Sample records for pancreatic lymphoma ppl

  1. Familial pancreatic lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    James, J A; Milligan, D W; Morgan, G J; Crocker, J

    1998-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is not commonly a familial condition. This is believed to be the first two cases of primary pancreatic lymphoma within a single family. The two cases, a brother and sister, both presented in their 60s and were diagnosed histologically as having high grade B cell lymphoma affecting the pancreas, an uncommon primary site. Both responded well to treatment with chemotherapy and were in remission at the time of writing. On further investigation it was found that their mother also presented with a malignant lymphoma of cervical nodes 30 years earlier and subsequently died of the disease. Images PMID:9577380

  2. Partial Optimization of the 5-Terminal Codon Increased a Recombination Porcine Pancreatic Lipase (opPPL) Expression in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Chen, Dan; Tang, Jiayong; Jia, Gang; Long, Dingbiao; Liu, Guangmang; Chen, Xiaoling; Shang, Haiying

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic lipase plays a key role in intestinal digestion of feed fat, and is often deficient in young animals such as weaning piglets. The objective of this study was to express and characterize a partial codon optimized porcine pancreatic lipase (opPPL). A 537 bp cDNA fragment encoding N-terminus amino acid residue of the mature porcine pancreatic lipase was synthesized according to the codon bias of Pichia pastoris and ligated to the full-length porcine pancreatic lipase cDNA fragment. The codon optimized PPL was cloned into the pPICZ?A (Invitrogen, Beijing, China) vector. After the resultant opPPL/pPICZ?? plasmid was transformed into P.pastoris, the over-expressed extracellular opPPL containing a His-tag to the C terminus was purified using Ni Sepharose affinity column (GE Healthcare, Piscataway, NJ, USA), and was characterized against the native enzyme (commercial PPL from porcine pancreas, Sigma). The opPPL exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 52 kDa, and showed optimal temperature (40°C), optimal pH (8.0), Km (0.041 mM), and Vmax (2.008 µmol.mg protein ?1.min?1) similar to those of the commercial enzyme with p-NPP as the substrate. The recombinant enzyme was stable at 60°C, but lost 80% (P<0.05) of its activity after exposure to heat ?60°C for 20 min. The codon optimization increased opPPL yield for ca 4 folds (146 mg.L?1 vs 36 mg.L?1) and total enzyme activity increased about 5 folds (1900 IU.L?1 vs 367 IU.L?1) compared with those native naPPL/pPICZ?? tranformant. Comparison of gene copies and mRNA profiles between the two strains indicated the increased rePPL yields may partly be ascribed to the increased protein translational efficiency after codon optimization. In conclusion, we successfully optimized 5-terminal of porcine pancreatic lipase encoding gene and over-expressed the gene in P. pastoris as an extracellular, functional enzyme. The recombination enzyme demonstrates a potential for future use as an animal feed additive for animal improvement. PMID:25544987

  3. Curative Chemoradiotherapy of Primary Pancreatic Lymphoma with Vertebral Metastasis: Palliation of Persistent Biliary Stricture by Roux-en-Y Hepaticojejunostomy.

    PubMed

    Serin, Kür?at Rahmi; Güven, Koray; Ozden, Ilgin; Do?an, Oner; Gök, Kaan; Demir, Cumhur; Emre, Ali

    2011-09-01

    Primary pancreatic lymphoma (PPL) is a rare tumor that usually presents with the clinical picture of advanced adenocarcinoma but has a much better prognosis. A 38-year-old man was referred after percutaneous transhepatic external biliary drainage for obstructive jaundice. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography had revealed a 5-cm pancreatic head mass that caused biliary tract dilation. Computed tomography angiography showed that the mass encased the celiac trunk as well as the common hepatic and splenic arteries. MRI also revealed a metastatic lesion at the third lumbar vertebra. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels were within normal range. The initial diagnosis was inoperable pancreatic adenocarcinoma; however, Tru-Cut pancreatic biopsy showed a large B cell lymphoma. After 6 sessions of chemotherapy and 21 sessions of radiotherapy, both the pancreatic mass and the vertebral metastasis had disappeared. However, he had persistent distal common bile duct stricture that could not be negotiated by either the endoscopic or percutaneous route. A Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy was performed. The patient stayed alive without recurrence for 52 months after the initial diagnosis and 45 months after completion of oncologic treatment. In conclusion, a large pancreatic mass with grossly involved peripancreatic lymph nodes, without ascites, liver or splenic metastasis, should alert the clinician to the possibility of PPL. Cure is possible by chemoradiotherapy even in the presence of vertebral metastasis. Persistent stricture in the distal common bile duct may require a biliodigestive anastomosis. PMID:22171216

  4. Secondary pancreatic involvement by a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Saif, M-Wasif; Khubchandani, Sapna; Walczak, Marek

    2007-09-28

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. More than 50% of patients have some site of extra-nodal involvement at diagnosis, including the gastrointestinal tract and bone marrow. However, a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis is rare. A 57-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and matted lymph nodes in her axilla. She was admitted with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan showed diffusely enlarged pancreas due to infiltrative neoplasm and peripancreatic lymphadenopathy. Biopsy of the axillary mass revealed a large B-cell lymphoma. The patient was classified as stage IV, based on the Ann Arbor Classification, and as having a high-risk lymphoma, based on the International Prognostic Index. She was started on chemotherapy with CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone). Within a week after chemotherapy, the patient's abdominal pain resolved. Follow-up CT scan of the abdomen revealed a marked decrease in the size of the pancreas and peripancreatic lymphadenopathy. A literature search revealed only seven cases of primary involvement of the pancreas in B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis. However, only one case of secondary pancreatic involvement by B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis has been published. Our case appears to be the second report of such a manifestation. Both cases responded well to chemotherapy. PMID:17828824

  5. Primary Pancreatic Lymphoma Simulating Acute Cholestatic Hepatitis in a 7-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Nitesh; Alam, Seema; Rawat, Dinesh; Khanna, Rajeev; Bansal, Kalpana; Bihari, Chhagan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pancreatic lymphoma in children has been described infrequently in literature, and its acute presentation as cholestatic hepatitis is similarly rare. We report a case of a 7-year-old child with primary pancreatic lymphoma presenting as acute infective hepatitis, leading to delay in correct diagnosis and management.

  6. Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lymph nodes in 1832. The disease was called Hodgkin's disease until it was officially renamed Hodgkin lymphoma in ... blood cancer. The LLS mission: Cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life ...

  7. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hormones important in maintaining normal blood sugar levels. Pancreatitis is an inflammation, or swelling, of the pancreas. Causes of pancreatitis include gallstones and toxins such as excessive alcohol. ...

  8. Lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sue Zupanec

    \\u000a Pediatric lymphomas are the third most common malignancy in North American children, and account for approximately 12% of\\u000a all childhood malignant diseases (Weitzman and Arceci 2003). Lymphoma in children and adolescents is divided into two major\\u000a subtypes:\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL)\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL)

  9. Pancreatitis

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Patient Education Institute

    This patient education program discusses both acute and chronic pancreatitis, including causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options. It also reviews the anatomy of the digestive system. This resource is a MedlinePlus Interactive Health Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine, designed and developed by the Patient Education Institute. NOTE: This tutorial requires a special Flash plug-in, version 4 or above. If you do not have Flash, you will be prompted to obtain a free download of the software before you start the tutorial. You will also need an Acrobat Reader, available as a free download, in order to view the Reference Summary.

  10. Enabling Pinpoint Landing (PPL) on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattis, Phil; George, Sean; Wolf, Aron

    2005-01-01

    Pinpoint landing (PPL) missions will deliver about 1000 kg of useful payload to the surface of Mars. Mid-to-high latitude landing site compatibility is sought which should provide the means to land at sites up to 2.5 km above Mars mean surface altitude. A dispersion and control analysis process is presented which helps to identify the effects of PPL error drivers, quantify the effect of dispersions on landing error and quantify the landing position control capability/authority along the entry path. An entry/descent/landing (EDL) profile is provided. Guided aeroshell is the baseline for all candidate Mars atmospheric entry architectures. A two-stage architecture is considered for the aerodynamic decelerator descent phase: supersonic parachute plus guided subsonic parachute or high-Mach inflatable decelerator plus guided subsonic parachute. The powered descent phase uses propulsive descent stage for soft landing and final error reduction maneuvers. Studies have found that the aeroshell entry face dispersions can be large, but closed-loop guidance can null out resulting errors to within about 2 km. Additionally, projected parachute control is inadequate to correct worst case dispersions without wind forecast data. To mitigate the problems dispersions due to atmospheric uncertainty can be reduced by providing on-board external means to measure density and winds ahead of the vehicle, higher L/D control authority options for the subsonic parachute phase can be investigated, and decelerators with control authority options for the supersonic descent phase can be examined. A navigation error analysis and wind effects summary are included.

  11. Shoe Theater Classroom (6 to 8 ppl per table)

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Room Open Square Horse Shoe Theater Classroom Clusters (6 to 8 ppl per table) Square Footage A 22 460 Sq. Ft. Masters Hall · 200 seats at tables Mahler Auditorium · Classroom ­ 288 · Theater ­ 600 Shoe Head table Theatre Executive Head table Classroom Circle of Chairs Cluster Types Head table

  12. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis, or swelling of the pancreas You may have ...

  13. A pilot study evaluating changes in pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity concentrations in canines treated with L-asparaginase (ASNase), vincristine, or both for lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Zachary; Steiner, Joerg; Suchodolski, Jan; Rogers, Kenita; Barton, Claudia; Brown, Marjorie

    2009-01-01

    L-asparaginase (ASNase) is a common chemotherapy agent for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. L-asparaginase has been reported to cause clinical pancreatitis in both humans and canines. Canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) is now a common diagnostic tool for evaluating pancreatitis in dogs. A total of 52 dogs were enrolled into this study. Canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (cPLI) concentrations were evaluated before and after administration of ASNase, vincristine, or both. All dogs enrolled in the study were evaluated for signs compatible with clinical pancreatitis. No dogs receiving ASNase alone showed evidence of clinical pancreatitis after administration. Also, there was no statistically significant change in cPLI concentrations before or after treatment. Fourteen percent of dogs that received both vincristine and ASNase concurrently had elevated concentrations of cPLI after treatment. Of the 11 dogs with clinical signs compatible with pancreatitis after any chemotherapy treatment, no dog had a cPLI concentration > 400 ?g/dL. In conclusion, ASNase did not cause clinical pancreatitis in this cohort of dogs but larger sample sizes are required to further validate this data. PMID:19436578

  14. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Solid Tumors With Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-01

    Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; AIDS Related Immunoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Glioma; Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  15. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Solid Tumors With Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-26

    Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; AIDS Related Immunoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Glioma; Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  16. Pancreatic lipase selectively hydrolyses DPA over EPA and DHA due to location of double bonds in the fatty acid rather than regioselectivity.

    PubMed

    Akanbi, Taiwo O; Sinclair, Andrew J; Barrow, Colin J

    2014-10-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of canola, anchovy and seal oils with different types and amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids was measured using porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) to establish the fatty acid selectivity of PPL. Substrates were subjected to the same conditions of hydrolysis, with percent hydrolysis monitored using Iatroscan and fatty acid selectivity monitored using gas chromatography (GC). Regardless of their distribution on the glycerol backbone, as monitored by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), ?-linolenic acid (ALA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) were rapidly cleaved by PPL while eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and stearidonic acid (STA) were hydrolysed more slowly. Results show that PPL preferentially hydrolyses ALA and DPA over EPA, DHA and STA, and this selectivity is due to fatty acid rather than regioselectivity. The primary structural factor associated with resistance to PPL appears to be the distance of the first double bond from the ester linkage being hydrolysed. PMID:24799209

  17. Imaging findings in pancreatic neoplasia and nodular hyperplasia in 19 cats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Silke Hecht; DOMINIQUE G. PENNINCK; J H Keatin

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic neoplasia in cats is rare and associated with a poor prognosis, but pancreatic nodular hyperplasia is a common incidental finding. The purpose of this study was to describe radiographic and ultrasonographic findings in cats with pancreatic neoplasia or nodular hyperplasia. Fourteen cats (age 3-18 years) were diagnosed with malignant pancreatic tumors: carcinoma\\/adenocarcinoma (n = 11), lymphoma (n = 1),

  18. Primary Pulmonary Lymphoma and Cutaneous Metastasis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Latif Moini, Ali; Farbod Ara, Tahmineh; Fazeli Mosleh Abadi, Masood

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma is the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, representing nearly one-third of all cases. Any organ can be involved, making a diagnostic biopsy imperative. When the lungs are the involved organs, it is called primary pulmonary lymphoma (PPL). Hereby, we present a case of PPL that demonstrated a single large mass on chest CT and had metastatic skin lesions. The diagnosis of PPL was performed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry staining of the transthoracic lung biopsy and skin lesion specimens. This case highlighted an unusual and subtle clinical presentation, and the importance of new onset pulmonary symptoms and a large lung mass on chest X-ray. Review of the literature on the patient`s radiographic presentation revealed various findings, the most common of which were single or multiple nodular lesions in one or two lungs. It highlighted the fact that this diagnosis should be considered in all cases with a lung mass and skin lesions. PMID:25763075

  19. PANCREATIC CANCER 14. PANCREATIC CANCER

    E-print Network

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    PANCREATIC CANCER 125 14. PANCREATIC CANCER 14.1. SUMMARY Pancreatic cancer was the eleventh most increase of approximately 4% per annum. The risk of developing pancreatic cancer up to the age of 74 was 1 their pancreatic cancer diagnosis. Table 14.1 Summary information for pancreatic cancer in Ireland, 1995

  20. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    Chronic pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas that does not heal or improve, gets worse over time, and leads ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  1. ICRF coupling on TFTR using the PPL antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.J.; Colestock, P.L.; Hosea, J.C.; Phillips, C.K.; Smithe, D.N.; Stevens, J.E.; Wilson, J.R. (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton, NJ (USA)); Gardner, W.; Hoffman, D. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1989-07-01

    Coupling of the PPL ICRF antenna to the TFTR plasma is experimentally measured as R{sub c}=P/I{sup 2}, where P is the net power dissipate and I is the RF current at a point in the resonant loop. The relation of R{sub c} to the equivalent antenna loading resistance is investigated using a transmission line model that includes the antenna structure and the feedthroughs. Coupling has been experimentally characterized for a variety of discharge conditions including H and {sup 3}He minority, D and {sup 4}He majority plasmas. Effects of antenna phasing, D neutral beam injection, RF power level, plasma density aned position are discussed. Distinct and reproducible eigenmodes in the loading are observed in H-minority, D-majority plasma during the density rise accompanying neutral beam injection. A 1-D wave propagation model has reproduced the general structure of the modes. For 0-{pi} toroidal phasing, the modes arise from radial reflections from both the reonance-absorption layer and the inner wall of the tokamak; for 0--0 phasing, the modes result from toroidal interference.

  2. Mercury Emission Control Technologies for PPL Montana-Colstrip Testing

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Kay; Michael L. Jones; Steven A. Benson

    2007-04-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) was asked by PPL Montana LLC (PPL) to provide assistance and develop an approach to identify cost-effective options for mercury control at its coal-fired power plants. The work conducted focused on baseline mercury level and speciation measurement, short-term parametric testing, and week long testing of mercury control technology at Colstrip Unit 3. Three techniques and various combinations of these techniques were identified as viable options for mercury control. The options included oxidizing agents or sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) such as chlorine-based SEA1 and an EERC proprietary SEA2 with and without activated carbon injection. Baseline mercury emissions from Colstrip Unit 3 are comparatively low relative to other Powder River Basin (PRB) coal-fired systems and were found to range from 5 to 6.5 g/Nm3 (2.9 to 3.8 lb/TBtu), with a rough value of approximately 80% being elemental upstream of the scrubber and higher than 95% being elemental at the outlet. Levels in the stack were also greater than 95% elemental. Baseline mercury removal across the scrubber is fairly variable but generally tends to be about 5% to 10%. Parametric results of carbon injection alone yielded minimal reduction in Hg emissions. SEA1 injection resulted in 20% additional reduction over baseline with the maximum rate of 400 ppm (3 gal/min). Week long testing was conducted with the combination of SEA2 and carbon, with injection rates of 75 ppm (10.3 lb/hr) and 1.5 lb/MMacf (40 lb/hr), respectively. Reduction was found to be an additional 30% and, overall during the testing period, was measured to be 38% across the scrubber. The novel additive injection method, known as novel SEA2, is several orders of magnitude safer and less expensive than current SEA2 injection methods. However, used in conjunction with this plant configuration, the technology did not demonstrate a significant level of mercury reduction. Near-future use of this technique at Colstrip is not seen. All the additives injected resulted in some reduction in mercury emissions. However, the target reduction of 55% was not achieved. The primary reason for the lower removal rates is because of the lower levels of mercury in the flue gas stream and the lower capture level of fine particles by the scrubbers (relative to that for larger particles). The reaction and interaction of the SEA materials is with the finer fraction of the fly ash, because the SEA materials are vaporized during the combustion or reaction process and condense on the surfaces of entrained particles or form very small particles. Mercury will have a tendency to react and interact with the finer fraction of entrained ash and sorbent as a result of the higher surface areas of the finer particles. The ability to capture the finer fraction of fly ash is the key to controlling mercury. Cost estimates for mercury removal based on the performance of each sorbent during this project are projected to be extremely high. When viewed on a dollar-per-pound-of-mercury removed basis activated carbon was projected to cost nearly $1.2 million per pound of mercury removed. This value is roughly six times the cost of other sorbent-enhancing agents, which were projected to be closer to $200,000 per pound of mercury removed.

  3. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

  4. Pancreatic tuberculosis or autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Salahuddin, Ayesha; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

  5. Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of pancreatic cancer, and it is now clear that pancreatic cancer is a disease of inherited (germ-line) and somatic gene mutations. The genes mutated in pancreatic cancer include KRAS2, p16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, and these are accompanied by a substantial compendium of genomic and transcriptomic alterations that facilitate cell cycle deregulation, cell survival, invasion, and metastases. Pancreatic cancers do not arise de novo, and three distinct precursor lesions have been identified. Experimental models of pancreatic cancer have been developed in genetically engineered mice, which recapitulate the multistep progression of the cognate human disease. Although the putative cell of origin for pancreatic cancer remains elusive, minor populations of cells with stem-like properties have been identified that appear responsible for tumor initiation, metastases, and resistance of pancreatic cancer to conventional therapies. PMID:18039136

  6. 75 FR 15462 - PPL Susquehanna, LLC; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ...50-388; NRC-2010-0109] PPL Susquehanna, LLC; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background...and NPF-22, which authorize operation of the Susquehanna Steam Electric Station (SSES), Units 1 and 2. The licenses...

  7. Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... daily chemotherapy that followed his diagnosis with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Though his treatments continue (3-1/2 years in total), ... Lymphoma Survivor The Woodlands, TX I was diagnosed with ...

  8. Pediatric Lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Paul Guillerman; Bruce R. Parker

    \\u000a As the third most common malignant neoplasm in childhood and adolescence, lymphoma is of significant interest to physicians\\u000a involved in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric oncologic patients. Considered a frequently lethal disease until the\\u000a late 1960’s, lymphoma now represents one of the most curable of pediatric cancers with long-term survival expected in a large\\u000a majority of children and adolescents

  9. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as the sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  10. What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How many people get pancreatic cancer? What is pancreatic cancer? To understand pancreatic cancer, it helps to know ... about these tumors, see our document Pancreatic Cancer . Pancreatic cancers Both the exocrine and endocrine cells of the ...

  11. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Home Cancers Selected for Study Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Last Updated: May 15, 2013 What is pancreatic cancer?Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic cancer, making up more than

  12. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Rajasree J; Lawler, Lanika; Miller, Mark R

    2007-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is the progressive and permanent destruction of the pancreas resulting in exocrine and endocrine insufficiency and, often, chronic disabling pain. The etiology is multifactorial. Alcoholism plays a significant role in adults, whereas genetic and structural defects predominate in children. The average age at diagnosis is 35 to 55 years. Morbidity and mortality are secondary to chronic pain and complications (e.g., diabetes, pancreatic cancer). Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is the radiographic test of choice for diagnosis, with ductal calcifications being pathognomonic. Newer modalities, such as endoscopic ultrasonography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, provide diagnostic results similar to those of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Management begins with lifestyle modifications (e.g., cessation of alcohol and tobacco use) and dietary changes followed by analgesics and pancreatic enzyme supplementation. Before proceeding with endoscopic or surgical interventions, physicians and patients should weigh the risks and benefits of each procedure. Therapeutic endoscopy is indicated for symptomatic or complicated pseudocyst, biliary obstruction, and decompression of pancreatic duct. Surgical procedures include decompression for large duct disease (pancreatic duct dilatation of 7 mm or more) and resection for small duct disease. Lateral pancreaticojejunostomy is the most commonly performed surgery in patients with large duct disease. Pancreatoduodenectomy is indicated for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic head enlargement. Patients with chronic pancreatitis are at increased risk of pancreatic neoplasm; regular surveillance is sometimes advocated, but formal guidelines and evidence of clinical benefit are lacking. PMID:18092710

  13. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Primary leptomeningeal plasmablastic lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marlon S. Mathews; Daniela A. Bota; Ronald C. Kim; Anton N. Hasso; Mark E. Linskey

    Lymphomas that develop in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients are predominantly aggressive B-cells lymphomas.\\u000a The most common HIV-associated lymphomas include Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (that often involves the\\u000a CNS), primary effusion lymphoma, and plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL). Of these, PBL is relatively uncommon and displays a distinct\\u000a affinity for presentation in the oral cavity. In this manuscript we

  15. 75 FR 17452 - PPL Susquehanna, LLC.; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 And 2; Correction to Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ...NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-387 and 50-388; NRC-2010-0109] PPL Susquehanna, LLC.; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 And 2; Correction to Federal Register Notice for Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...

  16. The Lymphoma Information Network

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Lymphoma Information Network website strives to "put a bit of humanity and understanding to this disease, to gather lymphoma information and resources in one place, and to present information in an easy to understand and logical format." The award-winning site offers information sections on Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Fighting Lymphoma, and Surviving Lymphoma. The site also offers a special resource section for kids and teenagers, and information about childhood lymphoma. In addition, the site contains an extensive Glossary of Lymphoma Terms, The Lymphoma Blog, resources for independent research, book lists, and related links.

  17. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:15051286

  18. PPL2ab neurons restore sexual responses in aged Drosophila males through dopamine.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shu-Yun; Wu, Chia-Lin; Hsieh, Min-Yen; Lin, Chen-Ta; Wen, Rong-Kun; Chen, Lien-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Hui; Yu, Yhu-Wei; Wang, Horng-Dar; Su, Yi-Ju; Lin, Chun-Ju; Yang, Cian-Yi; Guan, Hsien-Yu; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Fu, Tsai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Male sexual desire typically declines with ageing. However, our understanding of the neurobiological basis for this phenomenon is limited by our knowledge of the brain circuitry and neuronal pathways controlling male sexual desire. A number of studies across species suggest that dopamine (DA) affects sexual desire. Here we use genetic tools and behavioural assays to identify a novel subset of DA neurons that regulate age-associated male courtship activity in Drosophila. We find that increasing DA levels in a subset of cells in the PPL2ab neuronal cluster is necessary and sufficient for increased sustained courtship in both young and aged male flies. Our results indicate that preventing the age-related decline in DA levels in PPL2ab neurons alleviates diminished courtship behaviours in male Drosophila. These results may provide the foundation for deciphering the circuitry involved in sexual motivation in the male Drosophila brain. PMID:26123524

  19. PPL2ab neurons restore sexual responses in aged Drosophila males through dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Shu-Yun; Wu, Chia-Lin; Hsieh, Min-Yen; Lin, Chen-Ta; Wen, Rong-Kun; Chen, Lien-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Hui; Yu, Yhu-Wei; Wang, Horng-Dar; Su, Yi-Ju; Lin, Chun-Ju; Yang, Cian-Yi; Guan, Hsien-Yu; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Fu, Tsai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Male sexual desire typically declines with ageing. However, our understanding of the neurobiological basis for this phenomenon is limited by our knowledge of the brain circuitry and neuronal pathways controlling male sexual desire. A number of studies across species suggest that dopamine (DA) affects sexual desire. Here we use genetic tools and behavioural assays to identify a novel subset of DA neurons that regulate age-associated male courtship activity in Drosophila. We find that increasing DA levels in a subset of cells in the PPL2ab neuronal cluster is necessary and sufficient for increased sustained courtship in both young and aged male flies. Our results indicate that preventing the age-related decline in DA levels in PPL2ab neurons alleviates diminished courtship behaviours in male Drosophila. These results may provide the foundation for deciphering the circuitry involved in sexual motivation in the male Drosophila brain. PMID:26123524

  20. Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Lin; Dan Jones; Sherif Ibrahim

    \\u000a This chapter covers the clinical features, classification, differential diagnosis, and pathogenesis of Hodgkin lymphoma. Differences\\u000a between the histogenesis and appearance of classical subtypes (nodular sclerosis, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte-rich, and\\u000a lymphocyte-depleted) and the nodular lymphocyte predominant type are covered.

  1. Pancreatitis Associated with Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J. Balthazar

    2005-01-01

    The combined occurrence of pancreatic carcinoma with acute or chronic pancreatitis is seldom seen in medical practice, but when present it is a challenging dilemma, plagued by confusing overlapping clinical findings and pitfalls in diagnostic imaging tests. This article reviews the presumptive pathophysiological aspects of this relationship, the perplexing clinical presentations and the advantages and limitations of the noninvasive imaging

  2. Granulomatous pancreatitis - granulomas in chronic pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jörg Stürmer; Volker Becker

    1987-01-01

    Granulomatous pancreatitis can be described only in infectious granulomas and pancreatic involvement by systemic granulomatosis. The presence of classical chronic tryptic pancreatitis in addition to individual sarcoidosis granulomas in one of our cases of sarcoidosis, shows that pancreatitis in a patient with generalized granulomatosis should not necessarily be considered granulomatous pancreatitis. A variety of foreign-body granulomas found in the pancreas

  3. A Suspicious Pancreatic Mass in Chronic Pancreatitis: Pancreatic Actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    de Clerck, F.; Laukens, P.; De Wilde, V.; Vandeputte, L.; Cabooter, M.; Van Huysse, J.; Orlent, H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a chronic infection of the pancreas caused by the suppurative Gram-positive bacterium Actinomyces. It has mostly been described in patients following repeated main pancreatic duct stenting in the context of chronic pancreatitis or following pancreatic surgery. This type of pancreatitis is often erroneously interpreted as pancreatic malignancy due to the specific invasive characteristics of Actinomyces. Case. A 64-year-old male with a history of chronic pancreatitis and repeated main pancreatic duct stenting presented with weight loss, fever, night sweats, and abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a mass in the pancreatic tail, invading the surrounding tissue and resulting in splenic vein thrombosis. Resectable pancreatic cancer was suspected, and pancreatic tail resection was performed. Postoperative findings revealed pancreatic actinomycosis instead of neoplasia. Conclusion. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a rare type of infectious pancreatitis that should be included in the differential diagnosis when a pancreatic mass is discovered in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and prior main pancreatic duct stenting. Our case emphasizes the importance of pursuing a histomorphological confirmation. PMID:25705533

  4. MALT lymphomas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sami N. Malek; Amy J. Hatfield; Ian W. Flinn

    2003-01-01

    Opinion statement  Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas occur in a variety of organs, including the orbit, conjunctiva, salivary\\u000a glands, skin, thyroid gland, lungs, stomach, and intestine. These tumors are often localized and of indolent clinical behavior.\\u000a Diagnosis is made by pathologic evaluation of a tissue biopsy. Careful staging is mandatory and tailored to the initial presentation.\\u000a Staging includes a history and

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  6. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J. D.; Morton, D. G.; Neoptolemos, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    The differential diagnosis between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis is very important as the management and prognosis of these two diseases is different. In most patients with pancreatic disease, the diagnosis can be established but there is a subgroup of patients in whom it is difficult to differentiate between these conditions because the clinical presentation is often similar and currently available diagnostic tests may be unable to distinguish between an inflammatory or neoplastic pancreatic mass. This paper reviews the aetiology, pathology and clinical features of these diseases and discusses the limitations of conventional diagnostic methods and how newer techniques may be of value in the differential diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9373592

  7. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Braganza, Joan M; Lee, Stephen H; McCloy, Rory F; McMahon, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive fibroinflammatory disease that exists in large-duct (often with intraductal calculi) or small-duct form. In many patients this disease results from a complex mix of environmental (eg, alcohol, cigarettes, and occupational chemicals) and genetic factors (eg, mutation in a trypsin-controlling gene or the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator); a few patients have hereditary or autoimmune disease. Pain in the form of recurrent attacks of pancreatitis (representing paralysis of apical exocytosis in acinar cells) or constant and disabling pain is usually the main symptom. Management of the pain is mainly empirical, involving potent analgesics, duct drainage by endoscopic or surgical means, and partial or total pancreatectomy. However, steroids rapidly reduce symptoms in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis, and micronutrient therapy to correct electrophilic stress is emerging as a promising treatment in the other patients. Steatorrhoea, diabetes, local complications, and psychosocial issues associated with the disease are additional therapeutic challenges. PMID:21397320

  8. Study to Assess Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Oral CC-223 for Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-23

    Multiple Myeloma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Neuroendocrine Tumors of Non-Pancreatic Origin; Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

  9. Pancreatic Exocrine Tumors

    MedlinePLUS

    Pancreatic Exocrine Tumors More than 95% of pancreatic cancers are classified as exocrine tumors. These tumors start in the exocrine cells of the pancreas. The following table describes the most common pancreatic ...

  10. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? Frequent or chronic abdominal pain is the most common ... will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are children ...

  11. Lymphoblastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cortelazzo, Sergio; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Hoelzer, Dieter

    2011-09-01

    Lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL) is a neoplasm of immature B cells committed to the B-(B-LBL) or T-cell lineage (T-LBL) that accounts for approximately 2% of all lymphomas. From a histopathological point of view, blasts may be encountered in tissue biopsy and/or bone marrow (BM). In tissue sections, LBL is generally characterized by a diffuse or, as in lymph nodes and less commonly, paracortical pattern. Although histological features are usually sufficient to distinguish lymphoblastic from mature B- or T-cell neoplasms, a differential diagnosis with blastoid variant of mantle cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma or myeloid leukemia may arise in some cases. Of greater importance is the characterization of immunophenotype by flow cytometry. In B-LBL, tumour cells are virtually always positive for B cell markers CD19, CD79a and CD22. They are positive for CD10, CD 24, PAX5, and TdT in most cases, while the expression of CD20 and the lineage independent stem cell antigen CD34 is variable and CD45 may be absent. Surface immunoglobulin is usually absent. In T-LBL, neoplastic cells are usually TdT positive and variably express CD1a, CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7 and CD8. The only reliable lineage-specific is surface CD3. Most B-LBL have clonal rearrangements of the Ig heavy chain or less frequently of light chain genes. T-cell receptor ? or ? chain gene rearrangements may be seen in a significant number of cases, but rearrangements are not helpful for lineage assignment. LBL occurs more commonly in children than in adults, mostly in males. Although 80% of precursor B-cell neoplasms present as acute leukemias, with BM and peripheral blood (PB) involvement, a small proportion present with a mass lesion and have <25% blasts in the BM. Unlike precursor T-LBL, mediastinal masses and involvement of BM are rare, but lymph nodes and extranodal sites are more frequently involved. T-LBL patients, compared to those with B-LBL, show younger age, a higher rate of mediastinal tumours or BM involvement. Patients are usually males in their teens to twenties and present with lymphadenopathy in cervical, supraclavicular and axillary regions, or with a mediastinal mass. In most patients the mediastinal mass is anterior, bulky, and associated with pleural effusions, superior vena cava syndrome, tracheal obstruction, and pericardial effusions. They frequently present with advanced disease, B symptoms and elevated serum LDH levels. Abdominal involvement (liver and spleen) is unusual. LBL is highly aggressive, but frequently curable with current therapy. The prognosis in all age groups has dramatically improved with the use of intensive ALL-type chemotherapy regimes, with a disease-free survival of 73-90% in children and 45-72% in adults. Intensive intrathecal chemotherapy prophylaxis is required to reduce the CNS relapse incidence, while the role of prophylactic cranial irradiation is unclear. Consolidation mediastinal irradiation may decrease mediastinal relapse. Patients with adverse prognostic features should be considered for high-dose chemotherapy and SCT. Autologous SCT has been shown to produce similar good results as chemotherapy alone, and allogeneic SCT is likely to be a more appropriate option for patients who are beyond first remission or with more advanced disease. PMID:21273093

  12. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) and Its Lipation Product 2-Pentylpyrrole Lysine (2-PPL) in Peanuts.

    PubMed

    Globisch, Martin; Kaden, Diana; Henle, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    After synthesis of a deuterated 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) standard, the formation of 4-HNE during heating of peanut oil and whole peanuts, respectively, was measured by GC-MS. Whereas a significant increase in 4-HNE levels was observed for peanut oil, the amount of 4-HNE decreased when whole peanuts were roasted due to lipation reactions with amino acid side chains of the proteins. The ?-amino group of lysine was identified as the favored reaction partner of 4-HNE. After heating N(?)-acetyl-l-lysine and 4-HNE, a Schiff base, a novel pyridinium derivative, a 2-pentylpyrrol derivative and, following reduction and hydrolysis, a reduced, cyclized Michael adduct were identified. 2-Amino-6-(2-pentyl-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)hexanoic acid (2-PPL) was synthesized and quantitated in peanut proteins, which had been incubated with various amounts of 4-HNE by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS after enzymatic hydrolysis. At low 4-HNE concentrations the modification of lysine could be entirely explained by the formation of 2-PPL. Additionally, 2-PPL was quantified for the first time in peanut samples, and an increase depending on the roasting time was observed. 2-PPL represents a suitable marker to evaluate the extent of food protein lipation by 4-HNE. PMID:25945920

  13. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abate-Daga, Daniel; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains largely an incurable disease necessitating the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-transduced T cells represents an alternative treatment with curative potential. We present an overview of the engineering of novel CARs targeting prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), implications for the development of immunotherapies, and potential strategies to circumvent on-target/off-tumor toxicities. PMID:25083334

  14. Pancreatic enzyme synthesis in pancreatic disease.

    PubMed

    Boyd, E J; Clark, G; Dunbar, J; Wormsley, K G

    1985-08-01

    In a prospective evaluation of patients suspected of having chronic pancreatitis, synthesis of pancreatic enzymes was measured by means of the incorporation of selenium-75-labelled methionine into the proteins of duodenal aspirate during stimulation of pancreatic secretion with secretin (1 CU X kg-1 X h-1) plus cholecystokinin (CCK) (1 IDU X kg-1 X h-1). The rate of pancreatic enzyme synthesis was increased in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Measurement of pancreatic enzyme synthesis was more sensitive in the detection of chronic pancreatitis than either the bicarbonate or the trypsin secretory response to secretin plus CCK. A combination of the bicarbonate secretory response with measurement of the rate of enzyme synthesis provided a positive predictive power of 100% when both tests were abnormal and a negative predictive power of 100% when both tests were normal, so that the combined test can be recommended both for excluding and confirming the presence of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:4035292

  15. Pegfilgrastim and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated, Relapsed, or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-22

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  16. Undifferentiated Carcinoma with Osteoclast-Like Giant Cells of the Pancreas in a Patient with New Diagnosis of Follicular Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Apeksha; Khurana, Tanvi; Freid, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells are rare, with only 50 cases published to date. We report a case of a 67-year-old male with a new diagnosis of follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with an incidental pancreatic body mass on abdominal imaging. Cytology from the pancreatic mass obtained via endoscopic ultrasound-directed fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) revealed an undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells.

  17. Primary spinal epidural lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Cugati, Goutham; Singh, Manish; Pande, Anil; Ramamurthi, Ravi; Balasubramanyam, Mahalakshmi; Sethi, Sumer K.; Singh, Ajai Kumar

    2011-01-01

    An epidural location for lymphoma is observed in 0.1–6.5% of all the lymphomas. Primary spinal epidural lymphoma (PSEL) is a subset of lymphomas, where there are no other recognizable sites of lymphomas at the time of diagnosis. The incidence of this subset of lymphomas is much less. It, however, is increasingly diagnosed, due to the increased use of more sensitive imaging modalities. For the electronic search, Pubmed was used to identify journals that enlisted and enumerated PSEL from 1961 to January 2011. The following combination of terms: “primary,” “spinal,” “epidural,” and “lymphoma” were used. The most significant articles and their bibliographies were analyzed by the authors. The symptoms, pathogenesis, diagnostic workup, histopathology, treatment, and outcome have been analyzed in a systematic manner PMID:22013369

  18. Radiologic diagnosis and staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Freeny, P C

    1989-01-01

    IBD CT is the single best modality for diagnosis and staging of patients with suspected pancreatic carcinoma. While carefully performed real-time US is an excellent technique for determining the level and etiology of bile duct obstruction, it is of more limited value for diagnosis of tumors in the body and tail of the gland, and is less accurate than IBD CT for assessment of tumor resectability. Thus, most patients require IBD CT for accurate, nonoperative staging. ERCP and angiography continue to be useful adjunctive procedures for evaluation of patients with suspected pancreatic carcinoma, particularly for evaluation of equivocal CT or US findings. An isolated pancreatic mass, that is, a mass with no ancillary CT or US findings of carcinoma (local extension, distant metastases), is a non-specific finding and requires further evaluation with either ERCP or angiography, and perhaps most importantly, with FNAB. Other neoplasms may mimic pancreatic ductal carcinoma, particularly islet cell carcinoma and lymphoma. Pancreatitis also can result in a focal pancreatic mass, simulating a neoplasm. These diseases usually respond to therapy and thus it is essential to confirm the radiologic diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma with biopsy, particularly if surgery is not planned or if chemoradiation therapy is anticipated. PMID:2535684

  19. Acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Harper, Simon J F; Cheslyn-Curtis, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and the annual incidence appears to be increasing. It presents as a mild self-limiting illness in 80% of patients. However, one-fifth of these develop a severe complicated life-threatening disease requiring intensive and prolonged therapeutic intervention. Alcohol and gallstone disease remain the commonest causes of AP but metabolic abnormalities, obesity and genetic susceptibility are thought be increasingly important aetiological factors. The prompt diagnosis of AP and stratification of disease severity is essential in directing rapid delivery of appropriate therapeutic measures. In this review, the range of diagnostic and prognostic assays, severity scoring systems and radiological investigations used in current clinical practice are described, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. Increased understanding of the complex pathophysiology of AP has generated an array of new potential diagnostic assays and these are discussed. The multidisciplinary approach to management of severe pancreatitis is outlined, including areas of controversy and novel treatments. PMID:20926469

  20. Primary testicular lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Umberto Vitolo; Andrés J. M. Ferreri; Emanuele Zucca

    2008-01-01

    Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the testis (PTL) accounts for about 9% of testicular neoplasms and 1–2% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. It is the most common testicular malignancy in elder men. Anecdotal reports associated PTL development with trauma, chronic orchitis, cryptorchidism, or filariasis exist, but no case-control studies have confirmed their etiologic significance. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most

  1. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mitchell R. Smith

    1996-01-01

    Lymphoid neoplasia is a complex area comprising multiple diseases with varied pathology, treatment, and outcome. The non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are reviewed here. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, collectively, represent the sixth most common cancer in the United States as well as the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths. The overall incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma has risen steadily over the past four decades. Although

  2. Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gobbi, Paolo G; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Levis, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a curable malignancy which shows a bimodal curve in incidence in economically developed countries; there is a putative association with Epstein-Barr virus. The WHO 2008 classification schema recognises two histological types of HL: the nodular lymphocyte predominant and the "classic" HL. The latter encompasses four entities: nodular sclerosis, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte depletion, and lymphocyte-rich. Most patients with HL present with asymptomatic superficial lymphadenopathy. The commonest sites of disease are the cervical, supraclavicular and mediastinal lymph nodes, while sub-diaphragmatic presentations and bone marrow and hepatic involvement are less common. Splenic involvement is usually concomitant with hepatic disease and systemic symptoms; extranodal presentations are quite rare. Systemic symptoms are present in ?35% of cases. The stage of disease is defined according to the Ann Arbor staging system or its Cotswolds variant, and staging work-up includes physical examination, chest X-rays, chest and abdominal CT scan, and bone marrow biopsy. (18)FDG-PET ((18)fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) plays a central role in staging, response assessment and prognosis definition. Classic HL usually spreads by contiguity within the lymphatic tissue network, with a late extension to adjacent and distant viscera. Mortality from HL has been progressively decreasing, as confirmed by the most recent 5-year survival figure of 81%. The list of putative prognostic factors in HL has been increasing, but most factors still require prospective validation. Some of these variables are used to stratify early-stage disease into "favourable" and "unfavourable" categories, with "unfavourable early-stage" being intermediate between "favourable early-stage" and "advanced-stage". ABVD (adriamycin(doxorubicin), bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) combination chemotherapy followed by involved-field irradiation is the standard treatment for patients with early-stage HL, with a 5-year OS >95%. Several trials assessing less intensive approaches for patients with favourable early-stage HL are ongoing. More intensified combinations, such as the BEACOPP (bleomycin, etoposide, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine (Oncovin), procarbazine, prednisone) regimen, are being investigated, usually in patients with unfavourable early-stage HL and interim PET+. ABVD is the standard chemotherapy treatment also for patients with advanced disease. Although some evidence suggests that more intensive combinations provide better disease control, the inevitable increased risk of relevant late toxicity worries investigators. Consequently, there has been a shift towards investigating the innovative strategy of a more aggressive schedule for patients with (18)FDG-PET positive results after the first 2 courses of ABVD. High-dose chemotherapy supported by ASCT (autologous stem cell transplantation) is considered the standard of care in patients with HL which has relapsed after, or is refractory to conventional chemoradiotherapy, while allogeneic transplant is a suitable tool for patients with chemorefractory disease and patients failed after ASCT. PMID:22867814

  3. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Prasanna; Wu, Guang-Yao; Zhu, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract is the most common extranodal site involved by lymphoma with the majority being non-Hodgkin type. Although lymphoma can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, the most frequent sites in order of its occurrence are the stomach followed by small intestine and ileocecal region. Gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is usually secondary to the widespread nodal diseases and primary gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is relatively rare. Gastrointestinal lymphomas are usually not clinically specific and indistinguishable from other benign and malignant conditions. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common pathological type of gastrointestinal lymphoma in essentially all sites of the gastrointestinal tract, although recently the frequency of other forms has also increased in certain regions of the world. Although some radiological features such as bulky lymph nodes and maintenance of fat plane are more suggestive of lymphoma, they are not specific, thus mandating histopathological analysis for its definitive diagnosis. There has been a tremendous leap in the diagnosis, staging and management of gastrointestinal lymphoma in the last two decades attributed to a better insight into its etiology and molecular aspect as well as the knowledge about its critical signaling pathways. PMID:21390139

  4. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  5. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-04

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  6. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a signi?cant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  7. [Epidemiology of pancreatic adenocarcinomas].

    PubMed

    Partensky, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer, mostly represented by pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, is a major public health burden in developed countries. More than half a million people are expected to die from pancreatic cancer, worldwide, in 2030. Age and tobacco are the main identified risk factors in sporadic cases, when many genetic syndromes increase the risk significantly. History of pancreatic cancer is a significant risk factor for pancreatic cancer for any first-degree related individual, known as familial pancreatic cancer. The genetic signature of this syndrome is probably due to a still not identified autosomal dominantly inherited gene with reduced penetrance. The risk increases with the number of first-degree relatives involved. Precursor lesions are known to give rise to invasive pancreatic cancer. These particular lesions are either macroscopic (intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia and mucinous cystic neoplasms), or microscopic (pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia). It is possible to identify a orouo of hig h-risk individuals who could be candidate for screening. PMID:26016196

  8. Problems of pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew L. Warshaw

    1986-01-01

    Pancreatitis is not one disease but several and perhaps many. Diagnosis is imperfect in all forms and the usual lack of histologic\\u000a material has hampered attempts to understand the pathogenesis and possible interrelationships of the different forms of pancreatic\\u000a inflammation. Acute pancreatitis does not as a rule evolve into chronic pancreatitis, even after multiple recurrences. Recurrent\\u000a acute attacks can be

  9. Primary leptomeningeal plasmablastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Marlon S; Bota, Daniela A; Kim, Ronald C; Hasso, Anton N; Linskey, Mark E

    2011-09-01

    Lymphomas that develop in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients are predominantly aggressive B-cells lymphomas. The most common HIV-associated lymphomas include Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (that often involves the CNS), primary effusion lymphoma, and plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL). Of these, PBL is relatively uncommon and displays a distinct affinity for presentation in the oral cavity. In this manuscript we report a previously undescribed primary leptomeningeal form of PBL in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A 40-year-old HIV positive man presented with acute onset confusion, emesis, and altered mental status. Lumbar puncture showed numerous nucleated cells with atypical plasmocyte predominance. CSF flowcytometry showed kappa restriction with CD8 and CD38 positivity and negative lymphocyte markers, while the MRI showed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement. As the extensive systemic work-up failed to reveal any disease outside the brain, an en bloc diagnostic brain and meningeal biopsy was performed. The biopsy specimen showed sheets of plasmacytoid cells with one or more large nuclei, prominent nuclear chromatin, scattered mitoses, and abundant cytoplasm, highly suggestive of plasmablastic lymphoma. HIV-associated malignancies have protean and often confusing presentations, which pose diagnostic difficulties posed to the practicing neurological-surgeons. Even in cases where an infectious cause is suspected for the meningeal enhancement, neoplastic involvement should be considered, and cytology and flow-cytometry should be routinely ordered on the CSF samples. PMID:21359853

  10. Classification of pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Sarner; P B Cotton

    1984-01-01

    An international group of doctors interested in pancreatic disease met in Cambridge in March 1983, under the auspices of the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, to discuss the classification of pancreatitis in the light of developments that have taken place in the 20 years since the crucial conference in Marseille.

  11. Management of necrotizing pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Slavin; Paula Ghaneh; Robert Sutton; Mark Hartley; Peter Rowlands; Conall Garvey; Mark Hughes; John Neoptolemos

    Infection complicating pancreatic necrosis leads to persisting sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and accounts for about half the deaths that occur following acute pancreatitis. Severe cases due to gallstones require urgent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Patients with pancreatic necrosis should be followed with serial contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and if infection is suspected fine needle aspiration of the necrotic area for

  12. Experimental Models of Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease characterized by interstitial edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, depending on its severity. Regardless of the extent of tissue injury, acute pancreatitis is a completely reversible process with evident normal tissue architecture after recovery. Its pathogenic mechanism has been known to be closely related to intracellular digestive enzyme activation. In contrast to acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible tissue damage such as acinar cell atrophy and pancreatic fibrosis that results in exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Recently, many studies of chronic pancreatitis have been prompted by the discovery of the pancreatic stellate cell, which has been identified and distinguished as the key effector cell of pancreatic fibrosis. However, investigations into the pathogenesis and treatment of pancreatitis face many obstacles because of its anatomical location and disparate clinical course. Due to these difficulties, most of our knowledge on pancreatitis is based on research conducted using experimental models of pancreatitis. In this review, several experimental models of pancreatitis will be discussed in terms of technique, advantages, and limitations. PMID:24944983

  13. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonas Rosendahl; Hans Bödeker; Joachim Mössner; Niels Teich

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP) is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic

  14. Surgical Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew R. Porembka; William G. Hawkins; Steven M. Strasberg

    \\u000a Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by progressive parenchymal fibrosis resulting in loss of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine\\u000a function. The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis is unclear, but is thought to be secondary to repeated parenchymal injury.\\u000a Common etiologies include alcoholic pancreatitis, autoimmune pancreatitis, and pancreatic duct obstruction caused by pancreatic\\u000a divisum or stricture. The disease affects all elements of the gland; exocrine

  15. Biomarkers for lymphoma

    DOEpatents

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.

    2014-09-02

    A biomarker, method, test kit, and diagnostic system for detecting the presence of lymphoma in a person are disclosed. The lymphoma may be Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The person may be a high-risk subject. In one embodiment, a plasma sample from a person is obtained. The level of at least one protein listed in Table S3 in the plasma sample is measured. The level of at least one protein in the plasma sample is compared with the level in a normal or healthy subject. The lymphoma is diagnosed based upon the level of the at least one protein in the plasma sample in comparison to the normal or healthy level.

  16. Primary breast lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Chan Y; Campbell, Belinda A; Seymour, John F

    2014-09-01

    Primary breast lymphoma is a rare form of extranodal lymphoma, defined by the presence of a primary lesion within the breast with or without regional nodal involvement but no other extra-mammary sites of involvement. It comprises diverse histologic subtypes, but diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common. In this review, we describe in detail the clinical features, diagnosis and staging, pathogenesis, risk factors and therapy of primary breast diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We consider choice and number of cycles of chemotherapy, the indications for radiotherapy and discuss the need for central nervous system prophylaxis. We also provide a brief overview of the less commonly encountered histologic subtypes including marginal zone, follicular, Burkitt and breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma. We conclude with a suggested treatment approach and potential areas of future research. PMID:24953564

  17. Prospective risk of pancreatic cancer in familial pancreatic cancer kindreds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alison P. Klein; Kieran A. Brune; Gloria M. Petersen; Michael Goggins; Anne C. Tersmette; G. J. A. Offerhaus; C. Griffin; J. L. Cameron; C. H. J. Yeo; S. Kern; R. H. Hruban

    2004-01-01

    Individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer have an in- creased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Quantification of this risk provides a rational basis for cancer risk counseling and for screening for early pancreatic cancer. In a prospective registry-based study, we esti- mated the risk of pancreatic cancer in individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer. Standardized incidence

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound in the evaluation of pancreatic neoplasms-solid and cystic: A review.

    PubMed

    Nelsen, Eric M; Buehler, Darya; Soni, Anurag V; Gopal, Deepak V

    2015-04-16

    Pancreatic neoplasms have a wide range of pathology, from pancreatic adenocarcinoma to cystic mucinous neoplasms. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with or without fine needle aspiration (FNA) is a helpful diagnostic tool in the work-up of pancreatic neoplasms. Its utility in pancreatic malignancy is well known. Over the last two decades EUS-FNA has become a procedure of choice for diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. EUS-FNA is highly sensitive and specific for solid lesions, with sensitivities as high as 80%-95% for pancreatic masses and specificity as high as 75%-100%. Multiple aspects of the procedure have been studied to optimize the rate of diagnosis with EUS-FNA including cytopathologist involvement, needle size, suctioning and experience of endoscopist. Onsite pathology is one of the most important elements in increasing diagnostic yield rate in EUS-FNA. EUS-FNA is valuable in diagnosing rare and atypical pancreatic neoplasms including neuroendocrine, lymphoma and metastatic disease. As more and more patients undergo cross sectional imaging, cystic lesions of the pancreas are becoming a more common occurrence and EUS-FNA of these lesions can be helpful for differentiation. This review covers the technical aspects of optimizing pancreatic neoplasm diagnosis rate, highlight rare pancreatic neoplasms and role of EUS-FNA, and also outline the important factors in diagnosis of cystic lesions by EUS-FNA. PMID:25901210

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound in the evaluation of pancreatic neoplasms-solid and cystic: A review

    PubMed Central

    Nelsen, Eric M; Buehler, Darya; Soni, Anurag V; Gopal, Deepak V

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms have a wide range of pathology, from pancreatic adenocarcinoma to cystic mucinous neoplasms. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with or without fine needle aspiration (FNA) is a helpful diagnostic tool in the work-up of pancreatic neoplasms. Its utility in pancreatic malignancy is well known. Over the last two decades EUS-FNA has become a procedure of choice for diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. EUS-FNA is highly sensitive and specific for solid lesions, with sensitivities as high as 80%-95% for pancreatic masses and specificity as high as 75%-100%. Multiple aspects of the procedure have been studied to optimize the rate of diagnosis with EUS-FNA including cytopathologist involvement, needle size, suctioning and experience of endoscopist. Onsite pathology is one of the most important elements in increasing diagnostic yield rate in EUS-FNA. EUS-FNA is valuable in diagnosing rare and atypical pancreatic neoplasms including neuroendocrine, lymphoma and metastatic disease. As more and more patients undergo cross sectional imaging, cystic lesions of the pancreas are becoming a more common occurrence and EUS-FNA of these lesions can be helpful for differentiation. This review covers the technical aspects of optimizing pancreatic neoplasm diagnosis rate, highlight rare pancreatic neoplasms and role of EUS-FNA, and also outline the important factors in diagnosis of cystic lesions by EUS-FNA. PMID:25901210

  20. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  1. Endoscopic treatment of chronic pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurent Heyries; Jose Sahel

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of chronic pancreatitis has been exclusively surgical for a long time. Recently, endoscopic therapy has become widely used as a primary therapeutic option. Initially performed for drainage of pancreatic cysts and pseudocysts, endoscopic treatments were adapted to biliary and pancreatic ducts stenosis. Pancreatic sphincterotomy which allows access to pancreatic ducts was firstly reported. Secondly, endoscopic methods of stenting, dilatation,

  2. Sensory nerves and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingfu

    2014-01-01

    Sensory nerves are a kind of nerve that conduct afferent impulses from the periphery receptors to the central nervous system (CNS) and are able to release neuromediators from the activated peripheral endings. Sensory nerves are particularly important for microcirculatory response, and stimulation of pancreatic sensory nerves releases a variety of neuropeptides such as substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), etc., leading to neurogenic inflammation characterized as the local vasodilatation and plasma extravasation. Deactivation of sensory nerves often leads to the disturbances of pancreatic microcirculation. Pancreatitis is a common digestive disease that can lead to severe complications and even death if it goes untreated. Experimental studies in animals and tissue analysis in patients with pancreatitis have shown significant changes in sensory nerves supplying the pancreatic gland. Thus making clear the whole mechanism of pancreatitis is essential to treat and cure it. Sensory nerves may have a close correlation with the development of pancreatitis, and knowing more about the role of sensory nerve in pancreatitis is important for the treatment for pancreatitis. This review is aimed to summarize the relationship between sensory nerves and pancreatitis. PMID:25493260

  3. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer ... Pancreatic Cancer Drugs Approved for Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized ...

  4. Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Tumours of Haematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues (ed 4th) . Lyon, France: IARC Press; 2008. FS5 Cutaneous T-Cell ... Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues. 4th ed. IARC Press Lyon, France; 2008. Wollina U. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: ...

  5. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... daily chemotherapy that followed his diagnosis with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Though his treatments continue (3-1/2 years in total), ... Lymphoma Survivor The Woodlands, TX I was diagnosed with ...

  6. Leukemia & Lymphoma Society

    MedlinePLUS

    ... daily chemotherapy that followed his diagnosis with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Though his treatments continue (3-1/2 years in total), ... Lymphoma Survivor The Woodlands, TX I was diagnosed with ...

  7. Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Narula, Ritesh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2015-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is an uncommon, but potentially fatal intraocular malignancy, which may occur with or without primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Considered to be a subset of PCNSL, it is mostly of diffuse large B-cell type. The diagnosis of PVRL poses a challenge not only to the clinician, but also to the pathologist. Despite aggressive treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, relapses or CNS involvement are common. PMID:25971162

  8. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist.

    PubMed

    Patel, Milan R; Eppolito, Amanda L; Willingham, Field F

    2013-03-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68-81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for genetic testing are discussed. PMID:23503650

  9. Enzymatic Synthesis of (S)-(-)-gamma-Methyl-gamma-butyrolactone from Racemic Methyl gamma-hydroxypentanoate Using Porcine Pancreatic Lipase: A Microscale Advanced Bioorganic Chemistry Laboratory Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Moses

    1998-02-01

    The use of enzymes in academic as well as industrial chemical laboratories is now common, and in some cases live organisms are utilized. In this laboratory project, porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) is used to convert a racemic sample of methyl gamma-hydroxypentanoate into gamma-methyl-gamma-butyrolactone in an effort to demonstrate the ability of enzymes to differentiate between enantiomeric substrates. This project also uses a number of chemical and spectroscopic techniques commonly used by organic and biochemists. Students are asked to complete two lactonization reactions of racemic methyl gamma-hydroxypentanoate: one is catalyzed by PPL and the other by para-toluenesulfonic acid, which produces a racemic mixture of gamma-methyl-gamma-butyrolactone. Both samples of the gamma-lactone are analyzed by TLC, purified by silica gel column chromatography, and characterized by infrared and 1H-NMR studies. While the sample of g-lactone obtained from the PPL catalyzed reaction is optically active, [alpha]D25° = -13.4° (c = 0.0098, chloroform), the sample from the acid catalyzed reaction is not. Results from 1H-NMR studies of these lactones with a mole equivalent of (R)-(-)-2,2,2-trifluoro-1-(9-anthryl)ethanol show the enantiomeric excess of the optically active lactone to be 37 + 4 % favoring the S-enantiomer.

  10. Pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pradeep Bansal; Amnon Sonnenberg

    1995-01-01

    Background & Aims: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) maintains a computerized file of all hospital discharges since 1970. In taking advantage of this large database, the present study aimed to determine whether pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Methods: A case control study compared the occurrence of pancreatitis in 2639 patients with pancreatic cancer and a matched

  11. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Adult Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Unfavorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  12. Molecular biology of Hodgkin lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralf Küppers

    2009-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is derived from mature B cells and subdivided into classical HL and nodular lymphocyte predominant HL (NLPHL). HL is unique among human B cell lymphomas because of the rarity of the lymphoma cells, the Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells in classical HL and the lymphocyte- predominant (LP) cells in NLPHL, which usually account for 0.1% to 10%

  13. [Hodgkin's lymphoma and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Datsenko, P V; Panshin, G A

    2015-01-01

    After a median observation time of 4,5 years, 440 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma stage I-IV to the Ann Arbor classification were treated with radiotherapy (2200 lymph areas) and ABVD (n=204) or BEACOPP (n=117) or CEA/ABVD (lomustine, etoposide, adriamycine, bleomycine, vinblastine and dacarbacine; n=119) regimens in 1995-2012. Correct allocation of groups with "CR or PR ?80%" and "PR: 0-79%", after first-line chemotherapy, is extremely important for following RT planning. Adaptation of patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma can take place only after successful treatment, the probability of relapse and fear of repeated courses strongly interfere with this process, especially in the first years after its closure. Duration of remission period, especially in young people, is no less important than the criteria for overall survival. It is impossible to build recommendations for treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma, based only on long-term survival rates. Importance of radiotherapy in reducing the number of relapses is undeniable, so the idea that the development of the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of the ray method Hodgkin's lymphoma gradually becomes secondary is in serious doubt. Our findings suggest the importance of both maintaining a high disease-free survival and reducing long-term complications in designing treatments of Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:26016145

  14. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-05-27

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient's age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  15. Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis-as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery. PMID:24132440

  16. Pancreatic imaging. New modalities.

    PubMed

    Freeny, P C

    1999-09-01

    This article discusses the techniques and applications of the newest pancreatic cross-sectional imaging modalities. The specific modalities that are discussed include helical computed tomography with dual phase imaging and three-dimensional computer rendering techniques, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic and intraductal pancreatic sonography, and radionuclide scintigraphy using positron emission scanning and somatostatin-receptor imaging. PMID:10503147

  17. Pancreatic cancer...107 Chapter 10

    E-print Network

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    NICR/NCRI Pancreatic cancer...107 Chapter 10: Pancreatic cancer (C25) KEY FINDINGS - INCIDENCE. #12;Cancer in Ireland 1994-2004: A comprehensive report 108...Pancreatic cancer 10.1: Incidence Pancreatic cancer made up 2.4% of all male and 2.6% of all female cancers (excluding NMSC) in Ireland during

  18. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jason Kihyuk; Enns, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins, autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted. PMID:18081217

  19. Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maryse Bernard; Richard W. Tsang

    \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a An estimated 8,490 new cases of Hodgkin’s lymphoma were diagnosed in the USA in 2010.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Reed–Sternberg cells are the malignant cells in classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma (CD15+, CD30+, and CD45?). In nodular lymphocyte-predominant\\u000a Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NLPHL), these cells express B-cell markers (CD20+, CD79a+, and CD45+) and are CD15? and CD30?.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Common presentation is an asymptomatic lymph node enlargement

  20. Radiation therapy for orbital lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: pzhou@partners.org; Ng, Andrea K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Silver, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Li Sigui [Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Hua Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mauch, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To describe radiation techniques and evaluate outcomes for orbital lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients (and 62 eyes) with orbital lymphoma treated with radiotherapy between 1987 and 2003 were included. The majority had mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (48%) or follicular (30%) lymphoma. Seventeen patients had prior lymphoma at other sites, and 29 had primary orbital lymphoma. Median follow-up was 46 months. Results: The median dose was 30.6 Gy; one-third received <30 Gy. Electrons were used in 9 eyes with disease confined to the conjunctiva or eyelid, and photons in 53 eyes with involvement of intraorbital tissues to cover entire orbit. Local control rate was 98% for all patients and 100% for those with indolent lymphoma. Three of the 26 patients with localized primary lymphoma failed distantly, resulting in a 5-year freedom-from-distant-relapse rate of 89%. The 5-year disease-specific and overall survival rates were 95% and 88%, respectively. Late toxicity was mainly cataract formation in patients who received radiation without lens block. Conclusions A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for indolent orbital lymphoma. Distant relapse rate in patients with localized orbital lymphoma was lower than that reported for low-grade lymphoma presenting in other sites. Orbital radiotherapy can be used for salvage of recurrent indolent lymphoma.

  1. Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Case 207: Hodgkin lymphoma with paraneoplastic hypercalcemic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Erik S; Davidzon, Guido

    2014-07-01

    A 15-year-old girl presented with a 2-month history of 30-lb (13.6 kg) weight loss, chest and abdominal pain, nausea, bilious emesis, cough, and shortness of breath. Initial blood count (performed at an outside hospital) showed elevated white blood cell and platelet counts but low hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. On examination, she had adenopathy in the left axillary and supraclavicular regions, fullness in the left chest, and abdominal guarding. Ultrasonography (US)-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the left anterior chest wall mass was nondiagnostic, and lumbar puncture and bone marrow biopsies were negative. At that time, the patient underwent several imaging studies-including chest radiography; bone scanning; contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis; and fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT-all performed within 1 week of each other. Pertinent serum laboratory values at the time of these tests were as follows: calcium level, 17 mg/dL (4.25 mmol/L) (normal range, 8.5-10.5 mg/dL [2.1-2.6 mmol/L]); ionized calcium level, 2.3 mmol/L (normal range, 1.1-1.3 mmol/L); lipase level, 2423 U/L (normal level, <300 U/L); amylase level, 1435 U/L (normal level, <140 U/L); lactate dehydrogenase level, 253 U/L (normal level, <240 U/L), albumin level, 2.6 g/dL (26 g/L) (normal level, 3.5-5.0 g/dL [35-50 g/L]), and creatinine level, 1.7 mg/dL (150.3 ?mol/L) (normal level, <1.2 mg/dL [<106.1 ?mol/L]). A follow-up PET/CT scan was performed approximately 2 months later after initial therapy. PMID:24956051

  3. Histopathology of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franziska C. Eberle; Haresh Mani; Elaine S. Jaffe

    2009-01-01

    In the last few years, there has been a greater understanding of the spectrum and biology of Hodgkin's lymphoma. In standard texts, Hodgkin's lymphoma is classified as 2 distinct entities, namely nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. However, recent evidence suggests that classical Hodgkin's lymphoma is not a single disease. Although the mixed cellularity and lymphocyte-depleted subtypes

  4. Fatal Pancreatic Panniculitis Associated with Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woo Sun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Woo; Paik, Chang Nyol; Kim, Hyung Ok

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thick shadowy wall. We herein report a case of fatal pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with acute pancreatitis in a 50-yr-old man. He presented with a 3-week history of multiple tender skin nodules, abdominal pain and distension. Laboratory and radiologic findings revealed acute pancreatitis, and skin biopsy showed pancreatic panniculitis. Despite intensive medical care, he died of multi-organ failure 3 weeks after presentation. PMID:17982246

  5. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP). PMID:25469024

  6. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  7. Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Signs and symptoms of pancreatic cancer Can pancreatic cancer be found early? Pancreatic cancer is hard to ... Testing: What You Need to Know . Testing for pancreatic cancer in people at high risk For people in ...

  8. Molecular Profiling of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma and Chronic Pancreatitis Identifies Multiple Genes Differentially Regulated in Pancreatic Cancer 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig D. Logsdon; Diane M. Simeone; Charles Binkley; Thiruvengadam Arumugam; Joel K. Greenson; Thomas J. Giordano; David E. Misek; Samir Hanash

    2003-01-01

    The molecular basis of pancreatic cancer is not understood. Previous attempts to determine the specific genes expressed in pancreatic cancer have been hampered by similarities between adenocarcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. In the current study, microarrays (Affymetrix) were used to profile gene expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (10), pancreatic cancer cell lines (7), chronic pancreatitis (5), and normal pancreas (5). Molecular profiling

  9. Lymphoma: Immune Evasion Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ranjan; Hammerich, Linda; Peng, Paul; Brown, Brian; Merad, Miriam; Brody, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    While the cellular origin of lymphoma is often characterized by chromosomal translocations and other genetic aberrations, its growth and development into a malignant neoplasm is highly dependent upon its ability to escape natural host defenses. Neoplastic cells interact with a variety of non-malignant cells in the tumor milieu to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment. The resulting functional impairment and dysregulation of tumor-associated immune cells not only allows for passive growth of the malignancy but may even provide active growth signals upon which the tumor subsequently becomes dependent. In the past decade, the success of immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive cell transfer for relapsed or refractory lymphomas has validated immunotherapy as a possible treatment cornerstone. Here, we review the mechanisms by which lymphomas have been found to evade and even reprogram the immune system, including alterations in surface molecules, recruitment of immunosuppressive subpopulations, and secretion of anti-inflammatory factors. A fundamental understanding of the immune evasion strategies utilized by lymphomas may lead to better prognostic markers and guide the development of targeted interventions that are both safer and more effective than current standards of care. PMID:25941795

  10. Immunohistochemical Profiling of Lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew W. Anderson; Yasodha Natkunam

    \\u000a This chapter covers the technique of immunostaining for the characterization of lymphoma and hematopoietic tumors in tissues.\\u000a The range of markers that may be diagnostically useful is discussed, as are the methodologic issues related to new marker\\u000a identification, reagent validation, standardization and quantitation of staining levels.

  11. Breast lumps and lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ellis; J. Arno; M. Owen-Smith; K. Sikora

    1985-01-01

    We report two cases of young women in whom a breast lump was the first symptom of disseminated lymphoma. They were managed by wide excision of the affected segments of breast. Histological diagnosis was aided by immunoperoxidase stains for immunoglobulin chains. Further investigations demonstrated the wide spread nature of the disease, with involvement of bone marrow, bone cortex, lymph nodes

  12. Pancreatic fistula and postoperative pancreatitis after pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudis, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The most serious complication after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) is pancreatic fistula (PF) type C, either as a consequence or independently from postoperative pancreatitis (PP). Differentiating between these two types of complications is often very difficult, if not impossible. The most significant factor in early diagnosis of PP after PD is an abrupt change in clinical status. In our retrospective study we also observed significantly higher levels of serum concentrations of CRP and AMS comparing to PF without PP. Based on our findings, CT scan is not beneficial in the early diagnosis of PP. Meantime PF type C is indication to operative revision with mostly drainage procedure which is obviously not much technically demanding, there are no definite guidelines on how to proceed in PP. Therefore the surgeon’s experience determines not only whether PP will be diagnosed early enough and will be differentiated from PF without PP, but also whether a completion pancreatectomy will be performed in indicated cases. PMID:25392838

  13. Panobinostat and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-23

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. Is Hodgkin lymphoma just another B-cell lymphoma?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harald Stein; Roshanak Bob

    2009-01-01

    Hodgkin disease was the first defined lymphoid neoplasm. For many decades it was regarded as a disease separate from non-Hodgkin\\u000a lymphoma. However, recent studies have shown that the dysplastic cells of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are monoclonal B cells. This\\u000a finding raised again the question “Is HL just another B-cell lymphoma?” This article reviews the different aspects of HL and\\u000a B-cell

  15. [Acute hypertrygliceridemic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Senosiain Lalastra, Carla; Tavío Hernández, Eduardo; Moreira Vicente, Victor; Maroto Castellanos, Maite; García Sánchez, Maria Concepción; Aicart Ramos, Marta; Téllez Vivajos, Luis; Cuńo Roldán, José Luis

    2013-04-01

    Acute hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis is the third cause of acute pancreatitis in the Western population. There is usually an underlying alteration in lipid metabolism and a secondary factor. Clinical presentation is similar to that of pancreatitis of other etiologies, but the course of acute hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis seems to be worse and more recurrent. Some laboratory data can be artefacts, leading to diagnostic errors. This is the case of amylase, which can show false low levels. Treatment is based on intense fluidotherapy and analgesia. When there is no response to conservative management, other methods to lower triglyceride levels should be used. Several options are available, such as plasmapheresis, insulin, and heparin. The present article provides a review of the current literature on this entity. PMID:23522394

  16. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... allo-transplantation?" For each pancreatic islet allo-transplant infusion, researchers use specialized enzymes to remove islets from ... in a lab. Transplant patients typically receive two infusions with an average of 400,000 to 500, ...

  17. Pancreatitis - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... most commonly caused by either alcohol toxicity or gallstones. Gallstones can lodge in the common bile duct and ... If pancreatitis is due to gallstones, most often the responsible gallstone ... goes away. Less commonly, a minor surgical procedure ...

  18. Intracranial ectopic pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Heller, R Scott; Tsugu, Hitoshi; Nabeshima, Kazuki; Madsen, Ole D

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 a young Japanese female was reported to suffer from a congenital brain malformation with a non-functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor arising from intracranial ectopic pancreatic tissue. Ectopic pancreas is normally confined to other endodermally-derived organs and not previously reported to be found in the brain. Therefore, we sought to better understand the true pancreatic nature of the tissue and to further understand the mechanism by which ectopic pancreas could appear in the brain. A detailed immunohistochemical analysis for pancreatic hormones, transcription factors, ductal/exocrine markers and stem cell markers on sections from the resected tumor tissue was performed. All five endocrine cell types are observed but pancreatic polypeptide cells are quite rare and ghrelin and glucagon cells are more numerous than in normal human pancreas. Insulin immunoreactive cells stain for c-peptide. The ?-cell specific transcription factor, Nkx6.1, is expressed only in the insulin immunoreactive cells while neither Ptf1a or PDX-1 immunoreactive cells can be observed. Duct-like structures stain strongly for pan-cytokeratin and E-cahderin. The exocrine like tissue stains strongly for pancreatic amylase, lipase and chymotrypsin. Ngn-3 cells were very rare and not in the pancreatic area. Examining for endodermal markers we observed Sox17 had a weak staining in some areas of the pancreatic tissue but was much less widely expressed than FoxA2. The tumor tissue did not stain for the stem cell markers, Oct-4 and Sox2. It is speculated that the ectopic pancreas domain may arise from misexpression of homeodomain transcription factors related to Pdx1 within a domain of Ptf1a expression. PMID:21099298

  19. FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Pancreatic synthetic rates: a new test of pancreatic function.

    PubMed

    Boyd, E J; Wood, H; Clarke, G; Neill, G D; Hutchison, F; Wormsley, K G

    1982-03-01

    Synthesis of pancreatic enzymes was measured in 7 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 10 patients with no pancreatic disease, on the basis of the incorporation of 75Se-methionine into pancreatic exocrine proteins. Two of the patients with chronic pancreatitis had normal exocrine function. Pancreatic secretion was stimulated by intravenous infusion of secretin (1 clinical unit x kg-1 x h-1) and cholecystokinin (1 Ivy dog unit x kg-1 x h-1). 75Se-methionine (3.0 microCi x kg-1) was added to the infusion. Synthetic rates were significantly greater in all the patients with chronic pancreatitis, including the two individuals with normal responses to stimulation with secretin and cholecystokinin. Studies of synthetic rates may therefore be able to confirm the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis before exocrine insufficiency becomes manifest. PMID:7134848

  1. Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle A. Fanale; Anas Younes

    Whereas it is estimated that 7800 new cases of Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) will be diagnosed in 2006, nodular lymphocyte predominant\\u000a Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) will only account for 3–8% of newly diagnosed HL (1, 2). The majority of the incidence is accounted\\u000a for by the classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) subtypes (nodular sclerosing, lymphocyte rich, lymphocyte depleted, and mixed\\u000a cellularity). There exists

  2. Study of Alisertib (MLN8237) in Adults With Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-15

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Precursor B-lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; T-cell Lymphoma, Excluding Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Follicular Lymphoma With ? 50% Diffuse Large Cell Component

  3. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-06

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  4. Lymphoma-associated dysimmune polyneuropathies.

    PubMed

    Stübgen, Joerg-Patrick

    2015-08-15

    Lymphoma consists of a variety of malignancies of lymphocyte origin. A spectrum of clinical peripheral neuropathy syndromes with different disease mechanisms occurs in about 5% of lymphoma patients. There exists a complex inter-relationship between lymphoproliferative malignancies and autoimmunity. An imbalance in the regulation of the immune system presumably underlies various immune-mediated neuropathies in patients with lymphoma. This article reviews lymphoma and more-or-less well-defined dysimmune neuropathy subgroups that are caused by humoral and/or cell-mediated immune disease mechanisms directed against known or undetermined peripheral nerve antigens. PMID:26070654

  5. Occupational exposure and malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Persson, B

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of malignant lymphoma, especially non-Hodgkin's lymphoma has increased over the last few decades. This statement is true despite the fact that methods for diagnosing malignant lymphoma have changed and misclassification has become a problem. The present review is mainly concerned with occupational aspects of malignant lymphoma. Several subsequent studies have dealt with malignant lymphoma among woodworkers and pulp and paper mill workers pointing to increased risks. Exposure to phenoxy herbicides have provided reasonable evidence to be connected with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, whereas there is limited information regarding Hodgkin's disease. The relationship between solvent exposure and malignant lymphoma has been observed in a great number of studies. It is, however, still hard to identify specific solvent compounds responsible for the increased risk. Other occupational exposures i.e. wood preservatives, welding, asbestos, hair dyes and exposure to animal viruses among meatworkers and veterinarians have also been studied in relation to malignant lymphoma. This review shows that occupational factors, especially exposure to solvents and phenoxy herbicides and also to wood, play a role in the epidemiology of malignant lymphoma. PMID:9117190

  6. Lenalidomide for mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Skarbnik, Alan P; Goy, Andre H

    2015-06-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma accounts for 6% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. It is a biologically and clinically heterogeneous disease and treatment may be difficult, since most patients present at an older age, being unable to undergo intensive chemotherapy. Lenalidomide is an approved medication for relapsed mantle cell lymphoma in patients who received at least two lines of therapy, including bortezomib. New insights into the mechanisms of action of lenalidomide provided ground for novel combinations that may be more tolerable, while still efficient, for this patient population. In this review, we evaluate the current paradigm for lenalidomide in mantle cell lymphoma. PMID:25952533

  7. Pancreatic ductal system obstruction and acute recurrent pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Delhaye; C Matos; M Arvanitakis

    2008-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis is a clinical entity largely associated with pancreatic ductal obstruction. This latter includes congenital variants, of which pancreas divisum is the most frequent but also controversial, chronic pancreatitis, tumors of the pancreaticobiliary junction and sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. This review summarizes current knowledge about diagnostic work-up and therapy of these conditions.

  8. Pancreatic trauma: A concise review

    PubMed Central

    Debi, Uma; Kaur, Ravinder; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sinha, Anindita; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the pancreas is rare and difficult to diagnose. In contrast, traumatic injuries to the liver, spleen and kidney are common and are usually identified with ease by imaging modalities. Pancreatic injuries are usually subtle to identify by different diagnostic imaging modalities, and these injuries are often overlooked in cases with extensive multiorgan trauma. The most evident findings of pancreatic injury are post-traumatic pancreatitis with blood, edema, and soft tissue infiltration of the anterior pararenal space. The alterations of post-traumatic pancreatitis may not be visualized within several hours following trauma as they are time dependent. Delayed diagnoses of traumatic pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of pancreatic injuries because early recognition of the disruption of the main pancreatic duct is important. We reviewed our experience with the use of various imaging modalities for diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma. PMID:24379625

  9. Primary testicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Vitolo, Umberto; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Zucca, Emanuele

    2008-02-01

    Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the testis (PTL) accounts for about 9% of testicular neoplasms and 1-2% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. It is the most common testicular malignancy in elder men. Anecdotal reports associated PTL development with trauma, chronic orchitis, cryptorchidism, or filariasis exist, but no case-control studies have confirmed their etiologic significance. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common histotype in primary forms; aggressive histologies, especially Burkitt's lymphoma, are prevalent in cases of secondary involvement of testis. The most common clinical presentation is a unilateral painless scrotal swelling, sometimes with sharp scrotal pain or hydrocele. Systemic B symptoms are present in 25-41% of patients with advanced stage. Less frequently, abdominal pain, and ascites can be seen in patients with involvement of retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Bilateral testicular involvement is detected in up to 35% of patients. Although good results with doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy, followed or not by radiotherapy, have been reported, a high proportion of patients with stage I-II diseases experience aggressive relapses, and patients with advanced disease have a very poor prognosis. PTL has a propensity to disseminate to other extranodal organs, including the controlateral testis, CNS, skin, Waldeyer's ring, lung, pleura, and soft tissue. Orchidectomy followed by R-CHOP combination, with CNS prophylaxis, and prophylactic irradiation of the contralateral testis is the recommended first-line treatment for patients with limited disease. Management of patients with advanced or relapsed disease should follow the worldwide recommendations for nodal DLBCL. PMID:17962036

  10. Vaccination strategies for lymphomas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammed M. Dar; Larry W. Kwak

    2003-01-01

    Vaccination strategies for lymphomas were developed along with one of the first recognized tumor-specific targets, the clonal\\u000a antigen receptor, composed of unique variable regions known as idiotypes. Human clinical trials of idiotype vaccination have\\u000a benefited from highly concordant animal models, leading to sequential improvements in design. Evidence of the clinical benefit\\u000a of idiotype vaccines is strong but formally unproven. Significant

  11. Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea M. Sheehan

    \\u000a This chapter covers T and B lymphoblastic neoplasms, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and lymphoblastic lymphoma\\u000a (LBL). Morphologic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic features are discussed along with the parameters of various modalities\\u000a used in their diagnosis. The techniques and utility of minimum residual disease (MRD) measurement after therapy is discussed,\\u000a as are new insights into the molecular biology of leukemogenesis gleaned

  12. Lymphoblastic lymphoma in adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John W. Sweetenham

    2006-01-01

    Understanding of the pathogenesis and biology of precursor T-cell and B-cell neoplasms has advanced significantly with the\\u000a description of gene expression profiling studies, especially in T-cell disease. These studies have demonstrated leukemic arrest\\u000a at various stages of thymocyte maturation, characterized by gene expression signatures with prognostic significance. Optimal\\u000a treatment strategies for adult lymphoblastic lymphoma are uncertain, although current evidence supports

  13. Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georgina Hall; Cindy Schwartz; Stephen Daw; Louis S. Constine

    \\u000a Survival of a pediatric cancer patient is measured not only by the therapeutic eradication of the malignancy, but also by\\u000a maintenance of potential for a life unburdened by medical morbidity. This challenge for pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treatment\\u000a has, in recent decades, defined the strategies of care. Although the biology and natural history of HL is similar in children\\u000a and

  14. Oblimersen Sodium and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  16. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-15

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  17. Primary testicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Vural, Filiz; Cagirgan, Seckin; Saydam, Guray; Hekimgil, Mine; Soyer, Nur Akad; Tombuloglu, Murat

    2007-11-01

    We evaluated clinical features, management and survival of 12 patients with primary testicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma presented to our hematology unit between January 1992 and July 2006, retrospectively. The median age of patients was 47 years at presentation (range 29-78 years) and > 80% of them were < 50 years old. In the majority of cases, orchidectomy was performed as diagnostic and first-line therapeutic procedures. Dominant histological subtype was diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Seven patients out of 12 (58%) were Ann Arbor stages I and II, and the remaining five patients (42%) were stages III and IV. All the patients received doxorubicin-based chemotherapy and achieved complete remission. The addition of rituximab and central nervous system prophylaxis with intrathecal combined chemotherapy containing methotrexate, cytarabine and dexametasone were applied to three patients who were recently admitted. The rate of relapse was 8% and progression-free survival (PFS) at 10 years was 88%. Median duration of response was 84 months (range 14-173 months), median 97.5 months of follow-up. All patients are alive and in case remission. Because of the spreading nature and relapse probability at different sites, including central nervous system and contralateral testis, systemic treatment with doxorubicin-based chemotherapy with or without prophylaxis for contralateral testis and the central nervous system seems to improve the outcome of primary testicular lymphoma. PMID:18020104

  18. Immunoregulation in pancreatic cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet M. D. Plate; Susan Shott; Jules E. Harris

    1999-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer known in man yet specific anti-tumor immunity has been\\u000a demonstrated in lymph nodes draining the sites of pancreatic tumors. Despite this immunity, pancreatic cancer patients suffer\\u000a a quick demise. To further define tumor immunity in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, we sought to characterize\\u000a helper T cell subsets, serum cytokines,

  19. MDX-010 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-22

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Geldanamycin Analogue in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-13

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. An update on lymphoma in children and young adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine Morley-Jacob; Eve Gallop-Evans

    Lymphoma accounts for approximately 10% of childhood cancers, but 17% in teenagers. It is divided into Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, with the vast majority of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in children being Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Lymphoma usually presents with painless lymphadenopathy, most commonly in the cervical region. ‘B’ symptoms are associated with more advanced disease. The

  2. Pancreatic ascariasis with periampullary carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Arulprakash, S; Sahu, Manoj Kumar; Dutta, Amit Kumar; Joseph, A; Chandy, George M

    2015-01-01

    Ascarias lumbricoides infestation is endemic in tropical countries. Most infections are asymptomatic, but it can produce a wide spectrum of manifestations including hepatobiliary and pancreatic complications. There are reports of association of biliary ascariasis with bilary malignancies in the past, but same is not known for pancreatic ascariasis. We report a case of association of periampullary malignancy with pancreatic ascariasis. PMID:25709954

  3. Lymphoma of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

    2014-01-01

    Background. Lymphoma of the urinary bladder (LUB) is rare. Aims. To review the literature on LUB. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results. LUB can be either primary or secondary. The tumour has female predominance; most cases occur in middle-age women. Secondary LUB occurs in 10% to 25% of leukemias/lymphomas and in advanced-stage systemic lymphoma. Less than 100 cases have been reported. MALT typically affects adults older than 60 years; 75% are female. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is also common and may arise from transformation of MALT. LUB presents with haematuria, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, and abdominal or back pain. Macroscopic examination of LUBs show large discrete tumours centred in the dome or lateral walls of the bladder. Positive staining of LUB varies by the subtype of lymphoma; B-cell lymphomas are CD20 positive. MALT lymphoma is positively stained for CD20, CD19, and FMC7 and negatively stained for CD5, CD10, and CD11c. LUB stains negatively with Pan-keratin, vimentin, CK20, and CK7. MALT lymphoma exhibits t(11; 18)(q21: 21). Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the MALT type of LUB with no recurrence. Conclusions. LUB is diagnosed by its characteristic morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics. Radiotherapy is a useful treatment. PMID:24511310

  4. Incidental isolated pancreatic hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    K?sao?lu, Abdullah; Özo?ul, Bünyami; Atamanalp, Sabri Selçuk; Pirimo?lu, Berhan; Ayd?nl?, Bülent; Korkut, Ercan

    2015-03-01

    Isolated pancreatic hydatid cysts are a rare parasitic disease even in endemic areas. It is difficult to discriminate primary pancreatic hydatid cysts from other cystic and solid lesions of the pancreas. This is a case report of an incidental isolated pancreatic hydatid cyst. A heterogeneous cystic lesion in the body of the pancreas was identified on magnetic resonance imaging of a patient previously diagnosed patient with cholelithiasis, and because of the malignant possibility of the lesion, splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy and cholecystectomy was performed. The histopathologic diagnosis was reported as a hydatid cyst. Pancreatic hydatid cysts should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic pseudocysts and cystic malignancies. PMID:25917590

  5. Acute pancreatitis and hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Deborah A

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a condition characterized by painful inflammation of the pancreas and can be either chronic or acute. The most common causes of acute pancreatitis (AP) in the United States are gallstones and excessive alcohol consumption. In addition, significantly elevated serum triglyceride levels can precipitate episodes of AP. Genetic defects are associated with severe elevations in serum triglyceride levels, whereas poorly controlled diabetes, obesity, and high-fat diets can contribute to elevated triglyceride levels substantial enough to provoke pancreatitis (secondary hypertriglyceridemia). Treatment of hypertriglyceridemia-induced AP consists of immediate reduction in serum triglyceride levels and long-term medications and lifestyle modifications. Nurses are instrumental in patient education about lifelong treatment strategies. PMID:19357469

  6. Fenretinide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-30

    Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  8. Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Tandan, Manu; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2013-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP who have failed to respond to medical therapy and require intervention. PMID:24115811

  9. Treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis by inhibition of pancreatic secretion with octreotide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Malfertheiner; D Mayer; M Büchler; J E Domínguez-Muńoz; B Schiefer; H Ditschuneit

    1995-01-01

    It has been suggested that pancreatic ductal hypertension, secondary to pancreatic outflow obstruction, is a cause of pain in chronic pancreatitis. This study investigated the effect of inhibiting pancreatic secretion with octreotide in chronic pancreatitis pain. Ten patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis and severe daily pain were included in an intraindividual double blind crossover study. All patients received octreotide (3

  10. Comparative Study of Serum Pancreatic Isoamylase, Lipase, and Trypsin-Like Immunoreactivity in Pancreatic Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Ventrucci; L. Gullo; C. Daniele; C. Bartolucci; P. Priori; L. Platé; G. Bonora; G. Labň

    1983-01-01

    Serum total amylase, pancreatic and salivary isoamylase, lipase and trypsin-like immunoreactivity (TLI) were measured in 16 patients with acute pancreatitis, 37 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 11 patients with pancreatic cancer, and 53 control subjects in order to evaluate the relative value of these tests in the diagnosis of pancreatic disease. In acute pancreatitis patients studied within 2 days from the

  11. Overexpression of Pancreatitis-Associated Protein (PAP) in Human Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Min-Jue Xie; Yoshiharu Motoo; Juan Lucio Iovanna; Shi-Bing Su; Koushiro Ohtsubo; Fujitsugu Matsubara; Norio Sawabu

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) is almost absent in normal pancreas, but is strongly induced in acute pancreatitis. PAP mRNA is also expressed in cancer cells, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. However, the clinicopathological significance of PAP in human pancreatic cancer is not clear. We examined PAP expression in pancreatic tissues from individuals with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma using immunohistochemistry. PAP was overexpressed in

  12. Vorinostat and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-12-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  13. Lenalidomide and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-01

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  14. Pancreatic trauma in children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ingrid Sutherland; Oren Ledder; Joe Crameri; Andrew Nydegger; Anthony Catto-Smith; Timothy Cain; Mark Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Purpose  To document the demographics, mechanisms and outcome of traumatic pancreatitis in children at a single large tertiary referral\\u000a centre in Australia.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We undertook a 10-year retrospective audit of children admitted to the Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Australia with\\u000a a hospital coded diagnosis which included pancreatic injury between 1993 and 2002. Data included patient demographics, source\\u000a of admission, mechanism of injury,

  15. Hypertriglyceridaemia-induced pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Natasha; Fernando, Upul; Baskar, Varadarajan

    2013-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridaemia is the third most common cause of acute pancreatitis but is relatively rare and therefore requires a high level of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed. We discuss the case of a 46-year-old man who initially presented to the accident and emergency department with suspected first presentation of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and a normal amylase but who did not respond to DKA treatment. Further history revealed significant cardiovascular risk factors, examination showed an evidence of hyperlipidaemia and investigations revealed acute pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridaemia. We discuss the causes of hypertriglyceridaemia, the difficulty in differentiating primary versus secondary hypertriglyceridaemia, possible pathogenesis and current evidence-based treatments. PMID:23446049

  16. Hypertriglyceridaemia-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Weston, Natasha; Fernando, Upul; Baskar, Varadarajan

    2013-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridaemia is the third most common cause of acute pancreatitis but is relatively rare and therefore requires a high level of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed. We discuss the case of a 46-year-old man who initially presented to the accident and emergency department with suspected first presentation of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and a normal amylase but who did not respond to DKA treatment. Further history revealed significant cardiovascular risk factors, examination showed an evidence of hyperlipidaemia and investigations revealed acute pancreatitis secondary to hypertriglyceridaemia. We discuss the causes of hypertriglyceridaemia, the difficulty in differentiating primary versus secondary hypertriglyceridaemia, possible pathogenesis and current evidence-based treatments. PMID:23446049

  17. Cystic pancreatic lymphangioma

    PubMed Central

    Gure?, Nazim; Gurluler, Ercument; Alim, Altan; Berber, Ibrahim; Gurkan, Alihan

    2012-01-01

    Lymphangioma of the pancreas is a rare benign tumor of lymphatic origin. Retroperitoneal lymphangiomas account for 1% of all lymphangiomas. Herein, we report a case of cystic pancreatic lymphangioma diagnosed in 34 year-old female patient who was hospitalized for a slight pain in the epigastrium and vomiting. Radiological imaging revealed a large multiloculated cystic abdominal mass with enhancing septations involving the upper retroperitoneum. During the laparoscopic surgery, a well circumscribed polycystic tumor was completely excised preserving the pancreatic duct. The patient made a complete recovery and is disease-free 12 months postoperatively. PMID:22826784

  18. Clinical and Pathologic Studies in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients Receiving Antibody Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-05-31

    Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Diffuse Large B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Follicular / Indolent B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Mantle Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Marginal Zone; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Peripheral T-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Waldenstr Macroglobulinemia

  19. Primary follicular lymphoma of the duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Mardones, Mabel A.; Krause, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma, a common nodal lymphoma, is rare in the gastrointestinal tract. When seen in this location, duodenal involvement is frequent. Most patients have localized disease, and survival appears to be excellent even without treatment. Although the outcomes are improved, the morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features remain similar to those of nodal follicular lymphomas. We describe a woman with de novo follicular lymphoma of the duodenum and discuss the features of this remarkably indolent variant of follicular lymphoma. PMID:26130897

  20. HIV-Associated lymphomas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Straus

    2001-01-01

    Intermediate and high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) with a B-cell phenotype are AIDS-defining illnesses. The incidence\\u000a of systemic NHL is over 100 times increased, primary central nervous system NHL is over 3000 times increased, and Hodgkin’s\\u000a disease is approximately 10 times increased in the HIV-infected population. Unusual extranodal presentations of NHL and Hodgkin’s\\u000a disease are seen in HIV-infected individuals. High-grade histologies

  1. Pancreatitis associated protein as an early marker of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kemppainen, E; Sand, J; Puolakkainen, P; Laine, S; Hedström, J; Sainio, V; Haapiainen, R; Nordback, I

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measuring serum pancreatitis associated protein (PAP) in acute pancreatitis has proved valuable to monitoring the course of the disease and the recovery of the patient. AIMS: The aim was to analyze the utility of PAP on admission as a diagnostic and prognostic marker of acute pancreatitis. PATIENTS: Values of PAP were prospectively analyzed in 80 healthy volunteers, 164 patients with abdominal pain but without pancreatitis, 109 patients with mild acute pancreatitis, and 38 patients with severe acute pancreatitis. METHODS: The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was verified with clinical, laboratory, radiological, and in some cases findings at operation or necropsy. RESULTS: Mean (95% confidence intervals) serum PAP values were 27 (24 to 29) micrograms/l in healthy volunteers, 78 (59 to 96) micrograms/l in patients with abdominal pain, 191 (134 to 247) micrograms/l, in patients with mild acute pancreatitis, and 599 (284 to 914) micrograms/l in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Differences between the groups were significant (p = 0.04 - 0.01). Despite the differences in means, the ranges overlapped between the groups. The sensitivity of PAP on admission to detect acute pancreatitis was 38%-53% and the respective specificity 89%-77% depending on the cut off level. The sensitivity of PAP to detect severe acute pancreatitis was 45%-68% and the specificity 74%-59% depending on the cut off level. CONCLUSIONS: Admission PAP did not distinguish severe from mild acute pancreatitis better than C reactive protein. Measurement of PAP does not give appreciable diagnostic advantages in the early phase of acute pancreatitis. PMID:9026481

  2. Reduction of miR-29c enhances pancreatic cancer cell migration and stem cell-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jianxin; Yu, Chao; Chen, Meiyuan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Se; Sun, Chengyi

    2015-01-01

    The hallmarks of pancreatic cancer are limitless replicative potential as well as tissue invasion and metastasis, leading to an extremely aggressive disease with shockingly high lethality. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these characteristics remain largely unclear. Herein, we report the results of a differential miRNA expression screen that compared pancreatic cancer tissues and normal pancreatic tissues, where the pancreatic cancer tissues had highly downregulated miR-29c with relative Wnt cascade hyperactivation. MiR-29c directly suppressed the following Wnt upstream regulators: frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas 2 (FRAT2), low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 6 (LRP6), Frizzled-4 (FZD4) and Frizzled-5 (FZD5). Furthermore, transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) inhibited miR-29c expression, leading to Wnt activation. Significantly, our results were consistent with an important correlation between miR-29c levels and TGF-? hyperactivation and the activated Wnt cascade in human pancreatic cancer specimens. These findings reveal a novel mechanism for Wnt hyperactivation in pancreatic cancer and may suggest a new target for clinical intervention in pancreatic cancer. PMID:25605017

  3. Cilengitide (EMD 121974) in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  4. Patient Derived Cancer Cell Lines in Identifying Molecular Changes in Patients With Previously Untreated Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Gemcitabine Hydrochloride-Based Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-07

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  5. Capecitabine-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Hanifi; Warmerdam, Laurence V

    2010-06-01

    Capecitabine is an oral pro-drug of fluorouracil, which is a commonly used cytotoxic drug in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma. Many adverse effects are known to occur with capecitabine including diarrhea, palmar-planter erythrodysesthesia and nausea. We report a case of capecitabine-induced pancreatitis, also occurring with re-challenge. PMID:19700478

  6. Protecting Pancreatic ?-cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonello Pileggi; Elizabeth S. Fenjves; Dagmar Klein; Camillo Ricordi; Ricardo L. Pastori

    2004-01-01

    Summary Type 1 diabetes mellitus is an autoimmune disorder in which the insulin-producing b-cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans are selectively destroyed. Transplantation of allogeneic islets offers a novel therapeutic approach for type 1 diabetic patients. Primary obstacles to the successful outcome of this treatment are loss of the islets occurring first during the isolation procedure and then immediately

  7. Nutrition in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Henrik Hřjgaard; Irtun, Řivind; Olesen, Sřren Schou; Drewes, Asbjřrn Mohr; Holst, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is a major player in nutrient digestion. In chronic pancreatitis both exocrine and endocrine insufficiency may develop leading to malnutrition over time. Maldigestion is often a late complication of chronic pancreatic and depends on the severity of the underlying disease. The severity of malnutrition is correlated with two major factors: (1) malabsorption and depletion of nutrients (e.g., alcoholism and pain) causes impaired nutritional status; and (2) increased metabolic activity due to the severity of the disease. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. Good nutritional practice includes screening to identify patients at risk, followed by a thoroughly nutritional assessment and nutrition plan for risk patients. Treatment should be multidisciplinary and the mainstay of treatment is abstinence from alcohol, pain treatment, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation. To achieve energy-end protein requirements, oral supplementation might be beneficial. Enteral nutrition may be used when patients do not have sufficient calorie intake as in pylero-duodenal-stenosis, inflammation or prior to surgery and can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis and should only be used in case of GI-tract obstruction or as a supplement to enteral nutrition. PMID:24259957

  8. Congenital pancreatic cyst

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduardo T. Fernandes; S. Douglas Hixson; Robert S. Hollabaugh; Olga P. Edwards; Thomas F. Boulden; Monford D. Custer

    1989-01-01

    True congenital pancreatic cysts are extremely rare, with less than 20 cases reported in the literature. A 3-month-old infant with a giant congenital cyst of the pancreas is reported. The cyst, located in the head and body of the pancreas, was diagnosed by ultrasound and completely excised. The clinical presentation and treatment of this anomaly are discussed.

  9. Nutrition and pancreatic cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geoffrey R. Howe; J. David Burch

    1996-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence on the relation between nutrition and pancreatic cancer is reviewed. A number of epidemiologic studies of diet and cancer of the pancreas have been reported including descriptive, case-control, and cohort studies. Overall, fairly consistent patterns of positive associations with the intake of meat, carbohydrates, and dietary cholesterol have been observed. Consistent inverse relationships with fruit and vegetable intakes

  10. Pancreatitis in childhood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard D. Spicer; Sidney Cywes

    1988-01-01

    Ninety children treated for acute, relapsing, or chronic pancreatitis at the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town, between 1958 and 1982 are reviewed. The commonest cause was Ascaris worms in the bile duct and the next commonest identifiable cause was trauma. Diagnosis was clinical, confirmed by raised amylase levels and radiological or operative findings. Ultrasound was particularly helpful.

  11. [Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Daiji; Shirai, Kohji

    2013-09-01

    In Japan, the frequency of acute pancreatitis is 27.7 per 100,000, which includes 1.4 % of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis(HTGP). Severity and complication rates with HTGP have been reported as higher in comparison to acute pancreatitis from other etiologies. Havel has suggested that hydrolysis of excessive triglyceride-rich lipoproteins releases high concentrations of free fatty acid(FFA). The FFA micelles injure the vascular endothelium and acinar cells of the pancreas, producing a self-perpetuating ischemic and acidic environment with resultant toxicity. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) abnormality has been reported to contribute to severe hypertriglyceridemia. However, patients without any LPL abnormality are often encountered clinically, suggesting that other factors may be involved in the development of severe hypertriglyceridemia. In 21 patients with HTGP, 9 patients(42.9 %) with apolipoprotein AV (ApoAV) Gly185-Cys polymorphism were observed, whereas 14.3 % with LPL gene variants. No patient had ApoCII deficiency. These results suggest that in addition to LPL gene variants, ApoAV variant may be numerously involved in HTGP. It is important for clinicians to routinely investigate pathogenesis of hypertriglyceridemia in case with pancreatitis because specific management may be needed. PMID:24205721

  12. MS-275 and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. Gemcitabine and Bendamustine in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-22

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  15. A Phase II Trial of Panobinostat and Lenalidomide in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-22

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  16. A Phase II Trial of Panobinostat and Lenalidomide in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-26

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  17. Combination Chemotherapy, Rituximab, and Ixazomib Citrate in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-22

    Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; MYC Gene Mutation; Plasmablastic Lymphoma

  18. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: epidemiology and genetics.

    PubMed Central

    Flanders, T Y; Foulkes, W D

    1996-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an important cause of death from cancer throughout the developed world. There are few established environmental risk factors, but a previous history of pancreatitis and exposure to tobacco and salted food appear to be the most important. A family history of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is not common in patients with this disease, but recent research has shown that pancreatic adenocarcinoma can be a feature of cancer susceptibility syndromes associated with germline mutations in p16, BRCA1, BRCA2, and APC. This highlights the need for a full family history in apparently sporadic cases. Somatic mutations in p16, BRCA2, and APC have also been reported in pancreatic cancer; however, K-RAS mutations appear to be the commonest oncogenic alteration. Recent advances in our understanding of the basis of hereditary cancer syndromes may be applicable to the diagnosis, treatment, and possibly prevention of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in the future. PMID:8950667

  19. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Gonçalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6?months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22655256

  20. If I Had - Mediastinal Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... In Depth In the Spotlight If I Had... Universities and Hospitals By Disease or Symptom View QuickTime ... Mediastinal Lymphoma - Dr. Jonathan W. Friedberg, M.D, University of Rochester Medical Center Back to Home Page ...

  1. Stages of Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for, diagnose, and monitor many different conditions. Blood chemistry studies : A procedure in which a blood sample ... from the disease compared to patients with no history of Hodgkin lymphoma who have breast cancer. Some ...

  2. MORAb-004 in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-09

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. The biology of Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralf Küppers

    2008-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma was first described in 1832. The aetiology of this lymphoma, however, remained enigmatic for a long time. Only within the past 10 years has the B-cell nature of the pathognomonic Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg (HRS) cells been revealed, along with several recurrent genetic lesions. The pathogenetic role for Epstein–Barr virus infection has also been substantiated. HRS cells in classical

  4. Molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donghui Li; Li Jiao

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Currently there is no early diagnostic\\u000a test and no effective treatment options for this deadly disease. Prevention of pancreatic cancer is difficult because little\\u000a is known about its etiology. The main modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer include cigarette smoking and dietary\\u000a factors. Information from molecular

  5. [Acute pancreatitis and ectopic pancreas].

    PubMed

    Vix, J; Rohr, S; Faure, F; Jung, E; Meyer, C

    1997-07-01

    We report the case of a 28-year-old woman with a pancreatic heterotopia presenting with a history of acute pancreatitis. Symptoms were epigastric pains. Abdomino-pelvic CT Scan revealed a tumor located in gastro-duodenal area. Exploratory surgery was performed, and the segment containing the mass was resected. Histopathologic examination of the lesion revealed heterotopic pancreatic tissue without malignancy. PMID:9378788

  6. Advanced Imaging of Chronic Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nabil Elia Choueiri; Numan Cem Balci; Samer Alkaade; Frank R. Burton

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by continuing inflammation, destruction, and irreversible morphological changes in the\\u000a pancreatic parenchyma and ductal anatomy. These changes lead to chronic pain and\\/or loss of function. Although these definitions\\u000a are simple, the clinical diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis remains difficult to make, especially for early disease. Routine\\u000a imaging modalities such as transabdominal ultrasound and standard CT scans are

  7. Everolimus and Octreotide Acetate With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-22

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  8. A positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic ?-cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Yang, Zhe; Wang, Weiping; Guo, Ting; Jia, Zhuqing; Ma, Kangtao; Zhou, Chunyan

    2014-07-01

    Insulin enhancer binding protein-1 (ISL-1), a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor, has been reported to play essential roles in promoting adult pancreatic ?-cells proliferation. Recent studies indicate that ISL-1 may also involve in the occurrence of a variety of tumors. However, whether ISL-1 has any functional effect on tumorigenesis, and what are the differences on ISL-1 function in distinct conditions, are completely unknown. In this study, we found that ISL-1 was highly expressed in human pancreatic ?-cells, as well as in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but to a much less extent in other normal tissues or tumor specimens. Further study revealed that ISL-1 promoted the proliferation of pancreatic ?-cells and DLBCL cells, and also accelerated the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. We also found that ISL-1 could activate c-Myc transcription not only in pancreatic ?-cells but also in DLBCL cells. However, a cell-specific feedback regulation was detectable only in DLBCL cells. This auto-regulatory loop was established by the interaction of ISL-1 and c-Myc to form an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex, and synergistically to promote ISL-1 transcription through binding on the ISL-1 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic ?-cells, which might result in the functional diversities of ISL-1 in different physiological and pathological processes. PMID:24845569

  9. Molecular Pathogenesis of MALT Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Troppan, Katharina; Wenzl, Kerstin; Neumeister, Peter; Deutsch, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 8% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas are extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), also known as MALT lymphoma, which was first described in 1983 by Isaacson and Wright. MALT lymphomas arise at a wide range of different extranodal sites, with the highest frequency in the stomach, followed by lung, ocular adnexa, and thyroid, and with a low percentage in the small intestine. Interestingly, at least 3 different, apparently site-specific, chromosomal translocations and missense and frameshift mutations, all pathway-related genes affecting the NF-?B signal, have been implicated in the development and progression of MALT lymphoma. However, these genetic abnormalities alone are not sufficient for malignant transformation. There is now increasing evidence suggesting that the oncogenic product of translocation cooperates with immunological stimulation in oncogenesis, that is, the association with chronic bacterial infection or autoaggressive process. This review mainly discusses MALT lymphomas in terms of their genetic aberration and association with chronic infections and summarizes recent advances in their molecular pathogenesis. PMID:25922601

  10. Novel agents in indolent lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Merli, Michele; Ferrario, Andrea; Basilico, Claudia; Maffioli, Margherita; Caramazza, Domenica; Appio, Lorena; Arcaini, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Indolent non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (iNHLs) include follicular lymphomas (FL), marginal-zone lymphoma, lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma. First-line standard therapy in advanced, symptomatic iNHL consists of rituximab-based immunochemotherapy. The recent rediscovery of the ‘old’ chemotherapeutic agent bendamustine, an alkylating agent with a peculiar mechanism of action, has added a new effective and well-tolerated option to the therapeutic armamentarium in iNHL, increasing response rates and duration. However, patients invariably relapse and subsequent active and well-tolerated agents are needed. In recent years a large number of new targeted agents have been tested in preclinical and clinical experimentation in FL and indolent nonfollicular lymphoma (iNFL), including the new monoclonal antibodies binding CD20 or other surface antigens, immunoconjugates and bispecific antibodies. Moreover novel agents directed against intracellular processes such as proteasome inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors and agents that target the tumour microenvironment, notably the immunomodulatory agent lenalidomide, are under active clinical investigation. The development of these new drugs may change in the near future the approach to iNHL patients, leading to better tolerated and effective therapy regimens. PMID:23610620

  11. Novel agents in indolent lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Merli, Michele; Ferrario, Andrea; Basilico, Claudia; Maffioli, Margherita; Caramazza, Domenica; Appio, Lorena; Arcaini, Luca; Passamonti, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (iNHLs) include follicular lymphomas (FL), marginal-zone lymphoma, lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma. First-line standard therapy in advanced, symptomatic iNHL consists of rituximab-based immunochemotherapy. The recent rediscovery of the 'old' chemotherapeutic agent bendamustine, an alkylating agent with a peculiar mechanism of action, has added a new effective and well-tolerated option to the therapeutic armamentarium in iNHL, increasing response rates and duration. However, patients invariably relapse and subsequent active and well-tolerated agents are needed. In recent years a large number of new targeted agents have been tested in preclinical and clinical experimentation in FL and indolent nonfollicular lymphoma (iNFL), including the new monoclonal antibodies binding CD20 or other surface antigens, immunoconjugates and bispecific antibodies. Moreover novel agents directed against intracellular processes such as proteasome inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors and agents that target the tumour microenvironment, notably the immunomodulatory agent lenalidomide, are under active clinical investigation. The development of these new drugs may change in the near future the approach to iNHL patients, leading to better tolerated and effective therapy regimens. PMID:23610620

  12. Hepatitis C virus and lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Viswanatha, D S; Dogan, A

    2007-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is well known for its aetiological role in chronic non-A, non-B viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; in addition, the virus has also been implicated in a number of extra-hepatic "autoimmune" disease manifestations. A causative association between HCV and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was postulated relatively recently and has been the subject of intense investigation, as well as some debate. On the strength of epidemiological data, emerging biological investigations and clinical observations, HCV appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of at least a proportion of patients with NHL. Morphologically, HCV-associated lymphomas represent a variety of histological subtypes including marginal zone lymphoma (splenic, nodal and extranodal), small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Remarkably, some HCV-associated NHL appears to be highly responsive to antiviral therapy, providing some clinical evidence for this relationship, as well as the prospect for novel therapeutic intervention. PMID:18042694

  13. Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Raizner, Aileen; Phatak, Uma Padhye; Baker, Kenneth; Patel, Mohini G.; Husain, Sohail Z.; Pashankar, Dinesh S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Necrotizing pancreatitis is very rare in children. In this case series, we describe the etiologic factors, course, and outcome of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in children. Study Design We performed a retrospective study of children with necrotizing pancreatitis diagnosed over the last 21 years at Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital. Computed tomography (CT) scan criteria were used to diagnose necrotizing pancreatitis and to assess severity index. Charts were reviewed to collect demographic data, etiology, details of hospital stay, complications, and outcome. Results Eight children (mean age 12.8 years; range 4 to 20.7 years) had necrotizing pancreatitis. Etiologic factors were medications, diabetes, gallstones, and alcohol. All patients had a prolonged hospitalization (9 to 40 days; mean 18 days) and five patients required admission to the pediatric intensive care unit. During the hospital stay, patients developed complications involving the respiratory, hematological, renal, metabolic, and circulatory systems. All patients had aggressive supportive medical therapy and none required surgical intervention. There were no deaths attributable to pancreatitis. Late complications following hospital discharge occurred in six patients and included pseudocysts, transient hyperglycemia, diabetes, and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The CT severity index correlated with the risk of complications. Conclusions Acute necrotizing pancreatitis has a variable etiology in children. CT scan is useful for the diagnosis and assessment of severity. Necrotizing pancreatitis in children is associated with severe acute and late complications and requires intensive medical therapy. PMID:23102790

  14. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muńoz, J Enrique

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of the disease, the pharmacological treatment of pain, and knowledge of the natural history of autoimmune pancreatitis. New evidence supports the relatively low prevalence of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, and the role of tobacco in triggering the etiopathogenic mechanisms of chronic pancreatitis is better understood. Some studies have identified certain factors that are associated with having a positive genetic test in adults with chronic idiopathic pancreatitis, which should help to select those patients who should undergo genetic studies. Antioxidant therapy has been shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Finally, the development of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency is a very common finding during the long-term follow-up of patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. Smoking also seems to play a role in this type of pancreatitis. PMID:24160957

  15. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muńoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. PMID:25294271

  16. Root of the superior mesenteric artery in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma: evaluation with CT.

    PubMed

    Schulte, S J; Baron, R L; Freeny, P C; Patten, R M; Gorell, H A; Maclin, M L

    1991-09-01

    To determine if changes involving the root of the superior mesenteric artery are specific for neoplasm, the authors retrospectively reviewed 173 computed tomographic (CT) examinations of patients with proved pancreatitis (103 examinations) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (70 examinations). Streaky infiltration of the fat surrounding the root was seen in 27 of 56 examinations of acute pancreatitis, in four of 24 examinations of chronic pancreatitis, in 12 of 23 examinations of pancreatitis complicated by abscess, and in 25 of 70 examinations of pancreatic carcinoma. Periarterial lymph nodes were visible in 14 with acute pancreatitis, in three with chronic pancreatitis, in six with pancreatic abscess, and in 11 with pancreatic carcinoma. A focal mass extended to within 1 cm of the root in 10 with acute pancreatitis, in two with chronic pancreatitis, in four with pancreatic abscess, and in 24 with pancreatic carcinoma; the mass obliterated the periarterial fat in seven with acute pancreatitis, in one with pancreatic abscess, and in 18 with pancreatic carcinoma. Circumferential encasement occurred in one with chronic pancreatitis, in four with pancreatic abscess, in 14 with pancreatic carcinoma, and in none with acute pancreatitis; nearly all cases of encasement revealed loss of periarterial fat. Thus, these indicators are not specific for neoplasm. PMID:1871275

  17. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-10

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  18. Apolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-15

    Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  19. Rituxan/Bendamustine/PCI-32765 in Relapsed DLBCL, MCL, or Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-22

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  20. Management of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, David E; Gordon, Stuart R; Gardner, Timothy B

    2014-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common medical condition with extensive morbidity and mortality. Approximately 210,000 Americans are hospitalized each year; and 5% of patients with AP will die. It is also an expensive condition, costing 2.6 billion dollars (United States) in 2009 alone. Moreover, the incidence is increasing - the National Hospital Discharge Survey showed hospitalizations increased from 78 per 100,000 in 2007 to 90 per 100,000 just three years later in 2010. There is no proven pharmacologic entity to treat the inflammatory response associated with acute pancreatitis; supportive care with IV fluids, bowel rest and pain control are the mainstays of therapy. Recently, new developments to help increase survival and minimize morbidity with several key interventions have been investigated. This summary highlights new studies and meta-analyses to provide current opinion on treatment of this morbid condition. PMID:24766182

  1. NIH study shows Burkitt lymphoma is molecularly distinct from other lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have uncovered a number of molecular signatures in Burkitt lymphoma, including unique genetic alterations that promote cell survival, that are not found in other lymphomas. These findings provide the first genetic evidence that Burkitt lymphoma is a cancer fundamentally distinct from other types of lymphoma.

  2. Proteomic analysis of pancreatic juice for the identification of biomarkers of pancreatic cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeong Youp Park; Sun-A Kim; Joo Won Chung; Seungmin Bang; Seung Woo Park; Young-Ki Paik; Si Young Song

    2011-01-01

    Introduction  Protein profiles of endoscopically collected pancreatic juice from normal, chronic pancreatitis patients and pancreatic cancer\\u000a patients were compared to identify diagnostic biomarkers of pancreatic cancer.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Secretin was injected intravenously and pancreatic juice was collected via selective cannulation of the pancreatic duct during\\u000a endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Pancreatic juices consisting of three pooled samples for normal control, chronic\\u000a pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer

  3. Surgical management of necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Beger, H G

    1989-06-01

    The most important diagnostic step in the management of patients with severe acute pancreatitis is the discrimination between acute interstitial and necrotizing pancreatitis. Measurement of C-reactive protein, lactic acid dehydrogenase, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and alpha-2-macroglobulin and contrast-enhanced CT are useful in detecting the necrotizing course of acute pancreatitis. C-reactive protein, lactic acid dehydrogenase, and contrast-enhanced CT offer detection rates of 85 per cent to more than 90 per cent for pancreatic necrosis. Surgical decision-making in necrotizing pancreatitis should be based on clinical, morphologic, and bacteriologic data. Patients with focal pancreatic necrosis, in general, respond well to medical treatment and do not need surgery. Extended (50 per cent or more) pancreatic necroses, infected necroses, and intrapancreatic parenchymal necroses plus extrapancreatic fatty tissue necroses are indicators for surgical management. The decision for the timing of operation in patients with proved necrotizing pancreatitis should be based on clinical criteria: the development of an acute surgical abdomen, generalized sepsis, shock, persisting or increasing organ dysfunction, or some combination thereof despite maximum intensive care treatment for at least 3 days. Major pancreatic resection for the treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis appears disadvantageous. Necrosectomy and continuous local lavage allow debridement of devitalized tissue and preservation of vital pancreatic tissue. Postoperative local lavage thus results in an atraumatic evacuation of necrotic tissue, the bacterial material, and biologically active substances. The hospital mortality rate of patients treated with necrosectomy and continuous local lavage (the Ulm protocol) is below 10 per cent. Nevertheless, controlled prospective clinical trials should be performed in order to bring more precision to our clinical decisions in respect to the role of surgery for this disease. PMID:2658162

  4. Drinking water mutagenicity and leukemia, lymphomas, and cancers of the liver, pancreas, and soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Koivusalo, M; Vartiainen, T; Hakulinen, T; Pukkala, E; Jaakkola, J J

    1995-01-01

    The acid, mutagenic compounds present in chlorinated drinking water have caused concern about the potential cancer risk of drinking-water mutagenicity. In this study, past exposure to drinking water mutagenicity was assessed for the years 1955 and 1970 in 56 Finnish municipalities, using the historical information on water quality and treatment. Cases of leukemia, lymphomas, and cancers of the liver, pancreas, and soft tissue were derived from the Finnish Cancer Registry for two periods: 1966-1976 and 1977-1989. Relative risk was estimated in an additive Poisson regression model, adjusting for age, gender, social class, urbanity, and time period. In an ordinary municipality that was supplied with mutagenic drinking water (3,000 net rev/l), the observed exposure-response relationship indicated a relative risk of 1.1-1.3 for lymphomas and 1.1-1.2 for pancreatic cancer, compared with municipalities in which nonmutagenic drinking water was consumed. PMID:7677425

  5. Pancreatic stenting prevents pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul R. Tarnasky; Yuko Y. Palesch; John T. Cunningham; Patrick D. Mauldin; Peter B. Cotton; Robert H. Hawes

    1998-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction are at high risk of developing pancreatitis after endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Impaired pancreatic drainage caused by pancreatic sphincter hypertension is the likely explanation for this increased risk. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine if ductal drainage with pancreatic stenting protects against pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with

  6. Pancreatic stellate cells respond to inflammatory cytokines: potential role in chronic pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Mews; P Phillips; R Fahmy; M Korsten; R Pirola; J Wilson; M Apte

    2002-01-01

    Background: It is now generally accepted that chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis may result from repeated episodes of acute pancreatic necroinflammation (the necrosis-fibrosis sequence). Recent stud- ies suggest that pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), when activated, may play an important role in the development of pancreatic fibrosis. Factors that may influence PSC activation during pancreatic necroinflammation include cytokines known to be

  7. Rare primary extranodal lymphomas: diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of the genital tract

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Péter Rajnics; Judit Demeter; Judit Csomor; László Krenács; László Pajor; Balázs Kollár; Zsuzsanna Kertész; Miklós Egyed

    2009-01-01

    Primary non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) of the genital tract is a rare entity. Etiology and pathogenesis of these NHLs are unknown,\\u000a although there might be a possible association between chronic inflammation and lymphomas. The most common histological subtype\\u000a is the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We report two cases of uterine lymphoma and one case of prostate lymphoma in this paper.\\u000a The

  8. Composite lymphoma: the interface between Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Rüdiger; A. Zettl; G. Ott; H. K. Müller-Hermelink

    2000-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is a rare neoplasm mainly affecting young people. Within the last decade, nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma (NLPHL) has been separated from all other cases of the so-called classical type. Moreover, the derivation of Hodgkin's lymphoma from germinal centre B-cells has been established, giving rise to a possible clonal relationship between Hodgkin's lymphoma and the non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). The

  9. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric MALT lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lehours, P; Mégraud, F

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is implicated in the development of two different gastric cancers: gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric MALT lymphoma. The association with the gastric MALT lymphoma is strong and causal. It is currently the only cancer which can be treated by a simple antibiotic treatment. However, the evolution of an H. pylori infection towards lymphoma is exceptional. Host susceptibility factors and environmental factors predisposing a patient to lymphoma have not yet been determined. The bacterial factors are currently being identified. PMID:16358940

  10. Pancreatic involvement in Legionella pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Franchini, S; Marinosci, A; Ferrante, L; Sabbadini, M G; Tresoldi, M; Dagna, L

    2015-06-01

    Legionella-associated pancreatitis has been rarely reported. Since this condition is very rarely suspected and investigated in patients with Legionella pneumonia, its incidence is probably underestimated. Here we report a case of Legionella pneumonia-associated pancreatitis and review the relevant related literature. PMID:25575464

  11. Minimally Invasive Retroperitoneal Pancreatic Necrosectomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Connor; P. Ghaneh; M. Raraty; R. Sutton; E. Rosso; C. J. Garvey; M. L. Hughes; J. C. Evans; P. Rowlands; J. P. Neoptolemos

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: Open surgery for pancreatic necrosis is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. We report the results of a recently developed minimally invasive technique that we adopted in 1998. Methods: A descriptive explanation of the approach is given together with the results of a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent a minimally invasive retroperitoneal pancreatic necrosectomy (MIRP) between August 1998

  12. Pancreatic cancer biology and genetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nabeel Bardeesy; Ronald A. DePinho

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive and devastating disease, which is characterized by invasiveness, rapid progression and profound resistance to treatment. Advances in pathological classification and cancer genetics have improved our descriptive understanding of this disease; however, important aspects of pancreatic cancer biology remain poorly understood. What is the pathogenic role of specific gene mutations? What is the cell of

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Alcoholic Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Minoti V Apte; Ron Pirola; Jeremy S Wilson

    2005-01-01

    Alcoholic pancreatitis is a major complication of alcohol abuse. Since only a minority of alcoholics develop pancreatitis, there has been a keen interest in identifying the factors that may confer individual susceptibility to the disease. Numerous possibilities have been evaluated including diet, drinking patterns and a range of inherited factors. However, at the present time, no susceptibility factor has been

  14. Epidemiological Trends in Pancreatic Neoplasias

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Babette Simon; Hartmut Printz

    2001-01-01

    Primary prevention is the most effective approach to reduce the incidence of pancreatic cancer. Epidemiological studies have contributed to the identification of risk factors for pancreatic cancer, suggesting an association with age, various medical conditions, environmental and lifestyle risk factors, and occupational and genetic conditions. Age is the strongest risk factor. The most consistently identified environmental risk factor is smoking,

  15. Extraintestinal Manifestations of Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tomica Milosavljevic; Mirjana Kostic-Milosavljevic; Ivan Jovanovic; Miodrag Krstic

    2012-01-01

    The term autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was first used in Japan in 1995 to describe a newly recognized form of chronic pancreatitis, after the description of Yoshida and colleagues. But Sarles in 1961, first described a form of idiopathic chronic inflammatory sclerosis of the pancreas, suspected to be due to an autoimmune process. AIP has become a widely accepted term because

  16. Somatostatin therapy of acute experimental pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Lankisch, P G; Koop, H; Winckler, K; Fölsch, U R; Creutzfeldt, W

    1977-01-01

    Because somatostatin (SRIF) reduces exocrine pancreatic secretion, its effect on acute pancreatitis was investigated in rats. Linear SRIF reduced serum amylase and lipase but had no effect on pancreatic necrosis, oedema, leucocyte infiltration, and enzyme content. The mortality rate was not reduced. These results do not recommend the use of SRIF in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. PMID:604191

  17. Current topics on precursors to pancreatic cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takaori K; Hruban RH; Maitra A; Tanigawa N

    2006-01-01

    Prognosis of invasive pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is bleak and the vast majority of patients with pancreatic cancer die of their disease. The detection and treatment of the non- invasive precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer offer the oppor- tunity to cure this devastating disease and therefore great efforts are being made to identify the precursors to pancreatic cancer. Several distinct precursor

  18. The foamy variant of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jorge Albores-Saavedra; Mariana Weimersheimer-Sandoval; Fredy Chable-Montero; Daniel Montante-Montes de Oca; Ralph H. Hruban; Donald Earl Henson

    2008-01-01

    Foamy gland adenocarcinoma is a variant of pancreatic ductal carcinoma, whose precursor has not been described. We describe here the morphologic and immunohistochemical features of the pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions associated with invasive foamy pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The staining properties and morphologic and immunohistochemical features of 3 foamy PanIN lesions were compared with those of 7 pancreatic foamy gland adenocarcinomas.

  19. Primary mantle cell lymphoma of appendix.

    PubMed

    Gaopande, V L; Deshmukh, S D; Shinde, V C

    2015-05-01

    We present a case of immunohistochemically proven primary mantle cell lymphoma of appendix that presented as a mass in right iliac fossa. The usual presentation of gastrointestinal mantle cell lymphoma is in the form of multiple lymphomatous polyposis. Mantle cell lymphoma has a unique immunohistochemistry and genetic abnormality. PMID:26003101

  20. Learning about Lymphoma: Glossary of Terms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... development of new or abnormal tissue growth. chronic lymphoblastic lymphoma: A slowly progressing disease in which too many ... antigen. high-grade lymphomas: Includes large cell, immunoblastic, lymphoblastic, and ... to as Hodgkin's lymphoma): A malignant disease of the lymph nodes that ...

  1. Familial pancreatic cancer: genetic advances

    PubMed Central

    Rustgi, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Beset by poor prognosis, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is classified as familial or sporadic. This review elaborates on the known genetic syndromes that underlie familial pancreatic cancer, where there are opportunities for genetic counseling and testing as well as clinical monitoring of at-risk patients. Such subsets of familial pancreatic cancer involve germline cationic trypsinogen or PRSS1 mutations (hereditary pancreatitis), BRCA2 mutations (usually in association with hereditary breast–ovarian cancer syndrome), CDKN2 mutations (familial atypical mole and multiple melanoma), or DNA repair gene mutations (e.g., ATM and PALB2, apart from those in BRCA2). However, the vast majority of familial pancreatic cancer cases have yet to have their genetic underpinnings elucidated, waiting in part for the results of deep sequencing efforts. PMID:24395243

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis: a surgical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Saavedra-Perez, David; Vaquero, Eva C; Ayuso, Juan R; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano

    2014-12-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is defined as a particular form of pancreatitis that often manifests as obstructive jaundice associated with a pancreatic mass or an obstructive bile duct lesion, and that has an excellent response to corticosteroid treatment. The prevalence of AIP worldwide is unknown, and it is considered as a rare entity. The clinical and radiological presentation of AIP can mimic bilio-pancreatic cancer, presenting difficulties for diagnosis and obliging the surgeon to balance decision-making between the potential risk presented by the misdiagnosis of a deadly disease against the desire to avoid unnecessary major surgery for a disease that responds effectively to corticosteroid treatment. In this review we detail the current and critical points for the diagnosis, classification and treatment for AIP, with a special emphasis on surgical series and the methods to differentiate between this pathology and bilio-pancreatic cancer. PMID:25066570

  3. Proteomics studies of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ru; Pan, Sheng; Aebersold, Ruedi; Brentnall, Teresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, with 4% survival 5 years after diagnosis. Biomarkers are desperately needed to improve earlier, more curable cancer diagnosis and to develop new effective therapeutic targets. The development of quantitative proteomics technologies in recent years offers great promise for understanding the complex molecular events of tumorigenesis at the protein level, and has stimulated great interest in applying the technology for pancreatic cancer studies. Proteomic studies of pancreatic tissues, juice, serum/plasma, and cell lines have recently attempted to identify differentially expressed proteins in pancreatic cancer to dissect the abnormal signaling pathways underlying oncogenesis, and to detect new biomarkers. It can be expected that the continuing evolution of proteomics technology with better resolution and sensitivity will greatly enhance our capability in combating pancreatic cancer. PMID:18633454

  4. [Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lémann, M

    2008-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids. PMID:18378104

  5. Gray zone lymphoma: chromosomal aberrations with immunophenotypic and clinical correlations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franziska C Eberle; Itziar Salaverria; Christian Steidl; Thomas A Summers; Stefania Pittaluga; Susana Ben Neriah; Jaime Rodriguez-Canales; Liqiang Xi; Kris Ylaya; David Liewehr; Kieron Dunleavy; Wyndham H Wilson; Stephen M Hewitt; Mark Raffeld; Randy D Gascoyne; Reiner Siebert; Elaine S Jaffe

    2011-01-01

    The term gray zone lymphoma has been applied to tumors that demonstrate transitional morphologic and immunophenotypic features between classical Hodgkin's lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, especially primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. Histopathological and genetic data are limited for these unusual cases. We analyzed cases of gray zone lymphoma (n=27), mediastinal composite lymphoma (n=3) and mediastinal synchronous\\/metachronous lymphoma (n=3) by

  6. Minimally invasive treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cebulski, W?odzimierz; S?odkowski, Maciej; Krasnod?bski, Ireneusz W.

    2014-01-01

    Infected pancreatic necrosis is a challenging complication that worsens prognosis in acute pancreatitis. For years, open necrosectomy has been the mainstay treatment option in infected pancreatic necrosis, although surgical debridement still results in high morbidity and mortality rates. Recently, many reports on minimally invasive treatment in infected pancreatic necrosis have been published. This paper presents a review of minimally invasive techniques and attempts to define their role in the management of infected pancreatic necrosis. PMID:25653725

  7. Pancreaticojejunostomy For Severe Symptomatic Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Denton, G. W. L.; Brough, W. A.

    1992-01-01

    The role of operation, particularly pancreaticojejunostomy, in the treatment of abdominal pain from chronic pancreatitis is controversial, but relief of pancreatic duct obstruction may decrease the rate of pancreatic organ failure. Our results over 6 years in 13 carefully selected patients suggest that pancreatic drainage does relieve pain but is less effective in preventing pancreatic exocrine failure. Pain was the indication for operation in all patients. PMID:1610724

  8. Non-operative differentiation between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, C R; Cooper, M J; Lewis, M H; Moossa, A R

    1979-01-01

    Eighty-five of 186 patients investigated for suspected pancreatic cancer had an unequivocal final diagnosis of either pancreatic cancer (58 patients) or chronic pancreatitis (27 patients). They had been studied prospectively using ultrasonography, computerized tomography, radionuclide scanning, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), selective celiac and superior mesenteric angiography, duodenal drainage studies, cytologic studies, serum carcinoembryonic antigen assay, and pancreatic oncofetal antigen assay, The results were compared to determine which test would most frequently and reliably differentiate between pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis in a patient believed to have one or other disease. Criteria for interpreting results, first for highest rate of correct diagnoses, and second for highest accuracy were derived. Applying these criteria, ultrasonography achieved the highest rate of correct diagnoses (97% of patients diagnosed with 84% accuracy). ERCP, duodenal drainage studies, and cytology were the most accurate tests ((86% accuracy each test) but, with this accuracy, ERCP most frequently gave a diagnosis (diagnosis rate: ERCP--70%, duodenal drainage--32%, cytology--35%). The results suggest that ultrasonography is the best noninvasive test, and that a combination of ERCP, pancreatic juice assay and cytology in a single procedure may prove to be the best discriminating investigation. PMID:443902

  9. Oblimersen and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumor or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  10. Pancreatic islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Corręa-Giannella, Maria Lúcia; Raposo do Amaral, Alexandre S

    2009-01-01

    Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic ? cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of ? cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR) from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of severe hypoglycemic episodes and improve glycemic control in selected patient for whom benefits of 4-5 years duration would be very valuable. Its limitations, however, indicate that the procedure in its current format is not suitable for all patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:19825146

  11. Alisertib With and Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-26

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-31

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  13. What's New in Pancreatic Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for pancreatic cancer What’s new in pancreatic cancer research and treatment? Research into ... area of research in many types of cancer. New treatments for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) Many pancreatic ...

  14. RESEARCH Open Access In vivo gene transfer targeting in pancreatic

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for targeted lentivirus transductions in vitro. In subcutaneous xenografts of human pancreatic cancer cells therapies for pancreatic cancer. Keywords: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma, Targeted therapy, Surface markerRESEARCH Open Access In vivo gene transfer targeting in pancreatic adenocarcinoma with cell surface

  15. Brentuximab Vedotin + Rituximab as Frontline Therapy for Pts w/ CD30+ and/or EBV+ Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-28

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Epstein-Barr Virus Infection; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoid

  16. Fulminant Vasculitis: A Rare Fatal Complication of Lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eyal Leshem; Yaron Davidovitz; Eyal Meltzer; Paul Fefer; Efrat Ofek; Yechezkel Sidi

    2006-01-01

    Vasculitis is rarely associated with lymphoma; however, most cases associated with lymphoma are cutaneous. Systemic vasculitis in association with lymphoma is usually an indolent and non-fatal complication. Two patients presented to our department with fulminant vasculitis with a fatal course and were later diagnosed with lymphoma. A search of the literature for systemic fulminant vasculitis in association with lymphoma disclosed

  17. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-09

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  18. Study of BKM120 & Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-09

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  19. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-31

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Prognosis of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Imrie, C W

    1995-01-01

    The prognosis of an individual attack of acute pancreatitis is dependent on its severity and whether or not sepsis develops in or around the pancreas. Approximately 20-25% of patients with acute pancreatitis have a severe form of the disease which usually necessitates high dependency or intensive care management in the first week or two of illness. While most of these patients can readily be identified by experienced clinical judgement a proportion of them do not appear unduly ill at first presentation. For this reason a number of objective grading systems have been devised which identified the group of patients with the greatest likelihood of developing major complications and being at risk of death. The most commonly utilised systems in the United Kingdom are the eight factor Glasgow scoring scale and the APACHE II system. The measurement of C-reactive protein is also helpful and it has recently been shown that the combining of the Glasgow scoring system with CRP results in 80% or better sensitivity and specificity for those who develop major clinical complications. The body mass index (BMI) when over 30 kgs/m2 is also a useful marker of an adverse outcome, and CT scanning is another method of grading severity. The newer markers of interleukin 6 and PMN elastase have yet to be proved in a large prospective clinical study but do show considerable promise as being of value in identifying the patient at risk. PMID:7668494

  1. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-07

    Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  3. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma and Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Innovative strategies in lymphoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Ulrich

    2003-08-14

    Treatment of malignant non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) in the 21st century has been revolutionized by novel biological agents offering targeted approaches in addition to radio-chemotherapy. Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against lymphatic surface antigens have been effective as monotherapeutic agents, and have already shown their superiority to conventional strategies when combined with chemotherapy. Radioimmunoconjugates are more effective than unlabelled antibodies. Specific inhibitors of neoangiogenesis as well as intracellular signal transduction pathways and antiapoptotic mechanisms have shown their efficacy in phase II studies. Long-term improvement in the setting of minimal residual disease has been observed after vaccination against surface antigens and non-myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation is effective in controlling lymphoma growth. Novel specific antigens are currently identified using expression profiling of lymphomas. In the near future, combinations of biological agents will challenge conventional therapy. These exciting new strategies will improve the success rate in aggressive NHLs and may even challenge the paradigm of incurability of indolent lymphomas. PMID:13677264

  5. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Hepatosplenic lymphoma in a dog

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael M Fry; W. Vernau; C Bromel; P A Pesavento; P. F. Moore

    2003-01-01

    We describe a case of a dog with hepatosplenic lymphoma, a disease characterized by infiltration of the liver, spleen, and bone marrow with gammadelta T cells, absence of peripheral lymphadenopathy, and an aggressive clinical course. Physical examination findings, hematologic and biochemical abnormalities, and clinical course of the disease in this patient were similar to those in humans. Immunophenotyping of liver

  7. Carfilzomib and Hyper-CVAD in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-13

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Genetic Testing Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-05

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  10. Chronic Pancreatitis (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... occurs when the pancreas becomes damaged by long-standing inflammation. Inflammation changes the pancreas' ability to function ... most common symptom of chronic pancreatitis is long-standing pain in the middle of the abdomen. You ...

  11. Hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis: presentation and management.

    PubMed

    Tsuang, Wayne; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Ruiz, Luis; Palascak, Joseph B; Gelrud, Andres

    2009-04-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is reported to cause 1-4% of acute pancreatitis (AP) episodes. HTG is also implicated in more than half of gestational pancreatitis cases. Disorders of lipoprotein metabolism are conventionally divided into primary (genetic) and secondary causes, including diabetes, hypothyroidism, and obesity. Serum triglyceride (TG) levels above 1,000 mg/dl are usually considered necessary to ascribe causation for AP. The mechanism for hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis (HTGP) is postulated to involve hydrolysis of TG by pancreatic lipase and release of free fatty acids that induce free radical damage. Multiple small studies on HTGP management have evaluated the use of insulin, heparin, or both. Many series have also reported use of apheresis to reduce TG levels. Subsequent control of HTG with dietary restrictions, antihyperlipidemic agents, and even regular apheresis has been shown anecdotally in case series to prevent future episodes of AP. However, large multicenter studies are needed to optimize future management guidelines for patients with HTGP. PMID:19293788

  12. Dynamic CT of pancreatic tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hosoki, T.

    1983-05-01

    Dynamic computed tomography was performed on 19 patients with clinically diagnosed pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. There were 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, three with inflammatory pancreatic masses, two with cystadenoma, one with insuloma, and three with peripancreatic tumors. Computed tomography was performed with a Varian-V-360-3 scanner; scanning was for 30 consecutive sec at 3 sec intervals after the bolus injection of 50 ml of contrast medium into the antecubital vein. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) may be more useful than conventional contrast CT because it facilitates: (1) correct evaluation of tumor vascularity allowing a differential diagnosis; (2) location of the boundary between tumor and a nontumor tissue; (3) detection of small tumors; and (4) visualization of pancreatic invasion by peripancreatic tumors. In addition, contrast enhancement and the degree of vascular proliferation can be quantitatively assessed by analyzing time-density curves.

  13. Evaluating steatosis in pancreatic transplant.

    PubMed

    Verma, Aneesha Ratan; Papalois, Vassilios

    2011-06-01

    Pancreatic transplant remains the only treatment that cures insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. It is recognized by transplant surgeons that donor pancreases with excessive fat infiltration have a poorer clinical outcome, resulting in significant recipient morbidity and mortality. However, no objective measure of pancreatic fat infiltration exists, and no study has been done that correlates the level of fat infiltration with clinical outcome. There have been significant radiologic advances that allow assessment of fat content of organs, and these could be used to accurately quantify the extent of pancreatic fat infiltration. We reviewed the literature regarding pancreatic steatosis, and examined ways in which the level of steatosis could be objectively measured before transplant, thereby improving clinical outcome. PMID:21649562

  14. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  15. MRI of transplanted pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Jirák, Daniel; Kríz, Jan; Herynek, Vít; Andersson, Benita; Girman, Peter; Burian, Martin; Saudek, Frantisek; Hájek, Milan

    2004-12-01

    A promising treatment method for type 1 diabetes mellitus is transplantation of pancreatic islets containing beta-cells. The aim of this study was to develop an MR technique to monitor the distribution and fate of transplanted pancreatic islets in an animal model. Twenty-five hundred purified and magnetically labeled islets were transplanted through the portal vein into the liver of experimental rats. The animals were scanned using a MR 4.7-T scanner. The labeled pancreatic islets were clearly visualized in the liver in both diabetic and healthy rats as hypointense areas on T2*-weighted MR images during the entire measurement period. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of iron-oxide nanoparticles inside the cells of the pancreatic islets. A significant decrease in blood glucose levels in diabetic rats was observed; normal glycemia was reached 1 week after transplantation. This study, therefore, represents a promising step toward possible clinical application in human medicine. PMID:15562474

  16. Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, H

    2003-01-01

    Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:12651880

  17. Treatment of Pain with Pancreatic Extracts in Chronic Pancreatitis: Results of a Prospective Placebo-Controlled Multicenter Trial

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joachim Mössner; Roger Secknus; Jürgen Meyer; Claus Niederau; Guido Adler

    1992-01-01

    According to the theory of negative feedback regulation of pancreatic enzyme secretion by proteases, treatment with pancreatic extracts has been proposed to lower pain in chronic pancreatitis by decreasing pancreatic duct pressure. We conducted a prospective placebo-controlled double blind multicenter study to investigate the effect of porcine pancreatic extracts on pain in chronic pancreatitis. 47 patients with pain (41 males,

  18. Pain Management in chronic pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darwin L. Conwell; Gregory Zuccaro

    1999-01-01

    Opinion statement  Painful chronic pancreatitis is difficult to manage. We believe a multidisciplinary approach is the best means of evaluating\\u000a this complex syndrome. In our opinion, the initial evaluation should aim at firmly establishing the diagnosis of chronic pan-creatitis:\\u000a calcifications on imaging; duct morphologic changes on pancreatography; parenchymal changes on ultrasound; or evidence of\\u000a pancreatic dysfunction on secre-tin\\/ cholecystokinin stimulation tests.

  19. Severe Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. W. Robertson; I. S. Stewart; C. W. Imrie

    2006-01-01

    For most patients with pregnancy-associated pancreatitis there is little maternal survival threat and only occasionally are there foetal deaths. We describe 4 young women with pregnancy-associated severe acute pancreatitis who each had gallstones. Their ages were 17, 18, 20 and 24 years. Each was a tertiary referral to our unit in Glasgow and each pursued a life-threatening course with hospital

  20. Pancreatic cancer — Outlook: targeted therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Michl; Thomas M. Gress

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease characterized by almost identical incidence and mortality rates. Since this tumour\\u000a is mostly diagnosed in an advanced stage there is usually no option for a curative surgical resection. In addition, pancreatic\\u000a cancers known to be resistant to conventional treatment modalities such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Therefore, novel\\u000a strategies for targeting these tumors are urgently

  1. Genomic Landscapes of Pancreatic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease with a dismal prognosis. However, recent advances in sequencing and bioinformatic technology have led to the systematic characterization of the genomes of all major tumor types in the pancreas. This characterization has revealed the unique genomic landscape of each tumor type. This knowledge will pave the way for improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to pancreatic tumors that take advantage of the genetic alterations in these neoplasms. PMID:25812653

  2. Biliary Complications of Pancreatic Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Adarsh; Sachdev, Ajay; Negi, Sanjay

    2001-01-01

    Pancreatic necrosis has the potential to cause avariety of locoregional complications (1). This isbecause of the propensity of the necrotic tissue tospread far beyond the confines of the pancreas. Theproximity of the biliary tract to the pancreas makesit particularly vulnerable to damage by the inflammatory process, and though likely, there are only isolated case reports of involvement of the biliarytract through the necrotic process (2-5). This papershares our experience in managing six patients withbiliary complications of pancreatic necrosis. PMID:12754382

  3. Genesis of Pancreatic Ductal Neoplasia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara A. Centeno; Gregory M. Springett

    \\u000a Pancreatic cancer is the fourth overall leading cause of cancer death in both genders, even though it is not among the most\\u000a frequent. Early detection and targeted therapeutic options, which can be obtained through a better understanding of the cellular\\u000a and molecular processes which lead to the development of pancreatic carcinoma, are key to improving the outcome of this highly

  4. What's New in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Additional resources for non-Hodgkin lymphoma What’s new in non-Hodgkin lymphoma research and treatment? Research ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma is focused on looking at new and better ways to treat this disease. Chemotherapy ...

  5. What Are the Key Statistics about Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for non-Hodgkin lymphoma? What are the key statistics about non-Hodgkin lymphoma? Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

  6. Vorinostat and Combination Chemotherapy With Rituximab in Treating Patients With HIV-Related Diffuse Large B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Other Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  7. Vorinostat and Combination Chemotherapy With Rituximab in Treating Patients With HIV-Related Diffuse Large B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Other Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-15

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  8. Laryngeal Lymphoma: The High and Low Grades of Rare Lymphoma Involvement Sites

    PubMed Central

    Degaetano, James; Farrugia, Eric; Magri, Claude; Refalo, Nicholas; Camilleri, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The larynx is an extremely rare site of involvement by lymphomatous disease. We present two cases of isolated laryngeal high-grade and another low-grade lymphoma, together with a literature review of laryngeal lymphoma management. PMID:25140179

  9. Bortezomib and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Mantle Cell Lymphoma Who Have Previously Undergone Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-14

    Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  10. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-19

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  11. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

  12. Mimics of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M; Kaza, Ravi K; Azar, Shadi F; Ruma, Julie A; Francis, Isaac R

    2013-01-01

    Several uncommon primary pancreatic tumors, inflammatory conditions, metastasis to the pancreas and peripancreatic masses can mimic the appearance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Differentiation between these lesions and PDA can be challenging, due to the overlap in imaging features; however, familiarity with their typical imaging features and clinical presentation may be helpful in their differentiation, as in some cases, invasive diagnostic tests or unnecessary surgery can be avoided. The different pathologies that can mimic PDA include inflammatory conditions such as the various forms of pancreatitis (chronic-focal mass-forming, autoimmune and groove pancreatitis), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, solid pseudopapillary tumors, metastasis (solid non-lymphomatous and hematologic), congenital variants (annular pancreas), as well as peripancreatic lesions (accessory spleen, adrenal masses, duodenal masses, lymph nodes and vascular lesions), and certain rare pancreatic tumors (e.g., acinar cell tumors, solid serous tumors, hamartoma and solitary fibrous tumors). The clinical presentation and imaging features of the most commonly encountered mimics of PDA are discussed in this presentation with representative illustrations. PMID:24060833

  13. 3-AP and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Idelalisib in Japanese Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (With or Without Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia); Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  15. Bortezomib, Ifosfamide, and Vinorelbine Tartrate in Treating Young Patients With Hodgkin's Lymphoma That is Recurrent or Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  16. Pancreatic cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchically organized structure of a cancer. In this review, we try to articulate the complicated signaling pathways regulating the retention of the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs, and in the wake of which, we seek to offer insights into the CSCs-relevant targeted therapeutics which are, in the meantime, confronted with bigger challenges than ever.

  17. Pancreatic duct strictures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jawad Ahmad; John Martin

    2000-01-01

    Opinion statement  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a The treatment of pancreatic duct strictures is based on an accurate assessment of the etiology of the disease, and then the\\u000a degree of symptomatology. Our outline for therapy is as follows:\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Exclude a diagnosis of malignancy by using radiologic, endoscopic, histologic, and molecular biologic modalities.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Once a benign stricture has been demonstrated, we favor a

  18. Pancreatitis after sphincter of Oddi manometry.

    PubMed Central

    Rolny, P; Anderberg, B; Ihse, I; Lindström, E; Olaison, G; Arvill, A

    1990-01-01

    The nature, frequency, severity, and possible causes of complications after 207 sphincter of Oddi manometry measurements were studied in 146 patients. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 6% (12 of 207) of the investigations and in 8% (12 of 146) of the patients examined. The pancreatitis was mild in all patients. After cannulation of the pancreatic duct, acute pancreatitis occurred in 10 of 95 (11%) patients compared with one of 93 (1%) when the manometry catheter entered the bile duct only (p less than 0.02). Seven (58%) of the patients who developed acute pancreatitis, however, were found to be suffering from chronic pancreatitis. Some 26% of all sphincter of Oddi manometry measurements on patients with this diagnosis were complicated by an acute attack of pancreatitis compared with 3% (p less than 0.001) in patients without signs of chronic pancreatitis. In all patients the pancreatitis developed within three hours of manometry. We conclude that pancreatitis may occasionally follow sphincter of Oddi manometry measurement, even in patients without pancreaticobiliary disease, and that underlying chronic pancreatitis constitutes a definite risk. Sphincter of Oddi manometry measurement in control subjects should therefore be performed only in centres where the safety of the procedure has been established, and the presence of chronic pancreatitis should be excluded beforehand. Cannulation of the pancreatic duct should be avoided. Manometry can be safely performed, however, as an outpatient procedure. PMID:2370018

  19. Diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Xenoulis, P G

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatitis is the most common disorder of the exocrine pancreas in both dogs and cats. Ante-mortem diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis can be challenging. The clinical picture of dogs and cats with pancreatitis varies greatly (from very mild to severe or even fatal) and is characterised by non-specific findings. Complete blood count, serum biochemistry profile and urinalysis should always be performed in dogs and cats suspected of having pancreatitis, although findings are not-specific for pancreatitis. Serum amylase and lipase activities and trypsin-like immunoreactivity (TLI) concentrations have no or only limited clinical value for the diagnosis of pancreatitis in either dogs or cats. Conversely, serum pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (PLI) concentration is currently considered to be the clinicopathological test of choice for the diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis. Abdominal radiography is a useful diagnostic tool for the exclusion of other diseases that may cause similar clinical signs to those of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasonography can be very useful for the diagnosis of pancreatitis, but this depends largely on the clinician's experience. Histopathological examination of the pancreas is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of pancreatitis, but it is not without limitations. In clinical practice, a combination of careful evaluation of the animal's history, serum PLI concentration and abdominal ultrasonography, together with pancreatic cytology or histopathology when indicated or possible, is considered to be the most practical and reliable means for an accurate diagnosis or exclusion of pancreatitis compared with other diagnostic modalities. PMID:25586803

  20. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Utility of PET/CT in diagnosis, staging, assessment of resectability and metabolic response of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Yi; Yang, Feng; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common gastrointestinal tumors, with its incidence staying at a high level in both the United States and China. However, the overall 5-year survival rate of pancreatic cancer is still extremely low. Surgery remains the only potential chance for long-term survival. Early diagnosis and precise staging are crucial to make proper clinical decision for surgery candidates. Despite advances in diagnostic technology such as computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasound, diagnosis, staging and monitoring of the metabolic response remain a challenge for this devastating disease. Positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), a relatively novel modality, combines metabolic detection with anatomic information. It has been widely used in oncology and achieves good results in breast cancer, lung cancer and lymphoma. Its utilization in pancreatic cancer has also been widely accepted. However, the value of PET/CT in pancreatic disease is still controversial. Will PET/CT change the treatment strategy for potential surgery candidates? What kind of patients benefits most from this exam? In this review, we focus on the utility of PET/CT in diagnosis, staging, and assessment of resectability of pancreatic cancer. In addition, its ability to monitor metabolic response and recurrence after treatment will be emphasis of discussion. We hope to provide answers to the questions above, which clinicians care most about. PMID:25400441

  2. ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN Report on the Assessment of Exocrine Pancreatic Function and Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher J; Chen, Kathy; Horvath, Karoly; Hughes, David; Lowe, Mark E; Mehta, Devendra; Orabi, Abrahim I; Screws, Jeremy; Thomson, Mike; Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Verkade, Henkjan J; Husain, Sohail Z; Wilschanski, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this clinical report is to discuss several recent advances in assessing exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) and pancreatitis in children, to review the array of pancreatic function tests, to provide an update on the inherited causes of EPI, with special emphasis on newly available genetic testing, and to review newer methods for evaluating pancreatitis. PMID:25915425

  3. Mabs against Pancreatic cancer Therapeutic antibodies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mabs against Pancreatic cancer 1 Therapeutic antibodies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer pancreatic cancer inserm-00497886,version1-6Jul2010 Author manuscript, published in "TheScientificWorldJournal (electronic resource) 2010;10:1107-20" DOI : 10.1100/tsw.2010.103 #12;Mabs against Pancreatic cancer 2

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Center: Providing the Research Tools Necessary to Advance Pancreatic Cancer Patient Care

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Pancreatic Cancer Center: Providing the Research Tools Necessary to Advance Pancreatic Cancer number of NCI-designated cancer centers have a specialized pancreatic cancer program. The creation of the IUPUI Signature Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research has been the foundation for putting IUPUI, the IU

  5. Does alcohol directly stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis? Studies with rat pancreatic stellate cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Minoti V. Apte; Phoebe A. Phillips; Roger G. Fahmy; Samantha J. Darby; Sally C. Rodgers; Geoffrey W. McCaughan; Mark A. Korsten; Romano C. Pirola; Daya Naidoo; Jeremy S. Wilson

    2000-01-01

    Background & Aims: Activated pancreatic stellate cells have recently been implicated in pancreatic fibrogenesis. This study examined the role of pancreatic stellate cells in alcoholic pancreatic fibrosis by determining whether these cells are activated by ethanol itself and, if so, whether such activation is caused by the metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde and\\/or the generation of oxidant stress within the

  6. Fusion Protein Cytokine Therapy After Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  7. Fusion Protein Cytokine Therapy After Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-14

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  8. PXD101 and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. Adult life after surviving lymphoma in childhood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolas X. von der Weid

    2008-01-01

    Introduction  Almost all pediatric lymphomas are malignant, high-grade tumors. The combined incidence of Hodgkin’s disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin\\u000a lymphoma (NHL) reaches 10 to 12 new cases a year per million children under the age of 16 years, representing about 10% of\\u000a all pediatric cancers. HD makes up to 40% and NHL 60% of pediatric lymphomas. During the last 20 years, cure rates raised

  10. Primary multifocal osseous lymphoma in a child

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takashi S. P. Sato; Polly J. Ferguson; Geetika Khanna

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of primary multifocal osseous lymphoma in a 6-year-old girl presenting with multifocal osteolytic lesions\\u000a without systemic symptoms or identifiable non-osseous primary tumor. The differential diagnoses for such a presentation include\\u000a histiocytosis X, chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, metastatic disease, and primary\\u000a bone lymphoma. Although non-Hodgkin lymphoma is common in the pediatric population, its presentation

  11. Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Fuchs; Dennis A. Eichenauer; Lucia Nogová; Volker Diehl; Andreas Engert

    2008-01-01

    Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is a rare subtype of Hodgkin lymphoma that differs from classic Hodgkin\\u000a lymphoma (cHL) with respect to histologic and clinical presentation. Because the prognosis of NLPHL in early unfavorable and\\u000a advanced stages is similar to that of cHL, treatment is similar. In contrast, early favorable-stage NLPHL has a better prognosis\\u000a than cHL. Thus, NLPHL in

  12. Burkitt Lymphoma | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The goal of the Burkitt Lymphoma Genome Sequencing Project (BLGSP) is to explore potential genetic changes in patients with Burkitt lymphoma (BL)Opens in a New Tab that could lead to better prevention, detection, and treatment of this rare and aggressive cancer. The Office of Cancer Genomics (OCG) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) initiated BLGSP in collaboration with the Foundation for Burkitt Lymphoma Research.

  13. Entourage: the immune microenvironment following follicular lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B E Wahlin; B Sander; B Christensson; B Řstenstad; H Holte; P D Brown; C Sundström; E Kimby

    2012-01-01

    In follicular lymphoma, nonmalignant immune cells are important. Follicular lymphoma depends on CD4+ cells, but CD8+ cells counteract it. We hypothesized that the presence of follicular lymphoma is associated with higher CD4+ than CD8+ cell numbers in the tumor microenvironment but not in the immune system. Using flow cytometry, pre-treatment and follow-up CD4\\/CD8 ratios were estimated in the bone marrow,

  14. Treatment of Lymphoblastic Lymphoma in Adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola Gökbuget; Dieter Hoelzer

    Lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL) is a rare entity of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) with an incidence of less than 2% (1.7% for\\u000a T- and less than 1% for B-lymphoblastic lymphoma) within all NHL [1]. In the USA, the population-based incidence was 0.2\\/100\\u000a 000 in males and 0.1\\/100 000 in females between 1978 and 1995. The age distribution is bimodal with higher rates

  15. Lipolysis of visceral adipocyte triglyceride by pancreatic lipases converts mild acute pancreatitis to severe pancreatitis independent of necrosis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram N; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Cline, Rachel A; DeLany, James P; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2015-03-01

    Visceral fat necrosis has been associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for over 100 years; however, its pathogenesis and role in SAP outcomes are poorly understood. Based on recent work suggesting that pancreatic fat lipolysis plays an important role in SAP, we evaluated the role of pancreatic lipases in SAP-associated visceral fat necrosis, the inflammatory response, local injury, and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP). For this, cerulein pancreatitis was induced in lean and obese mice, alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat and parameters of AP induction (serum amylase and lipase), fat necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure, and inflammatory response were assessed. Pancreatic lipases were measured in fat necrosis and were overexpressed in 3T3-L1 cells. We noted obesity to convert mild cerulein AP to SAP with greater cytokines, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and multisystem organ failure, and 100% mortality without affecting AP induction or pancreatic necrosis. Increased pancreatic lipase amounts and activity were noted in the extensive visceral fat necrosis of dying obese mice. Lipase inhibition reduced fat necrosis, UFAs, organ failure, and mortality but not the parameters of AP induction. Pancreatic lipase expression increased lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. We conclude that UFAs generated via lipolysis of visceral fat by pancreatic lipases convert mild AP to SAP independent of pancreatic necrosis and the inflammatory response. PMID:25579844

  16. Treatment Options by Stage (Pancreatic Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... syndrome . Signs and symptoms of pancreatic cancer include jaundice, pain, and weight loss. Pancreatic cancer may not ... doctor if you have any of the following: Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the ...

  17. Study Yields Genetic Insights into Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... HealthDay . All rights reserved. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Pancreatic Cancer Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Genes and Gene Therapy Pancreatic Cancer About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  18. Mantle cell lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the testis: a unique case of composite non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Andhavarapu, Swati; Crozier, Jennifer A; Jiang, Liuyan; Sher, Taimur

    2014-12-01

    Primary testicular non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a rare entity with the most common histologic subtype consisting of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Patients with primary testicular lymphoma (PTL) have a poor prognosis and a higher propensity for relapse. Also rare are composite lymphomas (CL) defined as two or more morphologically and phenotypically distinct lymphomas coexisting in a single organ or tissue. Here we present the first reported case of primary testicular composite lymphoma consisting of DLBCL and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). PMID:24750331

  19. Malignant gastric lymphoma with spontaneous perforation

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Satoko; Gen, Tokichi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Malignant gastric lymphoma, accounting only for 1% of primary gastric carcinoma, is usually a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Toyota et al reported that 37% of gastric perforations involved malignancy, generally gastric carcinoma. Fukuda et al found that less than 5% of malignant gastric lymphomas perforate. While it is relatively well known that perforations often take place during chemotherapy, they are rare in patients not receiving chemotherapy. To our knowledge, spontaneous perforation is rare in gastric malignant lymphoma, having been reported in the Japanese literature only 26 times, including this case, in the last 25?years. PMID:23329705

  20. Lenalidomide and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  1. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-16

    Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  2. Nitric oxide modulates pancreatic edema formation in rat caerulein-induced pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takashi Abe; Tooru Shimosegawa; Akihiko Satoh; Reishi Abe; Yoshifumi Kikuchi; Masaru Koizumi; Takayoshi Toyota

    1995-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the formation of pancreatic edema in caerulein-induced\\u000a pancreatitis in rats. Pancreatitis was produced by two intraperitoneal injections of caerulein, and plasma amylase concentration,\\u000a pancreatic edema index (pancreatic wet weight\\/body weight), and Evans blue extravasation (as a measure of vascular permeability)\\u000a were evaluated 5h after the first injection.

  3. Pancreatic Stellate Cell Activation and MMP Production in Experimental Pancreatic Fibrosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tokuyasu Yokota; Woody Denham; Kenric Murayama; Carolyn Pelham; Raymond Joehl; Richard H. Bell

    2002-01-01

    Background. The early events in pancreatic fibrosis are poorly understood. We examined the production of collagen and matrix metalloproteinases as well as the activation of pancreatic stellate cells in a rodent model of pancreatic fibrosis.Materials and methods. Pancreatitis was induced in rats by hyperstimulation with cerulein (50 ?g\\/kg\\/day ip) and concurrent pancreatic duct obstruction (SHOP model) for 96 h (n

  4. Pefloxacin penetration into human necrotic pancreatic tissue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Bertazzoni Minelli; A. Benini; A. Muner; C. Bassi; H. Abbas; P. Pederzoli

    1996-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis may be useful in acute necrotising pancreatitis, a disease associated with a considerable incidence of infectious complications. The aim of this study was to assess pefloxacin penetration into necrotic pancreatic tissue during human necrotic pancreatitis. Ten patients (mean age 53-2 ± 17-4 years) with severe acute pancreatitis (mean Ranson score 4-3) were studied. Pefloxacin was administered at a

  5. Bortezomib in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Suh, K Stephen; Goy, Andre

    2008-04-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) represents 6% of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, but is one of the most active fields of clinical investigation. Unfortunately, there is still no standard or curative therapy in MCL. Front-line therapy appears to benefit from intensification either through high-dose therapy with stem cell transplant consolidation or dose-intense chemotherapy with hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, adriamycin/doxorubicin and dexamethasone/rituximab. Most patients still relapse and a multitude of novel agents are currently being tested in this setting, including proteasome inhibitors with bortezomib (the first of its class and the first US FDA-approved drug for MCL), mTOR inhibitors, Bcl-2 inhibitors, antiangiogenesis agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors among others. An obvious effort is needed to enroll patients on clinical trials, the design of which might benefit from pharmacogenomics and a better understanding of MCL biology and its diversity. PMID:18407730

  6. Role of bacterial infections in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Dominique S

    2013-10-01

    Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including tobacco smoking, chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes, collectively account for less than half of all pancreatic cancer cases. Inflammation plays a key role in pancreatic carcinogenesis, but it is unclear what causes local inflammation, other than pancreatitis. Epidemiological data suggest that Helicobacter pylori may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, and more recently, data suggest that periodontal disease, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, a pathogen for periodontal disease, may also play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Individuals with periodontal disease have elevated markers of systemic inflammation, and oral bacteria can disseminate into the blood, stomach, heart and even reach the brain. These infections may contribute to the progression of pancreatic cancer by acting jointly with other pancreatic cancer risk factors that impact the inflammation and immune response, such as smoking and obesity, and the ABO genetic variant, recently linked to pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies. The complex interplay between bacteria, host immune response and environmental factors has been examined closely in relation to gastric cancer, but new research suggests bacteria may be playing a role in other gastrointestinal cancers. This review will summarize the literature on epidemiological studies examining infections that have been linked to pancreatic cancer and propose mechanistic pathways that may tie infections to pancreatic cancer. PMID:23843038

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Lindkvist, Björn

    2013-11-14

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an important cause of maldigestion and a major complication in chronic pancreatitis. Normal digestion requires adequate stimulation of pancreatic secretion, sufficient production of digestive enzymes by pancreatic acinar cells, a pancreatic duct system without significant outflow obstruction and adequate mixing of the pancreatic juice with ingested food. Failure in any of these steps may result in pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, which leads to steatorrhea, weight loss and malnutrition-related complications, such as osteoporosis. Methods evaluating digestion, such as fecal fat quantification and the (13)C-mixed triglycerides test, are the most accurate tests for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, but the probability of the diagnosis can also be estimated based on symptoms, signs of malnutrition in blood tests, fecal elastase 1 levels and signs of morphologically severe chronic pancreatitis on imaging. Treatment for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency includes support to stop smoking and alcohol consumption, dietary consultation, enzyme replacement therapy and a structured follow-up of nutritional status and the effect of treatment. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is administered in the form of enteric-coated minimicrospheres during meals. The dose should be in proportion to the fat content of the meal, usually 40-50000 lipase units per main meal, and half the dose is required for a snack. In cases that do not respond to initial treatment, the doses can be doubled, and proton inhibitors can be added to the treatment. This review focuses on current concepts of the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. PMID:24259956

  8. Lactoferrin secretion in alcoholic pancreatic disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William R. Brugge; Catherine A. Burke

    1988-01-01

    Lactoferrin, a nonenzyme protein normally secreted in small amounts in pancreatic juice, has been reported by several investigators to be secreted in large amounts in chronic pancreatitis. Whether this increased secretion first occurs at an early or late stage of alcoholic pancreatic disease is unknown. In this study we measured lactoferrin and enzyme outputs in duodenal juice from 10 healthy

  9. Acute Pancreatitis Due to a Duodenal Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Pyeon, Sung Ik; Kim, Yong Tae; Lee, Ban Seok; Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Jae Nam; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Oh, Kong Jin

    2014-01-01

    Duodenal ulcers and acute pancreatitis are two of the most commonly encountered gastrointestinal diseases among the general population. However, duodenal ulcer-induced pancreatitis is very rarely reported worldwide. This report elaborates on a distinct medical treatment that contributes to partial or complete treatment of acute pancreatitis induced by a duodenal ulcer scar. PMID:25505728

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lindkvist, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an important cause of maldigestion and a major complication in chronic pancreatitis. Normal digestion requires adequate stimulation of pancreatic secretion, sufficient production of digestive enzymes by pancreatic acinar cells, a pancreatic duct system without significant outflow obstruction and adequate mixing of the pancreatic juice with ingested food. Failure in any of these steps may result in pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, which leads to steatorrhea, weight loss and malnutrition-related complications, such as osteoporosis. Methods evaluating digestion, such as fecal fat quantification and the 13C-mixed triglycerides test, are the most accurate tests for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, but the probability of the diagnosis can also be estimated based on symptoms, signs of malnutrition in blood tests, fecal elastase 1 levels and signs of morphologically severe chronic pancreatitis on imaging. Treatment for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency includes support to stop smoking and alcohol consumption, dietary consultation, enzyme replacement therapy and a structured follow-up of nutritional status and the effect of treatment. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is administered in the form of enteric-coated minimicrospheres during meals. The dose should be in proportion to the fat content of the meal, usually 40-50000 lipase units per main meal, and half the dose is required for a snack. In cases that do not respond to initial treatment, the doses can be doubled, and proton inhibitors can be added to the treatment. This review focuses on current concepts of the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. PMID:24259956

  11. Lymphoma microenvironment: culprit or innocent?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B Herreros; A Sanchez-Aguilera; M A Piris; MA Piris

    2008-01-01

    Studies are revealing that lymphoid neoplasms are characterized by well-defined chromosome translocations and by the accumulation of subsequent molecular alterations involving mainly the cell cycle and\\/or apoptotic pathways. However, survival of B and T tumor cells is also dependent on the interactions with the accompanying cells that comprise the lymphoma microenvironment. Although non-tumor cells can contribute both positive and negative

  12. Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphomas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio Subtil

    \\u000a Cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders are a markedly heterogeneous group of diseases and ­represent one of the most challenging\\u000a areas in dermatopathology. Careful correlation of clinical, histopathological, immunophenotypic, and molecular findings is\\u000a essential for the accurate ­diagnosis and proper classification of these neoplasms [1]. There are several types of B-cell\\u000a ­lymphoma which may show skin involvement, either primarily or as a secondary

  13. Molecular Pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma

    E-print Network

    Hamoudi, Rifat A

    2010-01-01

    nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) (5%) . In cHL , the neoplastic cells are usually a minority population whose survival appears to be depende nt on the majority of reactive or inflammatory cells (Aldinucci et al., 2010). In the m... ajority of cases the neoplastic (Reed -Sternberg (Reed, 1902) ) cells appear to be of B -cell origin. NLPHL is characterised by lymphocytic and histocytic (L&H) or “popcorn” cells in that are distributed amidst abundant non-neoplastic inflammatory...

  14. Role of Osteopontin in Calcification in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroki Takada; Takahiro Nakazawa; Hirotaka Ohara; Tomoaki Ando; Kazuki Hayashi; Itaru Naito; Fumihiro Okumura; Hajime Tanaka; Tamaki Yamada; Satoru Takahashi; Takashi Joh

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine the potential for pancreatic calcification in autoimmune pancreatitis by investigating\\u000a osteopontin and CD44 expression. Methods Human pancreatic tissues in normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis, and autoimmune pancreatitis were obtained from the surgical\\u000a specimens of 42 patients. Pancreatic tissues from male Wistar Bonn\\/Kobori rats were also used as an animal autoimmune pancreatitis

  15. Methylation profiling of mediastinal gray zone lymphoma reveals a distinctive signature with elements shared by classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Franziska C.; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Wei, Lai; Hanson, Jeffrey C.; Killian, J. Keith; Sun, Hong-Wei; Adams, Lisa G.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Wilson, Wyndham H.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Meltzer, Paul S.; Staudt, Louis M.; Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Jaffe, Elaine S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mediastinal gray zone lymphoma is a newly recognized entity with transitional morphological and immunophenotypic features between the nodular sclerosis subtype of Hodgkin’s lymphoma and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. Diagnostic criteria for mediastinal gray zone lymphoma are still challenging, and the optimal therapy is as yet undetermined. Epigenetic changes have been implicated in the loss of the B-cell program in classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and might provide a basis for the immunophenotypic alterations seen in mediastinal gray zone lymphoma. Design and Methods We performed a large-scale DNA methylation analysis of microdissected tumor cells to investigate the biological underpinnings of mediastinal gray zone lymphoma and its association with the related entities classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma, making comparisons with the presumptively less related diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Results Principal component analysis demonstrated that mediastinal gray zone lymphoma has a distinct epigenetic profile intermediate between classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma but remarkably different from that of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Analysis of common hypo- and hypermethylated CpG targets in mediastinal gray zone lymphoma, classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma, primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was performed and confirmed the findings of the principal component analysis. Based on the epigenetic profiles we were able to establish class prediction models utilizing genes such as HOXA5, MMP9, EPHA7 and DAPK1 which could distinguish between mediastinal gray zone lymphoma, classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma with a final combined prediction of 100%. Conclusions Our data confirm a close relationship between mediastinal gray zone lymphoma and both classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma and primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma. However, important differences were observed as well, allowing a clear distinction from both parent entities. Thus, mediastinal gray zone lymphoma cannot be assigned to either classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma or primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma, validating the decision to create an intermediate category in the World Health Organization classification. PMID:21454882

  16. Hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuya; Ikegame, Kazuhiro; Mori, Minako; Inoue, Daichi; Kimura, Takaharu; Shimoji, Sonoko; Togami, Katsuhiro; Tabata, Sumie; Kurata, Masayuki; Imai, Yukihiro; Matsushita, Akiko; Nagai, Kenichi; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2010-04-01

    A 32-year-old male with chronic hepatitis B was admitted to a hospital with cellulitis in the right leg in September 2006. Pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and systemic superficial lymph node swelling were noted, and he was referred to our hospital. He developed fever and liver dysfunction in June 2007 and underwent a splenectomy. His pancytopenia subsequently improved. A pathologic diagnosis of hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma was made by examining spleen tissue and biopsy specimens of the liver and mesenteric lymph node. He had stage IVB disease because neoplastic T cells were noted in the bone marrow. The response of the lymphoma to conventional chemotherapy including the CHOP (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, prednisolone) and DeVIC (dexamethasone, etoposide, ifoshamide, carboplatin) regimens was poor and transient. A partial remission was obtained with an ESHAP (etoposide, cisplatin, cytarabine, methylprednisolone) regimen. Therefore, we planned a bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from an HLA-haploidentical sibling donor. He was moved to the Department of Hematology, Hyogo Medical College, to receive this BMT as part of a clinical trial. During the conditioning procedure for the transplantation, however, he died of septicemia. Since hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma is very rare with only 23 reported cases to date, herein we report this case and discuss the therapeutic strategy. PMID:20217452

  17. [Pathological diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    This lymphoma was recognized by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. In 1865, Samuel Wilks named it Hodgkin disease. Now, the term Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is acceptable over Hodgkin disease. Since the neoplastic cells of the disease is well-recognized to be a lymphoid cell, especially B lymphocyte. In WHO classification published in 2008, HLs are divided into two entities: Classical HL and nodular lymphocyte predominat HL. The former is composed of four different subtypes: nodular sclerosis (NS), mixed cellularity (MC), lymphocyte rich (LR), and lymphocyte depletion (LD). HL is characterized by the morphological feature comprising a minority of neoplastic cells, Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells and popcorn (LP) cells and a majority of non-neoplastic reactive cells. Antigen receptor gene analyses by prevailing molecular methods and flow cytometry are not appropriate method for the diagnosis of HL, because of small number of neoplastic cells. They are, however, very useful in the differential diagnosis to rule out other lymphomas. Even the present when science progressed, pathological (morphological and immunohistochemical) examination is very worth for diagnosis of HL. PMID:24724402

  18. Ascaris-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Khuroo, M S; Zargar, S A; Yattoo, G N; Koul, P; Khan, B A; Dar, M Y; Alai, M S

    1992-12-01

    The incidence, clinical disease and outcome of acute pancreatitis caused by ascariasis in an endemic area of Kashmir, India, was studied prospectively. Ascariasis was an aetiological factor in 59 of 256 patients (23.0 per cent) with acute pancreatitis. Worms had invaded the bile duct in 51 patients, the pancreatic duct in four and both ducts in four. Pancreatitis was mild in 46 patients and severe in 13. Associated pyogenic cholangitis was present in eight. Acute complications occurred in 11 patients. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) was performed in all cases within 72 h of admission and delineated ascarides in the duodenum invading the ampullary orifice (44 patients), in the bile duct (55) and in the pancreatic duct (eight). At ERCP, worms were extracted from the ampullary orifice and removed via the mouth of 33 patients with intractable epigastric pain, leading to rapid relief of symptoms. The eight patients with pyogenic cholangitis underwent endoscopic nasobiliary drainage to decompress the bile ducts; worms were extracted from the bile duct of three of these patients using a Dormia basket. A total of 56 patients recovered from acute illness with a combination of conservative and endoscopic treatment; the other three required emergency surgery. At a mean(s.d.) follow-up of 19(7) months, ten patients showed symptomatic worm reinvasion of the biliary tree. The overall mortality rate was 3 per cent. PMID:1486433

  19. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  20. Tanespimycin and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-26

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  2. Impaired pancreatic polypeptide release in chronic pancreatitis with steatorrhoea.

    PubMed Central

    Adrian, T E; Besterman, H S; Mallinson, C N; Garalotis, C; Bloom, S R

    1979-01-01

    Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) is a newly discovered hormonal peptide localised in a distinct endocrine cell type in the pancreas. PP circulates in plasma and in normal subjects levels rise substantially on the ingestion of food (mean rise 138 pmol/l). In 10 patients with chronic pancreatitis with exocrine deficiency the PP response to a test breakfast was greatly reduced (mean rise 20 pmol/l, P less than 0.001). PP response to the meal was normal in 10 patients with active coeliac disease and 12 patients with acute tropical sprue with steatorrhoea. PMID:428832

  3. The malignant lymphomas in Africa.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P

    1991-10-01

    Africa, the "dark continent" and the source of such wonderful tales as King Solomon's Mines and Jock of the Bushveld, has an equally enthralling story to tell about malignant disease in general and the lymphomas in particular as they occur among its varied people. It is uncertain how far back in history contact existed with the rest of the world, primarily in the form of slave trading and colonization by, among others, the Portuguese and the British. Until recent times, however, Africa's secrets have remained largely undisturbed. Fragments of medical information are recorded in the diaries of those early, intrepid explorers, such as Albert Cook, Henry Stanley, David Livingstone, and Albert Schweitzer. However, it is only in recent years that the great natural experiments that have for so long been underestimated, and very much less understood, belatedly started to attract attention. Examples are the systematic studies by Denis Burkitt, who through perseverance unraveled the lymphoma that now bears his name, and the thought-provoking description of the immunoproliferative small intestinal disease carried out by the Cape Town group, with both illustrating the axiom that "the study of man is man." Despite such occasional outstanding achievements, there is still considerable paucity of data pertaining to the various lymphoreticular malignancies, so that only limited conclusions are possible. Certainly, lymphoma in Africa differs from that elsewhere in the world. In part, this may reflect a background of immunologic disturbance attributable to parasitic infestation, viral infection, rampant malnutrition, and the impact of a wide variety of vectors, such as mosquitoes, in disease transmission. Striking differences exist in the distribution of these tumors as the incidence and pattern are followed from the equator to the milder climates in the south. This confirmed phenomenon gives rise to the tantalizing suggestion that, to some significant extent, the changes reflect the influence of geography. Thus, there may be associated alterations in the fauna and flora that determine the presence of intermediary hosts that have an impact on the eventual expression of the malignant clone. Many questions remain unanswered. For example, how can the lower incidence of Hodgkin's disease and the predominance of high-grade malignancies in the tropics and subtropics be explained? To what extent does the lymphocytic and plasmacytic hyperplasia, ascribed to intense antigenic stimulus in Burkitt's lymphoma and myeloma--perhaps even other lymphomas, such as IPSID--predispose the host to a mutational event that leads to the emergence of each distinctive neoplasm?(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1938763

  4. Pancreatic surgery: evolution and current tailored approach

    PubMed Central

    Mužina Miši?, Dubravka; Glav?i?, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Surgical resection of pancreatic cancer offers the only chance for prolonged survival. Pancretic resections are technically challenging, and are accompanied by a substantial risk for postoperative complications, the most significant complication being a pancreatic fistula. Risk factors for development of pancreatic leakage are now well known, and several prophylactic pharmacological measures, as well as technical interventions have been suggested in prevention of pancreatic fistula. With better postoperative care and improved radiological interventions, most frequently complications can be managed conservatively. This review also attempts to address some of the controversies related to optimal management of the pancreatic remnant after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:25392836

  5. Antimetabolite Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Malyn May Asuncion; Neidigh, Jonathan W.; Wall, Nathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly and aggressive disease. Less than 1% of diagnosed patients survive 5 years with an average survival time of only 4–8 months. The only option for metastatic pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy where only the antimetabolites gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil are used clinically. Unfortunately, efforts to improve chemotherapy regimens by combining, 5-fluorouracil or gemcitabine with other drugs, such as cisplatin or oxaliplatin, have not increased cell killing or improved patient survival. The novel antimetabolite zebularine shows promise, inducing apoptosis and arresting cellular growth in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. However, resistance to these antimetabolites remains a problem highlighting the need to discover and develop new antimetabolites that will improve a patient’s overall survival.

  6. [Pancreatic cancer- a curable disease].

    PubMed

    Limani, Perparim; Samaras, Panagiotis; Lesurtel, Mickael; Graf, Rolf; DeOliveira, Michelle L; Petrowsky, Henrik; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2015-04-22

    Pancreatic cancer is the seventh most common cancer in Switzerland associated with a dismal prognosis. Its natural course is fatal with a 3-year survival rate below 3%. Advances in diagnostic tools, tumor staging and multimodal treatment strategies resulted in an improved 5-year survival rate of over 20%. Patients presenting with pancreatic cancer significantly benefit from a multi-disciplinary treatment strategy in an experienced hepato-pancreato-biliary center. Following a comprehensive tumor staging, surgical resection associated with adjuvant chemotherapy is still the only curative therapy option. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy is currently investigated in clinical trials. Patients presenting with advanced pancreatic cancer not eligible for curative treatment might benefit from inclusion into innovative clinical trials with novel treatment concepts. PMID:25900693

  7. Endoscopic interventions for necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Trikudanathan, Guru; Attam, Rajeev; Arain, Mustafa A; Mallery, Shawn; Freeman, Martin L

    2014-07-01

    Interventions for necrotizing pancreatitis have undergone a paradigm shift away from open surgical necrosectomy and toward minimally invasive techniques, with endoscopic transmural drainage (ETD) and necrosectomy emerging as principle forms of treatment. Recent multicenter studies, randomized trials, evidence-based guidelines, and consensus statements have endorsed the safety and efficacy of endoscopic and other minimally invasive techniques for the treatment of walled-off necrosis. A comprehensive review of indications, standard and novel approaches, outcomes, complications, and controversies regarding ETD and necrosectomy is presented. Given the inherent challenges and associated risks, endoscopic techniques for the management of necrotizing pancreatitis should be performed at specialized multidisciplinary centers by expert endoscopists well versed in the management of necrotizing pancreatitis. PMID:24957157

  8. Update on Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Goggins, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) is a histologically well-defined precursor to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. PanINs are remarkably common lesions, particularly in the elderly population. Molecular studies have helped establish the progression of PanIN to invasive cancer, and recently genetically engineered mouse models have been generated that recapitulate the entire spectrum of lesions from precursor to invasive pancreatic cancer. Some PanIN lesions produce lobulocentric atrophy of the pancreatic parenchyma, and, when multifocal, this lobulocentric atrophy may be detectable using currently available imaging techniques such as endoscopic ultrasound. The association of acinar-ductal metaplasia with PanIN lesions has led some to hypothesize that PanINs develop from acinar cells that undergo acinar-ductal metaplasia. PMID:18787611

  9. Birth control pills and pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, J W

    1982-02-01

    There are only 6 published reports of pancreatitis associated with oral contraception (OC). This article presents 1 additional case. A 28 year old white woman was hospitalized for severe abdominal pains; gastroenteritis was diagnosed and the patient treated with Compazine and Maalox. Because of the increasing severity of pains the patient was rehospitalized and pancreatitis secondary to hyperlipoproteinemia was diagnosed. OC treatment was suspended, and the patient was successfully treated with Cimetidine, antacids, and insulin for elevated glucose. Pancreatitis caused by OC is probably due to alterations in lipid metabolism, and related to the estrogen content of the preparation used. A major study done recently with 2 types of synthetic estrogens combined with 3 types of progestogens confirmed that hypertriglyceridemia induced by OC was estrogen dosage-related. It seems apparent that OC use in patients with intrinsic lipid abnormalities may be contraindicated; other risk patients are those who are obese, diabetic, or with family antecedents of diabetes or hyperlipidemia. PMID:7070128

  10. Adjuvant treatment for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Vladimir; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Goodman, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women. Surgical resection has been shown to be the only curable treatment available. Unfortunately only 20% of all patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer are surgical candidates due to the aggressive biology of this disease. There is no clear consensus on what type of adjuvant therapy should be used for patients with pancreatic cancer. Chemoradiation is the favored treatment modality by many in the United States while gemcitabine based chemotherapy is favored in Europe. Both of these approaches have been shown by large prospective, randomized trials to improve disease free intervals and in some studies overall survival. The survival of these patients, even status post resection and adjuvant therapy, remains poor and therefore the need for alternative adjuvant therapies is needed. We will therefore discuss Abstracts #4124, #TPS4162, #4120 and #E15191 in this paper which are relevant to the issues described above. PMID:25076340

  11. A Case of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis due to Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong Kyoung; Lee, Sang Hyub; Kwak, Min Sun; Kim, Jai Hwan; Jang, Eun Sun; Hwang, Sung Wook; Hwang, Jin Hyeok; Joo, Li Jin; Yoon, Yoo Seok; Kim, Hae Ryoung

    2010-03-01

    Pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an extremely rare condition with various clinical manifestations. We report herein a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis due to pancreatic AVM in a 49-year-old man. This patient presented with epigastric pain that had developed after consuming alcohol 2 days prior to admission. Serum amylase and lipase levels were elevated and computed tomography revealed focal low-attenuation lesions with peripancreatic infiltrations in the pancreatic tail and multiple collateral vessels around the low-attenuation lesions. He was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis and pancreatic AVM. Although he had stopped drinking after the first attack of acute pancreatitis, his pancreatitis recurred twice within 3 months. He underwent a distal pancreatectomy after the third attack of acute pancreatitis. He was free of symptoms for 2 years after the pancreatectomy. PMID:20479928

  12. Follicular Lymphoma Presenting with Leptomeningeal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ricardo; Costa, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma is generally an indolent B cell lymphoproliferative disorder of transformed follicular center B cells. Central nervous system metastasis is a very rare complication portending a very poor prognosis. We report a rare case of follicular lymphoma presenting with leptomeningeal involvement achieving a complete remission after initial therapy. PMID:25544910

  13. Peripheral blood hemophagocytosis in an unusual lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Fragasso, Alberto; Mannarella, Clara; Ciancio, Angela; Scarciolla, Oronzo

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We describe a patient with fever, pancytopenia, and hepato-splenomegaly associated with the finding of neoplastic lymphoid cells and histiocytes with hemophagocytosis in the peripheral smear; the diagnostic features were suggestive for a biological overlap between a large B-cell lymphoma with intravascular involvement and the Asian variant of intravascular B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25678965

  14. Staging and Treatment of Cutaneous Lymphomas: Utility

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    · Sézary cell count (morphologic exam) · Flow cytometry: CD3, CD4, CD7, CD8, CD26 to assess for CD4+, CD4, unspecified · Aggressive epidermotropic CD8+ T-cell lymphoma · CD4+ sm/med-sized pleomorphic T-cell lymphoma/CD8 or abnormal phenotype (CD4+/CD7-%, CD4+/CD26-%, other) ­ Comp metabolic, LDH · Imaging studies

  15. What Is Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are: Hodgkin lymphoma (also known as Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Hodgkin disease, or Hodgkin’s disease), which is named after Dr. Thomas Hodgkin, who ... tests may be needed to tell them apart. Hodgkin disease is discussed in a separate American Cancer Society ...

  16. Radiation therapy of Waldeyer's ring lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shimm, D.S.; Dosoretz, D.E.; Harris, N.L.; Pilch, B.Z.; Linggood, R.M.; Wang, C.C.

    1984-08-01

    Forty-nine patients with biopsy-proven Waldeyer's ring lymphoma were treated with radiation therapy between 1968 and 1979; 45 to 50 Gy were given to Waldeyer's ring structures with a 5- to 10-Gy boost to the primary site. Uninvolved low cervical nodes received 40 to 50 Gy. Chemotherapy was reserved for treatment failures. Actuarial 5-year survival was 53%, disease-free survival was 48%, and local control was 98%. Patients with Stage I disease fared better than patients with Stage II disease, and unilateral adenopathy conferred a better prognosis than bilateral adenopathy. When classified by the Rappaport system, nodular lymphomas had a better prognosis than diffuse lymphomas, and of the diffuse lymphomas, histiocytic lymphoma was a more lethal disease than lymphocytic lymphoma. Patients with diffuse undifferentiated lymphomas in the Rappaport system, or high-grade lymphomas in the Working Formulation, fared poorly. Most relapses were systemic, and actuarial 5-year survival after salvage was only 20%. A logical approach to the treatment of this disease can be based on these prognostic features.

  17. Colonic lymphoma in the transplant patient

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel L. Phillips; Emmet B. Keeffe; Kent G. Benner; Rita M. Braziel

    1989-01-01

    Summary A 64-year-old male renal transplant recipient developed rectal bleeding caused by a primary lymphoma of the colon, an unusual site for initial disease involvement. Renal transplant recipients may be at increased risk for the development of primary colonic lymphoma, a diagnosis that should be considered in transplant patients who develop abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, or intestinal perforation. The unique

  18. Novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shing-Chun; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has become the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the last two decades. Only 3%-15% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had 5 year survival rate. Drug resistance, high metastasis, poor prognosis and tumour relapse contributed to the malignancies and difficulties in treating pancreatic cancer. The current standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however its efficacy is far from satisfactory, one of the reasons is due to the complex tumour microenvironment which decreases effective drug delivery to target cancer cell. Studies of the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer have revealed that activation of KRAS, overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2, inactivation of p16INK4A and loss of p53 activities occurred in pancreatic cancer. Co-administration of gemcitabine and targeting the molecular pathological events happened in pancreatic cancer has brought an enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of gemcitabine. Therefore, studies looking for novel targets in hindering pancreatic tumour growth are emerging rapidly. In order to give a better understanding of the current findings and to seek the direction in future pancreatic cancer research; in this review we will focus on targets suppressing tumour metastatsis and progression, KRAS activated downstream effectors, the relationship of Notch signaling and Nodal/Activin signaling with pancreatic cancer cells, the current findings of non-coding RNAs in inhibiting pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, brief discussion in transcription remodeling by epigenetic modifiers (e.g., HDAC, BMI1, EZH2) and the plausible therapeutic applications of cancer stem cell and hyaluronan in tumour environment. PMID:25152585

  19. Ofatumumab and Bendamustine Hydrochloride With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Untreated Follicular Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-13

    Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  20. Ofatumumab and Bendamustine Hydrochloride With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Untreated Follicular Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-01

    Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  1. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  2. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a review.

    PubMed

    Young, Kate; Iyer, Ridhima; Morganstein, Daniel; Chau, Ian; Cunningham, David; Starling, Naureen

    2015-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a rare and heterogeneous group of tumors with widely varying morphologies and behaviors. Due to their rarity and heterogeneity, progress in improving their treatment has been slow. However, in recent years there have been advances both in their characterization and in the available treatment options. This review will attempt to address these, with particular reference to pancreatic NETs. Pancreatic NETs are a subset of NETs, previously known as islet cell tumors, which appear to be a distinct biological entity, responding differently to systemic treatments compared with NETs arising elsewhere in the GI tract. PMID:25757686

  3. Rituximab, Lenalidomide, and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Follicular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-28

    Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  4. Study of Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Patients With Relapsed Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-13

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. FDG-PET/CT in lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D'souza, Maria M; Jaimini, Abhinav; Bansal, Abhishek; Tripathi, Madhavi; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Tripathi, Rajendra Prashad

    2013-01-01

    Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases that arise from the constituent cells of the immune system or from their precursors. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) is now the cornerstone of staging procedures in the state-of-the-art management of Hodgkin's disease and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It plays an important role in staging, restaging, prognostication, planning appropriate treatment strategies, monitoring therapy, and detecting recurrence. However, its role in indolent lymphomas is still unclear and calls for further investigational trials. The protean PET/CT manifestations of lymphoma necessitate a familiarity with the spectrum of imaging findings to enable accurate diagnosis. A meticulous evaluation of PET/CT findings, an understanding of its role in the management of lymphomas, and knowledge of its limitations are mandatory for the optimal utilization of this technique. PMID:24604942

  6. Lymphoma diagnosed at inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Veal, David R; Hammil, Chet W; Wong, Linda L

    2010-02-01

    Tumors presenting in the inguinal hernia sac are considered to be extremely rare, with the more common neoplasms metastasizing from the gastrointestinal tract, ovary and prostate. We report the case of Mantle cell lymphoma identified in the inguinal hernia sac following hernia repair While the hernia sac appeared normal to the surgeon, evaluation by the pathologist showed subtle gross irregularities, with subsequent histologic and immunochemical diagnosis of Mantle cell lymphoma. Twelve previous cases of a lymphoma diagnosed during hernia repair have been described in the English literature. This is the first report of Mantle cell lymphoma found in the hernia sac. This case illustrates the value of routine microscopic evaluation of hernia sacs found from inguinal/femoral herniorrhaphies, as it may be the primary presentation of an asymptomatic metastatic lymphoma. Additionally it underscores the importance of the surgeon's role in screening hernia sacs if the practice of submitting only macroscopically abnormal specimens for microscopic evaluation is adopted. PMID:20358722

  7. Inherited Pancreatic Cancer: Surveillance and Treatment Strategies for Affected Families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen J. Rulyak; Teresa A. Brentnall

    2001-01-01

    Background: Nearly 10% of pancreatic cancers are hereditary in origin, and in some individuals, the risk of pancreatic cancer approaches 50%. A number of defined syndromes can predispose families to pancreatic cancer, although many of the mechanisms that result in familial pancreatic cancers are unknown. This article reviews current knowledge regarding familial pancreatic cancers and highlights the rationale for screening

  8. New diagnostic criteria of acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kiriyama, Seiki; Gabata, Toshifumi; Takada, Tadahiro; Hirata, Koichi; Yoshida, Masahiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Hirota, Masahiko; Kadoya, Masumi; Yamanouchi, Eigoro; Hattori, Takayuki; Takeda, Kazunori; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Amano, Hodaka; Wada, Keita; Sekimoto, Miho; Arata, Shinju; Yokoe, Masamichi; Hirota, Morihisa

    2010-01-01

    Practical guidelines for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis are presented so that a rapid and adequate diagnosis can be made. When acute pancreatitis is suspected in patients with acute onset of abdominal pain and tenderness mainly in the upper abdomen, the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is made on the basis of elevated levels of pancreatic enzymes in the blood and/or urine. Furthermore, other acute abdominal diseases are ruled out if local findings associated with pancreatitis are confirmed by diagnostic imaging. According to the diagnostic criteria established in Japan, patients who present with two of the following three manifestations are diagnosed as having acute pancreatitis: characteristic upper abdominal pain, elevated levels of pancreatic enzymes, and findings of ultrasonography (US), CT or MRI suggesting acute pancreatitis. Detection of elevated levels of blood pancreatic enzymes is crucial in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Measurement of blood lipase is recommended, because it is reported to be superior to all other pancreatic enzymes in terms of sensitivity and specificity. For measurements of the blood amylase level widely used in Japan, it should be cautioned that, because of its low specificity, abnormal high values are also often obtained in diseases other than pancreatitis. The cut-off level of blood pancreatic enzymes for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is not able to be set because of lack of sufficient evidence and consensus to date. CT study is the most appropriate procedure to confirm image findings of acute pancreatitis. Elucidation of the etiology of acute pancreatitis should be continued after a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. In the process of the etiologic elucidation of acute pancreatitis, judgment whether it is gallstone-induced or not is most urgent and crucial for deciding treatment policy including the assessment of whether endoscopic papillary treatment should be conducted or not. The diagnosis of gallstone-induced acute pancreatitis can be made by combining detection of elevated levels of bilirubin, transamylase (ALT, AST) and ALP detected by hematological examination and the visualization of gallstones by US. PMID:20012328

  9. Effect of partial versus complete pancreatic denervation on pancreatic secretion.

    PubMed

    Barzilai, A; Medina, J A; Toth, L; Konturek, S; Dreiling, D A

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the effect of various stimuli on pancreatic secretion in two groups of dogs, one undergoing interruption of the cholinergic and adrenergic branches to the pancreas (long arc reflexes), and the second group undergoing total denervation of the pancreas by its isolation from stomach and duodenum (short arc reflexes). Stimulation of pancreatic secretion was accomplished by (a) hormonal, by i.v. secretin and CCK/PZ and (b) reflex stimulation by intraduodenal administration of fat (Na oleate) or amino acids (Aminosyn). After a few weeks of collected data in stimulated controls, the dogs were divided into two groups: (A) Four dogs underwent proximal truncal vagotomy, celiac ganglionectomy, and stripping of the common hepatic and gastroduodenal arteries for 2-3 cm. (B) Four dogs underwent the same procedures, but in addition the pancreas was dissected away from its vascular and nervous attachments to the duodenal wall and pyloric region, as well as from its mesenteric and peritoneal attachments. All animals were then tested with secretin, Cholecystokinin/pancreozymin (CCK/PZ), intraduodenal fat, and intraduodenal amino acids. The data obtained indicate that secretion of pancreatic bicarbonate is dependent on intact local duodeno-pancreatic nervous reflexes. Fat and amino acids stimulate the secretion of bicarbonate only when the attachments of the pancreas to the stomach and duodenum are intact. Stimulation by secretion or CCK, being humoral-hormonal mediators, appears not to be affected by the local denervation. PMID:3628221

  10. Alisertib and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-03

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  11. Alisertib and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-09

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  12. Primary lymphoma of the testis

    SciTech Connect

    Buskirk, S.J.; Evans, R.G.; Banks, P.M.; O'Connell, M.J.; Earle, J.D.

    1982-10-01

    Seventeen patients with initial presentation of lymphoma of the testis were evaluated at the Mayo Clinic between 1969 and 1979. The mean age of the patients was 69 years with 15 of the 17 patients age 60 and older at the time of diagnosis. All histologies were diffuse according to the Rappaport classification with 12 of 17 patients being histiocytic. Eleven of the 15 State I/sub E/A and II/sub E/A patients were treated with radiation therapy alone with doses ranging from 2,600 to 4,000 rad. Eight of these 11 Stage I/sub E/A patients experienced recurrence; in five of these eight, the first site of recurrence was Waldeyer's ring and adjacent structures. Four patients were treated initially with chemotherapy. In all four patients the lymphoma recurred, in two patients in the central nervous system (CNS). The survival rate at two years was 73% in Stage I/sub E/A patients and 25% in Stage II/sub E/A patients. There were no survivors at two years in those patients presenting with Stage IV disease. As patients with testicular lymphoma have a relatively high incidence of secondary involvement of Waldeyer's ring and the CNS, careful evaluation of these areas should be performed as part of the routine staging procedures. In view of the high incidence of secondary involvement of distant sites, systemic treatment should be given full consideration in addition to local irradiation as part of the initial treatment of patients with localized disease.

  13. Individualized management of follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bai, Bing; Huang, Hui-Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the most common indolent non-hodgkin lymphoma. Most patients with FL are diagnosed with advanced disease and are considered incurable. The classical prognostic index in FL is the FL international prognostic index (FLIPI). The management of FL is mainly determined by histologic grading, clinical stage, and tumor burden. For patients with stage I and II disease, an involved-site radiation therapy (ISRT) is recommended and may be potentially curative approach with 60% to 80% of 10-year overall survival (OS) rates, while patients with stage III and IV should be treated with systemic therapy. The watchful waiting is still an option for patients without symptoms or/and low tumor burden. Induction of immuno-chemotherapy combined with consolidation of rituximab maintenance (MR) is standard care for patients with symptomatic disease or with high tumor burden when treatment indicated. The major indication for systemic therapy is including candidate for clinical trials, threatened end organ function, cytopenia secondary to lymphoma bulky disease and steady progress etc. at present time. Routine baseline and regular hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) testing is strongly recommended for all patients before the initiation of immuno-chemotherapy in order to minimize the risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation which has been observed approximately 20% to 50% of patients with positive HBsAg and 3% to 45% of patients with positive HBcAb. Prophylactic antiviral treatment in patients who are HBsAg-positive or HBcAb-positive is indicated before immuno-chemotherapy. The management for elderly patients should be carefully selected to avoid overtreatment and severe toxicities. Individualized dose adjustment for chemotherapy and an adequate supportive treatment are essential for this special population. Novel agents such as lenalidomide, ibrutinib and idelalisib are promising. In conclusion, individualized management of FL remains challenging and role of new targeted agents need to be defined. PMID:25841714

  14. Molecular Targeting in Pancreatic Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Scott Wadler

    2007-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity of tumors of the upper GI tract are formidable with incidence and mortality nearly the same. Therefore, better therapies are necessary, and these are generally molecularly targeted therapies. This chapter focuses on the treatment of pancreatic cancer with targeted therapy. Important cellular pathways are reviewed, including signal transduction, proteasome inhibition, cell cycle, anti-angiogenesis pathways, immunologic therapies,

  15. Individual susceptibility to alcoholic pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Minoti V Apte; Ron Pirola; Jeremy S Wilson

    2007-01-01

    The observation that only a minority of heavy drinkers develop pancreatitis has prompted an intensive search for a trigger factor\\/cofactor\\/susceptibility factor that may precipitate a clinical attack. Putative susceptibility factors examined so far include diet, smoking, amount and type of alcohol consumed, the pattern of drinking and lipid intolerance. In addition, a range of inherited factors have been assessed including

  16. Endoscopic Treatment of Pancreatic Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal. PMID:24944986

  17. Pancreatic Carcinoma: Imaging Update 2001

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick C. Freeny

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the most recent advances in imaging of pancreatic carcinomas. The specific modalities discussed include helical computed tomography (HCT) with combined CT angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), and positron emission tomography (PET). Endoscopic ultrasound is discussed in other papers. HCT is believed to be the most efficacious modality for initial detection and staging

  18. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic calculi.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon; Lee, Dong Ki

    2014-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal. PMID:24944986

  19. Oncocytes in Human Chronic Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Frexinos; A. Ribet

    1972-01-01

    Oncocytes have been described in various tissues and under different circumstances, however, they were rarely encountered in pancreas. This paper wishes to emphasize the frequent presence of oncocytes in human chronic pancreatitis. Three readily distinguishable types of oncocytes were observed: normal oncocytes, condensed oncocytes and cells intermediate with centroacinar cells. The authors suggest that the increased number of oncocytes in

  20. Management of pancreatic duct stone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Li Li; Sheng-Ning Zhang

    2008-01-01

    ancreatic duct stone is a rare disease. With the advancement of radiological techniques in diagnosis and in-depth study the incidence of the disease has appeared to be rising in recent years, especially in the Western world. Defined as stone or calcification in the pancreatic duct, the pathogenesis of the disease remains unknown, but many theories are available for its formation.

  1. Dasatinib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride Alone in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-06

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  2. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

  3. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-09

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Secondary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  4. HIV-Resistant Gene Modified Stem Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Lymphoma With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-01

    HIV Infection; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  5. Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors by endoscopic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kitano, Masayuki; Kamata, Ken; El-Masry, Muhammad; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are highly diverse, as they can be solid or cystic, and benign or malignant. Since their imaging features overlap considerably, it is often difficult to characterize these tumors. In addition, small pancreatic tumors, especially those less than 2 cm in diameter, are difficult to detect and diagnose. For characterizing pancreatic tumors and detecting small pancreatic tumors, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the most sensitive of the imaging procedures currently available. This technique also provides good results in terms of the preoperative staging of pancreatic tumors. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has also proved to be a safe and useful method for tissue sampling of pancreatic tumors. Despite these advantages, however, it is still difficult to differentiate between benign and malignant, solid or cystic pancreatic tumors, malignant neoplasms, and chronic pancreatitis using EUS, even when EUS-FNA is performed. Recently, contrast-enhanced EUS with Doppler mode (CE-EUS) employing ultrasound contrast agents, which indicate vascularization in pancreatic lesions, has been found to be useful in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumors, especially small pancreatic tumors. However, Doppler ultrasonography with contrast-enhancement has several limitations, including blooming artifacts, poor spatial resolution, and low sensitivity to slow flow. Consequently, an echoendoscope was developed recently that has a broad-band transducer and an imaging mode that was designed specifically for contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CEH-EUS) with a second-generation ultrasound contrast agent. The CEH-EUS technique is expected to improve the differential diagnosis of pancreatic disease in the future. This review describes the EUS appearances of common solid and cystic pancreatic masses, the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA, and the relative efficacies and advantages of CE-EUS and CEH-EUS along with their relative advantages and their complementary roles in clinical practice. PMID:21160578

  6. Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Etoposide, Dexamethasone, and Filgrastim For Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. What Are the Key Statistics about Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... factors for pancreatic cancer? What are the key statistics about pancreatic cancer? The American Cancer Society’s most ... risk factors (listed in the next section ). For statistics related to survival, see the section “ Pancreatic cancer ...

  8. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors, Multiple Myeloma, or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma With or Without Impaired Liver or Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. Managing acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Skipworth, James R A; Shankar, Arjun; Pereira, Stephen P

    2010-10-01

    Pancreatitis may be acute or chronic. Although both can be caused by similar aetiologies, they tend to follow distinct natural histories. Around 80% of acute pancreatitis (AP) diagnoses occur secondary to gallstone disease and alcohol misuse. AP is commonly associated with sudden onset of upper abdominal pain radiating to the back that is usually severe enough to warrant the patient seeking urgent medical attention. Onset of pain may be related to a recent alcohol binge or rich, fatty meal. The patient may appear unwell, be tachycardic and have exquisite tenderness in the upper abdomen. Overall, 10-25% of AP episodes are classified as severe, leading to an associated mortality rate of 7.5%. Disease severity is best predicted from a number of clinical scoring systems which can be applied at diagnosis in association with repeated clinical assessment, measurement of acute inflammatory markers, and CT. All patients with suspected AP should be referred urgently. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) follows continued, repetitive or sustained injury to the pancreas and 70% of diagnoses occur secondary to alcohol abuse. The characteristic presenting feature of CP is insidious progression of chronic, severe, upper abdominal pain, radiating to the back, caused by a combination of progressive pancreatic destruction, inflammation and duct obstruction. Signs and symptoms include weight loss and steatorrhoea and later on diabetes. CP patients may also present with recurrent episodes mimicking AP, both symptomatically and metabolically. Diagnosis of CP should be based on symptom profile, imaging and assessment of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. CT should be the first-line imaging investigation. PMID:21141249

  10. Current knowledge of hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Valdivielso, Pedro; Ramírez-Bueno, Alba; Ewald, Nils

    2014-10-01

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a well established and the most common cause of acute pancreatitis (AP) after alcohol and gall stone disease. It is alleged to account for up to 10% of all pancreatitis episodes. Studies suggest that in patients with triglyceride (TG) levels>1000 mg/dL (>11.3 mmol/L), hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis (HTGP-AP) occurs in approximately 15-20% of all subjects referred to Lipid Clinics. Until now, there is no clear evidence which patients with severe HTG will develop pancreatitis and which will not. Underlying pathophysiological concepts include hydrolysis of TG by pancreatic lipase and excessive formation of free fatty acids with inflammatory changes and capillary injury. Additionally hyperviscosity and ischemia may play a decisive role. The clinical features of HTG-AP patients are supposed to be no different from patients with AP of other etiologies. Yet, there are well-conducted studies suggesting that HTG-AP is associated with a higher severity and complication rate. Therapeutic measurements in HTG-AP include dietary modifications, different antihyperlipidemic agents, insulin and/or heparin treatment. The beneficial use of plasmapheresis is repeatedly reported and suggested in many studies. Yet, due to the lack of randomized and controlled trials, it is currently unknown if plasmapheresis may improve morbidity and mortality in the clinical setting of HTG-AP. Since there are no commonly accepted clinical guidelines in the management of HTG-AP, there is a definite need for an international, multicenter approach to this important subject. PMID:25269432

  11. Extraintestinal manifestations of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostic-Milosavljevic, Mirjana; Jovanovic, Ivan; Krstic, Miodrag

    2012-01-01

    The term autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was first used in Japan in 1995 to describe a newly recognized form of chronic pancreatitis, after the description of Yoshida and colleagues. But Sarles in 1961, first described a form of idiopathic chronic inflammatory sclerosis of the pancreas, suspected to be due to an autoimmune process. AIP has become a widely accepted term because clinical, serologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings suggest an autoimmune mechanism. Most affected patients have hypergammaglobulinemia and increased serum levels of IgG, particularly IgG4. Recently published International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria for Autoimmune Pancreatitis include Guidelines of the International Association of Pancreatology, classifying AIP into types 1 and 2, using five cardinal features of AIP, namely imaging of pancreatic parenchyma and duct, serology, other organ involvement, pancreatic histology, and an optional criterion of response to steroid therapy. Extrapancreatic presentations can include sclerosing cholangitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis, sclerosing sialadenitis (Küttner tumor), lymphadenopathy, nephritis, and interstitial pneumonia. Increased IgG4+ plasma cell infiltrate has been reported in sclerosing lesions from other organ sites, including inflammatory pseudotumors of the liver, breast, mediastinum, orbit, and aorta, and it has been observed with hypophysitis and IgG4-associated prostatitis. Abundant IgG4+ plasma cells were also confirmed in Riedel thyroiditis, sclerosing mesenteritis, and inflammatory pseudotumor of the orbit and stomach. Extrapancreatic lesions could be synchronously or metachronously diagnosed with AIP, sharing the same pathological conditions, showing also a favorable result to corticosteroid therapy and distinct differentiation between IgG4-related diseases from the inherent lesions of the corresponding organs. PMID:22722443

  12. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Phil A; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a form of chronic pancreatitis that is characterized clinically by frequent presentation with obstructive jaundice, histologically by a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with fibrosis, and therapeutically by a dramatic response to corticosteroid therapy. Two distinct diseases, type 1 and type 2 AIP, share these features. However, these 2 diseases have unique pancreatic histopathologic patterns and differ significantly in their demographic profiles, clinical presentation, and natural history. Recognizing the popular and long-standing association of the term "AIP" with what is now called "type 1 AIP," we suggest using "AIP" solely for type 1 AIP and to acknowledge its own distinct disease status by using "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis" (IDCP) for type 2 AIP. AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The etiopathogenesis of AIP and IgG4-RD is largely unknown. However, the remarkable effectiveness of B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab in patients with AIP and IgG4-RD highlights the crucial role of B cells in its pathogenesis. IDCP is less commonly recognized, and little is known about its pathogenesis. IDCP has no biomarker but is associated with inflammatory bowel disease in ?25% of patients. Recently, the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP identified combinations of features that are diagnostic of both diseases. Both AIP and IDCP are corticosteroid responsive; however, relapses are common in AIP and rare in IDCP. Therefore, maintenance therapy with either an immunomodulator (eg, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or mycophenolate mofetil) or rituximab is often necessary for patients with AIP. Long-term survival is excellent for both patients with AIP and patients with IDCP. PMID:25770706

  13. Blood Sample Markers of Reproductive Hormones in Assessing Ovarian Reserve in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin

  14. Intravascular B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Erös, Nóra; Károlyi, Zsuzsánna; Kovács, Anikó; Takács, István; Radványi, Gáspár; Kelényi, Gábor

    2002-11-01

    Intravascular (angiotropic) lymphoma is a unique and rare cutaneous lymphoma in which the malignant T or B lymphoid cells proliferate within the lumens of small blood vessels, primarily in the skin and central nervous system. Erythematous, tender nodules, tumors, and telangiectases are the most common skin symptoms in addition to various neurologic signs. Progression of the disease produces secondary organ involvement with variable symptoms and can be fatal. We describe a case of a 74-year-old woman with edematous, infiltrated, orange-like skin with multiple telangiectases, generalized edema, severe weakness, and extremely high values of lactate dehydrogenase. Skin biopsy specimens revealed atypical large cells filling up the lumens of dermal capillaries. Immunohistochemical investigation results identified them as B cells with CD20, CD45, CD79a, Ki-67, and HLA-DR positivity. After administration of diuretics, colchicine, and systemic PUVA therapy, the patient lost her edema, her skin became tender and free of telangiectases, and laboratory alterations normalized. Because of heavy neuralgia in her legs, oral monochemotherapy was introduced with chlorambucil, and now the patient is in remission. PMID:12399744

  15. Oxaliplatin, Ifosfamide and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. [Primary lymphoma of the thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Ibnou Soufyane, N; Chadli, A; El Ghomari, H; Essodegui, F; Marouan, F; El Farouqi, A; Ababou, M R; Kafih, M

    2002-06-01

    Malignant primary lymphoma of the thyroid gland is a rare disease generally occurring women in the 6(th) or 7(th) decade of life. The principal clinical sign is giant goiter rapidly leading to sings of compression, raising the question of differential diagnosis with anaplastic cancer. The radiological findings in our patient were suggestive of malignancy due to the locoregional invasion. Immunohistochemistry study of the surgical specimen was required to reach the definitive diagnosis of thyroid gland primary lymphoma. Diagnosis of malignant primary lymphoma of the thyroid gland made at the stage of extensive locoregional extension compromises prognosis. Our patient died after one session of chemotherapy. PMID:12193880

  17. [Four cases of malignant primary breast lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Sae; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Asano, Yuka; Morisaki, Tamami; Noda, Satoru; Kawajiri, Hidemi; Takashima, Tsutomu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2014-11-01

    Primary malignant lymphoma of the breast (PBL) is comparatively rare in Japan.Herein, the authors present report 4 cases of PBL. All patients had the primary finding of a palpable left breast mass.Malignant lymphoma was strongly suspected by core needle biopsy, and final diagnosis was made on surgical specimens. All cases were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and were treated with targeted chemotherapy with R-CHOP. Only 1 of the 4 patients needed multidisciplinary therapy due to advanced age.Whenever PBL is suspected, targeted therapy should be considered. PMID:25731383

  18. CNS Intravascular Lymphoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Amer; Estephan, Bachir; Stüve, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Intravascular lymphoma is a rare but well-described entity. The clinical manifestations are heterogeneous. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman who presented initially with syncope followed by subacute cognitive decline that progressed to minimally conscious state. Shortly after the transfer to our tertiary center the patient died. Brain autopsy disclosed the diagnosis of B-cell intravascular lymphoma. We speculate that syncope could be the first manifestation of central nervous system intravascular lymphoma and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained syncope. In addition, we stress the importance of early brain biopsy in unexplained white matter disease. PMID:22937342

  19. Pathology and Molecular Pathology of Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreas Rosenwald; Ralf Küppers

    \\u000a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) comprises two disease entities: nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) and classical\\u000a Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). The new WHO classification maintains the subdivision of cHL into histological subtypes: nodular sclerosis\\u000a cHL (NSCHL), mixed cellularity cHL (MCCHL), lymphocyte-depleted cHL (LDCHL), and lymphocyte-rich cHL (LRCHL). The tumor cells\\u000a in NLPHL are termed lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells, whereas in cHL, Hodgkin

  20. Mantle Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Rectal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Atay, Hilmi; Y?ld?z, Levent; Bekta?, Ahmet; Turgut, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a mature B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. After the (11;14) translocation was identified as its constant finding in 1992, MCL was recognized as a separate subgroup of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In MCL, extranodal involvement may be observed in the bone marrow, the spleen, the liver, and the gastrointestinal system (GIS). Cases of MCL that present with a massive and solitary rectal mass are rare in the literature. In this case report, our aim was to present an MCL patient with a rarely observed solitary rectal involvement mimicking rectal carcinoma and to discuss treatment options for this patient. PMID:24822134

  1. [Pancreatic cystadenocarcinoma revealed by an acute pancreatitis and exploratory surgery. A rare case report].

    PubMed

    Bedioui, H; Moalla N-Manai, M Hédi; Chahbani, S; Gordah, Ahmed; Essoussi, M; Ben Aleya, M

    2003-08-01

    Cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas is a rare malignant tumor. It may appear as a typical pseudocyst on ultrasonography or CT scan. It is exceptionally revealed by an acute pancreatitis. Authors report a new case of cystadenocarcinoma of pancreas misinterpreted as pancreatic pseudocyst complicating acute pancreatitis. The diagnosis was established at laparotomy by discovering a locally advanced tumor of pancreatic tail with hepatic and peritoneal carcinosis metastasis. PMID:14608744

  2. Intrapancreatic communication of bile and pancreatic ducts secondary to pancreatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, B M; Traverso, L W; Freeny, P C

    1988-08-01

    An unusual complication of acute necrotizing pancreatitis occurred in which erosion of the intrapancreatic common bile duct and cephalic pancreatic duct formed a pancreaticobiliary cavity. This pancreatic process was observed to enhance during contrast computed tomography and was hypervascular during angiography, making preoperative diagnosis difficult. To our knowledge, the spontaneous development of such a cavity as a complication of acute pancreatitis has not been reported. The patient was successfully treated with pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:3395229

  3. Pancreatic Ductal Abnormalities Documented by Secretin-Enhanced MRCP in Asymptomatic Subjects With Chronic Pancreatic Hyperenzymemia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pier Alberto Testoni; A Mariani; S Curioni; A Giussani; E Masci

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:Persistently high serum pancreatic enzymes in asymptomatic subjects are considered a benign idiopathic condition called “non-pathological chronic pancreatic hyperenzymemia” (CPH). However, recent studies with advanced imaging techniques have brought to light abnormal pancreatic findings in a significant proportion of these subjects. The objective of this study was to evaluate pancreatic ductal morphology by secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP-S) in subjects

  4. Autoimmune Pancreatitis as a New Clinical Entity (Three Cases of Autoimmune Pancreatitis with Effective Steroid Therapy)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tetsuhide Ito; Itsuro Nakano; Shujiro Koyanagi; Toshihiko Miyahara; Yoshikatsu Migita; Keiichiro Ogoshi; Hironori Sakai; Shizu Matsunaga; Osamu Yasuda; Toshihiko Sumii; Hajime Nawata

    1997-01-01

    The most common forms of chronic pancreatitisare related to alcohol ingestion, whereas the entity ofnon-alcohol-associated (idiopathic) pancreatitis ispoorly understood. Autoimmunity has been suggested as a possible etiologic factor of idiopathicchronic pancreatitis. A total of 362 Japanese patientsunderwent endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP)for suspected pancreatic disease, and 161 were diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis. Among them, we foundthree cases (1.86% incidence) of unique

  5. Feline pancreatic lipase: purification and validation of a clinically significant radioimmunoassay for the diagnosis of feline pancreatitis 

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Benjamin Gregg

    2005-02-17

    Serum lipase activity has traditionally been used for diagnosis of pancreatitis in human beings and dogs. However, serum lipase activity is not specific for exocrine pancreatic function and many cell types other than pancreatic acinar cells also...

  6. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (p<0.001, analysis of variance linear contrast; n=8 for each group). Pathological events relating to these components were observed, including presence of inflammatory cells, deposited collagen, and phenotype conversion of PSCs. We demonstrate that label-free nonlinear optical microscopy is an efficient tool for dissecting PSCs and other pancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  7. Potential targets for pancreatic cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Lindzy F; Hawkins, William G; Goedegebuure, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with an overall 5-year survival of less than 5%. As there is ample evidence that pancreatic adenocarcinomas elicit antitumor immune responses, identification of pancreatic cancer-associated antigens has spurred the development of vaccination-based strategies for treatment. While promising results have been observed in animal tumor models, most clinical studies have found only limited success. As most trials were performed in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, the contribution of immune suppressor mechanisms should be taken into account. In this article, we detail recent work in tumor antigen vaccination and the recently identified mechanisms of immune suppression in pancreatic cancer. We offer our perspective on how to increase the clinical efficacy of vaccines for pancreatic cancer. PMID:21463193

  8. Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Fazlul H. [Department of Pathology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 740 Hudson Webber Cancer Research Center, 110 E Warren, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)], E-mail: fsarkar@med.wayne.edu; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei [Department of Pathology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 740 Hudson Webber Cancer Research Center, 110 E Warren, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  9. Current status of endotherapy for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Kwek, Andrew Boon Eu; Ang, Tiing Leong; Maydeo, Amit

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is associated with varied morphological complications, including intraductal stones, main pancreatic ductal strictures, distal biliary strictures and pseudocysts. Endoscopic therapy provides a less invasive alternative to surgery. In addition, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy improves the success rate of endoscopic clearance of intraductal stones. However, recent data from randomised trials have shown better long-term outcomes with surgical drainage for obstructive pancreatic ductal disease. In patients with distal biliary strictures, stent insertion leads to good immediate drainage, but after stent removal, recurrent narrowing is common. Endoscopic drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts has excellent outcome and should be accompanied by pancreatic ductal stenting when a ductal communication is evident. In those who remain symptomatic, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided coeliac plexus block may provide effective but short-term pain relief. In this review, we present the current evidence for the role of endotherapy in the management of patients with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25630314

  10. Transcriptional network governing the angiogenic switch in human pancreatic cancer

    E-print Network

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Transcriptional network governing the angiogenic switch in human pancreatic cancer Amir Abdollahi by simultaneous regulations of multiple genes organized as transcrip- tional circuitries. In pancreatic cancer

  11. Treatment of Pancreatic Ascites and External Pancreatic Fistulas with a Long-Acting Somatostatin Analogue (Sandostatin)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Segal; D. Parekh; J. Lipschitz; G. Gecelter; J. A. Myburgh

    1993-01-01

    Prior to the advent of somatostatin conservative therapy for pancreatic fistulas, treatment included intravenous nutritional therapy with nothing per mouth and therapeutic agents to diminish pancreatic secretions. None of these modalities were uniformly successful. A prospective study to evaluate the efficacy of a long-acting somatostatin analogue (Sandostatin) was carried out. 18 patients – 10 with pancreatic ascites and 8 with

  12. Cost-effectiveness of pancreatic cancer screening in familial pancreatic cancer kindreds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen J. Rulyak; Michael B. Kimmey; David L. Veenstra; Teresa A. Brentnall

    2003-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic screening of families predisposed to pancreatic cancer is increasingly used, but the cost-effectiveness of screening is unknown. Methods: A decision analysis was used to compare one-time screening for pancreatic dysplasia with EUS to no screening in a hypothetical cohort of 100 members of familial pancreatic cancer kindreds. Abnormal EUS findings are confirmed with ERCP and patients with abnormal

  13. Prevention of Pancreatic Cancer and Strategies for Management of Familial Pancreatic Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralph H. Hruban; Marcia I. Canto; Charles J. Yeo

    2001-01-01

    At the current time, pancreatic cancer remains a difficult and typically fatal disease. A number of case reports and case-control epidemiologic studies have suggested that familial aggregation plays a role in as many as 10% of all pancreatic cancers. During the last several years, genetic alterations responsible for syndromes linked with pancreatic cancer have been identified. These genes include BRCA2,

  14. Intramural Duodenal Hematoma with Acute Pancreatitis in a Patient With an Overt Pancreatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Apeksha; Ali, Ijlal; Islam, Raafa; Siddiqui, Ali A.

    2014-01-01

    Intramural hematomas have rarely been associated with pancreatitis, and to date there is only 1 case report of an intramural hematoma occurring with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We describe a patient who presented with gastric outlet obstruction secondary to a spontaneous intramural duodenal hematoma and was found to have a pancreatic adenocarcinoma on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) after it was not visualized by computed tomography (CT).

  15. Pancreatic ductulitis in Syrian golden hamsters bearing homologous transplantable pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Runge, R; Takahashi, M; Pour, P

    1978-10-01

    A highly specific pancreatitis primarily affecting the intralobular and intrainsular ductules has been demonstrated in Syrian golden hamsters bearing homologous, non-syngeneic, transplantable pancreatic adenocarcinomas induced by N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP). The ductulitis provides further evidence that induced pancreatic neoplasms originate from ductules. PMID:688204

  16. Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Tumor Progression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Siri Dunér; Jacob Lopatko Lindman; Daniel Ansari; Chinmay Gundewar; Roland Andersson

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive and highly lethal disease frequently characterized by a dense stromal or desmoplastic response. Accumulating evidence exists that tumor desmoplasia plays a central role in disease progression and that e.g. activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are responsible for the excess matrix production. The mechanisms underlying the tumor versus stroma interplay are complex. Pancreatic cancer cells

  17. Treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis by inhibition of pancreatic secretion with octreotide.

    PubMed Central

    Malfertheiner, P; Mayer, D; Büchler, M; Domínguez-Muńoz, J E; Schiefer, B; Ditschuneit, H

    1995-01-01

    It has been suggested that pancreatic ductal hypertension, secondary to pancreatic outflow obstruction, is a cause of pain in chronic pancreatitis. This study investigated the effect of inhibiting pancreatic secretion with octreotide in chronic pancreatitis pain. Ten patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis and severe daily pain were included in an intraindividual double blind crossover study. All patients received octreotide (3 x 100 micrograms/day subcutaneously) and placebo (3 x 0.9% saline solution subcutaneously) for three days at random. Between both treatment phases a two day washout period was interposed. Intensity of pain (visual analogue scale) and analgesic consumption were carefully registered. Pancreatic secretion was monitored daily by measuring faecal chymotrypsin concentration. It was found that during the administration of octreotide, pancreatic secretion was strongly inhibited (faecal chymotrypsin mean (SD) 1.7 (0.6) U/g) with respect to placebo (9.6 (4.2) U/g) and washout (7.6 (3.1) U/g) periods (p < 0.001). Pain score (29.6 (4.5) v 28.7 (5.8)) and consumption of analgesics were no different during the octreotide and placebo periods. It is concluded that short term inhibition of pancreatic secretion does not result in pain relief in patients with chronic pancreatitis. This finding is in contrast with the hypothesis that outflow obstruction of pancreatic secretion with consequent ductal hypertension is an important cause of severe persistent pain in chronic pancreatitis. PMID:7698708

  18. Acute idiopathic pancreatitis: clinical and diagnostic contribution.

    PubMed

    Forte, A; Montesano, G; Gallinaro, L; Bertagni, A; Turano, R; Hueck, S; Illuminati, G

    1997-01-01

    Acute idiopathic pancreatitis is a term used when no underlying cause can be identified on routine investigations. However more specialized investigations, such as endoscopic, endoscopic retrocolangio pancreopathy (CPRE), may detect aetiological factors, particularly biliary sludge and pancreatic duct abnormalities. The authors, reviewing the current literature, report their caseload of idiopathic pancreatitis. They conclude that CPRE is indicated if ultrasonography shows a calibre of the common duct at the superior limits of normal values and in each idiopathic recurrent AP. PMID:9444796

  19. Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia Revisited and Updated

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Sipos; S. Frank; T. Gress; S. Hahn; G. Klöppel

    2009-01-01

    Most pancreatic neoplasms are classified as ductal adenocarcinoma because they show a ductal phenotype, making a ductal origin very likely. The duct lesions that may give rise to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma have been called pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN). A classification system for these lesions distinguishes between three grades of PanIN. Molecular studies revealed that PanIN-2 and PanIN-3 lesions represent a

  20. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Epithelial Cancer, Malignant Lymphoma, or Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Chondrosarcoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. CTOP/ITE/MTX Compared With CHOP as the First-line Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Young Patients With T Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-24

    ALK-negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Peripherial T Cell Lymphoma,Not Otherwise Specified; Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T Cell Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis Like T Cell Lymphoma

  2. Can early endoscopic ultrasound predict pancreatic necrosis in acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder S.; Bhasin, Deepak K.; Sharma, Vishal; Sharma, Ravi; Chaudhary, Vinita; Chhabra, Puneet

    2014-01-01

    Background Presence of pancreatic/extrapancreatic necroses (PN/EPN) is an important prognostic indicator in acute pancreatitis (AP) and their early detection is a challenge. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) provides high resolution images of pancreas but there is paucity of data on its role in AP. Methods Consecutive patients with AP seen at our center from December 2012-November 2013 and presenting within 5 days of onset of symptoms were prospectively enrolled. EUS was done on the day of admission with a radial echoendoscope and pancreatic/peripancreatic findings were compared with the abdominal computed tomography (CT) findings performed on day 7. Results Of the 46 patients evaluated, 14 were excluded, and 32 patients (22 male; age 40.68±12.46 years) underwent EUS at admission. The etiology of AP was alcohol in 16, gallstones in 13, and idiopathic in 3 patients. Necrotizing pancreatitis was present in 20 (62%) patients, and mean CT severity index was 6.45±2.96. In patients without PN (n=12), EUS revealed normal echo pattern in 6 patients and diffusely hyperechoic and enlarged pancreas in 6 patients. In patients with PN/EPN, EUS revealed multiple hypoechoic areas (>5 mm) in 5 patients, multiple hyperechoic areas (>5 mm) in 7 patients and mixed hypo and hyperechoic areas in 8 patients. Also, 13 of these patients had peripancreatic hypoechoic areas that correlated with EPN. Moreover, EUS detected common bile duct (CBD) stones in two patients, pleural effusion in 17 patients, and ascites in 15 patients. Conclusion EUS done at admission can reliably detect PN and co-existent disorders like CBD stones. PMID:25331790

  3. Finasteride use and acute pancreatitis in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether there is an association between finasteride use and the risk of acute pancreatitis. This population-based case-control study used the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 2,530 male subjects aged 40-84 years with a first-attack of acute pancreatitis during the period of 1998-2011 as the case group and 10,119 randomly selected subjects without acute pancreatitis as the control group. Both groups were matched by age and index year of diagnosing acute pancreatitis. Subjects who never had finasteride prescription were defined as "never use." Subjects who at least received 1 prescription for finasteride before the date of diagnosing acute pancreatitis were defined as "ever use." The association of acute pancreatitis with finasteride use was examined by the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) using the multivariable unconditional logistic regression model. The crude OR of acute pancreatitis was 1.78 (95%CI 1.33, 2.39) for subjects with ever use of finasteride, when compared with subjects with never use of finasteride. After adjusting for potential confounders, the adjusted OR of acute pancreatitis decreased to 1.25 (95%CI 0.90, 1.73) for subjects with ever use of finasteride, but no statistical significance was seen. No association can be detected between finasteride use and the risk of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25573785

  4. Reconstruction after pancreatic trauma by pancreaticogastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Gonzalo Martín; Morillas, Patricia Jiménez; Pino, José C. Rodríguez; Canis, José M. Morón; Argenté, Francesc X. González

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic lesions are very infrequent after closed abdominal trauma (5% of cases) with a complication rate that affects 30–40% of patients, and a mortality rate that can reach 39%. In our experience, closed abdominal traumatisms occurring at typical popular horse-riding festivals in our region constitute a high risk of pancreatic trauma. The purpose of the present paper is to raise awareness about our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic lesions secondary to closed abdominal traumatism. Presentation of case We present the clinical cases of two young patients who, after suffering blunt abdominal trauma secondary to the impact of a horse during the celebration of typical horse-riding festival, were diagnosed with pancreatic trauma type III. The treatment was surgical in both cases and consisted in performing a pancreaticogastric anastomosis with preservation of the distal pancreas and spleen. The postoperative period was uneventful and, at present, both patients are asymptomatic. Discussion Signs and symptoms caused by pancreatic lesion are unspecific and difficult to objectify. With some limitations CT is the imaging test of choice for diagnosis and staging in the acute phase. The Wirsung section is indication for surgical treatment. The most extended surgical procedure in these cases is the resection of pancreatic body, tail, and spleen. Conclusion The identification of a pancreatic injury after closed abdominal trauma requires a high suspicion based on the injury mechanism. A safer option may be the distal pancreatic preservation with pancreaticogastric anastomosis in grade III lesions with healthy pancreatic tissue. PMID:25744560

  5. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A.; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T.; Jeon, Christie Y.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy. PMID:25426078

  6. [Acute pancreatitis: an overview of the management].

    PubMed

    Rebours, V

    2014-10-01

    Over the past decades, the incidence and the number of hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis have increased in the Western countries. The two most common etiological factors of acute pancreatitis are gallstones (including small gallstones or microlithiasis) and alcohol abuse. Acute pancreatitis is associated with a significant mortality (4-10%) and 25% in case of pancreatic necrosis, especially. Edematous pancreatitis is benign and oral feeding can be restarted once abdominal pain is decreasing and inflammatory markers are improving. Enteral tube feeding should be the primary therapy in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis who require nutritional support. Enteral nutrition in acute pancreatitis can be administered via either the nasojejunal or nasogastric route. In case of necrosis, preventive antibiotics are not recommended. The single indication is infected necrosis confirmed by fine needle aspiration. The incidence trends of acute pancreatitis possibly reflect a change in the prevalence of main etiological factors (e.g. gallstones and alcohol consumption) and cofactors such as tobacco, obesity and genetic susceptibility. Priority is to search for associated causes, especially in cases with atypical symptoms. In case of first acute pancreatitis in patients older than 50 years, the presence of a tumor (benign or malignant) has to be specifically ruled out, using CT-scan, MRI and endoscopic ultrasound. PMID:24837648

  7. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

    Cancer.gov

    A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

  8. Can Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Be Prevented?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus (HTLV-1) could have a great impact on non- ... to prevent HIV spread could also help control HTLV-1. Helicobacter pylori infection has been linked to ...

  9. Hodgkin Lymphoma in Adults (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... exact match Print INTRODUCTION Hodgkin lymphoma (formerly called Hodgkin's disease) is a cancer of the body's lymphatic system. ... discuss the evaluation and staging of patients with Hodgkin's disease: Cotswolds meeting. J Clin Oncol 1989; 7:1630. ...

  10. FDG-PET in Follicular Lymphoma Management.

    PubMed

    Bodet-Milin, C; Eugčne, T; Gastinne, T; Frampas, E; Le Gouill, S; Kraeber-Bodéré, F

    2012-01-01

    18-Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerised tomography (FDG PET/CT) is commonly used in the management of patients with lymphomas and is recommended for both initial staging and response assessment after treatment in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. Despite the FDG avidity of follicular lymphoma (FL), FDG PET/CT is not yet applied in standard clinical practice for patients with FL. However, FDG PET/CT is more accurate than conventional imaging for initial staging, often prompting significant management change, and allows noninvasive characterization to guide assessment of high-grade transformation. For restaging, FDG PET/CT assists in distinguishing between scar tissue and viable tumors in residual masses and a positive PET after induction treatment would seem to predict a shorter progression-free survival. PMID:22899920

  11. FDG-PET in Follicular Lymphoma Management

    PubMed Central

    Bodet-Milin, C.; Eugčne, T.; Gastinne, T.; Frampas, E.; Le Gouill, S.; Kraeber-Bodéré, F.

    2012-01-01

    18-Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerised tomography (FDG PET/CT) is commonly used in the management of patients with lymphomas and is recommended for both initial staging and response assessment after treatment in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. Despite the FDG avidity of follicular lymphoma (FL), FDG PET/CT is not yet applied in standard clinical practice for patients with FL. However, FDG PET/CT is more accurate than conventional imaging for initial staging, often prompting significant management change, and allows noninvasive characterization to guide assessment of high-grade transformation. For restaging, FDG PET/CT assists in distinguishing between scar tissue and viable tumors in residual masses and a positive PET after induction treatment would seem to predict a shorter progression-free survival. PMID:22899920

  12. Hypotension Associated with Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Geetanjali; Hamad, Hussein; Mohajer, Roozbeh; Catchatourian, Rosalind; Kovarik, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Hypotension is an extremely rare manifestation of Hodgkin lymphoma. We report the case of a patient who presented with new onset hypotension and was diagnosed with urosepsis and septic shock requiring pressor support for maintaining his blood pressure. computed tomography (CT) scan of abdomen showed liver lesions, which were new on comparison with a CT abdomen done 3 weeks back. Biopsy of the liver lesions and subsequently a bone marrow biopsy showed large atypical Reed-Sternberg cells, positive for CD15 and CD 30 and negative for CD45, CD3 and CD20 on immuno-histochemical staining, hence establishing the diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma. The mechanism involved in Hodgkin lymphoma causing hypotension remains anecdotal, but since it is mostly seen in patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma, it is hypothetically related to a complex interaction between cytokines and mediators of vasodilatation. Here we review relevant literature pertaining to presentation and pathogenesis of this elusive and rare association. PMID:25317321

  13. Cutaneous lymphomas: an update. Part 2: B-cell lymphomas and related conditions.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Werner; Kazakov, Dmitry V; Mitteldorf, Christina

    2014-03-01

    : Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas (PCBCL) are the second most common form of primary cutaneous lymphomas and account for approximately 25%-30% of all primary cutaneous lymphomas. Both forms of low-grade malignant PCBCL, primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL) and primary cutaneous marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue-type (MALT lymphoma) (PCMZL) represent the vast majority of PCBCL and show an indolent slowly progressive course and an excellent prognosis despite a high recurrence rate. Genetic analysis indicates that PCMZL differ from other forms of extranodal MALT lymphomas. The more common class-switched and the non-class-switched form of PCMZL can be distinguished as two distinctive subsets that differ in the cellular composition, IgM expression, and biological behavior with extracutaneous involvement found in the non-class-switched form. Recently, unusual clinical and histological forms of PCMZL and PCFCL manifesting with miliary or agminated lesions have been described that are diagnostically challenging. In contrast to PCMZL and PCFCL, primary cutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type, and other rare forms of large B-cell lymphomas such as intravascular large B-cell lymphoma have an unfavorable prognosis. There is an emerging group of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven B-cell lymphoproliferations including posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders and mucocutaneous ulcer occurring in immunocompromised patients and EBV-associated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly arising in the setting of senescence-linked immunodeficiency. This review reports on recent findings expanding the spectrum of clinicopathological features, differential diagnostic aspects, and the pathogenesis of PCBCL and discusses the group of EBV-associated B-cell lymphoproliferations involving the skin. PMID:24658377

  14. Genetic predisposition to lymphomas in mice.

    PubMed

    Hiai, H

    1996-10-01

    The spontaneous mouse lymphoma is a model of multifactorial genetic disease. It is induced by the endogenous murine leukemia virus (MuLV), whose genome is inherited as a Mendelian dominant trait. Lymphoma development takes place in multiple stages affected by many host genetic and epigenetic factors. An inbred strain SL/Kh with a high incidence of pre-B lymphomas has been established and the genetic predisposition of SL/Kh mice to lymphomas is being studied in the crosses with other inbred strains of mice. In the cross to the NFS/N lacking endogenous MuLV genome, it has been shown that lymphomas are induced by the expression of Emv-11 provirus (Chr. 7), and the types of B-lineage lymphomas are determined by combinations of the host genes, Esl-1 (Chr. 17) and Foc-1 (Chr. 4). Another gene, Tlsm-1 (Chr. 7) that determines the type of lymphomas to be T-lineage, is identified in the cross with AKR/Ms, with a high incidence of T-lymphomas. The role of the thymus in the development of T-lymphomas in the mouse, and the possible relevance of Tlsm-1 in this step, is discussed. The length of the latent period is determined by a gene Lia-1 (Chr. 17). A maternal resistance factor that is a maternal antibody to MuLV transmitted via milk and that epigenetically inhibits MuLV expression in SL/Ni-Eco-, one of subline of SL/NI mice, has been shown. Weak but definitive maternal resistance also operates in SL/Ni-Eco+, a subline lacking the maternal antibody to MuLV. In the latter, there is a recessive resistance gene Nir-1 (Chr. 4). In the cross with MSM/Ms, a wild mice-derived inbred strain, two resistance genes, Msmr-1 (Chr. 17) and Msmr-2 (Chr. 18), have been identified. In SL/Kh, all of these host genetic and epigenetic factors are favorable for lymphoma development. This model offers not only an understanding of the pathogenesis of virus-induced lymphomas but also may provide starting material for the comparative approach to homologous human diseases. PMID:8916139

  15. Lenalidomide And Rituximab as Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-11-13

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  16. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Krol, Michael L.; Podduturi, Varsha; Majid-Moosa, Abdulla; Krause, John R.

    2015-01-01

    AIDS-related malignancies may alter clinical courses and result in death in critically ill patients. We present a case of a newly diagnosed AIDS patient with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus infections who was found to have widely metastatic kinase-negative anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. This case demonstrates the diversity in the malignant presentation of HIV-infected patients, outside of the more commonly observed non-Hodgkin lymphomas. PMID:26130896

  17. Unusual breast neoplasm: primary breast lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Binesh, Fariba; Vahedian, Hassanali; Akhavan, Ali; Hakiminia, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    Primary breast lymphoma (PBL) is a rare clinical entity. The clinical and imaging findings in breast lymphoma can mimic those of breast carcinoma. As a result, the diagnosis of PBL relies on histological evaluation and confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. The treatment of choice of this rare disease is controversial. This case report highlights the diagnosis and management of a 48-year-old woman residing in Iran with PBL. PMID:23749857

  18. Burkitt's Lymphoma a rare cause for hydronephrosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Lümmen; H. Sperling; H. Rübben

    1997-01-01

    Summary  \\u000a Involvment of the genitouronary tract by lymphoproliferative disorders is rare. Rapid proliferating Burkitt's lymphomas could\\u000a mimic acute diseases. Due to the extreme chemosensitivity, the lymphoma is cureable and surgery should be done only for histology.\\u000a Initial surgery should be restricted to acute abdominal complications or complete removal of localised resectable disease.\\u000a In any case a multiagent chemotherapy is necessary.

  19. [Burkitt's lymphoma presenting as ovarian tumor].

    PubMed

    Dudnyikova, Anna; Tóth, Erika; Deák, Beáta; Pete, Imre

    2012-12-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a rapidly progressing tumor, which could be cured in 60-80% of cases. Its infiltration of the ileo-cecal region often spreads to the ovaries, though primary ovarian manifestation is also common. By presenting our case of a 27-year-old nulliparous patient with primary ovarian Burkitt's lymphoma, we would like to draw attention to its diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties. PMID:23236599

  20. Primary extranodal lymphomas of gastrointestinal localizations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Mihaljevi?; R. Nedeljkov-Jan?i?; V. Vuji?i?; D. Anti?; S. Jankovi?; N. ?olovi?

    2006-01-01

    This study is aimed at comparison of patients with extranodal lymphomas based on pathohistological findings differences (MALT\\u000a vs non-MALT) as well as regarding gastric and non-gastric localization, and determining the significance of clinical-laboratory\\u000a parameters with respect to therapeutic response and length of survival. A total of 56 patients with extranodal non-Hodgkin's\\u000a lymphomas of the gastrointestinal tract were evaluated over a

  1. Treatment of lymphoblastic lymphoma in adults

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dieter Hoelzer; Nicola Gökbuget

    2002-01-01

    Lymphoblastic lymphoma (LBL) is a rare subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with biological features similar to those of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. In the majority of cases LBL shows a T-cell phenotype, and mediastinal tumours are the most frequent manifestation. Outcomes of LBL patients treated according to NHL or ALL-type regimens are reviewed. Since prophylaxis of CNS relapse and local recurrence

  2. Lenalidomide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Follicular Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-18

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  3. PXD101 and 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-15

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Update on pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Logan R.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are relatively rare tumors comprising 1-2% of all pancreas neoplasms. In the last 10 years our understanding of this disease has increased dramatically allowing for advancements in the treatment of pNETs. Surgical excision remains the primary therapy for localized tumors and only potential for cure. New surgical techniques using laparoscopic approaches to complex pancreatic resections are a major advancement in surgical therapy and increasingly possible. With early detection being less common, most patients present with metastatic disease. Management of these patients requires multidisciplinary care combining the best of surgery, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. In addition to surgical advances, recently, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy and targeted molecular therapy. PMID:25493258

  5. Pancreatic carcinoma: imaging update 2001.

    PubMed

    Freeny, P C

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the most recent advances in imaging of pancreatic carcinomas. The specific modalities discussed include helical computed tomography (HCT) with combined CT angiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), and positron emission tomography (PET). Endoscopic ultrasound is discussed in other papers. HCT is believed to be the most efficacious modality for initial detection and staging of pancreatic carcinomas. It has an accuracy rate of about 95-97% for the detection of carcinomas and of virtually 100% for staging unresectable carcinomas. The accuracy for CT staging of a resectable tumor is about 80-85%, with small surface metastases to liver and peritoneum being the most often missed findings. MRI and MRCP are best used for evaluation of patients that cannot receive intravenous contrast media for HCT and of patients who have equivocal HCT findings. PET imaging may be useful for detection of extrapancreatic nodal metastases. PMID:11385250

  6. Current management of pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Lillemoe, K D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The author seeks to provide an update on the current management of pancreatic carcinoma, including diagnosis and staging, surgical resection and adjuvant therapy for curative intent, and palliation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: During the 1960s and 1970s, the operative mortality and long-term survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma was so poor that some authors advocated abandoning the procedure. Several recent series have reported a marked improvement in perioperative results with 5-year survival in excess of 20%. Significant advances also have been made in areas of preoperative evaluation and palliation for advanced disease. CONCLUSION: Although carcinoma of the pancreas remains a disease with a poor prognosis, advances in the last decade have led to improvements in the overall management of this disease. Resection for curative intent currently should be accomplished with minimal perioperative mortality. Surgical palliation also may provide the optimal management of selected patients. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 7. PMID:7531966

  7. Malignant lymphomas and occupational exposures.

    PubMed

    Persson, B; Dahlander, A M; Fredriksson, M; Brage, H N; Ohlson, C G; Axelson, O

    1989-08-01

    The effects of potential risk factors for Hodgkin's disease (HD) and for non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) were evaluated in a case-referent study encompassing 54 cases of HD, 106 cases of NHL, and 275 referents, all alive. Exposure information was obtained by questionnaires posted to the subjects. Crude rate ratios were increased for various occupational exposures including solvents, welding, wood preservatives, phenoxy acids, and fresh wood (sawmill workers, lumberjacks, paper pulp workers). After further analyses based on logistic regression occupational exposures to welding and creosote remained as significant risk factors for HD. For NHL, occupational exposures to solvents, phenoxy acids, and creosote but also work as carpenter or cabinet maker and contacts with pets (other than dogs, cats, and birds) were associated with significantly increased risks. PMID:2775671

  8. Familial Burkitt's lymphoma in Nigerians.

    PubMed

    Salawu, L; Fatusi, O A; Kemi-Rotimi, F; Adeodu, O O; Durosinmi, M A

    1997-12-01

    Three Nigerian sib-pairs with familial Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) seen between 1986 and 1996 are described. Their ages ranged from 4 to 20 years (median 9.5), and there were five males and one female. The mean age interval between each pair at presentation was 4 years (3-6) and the mean time interval 22 months (0.3-41). Two of the sib-pairs were sex-concordant, including a set of monozygotic twins. Five of the patients presented in stage C and one in stage A. Parental consanguinity was not found in any group. Space-clustering was confirmed in all three but time-clustering in only one. The occurrence of BL in multiple members of the same family, the presence of sex concordance and the relatively wide variation in the time of onset of disease between each pair suggest genetic predisposition as a possible additional aetiological factor for BL in the families affected. PMID:9578799

  9. High-dose gallium imaging in lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.C.; Leonard, R.C.; Canellos, G.P.; Skarin, A.T.; Kaplan, W.D.

    1983-08-01

    The role of gallium-67 imaging in the management of patients with lymphoma, traditionally assessed using low tracer doses and the rectilinear scanner, was assessed when using larger doses (7 to 10 mCi) and a triple-peak Anger camera. Gallium scan results in 51 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 21 patients with Hodgkin's disease were compared with simultaneous radiologic, clinical, and histopathologic reports. Subsequent disease course was also evaluated in light of radionuclide findings. Sensitivity and specificity of the scans were 0.90 or greater for both non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease, and overall accuracy by site was 96 percent. Although there are insufficient numbers of pretreatment scans to allow any conclusions, our data suggest that newer approaches to gallium scanning in treated patients are (1) highly specific in all lymphomas and most sensitive in high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease; (2) valuable in assessing the mediastinum in both non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease; and (3) helpful adjuncts to computed tomographic scanning and ultrasonography in assessing abdominal node disease.

  10. CPI-613, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-02

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. Ibrutinib in Treating Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Patients With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-09

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; HIV Infection; Intraocular Lymphoma; Multicentric Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  12. Genetically Engineered Lymphocyte Therapy in Treating Patients With Lymphoma That is Resistant or Refractory to Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-02

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  13. Nonoperative management of pancreatic pseudocyts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ugo Boggi; Giulio Di Candio; Alessandro Campatelli; Andrea Pietrabissa; Franco Mosca

    1999-01-01

    Summary  \\u000a Background. The accurate diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions remains a problem. The aim of this study was to ascertain the incidence\\u000a of and the reasons the diagnostic error occurred in a series of pseudocysts drained percutaneously and to compare these data\\u000a to those reported in the literature.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods. Data from 70 patients bearing one or more pseudocysts who underwent

  14. Radiologic staging of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nghiem, H V; Freeny, P C

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic CT currently is the imaging modality of choice for staging of pancreatic carcinoma. It has an accuracy of 72% in predicting tumor resectability and an accuracy of virtually 100% in predicting tumor unresectability. However, it is important that the CT criteria of unresectability be defined for each individual institution. In some hospitals, extended pancreatectomy, including resection of involved major extrapancreatic vessels, contiguous solid or hollow organs, and regional lymph nodes, is performed for pancreatic carcinoma. Thus, these CT findings would not be considered to obviate surgical resection, whereas in other hospitals, surgeons consider tumor spread beyond the gland, particularly vascular involvement, as a contraindication for resection. It is also important to note that enlarged regional lymph nodes that would be included in the resection are not considered to be a CT criteria of unresectability when they occur as an isolated finding. MR imaging, EUS, and angiography have less significant roles compared with CT in the staging of pancreatic carcinoma; however, MR imaging and EUS can be valuable staging techniques in patients in whom an optimal dynamic contrast-enhanced CT cannot be obtained, although angiography now is indicated primarily to provide the surgeon with a vascular roadmap prior to resection or to evaluate patients in whom CT is equivocal. PMID:8284362

  15. [Pediatric pancreatitis. Evidence based management guidelines of the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group].

    PubMed

    Párniczky, Andrea; Czakó, László; Dubravcsik, Zsolt; Farkas, Gyula; Hegyi, Péter; Hritz, István; Kelemen, Dezs?; Morvay, Zita; Oláh, Attila; Pap, Ákos; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Szabó, Flóra; Szentkereszti, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Takács, Tamás; Tiszlavicz, László; Veres, Gábor; Szücs, Ákos; Lásztity, Natália

    2015-02-22

    Pediatric pancreatitis is a rare disease with variable etiology. In the past 10-15 years the incidence of pediatric pancreatitis has been increased. The management of pediatric pancreatitis requires up-to-date and evidence based management guidelines. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group proposed to prepare an evidence based guideline based on the available international guidelines and evidences. The preparatory and consultation task force appointed by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group translated and complemented and/or modified the international guidelines if it was necessary. In 8 clinical topics (diagnosis; etiology; prognosis; imaging; therapy; biliary tract management; complications; chronic pancreatitis) 50 relevant questions were defined. Evidence was classified according to the UpToDate(®) grading system. The draft of the guidelines was presented and discussed at the consensus meeting on September 12, 2014. All clinical statements were accepted with total (more than 95%) agreement. The present Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group guideline is the first evidence based pediatric pancreatitis guideline in Hungary. The present guideline is the first evidence-based pancreatic cancer guideline in Hungary that provides a solid ground for teaching purposes, offers quick reference for daily patient care in pediatric pancreatitis and guides financing options. The authors strongly believe that these guidelines will become a standard reference for pancreatic cancer treatment in Hungary. PMID:25662148

  16. [5-fluorouracil treatment of acute pancreatitis and of pancreatic and duodenal fistulae].

    PubMed

    Georgescu, T; Naftali, Z; Varga, A; Simon, G; Pan?, C; Cr?ciun, C; Nistor, V; Ilniczky, P; Bo?ianu, A; Kovács, M

    1990-01-01

    In acute pancreatitis the mechanism involved in the auto-amplification of morbid phenomena can be suppressed in most of the cases by inhibiting the pancreatic secretion. This can also enhance the repair of pancreatic, duodenal and jejunal fistulae. On the basis of experimental studies carried out by Johnson, and on the clinical studies of Guttmann, as well as on original studies done by the authors, Ftorafur was included in the complex therapy of acute pancreatitis, and of pancreatic and duodenal fistulae. A group of 14 cases of acute pancreatitis, were treated. These included 5 necrotic-haemorrhagic pancreatitis, and 9 oedematous pancreatitis. The drug was given by continuous intravenous perfusion in doses of 1,200-1,600 mg per day, for a period of 6-12 days. In all the cases the clinical improvement of the patients as well as recovery of normal values of blood amylase were spectacular, and full recovery was achieved in all the cases. Ftorafur was also used in 3 cases of pancreatic fistulae, and in 2 cases of duodenal fistulae, and recovery was also achieved in a very short time. On the basis of this experience, although small, the authors recommend the introduction of Ftorafur in the complex therapy of acute pancreatitis, as well as in that of pancreatic and duodenal fistulae. Following administration of Ftorafur no adverse effects were noted, and in the doses mentioned above this drug did not delay the repair of surgical wounds. PMID:2149191

  17. Cytotoxic\\/natural killer cell cutaneous lymphomas. Report of EORTC Cutaneous Lymphoma Task Force Workshop

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marco Santucci; Nicola Pimpinelli; Daniela Massi; Marshall E. Kadin; Chris J. L. M. Meijer; HK Muller-Hermelink; Marco Paulli; Janine Wechsler; Rein Willemze; Heike Audring; Maria Grazia Bernengo; Lorenzo Cerroni; Sergio Chimenti; Andreas Chott; J. L. Diaz-Perez; Edgard Dippel; Lyn M. Duncan; Alfred C. Feller; Marie-Louise Geerts; Christian Hallermann; Werner Kempf; Robin Russell-Jones; Christian Sander; Emilio Berti

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cutaneous lymphomas expressing a cytotoxic or natural killer (NK) cell phenotype represent a group of lymphoproliferative disorders for which there is currently much confusion and little consensus regarding the best nomenclature and classification. METHODS: This study analyzes 48 cases of primary cutaneous lymphoma expressing cytotoxic proteins and\\/or the NK cell marker, CD56. These cases were collected for a workshop

  18. Immunological Reactions to Tumor-associated Antigens in Burkitt's Lymphoma and Other Lymphomas1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald B. Herberman; James L. McCoy; Paul H. Levine

    Summary Evidence for immune response to Burkitt's tumor and other lymphomas is reviewed. The common tumor- associated antigens detected in some assays and the natural reactivity to some of these antigens are analogous to the findings in virus-induced tumors in experimental animals. Delayed hypersensitivity reactions to autologous tumor extracts were observed in Burkitt's lymphoma, in Hodgkin's disease, and in other

  19. Dissolution of Pancreatic Lithiasis by Direct Citrate Application into the Pancreatic Duct in Two Patients with Chronic Idiopathic Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alfredo Güitrón; Horacio González-Loya; Ricardo Barinagarrementería; Juan Carlos Sarol; Raúl Adalid; Jorge Rodríguez-Delgado

    1997-01-01

    Several experimental and clinical studies have shown that citrates are useful in dissolving calcifications and proteic plug in pancreatic ducts both of alcoholic etiology and in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Until now, using citrates to dissolve stones in clinical studies was performed orally with satisfactory medium-term results, including control of abdominal pain and eradication of shadows on X-rays. Laboratory studies

  20. Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and a biopsy. Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, biological therapy, or therapy to remove proteins from the blood. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without ...

  1. Intravenous Chemotherapy or Oral Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage III-IV HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-07

    AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma

  2. Pain sensation in pancreatic diseases is not uniform: The different facets of pancreatic pain

    PubMed Central

    D’Haese, Jan G; Hartel, Mark; Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Hinz, Ulf; Bergmann, Frank; Büchler, Markus W; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To systematically characterize specific pain patterns in the most frequent pancreatic diseases. METHODS: Pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 314), pancreatic cancer (n = 469), and other pancreatic tumors (n = 249) including mucinous (n = 20) and serous cystadenoma (n = 31), invasive (n = 37) and non-invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN; n = 48), low stage (n = 18) and high stage neuroendocrine neoplasia (n = 44), and ampullary cancer (n = 51) was registered and correlated with clinicopathological data. Survival times were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Patients alive at the follow-up time were censored. Survival curves were compared statistically using the log-rank test. RESULTS: Forty-nine point one percent of pancreatic cancer patients revealed no pain, whereas in chronic pancreatitis only 18.3% were pain free. In contrary, moderate/severe pain was registered in 15.1% in pancreatic cancer patients that was increased in chronic pancreatitis with up to 34.2%. Serous cystadenoma was asymptomatic in most cases (58.1%), whereas 78.9% of all mucinous cystadenoma patients suffered pain. In neuroendocrine neoplasia pain was not a key clinical symptom since 64% of low stage neuroendocrine neoplasia and 59% of high stage neuroendocrine neoplasia patients were pain free. Cancer localization in the pancreatic body and patients with malignant pancreatic neoplasms were associated with more severe pain. Tumor grading and stage did not show any impact on pain. Only in pancreatic cancer, pain was directly associated with impaired survival. CONCLUSION: Pancreatic pain depicts different patterns of abdominal pain sensation according to the respective pancreatic disorder and does not allow a unification of the term pancreatic pain. PMID:25083089

  3. Bevacizumab and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumor, Lymphoma, Intracranial Glioblastoma, Gliosarcoma or Anaplastic Astrocytoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-14

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Treatment of pancreatic cancer by radiation therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralph R. Dobelbower; Andrew J. Milligan

    1984-01-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of pancreatic malignancy was expanded dramatically in the last decade. Development of new tumor localization and dose delivery techniques permits safe delivery of increased radiation dose to upper abdominal tumors. Interstitial implantation of radioisotopes directly into tumors has increased the local control rate for pancreatic cancer as high as 80%, but the

  5. Pancreatography in chronic pancreatitis: international definitions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A T Axon; M Classen; P B Cotton; M Cremer; P C Freeny; W R Lees

    1984-01-01

    Terminology in classification of pancreatograms was discussed at a recent international workshop on chronic pancreatitis. A new terminology based on morphological radiographic appearances and a new classification to describe the severity and localisation of pancreatogram changes were agreed. Pancreatograms in chronic pancreatitis are graded as normal or equivocal, or as showing mild, moderate, or marked changes, either diffuse or local.

  6. [Myocardial infarction as complication of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Asfalou, I; Miftah, F; Kendoussi, M; Raissouni, M; Benyass, A; Moustaghfir, A; Zbir, E; Hda, A; Hamani, A

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of an acute pancreatitis complicated by myocardial infarction with normal coronary arteries on angiography. This observation presents a double interest. First, it illustrates unusual forms of coronary disease represented by the non-atherosclerotic infarction. On the other hand, it shows that the multiple visceral damage associated with acute pancreatitis can include myocardial infarction which complications aggravate prognosis. PMID:21232905

  7. Somatostatin, Somatostatin Receptors, and Pancreatic Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Min Li; William E. Fisher; Hee Joon Kim; Xiaoping Wang; Charles F. Brunicardi; Changyi Chen; Qizhi Yao

    2005-01-01

    Somatostatin may play an important role in the regulation of cancer growth including pancreatic cancer by interaction with somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) on the cell surface. Five SSTRs were cloned, and the function of these SSTRs is addressed in this review. SSTR-2, SSTR-5, and SSTR-1 are thought to play major roles in inhibiting pancreatic cancer growth both in vitro and in

  8. Transpapillary and transmural drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth F. Binmoeller; Hans Seifert; Andreas Walter; Nib Soehendra

    1995-01-01

    Background: Endoscopic drainage of pseudocysts using the transpapillary and transmural approaches has been reported. We evaluated endoscopic drainage in 53 patients with symptomatic pancreatic pseudocysts in whom conservative management had failed.Methods: After preliminary endoscopic retrograde pancreatography, transpapillary drainage was attempted in 33 patients with pseudocysts that communicated with the main pancreatic duct. Transmural drainage of pseudocysts in contact with the

  9. Transpapillary and transmural drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth F. Binmoeller; Hans Seifert; Andreas Walter; Nib Soehendra

    Background: Endoscopic drainage of pseudocysts using the transpapillary and transmural approaches has been reported. We evaluated endoscopic drainage in 53 patients with symptomatic pancreatic pseudocysts in whom conservative management had failed. Methods: After preliminary endoscopic retrograde pancreatography, transpapillary drainage was attempted in 33 patients with pseudocysts that communicated with the main pancreatic duct. Transmural drainage of pseudocysts in contact with

  10. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, Alexander A; Mayerle, Julia; Christochowitz, Sandra; Weiss, Frank U; Sendler, Matthias; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  11. Management of blunt pancreatic trauma: what's new?

    PubMed

    Potoka, D A; Gaines, B A; Leppäniemi, A; Peitzman, A B

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic injuries are relatively uncommon but present a major challenge to the surgeon in terms of both diagnosis and management. Pancreatic injuries are associated with significant mortality, primarily due to associated injuries, and pancreas-specific morbidity, especially in cases of delayed diagnosis. Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is a key for optimal management, but remains a challenge even with more advanced imaging modalities. For both penetrating and blunt pancreatic injuries, the presence of main pancreatic ductal injury is the major determinant of morbidity and the major factor guiding management decisions. For main pancreatic ductal injury, surgery remains the preferred approach with distal pancreatectomy for most injuries and more conservative surgical management for proximal ductal injuries involving the head of the pancreas. More recently, nonoperative management has been utilized, especially in the pediatric population, with the potential for increased rates of pseudocyst and pancreatic fistulae and the potential for the need for further intervention and increased hospital stay. This review presents recent data focusing on the diagnosis, management, and outcomes of blunt pancreatic injury. PMID:26038029

  12. Role of Alcohol Metabolism in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alain Vonlaufen; Jeremy S. Wilson; Romano C. Pirola; Minoti V. Apte

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is the major cause of chronic inflammation of the pancreas (i.e., chronic pancreatitis). Although it has long been thought that alcoholic pancreatitis is a chronic disease from the outset, evidence is accumulating to indicate that chronic damage in the pancreas may result from repeated attacks of acute tissue inflammation and death (i.e., necroinflammation). Initially, research into the pathogenesis

  13. Prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lin-Lee; Tsai, Her-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Post-procedure pancreatitis is the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography (ERCP) and carries a high morbidity and mortality occurring in at least 3%-5% of all procedures. We reviewed the available literature searching for “ERCP” and “pancreatitis” and “post-ERCP pancreatitis”. in PubMed and Medline. This review looks at the diagnosis, risk factors, causes and methods of preventing post-procedure pancreatitis. These include the evidence for patient selection, endoscopic techniques and pharmacological prophylaxis of ERCP induced pancreatitis. Selecting the right patient for the procedure by a risk benefits assessment is the best way of avoiding unnecessary ERCPs. Risk is particularly high in young women with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD). Many of the trials reviewed have rather few numbers of subjects and hence difficult to appraise. Meta-analyses have helped screen for promising modalities of prophylaxis. At present, evidence is emerging that pancreatic stenting of patients with SOD and rectally administered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in a large unselected trial reduce the risk of post-procedure pancreatitis. A recent meta-analysis have demonstrated that rectally administered indomethecin, just before or after ERCP is associated with significantly lower rate of pancreatitis compared with placebo [OR = 0.49 (0.34-0.71); P = 0.0002]. Number needed to treat was 20. It is likely that one of these prophylactic measures will begin to be increasingly practised in high risk groups. PMID:24891970

  14. Xenobiotic Metabolism, Oxidant Stress and Chronic Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew A. Wallig

    1998-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis, although relatively rare in the Western World, is common in certain tropical zones where staple crops such as cassava are rich in cyanogenic glycosides. This paper reviews the evidence for a cyanide connection, with reference to experimental studies using another plant nitrile, crambene; and then examines the hypothesis that chronic pancreatitis represents a manifestation of uncoordinated detoxification reactions

  15. Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter J. Bolan; Aaron S. Fink

    2003-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) plays an important diagnostic and therapeutic role in the management of chronic pancreatitis. New techniques are being developed which should further improve outcomes of endoscopic intervention. The ultimate role of these therapeutic interventions for chronic pancreatitis awaits prospective randomized data demonstrating their efficacy and safety in comparison to surgery. Until such time, these often difficult techniques

  16. This is an exciting time in the treatment of lymphoma.

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cover Story: Leukemia/Lymphoma "This is an exciting time in the treatment of lymphoma." Past Issues / Summer ... best medication for each patient, indicates the best time for treatments, and sheds light on the patient's ...

  17. Non-Hodgkins lymphoma of maxilla: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, M. G.; Agrawal, S. M.; Kambalimath, Deepashri H.

    2011-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are a group of neoplasms that originate from the cells of the lymphoreticular system. Forty percent of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas arise from extra nodal sites. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas detected primarily in the bone are quite rare, but among jaw lesions, they are more frequently present in the maxilla than in the mandible. There are no classical characteristic clinical features of lymphomas involving the jaw bones. Swelling, ulcer or discomfort may be present in the region of the lymphoma, or it may mimic a periapical pathology or a benign condition. Extranodal non-Hodgkins lymphoma of the maxilla could present as one of the early manifestation of detrimental diseases. Clinically these types of lymphoma can mimic an inflammatory endo-periodontal lesion with symptoms of pain and local discomfort. The greater the delay in diagnosis subsequently worsens the prognosis. A case of maxillary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with an unusual presentation is discussed. PMID:22639517

  18. Antibody Therapy of Pediatric B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Wentrup, Friederike; de Zwart, Verena; Bierings, Marc

    2013-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma in children accounts for about 10% of all pediatric malignancies. Chemotherapy has been very successful leading to an over-all 5-year survival between 80 and 90% depending on lymphoma type and extent of disease. Therapeutic toxicity remains high calling for better targeted and thus less toxic therapies. Therapeutic antibodies have become a standard element of B-cell lymphoma therapy in adults. Clinical experience in pediatric lymphoma patients is still very limited. This review outlines the rationale for antibody treatment of B-cell lymphomas in children and describes potential target structures on B-cell lymphoma cells. It summarizes the clinical experience of antibody therapy of B-cell lymphoma in children and gives an outlook on new developments and challenges for antibody therapy of pediatric B-cell lymphoma. PMID:23565504

  19. Burkitt's lymphoma: an unusual cause of childhood paraplegia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mehmet Turgut; O. Ekin Özcan; Aykut Erbengi

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present two paraspinal Burkitt's lymphomas, with paraplegia. This entity is very rare in our country. In the evaluation of a paraplegic child, we believe that Burkitt's lymphoma should always be kept in mind.

  20. Carcinogen induced inflammation and pancreatic cancer INTRODUCT ION

    E-print Network

    Korhonen, Anna

    Carcinogen induced inflammation and pancreatic cancer INTRODUCT ION Pancreatic cancer is the fifth.0 4.0 5.0 A C D E F Figure 4. Pancreatic carcinogenic chemicals increase intracellular [Ca2+] in Panc/03 promotes cell survival. Pancreatic carcinogens upregulate inflammatory markers Figure 8. Effect

  1. [The post-traumatic pancreatitis: about four cases].

    PubMed

    Faroudy, M; Mosadik, A; Mouelhi, S; Ababou, A; Lazreq, C; Sbihi, A

    2006-06-01

    The post-traumatic pancreatitis is the main reason of mortality in the traumatisms of the pancreas, its concurrence is related to the lesions of the pancreatic channels. It represents only 1% of the pancreatitis. In a descriptive retrospective study, four cases of post-traumatic pancreatitis are described. PMID:16546346

  2. Survivin expression is a prognostic marker in pancreatic cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuhiro Kami; Ryuichiro Doi; Masayuki Koizumi; Eiji Toyoda; Tomohiko Mori; Daisuke Ito; Koji Fujimoto; Michihiko Wada; Shin-Ichi Miyatake; Masayuki Imamura

    2004-01-01

    BackgroundIn this study, we assessed survivin expression in pancreatic cancer specimens from patients who underwent either pancreatic resection alone or pancreatic resection plus postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) to evaluate whether survivin expression is predictive of sensitivity to PORT and outcome in pancreatic cancer patients.

  3. Alcohol Consumption in Patients with Acute or Chronic Pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Sand; P. G. Lankisch; I. Nordback

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of the relation between the alcoholic consumption and the development of pancreatitis should help in defining the alcoholic etiology of pancreatitis. Although the association between alcohol consumption and pancreatitis has been recognized for over 100 years, it remains still unclear why some alcoholics develop pancreatitis and some do not. Surprisingly little data are available about alcohol amounts, drinking patterns,

  4. Missed curable carcinoma of the pancreas presenting as chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Wharton, S. M.; Rahman, Z.; Johnson, C. D.

    1997-01-01

    We present a case of pancreatic malignancy which presented as chronic pancreatitis. The diagnostic difficulties are discussed. We recommend that when there is any doubt about a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis with a pancreatic mass, then early resection is appropriate. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9373601

  5. B cell lymphoma in hiv transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I (HIV-1) infection is associated with a high incidence of B-cell lymphomas. The role of HIV in these lymphomas is unclear and currently there are no valid in vivo models for better understanding HIV-related lymphomagenesis. Transgenic (Tg) 26 mice have a 7.4-kb pNL4-3 HIV-1 provirus lacking a 3.1-kb sequence encompassing parts of the gag-pol region. Approximately 15% of these HIV Tg mice spontaneously develop lymphoma with hallmark pre-diagnostic markers including skin lesions, diffuse lymphadenopathy and an increase in pro-inflammatory serum cytokines. Here we describe the phenotypic and molecular characteristics of the B cell leukemia/lymphoma in the Tg mice. Results The transformed B cell population consists of CD19+pre-BCR+CD127+CD43+CD93+ precursor B cells. The tumor cells are clonal and characterized by an increased expression of several cellular oncogenes. Expression of B cell-stimulatory cytokines IL-1?, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-13 and TNF? and HIV proteins p17, gp120 and nef were elevated in the Tg mice with lymphoma. Conclusions Increased expression of HIV proteins and the B-cell stimulatory factors is consistent with the interpretation that one or more of these factors play a role in lymphoma development. The lymphomas share many similarities with those occurring in HIV/AIDS+ patients and may provide a valuable model for understanding AIDS-related lymphomagenesis and elucidating the role played by HIV-1. PMID:23985023

  6. Colonic Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Akasaka, Risaburo; Chiba, Toshimi; Dutta, Amit K.; Toya, Yosuke; Mizutani, Tomomi; Shozushima, Tatsuyori; Abe, Keinosuke; Kamei, Masato; Kasugai, Satoshi; Shibata, Sho; Abiko, Yukito; Yokoyama, Naoki; Oana, Shuhei; Hirota, Shigeru; Endo, Masaki; Uesugi, Noriyuki; Sugai, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Colonic mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas are rare and a definitive treatment has not been established. Solitary or multiple, elevated or polypoid lesions are the usual appearances of MALT lymphoma in the colon and sometimes the surface may reveal abnormal vascularity. In this paper we report our experience with four cases of colonic MALT lymphoma and review the relevant literature. The first patient had a smooth elevated lesion in the rectum and histopathologic examination of the biopsy from the lesion showed centrocyte-like cells infiltrating the lamina propria. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) revealed thickening of the submucosa and muscularis propria. The patient underwent radiation therapy, and 9 months later a repeat colonoscopy showed complete resolution of the lesion. In case 2, colonoscopy showed a polyp in the cecum; the biopsy was diagnostic of MALT lymphoma. EUS detected a hypoechoic lesion confined to the mucosal layer of the colonic wall. The patient underwent endoscopic mucosal resection of the lesion and after 6 years of follow-up there was no evidence of recurrence. The third patient had a sessile elevated lesion in the sigmoid colon for which she underwent sigmoidectomy. Pathological examination of the surgical specimen was suggestive of MALT lymphoma. The last patient had a smooth elevated lesion in the rectum and magnification endoscopy showed irregular vascular pattern. The patient underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection, and biopsy examination showed the tumor to be MALT lymphoma. Although rare, awareness of MALT lymphoma of the colon is important to evaluate the patient appropriately and to plan further management. PMID:23012617

  7. Computed tomographic appearance of resectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y. (Univ. of Tokyo, Japan); Araki, T.; Tasaka, A.; Maruyama, M.

    1982-06-01

    Thirteen patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma were examined by computed tomography (CT). Nine had a mass, 2 had dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, 1 appeared to have ductal dilatation, and 1 had no sign of abnormality. Resectable carcinoma was diagnosed retrospectively in 8 cases, based on the following criteria: a mass with a distinct contour, frequently containing a tiny or irregular low-density area and accompanied by dilatation of the caudal portion of the main pancreatic duct without involvement of the large vessels, liver, or lymph nodes. Including unresectable cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and obstructive jaundice from causes other than cancer, the false-positive rate was less than 6%. However, a small cancer without change in pancreatic contour is difficult to detect with CT.

  8. Epigenetics and Epigenetic Alterations in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Omura, Noriyuki; Goggins, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a major therapeutic challenge. In 2008, there will be approximately 37,680 new cases and 34,290 deaths attributable to pancreatic cancer in the United States (U.S.), making it the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death. Recent comprehensive pancreatic cancer genome project found that pancreatic adenocarcinomas harbored 63 intragenic mutations or amplifications/homozygous deletions and these alterations clustered in 12 signaling pathways. In addition to widespread genetic alterations, it is now apparent that epigenetic mechanisms are also central to the evolution and progression of human cancers. Since epigenetic silencing processes are mitotically heritable, they can drive neoplastic progression and undergo the same selective pressure as genetic alterations. This review will describe recent developments in cancer epigenetics and their importance in our understanding of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PMID:19158989

  9. Rituximab, Romidepsin, and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. Bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with adrenal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, R; Read, D

    2000-01-01

    A 74 year old women presented with lethargy and weight loss and was found to have profound adrenal insufficiency and bilateral adrenal mass lesions. Histological examination revealed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There was no evidence of lymphoma outside the adrenal glands. Isolated bilateral adrenal masses may rarely be due to primary adrenal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is often associated with adrenal insufficiency.???Keywords: lymphoma; adrenal insufficiency PMID:10908383

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Oncology overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories throughout the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiological diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Biopsy and cytology in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Pathology and morphology of pancreatic cancer; Staging and prognosis of pancreatic cancer; Biological and immunological markers in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer; Surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer; Drug therapy of pancreatic cancer; Radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer; Selected studies on the epidemiology of pancreatic cancer; Clinical correlates and syndromes associated with pancreatic neoplasia.

  12. Classification and Management of Pancreatic Pseudocysts.

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Wan, Mei Hua; Xie, Kun-Lin; Li, Wei; Hu, Wei-Ming; Liu, Xu-Bao; Tang, Wen-Fu; Wu, Hong

    2015-06-01

    This article aims to elucidate the classification of and optimal treatment for pancreatic pseudocysts.Various approaches, including endoscopic drainage, percutaneous drainage, and open surgery, have been employed for the management of pancreatic pseudocysts. However, no scientific classification of pancreatic pseudocysts has been devised, which could assist in the selection of optimal therapy.We evaluated the treatment modalities used in 893 patients diagnosed with pancreatic pseudocysts according to the revision of the Atlanta classification in our department between 2001 and 2010. All the pancreatic pseudocysts have course of disease >4 weeks and have mature cysts wall detected by computed tomography or transabdominal ultrasonography. Endoscopic drainage, percutaneous drainage, or open surgery was selected on the basis of the pseudocyst characteristics. Clinical data and patient outcomes were reviewed.Among the 893 patients, 13 (1.5%) had percutaneous drainage. Eighty-three (9%) had type I pancreatic pseudocysts and were treated with observation. Ten patients (1%) had type II pseudocysts and underwent the Whipple procedure or resection of the pancreatic body and tail. Forty-six patients (5.2%) had type III pseudocysts: 44 (4.9%) underwent surgical internal drainage and 2 (0.2%) underwent endoscopic drainage. Five hundred six patients (56.7%) had type IV pseudocysts: 297 (33.3%) underwent surgical internal drainage and 209 (23.4%) underwent endoscopic drainage. Finally, 235 patients (26.3%) had type V pseudocysts: 36 (4%) underwent distal pancreatectomy or splenectomy and 199 (22.3%) underwent endoscopic drainage.A new classification system was devised, based on the size, anatomical location, and clinical manifestations of the pancreatic pseudocyst along with the relationship between the pseudocyst and the pancreatic duct. Different therapeutic strategies could be considered based on this classification. When clinically feasible, endoscopic drainage should be considered the optimal management strategy for pancreatic pseudocysts. PMID:26091462

  13. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) refers to a clinical entity characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis which occurs on more than one occasion. Recurrence of pancreatitis generally occurs in a setting of normal morpho-functional gland, however, an established chronic disease may be found either on the occasion of the first episode of pancreatitis or during the follow-up. The aetiology of ARP can be identified in the majority of patients. Most common causes include common bile duct stones or sludge and bile crystals; sphincter of oddi dysfunction; anatomical ductal variants interfering with pancreatic juice outflow; obstruction of the main pancreatic duct or pancreatico-biliary junction; genetic mutations; alcohol consumption. However, despite diagnostic technologies, the aetiology of ARP still remains unknown in up to 30% of cases: in these cases the term “idiopathic” is used. Because occult bile stone disease and sphincter of oddi dysfunction account for the majority of cases, cholecystectomy, and eventually the endoscopic biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy are curative in most of cases. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy appeared to be a curative procedure per se in about 80% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid oral treatment alone has also been reported effective for treatment of biliary sludge. In uncertain cases toxin botulin injection may help in identifying some sphincter of oddi dysfunction, but this treatment is not widely used. In the last twenty years, pancreatic endotherapy has been proven effective in cases of recurrent pancreatitis depending on pancreatic ductal obstruction, independently from the cause of obstruction, and has been widely used instead of more aggressive approaches. PMID:25493002

  14. Autoimmune pancreatitis—a new evolving pancreatic disease?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuichi Okazaki; Kazushige Uchida; Toshiro Fukui; Makoto Takaoka; Akiyoshi Nishio

    2010-01-01

    Introduction  Recent advances support the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis as a unique systemic disease because occasional extrapancreatic\\u000a lesions such as sclerosing cholangitis, sclerosing sialoadenitis, and retroperitoneal fibrosis show similar pathological features\\u000a with fibrosis and abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells, and are steroid responsive. Based on these findings,\\u000a several diagnostic criteria have been proposed.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and methods  Although AIP is accepted worldwide

  15. Blunt pancreatic trauma with main pancreatic duct disruption managed successfully with total parenteral nutrition: Report of a case

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshio Shirai; Kazuhiro Tsukada; Yoichi Yamadera; Tetsuya Ohtani; Terukazu Muto; Katsuyoshi Hatakeyama

    1995-01-01

    Although surgery is the usual treatment of choice for pancreatic trauma with disruption of the main pancreatic duct, we report herein the case of a patient in whom blunt pancreatic trauma with disruption of the proximal main pancreatic duct was successfully managed by conservative treatment. An 18-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain 22 days after being involved in a car

  16. Morphohistological Features of Pancreatic Stump Are the Main Determinant of Pancreatic Fistula after Pancreatoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ridolfi, Cristina; Angiolini, Maria Rachele; Gavazzi, Francesca; Spaggiari, Paola; Tinti, Maria Carla; Uccelli, Fara; Madonini, Marco; Montorsi, Marco; Zerbi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Pancreatic surgery is challenging and associated with high morbidity, mainly represented by postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) and its further consequences. Identification of risk factors for POPF is essential for proper postoperative management. Aim of the Study. Evaluation of the role of morphological and histological features of pancreatic stump, other than main pancreatic duct diameter and glandular texture, in POPF occurrence after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Patients and Methods. Between March 2011 and April 2013, we performed 145 consecutive pancreaticoduodenectomies. We intraoperatively recorded morphological features of pancreatic stump and collected data about postoperative morbidity. Our dedicated pathologist designed a score to quantify fibrosis and inflammation of pancreatic tissue. Results. Overall morbidity was 59,3%. Mortality was 4,1%. POPF rate was 28,3%, while clinically significant POPF were 15,8%. Male sex (P = 0.009), BMI ? 25 (P = 0.002), prolonged surgery (P = 0.001), soft pancreatic texture (P < 0.001), small pancreatic duct (P < 0.001), pancreatic duct decentralization on stump anteroposterior axis, especially if close to the posterior margin (P = 0.031), large stump area (P = 0.001), and extended stump mobilization (P = 0.001) were related to higher POPF rate. Our fibrosis-and-inflammation score is strongly associated with POPF (P = 0.001). Discussion and Conclusions. Pancreatic stump features evaluation, including histology, can help the surgeon in fitting postoperative management to patient individual risk after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:24900974

  17. Biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis: a clinical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chenggang; Li, Xin; Sun, Jintang; Zou, Peng; Gao, Shubo; Zhang, Peixun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical treatment features of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 21 cases of biliary tract and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis in the Department of General Surgery in our hospital during May 2005 to July 2011 was performed; the clinical treatment features were analyzed in terms of surgical option, onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery, length of stay in hospital and Ranson score. Results: There was no statistic difference between the two groups (A: The onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery < 0.5 year. B: The onset interval of acute pancreatitis after last surgery > 0.5 year) in pathogenetic condition and length of stay in hospital. All patients were discharged after treatment, a follow-up of 6-18 months found no recurrence of pancreatitis. Conclusion: There is no relevance between the treatment feature and onset interval of biliary and pancreatic surgery complicated by acute pancreatitis. The disease is still treated meanly with symptomatic and supportive treatment, while the etiological treatment is also particularly important.

  18. Limitations of surgery in intraabdominal Burkitt's lymphoma in children

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. B. Gahukamble; A. S. Khamage

    1995-01-01

    The role of surgery in intraabdominal Burkitt's lymphoma is a controversial subject, and different views are expressed. In the authors' institution, 41 children (30 boys and 11 girls) have been treated who had intraabdominal Burkitt's lymphoma. A study was undertaken to assess the limitations of surgery in the treatment of intraabdominal Burkitt's lymphoma. An uniform policy was made to resect

  19. Lymphoma Cells 'Burst' Onto the Scene | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    Using a novel microscopy technique that can be used to observe malignant lymphoma cells as they enter the lymph nodes in a living animal, a team of investigators from Stanford University made a surprising new finding about how lymphoma cells spread in the body. This result, say the researchers, could unlock new ways to detect and treat lymphoma.

  20. Hypertriglyceridaemia and abnormalities of triglyceride catabolism persisting after pancreatitis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. N. Durrington; O. P. Twentyman; J. M. Braganza; J. P. Miller

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-three patients referred consecutively following an attack of pancreatitis at least six weeks earlier (acute pancreatitis\\u000a in 10 patients and chronic pancreatitis in 23 patients) had an intravenous fat tolerance test to determine their capacity\\u000a to catabolise circulating triglycerides. Hypertriglyceridaemia was present in 14 patients (42%), including 5 with acute pancreatitis\\u000a and 9 with chronic pancreatitis. the highest serum triglyceride

  1. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alberto Maringhini; Morie A. Gertz; Eugene P. DiMagno

    1995-01-01

    Summary  Several reports suggest a relationship between bone marrow transplantation and pancreatic damage. The authors describe two\\u000a patients with pancreatic insufficiency after bone marrow transplantation. The first patient had weight loss arising from steatorrhea\\u000a secondary to severe pancreatic insufficiency (lipase output result<3% of normal) due to pancreatic atrophy. The second patient\\u000a had steatorrhea secondary to intestinal bacterial overgrowth, but moderate pancreatic

  2. Management of fibrosing pancreatitis in children presenting with obstructive jaundice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F A Sylvester; B Shuckett; E Cutz; P R Durie; M A Marcon

    1998-01-01

    Background—Children with fibrosing pancreatitis are conventionally treated surgically to relieve common bile duct (CBD) obstruction caused by pancreatic compression. Residual pancreatic function has not been formally tested in these patients.Aims—To evaluate the usefulness of non-surgical temporary drainage in children with fibrosing pancreatitis and to assess pancreatic function after resolution of their CBD obstruction.Patients—Four children (1.5–13 years; three girls).Methods and results—Abdominal

  3. Novel Agents in Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Marcus S.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is a mature B cell neoplasm constituting 5–7% of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Overall prognosis with current therapeutics remains poor, thus numerous novel agents are currently under investigation. In this review we focus on early phase trials that have demonstrated promise in mantle cell. Constitutive activation of signaling components downstream of the B cell receptor play an important role in the pathobiology of mantle cell lymphoma. Targeting of this signaling pathway has become a focus with specific agents under development including inhibitors of spleen tyrosine kinase, phosphoinositide-3-kinase and Bruton’s tyrosine kinase. Promsing data also supports further development of BH-3 mimetics, a crucial component of anti-apoptotic signaling. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have an established role in cutaneous T cell lymphoma and are now under investigation in mantle cell lymphoma as well. With further understanding of cellular signaling, the armamentarium of treatment options will be enhanced, with the hope of improving the prognosis of this disease. PMID:22687455

  4. Cellular Immunotherapy Following Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-29

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

  5. Current management of follicular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Buske, Christian; Dreyling, Martin; Weigert, Oliver; Lenz, Georg; Unterhalt, Michael

    2007-01-01

    After decades of stagnation, the prognosis of patients with follicular lymphomas (FL) has changed substantially within the last few years due to new and effective therapeutic modalities. These include myeloablative therapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in younger patients in first remission, which showed a significant prolongation of remission duration in three prospective randomised trials while the impact on overall survival still needs to be determined. Adding the anti-CD 20 antibody Rituximab to conventional chemotherapy resulted in a significant increase in remission rate, remission duration and, in two of four currently available prospective randomised studies, even in a longer overall survival. A prolongation of remission duration was also seen when Rituximab was given as maintenance after cytoreductive therapy including Rituximab. Radio-immunotherapy (RIT) with radioisotopes coupled to monoclonal antibodies produced encouraging data in several phase II studies. New therapeutic perspectives have also emerged from increasing insights into the biology of the disease that unravel molecular targets for novel agents, some of which have entered clinical evaluation already. PMID:17073892

  6. Role of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Pancreatic Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhihong; Vonlaufen, Alain; Phillips, Phoebe A.; Fiala-Beer, Eva; Zhang, Xuguo; Yang, Lu; Biankin, Andrew V.; Goldstein, David; Pirola, Romano C.; Wilson, Jeremy S.; Apte, Minoti V.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) produce the stromal reaction in pancreatic cancer (PC), and their interaction with cancer cells facilitates cancer progression. This study investigated the role of human PSCs (hPSCs) in the metastatic process and tumor angiogenesis using both in vivo (orthotopic model) and in vitro (cultured PSC and PC cells) approaches. A sex mismatch study (injection of male hPSCs plus female PC cells into the pancreas of female mice) was conducted to determine whether hPSCs accompany cancer cells to metastatic sites. Metastatic nodules were examined by fluorescent in situ hybridization for the presence of the Y chromosome. Angiogenesis was assessed by i) immunostaining tumors for CD31, an endothelial cell marker; and ii) quantifying human microvascular endothelial cell (HMEC-1) tube formation in vitro on exposure to conditioned media from hPSCs. Transendothelial migration was assessed in vitro by examining the movement of fluorescently labeled hPSCs through an endothelial cell monolayer. Human PSCs i) were found in multiple metastatic sites in each mouse injected with male hPSCs plus female PC cells; ii) increased CD31 expression in primary tumors from mice injected with MiaPaCa-2 and hPSCs and stimulated tube formation by HMEC-1 in vitro; and iii) exhibited transendothelial migration that was stimulated by cancer cells. Human PSCs accompany cancer cells to metastatic sites, stimulate angiogenesis, and are able to intravasate/extravasate to and from blood vessels. PMID:20934972

  7. Veliparib, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  8. Pancreatic exocrine secretion--a measure of the functional capacity of the pancreatic energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Letko, G; Pohle, T

    1989-01-01

    In studies on the pathogenesis of ischemic cell injury and of other pancreatic diseases the knowledge of the actual pancreatic energy state is an important factor. Therefore, it would be advantageous to have a simple and inexpensive method to determine this parameter and its alterations in the pancreas. At uniform hormonal stimulation, the extent of exocrine pancreatic secretion showed a clear dependence on energy supply in this organ. The degree of pancreatic juice edema formed after bolus injection of cholecystokinin and secretin at ductal occlusion was found to be the most sensitive and reproducible measure of the functional capacity of the pancreatic energy metabolism. While this parameter can be applied to experimental studies, only, the juice volume secreted could be determined under clinical conditions, too. Both parameters of pancreatic secretion were clearly decreased after preceding short-term ischemia and recovered after an adequate interval of reperfusion. PMID:2588744

  9. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis Causing a Highway to the Colon with Subsequent Road Closure: Pancreatic Colonic Fistula Presenting as a Large Bowel Obstruction Treated with Pancreatic Duct Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Justin; Schlepp, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Context. Colonic complications associated with acute pancreatitis have a low incidence but carry an increased risk of mortality with delayed diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic colonic fistula is most commonly associated with walled off pancreatic necrosis or abscess formation and rarely forms spontaneously. Classic clinical manifestations for pancreatic colonic fistula include diarrhea, hematochezia, and fever. Uncommonly pancreatic colonic fistula presents as large bowel obstruction. Case. We report a case of a woman with a history of recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis who presented with large bowel obstruction secondary to pancreatic colonic fistula. Resolution of large bowel obstruction and pancreatic colonic fistula was achieved with pancreatic duct stenting. Conclusion. Pancreatic colonic fistula can present as large bowel obstruction. Patients with resolved acute pancreatitis who have radiographic evidence of splenic flexure obstruction, but without evidence of mechanical obstruction on colonoscopy, should be considered for ERCP to evaluate for PCF. PCF not associated with walled off pancreatic necrosis or peritoneal abscess can be treated conservatively with pancreatic duct stenting. PMID:25893120

  10. Novel agents in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anita

    2015-08-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an uncommon B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, comprising approximately 6-8 % of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. MCL is biologically and clinically heterogeneous, and there is no standard treatment for MCL. Although untreated MCL often responds well to frontline combination chemotherapy, relapsed, refractory MCL can be challenging to treat and traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy is typically not highly effective. In recent years, increased insight into the molecular and genomic diversity of MCL and the pathogenesis of the disease has given rise to the development of many new biologically targeted therapies. Ibrutinib was recently FDA approved for relapsed, refractory MCL and will likely have a significant impact on treatment paradigms for MCL. In addition to ibrutinib, there are many classes of novel agents that are currently in development. This review focuses on recent developments in the management of relapsed, refractory MCL, describing the growing armamentarium of novel agents available to combat this disease. PMID:26045130

  11. Surveillance imaging in pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Voss, Stephan D

    2013-09-01

    Children with Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) routinely undergo surveillance computed tomography (CT) imaging for up to 5 years post-therapy (Rx), resulting in increased cost and radiation exposure without clear benefit. A number of recent studies have demonstrated that routine surveillance imaging, by CT, positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, as well as other imaging techniques, may be over-utilized for routine surveillance of patients with Hodgkin Lymphoma, and-in addition to contributing to increased cost and radiation exposure-show no clear survival benefit. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent data evaluating routine surveillance imaging and its role in detecting disease relapse in patients with Hodgkin Lymphoma. PMID:23832681

  12. Mantle cell lymphoma: observation to transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sweetenham, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma as a rare non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma can present in different clinical presentations such as an aggressive form or a more indolent picture. Treatment modality is based on multiple factors including age, presence or absence of symptoms, and comorbidities. Watchful waiting is a reasonable approach for asymptomatic patients especially in elderly. In symptomatic patients, treatment is chemo-immunotherapy followed by maintenance immunotherapy or autologous bone marrow transplant. Allogeneic bone marrow transplant has a potential benefit of cure for relapsed/refractory cases, but it has a high mortality rate. Novel treatment with agents such as ibrutinib, a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has shown promising results in relapse/refractory cases. We extensively review the most recent data on diagnostic and therapeutic management of mantle cell lymphoma through presenting two extreme clinical scenarios. PMID:25642314

  13. New insights into pancreatic cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Chinthalapally V; Mohammed, Altaf

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has been one of the deadliest of all cancers, with almost uniform lethality despite aggressive treatment. Recently, there have been important advances in the molecular, pathological and biological understanding of pancreatic cancer. Even after the emergence of recent new targeted agents and the use of multiple therapeutic combinations, no treatment option is viable in patients with advanced cancer. Developing novel strategies to target progression of PC is of intense interest. A small population of pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSCs) has been found to be resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. CSCs are believed to be responsible for tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. The CSC research has recently achieved much progress in a variety of solid tumors, including pancreatic cancer to some extent. This leads to focus on understanding the role of pancreatic CSCs. The focus on CSCs may offer new targets for prevention and treatment of this deadly cancer. We review the most salient developments in important areas of pancreatic CSCs. Here, we provide a review of current updates and new insights on the role of CSCs in pancreatic tumor progression with special emphasis on DclK1 and Lgr5, signaling pathways altered by CSCs, and the role of CSCs in prevention and treatment of PC. PMID:25914762

  14. Indications for surgery in necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Reber, H A; McFadden, D W

    1993-01-01

    The decision to operate on a patient with severe acute pancreatitis is often difficult and requires mature clinical judgment. Indications that are widely accepted include to establish the differential diagnosis, when the surgeon is concerned that the symptoms are due to a disease other than pancreatitis for which an operation is mandatory; in persistent and severe biliary pancreatitis, when an obstructing gallstone is lodged in the ampulla of Vater and cannot be managed endoscopically; in the presence of infected pancreatic necrosis; and to drain a pancreatic abscess, if percutaneous drainage does not produce the desired result. Other indications that are less well defined and somewhat controversial are the presence of sterile pancreatic necrosis involving 50% or more of the pancreas, when the pancreatitis persists despite maximal medical therapy, and when a patient's condition deteriorates. For these last three indications, guidelines have been presented that permit a logical approach to management, although uncertainty remains. Surgeons should strive to describe in detail and precisely the clinical state of their patients at the time that an operation is done, as well as the findings and technical details of the operation. This should allow further refinement in the management of this vexing problem. PMID:8128695

  15. Considerations on pancreatic exocrine function after pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Morera-Ocon, Francisco José; Sabater-Orti, Luis; Muńoz-Forner, Elena; Pérez-Griera, Jaime; Ortega-Serrano, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) procedure may lead to pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. There are several types of reconstruction for this kind of operation. Pancreaticogastrostomy (PG) was introduced to reduce the rate of postoperative pancreatic fistula. Although some randomized control trials have shown no differences regarding pancreatic leakage between PG and pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ), recently some reports reveal benefits from the PG over the PJ. Some surgeons concern about the performing of the PG and inactivation of pancreatic enzymes being in contact with the gastric juice, and the detrimental results over the exocrine pancreatic function. The pancreatic exocrine function can be measured with direct and indirect tests. Direct tests have the highest sensitivity and specificity for detection of exocrine insufficiency but require tube placement. Among the tubeless indirect tests, the van de Kamer stool fat analysis remains the standard to diagnose fat malabsorption. The patient compliance and time consuming makes it not so suitable for its clinical use. Fecal immunoreactive elastase test is employed for screening of exocrine insufficiency, is not cumbersome, and has been used to study pancreatic function after resection. We analyze the FE1 levels in our patients after the PD with two types of reconstruction, PG and PJ, and we discuss some considerations about the pancreaticointestinal drainage method after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:25232457

  16. Issues in Hypertriglyceridemic Pancreatitis - An Update

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, John; Singh, Vijay; Pitchumoni, C. S; Yadav, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a well established but underestimated cause of acute (AP) and recurrent AP (RAP). The clinical presentation of HTG-induced pancreatitis (HTG pancreatitis) is similar to other causes. Pancreatitis secondary to HTG is typically seen in the presence of one or more secondary factors (uncontrolled diabetes, alcoholism, medications, pregnancy) in a patient with an underlying common genetic abnormality of lipoprotein metabolism (Familial combined hyperlipidemia or Familial HTG). Less commonly, a patient with rare genetic abnormality (Familial chylomicronemic syndrome) with or without an additional secondary factor is encountered. The risk of AP in patients with serum triglycerides >1000 mg/dl and >2000 mg/dl is ?5% and 10-20% respectively. It is not clear whether HTG pancreatitis is more severe than when it is due to other causes. Clinical management of HTG pancreatitis is similar to that of other causes. Insulin infusion in diabetic patients with HTG can rapidly reduce triglyceride levels. Use of apheresis is still experimental and better designed studies are needed to clarify its role in management of HTG pancreatitis. Diet, lifestyle changes, control of secondary factors are key to the treatment and medications are useful adjuncts to long term management of triglyceride levels. Control of triglyceride levels to well below 500 mg/dl can effectively prevent recurrences of pancreatitis. PMID:24172179

  17. Grayscale and color Doppler features of testicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bertolotto, Michele; Derchi, Lorenzo E; Secil, Mustafa; Dogra, Vikram; Sidhu, Paul S; Clements, Richard; Freeman, Simon; Grenier, Nicolas; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ramchandani, Parvati; Cicero, Calogero; Abete, Luca; Bussani, Rossana; Rocher, Laurence; Spencer, John; Tsili, Athina; Valentino, Massimo; Pavlica, Pietro

    2015-06-01

    Pooled data from 16 radiology centers were retrospectively analyzed to seek patients with pathologically proven testicular lymphoma and grayscale and color Doppler images available for review. Forty-three cases were found: 36 (84%) primary and 7 (16%) secondary testicular lymphoma. With unilateral primary lymphoma, involvement was unifocal (n = 10), multifocal (n = 11), or diffuse (n = 11). Synchronous bilateral involvement occurred in 6 patients. Color Doppler sonography showed normal testicular vessels within the tumor in 31 of 43 lymphomas (72%). Testicular lymphoma infiltrates through the tubules, preserving the normal vascular architecture of the testis. Depiction of normal testicular vessels crossing the lesion is a useful adjunctive diagnostic criterion. PMID:26014335

  18. [Mixed cryoglobulinemia-associated membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, disclosing gastric MALT lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Buob, David; Copin, Marie-Christine

    2006-09-01

    We report a case of a mixed cryoglobulinemia-associated membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, disclosing gastric lymphoma of MALT-type. In the reported case, glomerulonephritis was associated with joint and skin symptoms related to type II mixed cryoglobulinemia. MALT lymphoma diagnosis was made by gastric biopsy. Renal pathological examination showed relatively uncommon findings, ie mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis lacking usual intraluminal thrombi. Although classical, renal manifestations of malignant lymphomas are uncommon, and rarely allow lymphoma diagnosis. The renal biological function improves as the lymphoma regresses with appropriated treatment. This case underlines the benefit of gastroscopy in cryoglobulinemia etiological research. PMID:17128153

  19. Differentiation of Autoimmune Pancreatitis From Pancreatic Cancer by Diffusion-Weighted MRI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Terumi Kamisawa; Kensuke Takuma; Hajime Anjiki; Naoto Egawa; Tastuo Hata; Masanao Kurata; Goro Honda; Kouji Tsuruta; Mizuka Suzuki; Noriko Kamata; Tsuneo Sasaki

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES:We sought to clarify the clinical utility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) for differentiating autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) from pancreatic cancer.METHODS:Thirteen AIP patients underwent DWI before therapy, and six of them underwent DWI after steroid therapy. The extent and shape of high-intensity areas were compared with those of 40 pancreatic cancer patients. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated in

  20. Detection of ras Gene Mutations in Pancreatic Juice and Peripheral Blood of Patients with Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Minora Tada; Masao Ornata; Shigenobu Kawai; Hiromitsu Saisho; Randall K. Saiki; John J. Sninsky

    Pancreatic adenocarcinomas are known to have a high incidence of K-ras gene mutations. Differential diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis sometimes presents a clinical dilemma. We recently developed a highly sensitive and specific polymerase chain reaction capa ble of detecting 3-30 copies of mutant K-ra.v genes harboring melon 12 single base changes in the presence of 300.000 normal copies.