complexes. Enzyme content in the pancreas decreased progressively following the formation of the edema to levels 15-20% of controls and remained reduced during the initial 5 days. Thymidine incorporation into total DNA showed a biphasic pattern with a distinct peak at day 1 and a second broader peak between days 4 and 7. Autoradiographic quantitation of labeling indices demonstrated the exclusive incorporation into intercalated duct cells and interstitial cells during the initial 24 h, while the second peak was predominantly due to labeling of acinar cells. Larger interlobular ducts and islets did not show changes in labeling index. In vivo labeling with /sup 3/H-thymidine during the first day and analysis of labeling indices 14 days later showed the persistence of label in intercalated duct cells and interstitial cells and argued against the stem cell hypothesis and against transformation of duct cells into acinar cells.

  16. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, C; Hofmann, B T; Wolters-Eisfeld, G; Bockhorn, M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that the current standard therapeutic options for pancreatic cancer are not adequate and still do not meet the criteria to cure patients suffering from this lethal disease. Although research over the past decade has shown very interesting and promising new therapeutic options for these patients, only minor clinical success was achieved. Therefore, there is still an urgent need for new approaches that deal with early detection and new therapeutic options in pancreatic cancer. To provide optimal care for patients with pancreatic cancer, we need to understand better its complex molecular biology and thus to identify new target molecules that promote the proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer cells. In spite of significant progress in curing cancers with chemotherapy, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most resistant solid tumour cancers and many studies suggest that drug-resistant cancer cells are the most aggressive with the highest relapse and metastatic rates. In this context, activated Notch signalling is strongly linked with chemoresistance and therefore reflects a rational new target to circumvent resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Here, we have focused our discussion on the latest research, current therapy options and recently identified target molecules such as Notch-2 and the heparin-binding growth factor midkine, which exhibit a wide range of cancer-relevant functions and therefore provide attractive new therapeutic target molecules, in terms of pancreatic cancer and other cancers also. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24024905

  17. Everolimus-eluting coronary stents

    PubMed Central

    Saez, Alejandro; Moreno, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Bare metal stents enabled a reduction in the risk of early procedural complications and restenosis in comparison with balloon angioplasty alone, but introduced a new and device-specific iatrogenic condition, ie, in-stent restenosis due to increased neointimal hyperplasia. Sirolimus- and paclitaxel-eluting stents reduce restenosis and the need for new revascularizations in comparison with bare metal stents, although at the cost of a slight increase in the risk of late stent thrombosis and a need for prolonged dual antiplatelet therapy. Everolimus is an analog of sirolimus with an increased solubility. In this review, the currently available evidence for everolimus-eluting stents is revised, including randomized trials against bare metal stents, and head-to-head trials comparing this stent with other drug-eluting stents. PMID:22915921

  18. Placement of ¹²⁵I seed strands and stents for a type IV Klatskin tumor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Yang, Zheng-Qiang; Shi, Hai-Bin; Liu, Shen; Zhou, Wei-Zhong; Zhao, Lin-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report a new technique that consists of placing two (125)I seed strands and two stents in the right and left intrahepatic bile ducts for the treatment of hilar cholangiocarcinoma. A 75-year-old man presented with jaundice and was diagnosed with Bismuth type IV Klatskin tumor. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) showed intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation and a soft tissue mass in the hepatic hilum. Because curative surgical resection was not possible, we placed (125)I seed strands and stents in the right and left intrahepatic bile ducts. Three months later, abdominal CT showed less intrahepatic and extrahepatic bile duct dilatation than before the procedure. This technique was feasible and could be considered for the treatment of patients with Bismuth type IV tumors. PMID:25574114

  19. Admission mixing duct assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlando, Robert J. (Inventor); Dunbar, Lawrence W. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A variable cycle jet engine is provided with a mixing duct assembly which mixes core engine exhaust gas with bypass air when the engine is operating in a turbofan mode and which blocks flow from the core engine and isolates the core engine from the bypass flow when the engine is operating as a ramjet.

  20. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  1. Pancreatic tumor margin detection by oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Zou, Jun; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Kuczynski, John; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    In surgical treatment of pancreatic cancers, the effectiveness of the procedures largely depends on the ability to completely and precisely remove the malignant tumors. We present the ex-vivo use of oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (OIRDS) to detect and differentiate normal from neoplastic tissue. An OIRDS probe has been constructed to provide scattering and absorption information of the pancreatic tissue. To reveal the physiological origin of the difference in these optical signatures, the optical scattering coefficients were extracted along the pancreatic duct with 1-cm spacing. Experimental results show that OIDRS was able to successfully determinate the tumor margins based on the higher optical scattering on malignant tissue.

  2. Endoscopic prevention of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Park, Do Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis (PEP) is not an uncommon adverse event but may be an avoidable complication. Although pancreatitis of severe grade is reported in 0.1%-0.5% of ERCP patients, a serious clinical course may be lethal. For prevention of severe PEP, patient risk stratification, appropriate selection of patients using noninvasive diagnostic imaging methods such as magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography or endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), and avoidance of unnecessary invasive procedures, are important measures to be taken before any procedure. Pharmacological prevention is also commonly attempted but is usually ineffective. No ideal agent has not yet been found and the available data conflict. Currently, rectal non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are used to prevent PEP in high-risk patients, but additional studies using larger numbers of subjects are necessary to confirm any prophylactic effect. In this review, we focus on endoscopic procedures seeking to prevent or decrease the severity of PEP. Among various cannulation methods, wire-guided cannulation, precut fistulotomy, and transpancreatic septostomy are reviewed. Prophylactic pancreatic stent placement, which is the best-known prophylactic method, is reviewed with reference to the ideal stent type, adequate duration of stent placement, and stent-related complications. Finally, we comment on other treatment alternatives, and make the point that further advances in EUS-guided techniques may afford useful PEP prophylaxis. PMID:25469026

  3. Cornice Duct System

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Place; Chuck Ladd

    2004-10-29

    SYNERGETICS, INC., has designed, developed, and tested an air handling duct system that integrates the air duct with the cornice trim of interior spaces. The device has the advantage that the normal thermal losses from ducts into unconditioned attics and crawl spaces can be totally eliminated by bringing the ducts internal to the conditioned space. The following report details work conducted in the second budget period to develop the Cornice Duct System into a viable product for use in a variety of residential or small commercial building settings. A full-scale prototype has been fabricated and tested in a laboratory test building at the Daylighting Facility at North Carolina State University., Based on the results of that testing, the prototype design as been refined, fabricated, installed, and extensively tested in a residential laboratory house. The testing indicates that the device gives substantially superior performance to a standard air distribution system in terms of energy performance and thermal comfort. Patent Number US 6,511,373 B2 has been granted on the version of the device installed and tested in the laboratory house. (A copy of that patent is attached.) Refinements to the device have been carried through two additional design iterations, with a particular focus on reducing installation time and cost and refining the air control system. These new designs have been fabricated and tested and show substantial promise. Based on these design and testing iterations, a final design is proposed as part of this document. That final design is the basis for a continuation in part currently being filed with the U.5, Patent office.

  4. Spectral Imaging for Intracranial Stents and Stent Lumen

    PubMed Central

    Chen, David Yen-Ting; Chen, Chi-Jen; Hsu, Hui-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Application of computed tomography for monitoring intracranial stents is limited because of stent-related artifacts. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of gemstone spectral imaging on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Materials and Methods In vitro, we scanned Enterprise stent phantom and a stent–cheese complex using the gemstone spectral imaging protocol. Follow-up gemstone spectral images of 15 consecutive patients with placement of Enterprise from January 2013 to September 2014 were also retrospectively reviewed. We used 70-keV, 140-keV, iodine (water), iodine (calcium), and iodine (hydroxyapatite) images to evaluate their effect on the intracranial stent and stent lumen. Two regions of interest were individually placed in stent lumen and adjacent brain tissue. Contrast-to-noise ratio was measured to determine image quality. The maximal diameter of stent markers was also measured to evaluate stent-related artifact. Two radiologists independently graded the visibility of the lumen at the maker location by using a 4-point scale. The mean of grading score, contrast/noise ratio and maximal diameter of stent markers were compared among all modes. All results were analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results In vitro, iodine (water) images decreased metallic artifact of stent makers to the greatest degree. The most areas of cheese were observed on iodine (water) images. In vivo, iodine (water) images had the smallest average diameter of stent markers (0.33 ± 0.17mm; P < .05) and showed the highest mean grading score (2.94 ± 0.94; P < .05) and contrast/noise ratio of in-stent lumen (160.03 ±37.79; P < .05) among all the modes. Conclusion Iodine (water) images can help reduce stent-related artifacts of Enterprise and enhance contrast of in-stent lumen. Spectral imaging may be considered a noninvasive modality for following-up patients with in-stent stenosis. PMID:26731534

  5. Pancreatic pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Apostolou, C; Krige, J E J; Bornman, P C

    2006-11-01

    Improvements in imaging studies and a better understanding of the natural history of pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) have allowed the different types to be clarified. Stratification of PFCs into subgroups should help in selecting from the increasing current available treatment options, which include percutaneous, endoscopic and surgical drainage. Percutaneous catheter drainage is safe and effective and should be the treatment of choice in poor-risk patients, and for infected pseudocysts related to acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic drainage should be the first management option in suitable pseudocysts related to chronic pancreatitis, if the necessary expertise is available. The high success rate and current low morbidity of elective open surgery mean that it is still the standard of management in this disease. Laparoscopic approaches are gaining favour, predominantly in drainage of collections in the lesser sac, and long-term data are awaited. The precise application of this modality will need to be critically compared with the low morbidity of mini-laparotomy, which is the current standard after non-operative treatment fails in these patients. It is essential to clearly stratify the different types of pancreatic pseudocysts, in particular with relation to acute or chronic pancreatitis, and perform a valid comparison of the different treatment modalities within groups. In this capacity a precise and transparent classification may provide valuable answers, in particular relating to optimal management according to pseudocyst type. PMID:17330634

  6. Process for making electroformed stents

    DOEpatents

    Hines, Richard A.

    2000-02-01

    This invention is directed to an expandable stent useful for implantation into an artery or the like. The stents are made using electroforming techniques in which an electrically-conductive mandrel is coated with a suitable resist material, after which the resist is exposed to an appropriate light pattern and frequency so as to form a stent pattern in the resist. The mandrel is then electroplated with a suitable stent material. The mandrel is etched away once a sufficient layer of stent material is deposited, leaving a completed stent.

  7. Efficacy of endoscopic guided anterograde 3 mm balloon dacryoplasty with silicone intubation in treatment of acquired partial nasolacrimal duct obstruction in adults

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohammad Javed; Naik, Milind N.

    2013-01-01

    Aim To report the outcomes of endoscopic guided anterograde 3 mm balloon dacryoplasty with silicone intubation in patients with acquired partial nasolacrimal duct obstructions in adults. Methods Retrospective case series, included 21 eyes with partially obstructed nasolacrimal ducts of 12 patients. All the 21 ducts were initially probed and the probe confirmed with an endoscope in the inferior meatus. After confirming the presence of probe in the inferior meatus, a 3 mm balloon was used for dilating the distal and proximal portions of nasolacrimal duct, followed by stenting of ducts with Crawford tubes. Main outcome measures were anatomical patency of the passage and resolution of epiphora. Results Of the 12 patients, 9 had bilateral and 3 had unilateral acquired partial nasolacrimal duct obstructions. All the patients underwent bicanalicular stenting under endoscopic guidance which were retained for a period of 12 weeks. A minimum follow up of 6 months following stent removal was considered for final analysis. 15 of the 21 ducts (71%) were freely patent on irrigation but 13 of the 21 reported improvement of epiphora. Two nasolacrimal ducts showed similar partial regurgitation and partial patency on syringing as before with no improvement of symptoms. Four nasolacrimal ducts were completely obstructed with complete regurgitation of fluid on syringing with worsening of the epiphora. Two eyes persisted with symptoms of epiphora despite patent nasolacrimal duct with grade 2 dye retention on dye disappearance test. Conclusions 3 mm balloon dacryoplasty is an alternative and safe way to manage partial nasolacrimal duct obstructions with an anatomical success in 71% and functional success in 62% of the patients. Further studies with a large sample size and longer follow-up are required to ascertain the long term benefits. PMID:24526857

  8. Coronary artery stents.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, A. J.; Coltart, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    The use of coronary stents to treat the acute complications of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and to reduce the restenosis rate following this procedure is reviewed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8761499

  9. Coronary Angioplasty Stent Placement

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Coronary Angioplasty Stent Placement Shawnee Mission Heart & Vascular Center, Shawnee Mission, Kansas February 19, 2009 Welcome to this OR-Live westbound cast presentation, live from Shawnee Mission Medical Center ...

  10. Feasibility and outcomes of laparoscopic enucleation for pancreatic neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyu Sung; Chung, Jun Chul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose With the advancement of laparoscopic techniques and instruments, laparoscopic approach for pancreatic lesions has become an increasingly used procedure. But, there are few and limited studies about laparoscopic enuleation (LE) for pancreatic lesions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to present our experience and to evaluate the clinical outcome of LE for pancreatic benign or borderline malignant tumors. Methods Between May 2005 and December 2011, 11 patients who underwent LE were analyzed. Candidates for LE met the following criteria: benign or borderline malignant pancreatic tumor, no involvement of main pancreatic duct, and outwardly growing tumor with small tumor bed. Results All 11 patients (10 women and 1 man with a mean age of 43.1 ± 11.9 years) who underwent LE were completed laparoscopically without conversion. The mean diameter of tumor was 4.0 ± 3.3 cm and all cases had benign tumors at the final pathologic diagnosis. One patient (9%) developed pancreatic fistula and mean postoperative hospital stay was 5.5 ± 1.7 days. During follow-up period (mean, 44.3 ± 23.9 months), all patients were alive with no recurrence or new onset of diabetes. Conclusion LE is a safe and effective procedure, and should be considered as a treatment option for pancreatic lesions that do not involve the main pancratic duct and have an outgrowing aspect with small tumor bed. PMID:25485235

  11. Larynx: implants and stents

    PubMed Central

    Sittel, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In the human larynx, implants a primarily used for the correction of glottis insufficiency. In a broader sense laryngeal stents may be considered as implants as well. Laryngeal implants can be differentiated into injectable and solid. The most important representatives of both groups are discussed in detail along with the respective technique of application. Laryngeal stents are primarily used perioperatively. Different types and their use are presented. PMID:22073097

  12. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%. PMID:24950816

  13. [Diagnostic and management algorithm of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Rybakov, G S; Dibirov, M D; Briskin, B S; Khalidov, O Kh; Barsukov, M G; Prosperov, M A; Kuznetsova, M A; Mikhaĭlin, A A; Ramazanova, Iu I; Larichev, D V; Kuz'mina, I D

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of diagnostics and treatment of 602 patients with destructive pancreatitis has shown that definition of etiological and pathogenetic forms of pancreatitis defines strategy of treatment. In this way, patients with biliary pancreatitis require emergency operative treatment with use of endoscopic interventions without dependence from a stage of disease. To patients with alcoholic or alimentary pancreatitis in the stage of enzymatic toxemia conservative treatment should be spent only, until shock and/or delirium won't be reduced. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography + endoscopic papillosphincterotomy with concrement removal from common bile duct--is the operation of choice in case of acute biliary pancreatitis at the first stage. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the operation of choice at the second stage of disease. At destructive pancreatitis of other origin in a stage of the infection or necrotic suppurative inflammation use of open and closed small invasive methods of intervention is most proved. Given tactics of treatment has allowed to lower severity of clinical course, frequency of complications and lethality. PMID:18454103

  14. Reciprocity principle in duct acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1979-01-01

    Various reciprocity relations in duct acoustics have been derived on the basis of the spatial reciprocity principle implied in Green's functions for linear waves. The derivation includes the reciprocity relations between mode conversion coefficients for reflection and transmission in nonuniform ducts, and the relation between the radiation of a mode from an arbitrarily terminated duct and the absorption of an externally incident plane wave by the duct. Such relations are well defined as long as the systems remain linear, regardless of acoustic properties of duct nonuniformities which cause the mode conversions.

  15. Drug-eluting stents to prevent stent thrombosis and restenosis.

    PubMed

    Im, Eui; Hong, Myeong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Although first-generation drug-eluting stents (DES) have significantly reduced the risk of in-stent restenosis, they have also increased the long-term risk of stent thrombosis. This safety concern directly triggered the development of new generation DES, with innovations in stent platforms, polymers, and anti-proliferative drugs. Stent platform materials have evolved from stainless steel to cobalt or platinum-chromium alloys with an improved strut design. Drug-carrying polymers have become biocompatible or biodegradable and even polymer-free DES were introduced. New limus-family drugs (such as everolimus, zotarolimus or biolimus) were adopted to enhance stent performances. As a result, these new DES demonstrated superior vascular healing responses on intracoronary imaging studies and lower stent thrombotic events in actual patients. Recently, fully-bioresorbable stents (scaffolds) have been introduced, and expanding their applications. In this article, the important concepts and clinical results of new generation DES and bioresorbable scaffolds are described. PMID:26567863

  16. Multidetector computed tomography features of pancreatic metastases from leiomyosarcoma: Experience at a tertiary cancer center

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Chong Hyun; Keraliya, Abhishek; Shinagare, Atul B; Kim, Kyung Won; Ramaiya, Nikhil H; Tirumani, Sree Harsha

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe the multidetector computed tomography features of pancreatic metastasis from leiomyosarcoma (LMS). METHODS: Between January 1995 and December 2012, 13 consecutive patients (11 women, 2 men; mean age of 57 years; range, 38-78 years) with pancreatic metastases from LMS were included in our study. Imaging features including location, number, largest dimension, tumor attenuation and enhancement characteristics, presence of necrosis, pancreatic ductal dilatation, common bile duct (CBD) dilatation, presence of pancreatitis, and atrophy were documented. RESULTS: The most common site of origin of the pancreatic metastases from LMS was uterus (38.5%), followed by retroperitoneum (30.8%) and extremity (23.1%). None of the patients in our study had pancreas as the first site of metastasis. All patients developed pancreatic metastases at a median interval of 24 mo. Pancreatic metastases from LMS were solitary in 8/13 patients and multiple in 5/13 patients, had no predilection for any part of the pancreas, were hypovascular on arterial phase in 10/13 patients and associated with pancreatic duct dilatation in 3/13 patients. None had CBD dilatation. None of the pancreatic metastases in LMS cohort caused pancreatitis, and atrophy. Median duration of follow-up was 19 mo for LMS cohort during which two patients underwent resection of metastasis (median survival 45 mo) while the remaining underwent systemic therapy (median survival 13 mo). CONCLUSION: Pancreatic metastases from LMS are often solitary and hypovascular masses and less commonly associated with pancreatic ductal dilatation, CBD dilatation, pancreatitis or pancreatic atrophy. Surgical resection of solitary LMS pancreatic metastasis can be considered due to the long survival of these patients. PMID:27027985

  17. Studies of pancreatic carcinogenesis in different animal models

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpelli, D.G.; Rao, M.S.; Reddy, J.K.

    1984-06-01

    Pancreatic carcinomas can be induced in rats, guinea pigs, and hamsters by a variety of carcinogens. The types of neoplasms which arise vary with the species of rodent. In the rat, they consist exclusively of acinar cells, in the other species the lesions are adenocarcinomas resembling those derived from pancreatic ductules and ducts, those in hamster more so than in guinea pigs. Careful sequential studies in the guinea pig and hamster suggest that acinar cells together with ductular and duct cells are involved in the genesis of duct adenocarcinomas. In each rodent model, the acinar cell appears to be quite sensitive to continued exposure to carcinogen. In each instance, acini undergo modulation, and in the guinea pig and hamster, permanent metaplastic transformation to ductlike structures. Such cells assume an enhanced capacity for cell proliferation which persists following cessation of carcinogen treatment. Other studies suggest that adult pancreatic acinar cells possess a surprising degree of plasticity. Their involvement in the pathogenesis of neoplasms resembling pancreatic ducts is not unlike other carcinogenic sequences where extensive cell modulation and metaplasia precede and are an integral part of the neoplastic transformation. 55 references, 9 figures, 4 tables.

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis--recent advances.

    PubMed

    Novotný, I; Díte, P; Lata, J; Nechutová, H; Kianicka, B

    2010-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is recognized as a distinct clinical entity, identified as a chronic inflammatory process of the pancreas in which the autoimmune mechanism is involved. Clinically and histologically, AIP has two subsets: type 1--lymphoplasmatic sclerosing pancreatitis with abundant infiltration of the pancreas and other affected organs with immunoglobulin G4-positive plasma cells, and type 2--duct centric fibrosis, characterized by granulocyte epithelial lesions in the pancreas without systemic involvement. In the diagnosis of AIP, two diagnostic criterions are used--the HISORt criteria and Asian Diagnostic Criteria. In the differential diagnosis, the pancreatic cancer must be excluded by endosonographically guided pancreatic biopsy. Typical signs of AIP are concomitant disorders in other organs (kidney, liver, biliary tract, salivary glands, colon, retroperitoneum, prostate). Novel clinicopathological entity was proposed as an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' (IgG4-RSC). Extensive IgG4-positive plasma cells and T lymphocyte infiltration is a common characteristics of this disease. Recently, IgG4-RSC syndrome was extended to a new entity, characterized by IgG4 hypergammaglobulinemia and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration, this being considered an expression of a lymphoproliferative disease, 'IgG4-positive multiorgan lymphoproliferative syndrome'. This syndrome includes Mikulicz's disease, mediastinal fibrosis, autoimmune hypophysitis, and inflammatory pseudotumor--lung, liver, breast. In the therapy of AIP, steroids constitute first-choice treatment. High response to the corticosteroid therapy is an important diagnostic criterion. In the literature, there are no case-control studies that determine if AIP predisposes to pancreatic cancer. Undoubtedly, AIP is currently a hot topic in pancreatology. PMID:20814208

  19. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Phil A; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a form of chronic pancreatitis that is characterized clinically by frequent presentation with obstructive jaundice, histologically by a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with fibrosis, and therapeutically by a dramatic response to corticosteroid therapy. Two distinct diseases, type 1 and type 2 AIP, share these features. However, these 2 diseases have unique pancreatic histopathologic patterns and differ significantly in their demographic profiles, clinical presentation, and natural history. Recognizing the popular and long-standing association of the term "AIP" with what is now called "type 1 AIP," we suggest using "AIP" solely for type 1 AIP and to acknowledge its own distinct disease status by using "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis" (IDCP) for type 2 AIP. AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The etiopathogenesis of AIP and IgG4-RD is largely unknown. However, the remarkable effectiveness of B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab in patients with AIP and IgG4-RD highlights the crucial role of B cells in its pathogenesis. IDCP is less commonly recognized, and little is known about its pathogenesis. IDCP has no biomarker but is associated with inflammatory bowel disease in ~25% of patients. Recently, the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP identified combinations of features that are diagnostic of both diseases. Both AIP and IDCP are corticosteroid responsive; however, relapses are common in AIP and rare in IDCP. Therefore, maintenance therapy with either an immunomodulator (eg, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or mycophenolate mofetil) or rituximab is often necessary for patients with AIP. Long-term survival is excellent for both patients with AIP and patients with IDCP. PMID:25770706

  20. Negative feedback regulation of pancreatic exocrine secretion in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Kim, C D; Lee, K Y; Chang, T M; Chey, W Y

    1995-03-01

    We have investigated whether hormonally mediated negative feedback mechanisms regulate pancreatic exocrine secretion in guinea pigs. In anesthetized guinea pigs prepared with a tube in the proximal duodenum, pyloric ligation, and pancreatic duct cannulation with PE-10 tubing, diversion of pancreatic juice for as long as 4 h in fasting states failed to increase either pancreatic secretion or plasma levels of secretin or cholecystokinin (CCK). In the same animal preparation, intraduodenal (ID) infusion of sodium oleate (SO) resulted in significant increases in both pancreatic secretin and plasma levels of the two hormones that were significantly suppressed by ID infusion of pancreatic juice or a combination of trypsin and chymotrypsin. In another group of guinea pigs, this significant increase in pancreatic secretion was profoundly suppressed by a rabbit antisecretin serum (0.2 ml) or loxiglumide (10 mg.kg-1.h-1). Moreover, a combination of the antiserum and loxiglumide completely abolished the pancreatic secretion. The effect of atropine, 20 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 i.v., on SO-stimulated pancreatic secretion and hormone release was also studied. Atropine completely suppressed the pancreatic secretion of volume flow, bicarbonate, and protein stimulated by SO, whereas neither one of the two hormone levels was affected by intravenous atropine, indicating that atropine blocks the actions of both secretin and CCK on the pancreatic exocrine secretion. It is concluded that a negative feedback regulation of exocrine pancreatic secretion is operative in the intestinal phase of pancreatic secretion in guinea pigs and that this feedback mechanism is mediated by both secretin and CCK. Furthermore, in guinea pigs, cholinergic tone plays an important modulating role in the mechanism. PMID:7716142

  1. ePTFE/FEP-Covered Metallic Stents for Palliation of MalignantBiliary Disease: Can Tumor Ingrowth Be Prevented?

    SciTech Connect

    Hatzidakis, Adam Krokidis, Miltiadis; Kalbakis, Kostantinos; Romanos, Jiannis; Petrakis, Ioannis; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2007-09-15

    Purpose. To determine the application and clinical effectiveness of ePTFE/FEP-covered metallic stents for palliation of malignant biliary disease, and to evaluate the efficiency of stent coverage in preventing tumor ingrowth. Methods. During a 3-year period, 36 patients with malignant obstructive jaundice were treated with ePTFE/FEP-covered stents, with or without proximal side holes. The stricture was located in the lower common bile duct (CBD) in 18 cases, the upper CBD in 9, the lower common hepatic duct (CHD) in 6, and the upper CHD in 3 patients. Results.Thirty-seven covered stents were percutaneously implanted. The technical success rate was 97%. Reintervention was required in 6 cases. The 30-day mortality rate was 40%, not procedure-related. Mean survival was 128 days. Primary patency rates were 100%,55.5%, and 25% at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively, while the assisted patency rate was 100% at 12 months. Stents without side holes had higher primary patency rates compared with those with side holes, where occlusion was always due to tumor ingrowth. Tumor ingrowth did not occur in the completely covered stents. No stent dysfunction due to sludge incrustation was found.Complications were 1 case of arterial laceration that occurred during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, and a subcapsular hematoma and 1 case of bile peritonitis, that both occurred during primary stenting. No complications followed the secondary stenting technique. Conclusion. ePTFE/FEP-covered metallic stents are safe and effective for palliation of malignant biliary disease. The presence of the ePTFE/FEP coating is likely to prevent from tumor ingrowth.

  2. Development of acute pancreatitis after Nissen fundoplication.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mikihiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Otake, Kohei; Okigami, Masato; Maji, Tomoaki; Kusunoki, Masato

    2015-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis subsequent to Nissen fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an extremely rare adverse event. We describe a pediatric case of acute pancreatitis resulting from superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) and gas bloat after fundoplication. Gas bloat is one of the known postoperative complications after Nissen fundoplication. Poor nutrition status, which is often associated with severe pediatric GERD, is a risk factor for SMAS. In this case, development of gas bloat and SMAS led to the formation of a closed loop and increased intraluminal pressure of the duodenum and pancreatic duct. Many pediatric patients who need anti-reflux surgery face the risk of developing this entity. Preventive measures, such as treatment with prokinetics and frequent small-volume meals, should be considered until improvement of nutritional status after fundoplication. PMID:25868962

  3. Endoscopic transnasal dacryocystorhinostomy without stenting: results in 64 consecutive procedures.

    PubMed

    Pittore, B; Tan, N; Salis, G; Brennan, P A; Puxeddu, R

    2010-12-01

    Dacryocystorhinostomy allows by-passing saccal and post-saccal stenoses and has traditionally been performed via an external approach, namely, external dacryocystorhinostomy. Over the past two decades, advances in endoscopic equipment have led to the widespread use of the endoscopic transnasal approach to the lacrimal pathway. A retrospective evaluation has been made of personal success rates in endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy without stenting in 56 patients (15 male, 41 female) treated for nasolacrimal duct obstruction (48 unilateral, 8 bilateral). Of these, 53 were primary endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy and 11 procedures were revisions of external dacryocystorhinostomy. A total of 64 endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomies were performed. Mean follow-up was 37.3 months (range 12-84 months). The success of surgery was defined by resolution of signs (epiphora and dacryocystitis) and objectively by endoscopic evaluation of the rhinostomy on routine follow-up. Results from patients undergoing primary endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy were better than those for revision of external dacryocystorhinostomy with overall anatomical and functional results of 94.3% and 90.9%, in our series. The present study confirms that endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy without stenting is effective for the treatment of nasolacrimal duct obstruction. The endoscopic approach allows simultaneous treatment of associated anatomic anomalies and sino-nasal disorders. Results obtained confirm that a functionally patent dacryocystorhinostomy can be achieved without the need for routine nasolacrimal stenting.. PMID:21808450

  4. Complicated bile duct stones

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  5. Complicated bile duct stones.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ashwin; Martin, Derrick

    2013-01-01

    Common bile duct stones (CBDSs) are solid deposits that can either form within the gallbladder or migrate to the common bile duct (CBD), or form de novo in the biliary tree. In the USA around 15% of the population have gallstones and of these, 3% present with symptoms annually. Because of this, there have been major advancements in the management of gallstones and related conditions. Management is based on the patient's risk profile; young and healthy patients are likely to be recommended for surgery and elderly patients with comorbidities are usually recommended for endoscopic procedures. Imaging of gallstones has advanced in the last 30 years with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography evolving from a diagnostic to a therapeutic procedure in removing CBDSs. We present a complicated case of a patient with a CBDS and periampullary diverticulum and discuss the techniques used to diagnose and remove the stone from the biliary system. PMID:23946532

  6. Lacrimal duct cyst abscess.

    PubMed

    Dharmasena, Aruna; Sobajo, Cassandra; Irion, Luciane; Ataullah, Sajid

    2014-12-01

    Cystic dilatation within the lacrimal gland is thought to be related to chronic inflammation and scarring of the lacrimal gland ductules. We review the literature and discuss a case and of lacrimal duct cyst suppuration presenting with visual loss, external ophthalmoplegia, proptosis and ptosis. To our knowledge, only one other report of a lacrimal ductal cyst abscess has been reported in the literature so far. PMID:25208223

  7. Biliary Tree Stem Cells, Precursors to Pancreatic Committed Progenitors: Evidence for Possible Life-long Pancreatic Organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunfang; Lanzoni, Giacomo; Carpino, Guido; Cui, Cai-Bin; Dominguez-Bendala, Juan; Wauthier, Eliane; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Oikawa, Tsunekazu; Pileggi, Antonello; Gerber, David; Furth, Mark E.; Alvaro, Domenico; Gaudio, Eugenio; Inverardi, Luca; Reid, Lola M.

    2013-01-01

    Peribiliary glands (PBGs) in bile duct walls, and pancreatic duct glands (PDGs) associated with pancreatic ducts, in humans of all ages, contain a continuous, ramifying network of cells in overlapping maturational lineages. We show that proximal (PBGs)-to-distal (PDGs) maturational lineages start near the duodenum with cells expressing markers of pluripotency (NANOG,OCT4,SOX2), proliferation (Ki67), self-replication (SALL4), and early hepato-pancreatic commitment (SOX9,SOX17,PDX1,LGR5), transitioning to PDG cells with no expression of pluripotency or self-replication markers, maintenance of pancreatic genes (PDX1), and expression of markers of pancreatic endocrine maturation (NGN3,MUC6,insulin). Radial-axis lineages start in PBGs near the ducts’ fibromuscular layers with stem cells and end at the ducts’ lumens with cells devoid of stem cell traits and positive for pancreatic endocrine genes. Biliary tree-derived cells behaved as stem cells in culture under expansion conditions, culture plastic and serum-free Kubota’s Medium, proliferating for months as undifferentiated cells, whereas pancreas-derived cells underwent only ∼8-10 divisions, then partially differentiated towards an islet fate. Biliary tree-derived cells proved precursors of pancreas’ committed progenitors. Both could be driven by 3-dimensional conditions, islet-derived matrix components and a serum-free, hormonally defined medium for an islet fate (HDM-P), to form spheroids with ultrastructural, electrophysiological and functional characteristics of neoislets, including glucose regulatability. Implantation of these neoislets into epididymal fat pads of immuno-compromised mice, chemically rendered diabetic, resulted in secretion of human C-peptide, regulatable by glucose, and able to alleviate hyperglycemia in hosts. The biliary tree-derived stem cells and their connections to pancreatic committed progenitors constitute a biological framework for life-long pancreatic organogenesis. PMID:23847135

  8. Stenting in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Morice, M C; Lefèvre, T; Louvard, Y; Dumas, P; Loubeyre, C

    1998-06-01

    The limitations (recurrent ischaemia, restenosis, reocclusion) of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) in acute myocardial infarction (MI) can be addressed by stenting. The preliminary results of stenting are favourable (Stent PAMI, STENTIM, ZWOLLE trials). We report the results of the ICPS registry including 519 patients directly treated with angioplasty and stenting at the acute phase of myocardial infarction, with a repeat MI rate of 1% and a mortality of 3.7% in the non-shock group. PMID:10212498

  9. Palliation of Malignant Biliary and Duodenal Obstruction with Combined Metallic Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Akinci, Devrim Akhan, Okan; Ozkan, Fuat; Ciftci, Turkmen; Ozkan, Orhan S.; Karcaaltincaba, Musturay; Ozmen, Mustafa N.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of palliation of malignant biliary and duodenal obstruction with combined metallic stenting under fluoroscopy guidance. Materials and Methods. A retrospective analysis of 9 patients (6 men and 3 women) who underwent biliary and duodenal stenting was performed. The mean age of patients was 61 years (range: 42-80 years). The causes of obstruction were pancreatic carcinoma in 7 patients, cholangiocellular carcinoma in one, and duodenal carcinoma in the other. Biliary and duodenal stents were placed simultaneously in 4 patients. In other 5 patients dudodenal stents were placed after biliary stenting when the duodenal obstruction symptoms have developed. In two patients duodenal stents were advanced via transgastric approach. Results. Technical success rate was 100 %. After percutaneous biliary drainage and stenting bilirubin levels decreased to normal levels in 6 patients and in remaining 3 patients mean reduction of 71% in bilirubin levels was achieved. Tumoral ingrowth occurred in one patient and percutaneous biliary restenting was performed 90 days after the initial procedure. Of the 9 patients, 6 patients were able to tolerate solid diet, whereas 2 patients could tolerate liquid diet and one patient did not show any improvement. Mean survival periods were 111 and 73 days after biliary and duodenal stenting, respectively. Conclusion. Combined biliary and duodenal stent placement which can be performed under fluoroscopic guidance without assistance of endoscopy is feasible and an effective method of palliation of malignant biliary and duodenal obstructions. If transoral and endoscopic approaches fail, percutaneous gastrostomy route allows duodenal stenting.

  10. No Mortality or Pancreatic Fistula After Full-Thickness Suture Pancreaticogastrostomy in 39 Patients Who Underwent Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fatih, Ozdemir; Adil, Baskiran; Cengiz, Ara; Mustafa, Ates; Sagir, Kahraman Ayşegul; Maras, Ozdemir Zeynep; Sezai, Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy is considered the standard operation for periampullary tumors. Despite major advances in pancreatic surgery, pancreatic fistula is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Meticulous surgical technique and proper reconstruction of the pancreas are essential to prevent pancreatic fistula. Pancreaticogastrostomy is a safe method for reconstruction of the pancreas after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Regardless of pancreatic texture or duct diameter, the reconstruction is performed by passing full-thickness sutures through both the anterior and posterior sides of the pancreas. In this study, we report 39 cases of reconstruction with pancreaticogastrostomy after pancreaticoduodenectomy without mortality or pancreatic fistula. PMID:25692430

  11. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kleeff, Jorg; Korc, Murray; Apte, Minoti; La Vecchia, Carlo; Johnson, Colin D; Biankin, Andrew V; Neale, Rachel E; Tempero, Margaret; Tuveson, David A; Hruban, Ralph H; Neoptolemos, John P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a major cause of cancer-associated mortality, with a dismal overall prognosis that has remained virtually unchanged for many decades. Currently, prevention or early diagnosis at a curable stage is exceedingly difficult; patients rarely exhibit symptoms and tumours do not display sensitive and specific markers to aid detection. Pancreatic cancers also have few prevalent genetic mutations; the most commonly mutated genes are KRAS, CDKN2A (encoding p16), TP53 and SMAD4 - none of which are currently druggable. Indeed, therapeutic options are limited and progress in drug development is impeded because most pancreatic cancers are complex at the genomic, epigenetic and metabolic levels, with multiple activated pathways and crosstalk evident. Furthermore, the multilayered interplay between neoplastic and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment challenges medical treatment. Fewer than 20% of patients have surgically resectable disease; however, neoadjuvant therapies might shift tumours towards resectability. Although newer drug combinations and multimodal regimens in this setting, as well as the adjuvant setting, appreciably extend survival, ∼80% of patients will relapse after surgery and ultimately die of their disease. Thus, consideration of quality of life and overall survival is important. In this Primer, we summarize the current understanding of the salient pathophysiological, molecular, translational and clinical aspects of this disease. In addition, we present an outline of potential future directions for pancreatic cancer research and patient management. PMID:27158978

  12. The long-term outcome of hepaticojejunostomy in the treatment of benign bile duct strictures.

    PubMed Central

    Tocchi, A; Costa, G; Lepre, L; Liotta, G; Mazzoni, G; Sita, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review the treatment and outcome of patients with benign bile duct strictures who underwent biliary enteric repair. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The authors conducted a retrospective review of all clinical records of patients referred for treatment of benign bile duct strictures caused by surgery, trauma, or common bile duct lithiasis or choledochal cyst. The authors performed univariate and multivariate analyses of clinical and pathologic factors in relation to patient outcome and survivals. METHODS: Eighty-four patients with documented benign bile duct strictures underwent hepaticojejunostomy, choledochojejunostomy, and intrahepatic cholangiojejunostomy during a 15-year period (January 1975 to December 1989). Morbidity, mortality, and patient survival rates were measured. RESULTS: Early and late outcomes correlated neither with demographic and clinical features at presentation nor with etiologic or pathologic characteristics of the stricture. Best results correlated with high biliary enteric anastomoses and degree of common bile duct dilatation independently of bile duct stricture location. CONCLUSIONS: High biliary enteric anastomosis provides a safe, durable, and highly effective solution to the problem of benign strictures of the bile duct. Transanastomotic tube stenting is unnecessary. Endoscopic and percutaneous transhepatic dilatation seems more appropriate for the treatment of patients in poor condition and those with anastomotic strictures. PMID:8757379

  13. Renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia: an autosomal recessive malformation.

    PubMed Central

    Torra, R; Alós, L; Ramos, J; Estivill, X

    1996-01-01

    We report two brothers with a cystic malformation of the kidneys, liver, and pancreas. In both cases the malformation was fatal and the children died shortly after birth. The pathological findings, consisting of multicystic dysplastic kidneys, dilated and dysgenetic bile ducts, dilated pancreatic ducts, and polysplenia, correspond to those reported by Ivemark as renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia. Many polymalformation syndromes include cystic affectation of these three organs, so this syndrome could be an isolated entity or a final common pathway of response of these organs to a variety of developmental disturbances, which could also include splenic abnormalities. We propose an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance for renal-hepatic-pancreatic dysplasia. Images PMID:8733053

  14. Surgical management of chronic pancreatitis at the Mayo Clinic.

    PubMed

    Sakorafas, G H; Farnell, M B; Nagorney, D M; Sarr, M G

    2001-04-01

    The authors' approach to the overall surgical management of chronic pancreatitis is to treat complications, that is, pain and, less commonly, obstruction and bleeding. The authors' practice is to exhaust nearly all forms of nonsurgical intervention before suggesting a surgical approach. Nonresponders are then evaluated for severity of pain, interference of quality of life, and presence of chemical dependency. Appropriate candidates undergo imaging examinations to determine the primary site of disease, presence of pancreatic ductal dilatation, and associated peripancreatic complications. The surgical treatment approach involves classic lines of proximal resection (pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy) for small duct disease and lateral pancreaticojejunal drainage for a dilated pancreatic duct. The authors have not yet routinely adopted the duodenum-preserving head resections of Beger and Frey, or thoracoscopic transthoracic splanchnicectomy, but they remain open-minded and avidly await good confirmatory, independent trials of these promising surgical interventions. PMID:11392431

  15. Small Arteriovenous Malformation of the Common Bile Duct Causing Hemobilia in a Patient with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Sadao Baba, Yasutaka; Ueno, Kazuto; Nakajo, Masayuki

    2008-07-15

    We report a 54-year-old male patient with arteriovenous malformation located at the common bile duct and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. The patient was treated as gallstone pancreatitis at first. Three days after endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD) for biliary drainage to subside gallstone pancreatitis, hemobilia was drained from the ENBD tube and the serum hemoglobin level gradually decreased. Cholangioscopy and angiography revealed that hemobilia was due to a small arteriovenous malformation located at the common bile duct. Subsequently, the patient was successfully treated by endovascular intervention.

  16. Could Transgastric Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Aspiration Alone Be Effective for the Treatment of Pancreatic Abscesses?

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hoon-Gil; Amarbat, Baatarnum; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Song, Hyo-Yeop; Song, Seung-Ryel

    2015-01-01

    Drainage of pancreatic abscesses is required for effective control of sepsis. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided endoscopic drainage is less invasive than surgery and prevents local complications related to percutaneous drainage. Endoscopic drainage with stent placement in the uncinate process of the pancreas is a technically difficult procedure. We report a case of pancreatic abscess treated by repeated EUS-guided aspiration and intravenous antibiotics without an indwelling drainage catheter or surgical intervention. PMID:26240812

  17. A Rare Anomaly of Biliary System: MRCP Evidence of a Cystic Duct Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Goya, Cemil; Arslan, Mehmet Serif; Hamidi, Cihad; Kuday, Suzan; Okur, Mehmet Hanifi; Aydogdu, Bahattin

    2014-01-01

    Cystic duct cysts are a rare congenital anomaly. While the other bile duct cysts (choledochus and the intrahepatic bile ducts) are classified according to the classification described by Tadoni, there is no classification method described by the cystic duct cysts, although it is claimed that the cystic duct cysts may constitute a new “Type 6” category. Only a limited number of patients with cystic duct cysts have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis is usually made in the neonatal period or during childhood. The clinical symptoms are nonspecific and usually include pain in the right upper quadrant and jaundice. The condition may also present with biliary colic, cholangitis, cholelithiasis, or pancreatitis. In our case, the abdominal ultrasonography (US) performed on a 6-year-old female patient who presented with pain in the right upper quadrant pointed out an anechoic cyst at the neck of the gall bladder. Based on the magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) results, a cystic dilatation was diagnosed in the cystic duct. The aim of this case-report presentation was to discuss the US and MRCP findings of the cystic dilatation of cystic duct, which is an extremely rare condition, in the light of the literature information. PMID:24987540

  18. Small bowel perforation due to a migrated esophageal stent: Report of a rare case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Karagul, Servet; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Ara, Cengiz; Tardu, Ali; Ertugrul, Ismail; Kirmizi, Serdar; Sumer, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Endoscopic esophageal stent placement is used to treat benign strictures, esophageal perforations, fistulas and for palliative therapy of esophageal cancer. Although stent placement is safe and effective method, complications are increasing the morbidity and mortality rate. We aimed to present a patient with small bowel perforation as a consequence of migrated esophageal stent. Presentation of case A 77-years-old woman was admitted with complaints of abdominal pain, abdominal distension, and vomiting for two days. Her past medical history included a pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic tumor 11 years ago, a partial esophagectomy for distal esophageal cancer 6 months ago and an esophageal stent placement for esophageal anastomotic stricture 2 months ago. On abdominal examination, there was generalized tenderness with rebound. Computed tomography showed the stent had migrated. Laparotomy revealed a perforation localized in the ileum due to the migrated esophageal stent. About 5 cm perforated part of gut resected and anastomosis was done. The patient was exitus fifty-five days after operation due to sepsis. Discussion Small bowel perforation is a rare but serious complication of esophageal stent migration. Resection of the esophagogastric junction facilitates the migration of the stent. The lumen of stent is often allow to the passage in the gut, so it is troublesome to find out the dislocation in an early period to avoid undesired results. In our case, resection of the esophagogastric junction was facilitated the migration of the stent and late onset of the symptoms delayed the diagnosis. Conclusion Patients with esophageal stent have to follow up frequently to preclude delayed complications. Additional technical procedures are needed for the prevention of stent migration. PMID:25967554

  19. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  20. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 View/Download: Small: 533x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 Description: Stage IV pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  1. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Database Supporting Research Raising Awareness Our Blog Patient Education Pancreas News Basics of Pancreatic Cancer FAQs The ... Detection- Goggins Lab Sol Goldman Center Discussion Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? ...

  2. [THE PLACE OF PANCREATICODUODENAL RESECTION IN SURGICAL TREATMENT OF COMPLICATED FORMS OF CHRONIC PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Pylypchuk, V I; Shevchuk, I M; Yavorskiy, A M; Dyriv, O L

    2015-11-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 120 patients, suffering complicated forms of chronic pancreatitis, were analyzed. In 5 patients pancreaticoduodenal resection in accordance to Whipple method have constituted the operation of choice. The indications for operation were: impossibility to exclude completely the malignant process inside pancreatic head; enhancement of the pancreatic head, causing duodenal, common biliary duct and the pancreatoduodenal zone vessels compression; cystic changes of pancreatic head with several episodes of hemorrhage inside the cyst and duodenum. The immediate, short-term and intermediate results of the operation were estimated as good and satisfactory. PMID:26939425

  3. Esophageal stents: when and how.

    PubMed

    Kachaamy, Toufic; Pannala, Rahul

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal stents are devices used to alleviate dysphagia and treat leaks and perforations. Successful esophageal stenting requires definition of the abnormal anatomy such as stricture length or location of the leak, proper stent selection and deployment. This requires detailed knowledge of characteristics of the currently available stents. Self-expanding metal stents whether fully or partially covered have become the mainstay of treatment of esophageal cancer-related dysphagia as they provide quick relief of symptoms and have a favorable safety and efficacy profile, compared to other modalities such as radiation, laser, and argon plasma coagulation. They are also the initial treatment of choice for both malignant and benign fistulae. Stents are also used in benign refractory strictures but long-term stricture resolution rates are low in this setting. Fully covered metal stents are relatively easier to remove compared to partially covered stents; optimal time interval for removal depends on the indication for stenting and the clinical status of the patient. Stent related adverse events include chest pain, reflux, migration, and recurrent obstruction. Serious adverse events occur in less than 5% with procedure-related mortality of less than 2%. Techniques such as placement of hemostatic clips, Over The Scope clips, and endoscopic suturing are being used to decrease the migration risk but the optimal approach has not been defined. Antireflux measures are needed when a stent is placed across the gastroesophageal junction. Stents with antireflux designs do not appear to offer additional benefit compared to the conventional stent designs. Newer stent designs including biodegradable, drug eluting and radioactive stents are currently being investigated. PMID:26824424

  4. Comparison of scanning electron microscopy findings regarding biofilm colonization with microbiological results in nasolacrimal stents for external, endoscopic and transcanalicular dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Balikoglu-Yilmaz, Melike; Yilmaz, Tolga; Cetinel, Sule; Taskin, Umit; Banu Esen, Ayse; Taskapili, Muhittin; Kose, Timur

    2014-01-01

    AIM To compare bacterial biofilm colonization in lacrimal stents following external dacryocystorhinostomy (EX-DCR), endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (EN-DCR), and transcanalicular dacryocystorhinostomy (TC-DCR) with multidiode laser. METHODS This prospective study included 30 consecutive patients with nasolacrimal duct obstruction who underwent EXT-, EN-, or TC-DCR. Thirty removed lacrimal stent fragments and conjunctival samples were cultured. The lacrimal stent biofilms were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). RESULTS Eleven (36.7%) of the 30 lacrimal stent cultures were positive for aerobic bacteria (most commonly Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). However anaerobic bacteria and fungi were not identified in the lacrimal stent cultures. Twenty-seven (90%) patients had biofilm-positive lacrimal stents. The conjunctival culture positivity after the DCR, biofilm positivity on stents, the grade of biofilm colonization, and the presence of mucus and coccoid and rod-shaped organisms did not significantly differ between any of the groups (P>0.05). However, a significant difference was found when the SEM results were compared to the results of the lacrimal stent and conjunctival cultures (P<0.001). CONCLUSION Type of dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) surgery did not affect the biofilm colonization of the lacrimal stents. SEM also appears to be more precise than microbiological culture for evaluating the presence of biofilms on lacrimal stents. PMID:24967205

  5. Isolated Right Segmental Hepatic Duct Injury Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Perini, Rafael F.; Uflacker, Renan Cunningham, John T.; Selby, J. Bayne; Adams, David

    2005-04-15

    Purpose. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is the treatment of choice for gallstones. There is an increased incidence of bile duct injuries in LC compared with the open technique. Isolated right segmental hepatic duct injury (IRSHDI) represents a challenge not only for management but also for diagnosis. We present our experience in the management of IRSHDI, with long-term follow-up after treatment by a multidisciplinary approach. Methods. Twelve consecutive patients (9 women, mean age 48 years) were identified as having IRSHDI. Patients' demographics, clinical presentation, management and outcome were collected for analysis. The mean follow-up was 44 months (range 2-90 months). Results. Three patients had the LC immediately converted to open surgery without repair of the biliary injury before referral. Treatments before referral included endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), percutaneous drainage and surgery, isolated or in combination. The median interval from LC to referral was 32 days. Eleven patients presented with biliary leak and biloma, one with obstruction of an isolated right hepatic segment. Post-referral management of the biliary lesion used a combination of ERCP stenting, percutaneous drainage and stent placement and surgery. In 6 of 12 patients ERCP was the first procedure, and in only one case was IRSHDI identified. In 6 patients, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC) was performed first and an isolated right hepatic segment was demonstrated in all. The final treatment modality was endoscopic management and/or percutaneous drainage and stenting in 6 patients, and surgery in 6. The mean follow-up was 44 months. No mortality or significant morbidity was observed. Conclusion. Successful management of IRSHDI after LC requires adequate identification of the lesion, and multidisciplinary treatment is necessary. Half of the patients can be treated successfully by nonsurgical procedures.

  6. β-Cell Differentiation of Human Pancreatic Duct–Derived Cells After In Vitro Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Corritore, Elisa; Dugnani, Erica; Pasquale, Valentina; Misawa, Ryosuke; Witkowski, Piotr; Lei, Ji; Markmann, James; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Sokal, Etienne M.; Bonner-Weir, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract β-Cell replacement therapy is a promising field of research that is currently evaluating new sources of cells for clinical use. Pancreatic epithelial cells are potent candidates for β-cell engineering, but their large-scale expansion has not been evidenced yet. Here we describe the efficient expansion and β-cell differentiation of purified human pancreatic duct cells (DCs). When cultured in endothelial growth-promoting media, purified CA19-9+ cells proliferated extensively and achieved up to 22 population doublings over nine passages. While proliferating, human pancreatic duct-derived cells (HDDCs) downregulated most DC markers, but they retained low CK19 and SOX9 gene expression. HDDCs acquired mesenchymal features but differed from fibroblasts or pancreatic stromal cells. Coexpression of duct and mesenchymal markers suggested that HDDCs were derived from DCs via a partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). This was supported by the blockade of HDDC appearance in CA19-9+ cell cultures after incubation with the EMT inhibitor A83-01. After a differentiation protocol mimicking pancreatic development, HDDC populations contained about 2% of immature insulin-producing cells and showed glucose-unresponsive insulin secretion. Downregulation of the mesenchymal phenotype improved β-cell gene expression profile of differentiated HDDCs without affecting insulin protein expression and secretion. We show that pancreatic ducts represent a new source for engineering large amounts of β-like-cells with potential for treating diabetes. PMID:25437872

  7. Combined Endoscopic and Laparoscopic Management of Postcholecystectomy Mirizzi Syndrome from a Remnant Cystic Duct Stone: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Arpit; Zhurov, Yuriy; Ibrahim, George; Maffei, Anthony; Giannone, Jonathan; Cerabona, Thomas; Kaul, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Mirizzi syndrome has been defined in the literature as common bile duct obstruction resulting from calculi within Hartmann's pouch or cystic duct. We present a case of a 78-year-old female, who developed postcholecystectomy Mirizzi syndrome from a remnant cystic duct stone. Diagnosis of postcholecystectomy Mirizzi syndrome was made on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) performed postoperatively. The patient was treated with a novel strategy by combining advanced endoscopic and laparoscopic techniques in three stages as follows: Stage 1 (initial presentation): endoscopic sphincterotomy with common bile duct stent placement; Stage 2 (6 weeks after Stage 1): laparoscopic ultrasonography to locate the remnant cystic duct calculi followed by laparoscopic retrieval of the calculi and intracorporeal closure of cystic duct stump; Stage 3 (6 weeks after Stage 2): endoscopic removal of common bile duct stent along with performance of completion endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram. In addition, we have performed an extensive review of the various endoscopic and laparoscopic management techniques described in the literature for the treatment of postcholecystectomy syndrome occurring from retained cystic duct stones. PMID:27047698

  8. Combined Endoscopic and Laparoscopic Management of Postcholecystectomy Mirizzi Syndrome from a Remnant Cystic Duct Stone: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Amin, Arpit; Zhurov, Yuriy; Ibrahim, George; Maffei, Anthony; Giannone, Jonathan; Cerabona, Thomas; Kaul, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Mirizzi syndrome has been defined in the literature as common bile duct obstruction resulting from calculi within Hartmann's pouch or cystic duct. We present a case of a 78-year-old female, who developed postcholecystectomy Mirizzi syndrome from a remnant cystic duct stone. Diagnosis of postcholecystectomy Mirizzi syndrome was made on endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) performed postoperatively. The patient was treated with a novel strategy by combining advanced endoscopic and laparoscopic techniques in three stages as follows: Stage 1 (initial presentation): endoscopic sphincterotomy with common bile duct stent placement; Stage 2 (6 weeks after Stage 1): laparoscopic ultrasonography to locate the remnant cystic duct calculi followed by laparoscopic retrieval of the calculi and intracorporeal closure of cystic duct stump; Stage 3 (6 weeks after Stage 2): endoscopic removal of common bile duct stent along with performance of completion endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram. In addition, we have performed an extensive review of the various endoscopic and laparoscopic management techniques described in the literature for the treatment of postcholecystectomy syndrome occurring from retained cystic duct stones. PMID:27047698

  9. Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase regulates pancreatic ductal, but not β‐cell, regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Cheng‐Ho; Miller, Amber; Panopoulos, Andreas; Hao, Ergeng; Margolis, Robert; Terskikh, Alexey; Levine, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK) is expressed in stem/progenitor cells in some adult tissues, where it has been implicated in diverse biological processes, including the control of cell proliferation. Here, we described studies on its role in adult pancreatic regeneration in response to injury induced by duct ligation and β‐cell ablation. MELK expression was studied using transgenic mice expressing GFP under the control of the MELK promoter, and the role of MELK was studied using transgenic mice deleted in the MELK kinase domain. Pancreatic damage was initiated using duct ligation and chemical beta‐cell ablation. By tracing MELK expression using a MELK promoter‐GFP transgene, we determined that expression was extremely low in the normal pancreas. However, following duct ligation and β‐cell ablation, it became highly expressed in pancreatic ductal cells while remaining weakly expressed in α‐cells and β‐ cells. In a mutant mouse in which the MELK kinase domain was deleted, there was no effect on pancreatic development. There was no apparent effect on islet regeneration, either. However, following duct ligation there was a dramatic increase in the number of small ducts, but no change in the total number of duct cells or duct cell proliferation. In vitro studies indicated that this was likely due to a defect in cell migration. These results implicate MELK in the control of the response of the pancreas to injury, specifically controlling cell migration in normal and transformed pancreatic duct cells. PMID:25194022

  10. Moulded calculus of common bile duct mimicking a stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Brocki, Marian; Śmigielski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Bile duct stenosis, in most cases, appears to be the consequence of pancreatic head, ampulla of Vater and bile duct tumours, cholangitis sclerosans, as well as iatrogenic damages, which may all be diagnosed during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). In very rare cases the restriction may result from an atypically shaped wedged stone. This situation creates many diagnostic problems, which in the majority of cases can be solved using imaging studies. However, in some patients even a significant extension of diagnostic procedures may not lead to a correct diagnosis. We present a diagnostically difficult case of a deposit imitating restriction. We present a 70-year-old woman with common bile duct restriction undiagnosed despite several ultrasound examinations (USG), computed tomography (CT), double magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Only after the third ERCP examination a fragmented, by formerly introduced prosthesis, deposit, imitating narrowing, was revealed. Identification of bile duct deposits depends on their composition, localisation and the imaging techniques used. Pigment calculi with atypical shape, bile density, air density or surrounding tissue density are very difficult to diagnose. Thus, the sensitivity of common bile duct stone detection in USG, CT, MRCP and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is 5–88%; 6–88%; 73–97%; and 84–98%, respectively. Moreover, ERCP may not diagnose the character of the restriction even in 5.2% up to 30% of the patients. Consequently, assessment of diagnosis in a number of patients is difficult. A deposit imitating common bile duct (CBD) restriction is a rare, difficult to diagnose phenomenon, which should be taken into account during differential diagnosis of CBD restrictions. PMID:25061493

  11. Diagnosis and management of autoimmune pancreatitis: Experience from China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Liu, Quan-Da; Zhou, Ning-Xin; Zhang, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Dian-Jun

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinical, radiographic and pathologic characteristics, diagnostic and treatment modalities in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). METHODS: In this retrospective study, the data of patients with diagnosed chronic pancreatitis (CP) between 1995 and 2006 in Chinese PLA General Hospital were included to screen for the cases with AIP, according to the following diagnostic criteria: (1) diagnostic histopathologic features, and abound IgG4-positive plasma cells on pancreatic tissues; (2) characteristic imaging on computed tomography and pancreatography, together with increased serum IgG, γ-globulin levels or presence of autoantibodies; (3) response to steroid therapy. The clinical, radiographic and pathologic characteristics, diagnostic and treatment modalities, and outcome of AIP cases were reviewed. RESULTS: Twenty-five (22 male, 3 female; mean age 54 years, 36-76 years) out of 510 CP patients were diagnosed as AIP, which accounted for 49% (21/43) of CP population undergoing surgical treatment in the same period. The main clinical manifestations included intermittent or progressive jaundice in 18 cases (72%), abdominal pain in 11 (44%), weight loss in 10 (40%), and 3 cases had no symptoms. The imaging features consisted of pancreatic enlargement, especially in the head of pancreas (18 cases), strictures of main pancreatic duct and intrapancreatic bile duct. Massive lymphocytes and plasma cells infiltration in pancreatic tissues were showed on pathology, as well as parenchymal fibrosis. Twenty-three patients were misdiagnosed as pancreaticobiliary malignancy, and 21 patients underwent exploratory laparotomy, the remaining 4 patients dramatically responded to steroid therapy. No pancreatic cancer occurred during a mean 46-mo follow-up period. CONCLUSION: AIP patients always are subjected to mistaken diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and an unnecessary surgical exploration, due to its similarity in clinical features with pancreatic cancer. The differential diagnosis with high index of suspicion of AIP would improve the diagnostic accuracy for AIP. PMID:18203294

  12. Transhepatic Insertion of a Metallic Stent for the Relief of Malignant Afferent Loop Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Caldicott, David G.E.; Ziprin, Paul; Morgan, Robert

    2000-03-15

    A 65-year-old man with a polya gastrectomy presented with biliary obstruction. Percutaneous cholangiography indicated strictures of the distal common bile duct and afferent duodenal loop due to an inoperable carcinoma of the head of the pancreas. The patient was unfit for bypass surgery, and a previous gastrectomy precluded endoscopic intervention. Successful palliation of the biliary obstruction was achieved by placing metallic stents across the duodenal and biliary strictures via the transhepatic route. The use of stents for gastrointestinal stricture is reviewed.

  13. [Stenting and redilatation of the ductus arteriosus in univentricular heart with pulmonary atresia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Hernández-González, Martha; Solorio, Sergio; Martínez-Sánchez, Arturo; Abundes, Arturo; Ledesma, Mariano; Alva, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Complex congenital heart disease with pulmonary atresia is ductus arteriosus-dependent. Two palliative treatments have been available for years: a systemic pulmonary shunt and prostaglandin E1 infusion. Recently, interventional cardiology has offered a new procedure for these patients: stenting of the patent arterial duct. We report a case with univentricular heart and pulmonary atresia in which percutaneous balloon angioplasty and stenting of the arterial ductus were performed successfully. Nineteen months later the patient is in good clinical conditions with 75% of oxygen saturation. PMID:12148334

  14. Bile duct malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tucek, S; Tomasek, J; Halámkova, J; Kiss, I; Andrasina, T; Hemmelová, B; Adámková-Krákorová, D; Vyzula, R

    2010-01-01

    Bile duct malignancies include intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ECC), gall bladder carcinoma (GC) and carcinoma of Vater's ampulla (ampulloma). Bile duct neoplasms are rare tumours with overall poor prognosis. The overall incidence affects up to 12.5 per 100,000 persons in the Czech Republic. The mortality rate has risen recently to 9.5 per 100,000 persons. The incidence and mortality have been remarkably stable over the past 3 decades. The survival rate of patients with these tumours is poor, usually not exceeding 12 months. The diagnostic process is complex, uneasy and usually late. Most cases are diagnosed when unresectable, and palliative treatment is the main approach of medical care for these tumours. The treatment remains very challenging. New approaches have not brought much improvement in this field. Standards of palliative care are lacking and quality of life assessments are surprisingly not common. From the scarce data it seems, however, that multimodal individually tailored treatment can prolong patients'survival and improve the health-related quality of life. The care in specialized centres offers methods of surgery, interventional radiology, clinical oncology and high quality supportive care. These methods are discussed in the article in greater detail. Improvements in this field can be sought in new diagnostic methods and new procedures in surgery and interventional radiology. Understanding the tumour biology on the molecular level could shift the strategy to a more successful one, resulting in more cured patients. Further improvements in palliative care can be sought by defining new targets and new drug development. The lack of patients with bile duct neoplasms has been the limiting factor for any improvements. A new design of larger randomized international multicentric clinical trials with prompt data sharing could help to overcome this major problem. Defining standards of palliative care is a necessity. Addressing health-related quality of life could help to assess the real benefit of palliative treatment. PMID:20806821

  15. Intrahepatic Duct Stones Harboring Ascariasis Ova: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Fang; Lee, Wei-Chen; Wu, Ren-Chin; Chen, Tse-Ching

    2016-03-01

    Ascariasis lumbricoides is one of the most common helminthic infestations in humans. Despite the fact that the prevalence of ascariasis in developed countries has been decreasing, biliary ascariasis can cause serious complications, such as acute cholangitis, pancreatitis, and liver abscess. Here we presented a rare ascariasis-related complication-hepatolithiasis.A 60-year-old female patient had symptoms of recurrent cholangitis. Abdominal computed tomography scan revealed left intrahepatic duct stones with left liver lobe atrophy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was performed, but the stones could not be removed due to left main intrahepatic duct stenosis. The patient was treated with left hemi-hepatectomy. Unexpectedly, Ascaris ova were found on the histopathological examination. She received antihelminthic therapy orally and was on regular follow-up without any complications.Our study indicates that clinicians should be aware of biliary ascariasis in patients with hepatolithiasis, though not living in endemic areas. PMID:27015193

  16. Low Drain Fluid Amylase Predicts Absence of Pancreatic Fistula Following Pancreatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christina W.; Pitt, Henry A.; Riall, Taylor S.; Ronnekleiv-Kelly, Sean S.; Israel, Jacqueline S.; Leverson, Glen E.; Parmar, Abhishek D.; Kilbane, E. Molly; Hall, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Improvements in the ability to predict pancreatic fistula could enhance patient outcomes. Previous studies demonstrate that drain fluid amylase on postoperative day 1 (DFA1) is predictive of pancreatic fistula. We sought to assess the accuracy of DFA1 and to identify a reliable DFA1 threshold under which pancreatic fistula is ruled out. Methods Patients undergoing pancreatic resection from November 1, 2011 to December 31, 2012 were selected from the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pancreatectomy Demonstration Project data-base. Pancreatic fistula was defined as drainage of amylase-rich fluid with drain continuation >7 days, percutaneous drainage, or reoperation for a pancreatic fluid collection. Univariate and multi-variable regression models were utilized to identify factors predictive of pancreatic fistula. Results DFA1 was recorded in 536 of 2,805 patients who underwent pancreatic resection, including pancreaticoduodenectomy (n=380), distal pancreatectomy (n=140), and enucleation (n=16). Pancreatic fistula occurred in 92/536 (17.2 %) patients. DFA1, increased body mass index, small pancreatic duct size, and soft texture were associated with fistula (p<0.05). A DFA1 cutoff value of <90 U/L demonstrated the highest negative predictive value of 98.2 %. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve confirmed the predictive relationship of DFA1 and pancreatic fistula. Conclusion Low DFA1 predicts the absence of a pancreatic fistula. In patients with DFA1<90 U/L, early drain removal is advisable. PMID:25112411

  17. Collapse pressures of biodegradable stents.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Subbu; Poh, Tan Lay; Vinalia, Tjong; Mak, Koon Hou; Boey, Freddy

    2003-05-01

    Biodegradable stent prototypes were produced from poly L-lactic acid polymers with different molecular weights. The effects of molecular weight, drug incorporation and stent design on the collapse pressure of the stents were evaluated. While molecular weights did not show a significant effect on the collapse pressure of the stents, drug incorporation at high percentage decreased the collapse pressure of the stents substantially. Cryogenic fracture surfaces showed significant drug agglomeration as the concentration increased. The design of the stent was also found to a have significant effect on the collapse pressure. The stent produced from the same material has a higher collapse pressure when the load bearing surface area is increased. PMID:12628831

  18. Dedicated bifurcation stents

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Ajith Ananthakrishna; Jayaraman, Balachander

    2012-01-01

    Bifurcation percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is still a difficult call for the interventionist despite advancements in the instrumentation, technical skill and the imaging modalities. With major cardiac events relate to the side-branch (SB) compromise, the concept and practice of dedicated bifurcation stents seems exciting. Several designs of such dedicated stents are currently undergoing trials. This novel concept and pristine technology offers new hope notwithstanding the fact that we need to go a long way in widespread acceptance and practice of these gadgets. Some of these designs even though looks enterprising, the mere complex delivering technique and the demanding knowledge of the exact coronary anatomy makes their routine use challenging. PMID:22572498

  19. New Scopes, New Accessories, New Stents for Interventional Endoscopic Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher G.; Siddiqui, Uzma D.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advances have rapidly expanded the therapeutic potential of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Innovations in stent technology; directed adjunctive therapy for pancreatic tumors, including radiofrequency ablation and fiducial marker placement; advanced imaging modalities, including needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy; and new echoendoscopes, such as the forward-viewing linear echoendoscope, are emerging as safe and effective tools and devices for providing a broad range of treatments and therapies previously not thought possible. In this review, we summarize and discuss the new echoendoscopes, accessories, and stents for interventional EUS and highlight the recent literature on technical and therapeutic efficacy. The therapeutic role and indications for EUS are rapidly evolving well beyond its current limits as new EUS-specific designed tools are designed, and ultimately, should help achieve the goal of improving patient outcomes. PMID:26855923

  20. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abate-Daga, Daniel; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains largely an incurable disease necessitating the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-transduced T cells represents an alternative treatment with curative potential. We present an overview of the engineering of novel CARs targeting prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), implications for the development of immunotherapies, and potential strategies to circumvent on-target/off-tumor toxicities. PMID:25083334

  1. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Bhugul, Pravin Avinash; Huang, Xince; Liu, Lewei; Pan, Liangliang; Ni, Haizhen; Chen, Bicheng; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Qiyu; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg) into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF). The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP. PMID:26895040

  2. Stopping duct quacks: Longevity of residential duct sealants

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

    2000-08-01

    Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that these seals tend to fail over time periods ranging from days to years. We have used several test methods over the last few years to evaluate the longevity of duct sealants when subjected to temperatures and pressures representative of those found in the field. Traditional cloth duct tapes have been found to significantly under-perform other sealants and have been banned from receiving duct tightness credits in California's energy code (California Energy Commission 1998). Our accelerated testing apparatus has been redesigned since its first usage for improved performance. The methodology is currently under consideration by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) as a potential new test method. This report will summarize the set of measurements to date, review the status of the test apparatus and test method, and summarize the applications of these results to codes and standards.

  3. Stent-Graft Treatment for Bleeding Superior Mesenteric Artery Pseudoaneurysm After Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kojiro Mori, Yoshine; Komada, Tomohiro; Matsushima, Masaya; Ota, Toyohiro; Naganawa, Shinji

    2009-07-15

    We report two cases of intraperitoneal bleeding from superior mesenteric artery (SMA) pseudoaneurysm after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic head carcinoma. In both cases, a stent-graft was deployed on the main SMA to exclude pseudoaneurysm and to preserve blood flow to the bowel. Bleeding stopped after the procedure. One patient was able to be discharged but died from carcinoma recurrence 4 months later. The other patient died of sepsis and stent-graft infection 5 months later. These patients remained free of intraperitoneal rebleeding during the follow-up period.

  4. Endocrine pancreatic insufficiency secondary to chronic herpesvirus pancreatitis in a cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus).

    PubMed

    Phalen, David N; Falcon, Michelle; Tomaszewski, Elizabeth K

    2007-06-01

    A cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus) examined because of weight loss, polydipsia, and polyuria was diagnosed with diabetes mellitus based on the presence of glucosuria and marked hyperglycemia. Medical attempts to manage the diabetes mellitus were unsuccessful, and the bird was euthanatized. Histopathologic examination of the pancreas revealed a chronic active pancreatitis with herpesviral inclusions in many of the pancreatic acinar and duct cells. Psittacid herpesvirus-1 (PsHV-1) DNA was amplified from the lesion by polymerase chain reaction. Sequencing of the amplicon showed it to be the genotype 1 variant, which is most commonly associated with Pacheco's disease, an acute rapidly fatal systemic infection. The findings in this case suggest that the PsHV-1 genotype may also cause a localized disease of the pancreas. Infection with this virus should be considered as a differential diagnosis in birds with pancreatitis with or without diabetes mellitus. PMID:18065136

  5. A New Concept for Carotid Artery Stenting: Coating the Atherosclerotic Plaque by Covered Stent before Bare Stent Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Akgul, Erol

    2016-01-01

    In carotid artery stenting (CAS) procedures, distal embolism, periprocedural stent thrombosis, and 30-day stroke due to the plaque fragmentation and protrusion caused by stent implantation and balloon dilation are frequent complications. In this technical case report, a case is presented of extracranial carotid artery stenosis treated with a covered stent and subsequent implantation of a bare stent. In addition, the possibility is discussed that this new technique prevents the distal microembolic complications, periprocedural stent thrombosis, and 30-day stroke of extracranial CAS.

  6. Bile Duct (Cholangiocarcinoma) Cancer: Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Next Topic Chemotherapy for bile duct cancer Radiation therapy for bile duct cancer Radiation therapy uses ... of radiation for bile duct cancer. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) This type of radiation therapy uses ...

  7. Intrahepatic Transposition of Bile Ducts

    PubMed Central

    Delić, Jasmin; Savković, Admedina; Isaković, Eldar; Marković, Sergije; Bajtarevic, Alma; Denjalić, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the intrahepatic bile duct transposition (anatomical variation occurring in intrahepatic ducts) and to determine the frequency of this variation. Material and Methods. The researches were performed randomly on 100 livers of adults, both sexes. Main research methods were anatomical macrodissection. As a criterion for determination of variations in some parts of bile tree, we used the classification of Segmentatio hepatis according to Couinaud (1957) according to Terminologia Anatomica, Thieme Stuugart: Federative Committee on Anatomical Terminology, 1988. Results. Intrahepatic transposition of bile ducts was found in two cases (2%), out of total examined cases (100): right-left transposition (right segmental bile duct, originating from the segment VIII, joins the left liver duct-ductus hepaticus sinister) and left-right intrahepatic transposition (left segmental bile duct originating from the segment IV ends in right liver duct-ductus hepaticus dexter). Conclusion. Safety and success in liver transplantation to great extent depends on knowledge of anatomy and some common embryological anomalies in bile tree. Variations in bile tree were found in 24–43% of cases, out of which 1–22% are the variations of intrahepatic bile ducts. Therefore, good knowledge on ductal anatomy enables good planning, safe performance of therapeutic and operative procedures, and decreases the risk of intraoperative and postoperative complications. PMID:22550601

  8. Streamwise computation of duct flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greywall, M. S.

    1980-02-01

    A computational method is presented to calculate momentum and energy transport in two-dimensional viscous compressible duct flows. The flow in the duct is partitioned into finite streams. The difference equations are then obtained by applying momentum and energy conservation principles directly to the individual streams. The method is applicable to laminar and turbulence flows.

  9. "Biliary Diseases with Pancreatic Counterparts": Cross-sectional Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Flaherty, Erin M; Dasyam, Anil K; Menias, Christine O; Riddle, Nicole D; Lath, Narayan; Kozaka, Kazuto; Matsui, Osamu; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Prasad, Srinivasa R

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of the similarities in the histopathologic findings and the clinical-biologic behaviors of select biliary and pancreatic conditions, a new disease concept, "biliary diseases with pancreatic counterparts," has been proposed. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic pathologic conditions of the biliary tract have their counterparts in the pancreas. Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related sclerosing cholangitis is the biliary manifestation of IgG4-related sclerosing disease, and type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis is its pancreatic counterpart. People with chronic alcoholism can develop peribiliary cysts and fibrosis as well as pancreatic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis simultaneously. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, and mucinous cystic neoplasm are considered pancreatic counterparts for the biliary neoplasms of extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, intraductal papillary neoplasm of the biliary tract, and hepatic mucinous cystic neoplasm, respectively. The anatomic proximity of the biliary tract and the pancreas, the nearly simultaneous development of both organs from the endoderm of the foregut, and the presence of pancreatic exocrine acini within the peribiliary glands surrounding the extrahepatic bile ducts are suggested as causative factors for these similarities. Interestingly, these diseases show "nearly" identical findings at cross-sectional imaging, an observation that further supports this new disease concept. New information obtained with regard to biliary diseases can be used for evaluation of pancreatic abnormalities, and vice versa. In addition, combined genetic and molecular studies may be performed to develop novel therapeutic targets. For both biliary and pancreatic diseases, imaging plays a pivotal role in initial diagnosis, evaluation of treatment response, efficacy testing of novel drugs, and long-term surveillance. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:26824512

  10. MRI assessment of coronary stents.

    PubMed

    De Cobelli, F; Cappio, S; Vanzulli, A; Del Maschio, A

    1999-01-01

    Several types of coronary stents are poorly visualized by fluoroscopy. Until now, the only reliable procedure to establish coronary stent patency is to repeat coronary angiography. Purpose of this study was to localize previously placed coronary artery stents and to verify their patency with MR angiography. 13 stented coronary arteries (6 RCA, 5 LAD, 2 LCx) were prospectively examined with MR angiography one day to 8 months after stent placement. 18 amagnetic stents (6 Palmatz-Schatz, 6 Multilink, 5 Crossflex, 1 Wiktor) were imaged. Imaging was performed on a 1.5 T MR-system (GE Signa Horizon Echo Speed) with a phased array multicoil. Segmented k-space fast gradient-echo sequences (TR/TE/FA = 11/4.5/25 degrees; views per segment = 8; matrix = 256 x 160; thickness = 3 mm; no gap) were acquired with and without fat suppression at several phases of the cardiac cycle within a single breath-hold. Images of consecutive slice location were shown in a cine format. Correlation with coronary angiography (standard of reference) was performed in all patients. No MRI-related adverse events were observed. All the stents were visualized as areas of signal loss. The length of the signal loss corresponded to the length of the stents in all 18 cases. Stents were more directly visualized on images without fat suppression. In all cases the patent blood flow distal to the stents was observed as a high-signal linear structure distal to the signal void, corresponding to stent patency at coronary angiography. It was concluded that breath-hold cine coronary MR angiography is a safe technique to visualize coronary artery stents. Stent location and patency can be noninvasively established with this technique. PMID:10358391

  11. Factors affecting outcome after Frey procedure for chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Balachandar, Tirupporur Govindaswamy; Kannan, Devy Gounder; Rajarathinam, Govindhasamy; Vimalraj, Vellayudham; Rajendran, Shanmugasundaram; Ravichandran, Palanisamy; Jeswanth, Satyanesan; Surendran, Rajagopal

    2008-01-01

    Background. Debilitating abdominal pain remains the most common presentation of chronic pancreatitis and the treatment remains challenging. Objective. This prospective study analyzed the outcome of Frey's procedure in patients with inflammatory head mass. Methods. For the period between 2002 and 2007, 77 patients with chronic pancreatitis underwent Frey procedure for intractable abdominal pain. The mean follow-up was 14 months. For the purpose of analysis of the outcome, patients were grouped as poor pain control (19%) and good pain control groups (81%) based on the pain scores during follow-up. Results. There was no 30-day mortality. The logistic regression analysis showed that decreased volume percentage (48%) of head mass resected (p=0.003) and small diameter of the pancreatic duct (p=0.05) were associated with poor pain outcome. Subgroup analysis revealed that patients with small duct disease were associated with increased operative time (p=0.001), poor pain scores (p=0.001), and increased weight loss (p=0.003) during follow-up. Conclusions. Frey procedure can be performed with zero mortality and low morbidity in a high-volume center. It provides good pain relief in majority of the patients. Volume of the head mass cored affects pain outcome. Correlation between poor results in terms of pain relief and weight loss following Frey's procedure, and small duct disease supports the view that duct diameter is an important predictor of pain relief. PMID:19088936

  12. Mechanical Characteristics of Composite Knitted Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuda, Takanori Shomura, Yuzo; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Satoshi

    2009-09-15

    We used metal wires and fibers to fabricate a composite knitted stent and then compare the mechanical characteristics of this stent with those of a pure metallic stent of the same construction in order to develop a stent that offers a comparable degree of expandability as metallic stents but can be used for highly curved lesions that cannot be treated using metallic stents. We fabricated two types of composite knitted stent (N-Z stents), using nitinol wire with a diameter of 0.12 mm and polypara-phenylene-benzobisoxazole (PBO) multifilament fiber (Zyron AS; Toyobo, Osaka, Japan). Stents were knitted into a cylindrical shape using the same textile pattern as a Strecker stent. Two loop lengths (L) of nitinol wire were used in the N-Z stents: L = 1.84 mm (N-Z stent L = 1.84) and L = 2.08 mm (N-Z stent L = 2.08). For the sake of comparison, we fabricated a metallic stent of nitinol using the same textile pattern (N-N stent L = 1.92). We applied a radial compression force diametrically to each stent and applied a bending force diametrically at the free end of a stent with one end fixed in order to evaluate the relationship between stent elasticity and load values. In addition, we macroscopically evaluated the generation of kinks when the stent was bent 180{sup o}. The radial compressive force when the stent diameter was reduced by 53% was 6.44 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 1.84, 6.14 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 4.96 N in the case of N-N stent L = 1.92 mm. The composite stent had a radial compressive force higher than that of a metallic stent. The restoring force to longitudinal direction at a 90{sup o} bending angle was 0.005 N for N-Z stent L = 1.84, 0.003 N for N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 0.034 N for N-N stent L = 1.92. The restoring force of the composite stent was significantly lower. Finally, the composite stent generated no definitive kinks at a bending angle of 180{sup o}, regardless of loop length. However, the N-N stent clearly produced kinks, causing blockage of the inner cavity. In conclusion, the use of a metal and fiber composite in the construction of a knitted stent ensures an expansion performance comparable to that of metallic stents, while providing better kink resistance.

  13. Effective screening for early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Keiji; Okazaki, Akihito; Hirano, Naomichi; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Minami, Tomoyuki; Ikemoto, Juri; Kanemitsu, Kozue; Hino, Fumiaki

    2015-12-01

    Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer (PC) at an early stage with curative surgery should improve long-term patient outcome. At present, improving survival should lie in identifying those cases with high-risk factors or precursor lesions through an effective screening including ultrasonography, some biological markers, or national familial pancreatic cancer registration. Recently, cases with PC < 10 mm with a favorable prognosis have been reported. For the diagnoses of cases with PC < 10 mm, the rate of tumor detection was higher on endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) than on CT or other modalities, and EUS-guided fine needle aspiration was helpful in confirming the histologic diagnosis. Additionally, for the diagnosis of cases with PC in situ, EUS and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) may play important roles in detecting the local irregular stenosis of the pancreatic duct. Cytodiagnosis of pancreatic juice using endoscopic nasopancreatic drainage multiple times may be useful in the final diagnosis. PMID:26651254

  14. Ureteroscopic removal of forgotten ureteral stent.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ishida, Hiroaki; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    A 69-year-old female had a right ureteral stent placed due to ureteral stricture resulting from cervical cancer in March 2008. The ureteral stent migrated to the ureter and was not exchanged. A new ureteral stent was inserted, and was exchanged every 3 months. The patient was referred to our department to remove the forgotten ureteral stent. In January 2012, her old ureteral stent was removed ureteroscopically, and no ureteral stent encrustation was found. PMID:22707678

  15. Severe Acute Pancreatitis and Necrotizing Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Rahul; Subramanian, Ram M

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis results in nearly 250,000 admissions annually. Acute pancreatitis varies widely in its clinical presentation. Pancreatic necrosis accounts for substantial additional morbidity, with mortality rates remaining as high as 10% to 20% despite advances in critical care. The extent of necrosis correlates well with the incidence of infected necrosis, multiorgan failure, need for pancreatic debridement, and morbidity and mortality. Having established the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis, goals of appropriately aggressive resuscitation should be established and adhered to in a multidisciplinary approach involving both medical and surgical critical care. PMID:27016168

  16. Endoscopic management of chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Oza, Veeral M; Kahaleh, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common gastrointestinal illness, which affects the quality of life with substantial morbidity and mortality. The management includes medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches with the need for interaction between various specialties, calling for a concerted multidisciplinary approach. However, at the time of this publication, guidelines to establish care of these patients are lacking. This review provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the studies summarizing the various treatment options available, including medical, surgical and endoscopic options. In addition, technological advances such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogrophy, endoscopic shock wave lithotripsy and endoscopic ultrasound can now be offered with reasonable success for pancreatic decompression, stricture dilatation with stent placement, stone fragmentation, pseudocyst drainage, and other endoscopic interventions such as celiac plexus block for pain relief. We emphasize the endoscopic options in this review, and attempt to extract the most up to date information from the current literature. The treatment of CP and its complications are discussed extensively. Complications such as biliary strictures. pancreatic pseudocysts, and chronic pain are common issues that arise as long-term complications of CP. These often require endoscopic or surgical management and possibly a combination of approaches, however choosing amongst the various therapeutic and palliative modalities while weighing the risks and benefits, makes the management of CP challenging. Treatment goals should be not just to control symptoms but also to prevent disease progression. Our aim in this paper is to advocate and emphasize an evidence based approach for the management of CP and associated long term complications. PMID:23330050

  17. Persistent Mllerian duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, N P; Biyabani, R; Herzig, M J; Ali, A; Nazir, Z; Sulaiman, M N; Talati, J

    1998-09-01

    Persistent mllerian duct syndrome (PMDS) is a rare form of male pseudohermaphroditism. We present 5 cases with PMDS (2 cases associated with testicular malignancy) and discuss the diagnosis and management. Management strategies of PMDS have changed. Whereas in the past, removal of the mllerian remnants was targeted together with orchidopexy or -ectomy, this is no longer recommended. However, testicles that cannot be descended at an early stage are at a high risk of malignancy and should, therefore, be removed. If this is necessary on both sides, there is the additional problem of lifelong testosterone substitution which requires efficient patient monitoring and good patient compliance. In cases where this cannot be achieved, compromises, such as temporarily delayed orchidectomy, may be considered. PMID:9732199

  18. Complications of pancreatic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2011-01-01

    Many diseases, including pancreatitis benign tumors and cancer, may require pancreas surgery. Pancreatic resection can lead to a prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and even a potential chance for cure. However, the pancreatic surgery can result in complications, and high postoperative morbidity rates are still presence. This article reviews the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, which involves the more common complications, their prevention and treatment. PMID:22363072

  19. Chemical ablation of the gallbladder using alcohol in cholecystitis after palliative biliary stenting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae-Hoon; Park, Sang-Heum; Kim, Sang-Pil; Park, Ji-Young; Lee, Chang-Kyun; Chung, Il-Kwun; Kim, Hong-Soo; Kim, Sun-Joo

    2009-04-28

    Chemical ablation of the gallbladder is effective in patients at high risk of complications after surgery. Percutaneous gallbladder drainage is an effective treatment for cholecystitis; however, when the drain tube cannot be removed because of recurrent symptoms, retaining it can cause problems. An 82-year-old woman presented with cholecystitis and cholangitis caused by biliary stent occlusion and suspected tumor invasion of the cystic duct. We present successful chemical ablation of the gallbladder using pure alcohol, through a percutaneous gallbladder drainage tube, in a patient who developed intractable cholecystitis with obstruction of the cystic duct after receiving a biliary stent. Our results suggest that chemical ablation therapy is an effective alternative to surgical therapy for intractable cholecystitis. PMID:19399941

  20. Successful biliary drainage using a metal stent through the gastric stoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Noma, Yasuhiro; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of biliary drainage for malignant stricture using a metal stent with an ultrathin endoscope through the gastric stoma. A 78-year-old female was referred to our hospital for jaundice and fever. She had undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for esophageal obstruction after radiation therapy for cancer of the pharynx. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a 3-cm enhanced mass in the middle bile duct and dilatation of the intra-hepatic bile duct. We initially performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with a trans-oral approach. However, neither the side-viewing endoscope nor the ultrathin endoscope passed through the esophageal orifice. Thus, we eventually performed ERCP via the PEG stoma using an ultrathin endoscope. We performed biliary drainage with a 6F introducer self-expanding metal stent. The cytology findings obtained by brush cytology showed malignancy. Her laboratory results were restored to normal levels after drainage and no complication occurred. PMID:26140009

  1. Successful biliary drainage using a metal stent through the gastric stoma.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Noma, Yasuhiro; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-06-28

    We report a case of biliary drainage for malignant stricture using a metal stent with an ultrathin endoscope through the gastric stoma. A 78-year-old female was referred to our hospital for jaundice and fever. She had undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for esophageal obstruction after radiation therapy for cancer of the pharynx. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a 3-cm enhanced mass in the middle bile duct and dilatation of the intra-hepatic bile duct. We initially performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with a trans-oral approach. However, neither the side-viewing endoscope nor the ultrathin endoscope passed through the esophageal orifice. Thus, we eventually performed ERCP via the PEG stoma using an ultrathin endoscope. We performed biliary drainage with a 6F introducer self-expanding metal stent. The cytology findings obtained by brush cytology showed malignancy. Her laboratory results were restored to normal levels after drainage and no complication occurred. PMID:26140009

  2. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in the detection and characterization of solid pancreatic nodules: An update

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Najwa Al; Ramalho, Miguel; Semelka, Richard C; Buonocore, Valeria; Gigli, Silvia; Maccioni, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common malignant tumor of the pancreas. The remaining pancreatic tumors are a diverse group of pancreatic neoplasms that comprises cystic pancreatic neoplasms, endocrine tumors and other uncommon pancreatic tumors. Due to the excellent soft tissue contrast resolution, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently able to readily separate cystic from noncystic tumors. Cystic tumors are often easy to diagnose with MRI; however, noncystic non-adenocarcinoma tumors may show a wide spectrum of imaging features, which can potentially mimic ductal adenocarcinoma. MRI is a reliable technique for the characterization of pancreatic lesions. The implementation of novel motion-resistant pulse sequences and respiratory gating techniques, as well as the recognized benefits of MR cholangiopancreatography, make MRI a very accurate examination for the evaluation of pancreatic masses. MRI has the distinctive ability of non-invasive assessment of the pancreatic ducts, pancreatic parenchyma, neighbouring soft tissues, and vascular network in one examination. MRI can identify different characteristics of various solid pancreatic lesions, potentially allowing the differentiation of adenocarcinoma from other benign and malignant entities. In this review we describe the MRI protocols and MRI characteristics of various solid pancreatic lesions. Recognition of these characteristics may establish the right diagnosis or at least narrow the differential diagnosis, thus avoiding unnecessary tests or procedures and permitting better management. PMID:26644822

  3. A Newly Designed Stent for Management of Malignant Distal Duodenal Stenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Wei-Zhong Yang, Zheng-Qiang Liu, Sheng Zhou, Chun-Gao Xia, Jin-Guo Zhao, Lin-Bo Shi, Hai-Bin

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the clinical effectiveness of a newly designed stent for the treatment of malignant distal duodenal stenosis.MethodsFrom March 2011 to May 2013, six patients with malignant duodenal stenosis underwent fluoroscopically guided placement of the new duodenal stent consisting of braided, nested stent wires, and a delivery system with a metallic mesh inner layer. Primary diseases were pancreatic cancer in three patients, gastric cancer in two patients, and endometrial stromal sarcoma in one patient. Duodenal obstructions were located in the horizontal part in two patients, the ascending part in two patients, and the duodenojejunal flexure in two patients. Technical success, defined as the successful stent deployment, clinical symptoms before and after the procedure, and complications were evaluated.ResultsTechnical success was achieved in all patients. No major complications were observed. Before treatment, two patients could not take any food and the gastric outlet obstruction scoring system (GOOSS) score was 0; the other four patients could take only liquids orally (GOOSS score = 1). After treatment, five patients could take soft food (GOOSS score = 2) and one patient could take a full diet (GOOSS score = 3). The mean duration of primary stent patency was 115.7 days.ConclusionsThe newly designed stent is associated with a high degree of technical success and good clinical outcome and may be clinically effective in the management of malignant distal duodenal obstruction.

  4. Tissue Kallikrein Prevents Restenosis After Stenting of Severe Atherosclerotic Stenosis of the Middle Cerebral Artery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ruifeng; Zhang, Renliang; Yang, Fang; Lin, Min; Li, Min; Liu, Ling; Yin, Qin; Lin, Hang; Xiong, Yunyun; Liu, Wenhua; Fan, Xiaobing; Dai, Qiliang; Zhou, Lizhi; Lan, Wenya; Cao, Qinqin; Chen, Xin; Xu, Gelin; Liu, Xinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In-stent restenosis (ISR) following intracranial artery stenting affects long-term clinical outcome. This randomized controlled trial sought to identify the long-term efficacy of exogenous tissue kallikrein (TK) for preventing ISR after intracranial stenting of symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) atherosclerotic stenosis. Sixty-one patients successfully treated with intracranial stenting for symptomatic MCA M1 segment stenosis (>70%) were enrolled and randomized into 2 groups: control group and TK group. Patients in the TK group received human urinary kallidinogenase for 7 days, followed by maintenance therapy of pancreatic kallikrein for 6 months. The primary end point was angiographically verified ISR at 6 months, and secondary end points included vascular events and death within 12 months. Endogenous TK plasma concentrations of patients were measured before stenting and at the 6-month follow-up time-point. Patients in the TK group had lower occurrence rates of ISR and vascular events than patients in the control group. There was no difference in endogenous TK levels in plasma at 6 months postoperatively between the TK and control groups. Further subgroup analysis revealed that patients without ISR had higher endogenous TK levels at baseline and lower concentrations at 6 months postoperatively compared with patients who underwent ISR. Exogenous TK is effective for the prevention of ISR after intracranial stenting. PMID:26871851

  5. [Metallic biomaterials for coronary stents].

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Wieneke, H; Brauer, H; Erbel, R

    2001-04-01

    The introduction of coronary stents is a milestone in interventional cardiology. Two landmark studies have shown that stainless steel stents significantly decrease the restenosis rate as compared to balloon angioplasty. This fact led to a marked increase of stent implantation since the first stent implantation by Jacques Puel in 1986. Although the concept of coronary stenting significantly improved the interventional therapy of coronary artery disease, restenosis remains a major unsolved drawback of this technique. In addition to procedure and disease related factors like implantation pressure and plaque burden, data suggest that the stent as a medical implant plays a crucial role in the process of neointima formation. Since its introduction in cardiology, more than 50 different stents of different configuration and material have been developed. Although recent publications report of promising results using biodegradable materials, almost all coronary stents commercially available at the moment are made of metallic alloys. Whereas first generation stents were made exclusively from stainless steel and only minor interest was focussed on the stent material in the manufacture of coronary stents, recent studies strongly suggest that the metallic alloy used has a direct impact on the extent of neointima formation. Thus, metallic alloys differ not only with respect to mechanical features, but also by their biocompatible properties. These two factors are of major importance in the induction of vessel wall injury, inflammatory processes and cell proliferation. In the first part, the present paper reviews the metallurgic characteristics of metallic materials, which are currently used or under investigation in the production of coronary stents. In the second part, clinical and experimental results are summarized with respect to their biocompatibility and impact on the process of restenosis formation. PMID:11381573

  6. A large mural nodule in branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma of the pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Koichiro; Wakiyama, Shigeki; Futagawa, Yasuro; Shiba, Hiroaki; Misawa, Takeyuki; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Indications for resection of branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) remain controversial because of their low tendency to be malignant. Surgical resection should be recommended if any factors indicating malignancy are present. However, preoperative differentiation between benign and malignant tumors is very difficult, especially in cases of branch duct IPMNs. We herein report a case of branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous adenoma (IPMA) of the pancreas with a large mural nodule of 25 mm. A 74-year-old woman was admitted for examination and treatment for a cystic tumor in the head of the pancreas. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and computed tomography showed a cystic lesion, 50 mm in diameter, with an irregular mural nodule in the pancreatic head. Endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated a multicystic tumor connected with the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The mural nodule had a diameter of 18 mm, and the MPD had a slight dilation of 6 mm. These findings suggested a high potential for malignancy. The patient underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy with lymph node dissection. The excised pancreas showed multiple cysts located in the branch pancreatic duct with a maximum diameter of 75 mm. The mural nodule had a maximum diameter of 25 mm. The tumor was diagnosed as an IPMA by pathological examination. After operation, the patient was discharged without any complications. Two years after resection, the patient remains in remission with no evidence of tumor recurrence. PMID:26943388

  7. Acinar Cell Production of Leukotriene B4 Contributes to Development of Neurogenic Pancreatitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Rafiq A.; Vigna, Steven R.; Layne, Amanda C.; Romac, Joelle M.-J.; Liddle, Rodger A.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims In the pancreas, activation of primary sensory nerves through the transient receptor potential ion channel TRPV1 contributes to the early stages of development of pancreatitis. Little is known about the mechanism by which this occurs. We investigated whether leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is an endogenous agonist of TRPV1 and mediates pancreatitis. Methods Acute inflammation was induced in the pancreata of Trpv1−/− mice and their wild-type littermates by retrograde infusion of the main pancreatic duct with 2% sodium taurocholate (NaT) or intraperitoneal injections of caerulein. Mice were also given injections of resiniferatoxin (an excitotoxin that desensitizes TRPV1) or MK886 (a drug that inhibits LTB4 biosynthesis). Pancreatic tissues and plasma were collected and analyzed. Results Retrograde perfusion of the main pancreatic ducts of wild-type mice with NaT caused severe acute pancreatitis; severity was reduced by co-administration of resiniferatoxin. Trpv1−/− mice developed a less severe pancreatitis following NaT administration than controls. Administration of MK886 before perfusion with NaT also significantly reduced the severity of pancreatitis in wild-type mice. Pancreatic tissues from mice given NaT had a marked increase in the level of 5-lipoxygenase immunoreactivity specifically in acinar cells. Bile acid and caerulein induced secretion of LTB4 by cultured pancreatic acinar cells; MK886 inhibited this process. Conclusions Administration of caerulein or intraductal bile acids in mice causes production of LTB4 by pancreatic acinar cells. This activates TRPV1 on primary sensory nerves to induce acute pancreatitis. PMID:25729765

  8. Innovations in macroscopic evaluation of pancreatic specimens and radiologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Triantopoulou, Charikleia; Papaparaskeva, Kleo; Agalianos, Christos; Dervenis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a novel dissection technique of surgical specimens in different cases of pancreatic tumors and provide a radiologic pathologic correlation. In our hospital, that is a referral center for pancreatic diseases, the macroscopic evaluation of the pancreatectomy specimens is performed by the pathologists using the axial slicing technique (instead of the traditional procedure with longitudinal opening of the main pancreatic and/or common bile duct and slicing along the plane defined by both ducts). The specimen is sliced in an axial plane that is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the descending duodenum. The procedure results in a large number of thin slices (3–4 mm). This plane is identical to that of CT or MRI and correlation between pathology and imaging is straightforward. We studied 70 cases of suspected different solid and cystic pancreatic tumors and we correlated the tumor size and location, the structure—consistency (areas of necrosis—hemorrhage—fibrosis—inflammation), the degree of vessels’ infiltration, the size of pancreatic and common bile duct and the distance from resection margins. Missed findings by imaging or pitfalls were recorded and we tried to explain all discrepancies between radiology evaluation and the histopathological findings. Radiologic-pathologic correlation is extremely important, adding crucial information on imaging limitations and enabling quality assessment of surgical specimens. The deep knowledge of different pancreatic tumors’ consistency and way of extension helps to improve radiologists’ diagnostic accuracy and minimize the radiological-surgical mismatching, preventing patients from unnecessary surgery. PMID:27069980

  9. Reducing In-Stent Restenosis

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Robert A.; Halliday, Crawford A.; Miller, Ashley M.; Diver, Louise A.; Dakin, Rachel S.; Montgomery, Jennifer; McBride, Martin W.; Kennedy, Simon; McClure, John D.; Robertson, Keith E.; Douglas, Gillian; Channon, Keith M.; Oldroyd, Keith G.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug-eluting stents reduce the incidence of in-stent restenosis, but they result in delayed arterial healing and are associated with a chronic inflammatory response and hypersensitivity reactions. Identifying novel interventions to enhance wound healing and reduce the inflammatory response may improve long-term clinical outcomes. Micro–ribonucleic acids (miRNAs) are noncoding small ribonucleic acids that play a prominent role in the initiation and resolution of inflammation after vascular injury. Objectives This study sought to identify miRNA regulation and function after implantation of bare-metal and drug-eluting stents. Methods Pig, mouse, and in vitro models were used to investigate the role of miRNA in in-stent restenosis. Results We documented a subset of inflammatory miRNAs activated after stenting in pigs, including the miR-21 stem loop miRNAs. Genetic ablation of the miR-21 stem loop attenuated neointimal formation in mice post-stenting. This occurred via enhanced levels of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages coupled with an impaired sensitivity of smooth muscle cells to respond to vascular activation. Conclusions MiR-21 plays a prominent role in promoting vascular inflammation and remodeling after stent injury. MiRNA-mediated modulation of the inflammatory response post-stenting may have therapeutic potential to accelerate wound healing and enhance the clinical efficacy of stenting. PMID:26022821

  10. PMR Graphite Engine Duct Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stotler, C. L.; Yokel, S. A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the cost and weight advantages that could be obtained by utilizing the graphite/PMR15 material system to replace titanium in selected turbofan engine applications. The first component to be selected as a basis for evaluation was the outer bypass duct of the General Electric F404 engine. The operating environment of this duct was defined and then an extensive mechanical and physical property test program was conducted using material made by processing techniques which were also established by this program. Based on these properties, design concepts to fabricate a composite version of the duct were established and two complete ducts fabricated. One of these ducts was proof pressure tested and then run successfully on a factory test engine for over 1900 hours. The second duct was static tested to 210 percent design limit load without failure. An improved design was then developed which utilized integral composite end flanges. A complete duct was fabricated and successfully proof pressure tested. The net results of this effort showed that a composite version of the outer duct would be 14 percent lighter and 30 percent less expensive that the titanium duct. The other type of structure chosen for investigation was the F404 fan stator assembly, including the fan stator vanes. It was concluded that it was feasible to utilize composite materials for this type structure but that the requirements imposed by replacing an existing metal design resulted in an inefficient composite design. It was concluded that if composites were to be effectively used in this type structure, the design must be tailored for composite application from the outset.

  11. Photodynamic therapy for pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Stephen P.

    2009-02-01

    Patients with non-resectable pancreatic and biliary tract cancer (cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder cancer) have a dismal outlook with conventional palliative therapies, with a median survival of 3-9 months and a 5 year survival of less than 3%. Surgery is the only curative treatment but is appropriate in less than 20% of cases, and even then is associated with a 5-year survival of less than 30%. Although most applications of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in gastroenterology have been on lesions of the luminal gut, there is increasing experimental and clinical evidence for its efficacy in cancers of the pancreas and biliary tract. Our group has carried out the only clinical study of PDT in pancreatic carcinoma reported to date, and showed that PDT is feasible for local debulking of pancreatic cancer. PDT has also been used with palliative intent in patients with unresectable cholangiocarcinoma, with patients treated with stenting plus PDT reporting improvements in cholestasis, quality of life and survival compared with historical or randomized controls treated with stenting alone. Further controlled studies are needed to establish the influence of PDT and chemotherapy on the survival and quality of life of patients with pancreatic and biliary tract carcinoma.

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided cystogastrostomy for successful drainage of pancreatic pseudocyst: a pediatric case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuji; Ito, Kiyoaki; Inoue, Tadahisa; Ishii, Norimitsu; Yamamoto, Takaya; Oohashi, Tomohiko; Nakade, Yukiomi; Sato, Ken; Nakao, Haruhisa; Yoneda, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    A 15-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital with a recent increase in the size of a preexisting pancreatic pseudocyst. At 11 years of age, he was diagnosed with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) and received chemotherapy with L-asparaginase (L-Asp); he developed the pancreatic pseudocyst following L-Asp-induced acute pancreatitis. The pancreatic pseudocyst had increased to 120mm in diameter. He developed epigastralgia and portal hypertension. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided cystogastrostomy with the placement of a 7-cm 7-Fr plastic stent and a 5-Fr NB pigtail catheter led to the near-complete resolution of the pseudocyst. There were no signs of recurrence within the first year after intervention. EUS-guided drainage, increasingly used for pseudocysts, should be considered as an effective treatment approach for pediatric pancreatic pseudocysts. PMID:26743556

  13. Unusual course of the aberrant right hepatic artery running through the pancreatic parenchyma during modified Frey's procedure.

    PubMed

    Rebibo, L; Peltier, J; Gerin, O; Michel, D; Robert, B; Regimbeau, J-M

    2014-12-01

    We report a variation of an aberrant right hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery and crossing into pancreatic head without other hepatic artery substitution. The variant was discovered during radiological examinations in a patient with symptomatic chronic pancreatitis requiring Frey's procedure with reinsertion of the common bile duct into the pancreatic head. An aberrant right hepatic artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery is present in 10 to 20% of case and its course is usually retro-pancreatic. The course of this artery into the pancreatic head is uncommon and can be present up to 10% in case of ARHA. Knowledge of an aberrant right hepatic artery crossing into the pancreatic head is important before pancreatic surgery in order to avoid surgical complications, especially for liver necrosis. PMID:25260643

  14. Pancreatic trauma: The role of computed tomography for guiding therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    Moschetta, Marco; Telegrafo, Michele; Malagnino, Valeria; Mappa, Laura; Ianora, Amato A Stabile; Dabbicco, Dario; Margari, Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing traumatic injuries of the pancreas and guiding the therapeutic approach. METHODS: CT exams of 6740 patients admitted to our Emergency Department between May 2005 and January 2013 for abdominal trauma were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were identified through a search of our electronic archive system by using such terms as “pancreatic injury”, “pancreatic contusion”, “pancreatic laceration”, “peri-pancreatic fluid”, “pancreatic active bleeding”. All CT examinations were performed before and after the intravenous injection of contrast material using a 16-slice multidetector row computed tomography scanner. The data sets were retrospectively analyzed by two radiologists in consensus searching for specific signs of pancreatic injury (parenchymal fracture and laceration, focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement/edema, pancreatic hematoma, active bleeding, fluid between splenic vein and pancreas) and non-specific signs (inflammatory changes in peri-pancreatic fat and mesentery, fluid surrounding the superior mesenteric artery, thickening of the left anterior renal fascia, pancreatic ductal dilatation, acute pseudocyst formation/peri-pancreatic fluid collection, fluid in the anterior and posterior pararenal spaces, fluid in transverse mesocolon and lesser sac, hemorrhage into peri-pancreatic fat, mesocolon and mesentery, extraperitoneal fluid, intra-peritoneal fluid). RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-six/Six thousand seven hundred and forty (2%) patients showed CT signs of pancreatic trauma. Eight/one hundred and thirty-six (6%) patients underwent surgical treatment and the pancreatic injures were confirmed in all cases. Only in 6/8 patients treated with surgical approach, pancreatic duct damage was suggested in the radiological reports and surgically confirmed in all cases. In 128/136 (94%) patients who underwent non-operative treatment CT images showed pancreatic edema in 97 patients, hematoma in 31 patients, fluid between splenic vein and pancreas in 113 patients. Non-specific CT signs of pancreatic injuries were represented by peri-pancreatic fat stranding and mesentery fluid in 89% of cases, thickening of the left anterior renal fascia in 65%, pancreatic ductal dilatation in 18%, acute pseudocyst/peri-pancreatic fluid collection in 57%, fluid in the pararenal spaces in 45%, fluid in transverse mesocolon and lesser sac in 29%, hemorrhage into peri-pancreatic fat, mesocolon and mesentery in 66%, extraperitoneal fluid in 66%, intra-peritoneal fluid in 41% cases. CONCLUSION: CT represents an accurate tool for diagnosing pancreatic trauma, provides useful information to plan therapeutic approach with a detection rate of 75% for recognizing ductal lesions. PMID:26644827

  15. CXCL12 chemokine expression suppresses human pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Roy I; Zimmerman NP; Mackinnon AC; Tsai S; Evans DB; Dwinell MB

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an unsolved health problem with nearly 75% of patients diagnosed with advanced disease and an overall 5-year survival rate near 5%. Despite the strong link between mortality and malignancy, the mechanisms behind pancreatic cancer dissemination and metastasis are poorly understood. Correlative pathological and cell culture analyses suggest the chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a biological role in pancreatic cancer progression. In vivo roles for the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in pancreatic cancer malignancy were investigated. CXCR4 and CXCR7 were consistently expressed in normal and cancerous pancreatic ductal epithelium, established cell lines, and patient-derived primary cancer cells. Relative to healthy exocrine ducts, CXCL12 expression was pathologically repressed in pancreatic cancer tissue specimens and patient-derived cell lines. To test the functional consequences of CXCL12 silencing, pancreatic cancer cell lines stably expressingthe chemokine were engineered. Consistent with a role for CXCL12 as a tumor suppressor, cells producing the chemokine wereincreasingly adherent and migration deficient in vitro and poorly metastatic in vivo, compared to control cells. Further, CXCL12 reintroduction significantly reduced tumor growth in vitro, with significantly smaller tumors in vivo, leading to a pronounced survival advantage in a preclinical model. Together, these data demonstrate a functional tumor suppressive role for the normal expression of CXCL12 in pancreatic ducts, regulating both tumor growth andcellulardissemination to metastatic sites.

  16. Intestinal transit and bacterial translocation in obstructive pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Moody, F G; Haley-Russell, D; Muncy, D M

    1995-08-01

    Pancreatic infection from gut-derived bacteria has emerged as the major cause of death in necrotizing pancreatitis. Bacterial overgrowth of indigenous enteric organisms as a consequence of guts stasis (ileus) represents a potential initial event in this process. The present study was designed to examine the interrelationships between intestinal transit, enteric bacteriology, and the translocation of bacteria from the gut lumen to mesenteric lymph nodes and splanchnic viscera during experimentally induced acute pancreatitis. Male rats underwent pancreaticobiliary duct ligation (PBDL) or sham surgery and were sacrificed after 24, 48, or 96 hr. Severity of pancreatitis was assessed with histology, tissue water content, and amylase and lipase levels. Intestinal transit was measured with fluorescent tracers. Blood, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), splanchnic organs, and gut luminal contents were subjected to bacteriologic analysis. PBDL was followed by biochemical and histologic evidence of progressive pancreatic injury at each time interval. Enteric bacteria within the gut and in adjacent MLNs increased as intestinal transit decreased after PBDL-induced pancreatic inflammation. Surprisingly, all parameters returned to control levels by 96 hr in spite of progression of pancreatic inflammation. PMID:7648983

  17. Multiple Stent Fractures After Everolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation Causing Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eun Young; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Tae-Seok; Kim, Chan Joon; Cho, Jung Sun; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stent fracture is an uncommon complication of drug-eluting stent implantation, but it has a clinical significance because of its potential association with adverse cardiac events such as in-stent restenosis, target lesion revascularization, and stent thrombosis. Multiple stent fractures account for a small proportion, but they may lead to more serious complications. Newer generation drug-eluting stents are designed for improved safety and efficacy compared with early generation drug-eluting stents. Multiple stent fractures after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation are a rare case. We report a case of 25-year-old male who presented with acute myocardial infarction caused by multiple stent fractures after everolimus-eluting stents implantation and was treated by balloon angioplasty. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of multiple stent fractures even after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation. PMID:26871806

  18. Multiple Stent Fractures After Everolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation Causing Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ji, Eun Young; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Tae-Seok; Kim, Chan Joon; Cho, Jung Sun; Park, Mahn-Won; Her, Sung Ho

    2016-02-01

    Stent fracture is an uncommon complication of drug-eluting stent implantation, but it has a clinical significance because of its potential association with adverse cardiac events such as in-stent restenosis, target lesion revascularization, and stent thrombosis. Multiple stent fractures account for a small proportion, but they may lead to more serious complications. Newer generation drug-eluting stents are designed for improved safety and efficacy compared with early generation drug-eluting stents. Multiple stent fractures after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation are a rare case.We report a case of 25-year-old male who presented with acute myocardial infarction caused by multiple stent fractures after everolimus-eluting stents implantation and was treated by balloon angioplasty.Physicians should be aware of the possibility of multiple stent fractures even after newer generation drug-eluting stent implantation. PMID:26871806

  19. Nasal packing and stenting

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Nasal packs are indispensable in ENT practice. This study reviews current indications, effectiveness and risks of nasal packs and stents. In endoscopic surgery, nasal packs should always have smooth surfaces to minimize mucosal damage, improve wound healing and increase patient comfort. Functional endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery allows the use of modern nasal packs, since pressure is no longer required. So called hemostatic/resorbable materials are a first step in this direction. However, they may lead to adhesions and foreign body reactions in mucosal membranes. Simple occlusion is an effective method for creating a moist milieu for improved wound healing and avoiding dryness. Stenting of the frontal sinus is recommended if surgery fails to produce a wide, physiologically shaped drainage path that is sufficiently covered by intact tissue. PMID:22073095

  20. Controversies around carotid stenting.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, I Q; Kühn, A L

    2011-01-01

    In the last 10 years, CAS became an important alternative to surgery. However, many of the trials regarding stroke prevention had controversial requirements regarding the endovascular approach, leading to questionable conclusions. This review critically addresses results from previous randomized studies on efficacy and safety of the first established therapy for carotid artery stenosis, carotid endarterectomy (CEA) compared to the challenger, carotid artery stenting (CAS), as a newer and less invasive endovascular technique. PMID:21618849

  1. Early definite stent thrombosis with everolimus-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Ryo; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Konishi, Hirokazu; Tsuboi, Shuta; Okazaki, Shinya; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Stent thrombosis (ST) is a serious complication of percutaneous coronary intervention. Several factors are associated with ST, and combination of these factors increase the risk, even in everolimus-eluting stents, which have low risk of ST. We experienced a case of ST caused by limited coronary flow and resistance to antiplatelet agent. PMID:26509023

  2. Early definite stent thrombosis with everolimus-eluting stents.

    PubMed

    Naito, Ryo; Miyauchi, Katsumi; Konishi, Hirokazu; Tsuboi, Shuta; Okazaki, Shinya; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    Stent thrombosis (ST) is a serious complication of percutaneous coronary intervention. Several factors are associated with ST, and combination of these factors increase the risk, even in everolimus-eluting stents, which have low risk of ST. We experienced a case of ST caused by limited coronary flow and resistance to antiplatelet agent. PMID:26509023

  3. Hemodynamics in Idealized Stented Coronary Arteries: Important Stent Design Considerations.

    PubMed

    Beier, Susann; Ormiston, John; Webster, Mark; Cater, John; Norris, Stuart; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Young, Alistair; Cowan, Brett

    2016-02-01

    Stent induced hemodynamic changes in the coronary arteries are associated with higher risk of adverse clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of stent design on wall shear stress (WSS), time average WSS, and WSS gradient (WSSG), in idealized stent geometries using computational fluid dynamics. Strut spacing, thickness, luminal protrusion, and malapposition were systematically investigated and a comparison made between two commercially available stents (Omega and Biomatrix). Narrower strut spacing led to larger areas of adverse low WSS and high WSSG but these effects were mitigated when strut size was reduced, particularly for WSSG. Local hemodynamics worsened with luminal protrusion of the stent and with stent malapposition, adverse high WSS and WSSG were identified around peak flow and throughout the cardiac cycle respectively. For the Biomatrix stent, the adverse effect of thicker struts was mitigated by greater strut spacing, radial cell offset and flow-aligned struts. In conclusion, adverse hemodynamic effects of specific design features (such as strut size and narrow spacing) can be mitigated when combined with other hemodynamically beneficial design features but increased luminal protrusion can worsen the stent's hemodynamic profile significantly. PMID:26178872

  4. Self-expandable metal stents for malignant gastric outlet obstruction: A pooled analysis of prospective literature

    PubMed Central

    van Halsema, Emo E; Rauws, Erik AJ; Fockens, Paul; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To provide an overview of the clinical outcomes of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (MGOO). METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed of the literature published between January 2009 and March 2015. Only prospective studies that reported on the clinical success of stent placement for MGOO were included. The primary endpoint was clinical success, defined according to the definition used in the original article. Data were pooled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Subgroup analyses were performed for partially covered SEMSs (PCSEMSs) and uncovered SEMSs (UCSEMSs) using Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS: A total of 19 studies, including 1281 patients, were included in the final analysis. Gastric (42%) and pancreatic (37%) cancer were the main causes of MGOO. UCSEMSs were used in 76% of patients and PCSEMSs in 24%. The overall pooled technical success rate was 97.3% and the clinical success rate was 85.7%. Stent dysfunction occurred in 19.6% of patients, mainly caused by re-obstruction (12.6%) and stent migration (4.3%), and was comparable between PCSEMSs and UCSEMSs (21.2% vs 19.1%, respectively, P = 0.412). Re-obstruction was more common with UCSEMSs (14.9% vs 5.1%, P < 0.001) and stent migration was more frequent after PCSEMS placement (10.9% vs 2.2%, P < 0.001). The overall perforation rate was 1.2%. Bleeding was reported in 4.1% of patients, including major bleeding in 0.8%. The median stent patency ranged from 68 to 307 d in five studies. The median overall survival ranged from 49 to 183 d in 13 studies. CONCLUSION: The clinical outcomes in this large population showed that enteral stent placement was feasible, effective and safe. Therefore, stent placement is a valid treatment option for the palliation of MGOO. PMID:26604654

  5. In vitro evaluation of stent patency and in-stent stenoses in 10 metallic stents using MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Hamer, O W; Borisch, I; Paetzel, C; Nitz, W R; Seitz, J; Feuerbach, S; Zorger, N

    2006-08-01

    In vitro study to investigate the suitability of contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) for determination of stent patency and grading of in-stent stenoses in 10 metallic stents. The Acculink carotid, DynaLink, Easy Wallstent, JostentSelfX XF, Luminexx, Omnilink, sinus-SuperFlex, SMART, Symphony and ZA stent were separately placed in a vascular phantom. Dedicated stenoses inside the stents generated a concentric lumen narrowing of 50%. CEMRA was performed for each stent. Signal loss inside the stents and artificial lumen narrowing were assessed objectively using the evaluation software of the MR imager. Moreover, three blinded observers determined visibility of stent patency and in-stent stenoses subjectively on a 3-point scale and graded in-stent stenoses. Loss of signal intensity within the stent lumen ranged between 90% (Wallstent) and 5% (ZA), artificial lumen narrowing between 56% (Symphony) and 22% (ZA). For the Symphony and Wallstent, visibility of patency and in-stent stenoses was impaired and the observers' grading exaggerated the degree of stenoses (by 23% and 33%, respectively). For the remainder of stents, patency and stenoses were visible and stenoses were graded accurately (less than 10% discrepancy from reference standard). In this in vitro study, eight of 10 stents presented with MRI characteristics which enabled determination of stent patency and accurate grading of clinically relevant in-stent stenoses. PMID:16641417

  6. Endoscopic Management of Pancreatic Pseudocysts

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, K. D.

    1994-01-01

    Recently, endoscopic interventional procedures were introduced for nonsurgical therapy of symptomatic pancreas pseudocysts. We reported 25 patients treated by endoscopic retrograde pancreas drainage (ERPD), endoscopic cystogastrostomy (ECG), or endosopic cystoduodenostomy (ECD). ERPD was performed in 9 patients by placement of a 5 Fr. or 7 Fr. endoprosthesis transpapillary into the cyst or the main pancreatic duct. ECG was carried out in 10 cases, in 7 of these, a double pigtail catheter was additionally inserted. Three patients suffering from pseudocysts of the pancreas head were treated by ECD. In a further 3 cases, ERPD and ECG were combined. All patients reported a dramatic reduction of pain with a simultaneous increase of appetite and body weight. The drainage tubes were removed after disappearance of symptoms, and abnormal clinical and endoscopic findings within 2 to 12 months. In 4 cases, a recurrence of the cyst was found 10 and 22 months later, in 3 cases the endoprostheses had to be renewed because of catheter occlusion or dislocation. 2 patient underwent surgical treatment after insufficient endoscopic drainage due to haemorrhage or recurrence. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts yielded good results with low rates of recurrence and complications. According to our experiences we think endoscopic interventional techniques will oust surgery from its present dominant position in the next years. PMID:18493338

  7. Carotid stenting and endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Yip, Hon-Kan; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2016-07-01

    Stroke, either ischemic or hemorrhagic, remains the second commonest cause of death worldwide in the last decade. Etiologies for ischemic stroke (IS) vary widely. Atherothrombotic occlusion is an essential cause to which carotid artery stenosis (CAS) is a major contributor. Administration of anti-platelet agent to patients with CAS has been shown to reduce incidence of long-term IS. In additional, in patients with symptomatic CAS, clinical trials have demonstrated that carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is superior to medical therapy for prevention of future CAS-related IS. However, CEA is not suitable for CAS post-radiotherapy or those located at higher level of the internal carotid artery; and major complications of this procedure including cranial nerve injuries have stimulated the interest of using percutaneous transfemoral carotid stenting as an alternative approach. Although transfemoral arterial approach of carotid stenting is not inferior to CEA in improving clinical outcomes, it has been reported to be associated with vascular complication and has its limitations in patients with athero-occlusive disease of abdominal aorta or bilateral iliac arteries, level II or III aortic arch, or bovine type carotid arterial anatomy. Therefore, transradial/transbrachial arterial approach has emerged as a novel method for carotid stenting. This article provides a critical review on interventional approaches for the treatment of CAS. PMID:27061654

  8. Sound propagation in choked ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersh, A. S.; Liu, C. Y.

    1976-01-01

    The linearized equations describing the propagation of sound in variable area ducts containing flow are shown to be singular when the duct mean flow is sonic. The singularity is removed when previously ignored nonlinear terms are retained. The results of a numerical study, for the case of plane waves propagating in a one-dimensional converging-diverging duct, show that the sound field is adequately described by the linearized equations only when the axial mean flow Mach number at the duct throat M sub th 0.6. For M sub th 0.6, the numerical results showed that acoustic energy flux was not conserved. An attempt was made to extend the study to include the nonlinear behavior of the sound field. Meaningful results were not obtained due, primarily, to numerical difficulties.

  9. Cover For Duct Expansion Joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. R.

    1988-01-01

    Size and shape of cover reduces stress and increases strength. Cover for expansion joints on duct-work seals tightly while accommodating movement of joint. Provides ample bonding area on both members of joint.

  10. Articulated transition duct in turbomachine

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, James Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2014-04-29

    Turbine systems are provided. A turbine system includes a transition duct comprising an inlet, an outlet, and a duct passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The duct passage includes an upstream portion and a downstream portion. The upstream portion extends from the inlet between an inlet end and an aft end. The downstream portion extends from the outlet between an outlet end and a head end. The turbine system further includes a joint coupling the aft end of the upstream portion and the head end of the downstream portion together. The joint is configured to allow movement of the upstream portion and the downstream portion relative to each other about or along at least one axis.

  11. ADH-1, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic or Biliary Tract Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Adult Primary Cholangiocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Cholangiocarcinoma of the Gallbladder; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Periampullary Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Gallbladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IIIB Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Gallbladder Cancer; Stage IVB Gallbladder Cancer

  12. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  13. Acute pancreatitis and development of pancreatic pseudo cyst after extra corporeal shock wave lithotripsy to a left renal calculus: A rare case with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Mylarappa, Prasad; Javali, Tarun; Prathvi; Ramesh, D

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is considered the standard of care for the treatment of small upper ureteric and renal calculi. A few centers have extended its use to the treatment of bile duct calculi and pancreatic calculi. The complication rates with SWL are low, resulting in its wide spread acceptance and usage. However, some of the serious complications reported in 1% of patients include acute pancreatitis, perirenal hematoma, urosepsis, venous thrombosis, biliary obstruction, bowel perforation, lung injury, rupture of aortic aneurysm and intracranial hemorrhage. To our knowledge, only six cases of acute pancreatitis or necrotizing pancreatitis following SWL have been documented in the literature. Herein, we report a rare case of acute pancreatitis and formation of a pseudo cyst following SWL for left renal pelvic calculus. PMID:24497695

  14. Acute pancreatitis and development of pancreatic pseudo cyst after extra corporeal shock wave lithotripsy to a left renal calculus: A rare case with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Mylarappa, Prasad; Javali, Tarun; Prathvi; Ramesh, D.

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) is considered the standard of care for the treatment of small upper ureteric and renal calculi. A few centers have extended its use to the treatment of bile duct calculi and pancreatic calculi. The complication rates with SWL are low, resulting in its wide spread acceptance and usage. However, some of the serious complications reported in 1% of patients include acute pancreatitis, perirenal hematoma, urosepsis, venous thrombosis, biliary obstruction, bowel perforation, lung injury, rupture of aortic aneurysm and intracranial hemorrhage. To our knowledge, only six cases of acute pancreatitis or necrotizing pancreatitis following SWL have been documented in the literature. Herein, we report a rare case of acute pancreatitis and formation of a pseudo cyst following SWL for left renal pelvic calculus. PMID:24497695

  15. Two New Duct Leakage Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J.W.

    1998-12-01

    Two variations on the tests for duct leakage currently embodied in ASHRAE Standard 152P (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) are presented. Procedures are derived for calculating supply and return duct leakage to/from outside using these new variations. Results of these tests are compared with the original ones in Standard 152P on the basis of data collected in three New York State homes.

  16. TWO NEW DUCT LEAKAGE TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    1998-12-01

    Two variations on the tests for duct leakage currently embodied in ASHRAE Standard 152P (Method of Test for Determining the Design and Seasonal Efficiencies of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems) are presented. Procedures are derived for calculating supply and return duct leakage to/from outside using these new variations. Results of these tests are compared with the original ones in Standard 152P on the basis of data collected in three New York State homes.

  17. Flexible Borescope For Inspecting Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinozaki, Keith; Armstrong, Mike P.; Urquidi, Ron

    1995-01-01

    Borescope and associated equipment developed specifically for use in optical inspection of inside of flexible joints in rocket-engine fuel duct. Apparatus includes assembly, characterized as "mouse/canoe," at sensing end of 10-ft borescope cable. Borescope tip rides in mouse/canoe. The mouse/canoe made laterally compressible, to facilitate movement past constrictions and provides fixed distance from inspection point permitting accurate description in duct inspected.

  18. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Chvez, R

    1991-01-01

    This article review newer concepts of diagnosis and therapy for patients with acute pancreatitis. Although the pathogenesis are incompletely understood, much progress has recently been made in treatment of symptoms and medical support of the critically ill patients. The most common associate factors include: biliary tract disease (lithiasis), alcohol abuse, trauma and hyperlipoproteinemia. Most patients have abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, fever, abdominal tenderness and hypovolemia of varying degrees. Renal clearance of amilase is increased, the ratio of renal clearance to that of creatinine is very important in patients with hypovolemia or an underlying renal disease. The definition of risk factors, with regard to morbility or mortality. Those patients at great risk require critical care treatment in an ICU and meticulous pulmonary, cardiac, hematological and metabolic monitoring and treatment of any the abdominal complications. PMID:1820183

  19. Turbofan aft duct suppressor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, A. A.; Motsinger, R. E.; Fiske, G. H.; Joshi, M. C.; Kraft, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Suppressions due to acoustic treatment in the annular exhaust duct of a model fan were theoretically predicted and compared with measured suppressions. The predictions are based on the modal analysis of sound propagation in a straight annular flow duct with segmented treatment. Modal distributions of the fan noise source (fan-stator interaction only) were measured using in-duct modal probes. The flow profiles were also measured in the vicinity of the modal probes. The acoustic impedance of the single degree of freedom treatment was measured in the presence of grazing flow. The measured values of mode distribution of the fan noise source, the flow velocity profile and the acoustic impedance of the treatment in the duct were used as input to the prediction program. The predicted suppressions, under the assumption of uniform flow in the duct, compared well with the suppressions measured in the duct for all test conditions. The interaction modes generated by the rotor-stator interaction spanned a cut-off ratio range from nearly 1 to 7.

  20. Energy-efficient ducts: a practical overview

    SciTech Connect

    Krigger, J.

    1996-06-01

    Ducts are the heating and cooling system`s link to a home and to the ultimate comfort and satisfaction of its occupants. Proper duct design, installation, and testing can prevent a host of energy, comfort, system durability, and health and safety problems. This report addresses duct design and installation, identifies ways to improve duct energy efficiency, and summarizes test procedures used to assess duct air leakage and air flow.

  1. Nephroureteral Stents: Principles and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Makramalla, Abouelmagd; Zuckerman, Darryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Nephroureteral stents including antegrade, retrograde, or internal (double-J) stents are routinely placed by interventional radiologists. The purpose of this review is to provide a detailed and comprehensive description of indications, contraindications, technique, and various technical challenges of these procedures. Also pre- and postprocedure management of patients will be discussed including routine follow-up and dealing with potential complications. PMID:23204635

  2. Targeting tight junctions during epithelial to mesenchymal transition in human pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kyuno, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Ito, Tatsuya; Kono, Tsuyoshi; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Imamura, Masafumi; Konno, Takumi; Hirata, Koichi; Sawada, Norimasa; Kojima, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide and there is an urgent need to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the mortality of patients with this disease. In pancreatic cancer, some tight junction proteins, including claudins, are abnormally regulated and therefore are promising molecular targets for diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. Claudin-4 and -18 are overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions. Claudin-4 is a high affinity receptor of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE). The cytotoxic effects of CPE and monoclonal antibodies against claudin-4 are useful as novel therapeutic tools for pancreatic cancer. Claudin-18 could be a putative marker and therapeutic target with prognostic implications for patients with pancreatic cancer. Claudin-1, -7, tricellulin and marvelD3 are involved in epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) of pancreatic cancer cells and thus might be useful as biomarkers during disease. Protein kinase C is closely related to EMT of pancreatic cancer and regulates tight junctions of normal human pancreatic duct epithelial cells and the cancer cells. This review focuses on the regulation of tight junctions via protein kinase C during EMT in human pancreatic cancer for the purpose of developing new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for pancreatic cancer. PMID:25152584

  3. Stenting of the ductus arteriosus and banding of the pulmonary arteries: basis for various surgical strategies in newborns with multiple left heart obstructive lesions

    PubMed Central

    Michel-Behnke, I; Akintuerk, H; Marquardt, I; Mueller, M; Thul, J; Bauer, J; Hagel, K J; Kreuder, J; Vogt, P; Schranz, D

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To present an institutional experience with stent placement in the arterial duct combined with bilateral banding of the pulmonary artery branches as a basis for various surgical strategies in newborns with hypoplastic left heart obstructive lesions. Design: Observational study. Setting: Paediatric heart centre in a university hospital. Patients: 20 newborns with various forms of left heart obstructive lesions and duct dependent systemic blood flow. Interventions: Patients underwent percutaneous ductal stenting and surgical bilateral pulmonary artery banding. Atrial septotomy by balloon dilatation was performed as required, in one premature baby by the transhepatic approach. Main outcome measures: Survival; numbers of and reasons for palliative and corrective cardiac surgery. Results: One patient died immediately after percutaneous ductal stenting. One patient died in connection with the surgical approach of bilateral pulmonary banding. Stent and ductal patency were achieved for up to 331 days. Two patients underwent heart transplantation and two patients died on the waiting list. Ten patients had a palliative one stage procedure with reconstruction of the aortic arch and bidirectional cavopulmonary connection at the age of 3.5–6 months. There was one death. One patient is still awaiting this approach. Two patients received biventricular repair. In one, biventricular repair will soon be provided. Conclusions: Stenting the arterial duct combined with bilateral pulmonary artery banding in newborns with hypoplastic left heart or multiple left heart obstructive lesions allows a broad variation of surgical strategies depending on morphological findings, postnatal clinical conditions, and potential ventricular growth. PMID:12748222

  4. Cholangiocarcinoma and malignant bile duct obstruction: A review of last decades advances in therapeutic endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bertani, Helga; Frazzoni, Marzio; Mangiafico, Santi; Caruso, Angelo; Manno, Mauro; Mirante, Vincenzo Giorgio; Pigò, Flavia; Barbera, Carmelo; Manta, Raffaele; Conigliaro, Rita

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades many advances have been achieved in endoscopy, in the diagnosis and therapy of cholangiocarcinoma, however blood test, magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography scan may fail to detect neoplastic disease at early stage, thus the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma is achieved usually at unresectable stage. In the last decades the role of endoscopy has moved from a diagnostic role to an invaluable therapeutic tool for patients affected by malignant bile duct obstruction. One of the major issues for cholangiocarcinoma is bile ducts occlusion, leading to jaundice, cholangitis and hepatic failure. Currently, endoscopy has a key role in the work up of cholangiocarcinoma, both in patients amenable to surgical intervention as well as in those unfit for surgery or not amenable to immediate surgical curative resection owing to locally advanced or advanced disease, with palliative intention. Endoscopy allows successful biliary drainage and stenting in more than 90% of patients with malignant bile duct obstruction, and allows rapid reduction of jaundice decreasing the risk of biliary sepsis. When biliary drainage and stenting cannot be achieved with endoscopy alone, endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage represents an effective alternative method affording successful biliary drainage in more than 80% of cases. The purpose of this review is to focus on the currently available endoscopic management options in patients with cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:26078827

  5. Prevalence of Incidental Pancreatic Cysts on 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Patricia Bedesco; Puchnick, Andrea; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Goldman, Suzan Menasce

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To ascertain the prevalence of pancreatic cysts detected incidentally on 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen and correlate this prevalence with patient age and gender; assess the number, location, and size of these lesions, as well as features suspicious for malignancy; and determine the prevalence of incidentally detected dilatation of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). Methods Retrospective analysis of 2,678 reports of patients who underwent abdominal MRI between January 2012 and June 2013. Patients with a known history of pancreatic conditions or surgery were excluded, and the remaining 2,583 reports were examined for the presence of pancreatic cysts, which was then correlated with patient age and gender. We also assessed whether cysts were solitary or multiple, as well as their location within the pancreatic parenchyma, size, and features suspicious for malignancy. Finally, we calculated the prevalence of incidental MPD dilatation, defined as MPD diameter ≥ 2.5 mm. Results Pancreatic cysts were detected incidentally in 9.3% of patients (239/2,583). The prevalence of pancreatic cysts increased significantly with age (p<0.0001). There were no significant differences in prevalence between men and women (p=0.588). Most cysts were multiple (57.3%), distributed diffusely throughout the pancreas (41.8%), and 5 mm or larger (81.6%). In 12.1% of cases, cysts exhibited features suspicious for malignancy. Overall, 2.7% of subjects exhibited incidental MPD dilatation. Conclusions In this sample, the prevalence of pancreatic cysts detected incidentally on 3T MRI of the abdomen was 9.3%. Prevalence increased with age and was not associated with gender. The majority of cysts were multiple, diffusely distributed through the pancreatic parenchyma, and ≥ 5 mm in size; 12.1% were suspicious for malignancy. An estimated 2.7% of subjects had a dilated MPD. PMID:25798910

  6. Laparoscopic trans-cystic-duct common-bile-duct exploration.

    PubMed

    Phillips, E H; Rosenthal, R J; Carroll, B J; Fallas, M J

    1994-12-01

    One thousand seventy-one consecutive laparoscopic cholecystectomies were performed. Routine cholangiography was employed with a 99% success rate. One hundred thirty patients were found to have common duct stones (CBDS). In 48 (37%) patients they were unsuspected. One hundred eleven patients underwent attempted trans-cystic-duct extraction techniques (TCD-CBDE). One hundred three (93%) were successful. The following techniques were employed: 101--biliary endoscopy, 23--ampullary balloon dilation, 2--fluoroscopic basket retrieval. The average operative time was 136 min. The average postsurgical stay was 3.7 days. There were 19 (17%) complications--6 (5%) major. There were 4 retained stones (2 intentional) and 1 death. Patients over 65 years of age had more complications and patients with unsuspected CBDS under 65 years of age had the fewest. TCD-CBDE is a safe, effective way to extract common duct calculi. Endoscopy and basket stone retrieval was the primary technique employed. PMID:7878503

  7. Polyorethaoe-covered nitinol strecker stents as primary palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Kanasaki, Shuzo; Furukawa, Akira; Kane, Teruyuki; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of the polyure-thane-covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the treatment of patients with malignant biliary obstruction.Methods: Twenty-three covered stents produced by us were placed in 18 patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Jaundice was caused by cholangiocarcinoma (n=5), pancreatic Cancer (n=6), gallbladder Cancer (n=4), metastatic lymph nodes (n=2), and tumor of the papilla (n=1).Resulrs: The mean patency period of the Stents was 37.5 weeks (5-106 weeks). Recurrent obstructive jaundice occurred in two patients (11%). Adequate biliary drainage over 50 weeks or until death was achieved in 17 of 18 patients (94.4%). Late cholangitis was observed in two patients whose stents bridged the ampulla of Vater. Other late severe complications were not encountered.Conclusion: Although more study is necessary, our results suggest the clinical efficacy of our covered Nitinol Strecker stent in the management of obstructive jaundice caused by malignant diseases.

  8. Pancreatic Stem/Progenitor Cells for the Treatment of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2010-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes, and most patients with type 2 diabetes, have associated hyperglycemia due to the absence or reduction of insulin production by pancreatic β-cells. Surgical resection of the pancreas may also cause insulin-dependent diabetes depending on the size of the remaining pancreas. Insulin therapy has greatly improved the quality of life of diabetic patients, but this method is inaccurate and requires lifelong treatment that only mitigates the symptoms. The successes achieved over the last few decades by the transplantation of whole pancreas and isolated islets suggest that diabetes can be cured by the replenishment of deficient β-cells. These observations are proof-of-principle and have intensified interest in treating diabetes by cell transplantation, and by the use of stem cells. Pancreatic stem/progenitor cells could be one of the sources for the treatment of diabetes. Islet neogenesis, the budding of new islets from pancreatic stem/progenitor cells located in or near pancreatic ducts, has long been assumed to be an active process in the postnatal pancreas. Several in vitro studies have shown that insulin-producing cells can be generated from adult pancreatic ductal tissues. Acinar cells may also be a potential source for differentiation into insulin-producing cells. This review describes recent progress on pancreatic stem/progenitor cell research for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:21060969

  9. Vascular and ductal elastotic changes in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Sakellariou, Stratigoula; Evangelou, Kostantinos; Liapis, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Delladetsima, Ioanna

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to identify and define the type and frequency of elastotic alterations of vessels and ducts in pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) and evaluate its diagnostic significance. Representative tissue from 36 Whipple specimens, stained with Verhoeff's Van-Gieson, was studied focusing on the density and distribution of elastic fibers in walls of vessels and ducts, in perivascular and periductal tissue and in tumor stroma. Vessels and ducts within the carcinoma, at tumor periphery and in non-tumoral pancreas were grouped and examined separately. Vimentin and α-SMA immunostains were used for the depiction of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Histochemistry revealed mild to severe elastotic changes of vessels and ducts in all examined cases. Vascular and ductal elastosis was more prominent within the tumor and diminished at tumor periphery. In tumor stroma and non-tumoral pancreatic tissue mild or no elastosis was identified. α-SMA+ cells were observed in large numbers in tumor stroma and as a ring around carcinomatous structures. There were scant α-SMA+ cells around elastotic and non-elastotic vessels. Conclusively, vascular and ductal elastosis is a tumor-associated phenomenon in PDAC. Its presence is indicative of benignity acquiring a possible diagnostic role. PMID:26619815

  10. Biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, G J; Gillespie, J; Guillou, P J

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of death from malignant disease in Western society. Apart from the fortunate few patients who present with a resectable small pancreatic adenocarcinoma, conventional treatment offers no hope of cure and has little palliative value. Over the past two decades major steps have been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic growth and neoplasia. This review sets out to explore these advances, firstly in the regulation of normal pancreatic growth, and secondly the mechanism which may be involved in malignant change of the exocrine pancreas. From an understanding of this new biology, new treatment strategies may be possible for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:1855689

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy with a lumen-apposing, self-expandable fully covered metal stent for palliative biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    French, Joshua Blake; Coe, Adam Wesley; Pawa, Rishi

    2016-04-01

    In addition to the poor prognosis associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, it can also lead to several other conditions including obstructive jaundice that can affect a patient's quality of life. This is a major concern in non-operative patients where palliation is considered the main therapeutic goal. Traditionally, there are several ways to pursue palliative biliary drainage including endoscopic methods, a variety of surgical procedures, and percutaneous techniques. Generally, endoscopic methods such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with transpapillary stent placement are considered first-line therapies. Unfortunately, ERCP is not always possible due to several potential reasons. Although endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary puncture has been well described for several years, there are limitations to its usefulness in biliary drainage, in part due to complication concerns. However, more recently a lumen-apposing, self-expandable fully covered metal stent has been employed for such situations. We describe two cases in which this type of stent was used in patients for palliative biliary drainage in pancreatic adenocarcinoma where standard ERCP was not feasible. In both cases, stent deployment was successful without immediate complications related to the procedure or the stent. Furthermore, the main goal of these therapies was palliation and in both cases the patient chose this procedure for quality of life reasons. In the future, randomized trials are needed to better define the long-term effectiveness and safety of these stents compared to more standard therapies. PMID:26956721

  12. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics.

    PubMed

    Amundadottir, Laufey T

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  15. Nodal and Lefty signaling regulates the growth of pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, You-Qing; Sterling, Lori; Stotland, Aleksandr; Hua, Hong; Kritzik, Marcie; Sarvetnick, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Nodal and its antagonist, Lefty, are important mediators specifying the laterality of the organs during embryogenesis. Nodal signals through activin receptors in the presence of its co-receptor, Cripto. In the present study, we investigated the possible roles of Nodal and Lefty signaling during islet development and regeneration. We found that both Nodal and Lefty are expressed in the pancreas during embryogenesis and islet regeneration. In vitro studies demonstrated that Nodal inhibits, whereas Lefty enhances, the proliferation of a pancreatic cell line. In addition, we showed that Lefty-1 activates MAPK and Akt phosphorylation in these cells. In vivo blockade of endogenous Lefty using neutralizing Lefty-1 monoclonal antibody results in a significantly decreased proliferation of duct epithelial cells during islet regeneration. This is the first study to decipher the expression and function of Nodal and Lefty in pancreatic growth. Importantly, our results highlight a novel function of Nodal-Lefty signaling in the regulation of expansion of pancreatic cells. PMID:18393305

  16. [Pylorus-preserving pancreatic head resection : Video article].

    PubMed

    Bruns, C J; Popp, F C

    2016-04-01

    The pylorus preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD) is a surgical procedure for the treatment of pancreatic head cancer, distal bile duct tumors and malignancies of the duodenum. This surgical technique can also be applied to treat chronic pancreatitis. The perioperative mortality rate ranges between 3% and 5%. The procedure is performed in a standardized way. It begins with the exploration phase to clarify resectability of the tumor. Subsequently it is divided into a structured resection and reconstruction phase. Malignant tumors require a systematic lymphadenectomy of the hepatoduodenal ligament. Since the complication rate is not negligible, complication management plays an important role. Most frequently, delayed gastric emptying and pancreatic fistulas occur. We present an accompanying video of this operation online, where the PPPD procedure is performed to treat duodenal polyps in familial adenomatous polyposis after failure of endoscopic ablation. PMID:27059928

  17. Inherited pancreatic cancer syndromes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Sheila; Das, Siddhartha; Brand, Randall; Whitcomb, David C

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most challenging of all cancers. Genetic risk factors are believed to play a major role, but other than genes coding for blood group, genetic risks for sporadic cases remain elusive. However, several germline mutations have been identified that lead to hereditary pancreatic cancer, familial pancreatic cancer, and increased risk for pancreatic cancer as part of a familial cancer syndrome. The most important genes with variants increasing risk for pancreatic cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, CDKN2A, APC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, PRSS1, and STK11. Recognition of members of high-risk families is important for understanding pancreatic cancer biology, for recommending risk reduction strategies and, in some cases, initiating cancer surveillance programs. Because the best methods for surveillance have not been established, the recommendation to refer at-risk patients to centers with ongoing research programs in pancreatic cancer surveillance is supported. PMID:23187834

  18. In Vivo Healing Effects of Ankaferd Blood Stopper on the Residual Pancreatic Tissue in a Swine Model of Distal Pancreatectomy.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Kerem; Bostanci, Erdal Birol; Celep, Bahadir; Dincer, Nazmiye; Kurt, Mevlut; Teke, Zafer; Akoglu, Musa; Bilgili, Hasan; Ulusan, Sinan; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim C

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether intraoperative Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) application into the pancreatic channel and to the pancreatic remnant surface following distal pancreatectomy can or cannot prevent postoperative pancreatic fistula formation. Three pigs underwent distal pancreatectomy under general anesthesia. In two of the pigs, 0.5 ml of ABS was applied to the stump surface area after adding 0.5 ml of ABS into the pancreatic channel. The remaining one animal served as the control. The pigs were sacrificed on the seventh postoperative day for autopsy. The pancreatic remnants from the animals were then taken for histopathological analyses. It was observed that the oral intake had been broken and abdominal distention had developed in the control pig following on the third postoperative day. However, no significant clinical changes were observed in the ABS-applied pigs. In the autopsy, it was found that the control pig had generalized peritonitis with pancreatic necrosis. On the other hand, the ABS-applied pigs had either macroscopically and microscopically normal pancreatic tissue architecture with an occluded Wirsung duct at the pancreatic stump. It was concluded that application of ABS on the transected surface and into the pancreatic channel could prevent pancreatic fistula formation and improve wound healing in the residual pancreatic tissue following distal pancreatectomy. PMID:26246697

  19. Congenital Atresia of Wharton's Duct.

    PubMed

    Hseu, Anne; Anne, Premchand; Anne, Samantha

    2016-02-01

    This is a case report of a three-month-old male who presented to clinic with a cystic lesion under the tongue. On clinical examination, a cystic lesion was observed in the, floor-of-mouth. The patient was referred to Paediatric Otorhinolaryngology service for further management. The differential diagnoses for floor-of-mouth lesions should be reviewed with primary focus on the Wharton's duct atresia and its management. It is crucial to recognize submandibular duct atresia in the primary Paediatric clinic in order to expedite management of lesion before complications arise including infection, enlargement of cyst, and feeding and breathing difficulties. PMID:27042492

  20. [Dacryolith in a lacrimal duct].

    PubMed

    Holtmann, C; Brachert, M; Spaniol, K; Roth, M; Cacchi, C; Geerling, G

    2016-03-01

    A 31-year-old woman presented with a prominent, yellowish conjunctival mass in the left temporal canthus that had persisted for 3 months despite previous puncture. Repeat incision and curettage produced an 8 mm long concretion. A histopathological examination revealed a dacryolith in the lacrimal duct. This pathology is very rare in this location but has to be considered as a differential diagnosis when patients present with prominence and discomfort in the area of the temporal canthus. The treatment of choice is resection of the dacryolith and irrigation of the lacrimal ducts with penicillin. PMID:26160103

  1. Hepaticojejunostomy by interventional radiology with an expandable metallic stent after extended right hepatectomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Yamagiwa, Kentaro; Tabata, Masami; Matsumoto, Eiichi; Mizuno, Shugo; Isaji, Shuji

    2008-08-01

    As a rare complication of extended right hepatectomy with portal vein resection, we were unable to find the cut end of the bile duct of the lateral segment to create a hepaticojejunostomy in a 57-year-old man with hilar cholangiocarcinoma. However, we succeeded in safely creating a hepaticojejunostomy between the bile duct of the lateral segment and a Roux-en-Y jejunum by using the guide wire technique and an expandable metallic stent under fluoroscopic and cholangioscopic guidance after the operation. The patient was discharged with an internal biliary drainage tube, but died of recurrence about 2 years after the operation with the hepaticojejunostomy remaining patent. PMID:18716543

  2. Endovascular Stents and Stent-Grafts: Is Heparin Coating Desirable?

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Stephen R.; Souza, Nandita M. de; Allison, David J.

    2000-07-15

    Heparins are glycosaminoglycans that, in addition to their anticoagulant activity, have interactions with growth factors and other glycoproteins. These interactions may stimulate neointimal hyperplasia when heparin is delivered locally on stents and stent-grafts. Modifying the structure of heparin to retain anticoagulant activity while minimizing these stimulatory effects on the vascular endothelium is desirable and may be achieved by understanding the relationships between the structure and function of the various parts of the heparin molecule.

  3. Cluster hepaticojejunostomy with radial spreading anchoring traction technique for secure reconstruction of widely opened hilar bile ducts

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Secure reconstruction of multiple hepatic ducts that are severely damaged by tumor invasion or iatrogenic injury is a challenge. Failure of percutaneous or endoscopic biliary stenting requires lifelong placement of one or more percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) tubes. For such difficult situations, we devised a surgical technique termed cluster hepaticojejunostomy (HJ), which can be coupled with palliative bile duct resection. The cluster HJ technique consisted of applying multiple internal biliary stents and a single wide porto-enterostomy to the surrounding connective tissues. The technique is described in detail in the present case report. Performing cluster HJ benefits from three technical tips as follows: making the multiple bile duct openings wide and parallel after sequential side-to-side unification; radially anchoring and traction of the suture materials at the anterior anastomotic suture line; and making multiple segmented continuous sutures at the posterior anastomotic suture line. Thus, cluster HJ with radial spreading anchoring traction technique is a useful surgical method for secure reconstruction of severely damaged hilar bile ducts. PMID:27212993

  4. Basal autophagy maintains pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis and protein synthesis and prevents ER stress.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Laura; Fagman, Johan B; Kim, Ju Youn; Todoric, Jelena; Gukovsky, Ilya; Mackey, Mason; Ellisman, Mark H; Karin, Michael

    2015-11-10

    Pancreatic acinar cells possess very high protein synthetic rates as they need to produce and secrete large amounts of digestive enzymes. Acinar cell damage and dysfunction cause malnutrition and pancreatitis, and inflammation of the exocrine pancreas that promotes development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a deadly pancreatic neoplasm. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that maintain acinar cell function and whose dysregulation can lead to tissue damage and chronic pancreatitis are poorly understood. It was suggested that autophagy, the principal cellular degradative pathway, is impaired in pancreatitis, but it is unknown whether impaired autophagy is a cause or a consequence of pancreatitis. To address this question, we generated Atg7(Δpan) mice that lack the essential autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7) in pancreatic epithelial cells. Atg7(Δpan) mice exhibit severe acinar cell degeneration, leading to pancreatic inflammation and extensive fibrosis. Whereas ATG7 loss leads to the expected decrease in autophagic flux, it also results in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, oxidative stress, activation of AMPK, and a marked decrease in protein synthetic capacity that is accompanied by loss of rough ER. Atg7(Δpan) mice also exhibit spontaneous activation of regenerative mechanisms that initiate acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), a process that replaces damaged acinar cells with duct-like structures. PMID:26512112

  5. Primary pancreatic lymphoma: Report of three cases with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Haji, Altaf Gauhar; Sharma, Shekhar; Majeed, K. Abdul; Vijaykumar, D. K.; Pavithran, K.; Dinesh, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Primary pancreatic lymphoma (PPL) is an extremely rare neoplasm, which may be confused with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. So far only about 150 cases of PPL have been reported. Materials and Methods: We present our experience of 3 cases of PPL over a 4-year period. Results: All the patients presented with vague abdominal pain of duration ranging from 1½ months to 3 months. Two patients had diagnosis confirmed histologically by CT-guided core biopsy or Fine needle aspiration procedure. We were able to avoid unnecessary laparotomy in 2 patients using preoperative guided Fine needle aspiration Cytology, although the third patient did undergo a Whipple′s procedure as the diagnosis of PPL was not considered during the initial workup. Conclusions: There is no significant difference noted with regard to patient′s age or duration of symptoms between patients with either pancreatic adenocarcinoma or PPL. The differential diagnosis of PPL includes pancreatic adenocarcinoma and secondary involvement of pancreas from extra-nodal lymphoma. Combination of two things is suggestive of Pancreatic lymphoma: (1) Bulky localized tumor in pancreatic head (2) Absence of significant dilatation of main pancreatic duct strengthens a diagnosis of pancreatic lymphoma over adenocarcinoma. Majority of patients can be managed with chemotherapy with much better prognosis compared to patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Larger series of patients are needed to evaluate whether chemotherapy, eventually followed by involved-field radiation therapy, is the treatment of choice for PPL. PMID:20668602

  6. Basal autophagy maintains pancreatic acinar cell homeostasis and protein synthesis and prevents ER stress

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Laura; Fagman, Johan B.; Kim, Ju Youn; Todoric, Jelena; Gukovsky, Ilya; Mackey, Mason; Ellisman, Mark H.; Karin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cells possess very high protein synthetic rates as they need to produce and secrete large amounts of digestive enzymes. Acinar cell damage and dysfunction cause malnutrition and pancreatitis, and inflammation of the exocrine pancreas that promotes development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a deadly pancreatic neoplasm. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that maintain acinar cell function and whose dysregulation can lead to tissue damage and chronic pancreatitis are poorly understood. It was suggested that autophagy, the principal cellular degradative pathway, is impaired in pancreatitis, but it is unknown whether impaired autophagy is a cause or a consequence of pancreatitis. To address this question, we generated Atg7Δpan mice that lack the essential autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7) in pancreatic epithelial cells. Atg7Δpan mice exhibit severe acinar cell degeneration, leading to pancreatic inflammation and extensive fibrosis. Whereas ATG7 loss leads to the expected decrease in autophagic flux, it also results in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, oxidative stress, activation of AMPK, and a marked decrease in protein synthetic capacity that is accompanied by loss of rough ER. Atg7Δpan mice also exhibit spontaneous activation of regenerative mechanisms that initiate acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), a process that replaces damaged acinar cells with duct-like structures. PMID:26512112

  7. Mathematical modeling for the design of porous coronary stents: nano- and microporous stents v. macroporous stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Anwer K.; Finn, Aloke V.

    2010-04-01

    Drug delivery polymers play a role in late in-stent thrombosis of first generation drug-eluting coronary stents (DES) via an inflammatory reaction, which contributes to delayed endothelialization seen in patients with late stent thrombosis. Subsequent generation DES have non-polymer based DES whose surface pores serves as a drug reservoir. While drug elution for pores in the nanometer range have been shown to be comparable to polymer-based DES in terms of luminal renarrowing (i.e restenosis), how different pore sizes effect drug elution has not been fully characterized. We hypothesized that drug elution can be characterized with a mathematical model that takes into account the pore size of the stents and molecular characteristics of the eluted drug. Structural data from porous, non-polymer based stents were examined with pore radius ranging from the nanoporous to macroporous range (5 nm to > 10 mm). All stents eluted tacrolimus, sirolimus or paclitaxel. A mathematical model based on Stefan-Maxwell equations describing the mass transport of molecules through a porous media was constructed. A dimensionless number was derived characterizing molecular flux of the drugs through a porous membrane. It was observed that there was exponential rise in molecular flux of the eluted drug with pore sizes greater than 5 micrometers. The molecular characteristics of the eluted drug did not affect the molecular flux. In conclusions, stents in the nano- and microporous range will have similar drug elution profiles while macroporous stents will vary greatly. Careful attention to pore size may significantly enhance the design and efficacy of porous polymer free stents.

  8. Preventing post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis: What can be done?

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Goran; Milosevic, Marko; Stimac, Davor; Zerem, Enver; Jovanovi?, Predrag; Blazevic, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP) is the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The incidence of post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) pancreatitis varies substantially and is reported around 1%-10%, although there are some reports with an incidence of around 30%. Usually, PEP is a mild or moderate pancreatitis, but in some instances it can be severe and fatal. Generally, it is defined as the onset of new pancreatic-type abdominal pain severe enough to require hospital admission or prolonged hospital stay with levels of serum amylase two to three times greater than normal, occurring 24 h after ERCP. Several methods have been adopted for preventing pancreatitis, such as pharmacological or endoscopic approaches. Regarding medical prevention, only non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, namely diclofenac sodium and indomethacin, are recommended, but there are some other drugs which have some potential benefits in reducing the incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis. Endoscopic preventive measures include cannulation (wire guided) and pancreatic stenting, while the adoption of the early pre-cut technique is still arguable. This review will attempt to present and discuss different ways of preventing post-ERCP pancreatitis. PMID:25632179

  9. Gastrointestinal cancer-associated antigen CA 19-9 in histological specimens of pancreatic tumours and pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Haglund, C.; Lindgren, J.; Roberts, P. J.; Nordling, S.

    1986-01-01

    The expression of the gastrointestinal cancer associated antigen CA 19-9, defined by the monoclonal antibody 1116 NS 19-9, was studied by immunoperoxidase staining in routine formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections from normal pancreata, pancreata with pancreatitis and from benign and malignant pancreatic neoplasms. The formalin-fixed specimens were treated with pepsin, which enhanced the staining intensity. Eighty-five per cent of well to moderately differentiated adenocarcinomas were positive. The staining was most intense in the apical border of cells lining the lumina of malignant glands, and in mucus inside the lumina, but cytoplasmic staining was also seen. In poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas the number of positive cells was smaller and in anaplastic carcinomas only occasional cells were stained. All mucinous cystadenomas and cystadenocarcinomas stained intensely, whereas serous cystadenomas, and all benign and malignant islet cell tumours were negative. Ducts in chronic pancreatitis and in normal pancreata were positive in 96% and 79%, respectively, but the staining was focal and usually weaker than in carcinomas. In acute pancreatitis (92% positive) the staining was more intense, and the CA 19-9 expression was seen predominantly in small terminal ducts and in centroacinar cells. There was an apparent correlation between the degree of differentiation of the ductal adenocarcinomas and the expression of CA 19-9, whereas the correlation between tissue expression and serum levels of CA 19-9 was poor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3513813

  10. Pancreatic fistula after pancreaticoduodenectomy: A comparison between the two pancreaticojejunostomy methods for approximating the pancreatic parenchyma to the jejunal seromuscular layer: Interrupted vs continuous stitches

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Yang, Sung Hoon; Jang, Jin-Young; Kim, Sun-Whe

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study is to find a better operative technique by comparing interrupted stitches with continuous stitches for the outer layer of the pancreaticojejunostomy, i.e., the stitches between the stump parenchyma of the pancreas and the jejunal seromuscular layer, and other risk factors for the incidence of pancreatic leakage. METHODS: During the period January 1997 to October 2004, 133 patients have undergone the end-to-side and duct-to-mucosa pancreaticojejunostomy reconstruction after pancreaticoduodenectomy with interrupted suture for outer layer of the pancreaticojejunostomy and 170 patients with a continuous suture at our institution by one surgeon. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the two groups in the diagnosis, texture of the pancreas, use of octreotide and pathologic stage. Pancreatic fistula occurred in 14 patients (11%) among the interrupted suture cases and in 10 (6%) among the continuous suture cases (P = 0.102). Major pancreatic leakage developed in three interrupted suture patients (2%) and zero continuous suture patients (P = 0.026). In multivariate analysis, soft pancreatic consistency (odds ratio, 5.5; 95% confidence interval 2.3-13.1) and common bile duct cancer (odds ratio, 3.7; 95% CI 1.6-8.5) were predictive of pancreatic leakage. CONCLUSION: Pancreatic texture and pathology are the most important factors in determining the fate of pancreaticojejunal anastomosis and our continuous suture method was performed with significantly decreased occurrence of major pancreatic fistula. In conclusion, the continuous suture method is more feasible and safer in performing duct-to-mucosa pancreaticojejunostomy. PMID:17879405

  11. Pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple resection) in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Howard, J M; Zhang, Z

    1990-01-01

    The armamentarium of the pancreatic surgeon must include multiple operative techniques, to be adapted to the clinical and anatomical findings in the patient with chronic pancreatitis. Pancreaticoduodenectomy is an essential component of this armamentarium. Its indications and limitations require continued refinement. Pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple operation) provides excellent results in the relief of the pain of chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of reoperation for control of pain after this procedure is less than after drainage procedures. The postoperative mortality rate in recent report is less than 2%. Whereas resection of pancreatic tissue diminishes pancreatic function, the metabolic deficits are partially compensated by the better nutritional status resulting from pain relief and discontinuation of narcotics. In experienced hands, pancreaticoduodenectomy would appear to be the procedure of choice in patients with small pancreatic ducts. In selected patients, it appears to be a good procedure and, possibly, the operation of choice when the disease is predominantly present in the head of the pancreas and/or the uncinate process, especially when strictures involve the common bile duct and duodenum. The authors prefer the procedure when a hard, chronically-inflamed mass is present in the head of the pancreas. In our experience, if the suspicion of malignancy of the head of the pancreas persists at operation, pancreaticoduodenectomy is the procedure of choice. Before undertaking resection, the individual surgeon must assess his/her own experience; a low risk is essential. The continuing alcoholic is not a candidate for pancreaticoduodenectomy. Those who will not stop drinking should seldom be accepted for resection. The same limitation exists for the narcotic addict, but few such patients are encountered today. In the authors' experience, the operation is excellent for the relief of pain. It is the lifestyle of the continuing alcoholic that poses the more significant problem. PMID:2305589

  12. Large duct type invasive adenocarcinoma of the pancreas with microcystic and papillary patterns: a potential microscopic mimic of non-invasive ductal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bagci, Pelin; Andea, Aleodor A; Basturk, Olca; Jang, Kee-Taek; Erbarut, Ipek; Adsay, Volkan

    2012-03-01

    A morphological variant of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma forming large ductal elements, large duct type ductal adenocarcinoma, is documented and its clinicopathological features are studied. These tumors may have microcystic and papillary growth patterns that closely mimic the non-invasive cystic and papillary pancreatic tumors such as: intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasia, including the oncocytic variant, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and ducts involved by pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. In a review of 230 pancreatectomy specimens with ductal adenocarcinoma, 28 (8%) cases of large duct type ductal adenocarcinomas were identified according to following criteria: more than 50% of the tumor sections available for examination contained infiltrative ducts with a diameter larger than 0.5 mm or had a macroscopically identifiable microcystic pattern. Overall characteristics of large duct type ductal adenocarcinomas were not too different than those of conventional ductal adenocarcinomas, except that there was a slight female predominance in the former (F/M=2.3). The mean age was 67 (vs 63 in conventional ductal adenocarcinomas; P=0.015), and occurrence in the tail was slightly more common (40% vs 18% in conventional ductal adenocarcinomas; P=0.006). Grossly, cysts measuring up to 1 cm was noted in 10 cases. Microscopically, large duct type adenocarcinomas were characterized by irregularly distributed large ducts with jagged edges, lined by columnar mucinous cells often having deceptively bland cytological features and variable degrees of papillomatosis. Stromal desmoplasia had a hypercellular quality (morphologically distinct from ovarian-like stroma) in four cases, and had a myxoid quality in others. KRAS oncogene mutation was identified in 9 out of 11 cases. Median, 1-year and 2-year survival rates were 16 months, 77% and 30%, respectively, as opposed to 12 months, 52% and 30%, respectively, in conventional ductal adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, it should be recognized that, some (8%) pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas exhibit a large duct pattern that may microscopically mimic non-invasive pancreatic tumors characterized by cystic and papillary patterns. They may be distinguished by the relatively smaller size of the cysts, irregularity of the duct contours, clustering of the ducts, presence of intraluminal neutrophils and granular debris, degree of cytological pleomorphism, and myxoid quality of the stroma. Clinical behavior appears to be slightly better than that of conventional ductal adenocarcinoma, which may be accounted by the well-differentiated nature of these tumors. PMID:22056954

  13. Analysis of the stent expansion in a stenosed artery using finite element method: application to stent versus stent study.

    PubMed

    Imani, S Misagh; Goudarzi, A M; Ghasemi, S E; Kalani, A; Mahdinejad, J

    2014-10-01

    In this article, finite element method is used to investigate the mechanical behavior of a stent and to determine the biomechanical interaction between the stent and the artery in a stenting procedure. The main objective of this study is to reach to a model close to a real condition of coronary stent placement. Unlike most of the models proposed in the literature, all the steps of the deployment of a stent in the stenotic vessel (i.e. pressure increasing, constant load pressure and pressure decreasing) are simulated in this article to show the behavior of the stent in different stages of implantation. The results indicate that the first step of deployment, that is, pressure increasing, plays a main role in the success of stent implantation. So that, in order to compare the behavior of different types of stents, it is sufficient to compare their behavior at the end of pressure increasing step. In order to show the application of the findings in stent versus stent studies, three commercially available stents (the Palmaz-Schatz, Multi-Link and NIR stents) are modeled and their behavior is compared at the end of pressure increasing step. The effect of stent design on the restenosis rate is investigated. According to the findings, the possibility of restenosis is lower for Multi-Link and NIR stents in comparison with Palmaz-Schatz stent which is in good agreement with clinical results. Therefore, the testing methodology outlined here is proposed as a simple and economical alternative for "stent versus stent" complicated clinical trials. PMID:25406228

  14. Performance Study of a Ducted Fan System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrego, Anita I.; Bulaga, Robert W.; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation was completed in the NASA Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel with the objective of determining the performance characteristics of a ducted fan. The model was an annular duct with a 38-in diameter, 10-in chord, and a 5-bladed fixed-pitch fan. Model variations included duct angle of attack, exit vane flap length, flap deflection angle, and duct chord length. Duct performance data were obtained for axial and forward flight test conditions. Axial flow test data showed figure of merit decreases with increasing advance ratio. Forward flight data showed an increasing propulsive force with decreasing duct angle of attack. Exit vane flap deflection angle and flap chord length were shown to be an effective way of providing side force. Extending the duct chord did not effect the duct performance.

  15. Surgery for Bile Duct (Cholangiocarcinoma) Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Radiation therapy for bile duct cancer Surgery for bile duct cancer There are 2 general ... also help plan the operation to remove it. Surgery for resectable cancers For resectable cancers, the type ...

  16. Surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis and quality of life after operation.

    PubMed

    Izbicki, J R; Bloechle, C; Knoefel, W T; Rogiers, X; Kuechler, T

    1999-08-01

    In conclusion, surgical therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis may be characterized as follows: 1. Independently, several investigators have found intraductal and intraparenchymatous hypertension in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Decompression of the ductal system as the main principle of surgical therapy achieves clinical pain relief in most patients with chronic pancreatitis. The precondition is a consequent drainage of the main pancreatic duct and tributary ducts of second and third order up to the prepapillary region. The presence of an inflammatory tumor in the head of the pancreas or ductal abnormalities in the prepapillary region or a pancreas divisum requires performance of an extended drainage operation (LPJ-LPHE) to achieve pain relief and an improved quality of life. An extended drainage operation effectively manages complications arising from adjacent organs, such as distal common bile duct stenosis, segmental duodenal stenosis, and internal pancreatic fistulas. The extent of decompression has to be tailored to the anatomic and morphologic situation of the patient. 2. In patients with chronic pancreatitis, the main pancreatic duct is usually dilated. A small duct (3-5 mm) is only small for the surgeon. For the sclerosing entity of chronic pancreatitis with a truly small duct, that is, less than 3 mm in diameter ("small duct disease"), a longitudinal V-shaped excision of the ventral pancreas, as opposed to left resection, provides a new perspective for a sufficient drainage. 3. In the presence of segmental portal hypertension, a simple or extended drainage operation does not result in a normalization of the portal venous blood flow; however, how often relevant upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage develops from segmental portal hypertension is unclear. Therefore, the clinical relevance of this special problem needs further evaluation. 4. Postoperative morbidity of LPJ-LPHE is significantly lower in comparison to resectional procedures, such as PD, PPPD, and DPRHP. A lower perioperative mortality rate is not justified anymore as a relevant criterion in favor of drainage procedures because resectional procedures are burdened by a minimal or no mortality in experienced centers; however, PD and PPPD are greatly hampered by a significantly decreased postoperative global quality of life as opposed to the LPJ-LPHE. This is reflected by a significantly lower rate of social and professional rehabilitation. 5. The incidence of exocrine and endocrine organ dysfunction is lower after LPJ-LPHE compared with PD or PPPD, but not compared with DPRHP. Preservation of the gastroduodenal passage and the continuity of the bile duct with its associated feedback mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic secretion and glucose metabolism seem to be responsible for this phenomenon. 6. An early surgical or endoscopic interventional drainage of the hypertensive pancreatic duct system possibly offers the chance to favorably manipulate the natural course of chronic pancreatitis with regard to a delayed onset of exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. 7. Late mortality reflects continued alcohol abuse rather than the effect of an operative procedure. PMID:10470335

  17. Advances in Ureteral Stent Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.

    2007-04-01

    Ureteral stents are commonly used in urolithiasis patients for relief of obstruction or in association with stone treatments such as ureteroscopy and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. There are currently many different bulk materials and coatings available for the manufacture of ureteral stents, however the ideal material has yet to be discovered. All potential biomaterials must undergo rigorous physical and biocompatibility testing before commercialization and use in humans. Despite significant advances in basic science research involving biocompatibility issues and biofilm formation, infection and encrustation remain associated with the use of biomaterials in the urinary tract. There have been many significant advances in the design of ureteral stents in recent years and these will be highlighted along with a discussion of future aspects of biomaterials and use of stents in association with urolithiasis.

  18. The Influence of a Metal Stent on the Distribution of Thermal Energy during Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    van den Bos, Willemien; Neal, Robert E.; van Lienden, Krijn P.; Besselink, Marc G. H.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; van der Geld, Cees W. M.; Meijerink, Martijn R.; Klaessens, John H.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Irreversible electroporation (IRE) uses short duration, high-voltage electrical pulses to induce cell death via nanoscale defects resulting from altered transmembrane potential. The technique is gaining interest for ablations in unresectable pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancer. Metal stents are often used for palliative biliary drainage in these patients, but are currently seen as an absolute contraindication for IRE due to the perceived risk of direct heating of the metal and its surroundings. This study investigates the thermal and tissue viability changes due to a metal stent during IRE. Methods IRE was performed in a homogeneous tissue model (polyacrylamide gel), without and with a metal stent placed perpendicular and parallel to the electrodes, delivering 90 and 270 pulses (15–35 A, 90 μsec, 1.5 cm active tip exposure, 1.5 cm interelectrode distance, 1000–1500 V/cm, 90 pulses/min), and in-vivo in a porcine liver (4 ablations). Temperature changes were measured with an infrared thermal camera and with fiber-optic probes. Tissue viability after in-vivo IRE was investigated macroscopically using 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) vitality staining. Results In the gel, direct stent-heating was not observed. Contrarily, the presence of a stent between the electrodes caused a higher increase in median temperature near the electrodes (23.2 vs 13.3°C [90 pulses]; p = 0.021, and 33.1 vs 24.8°C [270 pulses]; p = 0.242). In-vivo, no temperature difference was observed for ablations with and without a stent. Tissue examination showed white coagulation 1mm around the electrodes only. A rim of vital tissue remained around the stent, whereas ablation without stent resulted in complete tissue avitality. Conclusion IRE in the vicinity of a metal stent does not cause notable direct heating of the metal, but results in higher temperatures around the electrodes and remnant viable tissue. Future studies should determine for which clinical indications IRE in the presence of metal stents is safe and effective. PMID:26844550

  19. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Occlusion Complicated with Biliary Fistula Successfully Treated with a Stent Graft: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunyoung; Lee, Sung Won; Kim, Woo Hyeon; Bae, Si Hyun; Han, Nam Ik; Oh, Jung Suk; Chun, Ho Jong; Lee, Hae Giu

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old man with liver cirrhosis received transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) for the treatment of recurrent variceal bleeding and F3 esophageal varices. During routine follow up liver ultrasound examination, six months after the implantation, TIPS occlusion was suspected and TIPS revision was performed. During the revision, moderate to severe stenosis at the hepatic venous segment of the tract and a total occlusion at the parenchymal segment of TIPS tract near the portal vein with biliary-TIPS fistula were identified with a clear visualization of the common bile duct. After the successful TIPS revision with the placement of an additional stent-graft, the biliary fistula and common bile duct were no more delineated. We herein report a rare case with an obvious visualization of biliary-TIPS fistula associated with obstruction of TIPS shunt on the tractogram and recanalization with an additional stent-graft. PMID:27127576

  20. What Are the Key Statistics about Bile Duct Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for bile duct cancer? What are the key statistics about bile duct cancer? Bile duct cancer is ... it is when it is found. For survival statistics, see the section “ Survival statistics for bile duct ...

  1. [Synchronous malignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the bile duct and pancreas requiring left hepatectomy and total pancreatectomy].

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok-Bog; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Park, Gil-Chun; Park, Yo-Han; Park, Hyung-Woo; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Lee, Sung-Koo; Yu, Eun-Sil; Kim, Ji-Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the bile duct (IPMN-B) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas (IPMN-P) have striking similarities and are recognized as counterparts. However, simultaneous occurrence of IPMN-B and IPMN-P is extremely rare. A 66 year-old female presented with recurrent epigastric pain and fever. During the past 9 years, she had three clinical episodes related to intrahepatic duct stones and IPMN-P in the pancreas head and was managed by medical treatment. Laboratory test results at admission revealed leukocytosis (12,600/mm(3)) and elevated CA 19-9 level (1,200 U/mL). Imaging study demonstrated liver abscess in the Couinaud's segment 4, IPMN-B in the left lobe, and IPMN-P in the whole pancreas with suspicious malignant change. Liver abscess was drained preoperatively, followed by left lobectomy with bile duct resection and total pancreatectomy with splenectomy. On histologic examination, non-invasive intraductal papillary mucinous carcinoma arising from various degree of dysplastic mucosa of the liver and pancreas could be observed. However, there was no continuity between the hepatic and pancreatic lesions. This finding in our case supports the theory that double primary lesions are more likely explained by a diffuse IPMN leading to synchronous tumors arising from both biliary and pancreatic ducts rather than by a metastatic process. Herein we present a case of simultaneous IPMN of the bile duct and pancreas which was successfully treated by surgical management. PMID:24561701

  2. Duct injection technology prototype development

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, S.L. . Research and Development Div.)

    1991-08-01

    This report describes a test program conducted to determine the corrosion rate of materials in the dry scrubber or duct injection systems. Four materials were evaluated: 1010 carbon steel, Corten, 317SS and Hastelloy C-276. The results show that acidic conditions result in higher corrosion rates than alkaline conditions for all the materials. The carbon steel, Corten and stainless steel show moderate to heavy pitting attack in the acidic environment. For the alkaline conditions, the corrosion rates of carbon steel and Corten were higher than the stainless steel or Hastelloy C-276. Also, the corrosion rate of abraded specimens were four time those of unabraded specimens in the flue gas. It is probable that areas of wall-wetting and plugging in the duct injection process will exhibit high rates of corrosion for the carbon steel, Corten, and stainless steel materials. General corrosion and pitting corrosion will predominate. Additionally, abraded duct areas will corrode at a significantly higher rate than unabraded duct materials. 6 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Advances in dual therapy stenting.

    PubMed

    Giustino, Gennaro; Faggioni, Michela; Mehran, Roxana

    2016-04-01

    Interventional cardiovascular medicine is in continuous evolution. Introduction of drug-eluting stents (DES) in clinical practice drastically improved the efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention by reducing the risk of in-stent restenosis through the abluminal elution of an antiproliferative drug to suppress neointimal hyperplasia. Unfortunately, safety issues rose with first-generation DES due to incomplete luminal stent strut endothelialization and subsequent risk of late and very-late thrombosis. While 2nd-generation DES addressed some of the safety issues observed with 1st-generation DES, some limitations remain. Dual therapy stenting is an innovative technology developed with the rationale of combining a highly effective antiproliferative drug elution on the abluminal side and an endothelial progenitor cell capture system on the luminal side to accelerate stent strut endothelialization; thus potentially preventing the early and late complications of incomplete endothelial coverage while maintaining an antirestenotic effectiveness. Additionally, a DES platform associated with more predictable and faster endothelialization pattern may be an important therapeutic option in patients at high-risk for bleeding who cannot tolerate even short regimens of dual antiplatelet therapy. The present article reviews the most recent developments in dual therapy stenting from its rationale to the preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26934661

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  6. [Nutritional status in patients with chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Kucheryavyi, Yu A; Andreev, D N; Bideeva, T V

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas, accompanied by damage to the functioning parenchyma and ducts to develop irreversible structural changes (fibrosis, calcification) and irreparable loss of the endocrine and exocrine functions of this organ. Maldigestion is a typical outcome of CP of any etiology with a long-term history. Fat malabsorption is considered as a basis for malnutrition in patients with CP. The severity of malnutrition in patients with CP correlates with three major pathogenetic factors: primary nutrient deficiency, pancreatic maldigestion and secondary malabsorption syndrome (nutrient loss), hypermetabolism that is caused by an inflammatory process in the pancreas and that determines the severity of the disease. Malnutrition in patients with CP is not just a complication of this disease, but has an important impact on its course. Patients with severe malnutrition are noted to have the significantly lower activity of pancreatic enzymes in the duodenal contents, feces, and blood, which is correlated with the smaller blood amount of total protein and albumin. PMID:27135105

  7. Clinical approach to incidental pancreatic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Austin L; Lee, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    The approach to incidentally noted pancreatic cysts is constantly evolving. While surgical resection is indicated for malignant or higher risk cysts, correctly identifying these highest risk pancreatic cystic lesions remains difficult. Using parameters including cyst size, presence of solid components, and pancreatic duct involvement, the 2012 International Association of Pancreatology (IAP) and the 2015 American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) guidelines have sought to identify the higher risk patients who would benefit from further evaluation using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Not only can EUS help further assess the presence of solid component and nodules, but also fine needle aspiration of cyst fluid aids in diagnosis by obtaining cellular, molecular, and genetic data. The impact of new endoscopic innovations with novel methods of direct visualization including confocal endomicroscopy require further validation. This review also highlights the differences between the 2012 IAP and 2015 AGA guidelines, which include the thresholds for sending patients for EUS and surgery and methods, interval, and duration of surveillance for unresected cysts. PMID:26811661

  8. Colorectal Stents: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Mi

    2015-01-01

    A self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) is an effective and safe method for the decompression of colon obstruction. Based on recent evidence, colorectal SEMS is now recommended for the palliation of patients with colonic obstruction from incurable colorectal cancer or extracolonic malignancy and also as a bridge to surgery in those who are a high surgical risk. Prophylactic SEMS insertion in patients with no obstruction symptoms is not recommended. Most colorectal SEMS are inserted endoscopically under fluoroscopic guidance. The technical and clinical success rates of colorectal SEMS are high, and the complication rate is acceptable. Advances in this technology will make the insertion of colorectal SEMS better and may expand the indications of colorectal SEMS in the future. PMID:26064818

  9. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  10. Two Cases of Immediate Stent Fracture after Zotarolimus-Eluting Stent Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Pil Hyung; Lee, Seung-Whan; Lee, Jong-Young; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Cheol Whan; Park, Duk-Woo; Park, Seong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation is currently the standard treatment for various types of coronary artery disease. However, previous reports indicate that stent fractures, which usually occur after a period of time from the initial DES implantation, have increased during the DES era; stent fractures can contribute to unfavorable events such as in-stent restenosis and stent thrombosis. In our present report, we describe two cases of zotarolimus-eluting stent fracture: one that was detected six hours after implementation, and the other case that was detected immediately after deployment. Both anatomical and technical risk factors contributed to these unusual cases of immediate stent fracture. PMID:25653706

  11. Resolution of pancreatico-pleural fistula with endoscopic ultrasound-guided therapy

    PubMed Central

    Houlihan, M.D.; Bowyer, B.A.; Barclay, R.L.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatico-pleural fistula is an uncommon cause of recurrent pleural effusion. Delayed diagnosis may occur if fluid amylase level is not obtained early in the clinical course. As most cases of pancreatico-pleural effusion are due to chronic pancreatitis, endoscopic therapy may be effective if pancreatic fluid secretion can be diverted to a more physiologic pathway. However, when severe pancreatitis leads to disconnection of the pancreatic duct, it precludes conventional endoscopic treatment via transpapillary stenting of the pancreatic duct. We describe a patient with a chronic, refractory pancreatico-pleural fistula arising from chronic pancreatitis with a disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome, which resolved following endoscopic ultrasound-guided therapy. PMID:26029626

  12. Chronic pancreatitis at early age of onset presenting interesting findings through endoscopic retrograde pancreatography and chemical analysis of nonopaque pancreatic concretion.

    PubMed

    Noda, A; Hamano, H; Shibata, T; Hayakawa, T; Tsuchie, K; Nimura, Y; Nakanishi, Y

    1987-04-01

    This case concerns a 20-year-old male patient with an approximate 10-year history of recurrent and severe abdominal pain radiating to the back. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed a short obstructing stenosis of the main pancreatic duct in the head of the pancreas, marked and tortuous dilatation of the prestenotic portion of the main pancreatic duct and its side branches, and a filling defect in the side branch in the body of the gland. Pancreaticojejunostomy was performed to induce decompression of the pancreatic duct. Histology of the pancreas showed advanced chronic pancreatitis. Three nonopaque concretions were obtained at operation. The largest one, which was milky white in appearance and elastic and soft in consistency, proved to be made up of protein. The concretion was rich in acidic amino acids, but poor in basic or aromatic residues. The molar composition of amino acids in the concretion was, in decreasing order, aspartic acid, serine, valine, glycine, and glutamic acid. Powder x-ray diffractometry revealed no crystalline structures. PMID:3829883

  13. The Development of Carotid Stent Material

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongsheng; Liu, Wenhua; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular angioplasty with stenting is a promising option for treating carotid artery stenosis. There exist a rapidly increasing number of different stent types with different materials. The bare-metal stent is the most commonly used stent with acceptable results, but it leaves us with the problems of thrombosis and restenosis. The drug-eluting stent is a breakthrough as it has the ability to reduce the restenosis rate, but the problem of late thrombosis still has to be addressed. The biodegradable stent disappears after having served its function. However, restenosis and degradation rates remain to be studied. In this article, we review every stent material with its characteristics, clinical results and complications and point out the standards of an ideal carotid stent. PMID:26019710

  14. Ureteral Stents. New Materials and Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monga, Manoj

    2008-09-01

    Issues of stent migration and challenges of stent placement can be addressed adequately with current stent designs and materials, and an emphasis on precision in technique. Future changes in ureteral stents will need to maintain the current standard that has been set with existing devices in these regards. In contrast, new advances are sorely needed in encrustation and infection associated with ureteral stents. The main target for future development in ureteral stent materials lies in a biodegradable stent that degrades either on demand or degrades reliably within one-month with predictable degradation patterns that do not predispose to urinary obstruction, discomfort or need for secondary procedures. The main target for future development in ureteral stent design is improved patient comfort.

  15. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or to support the vagina and to hold a skin graft after reconstructive surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  16. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or to support the vagina and to hold a skin graft after reconstructive surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  17. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or to support the vagina and to hold a skin graft after reconstructive surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  18. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or to support the vagina and to hold a skin graft after reconstructive surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  19. 21 CFR 884.3900 - Vaginal stent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... stent. (a) Identification. A vaginal stent is a device used to enlarge the vagina by stretching, or to support the vagina and to hold a skin graft after reconstructive surgery. (b) Classification. Class...

  20. Towards T-tube free laparoscopic bile duct exploration: a methodologic evolution during 300 consecutive procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, I J; Bailey, I S; Rhodes, M; O'Rourke, N; Nathanson, L; Fielding, G

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish a simple, reproducible, and safe technique of laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (CBDE) with high clearance rates and low morbidity and mortality rates. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: For most general surgeons, laparoscopic CBDE appears an unduly complex and demanding procedure. Since the introduction of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, many surgeons use endoscopic cholangiography (ERC) and endoscopic sphincterotomy as their only option in treating bile duct stones. ERC is more specific if used after surgery, but it carries an appreciable morbidity rate and has the disadvantage of requiring a second procedure to deal with bile duct stones. To this end, various methods of laparoscopic CBDE have been developed. METHODS: Between August 1991 and February 1997, 300 consecutive unselected patients underwent laparoscopic CBDE. RESULTS: Of 300 laparoscopic CBDE procedures, 173 (58%) were managed using a transcystic approach and 127 (42%) with choledochotomy. Successful laparoscopic stone clearance was achieved in 271 (90%). Of the 29 (10%) patients not cleared laparoscopically, 10 had an elective postsurgical ERC, 12 were converted to an open procedure early in the series, and 7 had unexpected retained stones. There was one death (mortality rate 0.3%) and major morbidity occurred in 22 patients (7%). The last 100 procedures were performed from July 1995 to February 1997, and stone clearance was unsuccessful in only two patients. CONCLUSIONS: Laparoscopic transcystic basket extraction of common duct stones under fluoroscopic guidance is a relatively quick, successful, and safe technique. Choledochotomy, when required, is associated with a higher morbidity rate, particularly with T-tube insertion, and the authors advocate primary bile duct closure with or without insertion of a biliary stent as a more satisfactory technique for both surgeon and patient. Most patients with gallbladder and common duct calculi should expect a curative one-stage laparoscopic procedure without the need for external biliary drainage or ERC. PMID:9671063

  1. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Goess, Ruediger; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Friess, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an often-underestimated complication following pancreatic surgery. After recent advances in managing acute postoperative complications the focus of current research is now shifting onto the long-term complications following pancreatectomy. Weight loss and steatorrhea as typical symptoms have high influence on the quality of life in the postoperative period. Malnutrition-related symptoms occur late and are often misinterpreted. Enzyme replacement therapy is more or less the only possible treatment option, even though not many controlled trials have been performed in this field. In this review we summarized the pathophysiology, diagnosis, risk factors and treatment options of exocrine insufficiency and focus mainly on patients with pancreaticoduodenectomy (classical Whipple), pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (ppWhipple) or distal pancreatectomy. Incidence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after surgery depends mainly on the initial diagnosis, the preoperative exocrine function and is associated with the extent of parenchyma resection. Diagnosing exocrine failure after surgery can be difficult and specific function tests are commonly not routinely performed. Starting and monitoring of enzyme replacement treatment is more based on clinical symptoms, than on objective markers. To improve the performance status of postsurgical patients it is important to consider pancreatic exocrine function as one aspect of quality of life. Further clinical trials should be initiated to gain more specific knowledge about the influence of the different pancreatic resections on pancreatic exocrine function to initialize proper treatment even before major clinical symptoms occur. PMID:27058237

  2. Interval Biliary Stent Placement Via Percutaneous Ultrasound Guided Cholecystostomy: Another Approach to Palliative Treatment in Malignant Biliary Tract Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, James Mortimer, Alex; Kelly, Michael; Loveday, Eric

    2010-12-15

    Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a minimally invasive procedure for providing gallbladder decompression, often in critically ill patients. It can be used in malignant biliary obstruction following failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography when the intrahepatic ducts are not dilated or when stent insertion is not possible via the bile ducts. In properly selected patients, percutaneous cholecystostomy in obstructive jaundice is a simple, safe, and rapid option for biliary decompression, thus avoiding the morbidity and mortality involved with percutaneous transhepatic biliary stenting. Subsequent use of a percutaneous cholecystostomy for definitive biliary stent placement is an attractive concept and leaves patients with no external drain. To the best of our knowledge, it has only been described on three previous occasions in the published literature, on each occasion forced by surgical or technical considerations. Traditionally, anatomic/technical considerations and the risk of bile leak have precluded such an approach, but improvements in catheter design and manufacture may now make it more feasible. We report a case of successful interval metal stent placement via percutaneous cholecystostomy which was preplanned and achieved excellent palliation for the patient. The pros and cons of the procedure and approach are discussed.

  3. Impact of Stent Design on In-Stent Stenosis in a Rabbit Iliac Artery Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, C. M. Grenacher, L.; Stampfl, U.; Arnegger, F. U.; Rehnitz, C.; Thierjung, H.; Stampfl, S.; Berger, I.; Richter, G. M.; Kauczor, H. U.; Radeleff, B. A.

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of stent design on in-stent stenosis in rabbit iliac arteries. Four different types of stent were implanted in rabbit iliac arteries, being different in stent design (crown or wave) and strut thickness (50 or 100 {mu}m). Ten stents of each type were implanted. Each animal received one crown and one wave stent with the same strut thickness. Follow-up was either 12 weeks (n = 10 rabbits) or 24 weeks (n = 10 rabbits). Primary study end points were angiographic and microscopic in-stent stenosis. Secondary study end points were vessel injury, vascular inflammation, and stent endothelialization. Average stent diameter, relative stent overdilation, average and minimal luminal diameter, and relative average and maximum luminal loss were not significantly different. However, a trend to higher relative stent overdilation was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents. A trend toward higher average and minimal luminal diameter and lower relative average and maximum luminal loss was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 100 {mu}m. Neointimal height, relative luminal area stenosis, injury score, inflammation score, and endothelialization score were not significantly different. However, a trend toward higher neointimal height was recognized in crown stents compared to wave stents with a strut thickness of 50 {mu}m and a follow-up of 24 weeks. In conclusion, in this study, crown stents seem to trigger neointima. However, the optimized radial force might equalize the theoretically higher tendency for restenosis in crown stents. In this context, also more favorable positive remodeling in crown stents could be important.

  4. Acute stent recoil in the left main coronary artery treated with additional stenting.

    PubMed

    Battikh, Kais; Rihani, Riadh; Lemahieu, Jean Michel

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of acute stent recoil occurring after the stenting of an ostial left main coronary artery lesion. The marked recoil after high-pressure balloon inflation confirmed that the radial force of the first stent was unable to ensure vessel patency. The addition of a second stent provided the necessary support to achieve a good final result. This case illustrates a possible complication of aorto-ostial angioplasty that could be treated with double stenting. PMID:12499528

  5. The 'buoy' stent: evaluation of a prototype indwelling ureteric stent in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Alfred; Deane, Leslie A; Borin, James F; Edwards, Robert A; Sala, Leandro G; Khan, Farhan; Abdelshehid, Corollos; McDougall, Elspeth M; Clayman, Ralph V

    2009-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess a prototype ureteric 'buoy' stent with a 10 F upper body tapering to a 3F tail, developed to potentially reduce stent-related irritative symptoms while providing an adequate mould for healing after endopyelotomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighteen Yucatan minipigs had the stent placed either into the intact ureter (phase I) or after Acucise proximal endoureterotomy (phase II). Buoy stents were compared to 10/7 F endopyelotomy stents and to standard 7 F stents in phases I and II, respectively. The pigs were assessed for vesico-ureteric reflux, hydronephrosis and infection, before stent insertion and at harvest. Stents were weighed before and after placement and the removal force was measured. Pressure/flow studies, antegrade nephrostograms and specimens for histopathology from the renal pelvis, ureter and vesico-ureteric junction (VUJ) were obtained at harvest. RESULTS Thirteen minipigs survived the entire study. Ureteric flow with the stents in situ was better for buoy stents than for 10/7 F stents (P < 0.005). Ureteric flow after endoureterotomy and subsequent stent removal was similar for buoy stents and standard 7 F stents. None of the stents refluxed. There was no difference between stents in removal force, weight change or incidence of hydronephrosis. At 1 and 12 weeks, buoy stents tended to produce lower histopathological alteration scores than control stents, especially at the VUJ (phase I, 2.0 vs 3.9, P = 0.092; phase II, 0.6 vs 1.7, P = 0.18). CONCLUSIONS The novel buoy stents are easily placed and removed via the urethra. They can cause less VUJ inflammation than standard stents while allowing for adequate ureteric flow and healing after proximal endoureterotomy. PMID:19154469

  6. Features associated with progression of small pancreatic cystic lesions: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hong-Ming; Chuang, Chiao-Hsiung; Shan, Yan-Shen; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Chiung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the progression rate of small pancreatic cystic lesions and identify characteristics associated with their progression. METHODS: Patients with pancreatic cystic lesions with at least 1-year of follow-up were evaluated retrospectively. We excluded patients with cysts larger than 3 cm or with features that were a concern for malignancy. In total, 135 patients were evaluated. The interval progression of the cysts was examined. Characteristics were compared between patients with and without progression. RESULTS: The pancreatic cysts ranged from 3 to 29 mm. The mean follow-up period was 4.5 ± 2.3 years and the mean progression rate was 1.0 ± 1.3 mm/year. Ninety patients showed interval progression and were divided into two groups; the minimal-change group (n = 41), who had cyst progression at less than 1 mm/year, and the progression group (n = 49), who had a progression rate of more than 1 mm/year. Compared with the cysts without progression, the lesions of the progression group were more frequently associated with tubular cyst, septation or a prominent pancreatic duct (P < 0.05). The odds ratio for progression was 5.318 for septation and 4.582 for tubular cysts. CONCLUSION: Small pancreatic cysts progress slowly. Lesions with tubular shape, septa, or prominent pancreatic duct were more likely to progress, and required further diagnostic intervention or shorter surveillance interval. PMID:26715814

  7. Small nodules which could indicate the early phase of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Miura, Fumihiko; Sano, Keiji; Amano, Hodaka; Toyota, Naoyuki; Wada, Keita; Shibuya, Makoto; Kadowaki, Susumu; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Yamaguchi, Taketo; Kondo, Fukuo

    2011-08-01

    We present a case with small pancreatic nodules, which could indicate the early phase of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). A 68-year-old man was referred to our hospital for further diagnostic evaluation of a pancreatic mass detected on abdominal ultrasonography screening for epigastric discomfort. Abdominal ultrasonography and endoscopic ultrasonography revealed a low echoic lesion measuring approximately 1 cm with an irregular margin in the body of the pancreas. Computed tomography revealed a tumor in the portal venous phase of enhancement; hence, a distal pancreatectomy was performed. On histology, a marked lymphocyte- and plasma cell-dominant inflammatory cell infiltrate was observed in the nodule. There was another smaller nodule consisting of moderate lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the 2-cm distal portion of the pancreas. Lymphoplasmacytic infiltration was also observed around the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic stump. In the parenchyma, other than these 3 portions, the normal lobular structure was well preserved. Little storiform fibrosis and obliterative phlebitis were observed in the resected specimen. On immunohistochemical staining, plasma cells showing strong immunoreactivity for immunoglobulin G4 were observed within these two nodules and around the main pancreatic duct at the cut surface. This case could indicate the early phase and multicentricity of AIP. PMID:26189525

  8. Recent Advances in Gastrointestinal Stent Development

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Seok; Jeong, Seok

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic stenting is increasingly being used in the management of gastrointestinal luminal obstruction, and has become the current treatment of choice for the palliation of blockage caused by malignant or benign growths. A variety of stents have been developed to enhance the efficacy of the procedure, and improvements are ongoing. In this article, we review the history of, and recent advances in, gastrointestinal stenting. We describe the rationale behind the design as well as the resulting outcome for each stent type. PMID:26064820

  9. Primary nitinol stenting for femoropopliteal disease.

    PubMed

    Mewissen, Mark W

    2009-04-01

    The 1- to 2-year primary patency rates associated with self-expanding nitinol stents for the treatment of symptomatic femoropopliteal disease are superior to those for percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and the first-generation stainless steel balloon-expandable stents. The advantages of nitinol stents include improved radial strength and flexibility, the ability to recover from being crushed, reduced foreshortening, and (importantly) deployability without balloon dilation of the stent edge (which may decrease the incidence of the edge stenosis, or "candy-wrap" effect, often observed with balloon-expandable stents). The technical success rate associated with primary deployment of nitinol stents is very high, and acute to 6-month patency results are predictably excellent. Prior to the introduction of nitinol stents, the original guidelines (2000) of the multidisciplinary TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus (TASC I) recommended only an adjunctive role for femoropopliteal stents following suboptimal PTA. The abbreviated 2007 TASC II report essentially extended this recommendation to nitinol stents. Here, current trials of nitinol stenting in the femoropopliteal segment are discussed, with emphasis on the advantages of primary (and often direct) deployment in selected circumstances dependent on factors including lesion length, lesion location, indication for treatment (critical limb ischemia or claudication, in-stent restenosis, stent-graft restenosis), and the relative appropriateness of other modalities (e.g., covered stents). Technical considerations in primary nitinol stenting are briefly reviewed. Open questions regarding the factors involved in nitinol stent fracture and the possible association of fracture and restenosis are examined in the context of current clinical trials. A new generation of femoropopliteal nitinol stents combining superior durability and flexibility is expected soon. Development and implementation of uniform reporting and surveillance standards is important for optimizing current and future research. PMID:19624075

  10. A Comprehensive Review of Esophageal Stents

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jinwha; Lam-Tsai, Yvette; Gress, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal stents are important tools for palliative treatment of inoperable esophageal malignancies. With the development of multiple self-expandable stents, there are now several therapeutic options for managing benign and malignant esophageal diseases. This paper discusses the various types of esophageal stents currently available, indications for their placement, challenges and complications that gastroenterologists face when placing these stents, and some of the innovations that will become available in the near future. PMID:23293566

  11. Fluid mechanics in stented arterial model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernad, S. I.; Totorean, A.; Bosioc, A.; Crainic, N.; Hudrea, C.; Bernad, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    Local hemodynamic factors are known affect the natural history of the restenosis critically after coronary stenting of atherosclerosis. Stent-induced flows disturbance magnitude dependent directly on the strut design. Strut shape, strut thickness and the distance between consecutive struts have been associated clinically with the with post-intervention clinical outcomes. Hemodynamically favorable designs according to computational modeling can reduced in-stent restenosis after coronary stenting intervention.

  12. Repositioning of Covered Stents: The Grip Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, John Martin; Guo Xiaofeng; Midia, Mehran

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Retrieval and repositioning of a stent deployed beyond its intended target region may be a difficult technical challenge. Materials and Methods: A balloon-mounted snare technique, a variant of the coaxial loop snare technique, is described. Results: The technique is described for the repositioning of a covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent and a covered biliary stent. Conclusion: The balloon-mounted snare technique is a useful technique for retrieval of migrated stents.

  13. Loss of HNF6 expression correlates with human pancreatic cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Pekala, Kelly R.; Ma, Xidi; Kropp, Peter A.; Petersen, Christine P.; Hudgens, Courtney W.; Chung, Christine H.; Shi, Chanjuan; Merchant, Nipun; Maitra, Anirban; Means, Anna L.; Gannon, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    Normal pancreatic epithelium progresses through various stages of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs) in the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Transcriptional regulation of this progression is poorly understood. In mouse, the Hnf6 transcription factor is expressed in ductal cells and at lower levels in acinar cells of the adult pancreas, but not in mature endocrine cells. Hnf6 is critical for terminal differentiation of the ductal epithelium during embryonic development and for pancreatic endocrine cell specification. We previously showed that, in mice, loss of Hnf6 from the pancreatic epithelium during organogenesis results in increased duct proliferation and altered duct architecture, increased periductal fibrosis and acinar-to-ductal metaplasia. Here we show that decreased expression of HNF6 is strongly correlated with increased severity of PanIN lesions in samples of human pancreata and is absent from >90% of PDAC. Mouse models in which cancer progression can be analyzed from the earliest stages that are seldom accessible in humans support a role for Hnf6 loss in progression from early to late stage PanIN and PDAC. In addition, gene expression analyses of human pancreatic cancer reveal decreased expression of HNF6 and its direct and indirect target genes compared to normal tissue and up-regulation of genes that act in opposition to HNF6 and its targets. The negative correlation between HNF6 expression and pancreatic cancer progression suggests that HNF6 maintains pancreatic epithelial homeostasis in humans, and that its loss contributes to the progression from PanIN to ductal adenocarcinoma. Insight on the role of HNF6 in pancreatic cancer development could lead to its use as a biomarker for early detection and prognosis. PMID:24638272

  14. Carotid Artery Stenting versus Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gahremanpour, Amir; Perin, Emerson C.; Silva, Guilherme

    2012-01-01

    For about 2 decades, investigators have been comparing carotid endarterectomy with carotid artery stenting in regard to their effectiveness and safety in treating carotid artery stenosis. We conducted a systematic review to summarize and appraise the available evidence provided by randomized trials, meta-analyses, and registries comparing the clinical outcomes of the 2 procedures. We searched the MEDLINE, SciVerse Scopus, and Cochrane databases and the bibliographies of pertinent textbooks and articles to identify these studies. The results of clinical trials and, consequently, the meta-analyses of those trials produced conflicting results regarding the comparative effectiveness and safety of carotid endarterectomy and carotid stenting. These conflicting results arose because of differences in patient population, trial design, outcome measures, and variability among centers in the endovascular devices used and in operator skills. Careful appraisal of the trials and meta-analyses, particularly the most recent and largest National Institutes of Healthsponsored trial (the Carotid Revascularization Endarterectomy vs Stenting Trial [CREST]), showed that carotid stenting and endarterectomy were associated with similar rates of death and disabling stroke. Within the 30-day periprocedural period, carotid stenting was associated with higher risks of stroke, especially for patients aged >70 years, whereas carotid endarterectomy was associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction. The slightly higher cost of stenting compared with endarterectomy was within an acceptable range by cost-effectiveness standards. We conclude that carotid artery stenting is an equivalent alternative to carotid endarterectomy when patient age and anatomy, surgical risk, and operator experience are considered in the choice of treatment approach. PMID:22949763

  15. Knotted stents: Case report and outcome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha Na; Hwang, Hokyeong

    2015-01-01

    A knotted ureteral stent is an extremely rare condition, with fewer than 20 cases reported in the literature; however, it is difficult to treat. We report a case in which a folded Terumo guidewire was successfully used to remove a knotted stent percutaneously without anesthesia. We also review the current literature on predisposing factors and management strategies for knotted ureteral stents. PMID:25964843

  16. Unrecognized stent embolization causing recurrent chest pain.

    PubMed

    Levisay, Justin P; Vaitkus, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Numerous methods have been described for retrieving or addressing stents that have embolized in the coronary arteries. Almost all of these prior reports address the "freshly" embolized stent with retrieval or deployment occurring during the same index procedure during which the embolization occurred. We describe a case of a thrombosed, chronically embolized coronary stent. PMID:16404788

  17. Surgical versus endoscopic management of common bile duct stones.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, B M; Kozarek, R A; Ryan, J A; Ball, T J; Traverso, L W

    1988-01-01

    The charts of all patients with common bile duct (CBD) stones admitted to Virginia Mason Medical Center between January 1, 1981 and July 31, 1986 were reviewed to define current methods of management and results of operative versus endoscopic therapy. Two hundred thirty-seven patients with CBD stones were treated. One hundred thirty patients had intact gallbladders. Of these patients, 76 (59%) underwent cholecystectomy and common bile duct exploration (CBDE) while 54 (41%) underwent endoscopic papillotomy (EP) only. Of the 107 patients admitted with recurrent stones after cholecystectomy, all but five were treated with EP. The overall mortality rate was 3.0%. Complications, success, and death rates were all similar for CBDE and EP, but the complications of EP were often serious and directly related to the procedure (GI hemorrhage, 6; duodenal perforation, 5; biliary sepsis, 4; pancreatitis, 1). Patients undergoing EP required significantly shorter hospitalization than those undergoing CBDE. Multivariate analysis showed that age greater than 70 years, technical failure, and complications increased the risk of death, regardless of procedure performed. Twenty-one per cent of those undergoing EP with gallbladders intact eventually required cholecystectomy. The conclusion is that the results of EP and CBDE are similar, and the use of EP has not reduced the mortality rates of this disease. PMID:3341812

  18. Complement Component 5 Mediates Development of Fibrosis, via Activation of Stellate Cells, in 2 Mouse Models of Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sendler, Matthias; Beyer, Georg; Mahajan, Ujjwal M.; Kauschke, Vivien; Maertin, Sandrina; Schurmann, Claudia; Homuth, Georg; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Halangk, Walter; Wartmann, Thomas; Weiss, Frank-Ulrich; Hegyi, Peter; Lerch, Markus M.; Mayerle, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms of chronic pancreatitis. We investigated the roles of complement component 5 (C5) in pancreatic fibrogenesis in mice and patients. Methods Chronic pancreatitis was induced by ligation of the midpancreatic duct, followed by a single supramaximal intraperitoneal injection of cerulein, in C57Bl6 (control) and C5-deficient mice. Some mice were given injections of 2 different antagonists of the receptor for C5a over 21 days. In a separate model, mice were given injections of cerulein for 10 weeks to induce chronic pancreatitis. Direct effects of C5 were studied in cultured primary cells. We performed genotype analysis for the single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs 17611 and rs 2300929 in C5 in patients with pancreatitis and healthy individuals (controls). Blood cells from 976 subjects were analyzed by transcriptional profiling. Results During the initial phase of pancreatitis, levels of pancreatic damage were similar between C5-deficient and control mice. During later stages of pancreatitis, C5-deficient mice and mice given injections of C5a-receptor antagonists developed significantly less pancreatic fibrosis than control mice. Primary pancreatic stellate cells were activated in vitro by C5a. There were no differences in the rs 2300929 SNP between subjects with or without pancreatitis, but the minor allele rs17611 was associated with a significant increase in levels of C5 in whole blood. Conclusions In mice, loss of C5 or injection of a C5a-receptor antagonist significantly reduced the level of fibrosis of chronic pancreatitis, but this was not a consequence of milder disease in early stages of pancreatitis. C5 might be a therapeutic target for chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26001927

  19. New Morphological Features for Grading Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae-Won; Lee, Ju-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Pathological diagnosis is influenced by subjective factors such as the individual experience and knowledge of doctors. Therefore, it may be interpreted in different ways for the same symptoms. The appearance of digital pathology has created good foundation for objective diagnoses based on quantitative feature analysis. Recently, numerous studies are being done to develop automated diagnosis based on the digital pathology. But there are as of yet no general automated methods for pathological diagnosis due to its specific nature. Therefore, specific methods according to a type of disease and a lesion could be designed. This study proposes quantitative features that are designed to diagnose pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. In the diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the region of interest is a duct that consists of lumen and epithelium. Therefore, we first segment the lumen and epithelial nuclei from a tissue image. Then, we extract the specific features to diagnose the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma from the segmented objects. The experiment evaluated the classification performance of the SVM learned by the proposed features. The results showed an accuracy of 94.38% in the experiment distinguishing between pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and normal tissue and a classification accuracy of 77.03% distinguishing between the stages of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. PMID:23984321

  20. Tear-ducts in wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, John W. M.

    1999-11-01

    We examine the radial spoke pattern evident in the meniscus region in glasses of strong alcoholic beverages exhibiting the `tears-in-wine' phenomenon. We demonstrate that the pattern results from ridge-like elevations of the free surface which are supported by evaporatively-driven Marangoni convection in the meniscus region. Vortices associated with the convective motions are aligned in the radial direction by the surface tension gradient responsible for the generation of tears. The radial flow is focussed into the ridges, which thus serve as the principal conduits of fluid for the tears; consequently, we refer to the ridges as `tear-ducts'. The phenomenon is examined experimentally, and a numerical model of evaporatively-driven Marangoni convection is developed which reproduces the salient features of the tear-duct phenomenon.

  1. HAARP-Induced Ionospheric Ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Milikh, Gennady; Vartanyan, Aram

    2011-01-04

    It is well known that strong electron heating by a powerful HF-facility can lead to the formation of electron and ion density perturbations that stretch along the magnetic field line. Those density perturbations can serve as ducts for ELF waves, both of natural and artificial origin. This paper presents observations of the plasma density perturbations caused by the HF-heating of the ionosphere by the HAARP facility. The low orbit satellite DEMETER was used as a diagnostic tool to measure the electron and ion temperature and density along the satellite orbit overflying close to the magnetic zenith of the HF-heater. Those observations will be then checked against the theoretical model of duct formation due to HF-heating of the ionosphere. The model is based on the modified SAMI2 code, and is validated by comparison with well documented experiments.

  2. Designing insulation for cryogenic ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Love, C. C.

    1984-03-01

    It is pointed out that the great temperature difference between the outside of a cryogenic duct and the liquified gas it carries can cause a high heat input unless blocked by a high thermal resistance. High thermal resistance for lines needing maximum insulation is provided by metal vacuum jackets. Low-density foam is satisfactory in cases in which higher heat input can be tolerated. Attention is given to the heat transfer through a duct vacuum jacket, the calculation of heat input and the exterior surface's steady-state temperature for various thicknesses of insulation, the calculation of the heat transfer through gimbal jackets, and design specifications regarding the allowable pressure rise in the jacket's annular space.

  3. Thyroglossal duct surgery. Sistrunk procedure.

    PubMed

    Righini, C-A; Hitter, A; Reyt, E; Atallah, I

    2016-04-01

    Midline cysts of the neck are the most common congenital malformations of the neck. They arise along the thyroglossal duct. The presence of a fistula is the result of either spontaneous (suppuration) or surgical fistulisation (simple incision or incomplete excision). The cyst and/or fistula are located between the base of the tongue and the thyroid gland, predominantly adjacent to the hyoid bone. This midline site can be explained by embryological development of the thyroid gland. Treatment is surgical. Many techniques have been described, but Sistrunck procedure (described in 1920), based on embryological studies, remains the reference technique with a recurrence rate of less than 3%, provided surgery is performed correctly, comprising resection of the body of the hyoid. Risk factors for recurrence are: surgery during the inflammatory phase, cyst rupture during dissection, multiple thyroglossal ducts and a technical error during the surgical procedure. PMID:26725753

  4. CT and MR Imaging Findings of Pancreatic Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenjie; Xu, Shunliang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies on pancreatic paraganglioma, a rare neoplasm, have primarily reported its ultrasound and routine and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) findings. To our knowledge, we are the first to report the contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequence findings of pancreatic paraganglioma. A male patient, ages 41 years, was admitted to our hospital due to a pancreatic space-occupying lesion that had been present for more than 10 days. The patient had no obvious discomfort. He had a history of hypertension and hyperthyroidism. Physical examination revealed upper abdominal tenderness without a palpable mass. Routine and contrast-enhanced abdominal CT showed a soft tissue mass at the pancreatic head/uncinate process, with patchy calcification within the lesion. On a contrast-enhanced CT scan, severe enhancement of the mass in the arterial phase was noted, as was slightly reduced but still marked enhancement in the venous phase. The celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery segment were wrapped by the tumor. Thickened, tortuous vessels were observed at the lesion edges, around which there were multiple enlarged lymph nodes. The main pancreatic duct was markedly dilated. Routine and contrast-enhanced pancreatic MRI demonstrated an abnormal nodular signal in the pancreatic head/uncinate process that was approximately 4.3 × 6.4 cm2 in size. T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) revealed hypointensity, whereas T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) revealed nonhomogeneous, slight hyperintensity. Patchy hypointensity on both T1WI and T2WI was observed within the lesion. DWI showed slight hyperintensity. Grossly heterogeneous enhancement of the mass was observed on a contrast-enhanced MRI scan, with the tumor wrapped around the adjacent vasculature, and multiple enlarged lymph nodes were observed peripherally. After preoperative preparation, the patient underwent pancreatoduodenectomy. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the resected tumor indicated pancreatic paraganglioma. After surgery, the patient recovered well, without presenting any recurrence or metastasis during short-term follow-up. For hypervascular pancreatic tumors on contrast-enhanced CT or MRI, and particularly those occurring in the pancreatic head, with a clear display of draining veins, the possibility of pancreatic paraganglioma should be considered. These tumors usually exhibit necrosis or cystic changes and are occasionally accompanied by calcification. PMID:26945413

  5. Aprotinin revisited: formulation, characterization, biodistribution and therapeutic potential of new aprotinin microemulsion in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Karasulu, H Yeşim; Oruç, Nevin; Üstündağ-Okur, Neslihan; İlem Özdemir, Derya; Ay Şenyiğit, Zeynep; Barbet Yılmaz, Funda; Aşıkoğlu, Makbule; Özkılıç, Hayal; Akçiçek, Eren; Güneri, Tamer; Özütemiz, Ömer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop aprotinin-loaded microemulsion (MA) for intravenous administration and evaluate the biodistribution and therapeutic potential of developed formulation in acute pancreatitis models in rats. Phase diagrams were constructed to identify microemulsion region and the optimal microemulsion was evaluated for physicochemical properties and treatment effect in rats, and comparisons made with the solution of aprotinin (SA). To evaluate the biodistribution of the drug by gamma scintigraphy aprotinin was radiolabeled with (99m)Tc radionuclide. Mild and severe acute pancreatitis was induced in rats by subcutaneous injections of cerulein and introductal infusion of 3% sodium taurocholate into the bile-pancreatic duct, respectively. In addition, serum amylase and pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase activities were measured to evaluate the pancreatic damage. According to gamma scintigraphy and biodistribution studies, accumulation times and distribution of (99m)Tc-MA and SA were different. While MA was highly uptake by reticuloendothelial system, SA was mostly excreted by kidneys and bladder. Compared with the mild acute pancreatitis group, treatment with MA significantly decreased the serum amylase activity and pancreas myeloperoxidase activity. Furthermore, the protease inhibitor molecule aprotinin has therapeutic potential in acute pancreatitis. Finally, MA may be suggested as a promising alternative for treatment of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25738992

  6. Stimulation of rat pancreatic exocrine secretion by cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide.

    PubMed

    Cowles, R A; Segura, B J; Mulholland, M W

    2001-05-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide is a recently described neuropeptide that has been localized to areas of the central and peripheral nervous systems. CART has been shown to be involved in feeding behavior when injected centrally, however, its effects upon peripheral tissues have not been studied. This report describes the effects of CART peptide on rat pancreatic exocrine secretion. Infusion of CART peptide caused four-fold increases in amylase secretion from anesthetized rats that had been fashioned with a bile-pancreatic duct cannula. CART peptide-induced increases in pancreatic secretion appear to involve pathways that are sensitive to both acetylcholine (ACh) and cholecystokinin (CCK) since pre-treatment with atropine (ACh receptor antagonist) or L-364,718 (CCK-A receptor antagonist) inhibited the effects of CART peptide on amylase secretion. Pre-treatment with a combination of atropine and L-364,718 abolished the effects of CART peptide. When isolated rat pancreatic acini were exposed to varying doses of CART peptide, no increase in amylase secretion was observed. The results of the present study suggest that CART peptide has stimulatory effects upon pancreatic exocrine secretion. CART peptide-induced increases in pancreatic secretion appear to be indirectly mediated as no direct effect upon pancreatic acini was shown. CART peptide likely acts upon either peripheral or central regulators of pancreatic secretory function that are distant from the acinar unit. PMID:11257316

  7. Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters Are Less Toxic Than Their Parent Fatty Acids Generated during Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Krutika; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Trivedi, Ram N; de Oliveira, Cristiane; Singh, Vijay P

    2016-04-01

    Although ethanol causes acute pancreatitis (AP) and lipolytic fatty acid (FA) generation worsens AP, the contribution of ethanol metabolites of FAs, ie, FA ethyl esters (FAEEs), to AP outcomes is unclear. Previously, pancreata of dying alcoholics and pancreatic necrosis in severe AP, respectively, showed high FAEEs and FAs, with oleic acid (OA) and its ethyl esters being the most abundant. We thus compared the toxicities of FAEEs and their parent FAs in severe AP. Pancreatic acini and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to FAs or FAEEs in vitro. The triglyceride of OA (i.e., glyceryl tri-oleate) or OAEE was injected into the pancreatic ducts of rats, and local and systemic severities were studied. Unsaturated FAs at equimolar concentrations to FAEEs induced a larger increase in cytosolic calcium, mitochondrial depolarization, and necro-apoptotic cell death. Glyceryl tri-oleate but not OAEE resulted in 70% mortality with increased serum OA, a severe inflammatory response, worse pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure. Our data show that FAs are more likely to worsen AP than FAEEs. Our observations correlate well with the high pancreatic FAEE concentrations in alcoholics without pancreatitis and high FA concentrations in pancreatic necrosis. Thus, conversion of FAs to FAEE may ameliorate AP in alcoholics. PMID:26878214

  8. Ducted propeller design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, R.J.

    1987-10-01

    The theory and implementation of the design of a ducted propeller blade are presented and discussed. Straightener (anti-torque) vane design is also discussed. Comparisons are made to an existing propeller design and the results and performance of two example propeller blades are given. The inflow velocity at the propeller plane is given special attention and two dimensionless parameters independent of RPM are discussed. Errors in off-design performance are also investigated. 11 refs., 26 figs.

  9. Geometrical deployment for braided stent.

    PubMed

    Bouillot, Pierre; Brina, Olivier; Ouared, Rafik; Yilmaz, Hasan; Farhat, Mohamed; Erceg, Gorislav; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Kulcsar, Zsolt; Pereira, Vitor Mendes

    2016-05-01

    The prediction of flow diverter stent (FDS) implantation for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms (IAs) is being increasingly required for hemodynamic simulations and procedural planning. In this paper, a deployment model was developed based on geometrical properties of braided stents. The proposed mathematical description is first applied on idealized toroidal vessels demonstrating the stent shortening in curved vessels. It is subsequently generalized to patient specific vasculature predicting the position of the filaments along with the length and local porosity of the stent. In parallel, in-vitro and in-vivo FDS deployments were measured by contrast-enhanced cone beam CT (CBCT) in idealized and patient-specific geometries. These measurements showed a very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the virtual deployments and provided experimental validations of the underlying geometrical assumptions. In particular, they highlighted the importance of the stent radius assessment in the accuracy of the deployment prediction. Thanks to its low computational cost, the proposed model is potentially implementable in clinical practice providing critical information for patient safety and treatment outcome assessment. PMID:26891065

  10. Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis without inflammatory bowel disease is genetically different from large duct disease

    PubMed Central

    Næss, Sigrid; Björnsson, Einar; Anmarkrud, Jarl A.; Al Mamari, Said; Juran, Brian D.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Chapman, Roger; Bergquist, Annika; Melum, Espen; Marsh, Steven G. E.; Schrumpf, Erik; Lie, Benedicte A.; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Karlsen, Tom H.; Hov, Johannes R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Small duct primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is phenotypically a mild version of large duct PSC, but it is unknown whether these phenotypes share aetiology. We aimed to characterize their relationship by investigating genetic associations in the HLA complex, which represent the strongest genetic risk factors in large duct PSC. Methods Four classical HLA loci (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1) were genotyped in 87 small duct PSC patients, 485 large duct PSC patients and 1117 controls across three geographical regions. Results HLA-DRB1*13:01 (OR=2.0, 95% CI 1.2–3.4, P=0.01) and HLA-B*08 (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.1–2.4, P=0.02) were significantly associated with small duct PSC compared with healthy controls. Based on the observed frequency of HLA-B*08 in small duct PSC, the strongest risk factor in large duct PSC, an estimated 32% (95% CI 4%–65%) of this population can be hypothesized to represent early stages or mild variants of large duct PSC. This subgroup may be constituted by small duct PSC patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which greatly resembled large duct PSC in its HLA association. In contrast, small duct PSC without IBD was only associated with HLA-DRB1*13:01(P=0.03) and was otherwise distinctly dissimilar from large duct PSC. Conclusions Small duct PSC with IBD resembles large duct PSC in its HLA association and may represent early stages or mild variants of large duct disease. Different HLA associations in small duct PSC without IBD could indicate that this subgroup is a different entity. HLA-DRB1*13:01 may represent a specific risk factor for inflammatory bile duct disease. PMID:24517468

  11. Multidisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Clores, Michael J; Thosani, Amar; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic lesions are commonly encountered today with the routine use of cross-sectional imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The majority of patients discovered to have a pancreatic cyst are completely asymptomatic; yet the presence of such a finding instills fear in the minds of both patient and physician, as the concern for malignant transformation to pancreatic cancer is great despite the relatively low overall likelihood of cyst progression. Not all cysts in the pancreas represent pancreatic cystic neoplasms (PCNs), and not all PCNs have significant malignant potential. Mucinous PCNs are the most concerning, as these lesions have the greatest potential for cancerous transformation to adenocarcinoma. Within the group of mucinous PCNs, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) involving the main pancreatic duct are the most worrisome, and surgical resection should be pursued if the patient has appropriate operative risks. IPMN lesions involving the branch ducts, and mucinous cystadenomas, have a lower likelihood for malignancy, and they may be closely followed for the development of any worrisome or high-risk features. Surveillance of known PCNs is performed with a combination of CT, MRI and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) may be used to assess cyst fluid cytology, and also to detect cyst fluid amylase level, carcinoembryonic antigen level, and DNA molecular analysis in certain cases. The presence or absence of specific cyst morphological features, as well as the cyst fluid analysis, is what enables the physician to guide the patient towards continued surveillance, versus the pursuit of surgical resection. PMID:24520195

  12. Update on Pancreatobiliary Stents: Stent Placement in Advanced Hilar Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ill

    2015-01-01

    Palliative drainage is the main treatment option for inoperable hilar cholangiocarcinoma to improve symptoms, which include cholangitis, pruritus, high-grade jaundice, and abdominal pain. Although there is no consensus on the optimal method for biliary drainage due to the paucity of large-scale randomized control studies, several important aspects of any optimal method have been studied. In this review article, we discuss the liver volume to be drained, stent type, techniques to insert self-expanding metal stents, and approaches for proper and effective biliary drainage based on previous studies and personal experience. PMID:26064819

  13. Current surgical treatment for bile duct cancer

    PubMed Central

    Seyama, Yasuji; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Since extrahepatic bile duct cancer is difficult to diagnose and to cure, a safe and radical surgical strategy is needed. In this review, the modes of infiltration and spread of extrahepatic bile duct cancer and surgical strategy are discussed. Extended hemihepatectomy, with or without pancreatoduodenectomy (PD), plus extrahepatic bile duct resection and regional lymphadenectomy has recently been recognized as the standard curative treatment for hilar bile duct cancer. On the other hand, PD is the choice of treatment for middle and distal bile duct cancer. Major hepatectomy concomitant with PD (hepatopancreatoduodenectomy) has been applied to selected patients with widespread tumors. Preoperative biliary drainage (BD) followed by portal vein embolization (PVE) enables major hepatectomy in patients with hilar bile duct cancer without mortality. BD should be performed considering the surgical procedure, especially, in patients with separated intrahepatic bile ducts caused by hilar bile duct cancer. Right or left trisectoriectomy are indicated according to the tumor spread and biliary anatomy. As a result, extended radical resection offers a chance for cure of hilar bile duct cancer with improved resectability, curability, and a 5-year survival rate of 40%. A 5-year survival rate has ranged from 24% to 39% after PD for middle and distal bile duct cancer. PMID:17461441

  14. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-04-01

    Empirical equations were developed and applied to predict losses of 0.01-100 {micro}m airborne particles making a single pass through 120 different ventilation duct runs typical of those found in mid-sized office buildings. For all duct runs, losses were negligible for submicron particles and nearly complete for particles larger than 50 {micro}m. The 50th percentile cut-point diameters were 15 {micro}m in supply runs and 25 {micro}m in return runs. Losses in supply duct runs were higher than in return duct runs, mostly because internal insulation was present in portions of supply duct runs, but absent from return duct runs. Single-pass equations for particle loss in duct runs were combined with models for predicting ventilation system filtration efficiency and particle deposition to indoor surfaces to evaluate the fates of particles of indoor and outdoor origin in an archetypal mechanically ventilated building. Results suggest that duct losses are a minor influence for determining indoor concentrations for most particle sizes. Losses in ducts were of a comparable magnitude to indoor surface losses for most particle sizes. For outdoor air drawn into an unfiltered ventilation system, most particles smaller than 1 {micro}m are exhausted from the building. Large particles deposit within the building, mostly in supply ducts or on indoor surfaces. When filters are present, most particles are either filtered or exhausted. The fates of particles generated indoors follow similar trends as outdoor particles drawn into the building.

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Interest Group

    Cancer.gov

    Mission Statement Pancreatic cancer is the most deadliest of all cancers and there is no effective treatment. There are a number of investigators at NCI, both in the basic and clinical disciplines, who are working on pancreatic cancer and who would like t

  16. Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, Garth L.; Rajotte, Ray V.

    1992-01-01

    Transplantation of insulin-producing tissue offers a physiologic approach to restoration of glycemic control. Whereas transplantation of vascularized pancreatic grafts has recently achieved encouraging results, pancreatic islet cell transplantation holds the promise of low morbidity and reduced requirements for agressive immunosuppression for recipients. Islet cell transplantation was recently demonstrated to induce euglycemia with insulin independence. Imagesp1656-a PMID:21221366

  17. Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Berenson; Wyllie

    1995-10-01

    Pancreatitis, once thought to be almost exclusively a disease of adults, is increasingly being found as the cause of abdominal pain in adolescents. The authors review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, managment, and complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis, noting that a high index of suspicion is needed to properly diagnose and provide optimal care to these patients. PMID:10358323

  18. Staining Protocols for Human Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Campbell-Thompson, Martha L.; Heiple, Tiffany; Montgomery, Emily; Zhang, Li; Schneider, Lynda

    2012-01-01

    Estimates of islet area and numbers and endocrine cell composition in the adult human pancreas vary from several hundred thousand to several million and beta mass ranges from 500 to 1500 mg 1-3. With this known heterogeneity, a standard processing and staining procedure was developed so that pancreatic regions were clearly defined and islets characterized using rigorous histopathology and immunolocalization examinations. Standardized procedures for processing human pancreas recovered from organ donors are described in part 1 of this series. The pancreas is processed into 3 main regions (head, body, tail) followed by transverse sections. Transverse sections from the pancreas head are further divided, as indicated based on size, and numbered alphabetically to denote subsections. This standardization allows for a complete cross sectional analysis of the head region including the uncinate region which contains islets composed primarily of pancreatic polypeptide cells to the tail region. The current report comprises part 2 of this series and describes the procedures used for serial sectioning and histopathological characterization of the pancreatic paraffin sections with an emphasis on islet endocrine cells, replication, and T-cell infiltrates. Pathology of pancreatic sections is intended to characterize both exocrine, ductular, and endocrine components. The exocrine compartment is evaluated for the presence of pancreatitis (active or chronic), atrophy, fibrosis, and fat, as well as the duct system, particularly in relationship to the presence of pancreatic intraductal neoplasia4. Islets are evaluated for morphology, size, and density, endocrine cells, inflammation, fibrosis, amyloid, and the presence of replicating or apoptotic cells using H&E and IHC stains. The final component described in part 2 is the provision of the stained slides as digitized whole slide images. The digitized slides are organized by case and pancreas region in an online pathology database creating a virtual biobank. Access to this online collection is currently provided to over 200 clinicians and scientists involved in type 1 diabetes research. The online database provides a means for rapid and complete data sharing and for investigators to select blocks for paraffin or frozen serial sections. PMID:22665223

  19. Management of Biliary Neoplastic Obstruction with Two Different Metallic Stents Implanted in One Session

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto; Fabiano, S. Pipitone, Vincenzo; Spinelli, Alessio; Reale, Carlo Andrea; Colangelo, Vittorio; Pampana, Enrico; Romagnoli, Andrea; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2005-01-15

    The efficacy of the 'one-step' technique using two different metallic stents (Wallstent and Ultraflex) and associated rate of complications was studied in 87 patients with jaundice secondary to malignant biliary obstruction, with bilirubin level less than 15 mg/dl and Bismuth type 1 or 2 strictures. The study group, composed of 40 men and 47 women with a mean age of 59.4 years (range 37-81 years), was treated with a 'one-step' percutaneous transhepatic implantation of self-expanding stents. The cause of the obstruction was pancreatic carcinoma in 38 patients (44%), lymph node metastasis in 20 patients (23%), gallbladder carcinoma in 13 patients (15%), cholangiocarcinoma in 12 patients (14%) and ampullary carcinoma in four patients (5%). A significant reduction in jaundice was obtained in all but one patient, with a drop of total serum bilirubin level from a mean of 13.7 mg/dl to 4.3 mg/dl within the first 4 days. The mean postprocedural hospitalization period was 5.4 days in the Wallstent group and 6.4 days in the Ultraflex group. Mean survival rate was 7.8 months (Wallstent group) and 7.1 months (Ultraflex group). The use of both stents did not reveal any significant difference in parameters tested. The implantation of these self-expandable stents in one session, in selected patients, is clinically effective, devoid of important complications and cost-effective due to the reduction in hospitalization.

  20. Spontaneous Pancreatitis Caused by Tissue-Specific Gene Ablation of Hhex in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Mark J.; McKenna, Lindsay B.; Zhang, Jia; Reichert, Maximilian; Bakir, Basil; Buza, Elizabeth L.; Furth, Emma E.; Bogue, Clifford W.; Rustgi, Anil K.; Kaestner, Klaus H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Perturbations in pancreatic ductal bicarbonate secretion cause chronic pancreatitis. The physiologic mechanism of ductal secretion is known, but its transcriptional control is not. We determine the role of the transcription factor hematopoietically expressed homeobox protein (Hhex) in ductal secretion and pancreatitis. METHODS We derived mice with pancreas-specific, Cremediated Hhex gene ablation to determine the requirement of Hhex in the pancreatic duct in early life and in adult stages. Histologic and immunostaining analyses were used to detect the presence of pathology. Pancreatic primary ductal cells were isolated to discover differentially expressed transcripts upon acute Hhex ablation on a cell autonomous level. RESULTS Hhex protein was detected throughout the embryonic and adult ductal trees. Ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors resulted in postnatal ductal ectasia associated with acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, a progressive phenotype that ultimately resulted in chronic pancreatitis. Hhex ablation in adult mice, however, did not cause any detectable pathology. Ductal ectasia in young mice did not result from perturbation of expression of Hnf6, Hnf1β, or the primary cilia genes. RNA-seq analysis of Hhex-ablated pancreatic primary ductal cells showed mRNA levels of the G-protein coupled receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 3 (Npr3), implicated in paracrine signaling, up-regulated by 4.70-fold. CONCLUSIONS Although Hhex is dispensable for ductal cell function in the adult, ablation of Hhex in pancreatic progenitors results in pancreatitis. Our data highlight the critical role of Hhex in maintaining ductal homeostasis in early life and support ductal hypersecretion as a novel etiology of pediatric chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26740970