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Sample records for pancreatic lymphoma ppl

  1. Partial Optimization of the 5-Terminal Codon Increased a Recombination Porcine Pancreatic Lipase (opPPL) Expression in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Chen, Dan; Tang, Jiayong; Jia, Gang; Long, Dingbiao; Liu, Guangmang; Chen, Xiaoling; Shang, Haiying

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic lipase plays a key role in intestinal digestion of feed fat, and is often deficient in young animals such as weaning piglets. The objective of this study was to express and characterize a partial codon optimized porcine pancreatic lipase (opPPL). A 537 bp cDNA fragment encoding N-terminus amino acid residue of the mature porcine pancreatic lipase was synthesized according to the codon bias of Pichia pastoris and ligated to the full-length porcine pancreatic lipase cDNA fragment. The codon optimized PPL was cloned into the pPICZαA (Invitrogen, Beijing, China) vector. After the resultant opPPL/pPICZαΑ plasmid was transformed into P.pastoris, the over-expressed extracellular opPPL containing a His-tag to the C terminus was purified using Ni Sepharose affinity column (GE Healthcare, Piscataway, NJ, USA), and was characterized against the native enzyme (commercial PPL from porcine pancreas, Sigma). The opPPL exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 52 kDa, and showed optimal temperature (40°C), optimal pH (8.0), Km (0.041 mM), and Vmax (2.008 µmol.mg protein −1.min−1) similar to those of the commercial enzyme with p-NPP as the substrate. The recombinant enzyme was stable at 60°C, but lost 80% (P<0.05) of its activity after exposure to heat ≥60°C for 20 min. The codon optimization increased opPPL yield for ca 4 folds (146 mg.L−1 vs 36 mg.L−1) and total enzyme activity increased about 5 folds (1900 IU.L−1 vs 367 IU.L−1) compared with those native naPPL/pPICZαΑ tranformant. Comparison of gene copies and mRNA profiles between the two strains indicated the increased rePPL yields may partly be ascribed to the increased protein translational efficiency after codon optimization. In conclusion, we successfully optimized 5-terminal of porcine pancreatic lipase encoding gene and over-expressed the gene in P. pastoris as an extracellular, functional enzyme. The recombination enzyme demonstrates a potential for future use as an animal feed

  2. Burkitt lymphoma with unusual presentation: Acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Koca, Tugba; Aslan, Nagehan; Dereci, Selim; Akcam, Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatitis due to malignant infiltration is an uncommon condition in childhood. Pancreatic lymphomas constitute <2% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Only six reported cases with various clinical presentation have been documented in the literature. Described herein is the case of a nine-year-old boy with abdominal pain, jaundice, emesis, weight loss, diarrhea, who developed hyperlipidemia and cholestasis. Pancreatitis was suspected due to high amylase and lipase. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed diffuse enlargement of the pancreas. This sausage pancreas imaging was suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis, but the patient was diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma on bone marrow aspiration, and rapidly improved with chemotherapy. Burkitt lymphoma should be kept in mind when patients present with pancreatitis, especially with diffuse enlarged pancreas. PMID:26031558

  3. Plasmablastic Lymphoma Mimicking Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Cheema, Ahmad R.; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare B-cell neoplasm. It predominantly occurs in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and exhibits a highly aggressive clinical behavior. Case Presentation. We describe an unusual case of a 37-year-old HIV-positive male who presented with acute pancreatitis secondary to multiple peripancreatic masses compressing the pancreas. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed diffuse and cohesive pattern of large B-cells resembling immunoblasts or plasmablasts. The neoplastic cells were positive for BOB1 and MUM1, partially positive for CD79a, and negative for CD20, CD56, CD138, CD3, CD5, AE1/AE3, and HHV8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization was positive. These features were consistent with PBL. The patient was initiated on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy, demonstrating a striking response. Conclusion. To our research, this is the first report of PBL with the initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. The findings in this case suggest that PBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. PMID:27034868

  4. Plasmablastic Lymphoma Mimicking Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Inayat, Faisal; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Cheema, Ahmad R; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare B-cell neoplasm. It predominantly occurs in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and exhibits a highly aggressive clinical behavior. Case Presentation. We describe an unusual case of a 37-year-old HIV-positive male who presented with acute pancreatitis secondary to multiple peripancreatic masses compressing the pancreas. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed diffuse and cohesive pattern of large B-cells resembling immunoblasts or plasmablasts. The neoplastic cells were positive for BOB1 and MUM1, partially positive for CD79a, and negative for CD20, CD56, CD138, CD3, CD5, AE1/AE3, and HHV8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization was positive. These features were consistent with PBL. The patient was initiated on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy, demonstrating a striking response. Conclusion. To our research, this is the first report of PBL with the initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. The findings in this case suggest that PBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. PMID:27034868

  5. A case of primary pancreatic non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma mimicking autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Anderloni, Andrea; Genco, Chiara; Ballarè, Marco; Carmagnola, Stefania; Battista, Serena; Repici, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Non Hodgkin lymphoma frequently involves the gastrointestinal tract, in particular the stomach and the small bowel. Rarely, it can also be a cause of pancreatic masses. Clinical presentation is often non-specific and may overlap with other pancreatic conditions such as carcinoma, neuroendocrine tumours and autoimmune pancreatitis. We report a case of primary pancreatic lymphoma in a young woman with jaundice, fever and abdominal pain mimicking autoimmune pancreatitis. Clinical evaluation included the abdominal Computed Tomography scan, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that revealed a large duodenal mass. Endoscopic biopsies were performed and eventually histological examination was coherent with a diagnosis of primary pancreatic lymphoma. PMID:26114186

  6. Malignant lymphoma of spleen presenting as acute pancreatitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chao-Ming; Cheng, Lung-Chih; Lo, Gin-Ho; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Chia-Ling; Pan, Wen-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    This is a case report of a patient who presented with acute pancreatitis without the common causes. A pancreatic biopsy revealed large B cell lymphoma. Spleen lymphoma with pancreatic involvement inducing acute pancreatitis, which is a rare disorder, was diagnosed. Here we also review the few similar cases reported in the literature. PMID:17659747

  7. Sporadic Burkitt Lymphoma Presenting as Acute Pancreatitis, Concurrent Sinusitis, and Enlarged Adenoids

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vasudha; Qian, You-Wen; Blake, Brooke; Rojas-Khalil, Yesenia; Radhakrishnan, Ravi S.; Muthukumar, Akila

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis and sinusitis as presentations of Burkitt lymphoma are uncommon and rarely described in children. We describe here the case of a child who presented with symptoms suggestive of sinusitis unresponsive to antibiotics, with subsequent development of abdominal symptoms due to pancreatitis. He was eventually diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma. PMID:27213067

  8. 'Ppl, I Have Breast Cancer'

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160134.html 'Ppl, I Have Breast Cancer' Many women found online support after their diagnosis, ... Women who communicated via social media after a breast cancer diagnosis and received information and/or support about ...

  9. Primary pulmonary lymphoma-role of fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography in the initial staging and evaluating response to treatment - case reports and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Dhanapathi, Halanaik; Nazar, Aftab Hasan; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Primary pulmonary lymphoma (PPL) is an uncommon entity of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which accounts for <1% of all cases of lymphoma. We present two rare cases of PPL of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which underwent 18fluorine fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography for initial staging and response evaluation after chemotherapy. PMID:27385889

  10. 78 FR 20313 - PPL Electric Utilities Corporation; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PPL Electric Utilities Corporation; Notice of Filing Take notice that on March 26, 2013, PPL Electric Utilities Corporation (PPL) submitted to the Federal Energy Regulatory...Support@ferc.gov , or call (866) 208-3676 (toll free). For TTY, call (202) 502-8659. Comment Date: 5:00...

  11. Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have ... immune system or have certain types of infections. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as Swollen, painless ...

  12. [Lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Lohri, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Although malignant lymphoma is split in over 60 distinct entities, four of them, diffuse large B cell lymphoma, follicular-, Hodgkin's- and mantle cell lymphoma constitute more than half of all new cases. A recent major revision of the Ann Arbor staging system restricts the suffix “A” and “B” just to Hodgkin's lymphoma. Bone marrow exams are abandonned in Hodgkin's and restricted in DLBCL. PET exams at different time points are crucial. PET guided therapy will lead to a reduction of the use of chemo- and radiation therapy. Many new targeted drugs have been introduced. Their therapeutic index is impressive as is their price tag. The radiation and chemotherapy free treatment of malignant lymphoma is within reach. PMID:26732717

  13. Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... group of blood cancers that develop in the lymphatic system. The two main types are Hodgkin lymphoma and ... Is a type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system Generally develops in the lymph nodes and lymphatic ...

  14. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  15. 77 FR 2973 - PPL Electric Utilities Corporation; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PPL Electric Utilities Corporation; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order... Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.207 (2011), PPL Electric Utilities Corporation (PPL Electric) filed a Petition for Declaratory Order, requesting that the Commission find that PPL Electric is entitled to...

  16. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... open. Balloon dilatation. Some endoscopes have a small balloon that the doctor uses to dilate, or stretch, a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  17. A Rare Case of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma in a Patient with IgG4-Related Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yoshito; Iwamuro, Masaya; Ocho, Kazuki; Hasegawa, Kou; Kimura, Kosuke; Hanayama, Yoshihisa; Kondo, Eisei; Tanaka, Takehiro; Otsuka, Fumio

    2016-08-01

    A 61-year-old Japanese man with IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis was referred to our hospital because of perspiration during food intake. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) with contrast media revealed multiple mesenteric lymphadenopathies. An open surgical abdominal biopsy and subsequent histopathological analysis revealed abnormally large lymphoid cells that were negative for CD3, CD5, and c-myc and positive for CD20 and bcl-2, leading to a diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Here, we discuss the risk of malignancies, particularly malignant lymphoma in patients with IgG4-related disease. The importance of pathological analysis to reach the appropriate diagnosis in such cases should be emphasized. PMID:27549673

  18. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  19. 75 FR 15462 - PPL Susquehanna, LLC; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PPL Susquehanna, LLC; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background PPL Susquehanna, LLC (PPL or the licensee) is the holder of Renewed Facility Operating License Nos. NPF-14 and NPF-22, which authorize operation...

  20. 77 FR 20805 - Application to Export Electric Energy; PPL EnergyPlus, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Application to Export Electric Energy; PPL EnergyPlus, LLC AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application. SUMMARY: PPL EnergyPlus, LLC. (PPL EnergyPlus) has applied...

  1. Heterologous expression of a lectin from Pleurocybella porrigens (PPL) in Phanerochaete sordida YK-624.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomohiro; Dohra, Hideo; Omae, Saori; Takeshima, Yoshino; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Hirai, Hirofumi; Kawagishi, Hirokazu

    2014-05-01

    Pleurocybella porrigens is a mushroom-forming fungus, which had been consumed as a traditional food in Japan. However, in 2004, 55 people got poisoned by eating the mushroom and 17 people among them died of acute encephalopathy. We have already reported the purification, characterization, and cDNA cloning of a lectin from the mushroom (PPL) which might have caused the poisoning. Here, we report the heterologous expression of recombinant PPL by basidiomycete Phanerochaete sordida YK-624. The glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter was used to drive the expression of the PPL gene (ppl) in P. sordida YK-624. Furthermore, the signal peptide of lignin peroxidase which is an extracellular protein was used to secrete rPPL into extracellular region. Fifteen regenerated clones were cultured on Kirk HNHC broth, and the presence of lectin activity in the culture broth was checked by agglutination assays. The results indicated that the culture broth of rPPL-6 clone showed the strongest hemagglutination activity, and it was therefore used for subsequent analysis. The heterologous expression of rPPL by P. sordida YK-624 was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, lectin activity by the hemagglutination assay, and mass of rPPL by MALDI-TOF respectively, indicating that the extracellular secretion of rPPL as active form was successful. PMID:24631556

  2. [Studies on the stability and some other important physical properties of polysaccharides polyphase liposome (PPL)].

    PubMed

    Zou, Y Y; Su, D S; Han, G C; Gu, X Q

    1989-01-01

    The stability and some other important physical properties of PPL were investigated by means of electron microscopy and MPV-TAS experiments. The results are rated as follows: Good integrity of liposome homogeneity of its particle size were reached, and at 100 degrees C PPL was found to undergo sterilization without causing changes of its shape and encapsulation efficiency for 1 h. Also, the distribution of PPL particle size and the regularity of the change of PPL particle in size were determined by Coulter counter. Using this method, the kinetic equation of coalescence of polyphase liposome and the activation energy for coalescence were obtained, and through these results the stability of PPL is elucidated. PMID:2508432

  3. Burkitt lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphoma is a very fast growing form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma . Causes Burkitt lymphoma was first discovered in children ... CT scan References National Cancer Institute: PDQ Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date last ...

  4. Covalent immobilization of porcine pancreatic lipase on carboxyl-activated magnetic nanoparticles: characterization and application for enzymatic inhibition assays.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan-Ting; Ren, Xiao-Yun; Liu, Yi-Ming; Wei, Ying; Qing, Lin-Sen; Liao, Xun

    2014-05-01

    Using carboxyl functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carrier, a novel immobilized porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) was prepared through the 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. Transmission electron microscopic images showed that the synthesized nanoparticles (Fe3O4-SiO2) possessed three dimensional core-shell structures with an average diameter of ~20 nm. The effective enzyme immobilization onto the nanocomposite was confirmed by atomic force microscopic (AFM) analysis. Results from Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Bradford protein assay, and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that PPL was covalently attached to the surface of magnetic nanoparticles with a PPL immobilization yield of 50mg enzyme/g MNPs. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis revealed that the MNPs-PPL nanocomposite had a high saturation magnetization of 42.25 emu·g(-1). The properties of the immobilized PPL were investigated in comparison with the free enzyme counterpart. Enzymatic activity, reusability, thermo-stability, and storage stability of the immobilized PPL were found significantly superior to those of the free one. The Km and the Vmax values (0.02 mM, 6.40 U·mg(-1) enzyme) indicated the enhanced activity of the immobilized PPL compared to those of the free enzyme (0.29 mM, 3.16 U·mg(-1) enzyme). Furthermore, at an elevated temperature of 70 °C, immobilized PPL retained 60% of its initial activity. The PPL-MNPs nanocomposite was applied in the enzyme inhibition assays using orlistat, and two natural products isolated from oolong tea (i.e., EGCG and EGC) as the test compounds. PMID:24656379

  5. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  6. Mercury Emission Control Technologies for PPL Montana-Colstrip Testing

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Kay; Michael L. Jones; Steven A. Benson

    2007-04-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) was asked by PPL Montana LLC (PPL) to provide assistance and develop an approach to identify cost-effective options for mercury control at its coal-fired power plants. The work conducted focused on baseline mercury level and speciation measurement, short-term parametric testing, and week long testing of mercury control technology at Colstrip Unit 3. Three techniques and various combinations of these techniques were identified as viable options for mercury control. The options included oxidizing agents or sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) such as chlorine-based SEA1 and an EERC proprietary SEA2 with and without activated carbon injection. Baseline mercury emissions from Colstrip Unit 3 are comparatively low relative to other Powder River Basin (PRB) coal-fired systems and were found to range from 5 to 6.5 g/Nm3 (2.9 to 3.8 lb/TBtu), with a rough value of approximately 80% being elemental upstream of the scrubber and higher than 95% being elemental at the outlet. Levels in the stack were also greater than 95% elemental. Baseline mercury removal across the scrubber is fairly variable but generally tends to be about 5% to 10%. Parametric results of carbon injection alone yielded minimal reduction in Hg emissions. SEA1 injection resulted in 20% additional reduction over baseline with the maximum rate of 400 ppm (3 gal/min). Week long testing was conducted with the combination of SEA2 and carbon, with injection rates of 75 ppm (10.3 lb/hr) and 1.5 lb/MMacf (40 lb/hr), respectively. Reduction was found to be an additional 30% and, overall during the testing period, was measured to be 38% across the scrubber. The novel additive injection method, known as novel SEA2, is several orders of magnitude safer and less expensive than current SEA2 injection methods. However, used in conjunction with this plant configuration, the technology did not demonstrate a significant level of mercury reduction. Near-future use of this

  7. Directed evolution of nitrilase PpL19 from Pseudomonas psychrotolerans L19 and identification of enantiocomplementary mutants toward mandelonitrile.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huihui; Wang, Hualei; Gao, Wenyuan; Chen, Lifeng; Wu, Kai; Wei, Dongzhi

    2015-12-25

    Nitrilase PpL19 from Pseudomonas psychrotolerans L19 can hydrolyze racemic mandelonitrile to (S)-mandelic acid with an enantiomeric excess (ee) value of 52.7%. In this study, random mutagenesis combined with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to identify the key residues responsible for nitrilase enantioselectivity. Five enzyme mutants exhibiting distinct selectivity were generated and four "hot spots" (M113, R128, A136, and I168) responsible for enantioselectivity toward mandelonitrile were identified and characterized. Furthermore, through saturation mutagenesis, positions 113 and 128 were confirmed to substantially influence the enantioselectivity of PpL19, and certain replacements of the methionine at position 113, in particular, were found to reverse the enantioselectivity of PpL19 from S- to R-selectivity. Two other single mutants of the enzyme, PpL19-A136Y and -I168Y, also showed reversed selectivity and preferentially produced (R)-mandelic acid (ee values: 66.7% and 74.3%, respectively). By combining the beneficial mutations, two enantiocomplementary nitrilase mutants, PpL19-LH and PpL19-GYY, were created, which exhibited high S- and R-selectivity toward mandelonitrile, respectively: PpL19-LH showed the highest S-selectivity toward mandelonitrile ever reported (91.1% ee), and, notably, the PpL19-GYY mutant was identified to be highly R-selective (90.1% ee) and thus an unexpected enantiocomplementary mutant for mandelonitrile. PMID:26577409

  8. 76 FR 67722 - PPL Energy Supply, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission PPL Energy Supply, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market- Based Rate Filing Includes Request for Blanket Section 204 Authorization This is a supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of PPL...

  9. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Solid Tumors With Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; AIDS Related Immunoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Glioma; Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  10. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  11. 77 FR 75674 - Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2, PPL Susquehanna, LLC, Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... COMMISSION Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2, PPL Susquehanna, LLC, Exemption 1.0 Background... and NPF-22, which authorizes operation of the Susquehanna Steam Electric Station (SSES), Units 1 and 2... unplanned Unit 1 outage necessary due to fatigue cracking experienced on the Unit 1 turbine blades...

  12. 78 FR 27216 - PPL Holtwood, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission PPL Holtwood, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Protests Take notice that the following hydroelectric application has been filed with the Commission and...

  13. Bioaerosols standoff detection simultaneously refereed with particle concentration (ppl) and viability units (ACPLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Simard, Jean-Robert; Rowsell, Susan

    2009-09-01

    Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) called SINBAHD. This LIDAR system was used to characterize spectrally the LIF of bioaerosol agent simulants and obscurants during 57 cross-wind open-air releases at Suffield, CAN in July 2007. An autoclave and gamma-irradiation killing procedures were performed on Bacillus subtilis var globigii (BG) samples before they were aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized. Slight discrepancies were observed in the spectral characteristics of killed versus live samples but none between the two killing methodologies. Significant signature variabilities were observed from the different batches of Erwinia Herbicolas (EH). The generated cloud was simultaneously characterized in Agent Containing Particle per Liter of Air (ACPLA) by slit sampler units and in particle per litter of air (ppl) by an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). Correlation assessment between the stand-off sensor SINBAHD and the two referee point sensors was done, allowing an estimation of SINBAHD's sensitivity in ACPLA and in ppl. For a 20-m thick cloud at a range of 990 m, a detection limit of a few tens of ACPLA and a few ACPLA were obtained for BG and EH respectively. The extracted correlation between ACPLA and ppl data for releases performed with an agricultural sprayer showed a high degree of variability: 2 to 29% and 1 to 6% of ACPLA/ppl ratio for BG and EH, respectively.

  14. 77 FR 74548 - North Shore Railroad Company-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-PPL Susquehanna, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... decision, North Shore stated that it provided common carrier rail service on the Line. In any event, North Shore will not become an authorized common carrier with respect to the Line until the effective date of... subsidiary of PPL Generation, LLC, is the operator of the power plant served by the Line and owns a...

  15. Combined Endoscopic-Radiological Rendezvous for Distal Tail Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula (POPF).

    PubMed

    Lucatelli, Pierleone; Sacconi, Beatrice; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Argirò, Renato; Corona, Mario; Bezzi, Mario; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Fiocca, Fausto; Saba, Luca; Catalano, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) with leakage of pancreatic juice is a rare, severe complication following pancreatic resection or, less commonly, splenectomy. Definitive treatment can require multidisciplinary approaches. We report a case of stenosis of the main pancreatic duct with distal tail GRADE C POPF, occurred after splenectomy for Hodgkin lymphoma, successfully treated with combined radiological-endoscopic approach. PMID:27048486

  16. [Cutaneous lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Beyeler, M; Burg, G; Dummer, R

    2004-10-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas are uncommon. They must be distinguished from secondary skin manifestations of primary nodal lymphomas. Primary cutaneous lymphomas are divided into B-cell- and T-cell cutaneous lymphoma and commonly have good prognosis. Therapy is based on the stage of the disease. Since cure is not possible, the aim of treatment is to control the disease and reduce symptoms. A variety of new and promising therapeutic modalities have been introduced in recent years. PMID:15349694

  17. PPL catalyzed four-component PASE synthesis of 5-monosubstituted barbiturates: Structure and pharmacological properties.

    PubMed

    Bihani, Manisha; Bora, Pranjal P; Verma, Alakesh K; Baruah, Reshita; Boruah, Hari Prasanna Deka; Bez, Ghanashyam

    2015-12-15

    Enzymatic four-component reactions are very rare although three-component enzymatic promiscuous reactions are widely reported. Herein, we report an efficient PASE protocol for the synthesis of potentially lipophilic zwitterionic 5-monosubstituted barbiturates by four component reaction of mixture of ethyl acetoacetate, hydrazine hydrate, aldehyde and barbituric acid in ethanol at room temperature. Seven different lipases were screened for their promiscuous activity towards the synthesis of 5-monosubstituted barbiturates and the lipase from porcine pancreas (PPL) found to give optimum efficiency. The zwitterionic 5-monosubstituted barbiturates with pyrazolyl ring showed promising pharmacological activity upon screening for antibacterial and apoptotic properties. PMID:26546212

  18. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  19. Cardiac Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, Jean; Burke, Allen P; Frazier, Aletta Ann

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma of the heart and pericardium may develop in up to 25% of patients with disseminated nodal disease, but primary cardiac lymphoma is rare. The majority are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, which arise in immunocompetent older individuals, men twice as often as women. Subsets are found in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV-AIDS or allograft recipients. Cardiac lymphomas tend to arise in the wall of the right heart, especially right atrium, with contiguous infiltration of epicardium and pericardium. Pericardial implants and effusions are common. The disease is often multifocal in the heart, but cardiac valves are usually spared. PMID:27265603

  20. 75 FR 17452 - PPL Susquehanna, LLC.; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 And 2; Correction to Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... appearing in the Federal Register on March 19, 2010 (75 FR 13322), that incorrectly stated the number of... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PPL Susquehanna, LLC.; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 And 2; Correction to...

  1. 77 FR 36012 - PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant Combined License Application; Notice of Intent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

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  2. 76 FR 81992 - PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Combined License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... COMMISSION PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Combined License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption 1.0..., Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This reactor is to be identified as Bell Bend Nuclear... application is based upon the U.S. EPR reference COL (RCOL) application for UniStar's Calvert Cliffs...

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  4. 76 FR 12954 - PPL EnergyPlus, LLC v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

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    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission PPL EnergyPlus, LLC v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Complaint Take... formal complaint against PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. (PJM or Respondent), alleging that PJM failed...

  5. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  6. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. Patients who have a weakened immune system are at high risk of primary lymphoma of the ...

  7. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  8. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

  9. Burkitt lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... is closely associated with the Epstein-Barr virus ( EBV ), the main cause of infectious mononucleosis . The North ... form of Burkitt lymphoma is not linked to EBV. People with HIV have an increased risk for ...

  10. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Warrick, Joshua I; Owens, Scott R; Tomlins, Scott A

    2014-10-01

    In this article, we review prostatic lymphomas and discuss the differential diagnosis of high-grade malignant neoplasms of the prostate. We illustrate this with a case of a 46-year-old man seen with lower urinary tract obstruction who had diffuse involvement by a high-grade malignancy on prostate biopsy. Morphologic evaluation and immunohistochemistry were consistent with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the prostate. Workup with positron emission tomography-computed tomography demonstrated intensely hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the mediastinum, as well as widespread osseous involvement and involvement of the pancreatic tail, prostate, and urinary bladder, suggesting secondary prostatic involvement by a nodal lymphoma. Lymphomas of the prostate are uncommon in surgical pathology practice and usually represent secondary involvement from leukemia/lymphoma at a more typical site. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma is the most common subtype. PMID:25268190

  11. Pancreatic abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Most people with pancreatic abscesses have had pancreatitis. However, the complication often takes 7 or more days to develop. Signs of an abscess can be seen on: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of the abdomen Ultrasound of the abdomen

  12. Pancreatitis - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100149.htm Pancreatitis - series To use the sharing features on this ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pancreatitis A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  13. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... It may also contain tissue from the pancreas, pancreatic enzymes, and blood. ... located behind the stomach. It produces chemicals (called enzymes) ... Pancreatic pseudocysts most often develop after an episode of ...

  14. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Wood, Laura D; Itoi, Takao; Takaori, Kyoichi

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease, for which mortality closely parallels incidence. Most patients with pancreatic cancer remain asymptomatic until the disease reaches an advanced stage. There is no standard programme for screening patients at high risk of pancreatic cancer (eg, those with a family history of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis). Most pancreatic cancers arise from microscopic non-invasive epithelial proliferations within the pancreatic ducts, referred to as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias. There are four major driver genes for pancreatic cancer: KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4. KRAS mutation and alterations in CDKN2A are early events in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Endoscopic ultrasonography and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration offer high diagnostic ability for pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection is regarded as the only potentially curative treatment, and adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine or S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, is given after surgery. FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, folinic acid [leucovorin], irinotecan, and oxaliplatin) and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) are the treatments of choice for patients who are not surgical candidates but have good performance status. PMID:26830752

  16. Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of pancreatic cancer, and it is now clear that pancreatic cancer is a disease of inherited (germ-line) and somatic gene mutations. The genes mutated in pancreatic cancer include KRAS2, p16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, and these are accompanied by a substantial compendium of genomic and transcriptomic alterations that facilitate cell cycle deregulation, cell survival, invasion, and metastases. Pancreatic cancers do not arise de novo, and three distinct precursor lesions have been identified. Experimental models of pancreatic cancer have been developed in genetically engineered mice, which recapitulate the multistep progression of the cognate human disease. Although the putative cell of origin for pancreatic cancer remains elusive, minor populations of cells with stem-like properties have been identified that appear responsible for tumor initiation, metastases, and resistance of pancreatic cancer to conventional therapies. PMID:18039136

  17. Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 8,500 % of All New Cancer Cases 0.5% Estimated Deaths in 2016 1,120 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 193,545 people living with Hodgkin lymphoma in ...

  18. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  19. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lymphoma? A lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system . The lymphatic system is a part of the body's immune system. ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma, cancer cells form in the lymphatic system and start to grow. Most of the time, ...

  20. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) made in the past year. Recent findings Tropical pancreatitis associates with SPINK1 and/or CFTR gene mutations in approximately 50% of patients, similar to the frequency in idiopathic CP. Corticosteroids increase secretin-stimulated pancreatic bicarbonate concentrations in AIP by restoring mislocalized CFTR protein to the apical ductal membrane. Most patients with asymptomatic hyperenzymemia have pancreatic lesions of unclear significance or no pancreatic lesions. Common pitfalls in the use of diagnostic tests for EPI confound interpretation of findings in IBS and severe renal insufficiency. Further study is needed to improve the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) to diagnose CP. Celiac plexus block provides short term pain relief in a subset of patients. Summary Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the genetic associations of tropical pancreatitis, a reversible mislocalization of ductal CFTR in AIP, the association of asymptomatic pancreatic hyperenzymemia with pancreatic disorders, limitations of diagnostic tests for EPI, diagnosis of CP by EUS and endoscopic pancreatic function testing and treatment of pain. PMID:21844753

  1. New Biofuel Integrating Glycerol into Its Composition Through the Use of Covalent Immobilized Pig Pancreatic Lipase

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Diego; Posadillo, Alejandro; Caballero, Verónica; Verdugo, Cristóbal; Bautista, Felipa M.; Romero, Antonio A.; Sancho, Enrique D.; Luna, Carlos; Calero, Juan

    2012-01-01

    By using 1,3-specific Pig Pancreatic lipase (EC 3.1.1.3 or PPL), covalently immobilized on AlPO4/Sepiolite support as biocatalyst, a new second-generation biodiesel was obtained in the transesterification reaction of sunflower oil with ethanol and other alcohols of low molecular weight. The resulting biofuel is composed of fatty acid ethyl esters and monoglycerides (FAEE/MG) blended in a molar relation 2/1. This novel product, which integrates glycerol as monoacylglycerols (MG) into the biofuel composition, has similar physicochemical properties compared to those of conventional biodiesel and also avoids the removal step of this by-product. The biocatalyst was found to be strongly fixed to the inorganic support (75%). Nevertheless, the efficiency of the immobilized enzyme was reduced to half (49.1%) compared to that of the free PPL. The immobilized enzyme showed a remarkable stability as well as a great reusability (more than 40 successive reuses) without a significant loss of its initial catalytic activity. Immobilized and free enzymes exhibited different reaction mechanisms, according to the different results in the Arrhenius parameters (Ln A and Ea). However, the use of supported PPL was found to be very suitable for the repetitive production of biofuel due to its facile recyclability from the reaction mixture. PMID:22949849

  2. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  3. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  4. Pancreatic Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Poras; Bhadana, Utsav; Arora, Mohinder P

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis of the pancreas is extremely rare and in most of the cases mimics pancreatic carcinoma. There are a number of case reports on pancreatic tuberculosis with various different presentations, but only a few case series have been published, and most of our knowledge about this disease comes from individual case reports. Patients of pancreatic tuberculosis may remain asymptomatic initially and manifest as an abscess or a mass involving local lymph nodes and usually present with non-specific features. Pancreatic tuberculosis may present with a wide range of imaging findings. It is difficult to diagnose tuberculosis of pancreas on imaging studies as they may present with masses, cystic lesions or abscesses and mass lesions in most of the cases mimic pancreatic carcinoma. As it is a rare entity, it cannot be recommended but suggested that pancreatic tuberculosis should be considered in cases with a large space occupying lesions associated with necrotic peripancreatic lymph nodes and constitutional symptoms. Ultrasonography/computed tomography/endosonography-guided biopsy is the recommended diagnostic technique. Most patients achieve complete cure with standard antituberculous therapy. The aims of this study are to review clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, and management of pancreatic tuberculosis and to present our experience of 5 cases of pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:26884661

  5. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  6. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality. PMID:20016434

  7. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  8. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure children receive vaccines to protect them against mumps and other childhood illnesses. Treat medical problems that ... Heart failure - overview Hemolytic-uremic syndrome Kawasaki disease Mumps Mycoplasma pneumonia Reye syndrome Patient Instructions Pancreatitis - discharge ...

  9. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... include: Abdominal CT scan Abdominal MRI Abdominal ultrasound

  10. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... body Blockage of the tubes (ducts) that drain enzymes from the pancreas Cystic fibrosis High levels of a fat, called ... Limiting caffeine The health care provider may prescribe pancreatic enzymes. You must take these medicines with every meal. ...

  11. Pancreatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and in front of your spine. It produces juices that help break down food and hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Problems with the pancreas can lead to many health problems. These include Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the ...

  12. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for ... therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  13. Hypothalamic and pancreatic lesions with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Shuangshoti, S; Samranvej, P

    1975-01-01

    A case is reported of a neoplasm of mixed mesenchymal and neuroepithelial origin consisting of plasmacytoma, lymphoma, ganglioneuroma, and astrocytoma in the same mass. The tumour arose in the hypothalamus of a 43 year old diabetic woman who also had alpha cell hyperplasia and beta cell hypoplasia of the islets of Langerhans. It is suggested that both hypothalamic and pancreatic lesions produced diabetes mellitus in this patient. Images PMID:1104774

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  17. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, C; Hofmann, B T; Wolters-Eisfeld, G; Bockhorn, M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that the current standard therapeutic options for pancreatic cancer are not adequate and still do not meet the criteria to cure patients suffering from this lethal disease. Although research over the past decade has shown very interesting and promising new therapeutic options for these patients, only minor clinical success was achieved. Therefore, there is still an urgent need for new approaches that deal with early detection and new therapeutic options in pancreatic cancer. To provide optimal care for patients with pancreatic cancer, we need to understand better its complex molecular biology and thus to identify new target molecules that promote the proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer cells. In spite of significant progress in curing cancers with chemotherapy, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most resistant solid tumour cancers and many studies suggest that drug-resistant cancer cells are the most aggressive with the highest relapse and metastatic rates. In this context, activated Notch signalling is strongly linked with chemoresistance and therefore reflects a rational new target to circumvent resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Here, we have focused our discussion on the latest research, current therapy options and recently identified target molecules such as Notch-2 and the heparin-binding growth factor midkine, which exhibit a wide range of cancer-relevant functions and therefore provide attractive new therapeutic target molecules, in terms of pancreatic cancer and other cancers also. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24024905

  18. Study to Assess Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Oral CC-223 for Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    Multiple Myeloma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Neuroendocrine Tumors of Non-Pancreatic Origin; Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

  19. Pediatric Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Pavio, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma is the third most common pediatric neoplasm. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) accounts for nearly half of cases and commonly involves extranodal sites. Compared with adults, this histologic spectrum of pediatric NHL is very narrow and consists of aggressive tumors. Patients typically present with widespread disease. Generally, NHL occurring in children includes Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Staging and assessment of therapeutic response are usually based on FDG-PET/CT. Due to the increased susceptibility of young patients to the effects of ionizing radiation, alternative methods of imaging are being explored. PMID:27265605

  20. Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... called primary cutaneous ALCL and follows a less aggressive course. In almost all cases of primary cutaneous ... kinase (ALK). While both lymphomas are treated as aggressive lymphomas, the prognosis for ALCL depends on whether ...

  1. Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chicago Medicine Supported through grants from: ©2013 Lymphoma Research Foundation Getting the Facts is published by the Lymphoma Research Foundation (LRF) for the purpose of informing and educating ...

  2. T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... are extremely rare. T-cell lymphomas can be aggressive (fast-growing) or indolent (slow-growing). Lymphomas are ... also be involved. This group of PTCLs is aggressive and requires combination chemotherapy upon diagnosis. For more ...

  3. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  4. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26199449

  5. Pathology of Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Heckendorn, Emily; Auerbach, Aaron

    2016-07-01

    An overview of the pathology of extranodal lymphoma is presented. The emphasis of this presentation is on the classification system of extranodal lymphomas, including both B-cell and T-cell lymphomas, based on their morphology, phenotype, and molecular alterations. PMID:27265600

  6. Pegfilgrastim and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated, Relapsed, or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-20

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  7. Pancreatic panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahawish, Karim; Iyasere, Isoken T

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old Caucasian man presenting with polyarthritis, weight loss and multiple tender cutaneous nodules. Abnormal liver function tests prompted imaging of the liver which demonstrated liver metastases. Biopsy of the liver lesions confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:25150233

  8. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kleeff, Jorg; Korc, Murray; Apte, Minoti; La Vecchia, Carlo; Johnson, Colin D; Biankin, Andrew V; Neale, Rachel E; Tempero, Margaret; Tuveson, David A; Hruban, Ralph H; Neoptolemos, John P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a major cause of cancer-associated mortality, with a dismal overall prognosis that has remained virtually unchanged for many decades. Currently, prevention or early diagnosis at a curable stage is exceedingly difficult; patients rarely exhibit symptoms and tumours do not display sensitive and specific markers to aid detection. Pancreatic cancers also have few prevalent genetic mutations; the most commonly mutated genes are KRAS, CDKN2A (encoding p16), TP53 and SMAD4 - none of which are currently druggable. Indeed, therapeutic options are limited and progress in drug development is impeded because most pancreatic cancers are complex at the genomic, epigenetic and metabolic levels, with multiple activated pathways and crosstalk evident. Furthermore, the multilayered interplay between neoplastic and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment challenges medical treatment. Fewer than 20% of patients have surgically resectable disease; however, neoadjuvant therapies might shift tumours towards resectability. Although newer drug combinations and multimodal regimens in this setting, as well as the adjuvant setting, appreciably extend survival, ∼80% of patients will relapse after surgery and ultimately die of their disease. Thus, consideration of quality of life and overall survival is important. In this Primer, we summarize the current understanding of the salient pathophysiological, molecular, translational and clinical aspects of this disease. In addition, we present an outline of potential future directions for pancreatic cancer research and patient management. PMID:27158978

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  10. Uncommon presentations of common pancreatic neoplasms: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; De Robertis, Riccardo; Capelli, Paola; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Crosara, Stefano; Gobbo, Stefano; Butturini, Giovanni; Salvia, Roberto; Barbi, Emilio; Girelli, Roberto; Bassi, Claudio; Pederzoli, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms are a wide group of solid and cystic lesions with different and often characteristic imaging features, clinical presentations, and management. Among solid tumors, ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common: it arises from exocrine pancreas, comprises about 90% of all pancreatic neoplasms, and generally has a bad prognosis; its therapeutic management must be multidisciplinary, involving surgeons, oncologists, gastroenterologists, radiologists, and radiotherapists. The second most common solid pancreatic neoplasms are neuroendocrine tumors: they can be divided into functioning or non-functioning and present different degrees of malignancy. Cystic pancreatic neoplasms comprise serous neoplasms, which are almost always benign, mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, which can vary from benign to frankly malignant lesions, and solid pseudopapillary tumors. Other pancreatic neoplasms, such as lymphoma, metastases, or pancreatoblastoma, are rarely seen in clinical practice and have different and sometimes controversial managements. Rare clinical presentations and imaging appearance of the most common pancreatic neoplasms, both solid and cystic, are more frequently seen and clinically relevant than rare pancreatic tumors; their pathologic and radiologic appearances must be known to improve their management. The purpose of this paper is to present some rare or uncommon clinical and radiological presentations of common pancreatic neoplasms providing examples of multi-modality imaging approach with pathologic correlations, thus describing the histopathological bases that can explain the peculiar imaging features, in order to avoid relevant misdiagnosis and to improve lesion management. PMID:25772002

  11. AT13387 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, or Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  12. Burkitt lymphoma is molecularly distinct from other lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have uncovered a number of molecular signatures in Burkitt lymphoma, including unique genetic alterations that promote cell survival, that are not found in other lymphomas. These findings provide the first genetic evidence that Burkitt lymphoma

  13. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma This page lists cancer ... in Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma Adcetris (Brentuximab Vedotin) Ambochlorin ( ...

  14. Lymphoma in acquired generalized lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca J; Chan, Jean L; Jaffe, Elaine S; Cochran, Elaine; DePaoli, Alex M; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Goujard, Cecile; Vigouroux, Corinne; Gorden, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Acquired generalized lipodystrophy (AGL) is a rare disease thought to result from autoimmune destruction of adipose tissue. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) has been reported in two AGL patients. We report five additional cases of lymphoma in AGL, and analyze the role of underlying autoimmunity and recombinant human leptin (metreleptin) replacement in lymphoma development. Three patients developed lymphoma during metreleptin treatment (two PTCL and one ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma), and two developed lymphomas (mycosis fungoides and Burkitt lymphoma) without metreleptin. AGL is associated with high risk for lymphoma, especially PTCL. Autoimmunity likely contributes to this risk. Lymphoma developed with or without metreleptin, suggesting metreleptin does not directly cause lymphoma development; a theoretical role of metreleptin in lymphoma progression remains possible. For most patients with AGL and severe metabolic complications, the proven benefits of metreleptin on metabolic disease will likely outweigh theoretical risks of metreleptin in lymphoma development or progression. PMID:25864863

  15. Enzymatic Synthesis of (S)-(-)-gamma-Methyl-gamma-butyrolactone from Racemic Methyl gamma-hydroxypentanoate Using Porcine Pancreatic Lipase: A Microscale Advanced Bioorganic Chemistry Laboratory Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moses

    1998-02-01

    The use of enzymes in academic as well as industrial chemical laboratories is now common, and in some cases live organisms are utilized. In this laboratory project, porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) is used to convert a racemic sample of methyl gamma-hydroxypentanoate into gamma-methyl-gamma-butyrolactone in an effort to demonstrate the ability of enzymes to differentiate between enantiomeric substrates. This project also uses a number of chemical and spectroscopic techniques commonly used by organic and biochemists. Students are asked to complete two lactonization reactions of racemic methyl gamma-hydroxypentanoate: one is catalyzed by PPL and the other by para-toluenesulfonic acid, which produces a racemic mixture of gamma-methyl-gamma-butyrolactone. Both samples of the gamma-lactone are analyzed by TLC, purified by silica gel column chromatography, and characterized by infrared and 1H-NMR studies. While the sample of g-lactone obtained from the PPL catalyzed reaction is optically active, [alpha]D25° = -13.4° (c = 0.0098, chloroform), the sample from the acid catalyzed reaction is not. Results from 1H-NMR studies of these lactones with a mole equivalent of (R)-(-)-2,2,2-trifluoro-1-(9-anthryl)ethanol show the enantiomeric excess of the optically active lactone to be 37 + 4 % favoring the S-enantiomer.

  16. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  17. Pediatric lymphomas in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Klumb, Claudete E; Barber, Glen N; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study provides the clinical pathological characteristics of 1301 cases of pediatric/adolescent lymphomas in patients from different geographic regions of Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analyses of diagnosed pediatric lymphoma cases in a 10‐year period was performed. We believe that it represents the largest series of pediatric lymphomas presented from Brazil. RESULTS: Non‐Hodgkin lymphomas represented 68% of the cases, including those of precursor (36%) and mature (64%) cell origin. Mature cell lymphomas comprised 81% of the B‐cell phenotype and 19% of the T‐cell phenotype. Hodgkin lymphomas represented 32% of all cases, including 87% of the classical type and 13% of nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The geographic distribution showed 38.4% of the cases in the Southeast region, 28.7% in the Northeast, 16.1% in the South, 8.8% in the North, and 8% in the Central‐west region. The distribution by age groups was 15–18 years old, 33%; 11–14 years old, 26%; 6–10 years old, 24%; and 6 years old or younger, 17%. Among mature B‐cell lymphomas, most of the cases were Burkitt lymphomas (65%), followed by diffuse large B‐cell lymphomas (24%). In the mature T‐cell group, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK‐positive was the most prevalent (57%), followed by peripheral T‐cell lymphoma, then not otherwise specified (25%). In the group of classic Hodgkin lymphomas, the main histological subtype was nodular sclerosis (76%). Nodular lymphocyte predominance occurred more frequently than in other series. CONCLUSION: Some of the results found in this study may reflect the heterogeneous socioeconomical status and environmental factors of the Brazilian population in different regions. PMID:21340214

  18. Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangyu; Sun, Tao; Kong, Fanyang; Du, Yiqi; Li, Zhaoshen

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most lethal diseases with an incidence rate almost equal to the rate of mortality. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology that affects the pancreas. Epidemiological studies have identified CP to be a major risk factor for PC. Summary A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking CP and PC has identified several common pathways that provide targets for future interventions. This article reviews those components in the CP-PC connection, including the role of macrophages, the maintenance of genome stability, cytokines, and other nodal factors such as nuclear factor kappa B, COX-2 and reactive oxygen species. Key Message The molecular mechanisms that underlie CP and PC provide novel targets for future therapies for PC. Practical Implications The stromal-desmoplastic reaction plays an important role in initiating and sustaining chronic inflammation and tumor progression. Recently, two targeted anti-tumor agents, erlotinib and nab-paclitaxel, have shown promising therapeutic efficacy. Notably, both these agents target components (EGFR and SPARC) within the inflammatory stroma surrounding malignant cells, underscoring the importance of inflammation in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Identifying the common pathways linking CP and PC may help uncover additional novel targets for future therapies. PMID:26674754

  19. Primary Musculoskeletal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Mark D; Kransdorf, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Primary lymphoma of bone and soft tissue is rare and almost invariably of B-cell origin. Osseous lymphoma usually reveals aggressive bone destruction and associated soft tissue extension. Soft tissue involvement is optimally depicted by MR imaging. Cortical destruction allowing communication between the intraosseous and soft tissue components may be subtle with small striations of extension. Lymphoma of the deep soft tissues usually reveals long cones of intramuscular or intermuscular tumor again best depicted by MR imaging. Cutaneous or subcutaneous lymphoma demonstrates multiple nodules and plaquelike thickening. PMID:27265608

  20. Lymphoma Microenvironment and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mina L; Fedoriw, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    Understanding of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment is poised to expand in the era of next-generation sequencing studies of the tumor cells themselves. Successful therapies of the future will rely on deeper appreciation of the interactions between elements of the microenvironment. Although the phenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of tumor cells in lymphomas has progressed faster than most other solid organ tumors, concrete advancements in understanding the lymphoma microenvironment have been fewer. This article explores the composition of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment; its role in immune surveillance, evasion, and drug resistance; and its potential role in the development of targeted therapies. PMID:26940270

  1. Lenalidomide and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  2. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guannan; Cao, Zhe; Yang, Gang; Wu, Wenming; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication of pancreatic cancer, most often accompanying rare acinar cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with pancreatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Patient information: A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital for weight loss. A physical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on his lower extremities. The blood test showed abnormal increases in amylase, lipase, and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 levels. A computed tomography scan detected a hypodense 2 × 1.5 cm solid mass with an unclear margin in the head of the pancreas. The biopsy of subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities was conducted and revealed lobular panniculitis. Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic panniculitis were strongly suspected. After the administration of octreotide acetate and the Whipple procedure, the serous amylase and lipase levels returned to normal, and the pancreatic panniculitis had almost resolved by 4 weeks later. Conclusion: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare complication of pancreatic cancer. However, in the presence of a pancreatic mass, as in this case, clinicians should be aware that panniculitis may be the sentinel of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27495045

  3. Biomarkers for lymphoma

    DOEpatents

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.

    2014-09-02

    A biomarker, method, test kit, and diagnostic system for detecting the presence of lymphoma in a person are disclosed. The lymphoma may be Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The person may be a high-risk subject. In one embodiment, a plasma sample from a person is obtained. The level of at least one protein listed in Table S3 in the plasma sample is measured. The level of at least one protein in the plasma sample is compared with the level in a normal or healthy subject. The lymphoma is diagnosed based upon the level of the at least one protein in the plasma sample in comparison to the normal or healthy level.

  4. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. PMID:26526433

  5. Oral Clofarabine for Relapsed/Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Follicular Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Low Grade B-cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large-cell Lymphoma

  6. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Sala; Nikolopoulos, Ioannis; Kerwat, Rajab

    2016-01-01

    Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions. PMID:27274876

  7. Genetic Susceptibility to Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Skibola, Christine F.; Curry, John D.; Nieters, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic susceptibility studies of lymphoma may serve to identify at risk populations and to elucidate important disease mechanisms. METHODS This review considered all studies published through October 2006 on the contribution of genetic polymorphisms in the risk of lymphoma. RESULTS Numerous studies implicate the role of genetic variants that promote B-cell survival and growth with increased risk of lymphoma. Several reports including a large pooled study by InterLymph, an international consortium of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) case-control studies, found positive associations between variant alleles in TNF -308G>A and IL10 -3575T>A genes and risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Four studies reported positive associations between a GSTT1 deletion and risk of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Genetic studies of folate-metabolizing genes implicate folate in NHL risk, but further studies that include folate and alcohol assessments are needed. Links between NHL and genes involved in energy regulation and hormone production and metabolism may provide insights into novel mechanisms implicating neuro- and endocrine-immune cross-talk with lymphomagenesis, but will need replication in larger populations. CONCLUSIONS Numerous studies suggest that common genetic variants with low penetrance influence lymphoma risk, though replication studies will be needed to eliminate false positive associations. PMID:17606447

  8. Angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Tomasini, D; Berti, E

    2015-02-01

    Under the generic diagnosis of angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas are included several subtypes of lymphomas histopathologically characterized either by the predominantly endovascular-endoluminal presence of neoplastic lymphocytes of B-T or NK/T cell origin, or by a pathologic process centered around a blood vessels secondarily infiltrated and invaded by the spreading infiltrate. This group of lymphoproliferative disorders is heterogeneous regarding phenotype, but they share common features that are multiorgan involvement, worse prognosis, and, frequently Ebstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomic integration. At onset, some of these rare lymphomas, e.g. intravascular large cell lymphoma or lymphomatoid granulomatosis (Liebow dieases), are misdiagnosed as inflammatory diseases. The actual treatments of these disorders are based upon chemotherapy and/or chemotherapy plus bone marrow transplantation with variable results. Therapeutic approaches for EBV related angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas, similarly to those employed for other viral induced lymphoproliferative disease would comprise the employment of chemotherapy together with drugs able to interfere with viral infection. Such an approach has been used in rare cases of EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly, a lymphoproliferative disorders which development is linked to immunosuppression due to senescence. The present review will focus on intravascular and angiocentric lymphomas providing histopathologic, immunophenotypical and molecular data useful to overcome to a specific diagnosis and to differentiate them from other lymphoproliferative disorders showing a secondary vascular engulfment and infiltration and some vasculitides showing overlapping histopathologic features. PMID:25531150

  9. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.R.; Millar, A.M.; Taylor, T.V.

    1982-05-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with /sup 86/RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory.

  10. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  11. Bilateral ovarian Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, L; Medina Ramos, N; García Rodríguez, R; Barber, M A; Arias, M D; García, J A

    2009-01-01

    Primary ovarian lymphoma is a rare entity. We submit a case of a 34-year-old black patient presenting with a bilateral adnexal tumor. She underwent hysterectomy with double salpingo-oophorectomy followed by polychemotherapy treatment. Histology confirmed Epstein-Barr virus-positive bilateral Burkitt's lymphoma. The patient died from septic shock after a month of treatment. Endemic Burkitt's lymphoma has a predilection for the female genital tract, manifesting itself clinically as a pelvic mass and less frequently as a menstrual disorder. It is a rare entity in our environment but should be kept in mind when treating patients of African origin. PMID:19480266

  12. Cryosurgery for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kecheng; Yang, Daming

    2013-01-01

    The procedure of pancreatic cryosurgery is performed with intraoperative or percutaneous approaches. Based on current data and our initial experience, cryoablation appears to be a feasible, potentially safe and promising option in patients with locally advanced and unresectable pancreatic cancer. It is suggested that there are almost no known contraindications to the use of cryosurgery for pancreatic cancer. For most patients with pancreatic cancer, cryosurgery can substitute conventional surgery. PMID:25083453

  13. Pathological characteristics of oral lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, N; Kurihara, K

    1982-06-01

    Nine cases of oral extranodal lymphomas are described. Histologically, 6 cases were histiocytic, 2 lymphocytic and 1 Burkitt's lymphoma. According to the criteria of the Japanese Lymphoma Study Group, 8 cases seemingly belonged to the B-cell lymphoma classification, and one was unclassified. Geographical differences in the distribution of oral extranodal lymphomas between Japan and western countries were surveyed. A review of our cases and those in the literature revealed no significant difference in sex, age, frequency of B-cell lymphomas or site of predilection. In Japan, histiocytic lymphomas were the most common type of extranodal oral lymphomas. The most prevalent type of oral extranodal lymphomas in western countries could not be determined from the literature. PMID:6808100

  14. Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following treatment. Occasionally, cancer may return, and follow-up appointments with your cancer specialist can help you catch it early if it does. Your doctor will also watch for any late side effects of your treatment. After Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  15. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... The cancer may be low grade (slow growing), intermediate grade, or high grade (fast growing). NHL is ... Accessed March 2, 2015. National Cancer Institute: PDQ Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer ...

  16. Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Narula, Ritesh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2015-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is an uncommon, but potentially fatal intraocular malignancy, which may occur with or without primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Considered to be a subset of PCNSL, it is mostly of diffuse large B-cell type. The diagnosis of PVRL poses a challenge not only to the clinician, but also to the pathologist. Despite aggressive treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, relapses or CNS involvement are common. PMID:25971162

  17. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Amir; Nasiri, Mohammad Reza Ghavam; Memar, Bahram; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Raziee, Hamid Reza; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Mohtashami, Samira

    2012-01-01

    Background: Extranodal lymphoma may arise anywhere outside lymph nodes mostly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as non-Hodgkin's disease. We reviewed the clinicopathological features and treatment results of patients with primary GI lymphoma. Materials and Methods: A total number of 30 cases with primary GI lymphoma were included in this study. Patients referred to the Radiation Oncology Department of Omid Hospital (Mashhad, Iran) during a 5-year period (2006-11). Clinical, paraclinical, and radiological data was collected from medical records of the patients. Results: Out of the 30 patients with primary GI lymphoma in the study, 12 were female (40%) and 18 were male (60%) (male to female ratio: 3/2). B symptoms were present in 27 patients (90%). Antidiuretic hormone (LDH) levels were elevated in 9 patients (32.1%). The most common primary site was stomach in 14 cases (46.7%). Other common sites included small intestine and colon each in 8 patients (26.7%). All patients had histopathologically proven non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The most common histologic subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) in 16 patients (53.3%). In addition, 28 patients (93.3%) received chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (CHOP regimen). The median course of chemotherapy was 6 cources. Moreover, 8 patients (26.7%) received radiotherapy with cobalt 60. The median follow-up time was 26 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 53% and the median survival time was 60 months. Conclusion: Primary GI lymphoma is commonly seen in stomach and small intestine and mostly is DLBCL or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. PMID:23626617

  18. Primary Lymphoma of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun Yong; Hahn, Jee Sook; Suh, Chang Ok; Yang, Woo Ick

    2002-01-01

    Background: Primary lymphoma of bone is a rare disease. There is yet no systematical evaluation of primary lymphoma of bone in Korea. Here we report our experience of sixteen cases with primary lymphoma of bone focusing on the survival. Methods: Sixteen cases, collected for 13 years, were evaluated on the clinical presentation, histologic subtype, stage and treatment outcomes of the primary bone lymphoma. Results: The most common presenting complaint was bone pain. Malignant lymphoma of bone involved a wide variety of sites, the most prevalent site of which in this study was the spine. Most of the cases were in the diffuse large B-cell category. The clinical stage of lymphoma was IEA in two cases, IIEA in three cases, IVEA in five cases and IVEB in three cases. All treated cases received systemic chemotherapy and ten cases among them were treated with combined modality therapy. Median overall survival was not reached after median follow-up period of 28 months and five-year overall survival rate was 54%. Conclusion: More promising therapeutic strategies are needed for survival improvement on more accumulated cases. PMID:12298430

  19. HIV infection and lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Grogg, K L; Miller, R F; Dogan, A

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of lymphoma in patients with HIV infection greatly exceeds that of the general population. The increased risk for lymphoma appears related to multiple factors, including the transforming properties of the retrovirus itself, the immunosuppression and cytokine dysregulation that results from the disease, and, most importantly, opportunistic infections with other lymphotrophic herpes viruses such as Epstein–Barr virus and human herpesvirus 8. Histologically lymphomas fall into three groups: (1) those also occurring in immunocompetent patients; (2) those occurring more specifically in HIV‐positive patients; and (3) those also occurring in patients with other forms of immunosuppression. Aggressive lymphomas account for the vast majority cases. They frequently present with advanced stage, bulky disease with high tumour burden and, typically, involve extranodal sites. Clinical outcome appears to be worse than in similar aggressive lymphomas in the general population. However, following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the risk for developing lymphoma in the context of HIV infection has decreased and the clinical outcome has improved. PMID:18042692

  20. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Frank U.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of the body's immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli—like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells—and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. HP often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of HP patients to develop pancreatic cancer. PMID:24600409

  1. Biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, G J; Gillespie, J; Guillou, P J

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of death from malignant disease in Western society. Apart from the fortunate few patients who present with a resectable small pancreatic adenocarcinoma, conventional treatment offers no hope of cure and has little palliative value. Over the past two decades major steps have been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic growth and neoplasia. This review sets out to explore these advances, firstly in the regulation of normal pancreatic growth, and secondly the mechanism which may be involved in malignant change of the exocrine pancreas. From an understanding of this new biology, new treatment strategies may be possible for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:1855689

  2. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  3. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  4. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  6. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Adult Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Unfavorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  7. Obatoclax and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Aggressive Relapsed or Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  8. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  9. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer ... in pancreatic cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized ...

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  11. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  12. Ophthalmic lymphoma: epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sjö, Lene Dissing

    2009-02-01

    With a lifetime risk of 1% and 700 new cases per year, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the seventh most frequent type of cancer in Denmark. The incidence of NHL has increased considerably in Western countries over the last decades; consequently, NHL is an increasing clinical problem. Ophthalmic lymphoma, (lymphoma localized in the ocular region, i.e. eyelid, conjunctiva, lacrimal sac, lacrimal gland, orbit, or intraocularly) is relatively uncommon, accounting for 5%-10% of all extranodal lymphomas. It is, however, the most common orbital malignancy. The purpose of this thesis was to review specimens from all Danish patients with a diagnosis of ophthalmic lymphoma during the period 1980-2005, in order to determine the distribution of lymphoma subtypes, and the incidence- and time trends in incidence for ophthalmic lymphoma. Furthermore, an extended analysis of the most frequent subtype, extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (MALT lymphoma), was done to analyse clinical factors and cytogenetic changes with influence on prognosis. A total of 228 Danish patients with a biopsy-reviewed verified diagnosis of ocular adnexal-, orbital-, or intraocular lymphoma were identified. We found that more than 50% of orbital- and ocular adnexal lymphomas were of the MALT lymphoma subtype, whereas diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) predominated intraocularly (Sjo et al. 2008a). Furthermore, lymphoma arising in the lacrimal sac was surprisingly predominantly DLBCL (Sjo et al. 2006). Incidence rates were highly dependent on patient age. There was an increase in incidence rates for the whole population from 1980 to 2005, corresponding to an annual average increase of 3.4% (Sjo et al. 2008a). MALT lymphoma arising in the ocular region was found in 116 patients (Sjo et al. 2008b). One third of patients had a relapse or progression of disease after initial therapy and relapses were frequently found at extra-ocular sites. Overall survival, however, was not significantly poorer for patients

  13. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Goess, Ruediger; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Friess, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an often-underestimated complication following pancreatic surgery. After recent advances in managing acute postoperative complications the focus of current research is now shifting onto the long-term complications following pancreatectomy. Weight loss and steatorrhea as typical symptoms have high influence on the quality of life in the postoperative period. Malnutrition-related symptoms occur late and are often misinterpreted. Enzyme replacement therapy is more or less the only possible treatment option, even though not many controlled trials have been performed in this field. In this review we summarized the pathophysiology, diagnosis, risk factors and treatment options of exocrine insufficiency and focus mainly on patients with pancreaticoduodenectomy (classical Whipple), pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (ppWhipple) or distal pancreatectomy. Incidence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after surgery depends mainly on the initial diagnosis, the preoperative exocrine function and is associated with the extent of parenchyma resection. Diagnosing exocrine failure after surgery can be difficult and specific function tests are commonly not routinely performed. Starting and monitoring of enzyme replacement treatment is more based on clinical symptoms, than on objective markers. To improve the performance status of postsurgical patients it is important to consider pancreatic exocrine function as one aspect of quality of life. Further clinical trials should be initiated to gain more specific knowledge about the influence of the different pancreatic resections on pancreatic exocrine function to initialize proper treatment even before major clinical symptoms occur. PMID:27058237

  14. Radiation therapy for orbital lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ping . E-mail: pzhou@partners.org; Ng, Andrea K.; Silver, Barbara; Li Sigui; Hua Ling; Mauch, Peter M.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To describe radiation techniques and evaluate outcomes for orbital lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients (and 62 eyes) with orbital lymphoma treated with radiotherapy between 1987 and 2003 were included. The majority had mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (48%) or follicular (30%) lymphoma. Seventeen patients had prior lymphoma at other sites, and 29 had primary orbital lymphoma. Median follow-up was 46 months. Results: The median dose was 30.6 Gy; one-third received <30 Gy. Electrons were used in 9 eyes with disease confined to the conjunctiva or eyelid, and photons in 53 eyes with involvement of intraorbital tissues to cover entire orbit. Local control rate was 98% for all patients and 100% for those with indolent lymphoma. Three of the 26 patients with localized primary lymphoma failed distantly, resulting in a 5-year freedom-from-distant-relapse rate of 89%. The 5-year disease-specific and overall survival rates were 95% and 88%, respectively. Late toxicity was mainly cataract formation in patients who received radiation without lens block. Conclusions A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for indolent orbital lymphoma. Distant relapse rate in patients with localized orbital lymphoma was lower than that reported for low-grade lymphoma presenting in other sites. Orbital radiotherapy can be used for salvage of recurrent indolent lymphoma.

  15. Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Follicular Lymphoma Diagnosed With Medical Thoracoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sumera R; Lee, Paul J; Ghasemi, Mitra; Sosa, Andres F

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas may present with a recurrent pleural effusion, usually with involvement of other thoracic or extrathoracic sites. Lymphomas typically presenting with pleural disease include primary effusion lymphoma and pyothorax-associated lymphoma. We describe an unusual case of recurrent pleural effusion secondary to follicular lymphoma with no other known extrathoracic involvement at the time of diagnosis. PMID:26496088

  17. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  18. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 72,580 % of All New Cancer Cases 4.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 20,150 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 569,536 people living with non-Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  19. Pathogenesis of AIDS lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Herndier, B G; Kaplan, L D; McGrath, M S

    1994-08-01

    The AIDS-associated lymphomas represent a heterogeneous set of disease processes. The largest histologic subset of lymphomas is the large-cell lymphomas, which represent a spectrum of disease processes ranging from monomorphic monoclonal B-cell proliferations to very polymorphic and polyclonal mixtures of B cells, T cells and macrophages. The next most frequent class of systemic lymphoma are the small non-cleaved cell or Burkitt's-like lymphomas. These are relatively monomorphic, monoclonal malignant B-cell proliferations. The final subset of lymphomas, which are likely to become more common as the AIDS epidemic progresses, are the primary CNS lymphomas, which are expansions of EBV-immortalized B cells. The high incidence of tumor-associated EBV in the CNS lymphomas makes these lesions somewhat analogous to an opportunistic EBV infection. In HIV disease there is a long lag after infection before the appearance of clinical manifestations of impaired T-cell immunity. During this period, both appropriate B-cell proliferation in response to antigen (including the ubiquitous HIV) and abnormal B-cell proliferation (autoimmune, dysregulated) occur as the follicular architecture is disrupted by the virus and potential APC are exposed and/or infected with HIV. The destruction of FDC or the involution of their processes could interfere with the elimination by apoptosis of low-avidity B-cell clones. Antigen-competent B cells with pre-existing chromosomal translocations such as the t(8;14) (c-myc, IgH) would have a selective growth advantage in this setting. Figure 9 shows a schematic representation of prelymphomatous and lymphomagenic events as they are projected to occur. A similar pathogenetic scheme has been postulated for follicular B-cell lymphomas: PCR studies have demonstrated that a pool of t(14;18) (IgH;bcl-2) B-cells are present in lymph nodes featuring follicular hyperplasia. In response to antigen (the evidence favoring antigen drive is extensive hypersomatic

  20. Primary intracranial lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Shagufta T.; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL), a rare form of aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), has increased in incidence during the last three decades and occurs in both immune compromised and immune competent hosts. It has an overall poor prognosis. Objective: This study attempts to further delineate the clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological profile of PCNSL at Jeddah to King Faisal Hospital and Research Center. Methods: Computerized search through the archives of King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre between July 2000- December 2012 identified 15 patients with pathologically confirmed PCNSL. These were analyzed retrospectively. Their clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological data were analyzed. Results: Of the 15 PCNSL patients, 8 (53.3%) were females and 7 (46.6%) were males. There was female predilection especially in the age group of 40-59 years. Mean age at diagnosis for all patients was 50.4 years. There was no patient in the pediatric age group. The most common location in the brain was the frontal region in 7 patients (46.6%), 7 (46.6%) had multiple intracranial masses; all 15 (100%) were Non Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, among which 13 (86.6%) were diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. All 15 (100%) cases showed diffuse and strong positivity for CD 45, and CD 20. Fourteen patients were immune competent while one was immune compromised. Conclusions: PCNSL often occurs in middle-aged and aged patients. There is female predilection especially in the middle age. Frontal region is the most common location with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the predominant subtype. PMID:27366250

  1. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  2. Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis-as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery. PMID:24132440

  3. Pancreatic Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Joji Kurian; Kim, Min-Sik; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Raju, Rajesh; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Khan, Aafaque Ahmad; Sakamuri, Sruthi; Tankala, Shantal Gupta; Singal, Mukul; Nair, Bipin; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava; Maitra, Anirban; Gowda, Harsha; Hruban, Ralph H; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. The etiology of pancreatic cancer is heterogeneous with a wide range of alterations that have already been reported at the level of the genome, transcriptome, and proteome. The past decade has witnessed a large number of experimental studies using high-throughput technology platforms to identify genes whose expression at the transcript or protein levels is altered in pancreatic cancer. Based on expression studies, a number of molecules have also been proposed as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of this deadly cancer. Currently, there are no repositories which provide an integrative view of multiple Omics data sets from published research on pancreatic cancer. Here, we describe the development of a web-based resource, Pancreatic Cancer Database (http://www.pancreaticcancerdatabase.org), as a unified platform for pancreatic cancer research. PCD contains manually curated information pertaining to quantitative alterations in miRNA, mRNA, and proteins obtained from small-scale as well as high-throughput studies of pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We believe that PCD will serve as an integrative platform for scientific community involved in pancreatic cancer research. PMID:24839966

  4. Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma This page lists ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Adcetris ( ...

  5. Panobinostat and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. Post-ERCP pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Arata, Shinju; Takada, Tadahiro; Hirata, Koichi; Yoshida, Masahiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Hirota, Morihisa; Yokoe, Masamichi; Hirota, Masahiko; Kiriyama, Seiki; Sekimoto, Miho; Amano, Hodaka; Wada, Keita; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Gabata, Toshifumi; Takeda, Kazunori; Kataoka, Keisho; Ito, Tetsuhide; Tanaka, Masao

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatitis remains the most common severe complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Detailed information about the findings of previous studies concerning post-ERCP pancreatitis has not been utilized sufficiently. The purpose of the present article was to present guidelines for the diagnostic criteria of post-ERCP pancreatitis, and its incidence, risk factors, and prophylactic procedures that are supported by evidence. To achieve this purpose, a critical examination was made of the articles on post-ERCP pancreatitis, based on the data obtained by research studies published up to 2009. At present, there are no standardized diagnostic criteria for post-ERCP pancreatitis. It is appropriate that post-ERCP pancreatitis is defined as acute pancreatitis that has developed following ERCP, and its diagnosis and severity assessment should be made according to the diagnostic criteria and severity assessment of the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The incidence of acute pancreatitis associated with diagnostic and therapeutic ERCP is 0.4-1.5 and 1.6-5.4%, respectively. Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation is associated with a high risk of acute pancreatitis compared with endoscopic sphincterotomy. It was made clear that important risk factors include dysfunction of the Oddi sphincter, being of the female sex, past history of post-ERCP pancreatitis, and performance of pancreaticography. Temporary prophylactic placement of pancreatic stents in the high-risk group is useful for the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis [odds ratio (OR) 3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-6.4, number needed to treat (NNT) 10]. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with a reduction in the development of post-ERCP pancreatitis (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.32-0.65). Single rectal administration of NSAIDs is useful for the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis [relative risk (RR) 0.36, 95% CI 0.22-0.60, NNT 15] and decreases the

  7. FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  8. Follicular lymphoma of the submandibular salivary gland

    PubMed Central

    Shashidara, R.; Prasad, Priyanka R.; Jaishankar; Joseph, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Lymphomas are neoplastic diseases of lymph nodes. Lymphoma of the salivary gland is rare accounting for less than 5% of lymphomas overall. Furthermore, lymphomas arising in the submandibular gland are reported to comprise 916% of all salivary gland lymphomas. Among lymphomas originating from salivary glands, the ratio of follicular lymphoma is very low. They can also be seen in the lymph nodes of the salivary glands which is an uncommon presentation. Here, we present a case follicular lymphoma which presented as a salivary gland tumour. PMID:25364171

  9. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  10. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  11. Ixazomib Citrate and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Indolent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Refractory Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  12. Study of Alisertib (MLN8237) in Adults With Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-15

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Precursor B-lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; T-cell Lymphoma, Excluding Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Follicular Lymphoma With ≥ 50% Diffuse Large Cell Component

  13. Imaging of Extranodal Genitourinary Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rohena-Quinquilla, Iván R; Lattin, Grant E; Wolfman, Darcy

    2016-07-01

    The genitourinary (GU) system is commonly affected by disseminated lymphoma. Rarely, lymphoma can originate from and remain localized to one of the GU organs and thus presents as primary extranodal disease. Up to 40% of lymphomas present as extranodal disease, with only 3% having the GU system as the primary site of involvement. This article describes and correlates the radiologic and pathologic features of extranodal lymphomatous disease affecting the GU system with specific focus on the kidneys, adrenal glands, testicles, and ovaries. Lymphoma of the uterine body and cervix, external female genitalia, urinary bladder, and prostate gland is briefly discussed. PMID:27265606

  14. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  15. Acute Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Werlin, Steven L.

    2001-10-01

    There are no drugs that cure or abate pancreatitis. The treatment of patients with mild and moderate episodes of pancreatitis (85%) is supportive and expectant. Central issues include the removal of the initiating process (if possible), relief of pain, and maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be required for stone extraction in patients with biliary pancreatitis. Surgery is rarely required. The aims of treatment for patients with severe disease includes treatment of local, systemic, and septic complications in addition to those for mild and moderate disease. Homeostasis is maintained by the correction of hypocalcemia, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, electrolyte imbalances, and hypoxemia. A large number of medications have been used unsuccessfully in an attempt to halt the progression of the autodigestive process within the pancreas and to reduce pancreatic secretions. Nutritional support with either enteral or parenteral feeding is given. Intravenous antibiotics or selective bowel decontamination decrease mortality in patients with severe episodes of pancreatitis. The treatment for these individuals is often prolonged. Surgical treatment of traumatic pancreatitis with ductal rupture includes repair or resection. At times, simple drainage is performed and definitive surgery is deferred until later. Surgical treatment of severe pancreatitis includes debridement of necrotic and infected tissue. The emerging consensus appears to be that necrosectomy and local lavage or open management with planned re-exploration offers better survival than the conventional therapy of resection plus drainage alone. PMID:11560787

  16. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  17. Canine lymphoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Zandvliet, M

    2016-06-01

    Canine lymphoma (cL) is a common type of neoplasia in dogs with an estimated incidence rate of 20-100 cases per 100,000 dogs and is in many respects comparable to non-Hodgkin lymphoma in humans. Although the exact cause is unknown, environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are thought to play an important role. cL is not a single disease, and a wide variation in clinical presentations and histological subtypes is recognized. Despite this potential variation, most dogs present with generalized lymphadenopathy (multicentric form) and intermediate to high-grade lymphoma, more commonly of B-cell origin. The most common paraneoplastic sign is hypercalcemia that is associated with the T-cell immunophenotype. Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice and a doxorubicin-based multidrug protocol is currently the standard of care. A complete remission is obtained for most dogs and lasts for a median period of 7-10 months, resulting in a median survival of 10-14 months. Many prognostic factors have been reported, but stage, immunophenotype, tumor grade, and response to chemotherapy appear of particular importance. Failure to respond to chemotherapy suggests drug resistance, which can be partly attributed to the expression of drug transporters of the ABC-transporter superfamily, including P-gp and BCRP. Ultimately, most lymphomas will become drug resistant and the development of treatments aimed at reversing drug resistance or alternative treatment modalities (e.g. immunotherapy and targeted therapy) are of major importance. This review aims to summarize the relevant data on cL, as well as to provide an update of the recent literature. PMID:26953614

  18. Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Signs and symptoms of pancreatic cancer Can pancreatic cancer be found early? Pancreatic cancer is hard to ... Testing: What You Need to Know . Testing for pancreatic cancer in people at high risk For people in ...

  19. Lenalidomide and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mediastinal Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  20. Oblimersen Sodium and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  2. Lymphoma Immunotherapy: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Zappasodi, Roberta; de Braud, Filippo; Di Nicola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The rationale to treat lymphomas with immunotherapy comes from long-standing evidence on their distinctive immune responsiveness. Indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, in particular, establish key interactions with the immune microenvironment to ensure prosurvival signals and prevent antitumor immune activation. However, reports of spontaneous regressions indicate that, under certain circumstances, patients develop therapeutic antitumor immunity. Several immunotherapeutic approaches have been thus developed to boost these effects in all patients. To date, targeting CD20 on malignant B cells with the antibody rituximab has been the most clinically effective strategy. However, relapse and resistance prevent to cure approximately half of B-NHL patients, underscoring the need of more effective therapies. The recognition of B-cell receptor variable regions as B-NHL unique antigens promoted the development of specific vaccines to immunize patients against their own tumor. Despite initial promising results, this strategy has not yet demonstrated a sufficient clinical benefit to reach the regulatory approval. Several novel agents are now available to stimulate immune effector functions or counteract immunosuppressive mechanisms, such as engineered antitumor T cells, co-stimulatory receptor agonist, and immune checkpoint-blocking antibodies. Thus, multiple elements can now be exploited in more effective combinations to break the barriers for the induction of anti-lymphoma immunity. PMID:26388871

  3. MDX-010 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-22

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Geldanamycin Analogue in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-13

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  5. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Daniel; Friess, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients. PMID:26681935

  6. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  7. Lenalidomide and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  8. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV HIV-Associated Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Stage IIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVB Hodgkin Lymphoma

  9. Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the abdomen. The surgeon can look at the pancreas and other organs for tumors and take biopsy ... pancreatic cancers appear to be confined to the pancreas at the time they are found. Even then, ...

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... age at the time of diagnosis is 71. Gender Men are slightly more likely to develop pancreatic ... of these syndromes can be found by genetic testing. For more information on genetic testing, see Can ...

  11. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Beiderwellen, K; Sabet, A; Lauenstein, T C; Lahner, H; Poeppel, T D

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. PMID:27003413

  12. What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... very important to distinguish between exocrine and endocrine cancers of the pancreas. They have distinct risk factors and causes, have ... are by far the most common type of pancreas cancer. If you are told you have pancreatic cancer, ...

  13. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  14. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Common symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. However, not every patient with ... help the pancreas to recover. Patients who have abdominal pain can be treated with pain medications. Some patients ...

  15. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... allo-transplantation?" For each pancreatic islet allo-transplant infusion, researchers use specialized enzymes to remove islets from ... in a lab. Transplant patients typically receive two infusions with an average of 400,000 to 500, ...

  16. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... of immunosuppressive medications?" [ Top ] Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry Data In its 2010 annual report, 1 the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry presented data on 571 patients who received pancreatic islet allo- ...

  17. Lymphoma of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

    2014-01-01

    Background. Lymphoma of the urinary bladder (LUB) is rare. Aims. To review the literature on LUB. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results. LUB can be either primary or secondary. The tumour has female predominance; most cases occur in middle-age women. Secondary LUB occurs in 10% to 25% of leukemias/lymphomas and in advanced-stage systemic lymphoma. Less than 100 cases have been reported. MALT typically affects adults older than 60 years; 75% are female. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is also common and may arise from transformation of MALT. LUB presents with haematuria, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, and abdominal or back pain. Macroscopic examination of LUBs show large discrete tumours centred in the dome or lateral walls of the bladder. Positive staining of LUB varies by the subtype of lymphoma; B-cell lymphomas are CD20 positive. MALT lymphoma is positively stained for CD20, CD19, and FMC7 and negatively stained for CD5, CD10, and CD11c. LUB stains negatively with Pan-keratin, vimentin, CK20, and CK7. MALT lymphoma exhibits t(11; 18)(q21: 21). Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the MALT type of LUB with no recurrence. Conclusions. LUB is diagnosed by its characteristic morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics. Radiotherapy is a useful treatment. PMID:24511310

  18. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  19. Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smyk, Daniel S.; Rigopoulou, Eirini I.; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L.; Kriese, Stephen; Burroughs, Andrew K.; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was first used to describe cases of pancreatitis with narrowing of the pancreatic duct, enlargement of the pancreas, hyper-γ-globulinaemia, and antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity serologically. The main differential diagnosis, is pancreatic cancer, which can be ruled out through radiological, serological, and histological investigations. The targets of ANA in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis do not appear to be similar to those found in other rheumatological diseases, as dsDNA, SS-A, and SS-B are not frequently recognized by AIP-related ANA. Other disease-specific autoantibodies, such as, antimitochondrial, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies or diabetes-specific autoantibodies are virtually absent. Further studies have focused on the identification of pancreas-specific autoantigens and reported significant reactivity to lactoferrin, carbonic anhydrase, pancreas secretory trypsin inhibitor, amylase-alpha, heat-shock protein, and plasminogen-binding protein. This paper discusses the findings of these investigations and their relevance to the diagnosis, management, and pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:22844291

  20. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:27555793

  1. Tropical chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

    2003-01-01

    Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients. PMID:14654569

  2. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:27555793

  3. Nutrition in pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Meier, Rémy F; Beglinger, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    The pancreas plays a major role in nutrient digestion. Therefore, in both acute and chronic pancreatitis, exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop, impairing digestive and absorptive processes. These changes can lead to malnutrition over time. In parallel to these changes, decreased caloric intake and increased metabolic activity are often present. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. In severe acute pancreatitis, enteral nutrition with a naso-jejunal feeding tube and a low molecular diet displays clear advantages compared to parenteral nutrition. Infectious complications, length of hospital stay and the need for surgery are reduced. Furthermore, enteral nutrition is less costly than parenteral nutrition. Parenteral nutrition is reserved for patients who do not tolerate enteral nutrition. Abstinence from alcohol, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation is sufficient in over 80% of patients with chronic pancreatitis. In addition, oral supplements are helpful. Enteral nutrition can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:16782526

  4. Fenretinide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-30

    Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult

  5. Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  6. Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min Soo; Kang, Dong Young; Park, Jong Bin; Kim, Sang Tae; Suh, Kee Suck

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma describes a heterogeneous group of neoplasms of skin homing T cells that vary considerably in clinical presentation, histologic appearance, immunophenotype, and prognosis. This paper addresses the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in Asians with respect to clinical-epidemiologic and histopathological features. Compared with Western countries, Asia usually has higher rates of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas such as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, hydroa vacciniforme-like lymphoma, subcutaneous panniculitis T-cell lymphoma, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and lower rates of cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. Among many variants of mycosis fungoides, hypopigmented lesions, pityriasis lichenoides-like lesions, and ichthyosiform lesions are more prevalent in Asia than in the West. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is endemic in southwestern Japan especially in the Kyushu island. The clinicopathologic characteristics of cutaneous lymphoma vary according to geography, and this may be ascribed to genetic and environmental etiologic factors. PMID:22844610

  7. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in asians.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Soo; Kang, Dong Young; Park, Jong Bin; Kim, Sang Tae; Suh, Kee Suck

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma describes a heterogeneous group of neoplasms of skin homing T cells that vary considerably in clinical presentation, histologic appearance, immunophenotype, and prognosis. This paper addresses the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in Asians with respect to clinical-epidemiologic and histopathological features. Compared with Western countries, Asia usually has higher rates of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas such as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, hydroa vacciniforme-like lymphoma, subcutaneous panniculitis T-cell lymphoma, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and lower rates of cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. Among many variants of mycosis fungoides, hypopigmented lesions, pityriasis lichenoides-like lesions, and ichthyosiform lesions are more prevalent in Asia than in the West. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is endemic in southwestern Japan especially in the Kyushu island. The clinicopathologic characteristics of cutaneous lymphoma vary according to geography, and this may be ascribed to genetic and environmental etiologic factors. PMID:22844610

  8. Vorinostat and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-12-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  9. Study of ADCT-301 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-11

    Hodgkin Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, Marginal Zone; Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinaemia; Lymphoma,T-cell Cutaneous; Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral

  10. Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-08

    HIV Infection; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  11. Clinical and Pathologic Studies in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients Receiving Antibody Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-05-31

    Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Diffuse Large B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Follicular / Indolent B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Mantle Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Marginal Zone; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Peripheral T-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Waldenstr Macroglobulinemia

  12. Morphogenesis of thin hyperelastic plates: A constitutive theory of biological growth in the Föppl-von Kármán limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dervaux, Julien; Ciarletta, Pasquale; Ben Amar, Martine

    2009-03-01

    The shape of plants and other living organisms is a crucial element of their biological functioning. Morphogenesis is the result of complex growth processes involving biological, chemical and physical factors at different temporal and spatial scales. This study aims at describing stresses and strains induced by the production and reorganization of the material. The mechanical properties of soft tissues are modeled within the framework of continuum mechanics in finite elasticity. The kinematical description is based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient tensor into an elastic and a growth term. Using this formalism, the authors have studied the growth of thin hyperelastic samples. Under appropriate assumptions, the dimensionality of the problem can be reduced, and the behavior of the plate is described by a two-dimensional surface. The results of this theory demonstrate that the corresponding equilibrium equations are of the Föppl-von Kármán type where growth acts as a source of mean and Gaussian curvatures. Finally, the cockling of paper and the rippling of a grass blade are considered as two examples of growth-induced pattern formation.

  13. Pre-computed backprojection based penalized-likelihood (PPL) reconstruction with an edge-preserved regularizer for stationary Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiyu; Inscoe, Christy R.; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Chen, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Stationary Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (sDBT) is a carbon nanotube based breast imaging device with fast data acquisition and decent projection resolution to provide three dimensional (3-D) volume information. To- mosynthesis 3-D image reconstruction is faced with the challenges of the cone beam geometry and the incomplete and nonsymmetric sampling due to the sparse views and limited view angle. Among all available reconstruction methods, statistical iterative method exhibits particular promising since it relies on an accurate physical and statistical model with prior knowledge. In this paper, we present the application of an edge-preserved regularizer to our previously proposed precomputed backprojection based penalized-likelihood (PPL) reconstruction. By using the edge-preserved regularizer, our experiments show that through tuning several parameters, resolution can be retained while noise is reduced significantly. Compared to other conventional noise reduction techniques in image reconstruction, less resolution is lost in order to gain certain noise reduction, which may benefit the research of low dose tomosynthesis.

  14. Primary Extranodal Lymphoma of the Thorax.

    PubMed

    Kligerman, Seth J; Franks, Teri J; Galvin, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    Primary pulmonary lymphomas represent a pathologically heterogeneous group of disorders that often share imaging features, which include peribronchovascular nodules and masses or areas of nonresolving consolidation. Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma is an extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma seen in younger patients that has imaging and pathologic features that demonstrate some degree of overlap with Hodgkin lymphoma. Primary lymphomas of the pleural space are rare and associated with concomitant viral infections. PMID:27265602

  15. Ibrutinib or Idelalisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  16. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  17. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Krishna, S.V.S.; Lakhtakia, Sandeep; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis). Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson's disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis. PMID:24083160

  18. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  19. Hypovolemic shock, pancreatic blood flow, and pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Robert, J H; Toledano, A E; Toth, L S; Premus, G; Dreiling, D A

    1988-05-01

    Electromagnetic blood flow determinations were carried out on the superior pancreatic duodena (SPDA), the splenic (SA) and the superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries and compared to cardiac output (CO, thermodilution technique) in 12 anesthetized dogs submitted to hypovolemic shock of various duration: 5 dogs underwent a one-hour and 7 a three-hour period of shock. A 50 mm Hg level of mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was maintained throughout hypovolemia. Dogs were then reinfused. Control preshock values were 4.12 l/min for CO, 38.0 ml/min for SPDA, 405.9 ml/min for SA, and 963.6 ml/min for SMA. SPDA, SA and SMA flows expressed as % of CO amounted to 0.9, 9.8 and 23.4% respectively. No significant changes in SPDA and SMA flows were noted within the first hour of shock. However, from the end of the second hour on, both flows differed significantly (P less than 0.01), SMA increasing from -75.6% of its control value at the end of bleeding to -61.0%, and SPDA decreasing from -75.6 to -86.9%. Similar observations were made when respective flows were considered as % of CO. The SA behaved somewhat in an intermediate fashion. This relative spoliation in pancreatic blood supply as hypovolemia proceeds supports an ischemic etiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), which could account for some of the so-called idiopathic cases of AP. PMID:3385221

  20. Cilengitide (EMD 121974) in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  1. Hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hypocalcemia is a frequent finding in acute pancreatitis. Severe hypocalcemia can present with neurological as well as cardiovascular manifestations. Correction of hypocalcemia by parenteral calcium infusion remains a controversial topic as intracellular calcium overload is the central mechanism of acinar cell injury in pancreatitis. The current article deals with the art and science of calcium correction in pancreatitis patients. PMID:27076730

  2. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  3. Mantle Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Chan Yoon; Seymour, John F; Wang, Michael L

    2016-04-10

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an uncommon subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma previously considered to have a poor prognosis. Large gains were made in the first decade of the new century when clinical trials established the importance of high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell rescue and high-dose cytarabine in younger patients and the benefits of maintenance rituximab and bendamustine in older patients. In particular, greater depth of understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of MCL has resulted in an explosion of specifically targeted new efficacious agents. In particular, agents recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration include the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, immunomodulator lenalidomide, and Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib. We review recent advances in the understanding of MCL biology and outline our recommended approach to therapy, including choice of chemoimmunotherapy, the role of stem-cell transplantation, and mechanism-based targeted therapies, on the basis of a synthesis of the data from published clinical trials. PMID:26755518

  4. Primary hepatic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Padhan, Rajesh Kumar; Das, Prasenjit; Shalimar

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL) is a lymphoproliferative disorder confined to the liver without evidence of involvement of spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow or other lymphoid structures. This is in contrast to Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) that often involves the liver as a secondary manifestation. PHL is a rare disease and constitutes 0.016% of all cases of NHL. PHL typically occurs in middle aged men, and usually the chief presenting symptoms are non specific which includes right upper quadrant pain, B symptoms like fever and weight loss and constitutional symptoms. Most frequent physical finding is hepatomegaly which occurs in 75% of patients. Jaundice is rare and present only in less than 5% of patients. Majority of PHL originates from B cells. The blood investigations and imaging findings are nonspecific. Histopathology is essential and confirms the diagnosis. Treatment modalities include combination of surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The prognosis without therapy is grim. The prognosis and management of PHL is different from hepatocellular carcinoma or metastatic disease, hence it is essential to differentiate it from these diseases. The purpose of this review is to emphasize the importance of accurate diagnosis before implementing therapeutic plan for any hepatic space occupying lesion in liver. PMID:26591949

  5. Tests of pancreatic exocrine function - clinical significance in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jutta; Aghdassi, Ali Alexander; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia V; Layer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The pancreas functions as the main factory for digestive enzymes and therefore enables food utilisation. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, partial or complete loss of digestive enzyme synthesis, occurs primarily in disorders directly affecting pancreatic tissue integrity. However, other disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, such as coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome or gastric resection can either mimic or cause pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The overt clinical symptoms of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency are steatorrhoea and maldigestion, which frequently become apparent in advanced stages. Several direct and indirect function tests are available for assessment of pancreatic function but until today diagnosis of excretory insufficiency is difficult as in mild impairment clinically available function tests show limitations of diagnostic accuracy. This review focuses on diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders. PMID:19505669

  6. Lymphoma relapse presenting as neurolymphomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, My; Awad, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare neurological manifestation of lymphoma characterized by malignant lymphoma cells infiltrating cranial or peripheral nerve, or their roots. We present the first reported Australian case of a patient whose initial presentation of relapsed mantle cell lymphoma was NL. Our case highlights that clinical and imaging findings of NL often mimic other neuropathies, and hence presents unique challenges that may lead to delayed diagnosis and management. We emphasize the importance of considering NL in the differential diagnosis and combining imaging with other diagnostic modalities such as lumbar puncture (LP) to aid in the diagnosis of NL particularly where there is acute neurological deterioration. PMID:26889293

  7. Primary lymphoma of the gallbladder.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, E. P.; Lazda, E.; Grant, D.; Davis, J.

    1993-01-01

    A case of primary lymphoma of the gallbladder is described which is rare in the medical literature. A 76 year old man presented with acute cholecystitis and septicaemia. Investigation showed a lung abscess and a gallbladder mass. The mass was thought to be an empyema and cholecystostomy was performed. Biopsy of the gallbladder wall showed high-grade B cell lymphoma. The patient unfortunately succumbed to overwhelming septicaemia in the postoperative period. Postmortem examination confirmed primary lymphoma of the gallbladder without dissemination. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8415351

  8. Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Béchade, Dominique; Desjardin, Marie; Salmon, Emma; Désolneux, Grégoire; Bécouarn, Yves; Evrard, Serge; Fonck, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignant neoplasm that accounts for 1–2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. Here we report two cases of ACC and describe their clinical features, the therapies used to treat them, and their prognosis. The first patient was a 65-year-old woman who had an abdominal CT scan for a urinary infection. Fortuitously, a rounded and well-delimited corporeal pancreatic tumor was discovered. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration revealed an ACC. During the puncture, a hypoechoic cavity appeared inside the lesion, corresponding to a probable necrotic area. Treatment consisted of a distal splenopancreatectomy. The second patient was a 75-year-old man who complained of abdominal pain. An abdominal CT scan showed a cephalic pancreatic lesion and two hepatic metastases. An EUS-guided fine needle aspiration showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which enabled an objective response after 6 cycles.

  9. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2016-06-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy remains the only treatment option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the chance of long-term survival. If a radical tumor resection is possible, 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved. Pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years and resection approaches have been extended beyond standard procedures, including vascular and multivisceral resections. Consequently, borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR-PDAC), which has recently been defined by the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS), has become a controversial issue with regard to its management in terms of upfront resection vs. neoadjuvant treatment and sequential resection. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy to define resectability of PDAC is a keypoint in this context as well as the surgical and interdisciplinary expertise to perform advanced pancreatic surgery and manage complications. The present mini-review summarizes the current state of definition, management and outcome of BR-PDAC. Furthermore, the topic of ongoing and future studies on neoadjuvant treatment which is closely related to borderline resectability in PDAC is discussed. PMID:26970276

  10. Pharmacogenetics in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tourkantonis, Ioannis S; Peponi, Evangelia; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor overall survival rate. Given advances in pharmacogenomics, numerous gene mutations have been identified that could be potential targets for drug development. Therefore, future research strategies may identify prognostic and predictive markers aiming to improve outcome by maximizing efficacy whilst lowering toxicity. In this commentary, we summarize several interesting results regarding pancreatic cancer pharmacogenetics that have been presented in the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting. In particular, we focus on Abstract #4124, which investigated the potential predictive role of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) in patients treated with adjuvant gemcitabine for pancreatic cancer, on Abstract #4125, which examined the tolerability of a modified FOLFORINOX study based on UGT1A1*28 genotype guided dosing of IRI in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, and on Abstract #4130, which confirmed the predictive role of circulating tumor and invasive cells (CTICs) from patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer in second-line chemotherapy treatment setting. PMID:25076337

  11. Genetic aspects of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, David C

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis are complex inflammatory disorders of the pancreas with unpredictable severity, complications, and clinical courses. Growing evidence for genetic risk and modifying factors, plus strong evidence that only a minority of patients with these disorders are heavy alcohol drinkers, has revolutionized our concept of these diseases. Once considered a self-inflicted injury, pancreatitis is now recognized as a complex inflammatory condition like inflammatory bowel disease. Genetic linkage and candidate gene studies have identified six pancreas-targeting factors that are associated with changes in susceptibility to acute and/or chronic pancreatitis, including cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2), serine protease inhibitor Kazal 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), chymotrypsinogen C (CTRC) and calcium-sensing receptor (CASR). Patients with mutations in these genes are at increased risk of pancreatitis caused by a variety of stresses including hyperlipidemia and hypercalcemia. Multiple studies are reporting new polymorphisms, as well as complex gene x gene and gene x environmental interactions. PMID:20059346

  12. Rare gastrointestinal lymphomas: The endoscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Calogero; Bonanno, Giacomo; Giulietti, Giorgio; Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Spina, Paolo; Coppolino, Francesco; Cunsolo, Rosario; Raimondo, Francesco Di

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent up to 10% of gastrointestinal malignancies and about one third of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The most prominent histologies are mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the gastrointestinal tract can be the site of rarer lymphoma subtypes as a primary or secondary localization. Due to their rarity and the multifaceted histology, an endoscopic classification has not been validated yet. This review aims to analyze the endoscopic presentation of rare gastrointestinal lymphomas from disease diagnosis to follow-up, according to the involved site and lymphoma subtype. Existing, new and emerging endoscopic technologies have been examined. In particular, we investigated the diagnostic, prognostic and follow-up endoscopic features of T-cell and natural killer lymphomas, lymphomatous polyposis and mantle cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, plasma cell related disease, gastrointestinal lymphomas in immunodeficiency and Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract. Contrarily to more frequent gastrointestinal lymphomas, data about rare lymphomas are mostly extracted from case series and case reports. Due to the data paucity, a synergism between gastroenterologists and hematologists is required in order to better manage the disease. Indeed, clinical and prognostic features are different from nodal and extranodal or the bone marrow (in case of plasma cell disease) counterpart. Therefore, the approach should be based on the knowledge of the peculiar behavior and natural history of disease. PMID:26265987

  13. Pancreatitis activates pancreatic apelin-APJ axis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Song; Englander, Ella W.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Aronson, Judith F.; Rastellini, Cristiana; Garofalo, R. P.; Kolli, Deepthi; Quertermous, Thomas; Kundu, Ramendra

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatitis is classified into acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Apelin, a small regulatory peptide, is the endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor. Apelin and APJ are expressed in the pancreas. The aims of this study were to examine whether apelin influences the inflammatory and fibrosis responses to pancreatitis in mice and to identify mechanisms behind apelin's activities. Supramaximal cerulein induction of AP or CP caused significant (P < 0.05) elevations in pancreatic apelin and APJ expression. Levels declined during the recovery phases. In apelin gene-knockout mice with pancreatitis, pancreatic neutrophil invasion and myeloperoxidase activity were enhanced significantly, and apelin treatment suppressed both. Apelin exposure reduced CP-induced elevations of extracellular matrix-associated proteins. Apelin inhibited PDGF-simulated connective tissue growth factor production and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and keratinocyte cytokine levels were higher in apelin gene-knockout than wild-type mice with pancreatitis. Apelin reduced AP- and CP-induced elevations in pancreatic NF-κB activation. Together, these findings imply that the pancreatic apelin-APJ system functions to curb the inflammatory and fibrosis responses during pancreatitis. Furthermore, findings suggest that apelin reduces inflammation and fibrosis by reducing neutrophil recruitment and PSC activity. Inhibition of neutrophil invasion may be mediated by reduced keratinocyte cytokine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor secretion. Apelin-induced reductions in PSC proliferation and connective tissue growth factor production are putative mechanisms underlying apelin's inhibition of extracellular matrix production. The apelin-associated changes in NF-κB binding may be linked to apelin's regulation of pancreatic inflammatory and fibrosis responses during pancreatitis. PMID:23681476

  14. Pancreatitis activates pancreatic apelin-APJ axis in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Song; Englander, Ella W; Gomez, Guillermo A; Aronson, Judith F; Rastellini, Cristiana; Garofalo, R P; Kolli, Deepthi; Quertermous, Thomas; Kundu, Ramendra; Greeley, George H

    2013-07-15

    Pancreatitis is classified into acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Apelin, a small regulatory peptide, is the endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor. Apelin and APJ are expressed in the pancreas. The aims of this study were to examine whether apelin influences the inflammatory and fibrosis responses to pancreatitis in mice and to identify mechanisms behind apelin's activities. Supramaximal cerulein induction of AP or CP caused significant (P < 0.05) elevations in pancreatic apelin and APJ expression. Levels declined during the recovery phases. In apelin gene-knockout mice with pancreatitis, pancreatic neutrophil invasion and myeloperoxidase activity were enhanced significantly, and apelin treatment suppressed both. Apelin exposure reduced CP-induced elevations of extracellular matrix-associated proteins. Apelin inhibited PDGF-simulated connective tissue growth factor production and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and keratinocyte cytokine levels were higher in apelin gene-knockout than wild-type mice with pancreatitis. Apelin reduced AP- and CP-induced elevations in pancreatic NF-κB activation. Together, these findings imply that the pancreatic apelin-APJ system functions to curb the inflammatory and fibrosis responses during pancreatitis. Furthermore, findings suggest that apelin reduces inflammation and fibrosis by reducing neutrophil recruitment and PSC activity. Inhibition of neutrophil invasion may be mediated by reduced keratinocyte cytokine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor secretion. Apelin-induced reductions in PSC proliferation and connective tissue growth factor production are putative mechanisms underlying apelin's inhibition of extracellular matrix production. The apelin-associated changes in NF-κB binding may be linked to apelin's regulation of pancreatic inflammatory and fibrosis responses during pancreatitis. PMID:23681476

  15. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  16. Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-21

    Childhood Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  17. Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  18. Anti-CD22 CAR-T Therapy for CD19-refractory or Resistant Lymphoma Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-22

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  19. A Phase II Trial of Panobinostat and Lenalidomide in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  20. Gemcitabine and Bendamustine in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  1. Combination Chemotherapy, Rituximab, and Ixazomib Citrate in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-19

    Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; MYC Gene Mutation; Plasmablastic Lymphoma

  2. Drug-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Claudia; Maertin, Sandrina; Scheiber, Jonas; Ritter, Christoph A; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia

    2012-04-01

    Drugs are thought to be a rare cause for acute pancreatitis; however 525 different drugs are listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) database suspected to cause acute pancreatitis as a side effect. Many of them are widely used to treat highly prevalent diseases. The true incidence is not entirely clear since only few systematic population based studies exist. The majority of the available data are derived from case reports or case control studies. Furthermore, the causality for many of these drugs remains elusive and for only 31 of these 525 dugs a definite causality was established. Definite proof for causality is defined by the WHO classification if symptoms reoccur upon rechallenge.In the actual algorithm the diagnosis is confirmed if no other cause of acute pancreatitis can be detected, and the patient is taking one of the suspected drugs. PMID:22314811

  3. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment. PMID:9562770

  4. [Pulmonary alterations in Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Jóna, Ádám; Illés, Árpád; Szemes, Katalin; Miltényi, Zsófia

    2016-01-31

    Most of Hodgkin lymphoma patients survive due to combined chemo/radiotherapy. Improved survival brings long-term side effects to the front, which may determine the patients' subsequent quality of life and expected lifetime. This manuscript aims to analyze lung manifestations of Hodgkin lymphoma and treatment related pulmonary complications, demonstrated with own cases. The lung involvement in Hodgkin lymphoma is often secondary, and primary pulmonary involvement is very rare. The authors found 8-12% of lung involvement among their patients. Side effects of treatment consist of pulmonary infections in conjuction with immunosuppression, while on the other hand bleomycin and chest irradiation as part of current standard of care induced pneumonitis and fibrosis are reported. The pulmonary involvement in Hodgkin lymphoma may cause differential diagnostic difficulty. Lung involvement could modify stage and consequently treatment, and the development of side effects might determine later quality of life and expected lifetime. Therefore, identification of lung involvement is crucial. PMID:26801361

  5. Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tandan, Manu; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP

  6. Pathogenic Microorganisms and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunsaier; Li, Jingnan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist, and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including smoking, chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, collectively account for less than half of all pancreatic cancer cases. Accumulating reports have demonstrated that there is an association between pathogenic microorganisms and pancreatic cancer. Summary A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that microbiota are likely to influence pancreatic carcinogenesis. This review summarizes the literature on studies examining infections that have been linked to pancreatic cancer. Key Message Helicobacter pylori infection may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer; chronic hepatitis virus and oral microbiota may also play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Practical Implications Considering the worldwide burden of the disease, the association between microbiota and pancreatic cancer in this review may provide new ideas to prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies in this direction are urgently needed. PMID:26673459

  7. Enzymatic Debridement in Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Murat; Tekin, Ahmet; Kucukkartallar, Tevfik; Vatansev, Husamettin; Kartal, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ failure and pancreatic necrosis are the factors that determine prognosis in acute pancreatitis attacks. We investigated the effects of collagenase on the debridement of experimental pancreatic necrosis. The study covered 4 groups; each group had 10 rats. Group I was the necrotizing pancreatitis group. Group II was the collagenase group with pancreatic loge by isotonic irrigation following necrotizing pancreatitis. Group III was the collagenase group with pancreatic loge following necrotizing pancreatitis. Group IV was the intraperitoneal collagenase group following necrotizing pancreatitis. The progress of the groups was compared hematologically and histopathologically. There was no difference among the groups regarding the levels of leukocyte, hemogram, and urea. The differences in AST levels between Group I and II; and differences in glucose, calcium, LDH, AST, and amylase between Group II and III; between Group II and IV; between Group I and III; and between Group I and IV were statistically significant (P < 0.05). There were statistically significant differences between Group II and III, and Group II and IV regarding edema, acinar necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, hemorrhage, and fat necrosis (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the collagenase preparation used in this experimental pancreatitis model was found to be effective in the debridement of pancreatic necrosis. PMID:26011212

  8. MORAb-004 in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  10. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-08-15

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  11. Cardiac Sarcoidosis Masked by Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Takashige; Hattori, Hidetoshi; Serizawa, Naoki; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Uto, Kenta; Momose, Mitsuru; Kameyama, Kaori; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2016-08-01

    There is an association between sarcoidosis and lymphoma, termed "sarcoidosis-lymphoma syndrome." Sarcoidosis is generally detected before lymphoma, but it could present after or even concurrently with the diagnosis of lymphoma. We describe a patient presenting with ventricular tachycardia and lymphadenopathy. A diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma was made histologically. The patient responded to treatment, but had persistent (18)F-fluoro-deoxyglucose uptake in the lymph nodes and heart on follow-up positron emission tomography. Second biopsies of lymph node and endomyocardial both confirmed sarcoidosis. This finding suggests that we should maintain a high degree of suspicion for cardiac sarcoidosis in lymphoma patients. PMID:27094123

  12. Isolated gastric variceal bleeding caused by splenic lymphoma-associated splenic vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bao-Chung; Wang, Hong-Hau; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Shih, Yu-Lueng; Chang, Wei-Kuo; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan

    2013-10-28

    Isolated gastric varices (IGV) can occur in patients with left-sided portal hypertension resulting from splenic vein occlusion caused by thrombosis or stenosis. In left-sided portal hypertension, blood flows retrogradely through the short and posterior gastric veins and the gastroepiploic veins, leading to the formation of an IGV. The most common causes of splenic vein occlusion are pancreatic diseases, such as pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis, or a pseudocyst. However, various other cancers, such as colon, gastric, or renal cancers, have also been known to cause splenic vein occlusion. Our patient presented with a rare case of IGV bleeding induced by splenic lymphoma-associated splenic vein occlusion. Splenectomy, splenic artery embolization, and stenting of the splenic vein are the current treatment choices. Chemotherapy, however, is an alternative effective treatment for splenic vein occlusion caused by chemotherapy-sensitive tumors. Our patient responded well to chemotherapy with a cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, oncovin, and prednisolone regimen, and the splenic vein occlusion resolved after the lymphoma regressed. PMID:24187474

  13. Burkitt Lymphoma: beyond discoveries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    First described in 1958 in Uganda, Burkitt lymphoma (BL) attracted interest worldwide following reports of its uneven geographic distribution and rapidly fatal clinical course. Both suggested infectious etiology and curability. Seminal discoveries followed in quick succession. Viral etiology – due to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) – was confirmed. Chromosomal translocations, involving cellular MYC, a protooncogene, were discovered, shown to be a hallmark of BL, and central to the genetic basis of cancer. Cure of BL using combination chemotherapy was demonstrated. Unfortunately, civil disturbance in Africa disrupted BL research and blunted its impact on education and oncology care in Africa. Important questions went unanswered. The risk of BL due to malaria or EBV was not quantified. Efforts to answer whether BL could be prevented – by preventing malaria or early EBV infection – were abandoned. The mechanism of malaria in BL is unknown. In Africa, BL remains mostly fatal and diagnosis is still made clinically. Unprecedented advances in molecular, genomics and proteomic technologies, promising to unlock mysteries of cancers, have re-awakened interest in BL. With return of stability to Africa, the unanswered questions about BL are re-attracting global interest. This interest now includes exploiting the knowledge gained about genetics, proteomics, and bioinformatics to enable the development of targeted less toxic treatment for BL; and simpler methods to diagnose BL with high accuracy and sensitivity. The articles in the Burkitt Lymphoma (BL): Beyond Discoveries in Infectious Agents and Cancer highlight BL as priority. Authors explore etiology, pathology, pathogenesis of BL, and whether knowledge gained in the studies of BL can catalyze sustainable cancer services in one of the world’s poorest served regions. PMID:24079372

  14. Agatolimod Sodium, Rituximab, and Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-04

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  15. A positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qiao; Yang, Zhe; Wang, Weiping; Guo, Ting; Jia, Zhuqing; Ma, Kangtao; Zhou, Chunyan

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • ISL-1 is highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL. • ISL-1 accelerates the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. • c-Myc positively regulates ISL-1 expression in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells. • ISL-1 and c-Myc forms an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex only in DLBCL. • Positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 does not exist in normal pancreatic β-cell. - Abstract: Insulin enhancer binding protein-1 (ISL-1), a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor, has been reported to play essential roles in promoting adult pancreatic β-cells proliferation. Recent studies indicate that ISL-1 may also involve in the occurrence of a variety of tumors. However, whether ISL-1 has any functional effect on tumorigenesis, and what are the differences on ISL-1 function in distinct conditions, are completely unknown. In this study, we found that ISL-1 was highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells, as well as in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but to a much less extent in other normal tissues or tumor specimens. Further study revealed that ISL-1 promoted the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL cells, and also accelerated the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. We also found that ISL-1 could activate c-Myc transcription not only in pancreatic β-cells but also in DLBCL cells. However, a cell-specific feedback regulation was detectable only in DLBCL cells. This auto-regulatory loop was established by the interaction of ISL-1 and c-Myc to form an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex, and synergistically to promote ISL-1 transcription through binding on the ISL-1 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells, which might result in the functional diversities of ISL-1 in different physiological and pathological processes.

  16. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke. PMID:21734390

  17. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-07

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  18. Study of ADCT-402 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lineage Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, Marginal Zone; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  19. Rituxan/Bendamustine/PCI-32765 in Relapsed DLBCL, MCL, or Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  20. Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  1. Memory-enriched CAR-T Cells Immunotherapy for B Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  2. Apolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-15

    Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  3. Nutrition in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard; Irtun, Øivind; Olesen, Søren Schou; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Holst, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is a major player in nutrient digestion. In chronic pancreatitis both exocrine and endocrine insufficiency may develop leading to malnutrition over time. Maldigestion is often a late complication of chronic pancreatic and depends on the severity of the underlying disease. The severity of malnutrition is correlated with two major factors: (1) malabsorption and depletion of nutrients (e.g., alcoholism and pain) causes impaired nutritional status; and (2) increased metabolic activity due to the severity of the disease. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. Good nutritional practice includes screening to identify patients at risk, followed by a thoroughly nutritional assessment and nutrition plan for risk patients. Treatment should be multidisciplinary and the mainstay of treatment is abstinence from alcohol, pain treatment, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation. To achieve energy-end protein requirements, oral supplementation might be beneficial. Enteral nutrition may be used when patients do not have sufficient calorie intake as in pylero-duodenal-stenosis, inflammation or prior to surgery and can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis and should only be used in case of GI-tract obstruction or as a supplement to enteral nutrition. PMID:24259957

  4. Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis—as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery. PMID:24132440

  5. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... fewer than 10 grams of fat. About 20 potato chips contain 10 grams of fat, so it takes discipline to make sure to stay within this range. Patients who have lost the ability to digest food will be prescribed pills containing pancreatic enzymes to help with digestion. They may also be ...

  6. Laparoscopic pancreatic resection.

    PubMed

    Harrell, K N; Kooby, D A

    2015-10-01

    Though initially slow to gain acceptance, the minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection grew during the last decade and pancreatic operations such as the distal pancreatectomy and pancreatic enucleation are frequently performed laparoscopically. More complex operations such as the pancreaticoduodenectomy may also confer benefits with a minimally invasive approach but are less widely utilized. Though most research to date comparing open and laparoscopic pancreatectomy is retrospective, the current data suggest that compared with open, a laparoscopic procedure may afford postoperative benefits such as less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, and fewer wound complications. Regarding oncologic considerations, despite initial concerns, laparoscopic resection appears to be non-inferior to an open procedure in terms of lymph node retrieval, negative margin rates, and long-term survival. New technologies, such as robotics, are also gaining acceptance. Data show that while the laparoscopic approach incurs higher cost in the operating room, the resulting shorter hospital stay appears to be associated with an equivalent or lower overall cost. The minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection can be safe and appropriate with significant patient benefits and oncologic non-inferiority based on existing data. PMID:26199025

  7. Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yabar, Cinthya S; Winter, Jordan M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, yet advances in treatment options have been minimal over the past decade. In this review, we summarize the evaluation and treatments for this disease. We highlight molecular advances that hopefully will soon translate into improved outcomes. PMID:27546841

  8. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung, liver, and peritoneal cavity. An inset shows cancer cells spreading from the pancreas, through the blood and lymph system, to another ... abdomen that contains the intestines, stomach, and liver). Cancer may also have spread to ... pancreas or to lymph nodes. Stage IV pancreatic cancer. ...

  9. Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulou, E

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery is feasible and safe. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy should be widely adopted for benign lesions of the pancreas. Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy, although technically demanding, in the setting of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a number of advantages including shorter hospital stay, faster recovery, allowing patients to recover in a timelier manner and pursue adjuvant treatment options. Furthermore, it seems that progression-free survival is longer in patients undergoing laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy in comparison with those undergoing open pancreaticoduodenectomy. Minimally invasive middle pancreatectomy seems appropriate for benign or borderline tumors of the neck of the pancreas. Technological advances including intraoperative ultrasound and intraoperative fluorescence imaging systems are expected to facilitate the wide adoption of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. Although, the oncological outcome seems similar with that of open surgery, there are still concerns, as the majority of relevant evidence comes from retrospective studies. Large multicenter randomized studies comparing laparoscopic with open pancreatectomy as well as robotic assisted with both open and laparoscopic approaches are needed. Robotic approach could be possibly shown to be less invasive than conventional laparoscopic approach through the less traumatic intra-abdominal handling of tissues. In addition, robotic approach could enable the wide adoption of the technique by surgeon who is not that trained in advanced laparoscopic surgery. A putative clinical benefit of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery could be the attenuated surgical stress response leading to reduced morbidity and mortality as well as lack of the detrimental immunosuppressive effect especially for the oncological patients. PMID:26530291

  10. Pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers.

    PubMed

    Buck, Andreas K; Herrmann, Ken; Eckel, Florian; Beer, Ambros J

    2011-01-01

    Morphology-based imaging modalities have replaced classical conventional nuclear medicine modalities for detection of liver or pancreatic lesions. With positron emission tomography and the glucose analog F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), a sensitive and specific modality for the detection of hepatic metastases and extrahepatic tumor deposits from hepatocellular or pancreatic cancer is available. F-18 FDG PET can increase the accuracy of staging primary tumors of the liver or the pancreas, and can be used for response monitoring. Radiopharmaceuticals such as Ga-68 DOTATOC and F-18 DOPA allow the specific detection of neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors and their metastatic deposits. Hybrid scanners such as PET-CT integrate morphologic and metabolic information, and allow to increase the sensitivity and specificity of noninvasive imaging in many tumor entities. The development of specific radiopharmaceuticals and technical innovations such as SPECT-CT has increased the reliability of conventional scintigraphic imaging. This chapter focuses on the use of PET-CT in hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancers. PMID:21331938