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1

[Primary pancreatic lymphoma diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy].  

PubMed

Although primary pancreatic lymphoma (PPL) is a rare malignant tumor, the correct diagnosis is essential since their therapeutic management differs from other pancreatic tumors. The fine needle aspiration cytology guided by endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS-FNA) is currently the preferred technique for the diagnosis of neoplasms of the pancreas, being of particular interest in those pancreatic lesions with atypical characteristics or presentation. However, the usefulness of EUS-FNA in the PPL has been poorly studied because of the rarity of this entity. We report a case of a patient with HIV infection and PPL diagnosed by EUS-FNA. PMID:20932603

Gimeno-García, Antonio Z; Alonso, María Mar; García Castro, Candelaria; Nicolás Pérez, David; Quintero, Enrique

2010-11-01

2

78 FR 8509 - PPL Colstrip I, LLC, PPL Colstrip II, LLC, PPL Montana, LLC; Notice of Filing  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...15. PPL Colstrip I requests such waivers...for PPL Colstrip I as of September 1...argues that PPL Colstrip I and II have never made any jurisdictional...the OATT that they had on file, which now...the comment date, it is not necessary...

2013-02-06

3

Occurrence of anaplastic large cell lymphoma following IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and cholecystitis and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma  

PubMed Central

IgG4-related sclerosing disease is an established disease entity with characteristic clinicopathological features. Recently, the association between IgG4-related sclerosing disease and the risk of malignancies has been suggested. IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis with pancreatic cancer has been reported. Further, a few cases of extraocular malignant lymphoma in patients with IgG4-related sclerosing disease have also been documented. Herein, we describe the first documented case of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) following IgG4-related autoimmune pancreatitis and cholecystitis and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). A 61-year-old Japanese male, with a past history of DLBCL, was detected with swelling of the pancreas and tumorous lesions in the gallbladder. Histopathological study of the resected gallbladder specimen revealed diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with fibrosclerosis in the entire gallbladder wall. Eosinophilic infiltration and obliterative phlebitis were also noted. Immunohistochemically, many IgG4-positive plasma cells had infiltrated into the lesion, and the ratio of IgG4/IgG-positive plasma cells was 71.6%. Accordingly, a diagnosis of IgG4-related cholecystitis was made. Seven months later, he presented with a painful tumor in his left parotid gland. Histopathological study demonstrated diffuse or cohesive sheet-like proliferation of large-sized lymphoid cells with rich slightly eosinophilic cytoplasm and irregular-shaped large nuclei. These lymphoid cells were positive for CD30, CD4, and cytotoxic markers, but negative for CD3 and ALK. Therefore, a diagnosis of ALK-negative ALCL was made. It has been suggested that the incidence of malignant lymphoma may be high in patients with IgG4-related sclerosing disease, therefore, intense medical follow-up is important in patients with this disorder. PMID:24228121

Ishida, Mitsuaki; Hodohara, Keiko; Yoshida, Keiko; Kagotani, Akiko; Iwai, Muneo; Yoshii, Miyuki; Okuno, Hiroko; Horinouchi, Akiko; Nakanishi, Ryota; Harada, Ayumi; Yoshida, Takashi; Okabe, Hidetoshi

2013-01-01

4

PPL: PrimeLife Privacy Policy Engine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Web 2.0 introduces new breaches in the privacy protection of personal data. Most of the users of such Internet media are not aware about the risks of publishing personal information. These threats can lead to identity thefts, scams, and cyber criminal attacks. In this paper we propose a framework, based on a privacy policy language called PPL (Primelife Policy Language),

Slim Trabelsi; Jakub Sendor; Stefanie Reinicke

2011-01-01

5

Pancreatitis  

MedlinePLUS

... the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is serious and can lead to ... IV) fluids, antibiotics, and medicines to relieve pain. Chronic pancreatitis does not heal or improve. It gets ...

6

Pancreatitis  

MedlinePLUS

... or more of the tests used to diagnose acute pancreatitis—abdominal ultrasound, CT scan, EUS, and MRCP. Treatment Treatment for chronic pancreatitis may require hospitalization for pain management, IV hydration, and nutritional support. Nasogastric feedings may ...

7

Pancreatitis  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... level of sugar in the body. Hormones are substances in the blood stream that control our body ... After the pancreas recovers, blood levels of these substances usually return to normal. Treatment for acute pancreatitis ...

8

Shoe Theater Classroom (6 to 8 ppl per table)  

E-print Network

Room Open Square Horse Shoe Theater Classroom Clusters (6 to 8 ppl per table) Square Footage A 22 460 Sq. Ft. Masters Hall · 200 seats at tables Mahler Auditorium · Classroom ­ 288 · Theater ­ 600

Arnold, Jonathan

9

Malignant Lymphoma in the Parasellar Region  

PubMed Central

The entity of pituitary (sellar or parasellar) lymphoma includes primary pituitary lymphoma (PPL) and secondary pituitary lymphoma (SPL). The latter has an involvement of systemic lymphoma. Both of these lymphomas are extremely rare. We describe a patient with SPL showing a good prognosis. A 78-year-old woman presented with diplopia, left ptosis, and back pain. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a parasellar mass lesion extending to the upper clivus and another mass lesion with compression fracture of the Th3 vertebral body. Transsphenoidal exploration was performed, and it showed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Based on the positive tumor cells in the following bone marrow aspiration and hepatosplenomegaly in computed tomography (CT) findings, this patient was diagnosed as having a pituitary involvement of systemic lymphoma. After chemotherapy, she achieved complete remission for 4 years. The entity of pituitary lymphoma is extremely rare. Nineteen cases of PPL and 16 cases of SPL have been reported. Generally, clinical and radiological diagnosis was difficult because there are no specific findings. Therefore, biopsy was necessary in all of the cases. T2 hypointensity of a lesion in MR imaging in addition to an elevated serum level of soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) in a patient with a sellar lesion can be useful clues for the differential diagnosis of this rare disease. PMID:24660002

Koiso, Takao; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Shingo; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Okoshi, Yasushi; Matsumura, Akira

2014-01-01

10

Heterologous expression of a lectin from Pleurocybella porrigens (PPL) in Phanerochaete sordida YK-624.  

PubMed

Pleurocybella porrigens is a mushroom-forming fungus, which had been consumed as a traditional food in Japan. However, in 2004, 55 people got poisoned by eating the mushroom and 17 people among them died of acute encephalopathy. We have already reported the purification, characterization, and cDNA cloning of a lectin from the mushroom (PPL) which might have caused the poisoning. Here, we report the heterologous expression of recombinant PPL by basidiomycete Phanerochaete sordida YK-624. The glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter was used to drive the expression of the PPL gene (ppl) in P. sordida YK-624. Furthermore, the signal peptide of lignin peroxidase which is an extracellular protein was used to secrete rPPL into extracellular region. Fifteen regenerated clones were cultured on Kirk HNHC broth, and the presence of lectin activity in the culture broth was checked by agglutination assays. The results indicated that the culture broth of rPPL-6 clone showed the strongest hemagglutination activity, and it was therefore used for subsequent analysis. The heterologous expression of rPPL by P. sordida YK-624 was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, lectin activity by the hemagglutination assay, and mass of rPPL by MALDI-TOF respectively, indicating that the extracellular secretion of rPPL as active form was successful. PMID:24631556

Suzuki, Tomohiro; Dohra, Hideo; Omae, Saori; Takeshima, Yoshino; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Hirai, Hirofumi; Kawagishi, Hirokazu

2014-05-01

11

Pancreatic lipase selectively hydrolyses DPA over EPA and DHA due to location of double bonds in the fatty acid rather than regioselectivity.  

PubMed

The enzymatic hydrolysis of canola, anchovy and seal oils with different types and amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids was measured using porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) to establish the fatty acid selectivity of PPL. Substrates were subjected to the same conditions of hydrolysis, with percent hydrolysis monitored using Iatroscan and fatty acid selectivity monitored using gas chromatography (GC). Regardless of their distribution on the glycerol backbone, as monitored by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), ?-linolenic acid (ALA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) were rapidly cleaved by PPL while eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and stearidonic acid (STA) were hydrolysed more slowly. Results show that PPL preferentially hydrolyses ALA and DPA over EPA, DHA and STA, and this selectivity is due to fatty acid rather than regioselectivity. The primary structural factor associated with resistance to PPL appears to be the distance of the first double bond from the ester linkage being hydrolysed. PMID:24799209

Akanbi, Taiwo O; Sinclair, Andrew J; Barrow, Colin J

2014-10-01

12

77 FR 74548 - North Shore Railroad Company-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-PPL Susquehanna, LLC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35377] North Shore Railroad Company--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--PPL Susquehanna, LLC North Shore Railroad Company (North Shore), a Class III rail carrier, has filed a...

2012-12-14

13

The Discovery of the First Lithium Brown Dwarf: PPl 15  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The search for brown dwarfs (BDs) covered decades between the time they were first proposed theoretically and the time that a public announcement of the discovery of a BD was made which did not have to be recanted later (as was the case for a number of previous announcements). In a convergence of scientific progress, 1995 saw 3 real discoveries of BDs, as well as the first exoplanets. The substellar realm had suddenly opened up. This chapter describes the process that led to the first of these announcements: the identification of PPl 15 as a BD. It lay just below the substellar limit in the Pleiades cluster. To distinguish it from very similar-looking stars, the first successful application of the "lithium test" was applied by my group at UC Berkeley using the new Keck 10 m telescope and HIRES spectrograph. As part of the analysis, the new technique of "lithium dating" was developed. I place this discovery in the context of the broader search for BDs, and of the subsequent discoveries and progress in the field.

Basri, Gibor

14

Covalent immobilization of porcine pancreatic lipase on carboxyl-activated magnetic nanoparticles: characterization and application for enzymatic inhibition assays.  

PubMed

Using carboxyl functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carrier, a novel immobilized porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) was prepared through the 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. Transmission electron microscopic images showed that the synthesized nanoparticles (Fe3O4-SiO2) possessed three dimensional core-shell structures with an average diameter of ~20 nm. The effective enzyme immobilization onto the nanocomposite was confirmed by atomic force microscopic (AFM) analysis. Results from Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Bradford protein assay, and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that PPL was covalently attached to the surface of magnetic nanoparticles with a PPL immobilization yield of 50mg enzyme/g MNPs. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis revealed that the MNPs-PPL nanocomposite had a high saturation magnetization of 42.25 emu·g(-1). The properties of the immobilized PPL were investigated in comparison with the free enzyme counterpart. Enzymatic activity, reusability, thermo-stability, and storage stability of the immobilized PPL were found significantly superior to those of the free one. The Km and the Vmax values (0.02 mM, 6.40 U·mg(-1) enzyme) indicated the enhanced activity of the immobilized PPL compared to those of the free enzyme (0.29 mM, 3.16 U·mg(-1) enzyme). Furthermore, at an elevated temperature of 70 °C, immobilized PPL retained 60% of its initial activity. The PPL-MNPs nanocomposite was applied in the enzyme inhibition assays using orlistat, and two natural products isolated from oolong tea (i.e., EGCG and EGC) as the test compounds. PMID:24656379

Zhu, Yuan-Ting; Ren, Xiao-Yun; Liu, Yi-Ming; Wei, Ying; Qing, Lin-Sen; Liao, Xun

2014-05-01

15

Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2012-03-21

16

Plasmablastic lymphoma following transplantation.  

PubMed

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a serious complication following solid organ as well as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation due to prolonged immunosuppressive therapy. Plasmablastic lymphoma, although classically associated with HIV infection, has since been described in transplant patients as a variant of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder with varying clinical presentations. Here we add two additional cases to the literature: one following lung transplantation and one following pancreatic transplantation. In addition, the demographic, therapeutic, and immunophenotypic characteristics from prior reported cases are summarized. PMID:23543973

Van Vrancken, Michael J; Keglovits, Latoya; Krause, John

2013-04-01

17

77 FR 20805 - Application to Export Electric Energy; PPL EnergyPlus, LLC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...indicates that PPL EnergyPlus is a power marketer authorized by the Federal...EnergyPlus application to export electric energy to Canada should be clearly...the reliability of the U.S. electric power supply system. Copies of this...

2012-04-06

18

Pancreatic Enzymes  

MedlinePLUS

Pancreatic enzymes Ver esta página en español What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and carbohydrates. A ... into the duodenum, daily. This fluid contains pancreatic enzymes to help with digestion and bicarbonate to neutralize ...

19

PANCREATIC CANCER 14. PANCREATIC CANCER  

E-print Network

PANCREATIC CANCER 125 14. PANCREATIC CANCER 14.1. SUMMARY Pancreatic cancer was the eleventh most increase of approximately 4% per annum. The risk of developing pancreatic cancer up to the age of 74 was 1 their pancreatic cancer diagnosis. Table 14.1 Summary information for pancreatic cancer in Ireland, 1995

Paxton, Anthony T.

20

Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor ?/? and B-Cell Lymphoma-6 in Regulation of Genes Involved in Metastasis and Migration in Pancreatic Cancer Cells  

PubMed Central

PPAR?/? is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates various cellular functions via induction of target genes directly or in concert with its associated transcriptional repressor, BCL-6. Matrix remodeling proteinases are frequently over-expressed in pancreatic cancer and are involved with metastasis. The present study tested the hypothesis that PPAR?/? is expressed in human pancreatic cancer cells and that its activation could regulate MMP-9, decreasing cancer cells ability to transverse the basement membrane. In human pancreatic cancer tissue there was significantly higher expression of MMP-9 and PPAR?/?, and lower levels of BCL-6 mRNA. PPAR?/? activation reduced the TNF?-induced expression of various genes implicated in metastasis and reduced the invasion through a basement membrane in cell culture models. Through the use of short hairpin RNA inhibitors of PPAR?/?, BCL-6, and MMP-9, it was evident that PPAR?/? was responsible for the ligand-dependent effects whereas BCL-6 dissociation upon GW501516 treatment was ultimately responsible for decreasing MMP-9 expression and hence invasion activity. These results suggest that PPAR?/? plays a role in regulating pancreatic cancer cell invasion through regulation of genes via ligand-dependent release of BCL-6 and that activation of the receptor may provide an alternative therapeutic method for controlling migration and metastasis. PMID:23737761

Coleman, Jeffrey D.; Thompson, Jerry T.; Smith, Russell W.; Prokopczyk, Bogdan; Vanden Heuvel, John P.

2013-01-01

21

78 FR 77724 - PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption From the Requirement To Submit an...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption From the Requirement...constructed and operated as Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant (BBNPP), in Luzerne County...for UniStar's Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 3...

2013-12-24

22

PPL2 Translesion Polymerase Is Essential for the Completion of Chromosomal DNA Replication in the African Trypanosome  

PubMed Central

Summary Faithful copying of the genome is essential for life. In eukaryotes, a single archaeo-eukaryotic primase (AEP), DNA primase, is required for the initiation and progression of DNA replication. Here we have identified additional eukaryotic AEP-like proteins with DNA-dependent primase and/or polymerase activity. Uniquely, the genomes of trypanosomatids, a group of kinetoplastid protozoa of significant medical importance, encode two PrimPol-like (PPL) proteins. In the African trypanosome, PPL2 is a nuclear enzyme present in G2 phase cells. Following PPL2 knockdown, a cell-cycle arrest occurs after the bulk of DNA synthesis, the DNA damage response is activated, and cells fail to recover. Consistent with this phenotype, PPL2 replicates damaged DNA templates in vitro, including templates containing the UV-induced pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproduct. Furthermore, PPL2 accumulates at sites of nuclear DNA damage. Taken together, our results indicate an essential role for PPL2 in postreplication tolerance of endogenous DNA damage, thus allowing completion of genome duplication. PMID:24267450

Rudd, Sean G.; Glover, Lucy; Jozwiakowski, Stanislaw K.; Horn, David; Doherty, Aidan J.

2013-01-01

23

Software Strategies and Hardware Upgrades to the PPL Data Acquisition System (DAS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes upgrades to the Data Acquisition System for the Experimental Projects Department at PPL, especially in support of the PBX-M upgrade to be completed this year. Hardware and software maintenance problems with the old configuration, consisting of a DEC KL-10 and eight PDP-11's, are described. The real-time software and hardware performance requirements and projections for CAMAC I\\/O and

W. M. Davis; P. Roney; T. Gibney; P. Funk; M. Keller; N. Sauthoff; S. Davis; G. Bates; M. Corneliussen; H. Fishman; K. Tuttle-Frank; L. Ratzan; S. Kaye

1987-01-01

24

Cutaneous Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Cutaneous lymphomas, like other lymphomas, are systemic diseases by definition. Therefore, surgery has limited indications.\\u000a However, primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas (CBCL), such as follicle center lymphomas and large cell primary cutaneous CD30+\\u000a T-cell lymphomas, may present as a single nodule in the skin. In these cases, because investigation on tumor material is necessary,\\u000a an excision biopsy might be a good

Reinhard Dummer; Kazuhiro Kawai; Marie C. Zipser

25

Tropical Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tropical pancreatitis is a special type of chronic pancreatitis that is seen mainly in tropical countries. The prevalence of tropical pancreatitis is about 126\\/100,000 population in southern India. It occurs usually in young people, involves the main pancreatic duct and results in large ductal calculi. The etiology is not known, but genetic mutations such as the SPINK1 gene mutation and

Rakesh K. Tandon; Pramod K. Garg

2004-01-01

26

Isoamylacetate production by entrapped and covalently bound Candida rugosa and porcine pancreatic lipases.  

PubMed

Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) and porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) were immobilised by entrapping and also by covalent binding for use in synthesis of isoamyl acetate (IAAc), which has a typical banana flavour. Lipase entrapment was carried out by dripping sodium alginate (Na-Alg)-chitosan (Chi)-lipase mixture into CaCl(2)-glutaraldehyde (GAL) solution to obtain Ca-Alg/Chi(CRL/PPL). Immobilisation conditions were optimised as 1.5% Na-Alg, 1.5% chitosan and 0.15% GAL. Ca-Alg/Chi(CRL/PPL) samples showed the highest activity when they were dried upon reaching 27% of their initial weights. Covalent binding was achived with Chi modified with spacerarm via glutaraldehyde to get Chi(CRL/PPL). The highest IAAc production was observed when 1,3-diaminopropane was used as a spacer arm. The best ester yield was achieved in heptane, at 40 and 45°C reaction temperatures, 50mM IAA and 50 or 75 mM AA concentrations. The amount of IAAc was nearly 10 times higher for the batch type than for the continuous packed bed column reactor. PMID:22980809

Ozyilmaz, Gul; Ya??z, Esra

2012-12-15

27

Marginal Zone Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... are Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Lymphoma occurs when cells of the immune system ... lymphomas are a group of indolent (slow-growing) NHL B-cell lymphomas, which account for approximately 12 ...

28

Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

Saif, Muhammad Wasif

2014-01-01

29

Pancreatic abscess  

MedlinePLUS

... with pancreatic abscesses have had pancreatitis. However, the complication often takes 7 or more days to develop. Signs of an abscess can be seen on: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of the abdomen Ultrasound of the abdomen

30

Chronic pancreatitis  

MedlinePLUS

Tests for pancreatitis include: Fecal fat test Serum amylase Serum IgG4 (for diagnosing autoimmune pancreatitis) Serum lipase Serum trypsinogen Inflammation or calcium deposits of the pancreas, or changes to the ducts ...

31

[Pancreatic phlegmon].  

PubMed

Seven patients with severe pancreatic inflamation secondary to acute pancreatitis are reported. Symptoms, laboratory data and radiologia findings suggested the diagnosis of phlegmon of the pancreas. The ultrasonography of the pancreas was useful for discriminating pancreatic pseudocyst from this entity. Clinical evolution of the pancreatic phlegmon could be long, up to 4 months, but it has tendency to expontaneous resolution. Relevant clinical findings of the disease are mentioned. PMID:7403765

Segovia, E; Bautista, J; Stoopen, M

1980-01-01

32

Software strategies and hardware upgrades to the PPL data acquisition system (DAS)  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes upgrades to the Data Acquisition System for the Experimental Projects Department at PPL, especially in support of the PBX-M upgrade to be completed this year. Hardware and software maintenance problems with the old configuration, consisting of a DEC KL-10 and eight PDP-11's, are described. The real-time software and hardware performance requirements and projections for CAMAC I/O and data analysis and display are presented. Described are three applications that have realtime requirements and are located on separate processors, connected to PPPL's VAX Cluster by an Ethernet link. Building upon a previous large software base, general-purpose subroutine libraries and utilities are being emphasized. The most useful of these are described. The use of software packages from DEC, third-party vendors, and the fusion community, is also described. The new approaches to software development that are being incorporated into the DAS efforts are discussed. Specific future challenges are also described.

Davis, W.M.; Roney, P.; Gibney, T.; Funk, P.; Keller, M.; Sauthoff, N.; Davis, S.; Bates, G.; Corneliussen, M.; Fishman, H.

1987-08-01

33

Pancreatic trauma  

PubMed Central

Introduction Pancreatic trauma occurs in approximately 4% of all patients sustaining abdominal injuries. The pancreas has an intimate relationship with the major upper abdominal vessels, and there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with severe pancreatic injury. Immediate resuscitation and investigations are essential to delineate the nature of the injury, and to plan further management. If main pancreatic duct injuries are identified, specialised input from a tertiary hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) team is advised. Methods A comprehensive online literature search was performed using PubMed. Relevant articles from international journals were selected. The search terms used were: ‘pancreatic trauma’, ‘pancreatic duct injury’, ‘radiology AND pancreas injury’, ‘diagnosis of pancreatic trauma’, and ‘management AND surgery’. Articles that were not published in English were excluded. All articles used were selected on relevance to this review and read by both authors. Results Pancreatic trauma is rare and associated with injury to other upper abdominal viscera. Patients present with non-specific abdominal findings and serum amylase is of little use in diagnosis. Computed tomography is effective in diagnosing pancreatic injury but not duct disruption, which is most easily seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography or operative pancreatography. If pancreatic injury is suspected, inspection of the entire pancreas and duodenum is required to ensure full evaluation at laparotomy. The operative management of pancreatic injury depends on the grade of injury found at laparotomy. The most important prognostic factor is main duct disruption and, if found, reconstructive options should be determined by an experienced HPB surgeon. Conclusions The diagnosis of pancreatic trauma requires a high index of suspicion and detailed imaging studies. Grading pancreatic injury is important to guide operative management. The most important prognostic factor is pancreatic duct disruption and in these cases, experienced HPB surgeons should be involved. Complications following pancreatic trauma are common and the majority can be managed without further surgery. PMID:23676806

Bhattacharya, S

2013-01-01

34

What Is Pancreatic Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... How many people get pancreatic cancer? What is pancreatic cancer? To understand pancreatic cancer, it helps to know ... about these tumors, see our document Pancreatic Cancer . Pancreatic cancers Both the exocrine and endocrine cells of the ...

35

Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma  

Cancer.gov

Home Cancers Selected for Study Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Last Updated: May 15, 2013 What is pancreatic cancer?Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic cancer, making up more than

36

Autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Context: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a particular type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology, it is an entity distinct from all others forms of chronic pancreatitis, characterized by clinical, histopathological, radiographic, serologic and therapeutic features. This benign disease resembles pancreatic carcinoma both clinically and radiographically. Case Report: A 27-year-old man presented with obstructive jaundice and evocative image of pancreatic tumor. A pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple operation) was performed and pathological examination of the specimen diagnosed AIP. Patient responded well to a course of corticosteroids with resolution of clinical and biological disorders. Conclusion: Accurate and timely diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis is particularly important because steroid therapy is effective and pancreatic resection is not necessary. PMID:22361500

Hammami, Mohamed; Noomen, Faouzi; Toumi, Omar; Harzallah, Olfa; Mahmoudi, Ammar; Kallel, Wassim; Zouari, Khadija; Hamdi, Abdelaziz

2011-01-01

37

Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... are Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Lymphoma occurs when lymphocytes, a type of white ... cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a rare type of NHL, but the second or third most common subtype ...

38

Acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is most commonly caused by gallstones or chronic alcohol use, and accounts for more than 200,000 hospital admissions annually. Using the Atlanta criteria, acute pancreatitis is diagnosed when a patient presents with two of three findings, including abdominal pain suggestive of pancreatitis, serum amylase and/or lipase levels at least three times the normal level, and characteristic findings on imaging. It is important to distinguish mild from severe disease because severe pancreatitis has a mortality rate of up to 30%. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography is considered the diagnostic standard for radiologic evaluation of acute pancreatitis because of its success in predicting disease severity and prognosis. The BALI and computed tomography severity index scores also can aid in determining disease severity and predicting the likelihood of complications. Treatment begins with pain control, hydration, and bowel rest. In the first 48 to 72 hours of treatment, monitoring is required to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with worsening pancreatitis. When prolonged bowel rest is indicated, enteral nutrition is associated with lower rates of complications, including death, multiorgan failure, local complications, and systemic infections, than parenteral nutrition. In severe cases involving greater than 30% necrosis, antibiotic prophylaxis with imipenem/cilastatin decreases the risk of pancreatic infection. In gallstone-associated pancreatitis, early cholecystectomy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with sphincterotomy can decrease length of hospital stay and complication rates. A multidisciplinary approach to care is essential in cases involving pancreatic necrosis. PMID:25368923

Quinlan, Jeff D

2014-11-01

39

Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the prostate.  

PubMed

In this article, we review prostatic lymphomas and discuss the differential diagnosis of high-grade malignant neoplasms of the prostate. We illustrate this with a case of a 46-year-old man seen with lower urinary tract obstruction who had diffuse involvement by a high-grade malignancy on prostate biopsy. Morphologic evaluation and immunohistochemistry were consistent with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the prostate. Workup with positron emission tomography-computed tomography demonstrated intensely hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the mediastinum, as well as widespread osseous involvement and involvement of the pancreatic tail, prostate, and urinary bladder, suggesting secondary prostatic involvement by a nodal lymphoma. Lymphomas of the prostate are uncommon in surgical pathology practice and usually represent secondary involvement from leukemia/lymphoma at a more typical site. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma is the most common subtype. PMID:25268190

Warrick, Joshua I; Owens, Scott R; Tomlins, Scott A

2014-10-01

40

Acute Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary ?-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

Geokas, Michael C.

1972-01-01

41

Pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:15051286

Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

2011-01-01

42

pancreatic cancer  

E-print Network

Background: Recent reports indicate that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical role in malignancies. However, the role that miRNAs play in pancreatic cancer remains to be determined. The purpose of this study was to investigate aberrantly expressed miRNAs in pancreatic cancer tissues and demonstrate their roles in disease progression. Results: We detected the expression patterns of miRNAs in 10 pancreatic cancer tissues and their adjacent benign tissues by quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) and found that miR-15a and miR-214 were dysregulated in the tumor samples. This is the first time that miR-214 has been identified as aberrantly expressed in pancreatic cancer. In vitro experiments showed that overexpression of miR-15a inhibited the viability of pancreatic cancer cells, whereas overexpression of miR-214 decreased the sensitivity of the cells to gemcitabine (GEM). Furthermore, we identified WNT3A and FGF7 as potential targets of miR-15a and ING4 as a target of miR-214. Conclusions: Aberrant expression of miRNAs such as miR-15a and miR-214 results in different cellular effects in pancreatic cancer. Downregulation of miR-15a might contribute to proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells, whereas upregulation of miR-214 in pancreatic cancer specimens might be related to the poor response of pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy. MiR-15a directly targets multiple genes relevant in pancreatic cancer, suggesting that it may serve as a novel therapeutic target for treatment of the disease.

Xing J Zhang; Hua Ye; Cheng W Zeng; Hua Zhang; Yue Q Chen

43

Chronic Pancreatitis in Children  

MedlinePLUS

Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? Frequent or chronic abdominal pain is the ... pancreatitis will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are ...

44

New biofuel integrating glycerol into its composition through the use of covalent immobilized pig pancreatic lipase.  

PubMed

By using 1,3-specific Pig Pancreatic lipase (EC 3.1.1.3 or PPL), covalently immobilized on AlPO(4)/Sepiolite support as biocatalyst, a new second-generation biodiesel was obtained in the transesterification reaction of sunflower oil with ethanol and other alcohols of low molecular weight. The resulting biofuel is composed of fatty acid ethyl esters and monoglycerides (FAEE/MG) blended in a molar relation 2/1. This novel product, which integrates glycerol as monoacylglycerols (MG) into the biofuel composition, has similar physicochemical properties compared to those of conventional biodiesel and also avoids the removal step of this by-product. The biocatalyst was found to be strongly fixed to the inorganic support (75%). Nevertheless, the efficiency of the immobilized enzyme was reduced to half (49.1%) compared to that of the free PPL. The immobilized enzyme showed a remarkable stability as well as a great reusability (more than 40 successive reuses) without a significant loss of its initial catalytic activity. Immobilized and free enzymes exhibited different reaction mechanisms, according to the different results in the Arrhenius parameters (Ln A and Ea). However, the use of supported PPL was found to be very suitable for the repetitive production of biofuel due to its facile recyclability from the reaction mixture. PMID:22949849

Luna, Diego; Posadillo, Alejandro; Caballero, Verónica; Verdugo, Cristóbal; Bautista, Felipa M; Romero, Antonio A; Sancho, Enrique D; Luna, Carlos; Calero, Juan

2012-01-01

45

New Biofuel Integrating Glycerol into Its Composition Through the Use of Covalent Immobilized Pig Pancreatic Lipase  

PubMed Central

By using 1,3-specific Pig Pancreatic lipase (EC 3.1.1.3 or PPL), covalently immobilized on AlPO4/Sepiolite support as biocatalyst, a new second-generation biodiesel was obtained in the transesterification reaction of sunflower oil with ethanol and other alcohols of low molecular weight. The resulting biofuel is composed of fatty acid ethyl esters and monoglycerides (FAEE/MG) blended in a molar relation 2/1. This novel product, which integrates glycerol as monoacylglycerols (MG) into the biofuel composition, has similar physicochemical properties compared to those of conventional biodiesel and also avoids the removal step of this by-product. The biocatalyst was found to be strongly fixed to the inorganic support (75%). Nevertheless, the efficiency of the immobilized enzyme was reduced to half (49.1%) compared to that of the free PPL. The immobilized enzyme showed a remarkable stability as well as a great reusability (more than 40 successive reuses) without a significant loss of its initial catalytic activity. Immobilized and free enzymes exhibited different reaction mechanisms, according to the different results in the Arrhenius parameters (Ln A and Ea). However, the use of supported PPL was found to be very suitable for the repetitive production of biofuel due to its facile recyclability from the reaction mixture. PMID:22949849

Luna, Diego; Posadillo, Alejandro; Caballero, Veronica; Verdugo, Cristobal; Bautista, Felipa M.; Romero, Antonio A.; Sancho, Enrique D.; Luna, Carlos; Calero, Juan

2012-01-01

46

The Lymphoma Information Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Lymphoma Information Network website strives to "put a bit of humanity and understanding to this disease, to gather lymphoma information and resources in one place, and to present information in an easy to understand and logical format." The award-winning site offers information sections on Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Fighting Lymphoma, and Surviving Lymphoma. The site also offers a special resource section for kids and teenagers, and information about childhood lymphoma. In addition, the site contains an extensive Glossary of Lymphoma Terms, The Lymphoma Blog, resources for independent research, book lists, and related links.

47

Pancreatic Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for ... therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute

48

Hodgkin Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... system is working hard to filter an infection out of the body. Lymphoma is a disease in which cancer cells ... in which a doctor removes a tiny bit of tissue or fluid from the body and sends it out to a laboratory for a specialist to examine ...

49

Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Solid Tumors With Liver Dysfunction  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Extra-adrenal Paraganglioma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Hepatic Complications; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Insulinoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Male Breast Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Regional Pheochromocytoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Somatostatinoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage III Bladder Canc

2014-09-23

50

Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma l Lymphomatoid papulosis2 Aggressive clinical behavior l Sézary syndrome l Primary cutaneous ... lymphoma l Primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma Intermediate-aggressive clinical behavior l Primary cutaneous diffuse large B- ...

51

Radiology of lymphomas  

SciTech Connect

This book reviews the radiological aspects of lymphomas. The topics covered are: Classification of lymphomas as Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas; lymphomas of brain and spinal cord and the radiodiagnosis and chemotherapy; lymphomas of bones; lymph nodes of abdomen, chest and lymphomas of extranodal sites. Diagnostic techniques for lymphomas discussed are tracer techniques, computed tomography, ultrasonography and biopsy. Differential diagnosis of lymphomas from various other pathology of bone, brain and spinal cord is also discussed. Side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are also described.

Bruneton, J.N.; Schneider, M.

1986-01-01

52

Pancreatic pseudocysts.  

PubMed

Improvements in imaging studies and a better understanding of the natural history of pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs) have allowed the different types to be clarified. Stratification of PFCs into subgroups should help in selecting from the increasing current available treatment options, which include percutaneous, endoscopic and surgical drainage. Percutaneous catheter drainage is safe and effective and should be the treatment of choice in poor-risk patients, and for infected pseudocysts related to acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic drainage should be the first management option in suitable pseudocysts related to chronic pancreatitis, if the necessary expertise is available. The high success rate and current low morbidity of elective open surgery mean that it is still the standard of management in this disease. Laparoscopic approaches are gaining favour, predominantly in drainage of collections in the lesser sac, and long-term data are awaited. The precise application of this modality will need to be critically compared with the low morbidity of mini-laparotomy, which is the current standard after non-operative treatment fails in these patients. It is essential to clearly stratify the different types of pancreatic pseudocysts, in particular with relation to acute or chronic pancreatitis, and perform a valid comparison of the different treatment modalities within groups. In this capacity a precise and transparent classification may provide valuable answers, in particular relating to optimal management according to pseudocyst type. PMID:17330634

Apostolou, C; Krige, J E J; Bornman, P C

2006-11-01

53

Hodgkin lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a B cell–derived cancer, is one of the most common lymphomas. In HL, the tumor cells — Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells — are usually very rare in the tissue. Although HRS cells are derived from mature B cells, they have largely lost their B cell phenotype and show a very unusual co-expression of markers of various hematopoietic cell types. HRS cells show deregulated activation of multiple signaling pathways and transcription factors. The activation of these pathways and factors is partly mediated through interactions of HRS cells with various other types of cells in the microenvironment, but also through genetic lesions. The transforming events involved in the pathogenesis of HL are only partly understood, but mutations affecting the NF-?B and JAK/STAT pathways are frequent. The dependency of HRS cells on microenvironmental interactions and deregulated signaling pathways may offer novel strategies for targeted therapies. PMID:23023715

Kuppers, Ralf; Engert, Andreas; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

2012-01-01

54

Chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive fibroinflammatory disease that exists in large-duct (often with intraductal calculi) or small-duct form. In many patients this disease results from a complex mix of environmental (eg, alcohol, cigarettes, and occupational chemicals) and genetic factors (eg, mutation in a trypsin-controlling gene or the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator); a few patients have hereditary or autoimmune disease. Pain in the form of recurrent attacks of pancreatitis (representing paralysis of apical exocytosis in acinar cells) or constant and disabling pain is usually the main symptom. Management of the pain is mainly empirical, involving potent analgesics, duct drainage by endoscopic or surgical means, and partial or total pancreatectomy. However, steroids rapidly reduce symptoms in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis, and micronutrient therapy to correct electrophilic stress is emerging as a promising treatment in the other patients. Steatorrhoea, diabetes, local complications, and psychosocial issues associated with the disease are additional therapeutic challenges. PMID:21397320

Braganza, Joan M; Lee, Stephen H; McCloy, Rory F; McMahon, Michael J

2011-04-01

55

Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) remains a rarity despite the high incidence of tuberculosis in many of the African and Asian countries. Presentation as discrete pancreatic mass often masquerades as pancreatic neoplasm and diagnosis may require histology. Extra-hepatic portal hypertension due to splenic vein thrombosis complicating pancreatic TB has been reported in the literature. We report here a case of isolated pancreatic TB with pancreatic head mass mimicking neoplasm with extra-hepatic portal hypertension. The possibility of TB should be considered in the list of differential diagnoses of pancreatic mass and an endoscopic, ultrasound-guided biopsy might help to clinch the diagnosis of this potentially curable disease. PMID:24759351

Zacharia, George S.; Antony, Rajany; Kolassery, Sandesh; Ramachandran, Thazhath M.

2014-01-01

56

Pancreatic cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... to increase the cure rate (this is called adjuvant therapy). For pancreatic cancer that cannot be removed completely with surgery or cancer that has spread beyond the pancreas, a cure is not possible. But chemotherapy can extend one’s life.

57

Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4  

MedlinePLUS

... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 View/Download: Small: 533x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 Description: Stage IV pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

58

Pancreatic Exocrine Tumors  

MedlinePLUS

Pancreatic Exocrine Tumors More than 95% of pancreatic cancers are classified as exocrine tumors. These tumors start in the exocrine cells of the pancreas. The following table describes the most common pancreatic ...

59

Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3  

MedlinePLUS

... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

60

Triple-hit lymphoma  

PubMed Central

We report a case of a triple-hit lymphoma in a 72-year-old man. This lymphoma was diagnosed using morphology, flow cytometry, immunochemistry, and cytogenetics. Since many triple-hit lymphomas have not been documented in the literature, it is important to bring attention to this entity, as this lymphoma has different prognostic and therapeutic implications than other diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, thus making a correct and early diagnosis important. PMID:24688198

Pemmaraju, Naresh; Gill, Javed; Gupta, Saurabh

2014-01-01

61

Differentiating autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Differential diagnosis between autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) and pancreatic cancer can be very difficult. The main clinical symptoms in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis are jaundice, weight loss, abdominal pain and new onset of diabetes mellitus. Unfortunately, the same symptoms could be observed in patients with pancreatic carcinoma too. Imaging methods as computed tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endosonography (EUS); together with serological examination (IgG4 and Ca 19-9) play the important role in differentiation autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer. Extrapancreatic findings are distinctive in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. In some cases the pancreatic biopsy is indicated, mainly in patients with focal or multifocal form of autoimmune pancreatitis. Response to steroids (decreased pancreatic or extrapancreatic lesion or damage) is distinctive to AIP. In clinical practice, CT scan seems to be the most reasonable tool for examining the patients with obstructive jaundice with or without present pancreatic mass. Stratification the patients with possible AIP versus pancreatic cancer is important. In patients with AIP it may avoid pancreatic resection, as well as incorrect steroid treatment in patients with pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:25288201

Díte, P; Uvírová, M; Bojková, M; Novotný, I; Dvorácková, J; Kianicka, B; Nechutová, H; Dovrtelová, L; Floreánová, K; Martínek, A

2014-12-01

62

Grey Zone Lymphomas: Lymphomas with Intermediate Features  

PubMed Central

The current classification of lymphoid neoplasms is based on clinical information, morphology, immunophenotype, and molecular genetic characteristics. Despite technical and scientific progress, some aggressive B-cell lymphomas with features overlapping between two different types of lymphomas remain difficult to classify. The updated 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of Tumours of the Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues has addressed this problem by creation of two new provisional categories of B-cell lymphomas, unclassifiable; one with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma and the second with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma. We review here the diagnostic criteria of these two provisional entities and discuss new scientific findings in light of the 2008 WHO classification. PMID:22548066

Hoeller, Sylvia; Copie-Bergman, Christiane

2012-01-01

63

Study to Assess Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Oral CC-223 for Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Multiple Myeloma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Neuroendocrine Tumors of Non-Pancreatic Origin; Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

2013-07-17

64

Pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer remains largely an incurable disease necessitating the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-transduced T cells represents an alternative treatment with curative potential. We present an overview of the engineering of novel CARs targeting prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), implications for the development of immunotherapies, and potential strategies to circumvent on-target/off-tumor toxicities. PMID:25083334

Abate-Daga, Daniel; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

2014-01-01

65

Gallstone Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a disease of great social impact with an incidence of approximately 20\\/100,000 population per year.\\u000a The mild form, which accounts for 75–80% of cases, has virtually no mortality and benefits from simple symptomatic treatment.\\u000a In contrast, the severe form is characterized by local and systemic complications, may lead to multiorgan failure, and is\\u000a burdened by a

Matthias Kraft; Markus M. Lerch

66

Pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  Optimal therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma requires surgical removal with tumor-free margins. Superior outcomes have been\\u000a reported for high-volume centers incorporating a multidisciplinary approach. Postoperative (“adjuvant”) chemotherapy and radiation\\u000a should be considered in patients with successfully resected primary tumors. Combined modality treatment with chemotherapy\\u000a and radiation should be considered for locally advanced, unresectable tumors. Gemcitabine can provide symptom relief and

Steven J. Cohen; Wayne H. Pinover; James C. Watson; Neal J. Meropol

2000-01-01

67

Metformin induced acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis frequently presents with abdomen pain but may presents with various skin manifestations as rash and rarely, pancreatic panniculitis. Metformin, one of the most effective and valuable oral hypoglycemic agents in the biguanide class was linked to acute pancreatitis in few cases. Here, we report a case of metformin induce acute pancreatitis in young healthy man with normal renal function. PMID:24194972

Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H

2013-04-01

68

Metformin induced acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis frequently presents with abdomen pain but may presents with various skin manifestations as rash and rarely, pancreatic panniculitis. Metformin, one of the most effective and valuable oral hypoglycemic agents in the biguanide class was linked to acute pancreatitis in few cases. Here, we report a case of metformin induce acute pancreatitis in young healthy man with normal renal function. PMID:24194972

Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H.

2013-01-01

69

B-cell Lymphoma  

Cancer.gov

B-cell Lymphoma Lymphomas are cancers that arise from lymphoid cells, which are part of the immune system. The World Health Organization currently recognizes about 70 different types of lymphoma and divides them into four major groups: mature B-cell neoplasms,

70

Pegfilgrastim and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated, Relapsed, or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Marginal Zone Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2014-01-10

71

Determinants of Pancreatic Microcirculation in Acute Pancreatitis in Rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of arterial hypotension, high-volume crystalloid resuscitation, and isovolemic hemodilution on pancreatic microvascular perfusion during acute pancreatitis. Using intravital microscopy, pancreatic functional capillary density was analyzed in rats 1 and 2 hr after onset of acute pancreatitis. Pancreatic microvascular perfusion in acute pancreatitis was characterized by a (?62%) significant reduction of

Thomas Kerner; Brigitte Vollmar; Michael D. Menger; Helmut Waldner; Konrad Messmer

1996-01-01

72

Hodgkin's lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Introduction People with Hodgkin's lymphoma usually present with a lump in the neck or upper chest, but a quarter of people also have fever, sweating, weight loss, fatigue, and itch. Almost all people with localised disease can be cured, and, even among people with relapsed advanced disease, almost 80% survive event free for 4 years or more. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of: single-regimen chemotherapy treatments; combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments compared with radiotherapy alone; and combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments compared with the same chemotherapy agent alone, for first presentation stage I or II non-bulky disease? What are the effects of: specific combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy treatments versus each other; or different radiotherapy treatment strategies in stage I or II non-bulky disease? What are the effects of: single-regimen chemotherapy treatments; dose-intensified chemotherapy treatments; or combined chemotherapy plus radiotherapy treatments compared with chemotherapy alone, for first presentation stage II (bulky) disease, III, or IV disease? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 40 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: ABVD (with or without radiotherapy); ABVPP plus radiotherapy; ChlVPP-EVA; COPP-ABVD plus radiotherapy; CVPP plus radiotherapy; EBVP plus radiotherapy; escalating-dose BEACOPP; extended-field radiotherapy; increased-dose regimens; involved-field radiotherapy; MOPP (with or without radiotherapy); MOPP-ABV plus radiotherapy; and VBM plus radiotherapy. PMID:21726488

2009-01-01

73

Pancreatic pseudocysts and aneurysms  

PubMed Central

A number of methods are available for the drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts, including percutaneous, endoscopic and open approaches. The author reviewed the most rently reports, and and summarized the latest advances in the pancreatic pseudocysts. PMID:22558566

Andren-Sandberg, Ake

2010-01-01

74

Laparoscopic pancreatic necrosectomy.  

PubMed

We describe a patient with infected pancreatic necrosis who was treated successfully with minimally invasive surgery. Five weeks after an episode of acute uncomplicated pancreatitis, he was found to have infected pancreatic necrosis and splenic vein thrombosis. The patient underwent a laparoscopic pancreatic necrosectomy, splenectomy, and cholecystectomy. Seven days after surgery, the patient was discharged and continued to be asymptomatic for the 6 months of follow-up. PMID:10794217

Hamad, G G; Broderick, T J

2000-04-01

75

Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.  

PubMed

Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pancreatic NETs) are rare, low- to intermediate-grade neoplasms thought to arise from the pancreatic islets. Recent advances in pathology and our understanding of the biological behavior of this group of tumors has resulted in changes in their nomenclature and how we treat them. This review puts into perspective our current understanding of pancreatic NETs in terms of their incidence, pathology, and management. PMID:23054950

Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Sirohi, Bhawna; Goel, Mahesh; Barreto, Savio G

2013-01-01

76

Autoimmune pancreatitis: A review  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune pancreatitis has emerged over the last 40 years from a proposed concept to a well established and recognized entity. As an efficient mimicker of pancreatic carcinoma, its early and appropriate recognition are crucial. With mounting understanding of its pathogenesis and natural history, significant advances have been made in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. The characteristic laboratory features and imaging seen in autoimmune pancreatitis are reviewed along with some of the proposed diagnostic criteria and treatment algorithms. PMID:18081220

Zandieh, Iman; Byrne, Michael F

2007-01-01

77

[Chronic pancreatitis with pseudocysts?].  

PubMed

The gross examination of cystic changes in chronic pancreatitis can cause diagnostic problems particularly in the absence of grossly detectable tumor tissue. Besides the more frequently encountered pancreatitis-associated pseudocysts, pancreatic cysts should always raise attention to the differential diagnosis of a true neoplastic process. PMID:23380876

Veits, L; Vieth, M; Agaimy, A

2013-05-01

78

Classification of pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An international group of doctors interested in pancreatic disease met in Cambridge in March 1983, under the auspices of the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, to discuss the classification of pancreatitis in the light of developments that have taken place in the 20 years since the crucial conference in Marseille.

M Sarner; P B Cotton

1984-01-01

79

Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma  

Cancer.gov

Because pancreatic cancer is often diagnosed at a late stage, surgical removal of the tumor or the organ is often difficult, if not impossible. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, or PDAC, is by far the most common type of pancreatic malignancy. PDAC is distinct from other cancers due to the biological barrier the tumor builds around itself.

80

Lymphoma in the breast  

PubMed Central

Lymphoma is a rare neoplasm in the breast. In this location, it may be primary or secondary, depending on whether there is lymphoma elsewhere in the body. The most common presentation of breast lymphoma is a painless palpable mass, indistinguishable from that of breast carcinoma, although the treatment regimens for these two neoplasms differ vastly. Knowledge of the varied mammographic and sonographic presentations of breast lymphoma should prompt more frequent recognition of this unusual malignant entity. Proper diagnosis of this neoplasm is of the utmost importance to guide appropriate treatment planning and prevent unnecessary and potentially harmful surgery. We describe secondary breast lymphoma in a woman who had been diagnosed and treated for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma several years earlier. PMID:23543971

Wang, Jean C.; Gill, Javed I.

2013-01-01

81

Hodgkin lymphoma.  

PubMed

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a curable malignancy which shows a bimodal curve in incidence in economically developed countries; there is a putative association with Epstein-Barr virus. The WHO 2008 classification schema recognises two histological types of HL: the nodular lymphocyte predominant and the "classic" HL. The latter encompasses four entities: nodular sclerosis, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte depletion, and lymphocyte-rich. Most patients with HL present with asymptomatic superficial lymphadenopathy. The commonest sites of disease are the cervical, supraclavicular and mediastinal lymph nodes, while sub-diaphragmatic presentations and bone marrow and hepatic involvement are less common. Splenic involvement is usually concomitant with hepatic disease and systemic symptoms; extranodal presentations are quite rare. Systemic symptoms are present in ?35% of cases. The stage of disease is defined according to the Ann Arbor staging system or its Cotswolds variant, and staging work-up includes physical examination, chest X-rays, chest and abdominal CT scan, and bone marrow biopsy. (18)FDG-PET ((18)fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) plays a central role in staging, response assessment and prognosis definition. Classic HL usually spreads by contiguity within the lymphatic tissue network, with a late extension to adjacent and distant viscera. Mortality from HL has been progressively decreasing, as confirmed by the most recent 5-year survival figure of 81%. The list of putative prognostic factors in HL has been increasing, but most factors still require prospective validation. Some of these variables are used to stratify early-stage disease into "favourable" and "unfavourable" categories, with "unfavourable early-stage" being intermediate between "favourable early-stage" and "advanced-stage". ABVD (adriamycin(doxorubicin), bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) combination chemotherapy followed by involved-field irradiation is the standard treatment for patients with early-stage HL, with a 5-year OS >95%. Several trials assessing less intensive approaches for patients with favourable early-stage HL are ongoing. More intensified combinations, such as the BEACOPP (bleomycin, etoposide, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine (Oncovin), procarbazine, prednisone) regimen, are being investigated, usually in patients with unfavourable early-stage HL and interim PET+. ABVD is the standard chemotherapy treatment also for patients with advanced disease. Although some evidence suggests that more intensive combinations provide better disease control, the inevitable increased risk of relevant late toxicity worries investigators. Consequently, there has been a shift towards investigating the innovative strategy of a more aggressive schedule for patients with (18)FDG-PET positive results after the first 2 courses of ABVD. High-dose chemotherapy supported by ASCT (autologous stem cell transplantation) is considered the standard of care in patients with HL which has relapsed after, or is refractory to conventional chemoradiotherapy, while allogeneic transplant is a suitable tool for patients with chemorefractory disease and patients failed after ASCT. PMID:22867814

Gobbi, Paolo G; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Levis, Alessandro

2013-02-01

82

Primary Adrenal Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Primary non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the adrenal gland is rare. We report the case of a 56-year-old patient suffering from B symptoms. The CT scan showed a bilateral adrenal mass without any lymph nodes. Scan-guided biopsies led to the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The medullar biopsy eliminated a secondary lymphoma. The patient was treated by immunochemotherapy with a complete response before autologous stem cell transplantation. PMID:25035679

Kacem, Karima; Zriba, Sami; Lakhal, Raihane Ben; Bouteraa, Walid; Aissaoui, Lamia; Amor, Ramzi Ben; Abdennebi, Yosr Ben; Ali, Zaher Belhadj; Abid, Hela Ben; Meddeb, Balkis

2014-01-01

83

Pancreatic tuberculosis with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: A case report and systematic review  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is a relatively rare disease that can mimic carcinoma, lymphoma, cystic neoplasia, retroperitoneal tumors, pancreatitis or pseudocysts. Here, I report the case of a 31-year-old immigrant Burmese woman who exhibited epigastralgia, fever, weight loss and an epigastric mass. The patient was diagnosed with pancreatic TB and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and was treated with antituberculous drugs and percutaneous catheter drainage without a laparotomy. The clinical presentation, radiographic investigation and management of pancreatic TB are summarized in this paper to emphasize the importance of considering this rare disease in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic masses concomitant with human immunodeficiency virus infection. I also emphasize the need for both histopathological and microbiological diagnosis via fine-needle aspiration. PMID:22363146

Meesiri, Somchai

2012-01-01

84

Biology of pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of death from malignant disease in Western society. Apart from the fortunate few patients who present with a resectable small pancreatic adenocarcinoma, conventional treatment offers no hope of cure and has little palliative value. Over the past two decades major steps have been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic growth and neoplasia. This review sets out to explore these advances, firstly in the regulation of normal pancreatic growth, and secondly the mechanism which may be involved in malignant change of the exocrine pancreas. From an understanding of this new biology, new treatment strategies may be possible for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:1855689

Poston, G J; Gillespie, J; Guillou, P J

1991-01-01

85

Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

Li, Donghui

2011-01-01

86

Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma Overview Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The two main forms of lymphoma are ... develop into lymphomas: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells). Cancerous lymphocytes can travel to ...

87

Imaging of primary gastrointestinal lymphoma.  

PubMed

Primary gastrointestinal (GI) lymphoma most often arises from stomach, small bowel, or colon. The 2 most common subtypes of primary GI lymphoma include low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori infection, and high-grade diffuse, large B-cell lymphoma. Primary GI lymphoma demonstrates a myriad of imaging manifestations that can commonly mimic other pathologies. Timely and accurate diagnosis remains important because treatment and prognosis of primary GI lymphoma differ significantly from other GI malignancies and even lymphoma of other primary sites. PMID:24332207

Chang, Stephanie T; Menias, Christine O

2013-12-01

88

Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B  

MedlinePLUS

... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; illustration ...

89

Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A  

MedlinePLUS

... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

90

Acute Pancreatitis (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... hospitalization for at least a few days. (See "Management of acute pancreatitis" .) Mild pancreatitis — Mild pancreatitis usually resolves with simple supportive care, which entails monitoring, drugs to control pain, and intravenous fluids. You may not be allowed ...

91

Smoking and Pancreatic Disease  

PubMed Central

Smoking is a major risk factor for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanisms through which it causes the diseases remain unknown. In the present manuscript we reviewed the latest knowledge gained on the effect of cigarette smoke and smoking compounds on cell signaling pathways mediating both diseases. We also reviewed the effect of smoking on the pancreatic cell microenvironment including inflammatory cells and stellate cells. PMID:24660091

Edderkaoui, Mouad; Thrower, Edwin

2014-01-01

92

Genetic Susceptibility to Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Genetic susceptibility studies of lymphoma may serve to identify at risk populations and to elucidate important disease mechanisms. METHODS This review considered all studies published through October 2006 on the contribution of genetic polymorphisms in the risk of lymphoma. RESULTS Numerous studies implicate the role of genetic variants that promote B-cell survival and growth with increased risk of lymphoma. Several reports including a large pooled study by InterLymph, an international consortium of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) case-control studies, found positive associations between variant alleles in TNF -308G>A and IL10 -3575T>A genes and risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Four studies reported positive associations between a GSTT1 deletion and risk of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Genetic studies of folate-metabolizing genes implicate folate in NHL risk, but further studies that include folate and alcohol assessments are needed. Links between NHL and genes involved in energy regulation and hormone production and metabolism may provide insights into novel mechanisms implicating neuro- and endocrine-immune cross-talk with lymphomagenesis, but will need replication in larger populations. CONCLUSIONS Numerous studies suggest that common genetic variants with low penetrance influence lymphoma risk, though replication studies will be needed to eliminate false positive associations. PMID:17606447

Skibola, Christine F.; Curry, John D.; Nieters, Alexandra

2010-01-01

93

Pancreatic-duct reflux and acute gallstone pancreatitis.  

PubMed Central

A consecutive series of 614 operative cholangiograms was studied prospectively to determine the relationship of pancreatic-duct reflux to a previous history of acute gallstone pancreatitis. Of 53 patients who had previously had pancreatitis, 33 had pancreatic-duct reflux on their cholangiogram (62.3%), whereas, of 561 patients with no history of pancreatic disease, pancreatic-duct reflux was seen in only 82 (14.6%). In patients with a history of pancreatitis, reflux occurred into a wider pancreatic duct, at a greater angle between the bile and pancreatic ducts, and was associated with a longer functioning common channel. The wider cystic duct, wider common bile duct, and multiple small stones seen in patients with previous pancreatitis and pancreatic-duct reflux were suggestive of gallstone migration being associated with reflux. There was no correlation between pancreatic-duct reflux and the presence of choledochal calculi. Two patients developed recurrent severe pancreatitis after pancreatic-duct reflux of infected bile. Patients with gallstone pancreatitis appear to have an increased tendency for pancreatic-duct reflux that is mechanically facilitated by differences in the choledocho-pancreatic duct anatomy. Images FIG. 2. FIG. 3. FIG. 4. PMID:3729584

Armstrong, C P; Taylor, T V

1986-01-01

94

Epidemiologic overview of malignant lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Malignant lymphoma encompasses a wide variety of distinct disease entities. It is generally more common in developed countries and less common in developing countries. The East Asia region has one of the lowest incidence rates of malignant lymphoma. The incidence of malignant lymphoma around the world has been increasing at a rate of 3-4% over the last 4 decades, while some stabilization has been observed in developed countries in recent years. The reasons behind this lymphoma epidemic are poorly understood, although improving diagnostic accuracy, the recent AIDS epidemic, an aging world population and the increasing adoption of cancer-causing behaviors are suggested as contributing factors. Etiologies of malignant lymphoma include infectious agents, immunodeficiency, autoimmune disease, exposure to certain organic chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. The distribution of many subtypes exhibit marked geographic variations. Compared to the West, T/natural killer (NK) cell lymphomas (T/NK-cell lymphoma) and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) are relatively more common, whereas other B-cell lymphomas, particularly follicular lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, are less common in Asia. Some subtypes of T/NK-cell lymphomas defined by Epstein-Barr virus association are predominantly Asian diseases, if not exclusively so. Both ethnic and environmental factors play roles in such diversity. In this review, we discuss the geographic distribution and etiology of malignant lymphoma, as well as the trend. PMID:22783355

2012-01-01

95

Pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & Aims: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) maintains a computerized file of all hospital discharges since 1970. In taking advantage of this large database, the present study aimed to determine whether pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Methods: A case control study compared the occurrence of pancreatitis in 2639 patients with pancreatic cancer and a matched

Pradeep Bansal; Amnon Sonnenberg

1995-01-01

96

Lymphoma Coding Guidelines  

Cancer.gov

Coding Guidelines LYMPHOMA M9590/3-M9738/3 See the Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Neoplasm Case Reportability and Coding Manual and the Hematopoietic Database (DB) for more information and coding instructions. First Course of Therapy Do not code

97

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... it originates from, and whether there are certain DNA changes in the tumor cells themselves. ... Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment. Bethesda, Md: National Cancer Institute. Date last modified Feb. 28, 2014. Available at http://www.cancer. ...

98

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... trouble breathing and was coughing a lot during football practice. He also started having fever without knowing ... and other issues. This is called the medical history . If your family doctor suspects non-Hodgkin lymphoma, ...

99

International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium  

Cancer.gov

The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Formed in 2001, the Consortium is a group of international investigators who have completed or have ongoing case-control studies and who discuss and undertake research projects that pool data across studies or otherwise undertake collaborative research.

100

Targeted therapy in lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discovery of new treatments for lymphoma that prolong survival and are less toxic than currently available agents represents an urgent unmet need. We now have a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of lymphoma, such as aberrant signal transduction pathways, which have led to the discovery and development of targeted therapeutics. The ubiquitin-proteasome and the Akt\\/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)

Patrick B Johnston; RuiRong Yuan; Franco Cavalli; Thomas E Witzig

2010-01-01

101

Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation  

PubMed Central

An unusual case of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (P-AVM) combined with esophageal cancer is reported. A 59-year-old man was admitted with upper abdominal pain. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed numerous strongly enhanced abnormal vessels and a hypovascular lesion in the area of the pancreatic tail. Angiographic study of the celiac artery confirmed racemose vascular networks in the tail of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography revealed narrowing and displacement of the main pancreatic duct in the tail of the pancreas. Screening esophagoscopy showed a 0-IIa+IIc type tumor in the lower thoracic esophagus. Histological examination of esophagoscopic biopsies showed squamous cell carcinoma. Based on these findings, P-AVM or pancreatic cancer and esophageal cancer were diagnosed. Video-assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy and distal pancreatectomy were performed. Histological examination of the resected pancreas revealed abundant abnormal vessels with intravascular thrombi. In addition, rupture of a dilated pancreatic duct with pancreatic stones and both severe atrophy and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma were observed. The final diagnoses were P-AVM consequent to severe chronic pancreatitis and esophageal carcinoma. The patient's postoperative course was relatively good. PMID:24574946

Yamabuki, Takumi; Ohara, Masanori; Kimura, Noriko; Okamura, Kunishige; Kuroda, Aki; Takahashi, Ryo; Komuro, Kazuteru; Iwashiro, Nozomu

2014-01-01

102

Endocrine, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors  

MedlinePLUS

... 7am-5pm Pacific Time. Information provided by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, Inc. (“PanCAN”) is not a substitute ... products, services, clinical trials or treatments related to pancreatic cancer, but PanCAN does not recommend nor endorse any ...

103

Pathobiology of Alcoholic Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides a summary of the effects of alcohol abuse on the pathobiologic responses that occur during acute and chronic pancreatitis considering both the human disease and animal\\/tissue models. The effects are multiple and include ones on cell death leading to necrosis; on inflammation resulting in a sensitized response to pancreatic stress; and fibrosis through effects of ethanol on

Stephen J. Pandol; Michael Raraty

2007-01-01

104

Pancreatitis in cats.  

PubMed

Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids. PMID:23148855

Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

2012-08-01

105

Pathophysiology of Retinal Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Retinal lymphoma, the most common form of intraocular lymphoma, is a high-grade malignancy, usually of B-cell type, and is associated with a poor prognosis because of frequent central nervous system (CNS) involvement. The neoplastic B-cells of retinal lymphoma have a characteristic morphology and immunophenotype, express certain chemokines and chemokine receptors, and produce interleukins (IL), e.g. IL-10. Together with the cytological features of these tumors, the immunophenotype, presence of immunoglobulin rearrangements, and biochemical profile aid the diagnosis of retinal lymphomas. Immunophenotyping and somatic mutation analysis suggest derivation of most retinal lymphomas from an early post-germinal centre B-cell. Chromosomal translocation data would suggest, however, that a subgroup of these neoplasms may arise from germinal centre B-cells, and these could be associated with a better prognosis. Further investigations, such as gene expression profiling, are required to identify oncogenic pathways potentially involved in retinal lymphoma development, and to identify new prognostic/therapeutic markers for this tumor. PMID:19657975

Coupland, Sarah E.; Chan, Chi Chao; Smith, Justine

2009-01-01

106

Chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

An observational cross-sectional study of 50 cases of chronic calcific pancreatitis patients was conducted in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and some other tertiary level hospitals of Dhaka city from August 2008 to July 2010. Patients required laparotomy for different modalities of surgical treatment to manage chronic calcific pancreatitis were included in the study. Biopsy was taken from panceatic duct containing stone during laparotomy to determine the histopathological changes. Among 50 cases female predominance was observed. Male, female ratio was 2:3. Majority (62%) patients were in 20 to 40 years age group. Female presented earlier than male (20-30 years and 30-40 years respectively). All patients complained recurrent attack of epigastric pain. Other presentations were diabetes (74%), malnutrition and weight loss (56%), steatorrhoea (24%) and jaundice (12%). Adenocarcinoma was found in 3(6%) patients (2 male and 1 female) and rests were chronic pancreatitis. Several studies showed the association between chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Further large scale study is required to find out the national incidence level. PMID:25178600

Billah, M M; Chowdhury, M M; Das, B C; Shampa, N N; Khan, Z R

2014-07-01

107

Familial Risk of Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Al- though smoking and age are known risk factors for pancreatic cancer, sev- eral case reports and case-control stud- ies have suggested that there is also a familial risk. We evaluated whether a family history of pancreatic cancer increases the risk of pancreatic cancer in

Maryjean Schenk; Ann G. Schwartz; Erica O'Neal; Margaret Kinnard; Joel K. Greenson; Jon P. Fryzek; Gui Shuang Ying; David H. Garabrant

108

Pancreatic cancer...107 Chapter 10  

E-print Network

NICR/NCRI Pancreatic cancer...107 Chapter 10: Pancreatic cancer (C25) KEY FINDINGS - INCIDENCE. #12;Cancer in Ireland 1994-2004: A comprehensive report 108...Pancreatic cancer 10.1: Incidence Pancreatic cancer made up 2.4% of all male and 2.6% of all female cancers (excluding NMSC) in Ireland during

Paxton, Anthony T.

109

Review of idiopathic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins, autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted. PMID:18081217

Lee, Jason Kihyuk; Enns, Robert

2007-01-01

110

Outcome differences after endoscopic drainage of pancreatic necrosis, acute pancreatic pseudocysts, and chronic pancreatic pseudocysts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Comparative outcomes after endoscopic drainage of specific types of symptomatic pancreatic fluid collections, defined by using standardized nomenclature, have not been described. This study sought to determine outcome differences after attempted endoscopic drainage of pancreatic fluid collections classified as pancreatic necrosis, acute pseudocyst, and chronic pseudocyst. Methods: Outcomes were retrospectively analyzed for consecutive patients with symptoms caused by pancreatic

Todd H. Baron; Gavin C. Harewood; Desiree E. Morgan; Munford Radford Yates

2002-01-01

111

NON-HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA 8. NON-HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA  

E-print Network

NON-HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA 65 8. NON-HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA 8.1. SUMMARY Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL lymphocytes. NHL was the fifth most common cancer in Ireland, accounting for 3.4% of all malignant neoplasms diagnosed increased by approximately 3% per annum overall. The risk of developing NHL up to the age of 74

Paxton, Anthony T.

112

Molecular Pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma  

E-print Network

lymphoma appears to arise from acquired MALT, commonly due to chronic immunological stimulation, resulting either from pathogen infection or autoimmune disorders (Du, 2007) . Patients generally present with MALT lymphoma at stages I or II. The average... respond well to therapy and have a good overall prognosis (Fischbach et al. , 2007). 1 .2 .1 Aetiology of MALT lymphoma As mentioned in section 1.2, pathogen infection and autoimmune disorders play a major role in the development of MALT lymphoma...

Hamoudi, Rifat A

2010-01-01

113

Drug induced pancreatitis.  

PubMed

525 different drugs that can, as an adverse reaction, induce acute pancreatitis are listed in a WHO database. Compared to other causes drugs represent a relatively rare cause of pancreatitis. They should be considered as a triggering event in patients with no other identifiable cause of the disease, who takes medications that have been shown to induce pancreatitis. The prevalence of drug-induced pancreatitis is still unclear because most incidences have been documented only as isolated case reports. The overall incidence probably ranges from between 0.1 and 2% of pancreatitis cases. For only very few substances evidence from controlled trials has been obtained. Epidemiologic data suggest the risk of pancreatitis is highest for mesalazine (HR 3.5,) azathioprine (HR 2,5) and simvastatine (HR 1,8). Even when a definite association has been demonstrated it is often impossible to determine whether the drug, or the underlying condition for which the drug was taken has conferred the risk of pancreatitis (e.g. azathioprine and Crohns disease or pentamidine and HIV). Knowledge about the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms as well as evidence for a direct causality often remains sparse. For only 31 drugs a definite causality has been established. The most frequently reported are mesalazine (nine cases in total, three cases with re-exposure), azathioprine (five cases in total, two cases with re-exposure) and simvastatin (one case in total, this one with re-exposure). As cause-effect relationship is generally accepted when symptoms re-occur upon re-challenge. Available data from case control studies suggest that even drugs with solid evidence for an association with pancreatitis only rarely cause the disease. Even when pancreatitis is induced as an adverse drug event the disease course is usually mild or even subclinical. PMID:20227028

Nitsche, Claudia J; Jamieson, Nigel; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia V

2010-04-01

114

Researchers Identify Early Sign of Pancreatic Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... of pancreatic cancer Researchers identify early sign of pancreatic cancer September 28, 2014 Tags: PancreaticCancer Brian Wolpin, MD ... discovered a sign of the early development of pancreatic cancer – an upsurge in certain amino acids that occurs ...

115

Molecular Profiling of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma and Chronic Pancreatitis Identifies Multiple Genes Differentially Regulated in Pancreatic Cancer 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The molecular basis of pancreatic cancer is not understood. Previous attempts to determine the specific genes expressed in pancreatic cancer have been hampered by similarities between adenocarcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. In the current study, microarrays (Affymetrix) were used to profile gene expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (10), pancreatic cancer cell lines (7), chronic pancreatitis (5), and normal pancreas (5). Molecular profiling

Craig D. Logsdon; Diane M. Simeone; Charles Binkley; Thiruvengadam Arumugam; Joel K. Greenson; Thomas J. Giordano; David E. Misek; Samir Hanash

2003-01-01

116

Histone deacetylase inhibitors and pancreatic cancer: Are there any promising clinical trials?  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer, although not very frequent, has an exceptionally high mortality rate, making it one of the most common causes of cancer mortality in developed countries. Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose, allowing few patients to have the necessary treatment at a relatively early stage. Despite a marginal benefit in survival, the overall response of pancreatic cancer to current systemic therapy continues to be poor, and new therapies are desperately needed. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymes play an important role in the development and progression of cancer and HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) have been shown to induce differentiation and cell cycle arrest, activate the extrinsic or intrinsic pathways of apoptosis, and inhibit invasion, migration and angiogenesis in different cancer cell lines. As a result of promising preclinical data, various HDACIs are being tested as either monotherapeutic agents or in combination regimens for both solid and hematological malignancies. Vorinostat was the first HDACI approved by the Food and Drug Administration for patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The use of HDACIs in clinical trials, in pretreated and relapsed patients suffering from advanced pancreatic cancer is discussed. Unfortunately, clinical data for HDACIs in patients with pancreatic cancer are inadequate, because only a few studies have included patients suffering from this type of neoplasm and the number of pancreatic cancer patients that entered HDACIs phase II/III trials, among others with advanced solid tumors, is very limited. More studies recruiting patients with pancreatic cancer remain to determine the efficiency of these therapies. PMID:23482354

Koutsounas, Ioannis; Giaginis, Constantinos; Theocharis, Stamatios

2013-01-01

117

Pancreatic fistula and postoperative pancreatitis after pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

The most serious complication after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) is pancreatic fistula (PF) type C, either as a consequence or independently from postoperative pancreatitis (PP). Differentiating between these two types of complications is often very difficult, if not impossible. The most significant factor in early diagnosis of PP after PD is an abrupt change in clinical status. In our retrospective study we also observed significantly higher levels of serum concentrations of CRP and AMS comparing to PF without PP. Based on our findings, CT scan is not beneficial in the early diagnosis of PP. Meantime PF type C is indication to operative revision with mostly drainage procedure which is obviously not much technically demanding, there are no definite guidelines on how to proceed in PP. Therefore the surgeon’s experience determines not only whether PP will be diagnosed early enough and will be differentiated from PF without PP, but also whether a completion pancreatectomy will be performed in indicated cases. PMID:25392838

Rudis, Jan

2014-01-01

118

Primary gastric mantle cell lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Mantle cell lymphoma represents 2.5–7% all of non Hodgkin's lymphomas. Stomach is the most common site of extranodal lymphoma. However, that is not the case with mantle cell lymphoma, which is extremely rare. We present a case of 71-year-old woman admitted to the Internal Clinic of the University Clinical Hospital Center Rijeka, because of stomach discomfort and melena. Endoscopy and computed tomography revealed a polyp in gastric antrum. Histopathologic, immunohistochemic and genetic methods were also performed and the results were consistent with primary gastric mantle cell lymphoma without periepigastric and/or local or distant abdominal lymph node involvement. PMID:22567215

Petranovic, Duska; Pilcic, Gorazd; Peitl, Milena; Cubranic, Aleksandar; Valkovic, Toni; Nacinovic, Antica Duletic; Lucin, Ksenija; Jonjic, Nives

2012-01-01

119

Management of pancreatic fistulas.  

PubMed

The management of pancreatic fistulas can be complex and mandates a multidisciplinary approach. Basic principles of fistula control/patient stabilization, delineation of ductal anatomy, and definitive therapy remain of paramount importance. PMID:23632147

Blatnik, Jeffrey A; Hardacre, Jeffrey M

2013-06-01

120

Pancreatitis - series (image)  

MedlinePLUS

... that is most commonly caused by either alcohol toxicity or gallstones. Gallstones can lodge in the common ... pancreas into the intestine. Pancreatitis due to alcohol toxicity is most often seen in chronic alcoholic patients. ...

121

Update on gastric lymphoma.  

PubMed Central

Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is an uncommon entity that can often present like classic adenocarcinoma. The most common organ site involved is the stomach. Important prognostic indicators include location of lymph node involvement, histologic subtype, lymphocyte lineage, gross size, and location of the tumor. Surgical resection is the mainstay of curative therapy. Combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy may have a role either separately or as part of a multimodality treatment program. Clinicians are encouraged to enter patients with primary gastric lymphoma into multi-institutional, cooperative group clinical trials to more clearly define the best treatment strategy. PMID:1956083

Thomas, C. R.

1991-01-01

122

Radiation therapy for orbital lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To describe radiation techniques and evaluate outcomes for orbital lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients (and 62 eyes) with orbital lymphoma treated with radiotherapy between 1987 and 2003 were included. The majority had mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (48%) or follicular (30%) lymphoma. Seventeen patients had prior lymphoma at other sites, and 29 had primary orbital lymphoma. Median follow-up was 46 months. Results: The median dose was 30.6 Gy; one-third received <30 Gy. Electrons were used in 9 eyes with disease confined to the conjunctiva or eyelid, and photons in 53 eyes with involvement of intraorbital tissues to cover entire orbit. Local control rate was 98% for all patients and 100% for those with indolent lymphoma. Three of the 26 patients with localized primary lymphoma failed distantly, resulting in a 5-year freedom-from-distant-relapse rate of 89%. The 5-year disease-specific and overall survival rates were 95% and 88%, respectively. Late toxicity was mainly cataract formation in patients who received radiation without lens block. Conclusions A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for indolent orbital lymphoma. Distant relapse rate in patients with localized orbital lymphoma was lower than that reported for low-grade lymphoma presenting in other sites. Orbital radiotherapy can be used for salvage of recurrent indolent lymphoma.

Zhou Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: pzhou@partners.org; Ng, Andrea K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Silver, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Li Sigui [Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Hua Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mauch, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2005-11-01

123

Lipodystrophy, pancreatitis, and eosinophilia.  

PubMed Central

Two patients suffering from partial lipodystrophy, pancreatitis, and recurrent eosinophilia are described. In one patient the duodenum and the terminal ileum were narrowed, the appearances suggesting eosinophilic gastroenteritis: bilateral hydronephrosis was also present without ureteric obstruction. An association between lipodystrophy and renal disease is recognized; it is possible that there is also an association between lipodystrophy and pancreatitis, and eosinophilia with or without an intestinal lesion may be a further association. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 PMID:1123178

Smith, P M; Morgans, M E; Clark, C G; Lennard-Jones, J E; Gunnlaugsson, O; Jonasson, T A

1975-01-01

124

Arsenic-Induced Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide has brought about tremendous advancement in the treatment of acute promyelocytic myelogenous leukemia (APML). In most instances, the benefits of these treatments outweigh the risks associated with their respective safety profiles. Although acute pancreatitis is not commonly associated with arsenic toxicity, it should be considered as a possible side effect. We report a case of arsenic-induced pancreatitis in a patient with APML. PMID:22606427

Connelly, Sean; Zancosky, Krysia; Farah, Katie

2011-01-01

125

Imaging after pancreatic surgery.  

PubMed

Pancreatic surgery, until the Whipple era in the early 1900s, was once regarded as calamitous by most surgeons. With advances in surgical techniques, operative mortality has been greatly reduced, although morbidity remains a significant problem. Knowledge of the surgical options for treatment of pancreatic neoplastic and inflammatory disease is important for the practicing radiologist, to anticipate and identify complications commonly sought and well depicted with imaging. PMID:22560696

Morgan, Desiree E

2012-05-01

126

Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-09-02

127

[Diabetogenic tropical pancreatitis].  

PubMed

The tropical calcifying pancreatitis and/or fibrous pancreatitis are responsible for a number of cases of juvenile insulin-dependent diabetes in the Third World countries. World wide distributed in the tropical areas of Asia, Africa and South America, they can also be observed in Europe, in migrants from these countries. Intensive epidemiological and biochemical studies are currently developed in order to shed light on the many obscure points. Classification of the typical calcifying pancreatitis and the related syndromes is a matter of debate. The pathological basis is calcification of the pancreas and echography of the gland may become a cheap convenient relatively specific tool for epidemiology. The clinical syndrome consists of chronic painful pancreatic episodes since childhood, associated with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, followed by the onset, during adolescence, of diabetes mellitus, which is most of the times insulin dependent. Patients' history is free of chronic alcoholism, but includes constantly chronic caloric and proteic malnutrition. Although insulin dependent this diabetes in not prone to ketosis, due presumably to carnitine deficiency and relative glucagon deficiency (or suppressibility). Insulin resistance is traditionally noted, the pathophysiology of which is unknown. The mechanism of calcification appearance is also undetermined. Either a deficiency in pancreatic stone protein, or the toxic effect of cyanogen glucosides present in cassava and other tropical foodstuffs, or the malnutrition-related deficiency in sulphur-containing aminoacids may be causal factors. No valid experimental model of the disease is available. PMID:3044866

Assan, R; Assan, D; Thiebaut, M F; Laloux, S; Clauser, E; Boukersi, A

1988-01-01

128

Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed to be involved in the underlying immune reaction. IgG4 antibodies have two unique biological functions, Fab-arm exchange and a rheumatoid factor-like activity, both of which may play immune-defensive roles. However, the exact role of IgG4 in this disease still remains to be clarified. It seems important to recognize this unique entity given that the disease is treatable with steroids. PMID:22151922

2011-01-01

129

Immunohistochemical Profiling of Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter covers the technique of immunostaining for the characterization of lymphoma and hematopoietic tumors in tissues.\\u000a The range of markers that may be diagnostically useful is discussed, as are the methodologic issues related to new marker\\u000a identification, reagent validation, standardization and quantitation of staining levels.

Matthew W. Anderson; Yasodha Natkunam

130

Overexpression of Hepatic Pancreatic Polypeptide Receptors in Chronic Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) receptors have recently been demonstrated on liver microsomal membranes although the mechanisms of PP action on hepatocytes remain uncertain. The binding characteristics of these high affinity receptors under pathophysiologic conditions were studied in rats with oleic acid-induced chronic pancreatitis (CP), a state associated with diminished pancreatic PP content. Sixteen pancreatitic and 11 sham-operated control animals either were

Neal E. Seymour; Seth A. Spector; Dana K. Andersen; Mary S. Elm; David C. Whitcomb

1998-01-01

131

Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary pancreatitis  

MedlinePLUS

... to the pancreas increase the risk of developing pancreatic cancer. The risk is particularly high in people with ... history of cancer. In affected individuals who develop pancreatic cancer, it is typically diagnosed in mid-adulthood. Complications ...

132

Endoscopic treatment of chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Treatment of chronic pancreatitis has been exclusively surgical for a long time. Recently, endoscopic therapy has become widely used as a primary therapeutic option. Initially performed for drainage of pancreatic cysts and pseudocysts, endoscopic treatments were adapted to biliary and pancreatic ducts stenosis. Pancreatic sphincterotomy which allows access to pancreatic ducts was firstly reported. Secondly, endoscopic methods of stenting, dilatation, and stones extraction of the bile ducts were applied to pancreatic ducts. Nevertheless, new improvements were necessary: failures of pancreatic stone extraction justified the development of extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripsy; dilatation of pancreatic stenosis was improved by forage with a new device; moreover endosonography allowed guidance for celiac block, gastro-cystostomy, duodeno-cystostomy and pancreatico-gastrostomy. Although endoscopic treatments are more and more frequently accepted, indications are still debated. PMID:18069750

Heyries, Laurent; Sahel, Jose

2007-01-01

133

Molecular Pathways in Pancreatic Carcinogenesis  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is a genetic disease. Pancreatic cancers develop from one of three precursor lesions, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), and mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs), and each arises in association with distinct genetic alterations. These alterations not only provide insight into the fundamental origins of pancreatic cancer but provide ample opportunity for improving early diagnosis and management of cystic precursors. PMID:22806689

MACGREGOR-DAS, ANNE M.; IACOBUZIO-DONAHUE, CHRISTINE A.

2013-01-01

134

The challenge of pancreatic anastomosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and aims  Significant progress in surgical technique and perioperative management has substantially reduced the mortality rate of pancreatic\\u000a surgery. However, morbidity remains considerably high, even in expert hands and leakage from the pancreatic stump still accounts\\u000a for the majority of surgical complications after pancreatic head resection. For that reason, management of the pancreatic\\u000a remnant after partial pancreatoduodenectomy remains a challenge.

Axel Kleespies; Markus Albertsmeier; Firas Obeidat; Hendrik Seeliger; Karl-Walter Jauch; Christiane J. Bruns

2008-01-01

135

Chronic pancreatitis and extrapancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The relationship between chronic pancreatitis (CP) and extrapancreatic cancer has been debated in the recent years. In prospective\\u000a studies, it has been found that pancreatic cancer develops in 0–5% of patients with chronic pancreatitis. Many papers describe\\u000a an increased relative risk for developing extrapancreatic cancer in patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis. In this\\u000a study including 181 patients with CP, we

Torben Høiland Hansen; Mette Laursen; Erik Christensen; Helge Worning

1995-01-01

136

Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

Petrov, Max

2013-01-01

137

Panobinostat and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-10-13

138

SGN-30 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

2014-09-30

139

Classification of acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Based on the Atlanta Classification, acute pancreatitis is classified according to its severity in either mild or severe acute pancreatitis. In recent years, several issues regarding acute pancreatitis have been discussed in the literature. These issues include how many categories of severity should be considered; whether or not a patient with organ failure holds similar holds severity of disease and prognosis of a patient with infected necrosis; the role of transient organ failure; and how to evaluate organ failure. The"Evidence-based Telemedicine - Trauma and Acute Care Surgery" (EBT-TACS) conducted a review of the recent literature on the topic, and critically appraised its most relevant pieces of evidence.. The articles discussed suggested classifying the severity of acute pancreatitis in three or four categories, rather than mild or severe only, and addressed which is the best score to assess organ failure. The following recommendations were proposed: (1) Acute pancreatitis should be classified into four categories: mild, moderate, severe and critical, which allows a better determination of the characteristics of patients, (2) Evaluation of organ failure with a severity score that preferably evaluate directly each organ failure, such as the SOFA and MODS (Marshall). The SOFA seems to have greater accuracy, but the MODS has better applicability due to its ease of use. PMID:23752646

De Campos, Tercio; Parreira, José Gustavo; Assef, José Cesar; Rizoli, Sandro; Nascimento, Barto; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira

2013-01-01

140

Chronic pancreatitis in dogs.  

PubMed

Chronic pancreatitis used to be considered uncommon in dogs, but recent pathological and clinical studies have confirmed that it is in fact a common and clinically significant disease. Clinical signs can vary from low-grade recurrent gastrointestinal signs to acute exacerbations that are indistinguishable from classical acute pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a significant cause of chronic pain in dogs, which must not be underestimated. It also results in progressive impairment of endocrine and exocrine function and the eventual development of diabetes mellitus or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or both in some affected dogs at end stage. The etiology is unknown in most cases. Chronic pancreatitis shows an increased prevalence in certain breeds, and recent work in English Cocker Spaniels suggests it is part of a polysystemic immune-mediated disease in this breed. The histological and clinical appearance is different in different breeds, suggesting that etiologies may also be different. Diagnosis is challenging because the sensitivities of the available noninvasive tests are relatively low. However, with an increased index of suspicion, clinicians will recognize more cases that will allow them to institute supportive treatment to improve the quality of life of the patient. PMID:23148854

Watson, Penny

2012-08-01

141

FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-01-06

142

Rare T-Cell Lymphomas  

Microsoft Academic Search

T-Cell lymphomas are a group of rare or, at least uncommon, hematologic malignancies comprising about 10–15% of all non-Hodgkin’s\\u000a lymphomas in North America (6). Overrepresentation of certain subtypes such as natural killer (NK)\\/T-cell lymphoma makes them\\u000a relatively more common in Asia (105, 106). As classification systems for lymphoid malignancies become more sophisticated,\\u000a combining morphology, immunophenotype, molecular, and clinical information, more

Ana Maria Molina; Steven M. Horwitz

143

A Rare Collision Tumor Composed of Follicular Lymphoma and Adenocarcinoma in the Ampulla of Vater: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

The duodenum is infrequently affected by malignant lymphoma, and follicular lymphomas of the duodenum are rare histological subtypes. There are no reported cases of collision of follicular lymphoma and other tumors in the ampulla of Vater. A 57-year-old Japanese man presented with jaundice, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a tumor of the ampulla of Vater invading the pancreatic head with biliary dilatation and a thickened duodenal wall. The patient underwent subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. Histopathology of the resected specimen revealed lymphoid follicular formations with small-to-medium-sized centrocyte-like cells and some centroblast-like cells. The atypical lymphoid cells were immunohistochemically positive for CD10, CD20, and CD79a but negative for CD5 and cyclin D1. BCL2 protein was highly expressed in the follicle centers. The diagnosis was duodenal follicular lymphoma, Grade 1. The follicular lymphoma, 40?mm in diameter, involved duodenal submucosa and regional lymph nodes without distant metastasis. This duodenal follicular lymphoma was partially overlapped by adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, measuring 25 × 20?mm, which involved the lower common bile duct, pancreas, and duodenum. We report the first case of a surgically treated collision tumor composed of a rare mass-forming follicular lymphoma and adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. PMID:25002984

Tanioka, Fumihiko; Inaba, Keisuke; Takatori, Shingo; Ochiai, Hideto; Suzuki, Shohachi

2014-01-01

144

A rare collision tumor composed of follicular lymphoma and adenocarcinoma in the ampulla of vater: a case report.  

PubMed

The duodenum is infrequently affected by malignant lymphoma, and follicular lymphomas of the duodenum are rare histological subtypes. There are no reported cases of collision of follicular lymphoma and other tumors in the ampulla of Vater. A 57-year-old Japanese man presented with jaundice, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a tumor of the ampulla of Vater invading the pancreatic head with biliary dilatation and a thickened duodenal wall. The patient underwent subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. Histopathology of the resected specimen revealed lymphoid follicular formations with small-to-medium-sized centrocyte-like cells and some centroblast-like cells. The atypical lymphoid cells were immunohistochemically positive for CD10, CD20, and CD79a but negative for CD5 and cyclin D1. BCL2 protein was highly expressed in the follicle centers. The diagnosis was duodenal follicular lymphoma, Grade 1. The follicular lymphoma, 40?mm in diameter, involved duodenal submucosa and regional lymph nodes without distant metastasis. This duodenal follicular lymphoma was partially overlapped by adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, measuring 25 × 20?mm, which involved the lower common bile duct, pancreas, and duodenum. We report the first case of a surgically treated collision tumor composed of a rare mass-forming follicular lymphoma and adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater. PMID:25002984

Suzuki, Shioto; Tanioka, Fumihiko; Inaba, Keisuke; Takatori, Shingo; Ochiai, Hideto; Suzuki, Shohachi

2014-01-01

145

Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-11-15

146

Elderly patients with pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer marked significant increase of incidence during the last decades in the elderly population. Despite the certain increase of incidence there are no international guidelines for elderly patients who are suffering from pancreatic cancer. During the ASCO Annual Meeting 2014, two abstracts focusing on elderly patients suffering from different histological types of pancreatic cancer were presented. The first retrospective study (Abstract #4119) showed the benefit of the systemic treatment on overall survival for elderly patients with stage IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The second retrospective study (Abstract #4112) demonstrates the positive effect of somatostatin analogue (octreotide-LAR) treatment on overall survival for elderly patients with neuroendocrine pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:25076333

Kougioumtzopoulou, Andromachi S; Syrigos, Kostas N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

2014-07-01

147

Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP who have failed to respond to medical therapy and require intervention. PMID:24115811

Tandan, Manu; Reddy, D Nageshwar

2013-01-01

148

Study of Alisertib (MLN8237) in Adults With Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Precursor B-lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; T-cell Lymphoma, Excluding Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Follicular Lymphoma With ? 50% Diffuse Large Cell Component

2013-11-15

149

Genetic Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited genetic factors also play an important role, with approximately 5–10% of pancreatic cancer patients reporting family history of pancreatic cancer. While the genetic basis for the majority of the familial clustering of pancreatic cancer remains unclear, several important pancreatic cancer genes have been identified. These consist of high penetrance genes including BRCA2 or PALB2, to more common genetic variation associated with a modest increase risk of pancreatic cancer such as genetic variation at the ABO blood group locus. Recent advances in genotyping and genetic sequencing have accelerated the rate at which novel pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes have been identified with several genes identified within the past few years. This review addresses our current understanding of the familial aggregation of pancreatic cancer, established pancreatic cancer susceptablity genes and how this knowledge informs risk assessment and screening for high-risk families. PMID:22162228

Klein, Alison P.

2013-01-01

150

Cystic pancreatic lymphangioma  

PubMed Central

Lymphangioma of the pancreas is a rare benign tumor of lymphatic origin. Retroperitoneal lymphangiomas account for 1% of all lymphangiomas. Herein, we report a case of cystic pancreatic lymphangioma diagnosed in 34 year-old female patient who was hospitalized for a slight pain in the epigastrium and vomiting. Radiological imaging revealed a large multiloculated cystic abdominal mass with enhancing septations involving the upper retroperitoneum. During the laparoscopic surgery, a well circumscribed polycystic tumor was completely excised preserving the pancreatic duct. The patient made a complete recovery and is disease-free 12 months postoperatively. PMID:22826784

Gure?, Nazim; Gurluler, Ercument; Alim, Altan; Berber, Ibrahim; Gurkan, Alihan

2012-01-01

151

Primary Pancreatic Leiomyosarcoma  

PubMed Central

Primary pancreatic leiomyosarcomas are rare malignant neoplasms with an aggressive course and a large size. A 56-year-old woman presented with an 8-year history of abdominal pain. Multislice computed tomography revealed a large heterogeneous mass with necrotic, calcified and macroscopic fatty areas. The tumor was excised. Histopathological evaluation revealed leiomyosarcoma of the pancreas. If a patient has a large size mass with a cystic-necrotic component, pancreatic leiomyosarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis list after excluding other common differential diagnoses. PMID:25035704

Kocakoc, Ercan; Havan, Nuri; Bilgin, Mehmet; Atay, Musa

2014-01-01

152

Lymphoma Research Foundation: Patient Multimedia Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Lymphoma Research Foundation (LRF) is a "voluntary health organization devoted exclusively to funding lymphoma research and providing patients and healthcare professionals with critical information on the disease." The LRF Patient Multimedia Library offers an archived collection of informative online articles and videos addressing different aspects of lymphoma. Library categories include Lymphoma Overview, Lymphoma Treatment, Coping Issues, Clinical Trials, and Advocacy Issues. Examples of video and article titles include Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma 101; A Genetic Look at Lymphoma; Treating Lymphoma: Will a Customized Vaccine Work; Accuracy in Lymphoma Diagnosis; The Thriving Survivor; and more. The Library also offers archived videos from a 2003 Educational Forum on Lymphoma. In addition to the Library, the LRF site contains sections on Research, Lymphoma Education, Patient Conferences, and Patient Support.

153

Prevention of Postoperative Complications following Pancreatic Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Major pancreatic resection is still accompanied by considerable morbidity and even mortality. Complications which occur after pancreatic surgery are chiefly associated with exocrine pancreatic secretion, hence, the inhibition of exocrine pancreatic secretion perioperatively is a promising concept in the prevention of complications. The hormone somatostatin and its synthetic analogue octreotide have been shown to profoundly inhibit exocrine pancreatic secretion, particularly

M. Büchler; H. Friess

1993-01-01

154

Cutaneous Intravascular Lymphoma following Extravascular Lymphoma of the Lung  

Microsoft Academic Search

Intravascular lymphoma (IL) is a rare aggressive disease characterized by exclusive or predominant accumulation of malignant lymphoid cells within the lumina of small arteries, veins and capillaries. We describe a 74-year-old woman with IL presenting in the skin as asymptomatic teleangiectatic plaques on the thighs. The cutaneous neoplasm developed 18 months after an extravascular large B cell lymphoma of the

Carlo Tomasini; Mauro Novelli; Renata Ponti; Mario Pippione; Maria Grazia Bernengo

2004-01-01

155

Oblimersen Sodium and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-05-13

156

Pancreatic vascular regulation in chronic pancreatitis in cats.  

PubMed Central

In experimental obstructive chronic pancreatitis the normal hyperaemic response to secretory stimulation is lost, suggesting abnormal vascular regulation. Vascular regulatory mechanisms were investigated by observing the effect of increments in portal pressure on pancreatic blood flow in normal cats and cats with chronic pancreatitis. Normal cats maintained pancreatic blood flow until portal pressure was > 15 mm Hg, after which it decreased. Total vascular resistance decreased until the portal pressure was 15 mm Hg and increased thereafter. These observations suggested that metabolic regulatory mechanisms prevailed while portal pressure was in the physiological range but myogenic mechanisms became dominant during portal hypertension. In chronic pancreatitis the basal pancreatic blood flow was reduced and was inversely proportional to portal pressure. Total vascular resistance increased as portal pressure increased. In chronic pancreatitis myogenic regulatory responses prevailed at all levels of portal pressure. In conclusion, intrinsic regulation of pancreatic blood flow was abnormal in cats with chronic pancreatitis. The loss of the predominance of metabolic regulation over the normal range of portal pressure may partly explain the reduction of pancreatic blood flow in response to secretory stimulation. PMID:7890217

Widdison, A L; Karanjia, N D; Reber, H A

1995-01-01

157

MDX-010 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-05-22

158

Transformation of follicular lymphoma to diffuse large-cell lymphoma: Alternative patterns with  

E-print Network

Transformation of follicular lymphoma to diffuse large-cell lymphoma: Alternative patterns. Follicular lymphoma (FL) is often a precursor to a more aggressive lymphoma. FL accounts for 25­40% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) (1, 2). These tumors appar- ently derive from follicular center B cells

Botstein, David

159

Pancreatic pseudocysts in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic pseudocyst (PPC) is an uncommon condition in childhood and is almost always associated with blunt abdominal trauma. Additional disease within the pancreas is rare, unlike adult experience. Prior to the advent of ultrasonography (US) assessment of the cyst was difficult. Subsequently, it has become apparent that PPC may develop but still undergo spontaneous regression. We have reviewed eight children

Susan M. Sawyer; Patricia M. Davidson; N. McMullin; K. B. Stokes

1989-01-01

160

Lymphoma of the Urinary Bladder  

PubMed Central

Background. Lymphoma of the urinary bladder (LUB) is rare. Aims. To review the literature on LUB. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results. LUB can be either primary or secondary. The tumour has female predominance; most cases occur in middle-age women. Secondary LUB occurs in 10% to 25% of leukemias/lymphomas and in advanced-stage systemic lymphoma. Less than 100 cases have been reported. MALT typically affects adults older than 60 years; 75% are female. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is also common and may arise from transformation of MALT. LUB presents with haematuria, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, and abdominal or back pain. Macroscopic examination of LUBs show large discrete tumours centred in the dome or lateral walls of the bladder. Positive staining of LUB varies by the subtype of lymphoma; B-cell lymphomas are CD20 positive. MALT lymphoma is positively stained for CD20, CD19, and FMC7 and negatively stained for CD5, CD10, and CD11c. LUB stains negatively with Pan-keratin, vimentin, CK20, and CK7. MALT lymphoma exhibits t(11; 18)(q21: 21). Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the MALT type of LUB with no recurrence. Conclusions. LUB is diagnosed by its characteristic morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics. Radiotherapy is a useful treatment. PMID:24511310

Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

2014-01-01

161

Lenalidomide and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-11-15

162

Periampullary and Pancreatic Incidentaloma  

PubMed Central

Background: While incidental masses in certain organs have received particular attention, periampullary and pancreatic incidentalomas (PIs) remain poorly characterized. Methods: We reviewed 1944 consecutive pancreaticoduodenectomies (PD) over an 8-year period (April 1997 to October 2005). A total of 118 patients (6% of all PDs) presented with an incidental finding of a periampullary or pancreatic mass. The PI patients were analyzed and compared with the rest of the cohort (NI, nonincidentaloma group, n = 1826). Results: Thirty-one percent of the PI patients (n = 37) had malignant disease (versus 76% of the NI patients, P < 0.001), 47% (n = 55) had premalignant disease, and the remaining 22% (n = 26) had little or no risk for malignant progression. The 3 most common diagnoses in the PI group were IPMN without invasive cancer (30%), cystadenoma (17%), and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (10%). The PI group had a higher overall complication rate (55% versus 43%, P = 0.02), due in part to a significantly increased rate of pancreatic fistulas (18.4% PI versus 8.5% NI, P < 0.001). Patients in the PI group with malignant disease had a superior long-term survival (median, 30 months, P = 0.01) compared with patients in the NI group with malignant disease (median, 21 months). Conclusions: Incidentally discovered periampullary and pancreatic masses comprise a substantial proportion of patients undergoing PD. Roughly three fourths of these lesions are malignant or premalignant, and amenable to curative resection. Resected malignant PIs have favorable pathologic features as compared with resected malignant NIs, and resection of these early lesions in asymptomatic individuals is associated with improved survival, compared with patients with symptomatic disease. PMID:16633003

Winter, Jordan M.; Cameron, John L.; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Campbell, Kurtis A.; Chang, David; Riall, Taylor S.; Coleman, JoAnn; Sauter, Patricia K.; Canto, Marcia; Hruban, Ralph H.; Schulick, Richard D.; Choti, Michael A.; Yeo, Charles J.

2006-01-01

163

Nutritional Support in Acute Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a All pancreatic diseases, whether inflammatory or neoplastic, cause a change in the function of the organ that translates into\\u000a a digestive impairment. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer is frequently responsible for cachexia, due to its late diagnosis and\\u000a the peculiar characteristics of this type of tumor. It is also known that food consumption by pancreatic patients can frequently\\u000a trigger or exacerbate pain

Simona Irma Rocchetti; Aldo Alberto Beneduce; Marco Braga

164

Inflammatory pancreatic masses: problems in differentiating focal pancreatitis from carcinoma  

SciTech Connect

The authors studied 19 patients with focal inflammatory masses of the pancreas over an 18-month period. In 13 cases, transhepatic cholangiography and/or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were unsuccessful in differentiating pancreatitis from carcinoma. Eighteen patients had a history of alcohol abuse, and 12 had had pancreatitis previously. Pre-existing glandular injury appears to be a prerequisite to formation of focal inflammatory pancreatic masses.

Neff, C.C.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.; Mueller, P.R.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.

1984-01-01

165

Dendritic Cells Promote Pancreatic Viability in Mice with Acute Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis increases morbidity and mortality from organ necrosis by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) can promote or suppress inflammation, depending on their subtype and context. We investigated the roles of DC in development of acute pancreatitis. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced in CD11c.DTR mice using caerulein or L-arginine; DCs were depleted by administration of diphtheria toxin. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results Numbers of MHC II+CD11c+DC increased 100-fold in pancreas of mice with acute pancreatitis, to account for nearly 15% of intra-pancreatic leukocytes. Intra-pancreatic DC acquired an immune phenotype in mice with acute pancreatitis; they expressed higher levels of MHC II and CD86 and increased production of interleukin-6, membrane cofactor protein (MCP)-1, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-?. However, rather than inducing an organ-destructive inflammatory process, DC were required for pancreatic viability; the exocrine pancreas died in mice that were depleted of DC and challenged with caerulein or L-arginine. All mice with pancreatitis that were depleted of DC died from acinar cell death within 4 days. Depletion of DC from mice with pancreatitis resulted in neutrophil infiltration and increased levels of systemic markers of inflammation. However, the organ necrosis associated with depletion of DC did not require infiltrating neutrophils, activation of NF-?B, or signaling by mitogen-activated protein kinase or TNF-?. Conclusions DC are required for pancreatic viability in mice with acute pancreatitis and might protect organs against cell stress. PMID:21801698

Bedrosian, Andrea S.; Nguyen, Andrew H.; Hackman, Michael; Connolly, Michael K.; Malhotra, Ashim; Ibrahim, Junaid; Cieza-Rubio, Napoleon E.; Henning, Justin R.; Barilla, Rocky; Rehman, Adeel; Pachter, H. Leon; Medina-Zea, Marco V.; Cohen, Steven M.; Frey, Alan B.; Acehan, Devrim; Miller, George

2011-01-01

166

Fenretinide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-09-30

167

Role of pancreatic stellate cells in chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumor volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment following activation of PSCs, tumor progression, and chemoresistance is enhanced. This review will discuss how PSCs contribute to chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24782785

McCarroll, Joshua A.; Naim, Stephanie; Sharbeen, George; Russia, Nelson; Lee, Julia; Kavallaris, Maria; Goldstein, David; Phillips, Phoebe A.

2014-01-01

168

Internal pancreatic stent causing irreversible dilatation of pancreatic duct.  

PubMed

A 28-year-old woman underwent a pylorus preserving Whipple procedure for pancreatic serous cystadenoma located on the head of the pancreas. During the operation, an internal stent (7F silastic catheter, 9 cm in length) was placed within the pancreatic duct in the area of pancreaticojejunal end-to-end Dunking type anastomosis to prevent development of fistula. The stent was positioned so that one third of its length would lie into the pancreatic duct, and it was anchored to the periductal pancreatic tissue with only one rapidly absorbable chromic suture. Leakage from the anastomosis was not observed, and she was discharged without any complaint. Early postoperative abdominal CT examination revealed that the stent was retained within the normal caliber pancreatic duct (Fig. 1a). Six months after the operation, she began to complain to epigastric pain triggered by the meals. The laboratory analysis was normal, particularly liver biochemical tests and serum amylase. The internal pancreatic stent within the dilated pancreatic duct was detected by an additional CT examination (Fig. 1b). The stent was removed endoscopically at the third attempt. The pain was resolved after its removal. Control CT examination which was taken at the 18th month after removal of the stent showed dilatation of the pancreatic duct (Fig. 2a). The patient remained free of any complaint, although regressed pancreatic duct dilatation has persisted over 4 years of follow-up (Fig. 2b). PMID:24799775

Hasbahceci, Mustafa; Erol, Cengiz

2014-02-01

169

Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2014-09-12

170

Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used. PMID:24212626

Dabizzi, Emanuele; Assef, Mauricio Saab; Raimondo, Massimo

2011-01-01

171

Diagnostic management of pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used. PMID:24212626

Dabizzi, Emanuele; Assef, Mauricio Saab; Raimondo, Massimo

2011-01-01

172

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: epidemiology and genetics.  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an important cause of death from cancer throughout the developed world. There are few established environmental risk factors, but a previous history of pancreatitis and exposure to tobacco and salted food appear to be the most important. A family history of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is not common in patients with this disease, but recent research has shown that pancreatic adenocarcinoma can be a feature of cancer susceptibility syndromes associated with germline mutations in p16, BRCA1, BRCA2, and APC. This highlights the need for a full family history in apparently sporadic cases. Somatic mutations in p16, BRCA2, and APC have also been reported in pancreatic cancer; however, K-RAS mutations appear to be the commonest oncogenic alteration. Recent advances in our understanding of the basis of hereditary cancer syndromes may be applicable to the diagnosis, treatment, and possibly prevention of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in the future. PMID:8950667

Flanders, T Y; Foulkes, W D

1996-01-01

173

Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6?months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22655256

Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Goncalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

2012-01-01

174

Absence of annexin I expression in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and cell lines  

PubMed Central

Background Annexin I, one of the 20 members of the annexin family of calcium and phospholipid-binding proteins, has been implicated in diverse biological processes including signal transduction, mediation of apoptosis and immunosuppression. Previous studies have shown increased annexin I expression in pancreatic and breast cancers, while it is absent in prostate and esophageal cancers. Results Data presented here show that annexin I mRNA and protein are undetectable in 10 out of 12 B-cell lymphoma cell lines examined. Southern blot analysis indicates that the annexin I gene is intact in B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Aberrant methylation was examined as a cause for lack of annexin I expression by treating cells 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine. Reexpression of annexin I was observed after prolonged treatment with the demethylating agent indicating methylation may be one of the mechanisms of annexin I silencing. Treatment of Raji and OMA-BL-1 cells with lipopolysaccharide, an inflammation inducer, and with hydrogen peroxide, a promoter of oxidative stress, also failed to induce annexin I expression. Annexin I expression was examined in primary lymphoma tissues by immunohistochemistry and presence of annexin I in a subset of normal B-cells and absence of annexin I expression in the lymphoma tissues were observed. These results show that annexin I is expressed in normal B-cells, and its expression is lost in all primary B-cell lymphomas and 10 of 12 B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Conclusions Our results suggest that, similar to prostate and esophageal cancers, annexin I may be an endogenous suppressor of cancer development, and loss of annexin I may contribute to B-cell lymphoma development. PMID:15070421

Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Salazar, Eric; Gopalakrishnan, Velliyur K

2004-01-01

175

Vorinostat and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2010-12-08

176

Primary lymphoma of lung.  

PubMed

Five cases of primary lymphocytic lymphoma of the lung are described. One patient died 14 years after diagnosis, with spread of the tumour to the opposite lung. The remaining four patients were alive and well 18 months to 25 years after diagnosis. The pathological features of these five cases are described and the nature, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis are considered in relation to experience in the literature. The tumor is rare. It is important because of its good prognosis and diagnostic difficulty. PMID:580948

Sinclair, R A; Sullivan, J R; McConchie, I

1978-04-01

177

Imaging of musculoskeletal lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Abstract Lymphoma of the musculoskeletal system involving the bone, muscle or skin is commonly due to secondary involvement from disseminated disease but can occasionally present as primary extranodal disease. Although radiological features are traditionally known to be non-specific, recognition of certain characteristics using summation of imaging modalities as well as knowledge of clinical features can help in making the diagnosis. Imaging also plays an integral role in treatment response assessments, especially via positron emission tomography/computed tomography functional imaging. PMID:24334414

Ong, Keh Oon

2013-01-01

178

Clinical and Pathologic Studies in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients Receiving Antibody Treatment  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Diffuse Large B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Follicular / Indolent B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Mantle Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Marginal Zone; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Peripheral T-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Waldenstr Macroglobulinemia

2011-05-31

179

Treatment of Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is the reduced secretion of exocrine pancreatic enzymes into the duodenum. Its severity\\u000a can range from mild to moderate insufficiency, causing no symptoms to severe (?90% reduction of maximal enzyme secretion),\\u000a which causes malabsorption (1) and malnutrition and may significantly impact on morbidity and mortality (2). Causes of exocrine insufficiency include cystic fibrosis, pancreatic cancer, surgical removal

Supot Pongprasobchai; Eugene P. DiMagno

180

Identification of a Novel Kindred with Familial Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: Hereditary pancreatic cancer comprises about 10% of pancreatic cancer cases. Multiple causative mutations have been identified. Here we describe a pancreatitis\\/pancreatic cancer (P\\/PC) family, which demonstrates pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer resulting from an uncharacterized mutation. Methods: Family members completed evaluations to determine signs of mutation status. Select patients were screened for mutations associated with hereditary pancreatic diseases. Results: In

Jennifer LaFemina; Penelope A. Roberts; Yin P. Hung; James F. Gusella; Dushyant Sahani; Carlos Fernández-del Castillo; Andrew L. Warshaw; Sarah P. Thayer

2009-01-01

181

Acute pancreatitis: The stress factor  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disorder of the pancreas that may cause life-threatening complications. Etiologies of pancreatitis vary, with gallstones accounting for the majority of all cases, followed by alcohol. Other causes of pancreatitis include trauma, ischemia, mechanical obstruction, infections, autoimmune, hereditary, and drugs. The main events occurring in the pancreatic acinar cell that initiate and propagate acute pancreatitis include inhibition of secretion, intracellular activation of proteases, and generation of inflammatory mediators. Small cytokines known as chemokines are released from damaged pancreatic cells and attract inflammatory cells, whose systemic action ultimately determined the severity of the disease. Indeed, severe forms of pancreatitis may result in systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome, characterized by a progressive physiologic failure of several interdependent organ systems. Stress occurs when homeostasis is threatened, and stressors can include physical or mental forces, or combinations of both. Depending on the timing and duration, stress can result in beneficial or harmful consequences. While it is well established that a previous acute-short-term stress decreases the severity of experimentally-induced pancreatitis, the worsening effects of chronic stress on the exocrine pancreas have received relatively little attention. This review will focus on the influence of both prior acute-short-term and chronic stress in acute pancreatitis. PMID:24914340

Binker, Marcelo G; Cosen-Binker, Laura I

2014-01-01

182

Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases  

PubMed Central

A possible role for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and inducing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smoking habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecular mimicry between H. pylori ?-carbonic anhydrase (?-CA) and human CA type II, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal and acinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pancreatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the genesis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare.

Bulajic, Milutin; Panic, Nikola; Lohr, Johannes Matthias

2014-01-01

183

Chemoprevention strategies for pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis and it is often diagnosed at advanced stages, which makes it very difficult to treat. The low survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer points toward an increased need for novel therapeutic and chemopreventive strategies and early detection. Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Both synthetic as well as natural, diet-derived bioactive compounds have been evaluated as pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents and have been shown to have various degrees of efficacy in cellular and in vivo animal models. Some chemopreventive agents (for example curcumin, resveratrol, B-DIM) have also been reported to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic drugs (for example gemcitabine or erlotinib), which suggests the potential use of chemopreventive agents as potentiators of standard chemotherapy. Very few clinical trials with pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents have been completed and some are in early phases. Further development of pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents may prove to be tremendously valuable for individuals at high-risk of developing pancreatic cancer and patients who present with premalignant lesions. This Review discusses the current state of the pancreatic cancer chemoprevention field and highlights the challenges ahead. PMID:20440279

Stan, Silvia D.; Singh, Shivendra V.; Brand, Randall E.

2010-01-01

184

Brain Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease with a 5-year survival rate below 5%. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced tumor stage and existence of distant metastases. However, involvement of the central nervous system is rare in pancreatic cancer. We retrospectively analyzed all cases of brain metastases in pancreatic cancer reported to date focusing on patient characteristics, clinical appearance, therapy and survival. Including our own, 12 cases of brain metastases originating from pancreatic cancer were identified. In three patients brain metastases were the first manifestation of pancreatic cancer. All other patients developed brain metastases during their clinical course. In most cases, the disease progressed rapidly and the patients died within weeks or months. However, two patients showed long-term survival. Of note, both patients received resection of the pancreatic cancer as well as curative resection of the metachronous brain metastases. Brain metastases in pancreatic cancer are a rare condition and usually predict a very poor prognosis. However, there is evidence that resection of brain metastases of pancreatic cancer can be immensely beneficial to patient’s survival, even with the chance for cure. Therefore, a surgical approach in metastatic pancreatic cancer should be considered in selective cases. PMID:23429199

Lemke, Johannes; Scheele, Jan; Kapapa, Thomas; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Kornmann, Marko

2013-01-01

185

Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases.  

PubMed

A possible role for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and inducing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smoking habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecular mimicry between H. pylori ?-carbonic anhydrase (?-CA) and human CA type II, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal and acinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pancreatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the genesis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare. PMID:25400980

Bulajic, Milutin; Panic, Nikola; Löhr, Johannes Matthias

2014-11-15

186

Lymphoma Caused by Intestinal Microbiota  

PubMed Central

The intestinal microbiota and gut immune system must constantly communicate to maintain a balance between tolerance and activation: on the one hand, our immune system should protect us from pathogenic microbes and on the other hand, most of the millions of microbes in and on our body are innocuous symbionts and some can even be beneficial. Since there is such a close interaction between the immune system and the intestinal microbiota, it is not surprising that some lymphomas such as mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma have been shown to be caused by the presence of certain bacteria. Animal models played an important role in establishing causation and mechanism of bacteria-induced MALT lymphoma. In this review we discuss different ways that animal models have been applied to establish a link between the gut microbiota and lymphoma and how animal models have helped to elucidate mechanisms of microbiota-induced lymphoma. While there are not a plethora of studies demonstrating a connection between microbiota and lymphoma development, we believe that animal models are a system which can be exploited in the future to enhance our understanding of causation and improve prognosis and treatment of lymphoma. PMID:25257357

Yamamoto, Mitsuko L.; Schiestl, Robert H.

2014-01-01

187

How I treat CNS lymphomas  

PubMed Central

The pathogenesis of primary and secondary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma poses a unique set of diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic challenges. During the past 10 years, there has been significant progress in the elucidation of the molecular properties of CNS lymphomas and their microenvironment, as well as evolution in the development of novel treatment strategies. Although a CNS lymphoma diagnosis was once assumed to be uniformly associated with a dismal prognosis, it is now reasonable to anticipate long-term survival, and possibly a cure, for a significant fraction of CNS lymphoma patients. The pathogenesis of CNS lymphomas affects multiple compartments within the neuroaxis, and proper treatment of the CNS lymphoma patient requires a multidisciplinary team with expertise not only in hematology/oncology but also in neurology, neuroradiology, neurosurgery, clinical neuropsychology, ophthalmology, pathology, and radiation oncology. Given the evolving principles of management and the evidence for improvements in survival, our goal is to provide an overview of current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of CNS lymphomas and to highlight promising strategies that we believe to be most effective in establishing diagnosis, staging, and therapeutic management. PMID:23963042

Gupta, Neel K.; Mannis, Gabriel N.; LaMarre, Amanda K.; Treseler, Patrick

2013-01-01

188

Pathobiology of Hodgkin Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a lymphoid tumour that represents about 1% of all de novo neoplasms occurring every year worldwide. Its diagnosis is based on the identification of characteristic neoplastic cells within an inflammatory milieu. Molecular studies have shown that most, if not all cases, belong to the same clonal population, which is derived from peripheral B-cells. The relevance of Epstein-Barr virus infection at least in a proportion of patients was also demonstrated. The REAL/WHO classification recognizes a basic distinction between nodular lymphocyte predominance HL (NLPHL) and classic HL (CHL), reflecting the differences in clinical presentation, behavior, morphology, phenotype, molecular features as well as in the composition of their cellular background. CHL has been classified into four subtypes: lymphocyte rich, nodular sclerosing, mixed cellularity and lymphocyte depleted. Despite its well known histological and clinical features, Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) has recently been the object of intense research activity, leading to a better understanding of its phenotype, molecular characteristics and possible mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. PMID:24959337

Agostinelli, Claudio; Pileri, Stefano

2014-01-01

189

Cilengitide (EMD 121974) in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2013-01-23

190

Malignant lymphoma in african lions (panthera leo).  

PubMed

Malignant lymphoma has become an increasingly recognized problem in African lions (Panthera leo). Eleven African lions (9 male and 2 female) with clinical signs and gross and microscopic lesions of malignant lymphoma were evaluated in this study. All animals were older adults, ranging in age from 14 to 19 years. Immunohistochemically, 10 of the 11 lions had T-cell lymphomas (CD3(+), CD79a(-)), and 1 lion was diagnosed with a B-cell lymphoma (CD3(-), CD79a(+)). The spleen appeared to be the primary site of neoplastic growth in all T-cell lymphomas, with involvement of the liver (6/11) and regional lymph nodes (5/11) also commonly observed. The B-cell lymphoma affected the peripheral lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. According to the current veterinary and human World Health Organization classification of hematopoietic neoplasms, T-cell lymphoma subtypes included peripheral T-cell lymphoma (4/11), precursor (acute) T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia (2/11), chronic T-cell lymphocytic lymphoma/leukemia (3/11), and T-zone lymphoma (1/11). The single B-cell lymphoma subtype was consistent with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) testing by immunohistochemistry on sections of malignant lymphoma was negative for all 11 lions. One lion was seropositive for FeLV. In contrast to domestic and exotic cats, in which B-cell lymphomas are more common than T-cell lymphomas, African lions in this study had malignant lymphomas that were primarily of T-cell origin. Neither FeLV nor FIV, important causes of malignant lymphoma in domestic cats, seems to be significant in the pathogenesis of malignant lymphoma in African lions. PMID:20610770

Harrison, T M; McKnight, C A; Sikarskie, J G; Kitchell, B E; Garner, M M; Raymond, J T; Fitzgerald, S D; Valli, V E; Agnew, D; Kiupel, M

2010-09-01

191

Endoscopic ultrasonography in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Results of a prospective study with comparison to ultrasonography and CT scan.  

PubMed

Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) was compared to ultrasonography (US) and CT scan (CT) in order to evaluate its role in the diagnosis and the locoregional spread assessment of pancreatic cancer. Sixty-four patients suspected of pancreatic cancer were studied prospectively, and the results of imaging techniques were compared to histology and surgical exploration. There were 49 cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 11 of pancreatitis, 2 of common bile duct carcinoma, 1 lymphoma and 1 hepatocellular carcinoma with peripancreatic metastatic lymph nodes. EUS was significantly more accurate (91%) than CT (66%) and US (64%) for diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. EUS was able to image all 7 cancers less than 25 mm in diameter, US and CT only one. There were 4 false positives with EUS which were all cases of pseudotumorous pancreatitis. For detecting lymph node involvement, EUS was significantly more sensitive (62%) and accurate (74%) than US (8% and 37%) and CT (19% and 42%), respectively. Invaded lymph nodes adjacent to large tumors and micrometastatic involvement were responsible for this lack of sensitivity. EUS was significantly more sensitive (100%) than CT (71%) and US (17%) for detecting venous involvement. The specificity of EUS was lower (67%) because of duodenal bulb stenosis and large tumors. In conclusion, this prospective and comparative study confirms that EUS is an accurate tool for diagnosis and locoregional spread assessment of pancreatic cancer when performed in a reference center. EUS is of particular interest for small tumours. However, EUS does not enable differentiation of pseudotumorous pancreatitis from adenocarcinoma. PMID:8491130

Palazzo, L; Roseau, G; Gayet, B; Vilgrain, V; Belghiti, J; Fékéte, F; Paolaggi, J A

1993-02-01

192

Pancreatic polypepetide inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via a cholinergic pathway  

SciTech Connect

In rat pancreatic slices, rat pancreatic polypeptide (PP) or C-terminal hexapeptide of PP (PP-(31-36)) inhibited potassium-stimulated amylase release in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was unaffected by addition of hexamethonium but blocked by atropine. In contrast, PP-(31-36) did not have any effect on acetylcholine- or cholecystokinin octapeptide-stimulated amylase release. In addition, when pancreatic slices were incubated with ({sup 3}H)choline, PP-(31-36) inhibited the potassium-evoked release of synthesized ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of PP was unaffected by adrenergic, dopaminergic, or opioid receptor antagonists. Thus PP inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine release. This newly identified pathway provides a novel mechanism for hormonal inhibition of pancreatic enzyme secretion via modulation of the classic neurotransmitter function.

Jung, G.; Louie, D.S.; Owyang, C. (Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor (USA))

1987-11-01

193

MS-275 and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-23

194

Pancreatic stenting prevents pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & Aims: Patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction are at high risk of developing pancreatitis after endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Impaired pancreatic drainage caused by pancreatic sphincter hypertension is the likely explanation for this increased risk. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine if ductal drainage with pancreatic stenting protects against pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with

Paul R. Tarnasky; Yuko Y. Palesch; John T. Cunningham; Patrick D. Mauldin; Peter B. Cotton; Robert H. Hawes

1998-01-01

195

Pathology of lymphoma in HIV  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review Individuals with HIV infection have a greatly increased risk of developing malignancies, even when HIV infection is successfully controlled with antiretrovirals. Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is considered an AIDS-defining entity, and this disease is currently the most common type of cancer in HIV-infected individuals in the US and Europe. Here we describe the different types of lymphomas occurring in individuals with AIDS, and the most relevant pathologic features helpful for histologic and immunohistochemical diagnosis. Recent findings The incidence of some AIDS-related lymphoma subtypes has changed since the introduction of combined antiretroviral therapy, and some of the diagnostic methodologies have evolved. New biomarkers of disease have been identified, which may be useful for diagnosis. Summary Better pathological classification strategies and deeper molecular understanding of the different lymphoma subtypes that occur in people with AIDS will begin to allow the transition to more precise diagnosis and targeted treatments. PMID:23942293

Cesarman, Ethel

2014-01-01

196

Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-08

197

Gemcitabine and Bendamustine in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

2014-08-08

198

Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

2013-10-24

199

Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma in Adults (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... of lymphoma: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the most common type of lymphoma. Although there are more than 50 types of NHL, diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the ...

200

Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated. PMID:20617020

Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

2010-01-01

201

Beer and its non-alcoholic compounds: role in pancreatic exocrine secretion, alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed

In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated. PMID:20617020

Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

2010-03-01

202

Pancreatic cancer biology and genetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive and devastating disease, which is characterized by invasiveness, rapid progression and profound resistance to treatment. Advances in pathological classification and cancer genetics have improved our descriptive understanding of this disease; however, important aspects of pancreatic cancer biology remain poorly understood. What is the pathogenic role of specific gene mutations? What is the cell of

Nabeel Bardeesy; Ronald A. DePinho

2002-01-01

203

Brain Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer  

E-print Network

Abstract: Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease with a 5-year survival rate below 5%. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced tumor stage and existence of distant metastases. However, involvement of the central nervous system is rare in pancreatic cancer. We retrospectively analyzed all cases of brain metastases in pancreatic cancer reported to date focusing on patient characteristics, clinical appearance, therapy and survival. Including our own, 12 cases of brain metastases originating from pancreatic cancer were identified. In three patients brain metastases were the first manifestation of pancreatic cancer. All other patients developed brain metastases during their clinical course. In most cases, the disease progressed rapidly and the patients died within weeks or months. However, two patients showed long-term survival. Of note, both patients received resection of the pancreatic cancer as well as curative resection of the metachronous brain metastases. Brain metastases in pancreatic cancer are a rare condition and usually predict a very poor prognosis. However, there is evidence that resection of brain metastases of pancreatic cancer can be immensely beneficial to patient’s survival, even with the chance for cure. Therefore, a

Johannes Lemke; Jan Scheele; Thomas Kapapa; Christian Rainer Wirtz; Doris Henne-bruns; Marko Kornmann

2013-01-01

204

Ocular adnexal lymphoma--comparison of MALT lymphoma with other histological types  

PubMed Central

AIMS—To correlate histological features of ocular adnexal lymphoma using the revised European American lymphoma classification (REAL), with stage of disease at presentation, treatment modalities, and patient outcome. MALT lymphoma defines an extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma as outlined in the REAL classification. Comparison groups of patients included those with primary ocular adnexal MALT lymphoma versus primary ocular adnexal lymphomas of other types, MALT lymphoma versus non-MALT lymphomas (primary and secondary), and primary ocular adnexal lymphoma (MALT lymphomas and other types) versus secondary ocular adnexal lymphomas.?METHODS—A retrospective review of the National Ophthalmic Pathology Laboratory records identified 20 cases of ocular adnexal lymphoma over a 10 year period which were reclassified using appropriate immunohistochemical stains. Patients' medical records were examined for data including stage of the disease at presentation, mode of treatment, and patient outcome.?RESULTS—Among the 20 cases identified 14 had primary ocular adnexal lymphomas. 10 of the primary lymphomas had histological features of MALT lymphoma. One case was a primary ocular adnexal T cell lymphoma, one a follicular centre, follicular B cell lymphoma, and two were large cell B cell lymphomas. Six cases had systemic disease, four large B cell, one follicular centre, follicular B cell, and one mantle cell. A significantly higher proportion of patients with MALT lymphomas had early disease (p = 0.005), initially required local treatment (p = 0.005) and were alive at last follow up (p = 0.001) than those without. Two patients with MALT lymphoma had recurrence of lymphoma which responded to further treatment.?CONCLUSIONS—Patients with primary ocular adnexal MALT lymphomas present with localised disease requiring local treatment and have a better outcome compared with patients with other types. As a small percentage of these tumours recur, patients should be followed up indefinitely.?? PMID:10340987

Cahill, M.; Barnes, C.; Moriarty, P.; Daly, P.; Kennedy, S.

1999-01-01

205

Lymphomas of the gastrointestinal tract  

Microsoft Academic Search

The gastrointestinal tract is the most frequently involved extranodal localization, representing 30–40% of extranodal lymphomas\\u000a and from 4% to 20% of all non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) cases1, 2. In Western countries the most common location is the stomach (approximately 50–60%), followed by the small intestines (30%)\\u000a and the large intestine (around 10%)3. Involvement of the oesophagus is very rare. These proportions

E. Zucca

206

[Therapeutic attitude in acute necrotizing pancreatitis].  

PubMed

The necrosectomy, celiostomy and pancreatic drainage represent the surgical treatment of choice in necrotizing pancreatitis. We present the clinical observation of a patient 59 years old operated in surgical service of Baia Mare for acute necrotizing pancreatitis, discussing the moment of operation, tips of operations, postoperative complications as well as our experience in acute grave pancreatitis treatment. PMID:12731268

Le?e, Mihaela; Pop, C; Naghi, Ildiko; Mure?an, Lavinia

2002-01-01

207

Severe acute pancreatitis: Clinical course and management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Severity of AP is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and\\/or necrotizing pancreatitis pathomorphologically. Risk factors determining independently the outcome of SAP are early multi-organ failure, infection of necrosis and extended necrosis (> 50%). Up to one third of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis develop

Hans G Beger; Bettina M Rau

208

Hepatosplenic T cell lymphoma.  

PubMed

A 26 year old lady came with intermittent fever since eight months. She also complained of abdominal pain and decreased appetite for six months. She had swelling of feet and distension of abdomen due to ascites since one month. There was history of jaundice one month back. On radiological examination, hepatomegaly with dilated portal vein, massive splenomegaly and ascites without any lymphadenopathy was noted. Chest X-ray was normal. Blood examination and bone marrow studies were inconclusive. We received her liver biopsy, which showed normal architecture and sinusoidal infiltration by a monomorphic population of small to intermediate sized lymphoid cells. Portal tracts were free of such infiltrate. These lymphoid cells were LCA, CD3, CD43 positive and negative for CD20, CD34, CD4, CD8 and c-kit. Based on all these features, a diagnosis of Hepatosplenic T cell lymphoma was made. She was treated symptomatically, however she died within two months of diagnosis. PMID:25332524

Khan, Nadeem Noor Mohammad; Jijina, Farah F; Joshi, Amita S; Gupte, Prajakta A; Chaturvedi, Rachana A

2014-09-01

209

Conjunctival MALT Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Abstract A 67-year-old woman was referred for staging of a mucosa-associated lymphoid tumor lymphoma involving the left conjunctiva. CT scan had shown paravertebral and pelvic masses, and a breast nodule. FDG PET/CT demonstrated moderately increased uptake in the left ocular conjunctiva and confirmed the paravertebral and pelvic masses and the breast nodule. Moreover, abnormal FDG uptake was shown in 2 breast nodules, the flank, the gluteus maximus, and the gastric cardia. The patient received 6 cycles of rituximab-bendamustine chemotherapy with a complete clinical and metabolic response at the 6-month follow-up PET/CT and remained relapse-free without visual acuity problem after a 36-month follow-up. PMID:24458180

Sallak, Asmaa; Besson, Florent L.; Pomoni, Anastasia; Christinat, Alexandre; Adler, Marcel; Aegerter, Jean-Philippe; Nguyen, Christophe; de Leval, Laurence; Frossard, Valerie; Prior, John O.

2014-01-01

210

Familial pancreatic cancer: genetic advances  

PubMed Central

Beset by poor prognosis, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is classified as familial or sporadic. This review elaborates on the known genetic syndromes that underlie familial pancreatic cancer, where there are opportunities for genetic counseling and testing as well as clinical monitoring of at-risk patients. Such subsets of familial pancreatic cancer involve germline cationic trypsinogen or PRSS1 mutations (hereditary pancreatitis), BRCA2 mutations (usually in association with hereditary breast–ovarian cancer syndrome), CDKN2 mutations (familial atypical mole and multiple melanoma), or DNA repair gene mutations (e.g., ATM and PALB2, apart from those in BRCA2). However, the vast majority of familial pancreatic cancer cases have yet to have their genetic underpinnings elucidated, waiting in part for the results of deep sequencing efforts. PMID:24395243

Rustgi, Anil K.

2014-01-01

211

MORAb-004 in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-09-03

212

Burkitt Lymphoma: beyond discoveries  

PubMed Central

First described in 1958 in Uganda, Burkitt lymphoma (BL) attracted interest worldwide following reports of its uneven geographic distribution and rapidly fatal clinical course. Both suggested infectious etiology and curability. Seminal discoveries followed in quick succession. Viral etiology – due to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) – was confirmed. Chromosomal translocations, involving cellular MYC, a protooncogene, were discovered, shown to be a hallmark of BL, and central to the genetic basis of cancer. Cure of BL using combination chemotherapy was demonstrated. Unfortunately, civil disturbance in Africa disrupted BL research and blunted its impact on education and oncology care in Africa. Important questions went unanswered. The risk of BL due to malaria or EBV was not quantified. Efforts to answer whether BL could be prevented – by preventing malaria or early EBV infection – were abandoned. The mechanism of malaria in BL is unknown. In Africa, BL remains mostly fatal and diagnosis is still made clinically. Unprecedented advances in molecular, genomics and proteomic technologies, promising to unlock mysteries of cancers, have re-awakened interest in BL. With return of stability to Africa, the unanswered questions about BL are re-attracting global interest. This interest now includes exploiting the knowledge gained about genetics, proteomics, and bioinformatics to enable the development of targeted less toxic treatment for BL; and simpler methods to diagnose BL with high accuracy and sensitivity. The articles in the Burkitt Lymphoma (BL): Beyond Discoveries in Infectious Agents and Cancer highlight BL as priority. Authors explore etiology, pathology, pathogenesis of BL, and whether knowledge gained in the studies of BL can catalyze sustainable cancer services in one of the world’s poorest served regions. PMID:24079372

2013-01-01

213

[Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids. PMID:18378104

De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lémann, M

2008-04-01

214

Rituximab, Lenalidomide, and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Follicular Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

2014-11-20

215

Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

2014-09-08

216

NIH study shows Burkitt lymphoma is molecularly distinct from other lymphomas  

Cancer.gov

Scientists have uncovered a number of molecular signatures in Burkitt lymphoma, including unique genetic alterations that promote cell survival, that are not found in other lymphomas. These findings provide the first genetic evidence that Burkitt lymphoma is a cancer fundamentally distinct from other types of lymphoma.

217

Rituxan/Bendamustine/PCI-32765 in Relapsed DLBCL, MCL, or Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2014-03-28

218

Cutaneous lymphomas: from morphology to chip technology.  

PubMed

Cutaneous lymphomas represent a heterogeneous group of malignant lymphoid diseases with particular tropism for the skin. Prognosis and treatment depend on the type of lymphoma, thus precise diagnosis and classification are of paramount importance. Classification of cutaneous lymphomas relies on a synthesis of all available information, including clinical history and presentation, histopathology, immunophenotype, and molecular data. Thanks to the efforts of the lymphoma groups of both the World Health Organization (WHO) and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), a joint WHO-EORTC classification for primary cutaneous lymphomas has been proposed in 2005. The WHO-EORTC classification has been adsorbed with minor changes in the 2008 WHO classification of tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues, thus including for the first time primary cutaneous lymphomas as distinct subtypes of extranodal lymphomas in a general classification of lymphomas. PMID:20096193

Cerroni, L; Wiesner, T

2009-11-01

219

Gray zone lymphomas in pediatric patients.  

PubMed

Gray zone lymphomas are defined as lymphoid malignancies that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular investigations have been performed. The 2008 World Health Organization Classification proposed 2 gray zone lesions: (1) B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma and (2) B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma. These gray zone lesions are rare, especially in pediatric patients, and create a great challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because this differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this manuscript, we report 2 cases of pediatric patients with gray zone lymphoma and review clinicopathologic features, treatment options, and outcomes of this uncommon tumor. PMID:20331368

Liang, Xiayuan; Greffe, Brian; Cook, Bruce; Giller, Roger; Graham, Douglas K; McGranahan, Amy N; Wang, Michael

2011-01-01

220

Genetically Engineered Lymphocytes, Cyclophosphamide, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma or Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-08-04

221

Dissecting the gray zone between follicular lymphoma and marginal zone lymphoma using morphological and genetic features  

PubMed Central

Nodal marginal zone lymphoma is a poorly defined entity in the World Health Organization classification, based largely on criteria of exclusion and the diagnosis often remains subjective. Follicular lymphoma lacking t(14;18) has similar characteristics which results in a major potential diagnostic overlap which this study aims to dissect. Four subgroups of lymphoma samples (n=56) were analyzed with high-resolution array comparative genome hybridization: nodal marginal zone lymphoma, t(14;18)-negative follicular lymphoma, localized t(14:18)-positive follicular lymphoma and disseminated t(14;18)-positive follicular lymphoma. Gains on chromosomes 7, 8 and 12 were observed in all subgroups. The mean number of aberrations was higher in disseminated t(14;18)-positive follicular lymphoma than in localized t(14:18)-positive follicular lymphoma (P<0.01) and the majority of alterations in localized t(14:18)-positive follicular lymphoma were also found in disseminated t(14;18)-positive follicular lymphoma. Nodal marginal zone lymphoma was marked by 3q gains with amplifications of four genes. A different overall pattern of aberrations was seen in t(14;18)-negative follicular lymphoma compared to t(14;18)-positive follicular lymphoma. t(14;18)-negative follicular lymphoma is characterized by specific (focal) gains on chromosome 3, as observed in nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Our results support the notion that localized t(14:18)-positive follicular lymphoma represents an early phase of disseminated t(14;18)-positive follicular lymphoma. t(14;18)-negative follicular lymphoma bears aberrations that are more like those in nodal marginal zone lymphoma, suggesting a relation between these groups. PMID:23850804

Krijgsman, Oscar; Gonzalez, Patricia; Ponz, Olga Balague; Roemer, Margaretha G.M.; Slot, Stefanie; Broeks, Annegien; Braaf, Linde; Kerkhoven, Ron M.; Bot, Freek; van Groningen, Krijn; Beijert, Max; Ylstra, Bauke; de Jong, Daphne

2013-01-01

222

Rare primary extranodal lymphomas: diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of the genital tract  

Microsoft Academic Search

Primary non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) of the genital tract is a rare entity. Etiology and pathogenesis of these NHLs are unknown,\\u000a although there might be a possible association between chronic inflammation and lymphomas. The most common histological subtype\\u000a is the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We report two cases of uterine lymphoma and one case of prostate lymphoma in this paper.\\u000a The

Péter Rajnics; Judit Demeter; Judit Csomor; László Krenács; László Pajor; Balázs Kollár; Zsuzsanna Kertész; Miklós Egyed

2009-01-01

223

Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of the pancreatic secretory parenchyma. Despite the heterogeneity in pathogenesis and involved risk factors, processes such as necrosis/apoptosis, inflammation or duct obstruction are involved. This fibrosing process ultimately leads to progressive loss of the lobular morphology and structure of the pancreas, deformation of the large ducts and severe changes in the arrangement and composition of the islets. These conditions lead to irreversible morphological and structural changes resulting in impairment of both exocrine and endocrine functions. The prevalence of the disease is largely dependent on culture and geography. The etiological risk-factors associated with CP are multiple and involve both genetic and environmental factors. Throughout this review the M-ANNHEIM classification system will be used, comprising a detailed description of risk factors such as: alcohol-consumption, nicotine-consumption, nutritional factors, hereditary factors, efferent duct factors, immunological factors and miscellaneous and rare metabolic factors. Increased knowledge of the different etiological factors may encourage the use of further advanced diagnostic tools, which potentially will help clinicians to diagnose CP at an earlier stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical picture, it is not surprising that treatment of patients with CP is challenging and often unsuccessful. PMID:24259953

Brock, Christina; Nielsen, Lecia M?ller; Lelic, Dina; Drewes, Asbj?rn Mohr

2013-01-01

224

KRAS in pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most feared malignancies. The most common form of pancreatic cancer is adenocarcinoma arising from the ductal epithelium. KRAS is the most common oncogene that has been found to be mutated. However, targeting KRAS directly has been difficult. We do not know a lot about the relationship between KRAS and other signaling pathways. At the same time, little is known about the non KRAS mutated or wild type (WT) tumors. Most of the data that we have as far, as mutational status is concerned, has been obtained from the tumor itself and not from metastatic lesions. In this review, we discuss two abstracts (Abstracts #e15214 and #e15207) published in conjunction with the 2014 ASCO Annual Meeting. These discuss the relationship between KRAS and other signaling pathways and the differences between mutated KRAS and WT tumors. The studies found low rate of KRAS mutation in cells obtained from ascitic fluid. While the studies are small, these are novel findings that are worth exploring further. They increase our understanding of the biology of the disease and take us a step closer to treating this deadly malignancy. PMID:25076326

Agarwal, Archana; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

2014-07-01

225

[Pancreatic tumors: recent developments].  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer (PC) still typically has a poor prognosis. In addition to smoking, obesity and new-onset diabetes mellitus are considered to be significant risk factors. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) remains the mainstay for diagnosis and on which the majority of advances are based. In this sense, needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE) is gaining importance in the differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions and studies comparing different needle types (cytology vs. histology) for EUS-guided puncture. Intravenous contrast (IC-EUS) and elastography are additional tools associated with EUS that can assist in diagnosing PC. Regarding prognostic factors, the importance of the role of mesenteric-portal vein resection was emphasized, given the limited advances in treatment, as in previous years. Regarding cystic tumors, work focuses on validating the new international guidelines from Fukuoka 2012 (revised Sendai criteria) and on determining predictors of cystic lesion malignancy, mainly of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). From a therapeutic point of view, there are theories regarding the usefulness of alcohol and the gemcitabine-paclitaxel combination in the ablation of small mucinous cystic lesions through EUS-injection. PMID:25294272

Lariño Noia, José

2014-09-01

226

Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

2013-01-01

227

the Incidence of Pancreatic Cancer  

E-print Network

Laboratory studies indicate that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may inhibit pancreatic cancer, but epidemiologic data to support this finding are limited. We conducted a prospective study from 1992 through 1999 among 28 283 postmenopausal women who lived in Iowa to examine the association between the self-reported use of aspirin and other NSAIDs and the incidence of pancreatic cancer. Eighty incident cases of pancreatic cancer were identified during 7 years of follow-up. The multivariate-adjusted relative risk of

Nonsteroidal Anti; Kristin E. Anderson; Trista W; Johnson Deann Lazovich; Aaron R. Folsom

228

Acute mediastinitis arising from pancreatic mediastinal fistula in recurrent pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Acute mediastinitis is a fatal disease that usually originates from esophageal perforation and surgical infection. Rare cases of descending necrotizing mediastinitis can occur following oral cavity and pharynx infection or can be a complication of pancreatitis. The most common thoracic complications of pancreatic disease are reactive pleural effusion and pneumonia, while rare complications include thoracic conditions, such as pancreaticopleural fistula with massive pleural effusion or hemothorax and extension of pseudocyst into the mediastinum. There have been no reports of acute mediastinitis originating from pancreatitis in South Korea. In this report, we present the case of a 50-year-old female suffering from acute mediastinitis with pleural effusion arising from recurrent pancreatitis that improved after surgical intervention.

Choe, In Soo; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Sun Moon; Song, Kyung Ho; Koo, Hoon Sup; Park, Jung Ho; Pyo, Jin Sil; Kim, Ji Yeong; Choi, In Seok

2014-01-01

229

Acute mediastinitis arising from pancreatic mediastinal fistula in recurrent pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute mediastinitis is a fatal disease that usually originates from esophageal perforation and surgical infection. Rare cases of descending necrotizing mediastinitis can occur following oral cavity and pharynx infection or can be a complication of pancreatitis. The most common thoracic complications of pancreatic disease are reactive pleural effusion and pneumonia, while rare complications include thoracic conditions, such as pancreaticopleural fistula with massive pleural effusion or hemothorax and extension of pseudocyst into the mediastinum. There have been no reports of acute mediastinitis originating from pancreatitis in South Korea. In this report, we present the case of a 50-year-old female suffering from acute mediastinitis with pleural effusion arising from recurrent pancreatitis that improved after surgical intervention. PMID:25356062

Choe, In Soo; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Sun Moon; Song, Kyung Ho; Koo, Hoon Sup; Park, Jung Ho; Pyo, Jin Sil; Kim, Ji Yeong; Choi, In Seok

2014-10-28

230

17-DMAG in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-24

231

Rituximab and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2011-08-11

232

Pancreatic bladder or double gallbladder draining into pancreatic duct?  

Microsoft Academic Search

:   We report a case of pancreatic bladder which could also be interpreted as double gallbladder draining into the pancreatic\\u000a duct. A 6-year-old Japanese boy underwent a cholecystectomy of the smaller bladder under the diagnosis of duplication of the\\u000a gallbladder, leaving the normal gallbladder and an unremarkable biliary ductal system. The smaller bladder was histologically\\u000a similar to the gallbladder tissue.

Toshimitsu Ishibashi; Hideo Nagai; Toshihiko Yasuda; Yoshikazu Yasuda; Kogoro Kasahara; Kyotaro Kanazawa

1999-01-01

233

Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update  

PubMed Central

Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis.

Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

2014-01-01

234

Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

2014-10-07

235

Cure of incurable lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

The most potent method for augmenting the cytocidal power of monoclonal antibody (MAb) treatment is to conjugate radionuclides to the MAb to deliver systemic radiotherapy (radioimmunotherapy; RIT). The antigen, MAb, and its epitope can make a difference in the performance of the drug. Additionally, the radionuclide, radiochemistry, chelator for radiometals and the linker between the MAb and chelator can have a major influence on the performance of drugs (radiopharmaceuticals) for RIT. Smaller radionuclide carriers, such as antibody fragments and mimics, and those used for pretargeting strategies, have been described and evaluated. All of these changes in the drugs and strategies for RIT have documented potential for improved performance and patient outcomes. RIT is a promising new therapy that should be incorporated into the management of patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) soon after these patients have proven incurable. Predictable improvements using better drugs, strategies, and combinations with other drugs seem certain to make RIT integral to the management of patients with NHL, and likely lead to cure of currently incurable NHL.

De Nardo, Gerald L. [Radiodiagnosis and Therapy, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)]. E-mail: gldenardo@ucdavis.edu; Sysko, Vladimir V. [Radiodiagnosis and Therapy, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); De Nardo, Sally J. [Radiodiagnosis and Therapy, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

2006-10-01

236

Topotecan combined with Ifosfamide, Etoposide, and L-asparaginase (TIEL) regimen improves outcomes in aggressive T-cell lymphoma.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new regimen consisting of Topotecan, Ifosfamide, Etoposide, and L-asparaginase (TIEL) in treating aggressive T-cell lymphoma. Twenty-four patients were included in the research, eighteen males and six females. Half of the patients were in stages III and IV, and nearly half of them experienced failure of at least one regimen. Eleven were diagnosed as peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), five extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, non-specific, four angioimmunoblastic, and four anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (2 ALK positive). Patients were given 98 cycles of TIEL altogether. The responsive rate to TIEL was 76.9 % among 13 cases who received the regimen as the first-line treatment. Among 11 cases, TIEL was the second- or more-line treatment, the responsive rate was 63.6 %. The median PFS was 32.0 ± 21.0 (95 % CI 0-73.29) months. Median overall survival (OS) was not reached yet. Approximately 41.3 % of patients showed the third- to fourth-degree hematological side effects. Non-hematological toxicity included nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abnormal liver function. Among those patients received L-asparaginase, nine experienced mild abnormal coagulation function after 7 days of initiating chemotherapy, and no pancreatic injury was found. TIEL regimen is effective for aggressive T-cell lymphoma with controllable side effect and can be used for more patients. PMID:25428395

Shao, YaJuan; Guan, Mei; Chen, ShuChang; Jia, Ning; Wang, YuZhou

2015-01-01

237

Updated imaging nomenclature for acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

KEY POINTS 1. CT is used to confirm the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis when the diagnosis is in doubt and to differentiate acute interstitial pancreatitis from necrotizing pancreatitis, which is a key element of the updated Atlanta nomenclature. The acute interstitial variety accounts for 90-95% of cases, with acute necrotizing pancreatitis accounting for the remaining cases. 2. Necrosis due to acute pancreatitis is best assessed on IV contrast-enhanced CT performed 40 seconds after injection. Peripancreatic necrosis is a subtype of necrotizing pancreatitis in which tissue death occurs in peripancreatic tissues. This is seen in isolation in 20% of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. 3. Simple fluid collections associated with acute interstitial pancreatitis are subdivided chronologically. A collection observed within approximately 4 weeks of acute pancreatitis onset is termed an "acute peripancreatic fluid collection (APFC)." A collection older than 4 weeks should have a thin wall and is termed a "pseudocyst." Both APFCs and pseudocysts can be infected or sterile. 4. Fluid collections associated with necrotizing pancreatitis are labeled on the basis of age and the presence of a capsule. Within 4 weeks of acute pancreatitis onset, a fluid collection associated with necrotizing pancreatitis is termed an "acute necrotic collection (ANC)" whereas an older collection is termed an area of "walled-off necrosis (WON)" if it has a perceptible wall on CT. The term "pseudocyst" is not used in the setting of necrotizing pancreatitis collections. Although an ANC and a (WON can be infected or sterile, infection is far more likely compared with acute interstitial pancreatitis collections. 5. The severity of acute pancreatitis is graded on the basis of the presence of acute complications or organ failure. Mild acute pancreatitis has neither acute complications nor organ failure. Moderate-severity acute pancreatitis is associated with acute complications or organ failure lasting fewer than 48 hours. Severe acute pancreatitis is characterized by single- or multiorgan failure persisting for greater than 48 hours. PMID:25341160

Murphy, Kevin P; O'Connor, Owen J; Maher, Michael M

2014-11-01

238

Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Hodgkin's Disease  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-22

239

Listeria Vaccines for Pancreatic Cancer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a lethal disease that is notoriously resistant to standard therapies including chemotherapy. This is due in part to a tumor microenvironment that impedes drug delivery. However, leukocytes actively infiltrate tumo...

G. Beatty, P. Guirnalda, S. L. Luque

2013-01-01

240

[Artificial nutrition in acute pancreatitis].  

PubMed

Nutritional support in acute pancreatitis. Despite increasing knowledge and available guidelines in the fields of nutritional support in pancreatic diseases there do still exist a lot of controversies, aversions, delusions in the clinical work. Hungarian Society of Clinical Nutrition has already published it's own guideline on nutrition in pancreatic diseases in 2002. European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ESPEN) also published a Consensus Statement based on the proposals of an international Consensus Conference with active Hungarian participation. The aim of this article is to clear up habitual considerations of some physicians and to share current knowledge from physiology/pathophysiology to quality control upon these guidelines, meta-analyses, and, the daily practice of Hungarian pioneers of nutrition support in pancreatic diseases. PMID:15997665

Harsányi, László

2005-05-29

241

General Information about Pancreatic Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... the patient can continue to eat normally. Radiation therapy Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses ... Approved for Pancreatic Cancer for more information. Chemoradiation therapy Chemoradiation therapy combines chemotherapy and radiation therapy to ...

242

Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer  

Cancer.gov

This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

243

Dynamic CT of pancreatic tumors  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic computed tomography was performed on 19 patients with clinically diagnosed pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. There were 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, three with inflammatory pancreatic masses, two with cystadenoma, one with insuloma, and three with peripancreatic tumors. Computed tomography was performed with a Varian-V-360-3 scanner; scanning was for 30 consecutive sec at 3 sec intervals after the bolus injection of 50 ml of contrast medium into the antecubital vein. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) may be more useful than conventional contrast CT because it facilitates: (1) correct evaluation of tumor vascularity allowing a differential diagnosis; (2) location of the boundary between tumor and a nontumor tissue; (3) detection of small tumors; and (4) visualization of pancreatic invasion by peripancreatic tumors. In addition, contrast enhancement and the degree of vascular proliferation can be quantitatively assessed by analyzing time-density curves.

Hosoki, T.

1983-05-01

244

Immunotherapy for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer  

Cancer.gov

In this trial, researchers are using a monoclonal antibody called MDX-010 to treat patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. MDX-010 binds to and blocks the activity of an immune response inhibitor molecule called CTLA-4.

245

[Panniculitic T-cell lymphoma].  

PubMed

Panniculitic T-cell lymphoma is a rare, aggressive variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, with fewer than 100 cases described. The main problem is its diagnosis, as both the clinical and the histological features may simulate benign panniculitis. We present the case of a 34-year-old male patient, who had presented with an indurated plaque, sclerodermiform in appearance, on the front of the right thigh for 4 months, later accompanied by fever and constitutional symptoms. The initial diagnosis was cellulitis, but no clinical improvement was seen despite systemic antibiotic therapy. After two skin biopsies, the patient was diagnosed with panniculitic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The patient was treated with 8 cycles of CHOP chemotherapy, with resolution of the symptoms. PMID:16476344

Rodríguez-Vázquez, María; García-Arpa, Mónica; Martín, Francisco; Calle, Carmen; Marchán, Enrique; Romero, Guillermo; Cortina, Pilar

2005-03-01

246

Adjuvant Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death in Europe with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Although surgery cannot guarantee a cure, the 5-year survival does improve to around 10% following resection and increases to 20–30% with adjuvant chemotherapy. The European Study Group for Pancreatic Cancer (ESPAC) 1 trial was the first adequately powered,

Amy Thomas; Khaled Dajani; John P. Neoptolemos; Paula Ghaneh

2010-01-01

247

Mimics of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Abstract Several uncommon primary pancreatic tumors, inflammatory conditions, metastasis to the pancreas and peripancreatic masses can mimic the appearance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Differentiation between these lesions and PDA can be challenging, due to the overlap in imaging features; however, familiarity with their typical imaging features and clinical presentation may be helpful in their differentiation, as in some cases, invasive diagnostic tests or unnecessary surgery can be avoided. The different pathologies that can mimic PDA include inflammatory conditions such as the various forms of pancreatitis (chronic-focal mass-forming, autoimmune and groove pancreatitis), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, solid pseudopapillary tumors, metastasis (solid non-lymphomatous and hematologic), congenital variants (annular pancreas), as well as peripancreatic lesions (accessory spleen, adrenal masses, duodenal masses, lymph nodes and vascular lesions), and certain rare pancreatic tumors (e.g., acinar cell tumors, solid serous tumors, hamartoma and solitary fibrous tumors). The clinical presentation and imaging features of the most commonly encountered mimics of PDA are discussed in this presentation with representative illustrations. PMID:24060833

Kaza, Ravi K.; Azar, Shadi F.; Ruma, Julie A.; Francis, Isaac R.

2013-01-01

248

ZEB1 in Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most malignant human neoplasias. On the molecular level, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been demonstrated to contribute to the malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer cells. ZEB1 is a transcriptional repressor that has been identified as an inducer of EMT. A negative feedback loop between ZEB1 and microRNA-200c has been shown to regulate this EMT induction in various models. With respect to pancreatic cancer, primary effects of EMT comprise increased local and distant tumor cell dissemination. Another recently described feature of the EMT is the acquisition of cancer stem cell traits. For pancreatic cancer cells, antagonism between ZEB1 and stemness-inhibiting micro-RNAs has been demonstrated to contribute to this process, providing experimental support for the migrating cancer stem cell (MCSC) hypothesis. ZEB1 has also been shown to be associated with drug resistance of pancreatic cancer cells. This article reviews the biological functions of ZEB1 with a focus on pancreatic cancer. PMID:24281177

Wellner, Ulrich; Brabletz, Thomas; Keck, Tobias

2010-01-01

249

Alvocidib, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Lymphoproliferative Disorders or Mantle Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-06-03

250

Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-12-06

251

Alisertib With and Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-11-06

252

Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-06-23

253

Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

2014-08-05

254

Open approach in pancreatic and infected pancreatic necrosis: Laparostomies and preplanned revisions  

Microsoft Academic Search

One hundred and two patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis were treated in accordance with a combined regimen of necrosectomy, open drainage by laparostomies, and repeated re-explorations. The severity of pancreatitis was assessed by the APACHE II score (median 15 on admission). Eighty-seven (85%) patients were classified as having infected pancreatic necrosis and only 15 (15%) as having pancreatic necrosis. Overall,

Reinhold Ffigger; Franz Schulz; Michael Rogy; Friedrich Herbst; Darius Mirza; Arnulf Fritsch

1991-01-01

255

Mabs against Pancreatic cancer Therapeutic antibodies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer  

E-print Network

Mabs against Pancreatic cancer 1 Therapeutic antibodies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer pancreatic cancer inserm-00497886,version1-6Jul2010 Author manuscript, published in "TheScientificWorldJournal (electronic resource) 2010;10:1107-20" DOI : 10.1100/tsw.2010.103 #12;Mabs against Pancreatic cancer 2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

256

The Role of Somatostatin and Octreotide in Pancreatic Surgery and in Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Major pancreatic resection is still accompanied by considerable morbidity (35%) and even mortality (10%). Typical complications such as pancreatic fistula and abscess are chiefly associated with exocrine pancreatic secretion. Therefore, the perioperative inhibition of exocrine pancreatic secretion is a promising concept in the prevention of complications. The hormone somatostatin and its analogue octreotide is well known as a potent inhibitor

H. Friess; B. Hofbauer; M. W. Büchler

1994-01-01

257

Brentuximab Vedotin + Rituximab as Frontline Therapy for Pts w/ CD30+ and/or EBV+ Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Epstein-Barr Virus Infection; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoid

2014-09-10

258

Duodenum preservation in pancreatic head resection to maintain pancreatic exocrine function (determined by pancreatic function diagnostant test and cholecystokinin secretion)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Purpose. Organ-preserving surgery, such as pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD), duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR), or medial pancreatectomy (MP), is one of the recent advances in pancreatic surgery. There was a previous report that preservation of the duodenum maintained pancreatic function. However, concerning the resected pancreas, patients were divided into two groups; one group included pancreatic head resections such as Whipple, PPPD,

Koji Ito; T. Takada

2005-01-01

259

Hodgkin lymphoma transformation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Transformation to a large cell lymphoma may occur during the course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) in approximately 5% of the cases. This is known as Richter's transformation. A much less frequent transformation to Hodgkin lymphoma may occur. We report a case of CLL/SLL in which a transformation to Hodgkin lymphoma occurred, and we review previously published reports of this transformation. Transformation to Hodgkin lymphoma in CLL/SLL has a poor outcome compared to de novo cases of Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:23382602

Krause, John R.; Drinkard, Lee C.; Keglovits, Latoya C.

2013-01-01

260

Diagnosis and management of a patient with primary pulmonary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: A case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Primary pulmonary lymphoma (PPL) is an uncommon type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. The majority of PPLs are of low-grade, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type. Primary pulmonary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is extremely rare, and prompt diagnosis may be challenging since its clinical symptoms and signs are nonspecific. Although the clinical features, diagnostic procedures, optimal management and prognostic factors of this disease have not yet been well defined, open thoracotomy and chest computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous biopsy are the preferred methods used in previous studies. In the present case report, the diagnosis and management of a patient with primary pulmonary DLBCL is reported. A 68-year-old patient was admitted to hospital in May 2013, with complaints of shortness of breath and intermittent wheezing and a cough associated with the production of small amounts of phlegm. Following admission, chest CT scans revealed a mass in the right middle lobe with ground-glass opacities at the lesion margins, as well as air bronchograms in the areas of consolidation. Bronchoscopy was performed and revealed an endobronchial lesion and partial stenosis in the distal end of the middle segment bronchus. Transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) of the right hilar lymph node, as well as endobronchial biopsy, was performed. The patient was diagnosed with primary pulmonary DLBCL by subsequent histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis of biopsy specimens collected via TBNA. Following the final diagnosis, standard treatment with CHOP chemotherapy resulted in significant clinical and radiological response and the patient remained in remission 8 months later. These results indicate that TBNA may be an effective method for the diagnosis of primary pulmonary DLBCL. PMID:25120602

JIANG, AI-GUI; GAO, XIAO-YAN; LU, HUI-YU

2014-01-01

261

Study of BKM120 & Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-07-24

262

Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-31

263

Alpha 1 antitrypsin phenotypes and alcoholic pancreatitis.  

PubMed Central

Altered frequencies of alpha 1 antitrypsin phenotypes have been reported in patients with chronic pancreatitis, suggesting a possible genetic basis for individual susceptibility to this disease. Alpha 1 antitrypsin phenotypes, with particular regard to alcoholic pancreatitis, were studied. Patients with alcoholic pancreatitis were compared with alcoholic control subjects with no history of pancreatic disease. Serum alpha 1 antitrypsin concentrations were raised in pancreatitis patients sampled within one month of an acute attack of pancreatitis, but otherwise values were similar to those of control subjects. There were no significant differences in alpha 1 antitrypsin phenotypes between alcoholics with pancreatitis and alcoholic control subjects. This study of alpha 1 antitrypsin phenotypes provides no evidence of an inherited susceptibility to alcoholic pancreatitis. PMID:1885078

Haber, P S; Wilson, J S; McGarity, B H; Hall, W; Thomas, M C; Pirola, R C

1991-01-01

264

Utility of PET/CT in diagnosis, staging, assessment of resectability and metabolic response of pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common gastrointestinal tumors, with its incidence staying at a high level in both the United States and China. However, the overall 5-year survival rate of pancreatic cancer is still extremely low. Surgery remains the only potential chance for long-term survival. Early diagnosis and precise staging are crucial to make proper clinical decision for surgery candidates. Despite advances in diagnostic technology such as computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasound, diagnosis, staging and monitoring of the metabolic response remain a challenge for this devastating disease. Positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), a relatively novel modality, combines metabolic detection with anatomic information. It has been widely used in oncology and achieves good results in breast cancer, lung cancer and lymphoma. Its utilization in pancreatic cancer has also been widely accepted. However, the value of PET/CT in pancreatic disease is still controversial. Will PET/CT change the treatment strategy for potential surgery candidates? What kind of patients benefits most from this exam? In this review, we focus on the utility of PET/CT in diagnosis, staging, and assessment of resectability of pancreatic cancer. In addition, its ability to monitor metabolic response and recurrence after treatment will be emphasis of discussion. We hope to provide answers to the questions above, which clinicians care most about.

Wang, Xiao-Yi; Yang, Feng; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

2014-01-01

265

Acute mononeuropathy with angiotropic lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Angiotropic lymphoma can present as a vascular disease in the central nervous system. The patient described in this report had a sudden pain in the region of the right superficial peroneal nerve and a nerve biopsy showed tumoral cells in the lumen of most small blood vessels. This pathology, first described in the skin as malignant angioendotheliomatosis, can be compared

C. Vital; A. Heraud; A. Vital; M. Coquet; M. Julien; J. Maupetit

1989-01-01

266

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessement of bone marrow aspiration and biopsy reveal diffuse involvement with lymphoma in approximately 40 percent of the patients. Controversy exists in arbitrarily defining difference between leukemia (ALL) and NHL with marrow involvement. 2`B Most groups consider presence of greater than 25 percent blasts in bone marrow as a sign for leukemia. Usually ALl. is treated less agressively then NHL,

S. C. Gulati; C. Gulati; R. Vega; L. Gandola; J. Yopp; R. Dinsmore; R. O’Reilly; B. Clarkson

1983-01-01

267

Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prognosis of follicular lymphomas (FL) is heterogeneous and numerous treatments may be proposed. A validated prognostic index (PI) would help in evalu- ating and choosing these treatments. Characteristics at diagnosis were col- lected from 4167 patients with FL diag- nosed between 1985 and 1992. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to propose a PI. This index was then tested

Philippe Solal-Celigny; Pascal Roy; Philippe Colombat; Josephine White; Jim O. Armitage; Reyes Arranz-Saez; Wing Y. Au; Monica Bellei; Pauline Brice; Dolores Caballero; Bertrand Coiffier; Eulogio Conde-Garcia; Chantal Doyen; Massimo Federico; Richard I. Fisher; Javier F. Garcia-Conde; Cesare Guglielmi; Michael LeBlanc; Andrew T. Lister; Armando Lopez-Guillermo; Peter McLaughlin; Noel Milpied; Nicolas Mounier; Stephen J. Proctor; Ama Rohatiner; Paul Smith; Umberto Vitolo; Pier-Luigi Zinzani; Emanuele Zucca; Emili Montserrat; J. Bernard; Hopital H. Mondor; M. D. Anderson; CHU L. Huriez

2004-01-01

268

Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma  

Cancer.gov

This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

269

Chronic pancreatitis, type 3c diabetes, and pancreatic cancer risk.  

PubMed

About half of all patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) develop diabetes mellitus (DM) due to the loss of islet cell mass, not just beta cells as in Type 1 DM (T1DM), or due to insulin resistance, as in Type 2 DM (T2DM). Patients with DM from loss of islets due to pancreatic disease or resection are diagnosed with pancreatogenic or Type 3c DM (T3cDM). Patients with T3cDM also lose counter-regulatory hormones, such as glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide, and experience maldigestion associated with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Patients with T3cDM are therefore more susceptible to hypoglycemia and a mismatch (asynchrony) between food ingestion and nutrient absorption. At the same time, the use of incretin therapy is likely useless, since maldigestion leads to the release of higher levels of hind gut hormones, including GLP1. Thus, T3cDM caused by CP or destruction of the islets involves a special class of potential risks and comorbidity that may be overlooked if the CP has not been diagnosed. Further, because CP is also associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, better classification of patients with DM is needed to determine if PDAC is associated with DM or with undetected CP that gave rise to T3cDM that was previously misclassified as T1DM to T2DM. PMID:25262729

Whitcomb, David C

2014-01-01

270

Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma and Liver Dysfunction  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-02-21

271

Bortezomib and Vorinostat as Maintenance Therapy After Autologous Stem Cell Transplant for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

2014-07-28

272

Nitric oxide modulates pancreatic edema formation in rat caerulein-induced pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the formation of pancreatic edema in caerulein-induced\\u000a pancreatitis in rats. Pancreatitis was produced by two intraperitoneal injections of caerulein, and plasma amylase concentration,\\u000a pancreatic edema index (pancreatic wet weight\\/body weight), and Evans blue extravasation (as a measure of vascular permeability)\\u000a were evaluated 5h after the first injection.

Takashi Abe; Tooru Shimosegawa; Akihiko Satoh; Reishi Abe; Yoshifumi Kikuchi; Masaru Koizumi; Takayoshi Toyota

1995-01-01

273

Pancreatitis and Diabetic Ketoacidosis with Quetiapine Use  

PubMed Central

There have been case reports about second-generation antipsychotics causing pancreatitis. In addition, there has been a case report of pancreatitis without diabetic ketoacidosis associated with the use of quetiapine, specifically, and a case report of a patient receiving quetiapine who rapidly developed hyperglycemia and acidosis without evidence of acute or chronic pancreatitis. We present what we believe to be the first report of a patient who developed pancreatitis and life-threatening diabetic ketoacidosis while receiving quetiapine. PMID:19724733

Starer, Perry J.; Javaid, Shazia

2009-01-01

274

Endoscopic transpapillary drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Endoscopic therapy of pancreatic pseudocysts has been reported mainly in small series.Methods: The results of endoscopic transpapillary cyst drainage (ETCD) were evaluated prospectively in 30 patients with pancreatic pseudocysts.Results: There were 24 men and 6 women with an average age of 45 years (SD 16). Twenty-eight had chronic pancreatitis (25 with alcoholic pancreatitis). Transpapillary cystopancreatic stents, with the tip

Marc Barthet; José Sahel; Christine Bodiou-Bertei; Jean-Paul Bernard

1995-01-01

275

Carfilzomib, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

2014-10-17

276

Ipilimumab and Rituximab In Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2014-11-25

277

Carfilzomib and Hyper-CVAD in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-11-13

278

Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an important cause of maldigestion and a major complication in chronic pancreatitis. Normal digestion requires adequate stimulation of pancreatic secretion, sufficient production of digestive enzymes by pancreatic acinar cells, a pancreatic duct system without significant outflow obstruction and adequate mixing of the pancreatic juice with ingested food. Failure in any of these steps may result in pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, which leads to steatorrhea, weight loss and malnutrition-related complications, such as osteoporosis. Methods evaluating digestion, such as fecal fat quantification and the 13C-mixed triglycerides test, are the most accurate tests for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, but the probability of the diagnosis can also be estimated based on symptoms, signs of malnutrition in blood tests, fecal elastase 1 levels and signs of morphologically severe chronic pancreatitis on imaging. Treatment for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency includes support to stop smoking and alcohol consumption, dietary consultation, enzyme replacement therapy and a structured follow-up of nutritional status and the effect of treatment. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is administered in the form of enteric-coated minimicrospheres during meals. The dose should be in proportion to the fat content of the meal, usually 40-50000 lipase units per main meal, and half the dose is required for a snack. In cases that do not respond to initial treatment, the doses can be doubled, and proton inhibitors can be added to the treatment. This review focuses on current concepts of the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. PMID:24259956

Lindkvist, Bjorn

2013-01-01

279

Neural Hormonal Regulation of Exocrine Pancreatic Secretion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exocrine pancreatic secretion is regulated by hormone-hormonal and neural-hormonal interactions involving several regulatory peptides and neurotransmitter from the gut, the pancreas and the vagus nerve. The roles of the gastrointestinal peptides including secretin, CCK, neurotensin, motilin, PYY and pancreatic islet hormones including insulin, pancreatic polypeptide and somatostatin have been established. Interactions among secretin, CCK and neurotensin produce synergistic stimulatory effect.

William Y. Chey; Ta-min Chang

2001-01-01

280

Surgical management of pancreatic endocrine tumors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) are uncommon but clinically challenging and fascinating tumors with an annual incidence of 1 per 100,000 people. PETs present as either functional pancreatic tumors or as nonfunctional pancreatic tumors. Functional tumors are commonly associated with a specific hormonal syndrome directly related to a hormone secreted by the tumor, such as Zollinger–Ellison syndrome or organic hyperinsulinism. Nonfunctional

Jens Waldmann; Detlef K. Bartsch; Peter Langer; Volker Fendrich

2009-01-01

281

Vascular Mechanisms to Induce Acute Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vascular mechanisms are not standard tools to induce acute pancreatitis. They are used for special purposes to investigate the pathophysiologic significance of circulatory changes in acute pancreatitis. Because of the rich collateral network, occlusion of the main pancreatic arteries induces no pathological change. Complete occlusion of the venous outflow induces hemorrhagic necrosis of the pancreas, disturbances of the microcirculation, edema

H. Waldner

1992-01-01

282

Genetic Testing Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2013-01-23

283

AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2012-07-27

284

Isolation of Diverse Structural Compartments of Natural Organic Matter from the Kolyma River Watershed in East Siberian Arctic Using DEAE-Cellulose, XAD-8 Resin, C18 and PPL Cartridges  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Natural Organic Matter (NOM) is an essential part of the global carbon cycle and plays a significant role in transport of organic carbon from terrestrial ecosystems into the World Ocean. The Arctic region is one of the most vulnerable with respect to climate change. The Kolyma River is one of the great Arctic Rivers. The particular feature of the Kolyma River watershed is its location in the continuous permafrost zone. Hence, research on structural composition of NOM in the Kolyma River basin is very important for understanding the carbon flux and NOM transformations on the way from permafrost to the Arctic Ocean under conditions of the changing climate. The purpose of this work was to isolate diverse structural compartments of NOM from permafrost mud streams and freshwater environments of the Kolyma River basin suited for further structural studies using a suite of different sorbents. Another goal was to assess applicability of these sorbents for developing a NOM fluxmeter - passive device for in situ measurement of fluxes. The following sorbents were used in this study: diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) cellulose , XAD-8 resin, Varian Bond Elute PPL and C18-cartridges. The choice of the sorbents was based on the following considerations. DEAE-cellulose is an anion-exchanging resin. It is suited the best for isolation of negatively charged NOM constituents of high and low molecular weight which represent the major part of freshwater NOM. Given positive charge inherent within the sorbent, sorption of negatively charged compartments from natural water occurs under flow through conditions without any prior treatment. This makes the DEAE cellulose very promising for in situ applications (e.g., for fluxmeter). Amberlite XAD-8 is a macroreticular resin which is used as a part of the standard protocol of International Humic Substances Society for isolation of freshwater humic substances (HS). The XAD-8 resin represents a neutral hydrophobic polymer. As a result, for isolation of HS, water should be acidified to transfer humic solutes into protonated form. The acidification step is a major disadvantage of this technique which makes it hardly suitable for in situ applications. Bond Elute C18 and PPL solid phase extraction cartridges were used for extraction of the most hydrophobic part of NOM. Both C18 and PPL demand prior acidification of water sample. Particular advantage of these sorbents is their suitability for very soft methanol elution of the sorbed sample that makes them ideal sorbents for samples aimed for structural analysis. All sorbents yielded very different recoveries of NOM of the total pool of organic carbon in the sampled water which accounted for DEAE - 85%, PPL - 65%, C18 - 65%, XAD-8 - 50%. The obtained samples were structurally characterized using elemental analysis and size exclusion chromatography. This study is part of the Polaris Project, an NSF-funded undergraduate field program based out of the Northeast Science Station in Cherskiy, Northeast Siberia (thepolarisproject.org).

Andzhushev, M.; Dubinenkov, I.; Holmes, R. M.; Hatfield, K.; Perminova, I.; Bulygina, E. B.; Konstantinov, A.

2011-12-01

285

Vorinostat and Combination Chemotherapy With Rituximab in Treating Patients With HIV-Related Diffuse Large B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Other Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

2014-09-16

286

Bortezomib and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Mantle Cell Lymphoma Who Have Previously Undergone Stem Cell Transplantation  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

2014-07-14

287

Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody With or Without Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Children With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

2013-01-16

288

Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-02-18

289

3-AP and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-09-27

290

Genetically Engineered Lymphocyte Therapy After Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk, Intermediate-Grade, B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

2014-08-01

291

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma staging  

PubMed Central

Abstract In addition to clinical history and evaluations, the results of laboratory tests and imaging studies help clinicians in determining treatment strategies. Imaging plays a central role in the management of oncology patients including the initial diagnosis, staging, and follow-up to assess treatment response. Historically, radiologists have relied on free-style dictations to convey the results of imaging findings in radiology reports to referring clinicians. These unstructured free-style dictations can potentially be a source of frustration as the pertinent information needed to guide treatment may be omitted or difficult to extract from the report, thereby limiting its completeness and usefulness. These limitations can be overcome by adopting a structured and reproducible form of reporting imaging studies to help clinicians in deciding the best treatment strategy for each patient. There is a growing need to establish standardized radiology reporting templates for specific disease processes. One such example involves patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, as imaging findings determine the treatment arm to which the patient is assigned. In this presentation, we outline a list of essential features that need to be included in a structured report and highlight this with illustrative case examples. PMID:24060977

Francis, Isaac R.

2013-01-01

292

Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-08-26

293

Follicular lymphoma - treatment and prognostic factors  

PubMed Central

Follicular lymphoma is the second most frequent non-Hodgkin lymphoma accounting for about 10-20% of all lymphomas in western countries. The median age at diagnosis is 60 years old. The clinical presentation is usually characterized by asymptomatic peripheral adenopathy in cervical, axillary, inguinal and femoral regions. Treatment options for patients with naïve or recurrent follicular lymphoma are still controversial, ranging from a "watch and wait" policy to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. More recently, the availability of rituximab has substantially changed follicular lymphoma therapeutic approaches to such an extent that R-Chemo is now the standard induction first-line treatment. This review provides a general overview of the state of the art in the management of follicular lymphoma and also, a brief description regarding the current prognostic tools available for treatment decisions. PMID:23049385

Luminari, Stefano; Bellei, Monica; Biasoli, Irene; Federico, Massimo

2012-01-01

294

Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant In Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-10-01

295

Technical Advances in Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS)-Guided Tissue Acquisition for Pancreatic Cancers: How Can We Get the Best Results with EUS-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration?  

PubMed Central

Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is one of the least invasive and most effective modality in diagnosing pancreatic adenocarcinoma in solid pancreatic lesions, with a higher diagnostic accuracy than cystic tumors. EUS-FNA has been shown to detect tumors less than 3 mm, due to high spatial resolution allowing the detection of very small lesions and vascular invasion, particularly in the pancreatic head and neck, which may not be detected on transverse computed tomography. Furthermore, this minimally invasive procedure is often ideal in the endoscopic procurement of tissue in patients with unresectable tumors. While EUS-FNA has been increasingly used as a diagnostic tool, most studies have collectively looked at all primary pancreatic solid lesions, including lymphomas and pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, whereas very few studies have examined the diagnostic utility of EUS-FNA of pancreatic ductal carcinoma only. As with any novel and advanced endoscopic procedure that may incorporate several practices and approaches, endoscopists have adopted diverse techniques to improve the tissue procurement practice and increase diagnostic accuracy. In this article, we present a review of literature to date and discuss currently practiced EUS-FNA technique, including indications, technical details, equipment, patient selection, and diagnostic accuracy. PMID:24143320

Kedia, Prashant; Gaidhane, Monica

2013-01-01

296

Emphysematous pancreatitis predisposed by Olanzapine  

PubMed Central

A 32-year-old male presented to our intensive care unit with severe abdominal pain and was diagnosed as acute pancreatitis after 2 months of olanzapine therapy for bipolar disorder. His serum lipase was 900 u/L, serum triglyceride 560 mg/dL, and blood sugar, fasting and postprandial were 230 and 478 mg/dL, respectively on admission. Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) of abdomen was suggestive of acute pancreatitis. Repeat CECT showed gas inside pancreas and collection in peripancreatic area and patient underwent percutaneous drainage and antibiotics irrigation through the drain into pancreas. We describe the rare case of emphysematous pancreatitis due to development of diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and immunosuppression predisposed by short duration olanzapine therapy. PMID:25024479

Samanta, Sukhen; Samanta, Sujay; Banik, Krishanu; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

2014-01-01

297

Autoimmune pancreatitis: a case report.  

PubMed

Autoimmune pancreatitis is a fibro-inflammatory form of chronic pancreatitis. It is diagnosed by the combination of imaging studies such as a CT scan and pancreatography, laboratory analyses that include IgG4 and/or autoantibodies, histopathological evaluations and positive response to corticosteroid therapy. We report the case of a 41-year-old female with a history of jaundice and increasing abdominal pain for two weeks prior to her clinic visit. Laboratory results were significant for an increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) confirmed areas of stenosis and dilatation in the pancreatic duct and in the intra- and extra-hepatic bile ducts similar to primary sclerosantcholangitis. Laboratory analyses showed increased levels of IgG4 with thepresence of antinuclear antibodies. PMID:24829705

Salari, Masoumeh; Hosseini, Mousareza; Nekooei, Sirous; Ataei Azimi, Sajad; Farzanehfar, Mohammad Reza

2014-01-01

298

Autoimmune Pancreatitis: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune pancreatitis is a fibro-inflammatory form of chronic pancreatitis. It is diagnosed by the combination of imaging studies such as a CT scan and pancreatography, laboratory analyses that include IgG4 and/or autoantibodies, histopathological evaluations and positive response to corticosteroid therapy. We report the case of a 41-year-old female with a history of jaundice and increasing abdominal pain for two weeks prior to her clinic visit. Laboratory results were significant for an increase in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR). Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) confirmed areas of stenosis and dilatation in the pancreatic duct and in the intra- and extra-hepatic bile ducts similar to primary sclerosantcholangitis. Laboratory analyses showed increased levels of IgG4 with thepresence of antinuclear antibodies. PMID:24829705

Salari, Masoumeh; Hosseini, Mousareza; Nekooei, Sirous; Ataei Azimi, Sajad; Farzanehfar, Mohammad Reza

2014-01-01

299

Metabolism addiction in pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, an aggressively invasive, treatment-resistant malignancy and the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, is usually detectable only when already inevitably fatal. Despite advances in genetic screening, mapping and molecular characterization, its pathology remains largely elusive. Renewed research interest in longstanding doctrines of tumor metabolism has led to the emergence of aberrant signaling pathways as critical factors modulating central metabolic networks that fuel pancreatic tumors. Such pathways, including those of Ras signaling, glutamine-regulatory enzymes, lipid metabolism and autophagy, are directly affected by genetic mutations and extreme tumor microenvironments that typify pancreatic tumor cells. Elucidation of these metabolic networks can be expected to yield more potent therapies against this deadly disease. PMID:24556680

Blum, R; Kloog, Y

2014-01-01

300

Role of PET in lymphoma.  

PubMed

(18)?F-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), combined with a multidetector helical CT (PET/CT) has emerged, in the past decade as one of the most important prognostic tool for lymphoma management. Besides proving as the only imaging technique able to recapitulate all the information yielded by the standard radiological staging and restaging, it provided new essential information for chemosensitivity assessment and radiotherapy planning. In lymphoma staging, functional imaging (FI) by PET/CT was shown to be more accurate than conventional radiological (anatomical) imaging to detect nodal and extranodal involvement, whereas in posttreatment restaging it showed a superior predictive value on treatment outcome. In Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), FI concurred to delineate a new paradigm of therapy in which PET is considered an essential tool to guide physician's choice on treatment intensity and modality. In fact, PET proved very useful for: 1) assessing chemosensitivity early during treatment to predict final therapy outcome; 2) managing a residual mass, detected by CT scan in up to two thirds of patients at the end of chemotherapy; and 3) planning radiotherapy in early-stage disease when conformal radiotherapy fields are used to spare toxicity to adjacent tissues. The early chemosensitivity assessment is the underpinnings of a new therapeutic strategy in HL, aimed at minimizing treatment-related toxicity while maintaining treatment efficacy. Several clinical trials are currently underway to test this hypothesis. In diffuse, large, B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), PET/CT proved very useful: 1) in lymphoma staging, leading to upward stage migration in one third of the patients; and 2) to identify patients benefiting from consolidation radiotherapy for FDG-avid, single mass or limited-extension disease. Different to HL, the role of interim PET in DLBCL remains controversial. In follicular lymphoma (FL) preliminary studies PET/CT proved useful, in baseline staging to predict time to treatment in patients in which a watchful observation without treatment (watch and wait) was chosen as therapeutic approach treatment. In FL end-of-treatment PET/CT proved the most powerful prognostic tool to predict long-term treatment outcome. PMID:24619427

Gallamini, Andrea; Borra, Anna

2014-06-01

301

Pancreatic surgery: evolution and current tailored approach  

PubMed Central

Surgical resection of pancreatic cancer offers the only chance for prolonged survival. Pancretic resections are technically challenging, and are accompanied by a substantial risk for postoperative complications, the most significant complication being a pancreatic fistula. Risk factors for development of pancreatic leakage are now well known, and several prophylactic pharmacological measures, as well as technical interventions have been suggested in prevention of pancreatic fistula. With better postoperative care and improved radiological interventions, most frequently complications can be managed conservatively. This review also attempts to address some of the controversies related to optimal management of the pancreatic remnant after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:25392836

Muzina Misic, Dubravka; Glavcic, Goran

2014-01-01

302

Everolimus and Octreotide Acetate With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Beta Islet Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Islet Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic G-cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

2014-11-03

303

PXD101 and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-05-01

304

Adult life after surviving lymphoma in childhood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Almost all pediatric lymphomas are malignant, high-grade tumors. The combined incidence of Hodgkin’s disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin\\u000a lymphoma (NHL) reaches 10 to 12 new cases a year per million children under the age of 16 years, representing about 10% of\\u000a all pediatric cancers. HD makes up to 40% and NHL 60% of pediatric lymphomas. During the last 20 years, cure rates raised

Nicolas X. von der Weid

2008-01-01

305

CT of AIDS-related lymphoma.  

PubMed

A spectrum of CT findings in patients with AIDS-related lymphoma (ARL) is illustrated herein. When a solid mass anywhere in the body is encountered in a patient with AIDS, lymphoma must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Although the CT findings alone generally are not enough for a specific diagnosis of lymphoma, this frequently will be suggested as the most likely diagnosis, facilitating further workup. CT-guided biopsy is useful in providing tissue diagnosis in many cases. PMID:2017962

Townsend, R R

1991-05-01

306

Hepatitis C and Lymphoma: Questions and Answers  

Cancer.gov

People infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are at an increased risk of developing certain lymphomas (cancers of the lymphatic system). Researchers found that HCV infection increased the risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma by 20 percent to 30 percent. The risk of developing Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) went up by 300 percent and the risk for cryoglobulinemia, a form of blood vessel inflammation, was also elevated for those with HCV infections.

307

Blunt pancreatic trauma: evaluation with MDCT technology.  

PubMed

The purpose of this paper is to determine the relative frequency of multi-detector CT (MDCT) findings of pancreatic injury in blunt trauma and to determine their diagnostic accuracy in predicting main pancreatic duct injury. Fifty-three patients (31 male, 22 female; mean 44.1 years) with blunt trauma and admission MDCT findings suspicious for pancreatic injury or who underwent MDCT and had a discharge diagnosis of pancreatic trauma were included in this study. Two radiologists reviewed all images and recorded findings suspicious for pancreatic injury, which were subsequently compared to surgical findings to generate diagnostic accuracy. MDCT imaging findings suggestive of pancreatic injury included low attenuation peripancreatic fluid (n?=?51), hyperattenuating peripancreatic fluid (n?=?13), pancreatic contusion (n?=?7), active hemorrhage (n?=?2), and pancreatic laceration (n?=?16). Diagnostic accuracy of the various imaging findings varied for diagnosing main duct injury; there were highly sensitive, nonspecific imaging findings such as the presence of low attenuation peripancreatic fluid (sensitivity, 100 %; specificity 4.9 %) as well as insensitive, specific findings such as visualizing a pancreatic laceration involving >50 % of the parenchymal width (sensitivity, 50 %; specificity, 95.1 %). In the setting of blunt abdominal trauma, MDCT imaging findings can be grouped into two categories for determining integrity of the main pancreatic duct: indirect, highly sensitive but nonspecific findings and direct, specific but insensitive findings. Awareness of the clinical implications of the various MDCT imaging findings of pancreatic trauma is useful in interpreting their significance. PMID:23604978

Gordon, Robert W; Anderson, Stephan W; Ozonoff, Al; Rekhi, Satinder; Soto, Jorge A

2013-08-01

308

Molecular mechanisms of alcohol associated pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Alcohol abuse is commonly associated with the development of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Despite this close association, the fact that only a small percentage of human beings who abuse alcohol develop pancreatitis indicates that alcohol abuse alone is not sufficient to initiate clinical pancreatitis. This contention is further supported by the fact that administration of ethanol to experimental animals does not cause pancreatitis. Because of these findings, it is widely believed that ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to injury and additional factors trigger the development of overt pancreatitis. How ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to pancreatitis is not entirely known. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ethanol and its metabolites have a number of deleterious effects on acinar cells. Important acinar cells properties that are affected by ethanol include: calcium signaling, secretion of zymogens, autophagy, cellular regeneration, the unfolded protein response, and mitochondrial membrane integrity. In addition to the actions of ethanol on acinar cells, it is apparent that ethanol also affects pancreatic stellate cells. Pancreatic stellate cells have a critical role in normal tissue repair and the pathologic fibrotic response. Given that ethanol and its metabolites affect so many pancreatic functions, and that all of these effects occur simultaneously, it is likely that none of these effects is "THE" effect. Instead, it is most likely that the cumulative effect of ethanol on the pancreas predisposes the organ to pancreatitis. The focus of this article is to highlight some of the important mechanisms by which ethanol alters pancreatic functions and may predispose the pancreas to disease. PMID:25133017

Clemens, Dahn L; Wells, Mark A; Schneider, Katrina J; Singh, Shailender

2014-08-15

309

[Extracorporeal hemocorrection in acute pancreatitis].  

PubMed

An experience with using 340 operations of extracorporeal hemocorrection in complex intensive therapy of 160 patients with acute pancreatitis has been generalized. In 111 of these patients (69%) pancreatic necrosis complicated by the syndrome of multiple organ failure was diagnosed. Based on the mechanisms of medical efficiency the authors have developed differential indications for using different extracorporeal technologies depending on the clinico-laboratory profile of the endogenous intoxication, structure and degree of organic and systemic dysfunctions. The adoption of such technologies allowed lethality to be reduced from 37.5 to 27.6%. PMID:11011409

Romanchishen, A F; Chalenko, V V; Dubchenko, S G; Pastukhova, N K; Zotikov, A G

2000-01-01

310

Adjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer related death worldwide with an overall five-year survival of less than 5%. Potentially curative surgery, which alone can improve 5-year survival to 10%, is an option for only 10%-20% of patients at presentation owing to local invasion of the tumour or metastatic disease. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to improve 5-year survival to 20%-25% but conflicting evidence remains with regards to chemoradiation. In this article we review the current evidence available from published randomised trials and discuss ongoing phase III trials in relation to adjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:25356036

Jones, Owain Peris; Melling, James Daniel; Ghaneh, Paula

2014-01-01

311

Pancreatic sphincterotomy: Technique, indications, and complications  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic sphincterotomy serves as the cornerstone of endoscopic therapy of the pancreas. Historically, its indications have been less well-defined than those of endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy, yet it plays a definite and useful role in diseases such as chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic-type sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. In the appropriate setting, it may be used as a single therapeutic maneuver, or in conjunction with other endoscopic techniques such as pancreatic stone extraction or stent placement. The current standard of practice utilizes two different methods of performing pancreatic sphincterotomy: a pull-type sphincterotome technique without prior stent placement, and a needle-knife sphincterotome technique over an existing stent. The complications associated with pancreatic sphincterotomy are many, although acute pancreatitis appears to be the most common and the most serious of the early complications. As such, it continues to be reserved for those endoscopists who perform a relatively high-volume of therapeutic pancreaticobiliary endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. PMID:17696223

Buscaglia, Jonathan M; Kalloo, Anthony N

2007-01-01

312

Ultrasonography in diagnosing chronic pancreatitis: New aspects  

PubMed Central

The course and outcome is poor for most patients with pancreatic diseases. Advances in pancreatic imaging are important in the detection of pancreatic diseases at early stages. Ultrasonography as a diagnostic tool has made, virtually speaking a technical revolution in medical imaging in the new millennium. It has not only become the preferred method for first line imaging, but also, increasingly to clarify the interpretation of other imaging modalities to obtain efficient clinical decision. We review ultrasonography modalities, focusing on advanced pancreatic imaging and its potential to substantially improve diagnosis of pancreatic diseases at earlier stages. In the first section, we describe scanning techniques and examination protocols. Their consequences for image quality and the ability to obtain complete and detailed visualization of the pancreas are discussed. In the second section we outline ultrasonographic characteristics of pancreatic diseases with emphasis on chronic pancreatitis. Finally, new developments in ultrasonography of the pancreas such as contrast enhanced ultrasound and elastography are enlightened. PMID:24259955

Dimcevski, Georg; Erchinger, Friedemann G; Havre, Roald; Gilja, Odd Helge

2013-01-01

313

Pancreatic involvement in small cell lung cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Few data are available concerning incidence, clinical picture, and prognosis for pancreatic metastases of small cell lung carcinoma. In this paper we review the related literature available in English language. Conclusions Although pancreatic metastases are generally asymptomatic, they can rarely produce clinical symptoms or functional abnormalities. The widespread use of multi-detector computerised tomography (CT) in contemporary medical practice has led to an increased detection of pancreatic metastases in oncology patients. Tissue diagnosis is imperative because radiological techniques alone are incapable of differentiating them from primary pancreatic tumours. Pancreatic metastases occur in the relative end stage of small cell lung cancer. The main complications of these lesions, although rare, are acute pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice. Early chemotherapy can provide a survival benefit even in patients with mild acute pancreatitis or extrahepatic biliary obstruction. PMID:24587774

Gonlugur, Ugur; Mirici, Arzu; Karaayvaz, Muammer

2014-01-01

314

Primary cutaneous lymphomas other than mycosis fungoides.  

PubMed

Primary cutaneous lymphomas present in and are confined to the skin with no evidence of extracutaneous disease. The skin is the second most common extranodal site involved by primary lymphoma; 50% are mycosis fungoides (MF)-type cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, with the remainder being peripheral T-cell lymphoma (25%) and B-cell lymphoma (25%). The diagnosis of non-MF primary cutaneous lymphomas differs from that of nodal lymphomas: (1) presentation in the skin more often predicts outcome than histology, (2) immunophenotyping and immunogenotyping studies show differences in chromosomal translocations, cell-surface antigen expression (T-cell receptor [TCR] and immunoglobulin [Ig] heavy and light chains), and oncogene expression, (3) involvement of structural compartments of the skin (epidermis, periadnexal or adventitial dermis, interstitial dermis, and subcutis) aids differential diagnosis in place of nodal architecture, and (4) cytokine and extracellular matrix environments may influence behavior of cutaneous lymphomas. Diagnosis often requires coordinated evaluation of clinical history, immunohistochemistry on paraffin and frozen sections of skin biopsies, and molecular analysis. Classification of primary cutaneous lymphomas by a combined histologic type and clinical behavior is useful. PMID:10375086

Gilliam, A C; Wood, G S

1999-06-01

315

Mantle cell lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the testis: a unique case of composite non-Hodgkin lymphoma.  

PubMed

Primary testicular non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a rare entity with the most common histologic subtype consisting of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Patients with primary testicular lymphoma (PTL) have a poor prognosis and a higher propensity for relapse. Also rare are composite lymphomas (CL) defined as two or more morphologically and phenotypically distinct lymphomas coexisting in a single organ or tissue. Here we present the first reported case of primary testicular composite lymphoma consisting of DLBCL and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). PMID:24750331

Andhavarapu, Swati; Crozier, Jennifer A; Jiang, Liuyan; Sher, Taimur

2014-12-01

316

Lenalidomide and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-09-23

317

Pain in chronic pancreatitis: Managing beyond the pancreatic duct  

PubMed Central

Chronic pancreatitis (CP) continues to be a clinical challenge. Persistent or recurrent abdominal pain is the most compelling symptom that drives patients to seek medical care. Unfortunately, in spite of using several treatment approaches in the clinical setting, there is no single specific treatment modality that can be earmarked as a cure for this disease. Traditionally, ductal hypertension has been associated with causation of pain in CP; and patients are often subjected to endotherapy and surgery with a goal to decompress the pancreatic duct. Recent studies on humans (clinical and laboratory based) and experimental models have put forward several mechanisms, including neuroimmune alterations, which could be responsible for pain. This might explain the partial or no response to single modality treatment in a significant proportion of patients. The current review discusses the recent concepts of pain generation in CP and evidence based therapeutic approaches (other than ductal decompression) to handle persistent or recurrent pain. We focus primarily on parenchymal and neural components; and discuss the role of antioxidants and the existing controversies, drugs that interfere with neural transmission, pancreatic enzyme supplementation, celiac neurolysis, and pancreatic resection procedures. The review concludes with the treatment approach that we follow at our institute. PMID:24151350

Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Reddy, D Nageshwar

2013-01-01

318

[Perspective of cutaneous lymphoma reserach].  

PubMed

Primary cutaneous lymphomas are characterized by an expansion of hematopoietic cells in the special microenvironment of the skin. They represent a special challenge both for researches and for clinicians who treat patients with these disorders. New research data concerning the biology of lymphocytes and the cutaneous microenvironment have increased our knowledge of these diseases in the last decades. The new WHO/EORTC classification definitely will facilitate a more detailed investigation of the various subtypes. PMID:16734840

Dummer, Reinhard; Urosevic, Mirjana; Cozzio, Antonio; Asagoe, Kenji; Döbbeling, Udo; Burg, Günter

2006-06-01

319

CT evaluation of gastric lymphoma.  

PubMed

The purpose of our study was to determine the value of computed tomography (CT) with a drug-induced hypotonia and water filling in the diagnosis and preoperative staging of 27 patients with gastric lymphoma (GLy) confirmed by endoscopic biopsy. CT scans were performed in a supine and prone position with drug-induced hypotonia and water-filling of stomach with 500-700 ml., and intravenous administration of a non-ionic contrast agent. the prone position and drug-induced hypotonia allowed visualization of the whole gastric wall and prevented gas artifacts, commonly present during supine imaging. CT scans were analysed with respect to the thickness of the stomach wall, rugal thickening, presence of wall infiltration, mucosal nodularity, ulcerations and tumour masses, regional tumour spread, lymph node deposits and presence of distant metastases. The most common findings in GLy were ulcers of variable size, depth and number in 43% of cases, a mass with or without an ulcer in 36% of cases, and rugal thickening in 21% of cases. According to CT results, GLy was staged in four groups: I, II1, II2, III and IV. Precise preoperative staging was achieved in 73%, overstaging in 18% and understaging in 9% of patients. The sensitivity and specificity of the technique was 93% and 85% respectively. There was low grade MALT lymphoma in 69% and high grade MALT lymphoma in 31% of cases. We believe that CT performed ussing this method is a useful non-invasive method for preoperative evaluation and staging of gastric lymphoma and should be used before surgery is planned. PMID:20087255

Gligorievski, A

2009-12-01

320

Vascularisation Pattern of Chronic Pancreatitis Compared with Pancreatic Carcinoma: Results from Contrast-Enhanced Endoscopic Ultrasound  

PubMed Central

Discriminating between focal chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer is always a challenge in clinical medicine. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound using Doppler techniques can uniquely reveal different vascularisation patterns in pancreatic tissue alterated by chronic inflammatory processes and even allows a discrimination from pancreatic cancer. This paper will describe the basics of contrast-enhanced high mechanical index endoscopic ultrasound (CEHMI EUS) and contrast enhanced low mechanical index endoscopic ultrasound (CELMI EUS) and explain the pathophysiological differences of the vascularisation of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Furthermore it will discuss how to use these techniques in daily clinical practice. PMID:22844642

Hocke, Michael; Dietrich, Christoph F.

2012-01-01

321

Hodgkin's lymphoma: the pathologist's viewpoint  

PubMed Central

Despite its well known histological and clinical features, Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) has recently been the object of intense research activity, leading to a better understanding of its phenotype, molecular characteristics, histogenesis, and possible mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. There is complete consensus on the B cell derivation of the tumour in most cases, and on the relevance of Epstein-Barr virus infection and defective cytokinesis in at least a proportion of patients. The REAL/WHO classification recognises a basic distinction between lymphocyte predominance HL (LP-HL) and classic HL (CHL), reflecting the differences in clinical presentation and behaviour, morphology, phenotype, and molecular features. CHL has been classified into four subtypes: lymphocyte rich, nodular sclerosing, with mixed cellularity, and lymphocyte depleted. The borders between CHL and anaplastic large cell lymphoma have become sharper, whereas those between LP-HL and T cell rich B cell lymphoma remain ill defined. Treatments adjusted to the pathobiological characteristics of the tumour in at risk patients have been proposed and are on the way to being applied. PMID:11896065

Pileri, S A; Ascani, S; Leoncini, L; Sabattini, E; Zinzani, P L; Piccaluga, P P; Pileri, A; Giunti, M; Falini, B; Bolis, G B; Stein, H

2002-01-01

322

[Pathological diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma].  

PubMed

This lymphoma was recognized by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. In 1865, Samuel Wilks named it Hodgkin disease. Now, the term Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is acceptable over Hodgkin disease. Since the neoplastic cells of the disease is well-recognized to be a lymphoid cell, especially B lymphocyte. In WHO classification published in 2008, HLs are divided into two entities: Classical HL and nodular lymphocyte predominat HL. The former is composed of four different subtypes: nodular sclerosis (NS), mixed cellularity (MC), lymphocyte rich (LR), and lymphocyte depletion (LD). HL is characterized by the morphological feature comprising a minority of neoplastic cells, Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells and popcorn (LP) cells and a majority of non-neoplastic reactive cells. Antigen receptor gene analyses by prevailing molecular methods and flow cytometry are not appropriate method for the diagnosis of HL, because of small number of neoplastic cells. They are, however, very useful in the differential diagnosis to rule out other lymphomas. Even the present when science progressed, pathological (morphological and immunohistochemical) examination is very worth for diagnosis of HL. PMID:24724402

Tamaru, Jun-ichi

2014-03-01

323

Vaccine Therapy With or Without Cryosurgery in Treating Patients With Residual, Relapsed, or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia With Nodal Disease

2014-09-12

324

Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic ? Cells  

PubMed Central

We reviewed mechanisms that determine reactive oxygen species (redox) homeostasis, redox information signaling and metabolic/regulatory function of autocrine insulin signaling in pancreatic ? cells, and consequences of oxidative stress and dysregulation of redox/information signaling for their dysfunction. We emphasize the role of mitochondrion in ? cell molecular physiology and pathology, including the antioxidant role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2. Since in pancreatic ? cells pyruvate cannot be easily diverted towards lactate dehydrogenase for lactate formation, the respiration and oxidative phosphorylation intensity are governed by the availability of glucose, leading to a certain ATP/ADP ratio, whereas in other cell types, cell demand dictates respiration/metabolism rates. Moreover, we examine the possibility that type 2 diabetes mellitus might be considered as an inevitable result of progressive self-accelerating oxidative stress and concomitantly dysregulated information signaling in peripheral tissues as well as in pancreatic ? cells. It is because the redox signaling is inherent to the insulin receptor signaling mechanism and its impairment leads to the oxidative and nitrosative stress. Also emerging concepts, admiting participation of redox signaling even in glucose sensing and insulin release in pancreatic ? cells, fit in this view. For example, NADPH has been firmly established to be a modulator of glucose-stimulated insulin release. PMID:23304259

Jezek, Petr; Dlaskova, Andrea; Plecita-Hlavata, Lydie

2012-01-01

325

Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in pigeons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is a well-studied syndrome in domestic animals. EPI occurs when severe progressive loss of tubulo-acinar tissue from atrophy or inflammatory destruction results in insufficient secretion of digestive enzymes and clinical signs of malabsorption. However, the literature on EPI in birds is limited. The syndrome has been previously described in several cases where the diagnosis was based

Olga Amann; Merel J. M. Visschers; Gerry M. Dorrestein; Ineke Westerhof; J. T. Lumeij

2006-01-01

326

Endoscopic Treatment of Pancreatic Calculi  

PubMed Central

Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal. PMID:24944986

Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon

2014-01-01

327

Tanespimycin and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-02-21

328

Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH-R) in Treating Patients With MYC-Associated B-Cell Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-08-14

329

[The role of drains in pancreatic surgery].  

PubMed

Pancreatic fistula is a significant complication following pancreatic resection. Several methods aimed at lowering the postoperative pancreatic fistula rate were studied in the past. These methods mainly include pharmacological prophylaxis and technical modifications of pancreatic remnant management. Another method which can influence postoperative pancreatic fistula rate is the use of and the manipulation with intra-abdominal drains following pancreatic resection. Recent studies have shown that the use of the drains, the type of drain and manipulation with the drains can influence the outcomes. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge about the use of drains in pancreatic surgery. There are three questions to ask when studying the use of drains in pancreatic surgery: 1) Whether to use the drains at all 2) When to remove the drains? 3) Which type of the drain is more appropriate? Ad 1) Despite the growing number of studies showing comparable or even better results in patients without intra-abdominal drains following pancreatic resection, the latest randomized study proved that avoiding the use of drains is associated with more clinically significant postoperative complications and higher postoperative mortality. It is also important to consider the risk factors of pancreatic fistula development, especially pancreatic texture and the main pancreatic duct diameter. Currently, pancreatic resection without intra-abdominal drains cannot be routinely recommended. Ad 2) Two studies addressed the question when to remove the drains after pancreatic resection, and both studies clearly showed that early removal brings better results. Ad 3) No study has specifically addressed the question whether the type of drain can influence the rate of postoperative pancreatic fistula and of other complications. Gravity drains and closed-suction drains are most commonly used nowadays. The closed-suction drains are more effective due to the active suction. On the other hand, active suction can cause leak of the amylase-rich fluid through the pancreatic anastomosis or suture line and thus promote the development of pancreatic fistula or even worsen its clinical significance. There are no data in the literature so far regarding the type of drain. Therefore, we have commenced a randomized control trial which aims to compare closed-suction drains and closed gravity drains.Key words: Pancreatic resection - intra-abdominal drainage gravity drain closed-suction drain. PMID:25301343

Ce?ka, F; Jon, B; Love?ek, M; Skalický, P; Subrt, Z; Neoral, C; Ferko, A

2014-01-01

330

Rituximab and Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

2013-08-23

331

Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

2014-10-20

332

Brentuximab Vedotin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory CD30+ Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-09-24

333

Pleiotrophin promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Perineural invasion (PNI) in pancreatic cancer is an important cause of local recurrence, but little is known about its mechanism. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an important neurotrophic factor. It is of interest that our recent experimental data showed its involvement in PNI of pancreatic cancer. PTN strongly presents in the cytoplasm of pancreatic cancer cells, and high expression of PTN and its receptor may contribute to the high PNI of pancreatic cancer. Correspondingly, PNI is prone to happen in PTN-positive tumors. We thus hypothesize that, as a neurite growth-promoting factor, PTN may promote PNI in pancreatic cancer. PTN is released at the time of tumor cell necrosis, and binds with its high-affinity receptor, N-syndecan on pancreatic nerves, to promote neural growth in pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, neural destruction leads to a distorted neural homeostasis. Neurons and Schwann cells produce more N-syndecan in an effort to repair the pancreatic nerves. However, the abundance of N-syndecan attracts further PTN-positive cancer cells to the site of injury, creating a vicious cycle. Ultimately, increased PTN and N-syndecan levels, due to the continuous nerve injury, may promote cancer invasion and propagation along the neural structures. Therefore, it is meaningful to discuss the relationship between PTN/N-syndecan signaling and PNI in pancreatic cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of PNI in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24151381

Yao, Jun; Hu, Xiu-Feng; Feng, Xiao-Shan; Gao, She-Gan

2013-10-21

334

Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents  

PubMed Central

In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable.

Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

2014-01-01

335

Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents.  

PubMed

In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

2014-11-15

336

Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors by endoscopic ultrasonography  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic tumors are highly diverse, as they can be solid or cystic, and benign or malignant. Since their imaging features overlap considerably, it is often difficult to characterize these tumors. In addition, small pancreatic tumors, especially those less than 2 cm in diameter, are difficult to detect and diagnose. For characterizing pancreatic tumors and detecting small pancreatic tumors, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the most sensitive of the imaging procedures currently available. This technique also provides good results in terms of the preoperative staging of pancreatic tumors. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has also proved to be a safe and useful method for tissue sampling of pancreatic tumors. Despite these advantages, however, it is still difficult to differentiate between benign and malignant, solid or cystic pancreatic tumors, malignant neoplasms, and chronic pancreatitis using EUS, even when EUS-FNA is performed. Recently, contrast-enhanced EUS with Doppler mode (CE-EUS) employing ultrasound contrast agents, which indicate vascularization in pancreatic lesions, has been found to be useful in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumors, especially small pancreatic tumors. However, Doppler ultrasonography with contrast-enhancement has several limitations, including blooming artifacts, poor spatial resolution, and low sensitivity to slow flow. Consequently, an echoendoscope was developed recently that has a broad-band transducer and an imaging mode that was designed specifically for contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CEH-EUS) with a second-generation ultrasound contrast agent. The CEH-EUS technique is expected to improve the differential diagnosis of pancreatic disease in the future. This review describes the EUS appearances of common solid and cystic pancreatic masses, the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA, and the relative efficacies and advantages of CE-EUS and CEH-EUS along with their relative advantages and their complementary roles in clinical practice. PMID:21160578

Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kitano, Masayuki; Kamata, Ken; El-Masry, Muhammad; Kudo, Masatoshi

2010-01-01

337

NON-HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA IN COLON  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma has steadily risen and while other cancers have increased 25%, NHL has increased >80%. In the majority of NHL patients, the disease arises in lymph nodes, but primary extranodal disease accounts for 30% of new lymphoma patients and often present as localized disease. We report a rare and interesting case of intermediate grade diffuse Non-Hodgkin's

MONZORUL HASAN CHOWDHURY; FAZLE RABBI CHOWDHURY; FAZLE RABBI MOHAMMED; BILLAL ALAM

2007-01-01

338

Nature and importance of follicular lymphoma precursors.  

PubMed

It is now widely recognized that cancer development is a protracted process requiring the stepwise acquisition of multiple oncogenic events. In humans, this process can take decades, if not a lifetime, blurring the notion of 'healthy' individuals. Follicular lymphoma exemplifies this multistep pathway of oncogenesis. In recent years, variants of follicular lymphoma have been recognized that appear to represent clonal B-cell expansions at an early stage of follicular lymphoma lymphomagenesis. These include follicular lymphoma in situ, duodenal follicular lymphoma, partial involvement by follicular lymphoma, and in the blood circulating follicular lymphoma-like B cells. Recent genetic studies have identified similarities and differences between the early lesions and overt follicular lymphoma, providing important information for understanding their biological evolution. The data indicate that there is already genomic instability at these early stages, even in instances with a low risk for clinical progression. The overexpression of BCL2 in t(14;18)-positive B cells puts them at risk for subsequent genetic aberrations when they re-enter the germinal center and are exposed to the influences of activation-induced cytidine deaminase and somatic hypermutations. The emerging data provide a rationale for clinical management and, in the future, may identify genetic risk factors that warrant early therapeutic intervention. PMID:24790058

Mamessier, Emilie; Broussais-Guillaumot, Florence; Chetaille, Bruno; Bouabdallah, Reda; Xerri, Luc; Jaffe, Elaine S; Nadel, Bertrand

2014-05-01

339

T cell immunosurveillance controls B lymphoma development  

PubMed Central

We recently showed a critical role for T cells in the immunosurveillance of nascent B cell lymphomas arising from mutations impacting plasma cell differentiation. Our data suggest that CD8+ T cells continuously eliminate mutated B cells that fail to downregulate their co-stimulatory machinery and the Fas death receptor, thus constraining B lymphoma pathogenesis. PMID:25050223

Kallies, Axel

2014-01-01

340

[Indirect endolymphatic chemotherapy of patients with lymphoma].  

PubMed

Treated were 103 patients with malignant lymphomas (lymphogranulomatosis--87; non-Hodgkin lymphomas--16 patients). The treatment was complex including chemotherapy by means of endolymphatic administration of cyclophosphane, prospidin, methotrexate). The technique may be widely used and may be associated with other treatment methods. The efficacy of the method is substantiated and emphasized. PMID:2781767

Kindzel'ski?, L P; Gubareva, A A

1989-06-01

341

Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Review of Neurologic Complications.  

PubMed

Hodgkin's lymphoma is a hematolymphoid neoplasm, primarily of B cell lineage, that has unique histologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features. Neurologic complications of Hodgkin's Lymphoma can be separated into those that result directly from the disease, indirectly from the disease, or from its treatment. Direct neurologic dysfunction from Hodgkin's Lymphoma results from metastatic intracranial spinal disease, epidural metastases causing spinal cord/cauda equina compression, leptomeningeal metastases, or intradural intramedullary spinal cord metastases. Indirect neurologic dysfunction may be caused by paraneoplastic disorders (such as paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration or limbic encephalitis) and primary angiitis of the central nervous system. Hodgkin's lymphoma treatment typically includes chemotherapy or radiotherapy with potential treatment-related complications affecting the nervous system. Neurologic complications resulting from mantle-field radiotherapy include the "dropped head syndrome," acute brachial plexopathy, and transient ischemic attacks/cerebral infarcts. Chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma may cause cerebral infarction (due to emboli from anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy) and peripheral neuropathy. PMID:20975772

Grimm, Sean; Chamberlain, Marc

2011-01-01

342

FDG-PET/CT in lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases that arise from the constituent cells of the immune system or from their precursors. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) is now the cornerstone of staging procedures in the state-of-the-art management of Hodgkin's disease and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It plays an important role in staging, restaging, prognostication, planning appropriate treatment strategies, monitoring therapy, and detecting recurrence. However, its role in indolent lymphomas is still unclear and calls for further investigational trials. The protean PET/CT manifestations of lymphoma necessitate a familiarity with the spectrum of imaging findings to enable accurate diagnosis. A meticulous evaluation of PET/CT findings, an understanding of its role in the management of lymphomas, and knowledge of its limitations are mandatory for the optimal utilization of this technique. PMID:24604942

D'souza, Maria M; Jaimini, Abhinav; Bansal, Abhishek; Tripathi, Madhavi; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Tripathi, Rajendra Prashad

2013-01-01

343

Immunohistochemical evaluation of HER2\\/ neu expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although several morphological and molecular genetic studies have implicated various grades of pancreatic duct hyperplasia as precursor lesions to infiltrating pancreatic adenocarcinoma, the identity of preinvasive pancreatic neoplasms remains controversial. In the present study, the authors examined the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor homologue, HER-2\\/neu (c-erbB-2), in pancreatic duct lesions adjacent to infiltrating pancreas cancers in a series

John D Day; Joseph A Digiuseppe; Charles Yeo; Myla Lai-Goldman; Steven M Anderson; Steven N Goodman; Scott E Kern; Ralph H Hruban

1996-01-01

344

Autoimmune Pancreatitis as a New Clinical Entity (Three Cases of Autoimmune Pancreatitis with Effective Steroid Therapy)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most common forms of chronic pancreatitisare related to alcohol ingestion, whereas the entity ofnon-alcohol-associated (idiopathic) pancreatitis ispoorly understood. Autoimmunity has been suggested as a possible etiologic factor of idiopathicchronic pancreatitis. A total of 362 Japanese patientsunderwent endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP)for suspected pancreatic disease, and 161 were diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis. Among them, we foundthree cases (1.86% incidence) of unique

Tetsuhide Ito; Itsuro Nakano; Shujiro Koyanagi; Toshihiko Miyahara; Yoshikatsu Migita; Keiichiro Ogoshi; Hironori Sakai; Shizu Matsunaga; Osamu Yasuda; Toshihiko Sumii; Hajime Nawata

1997-01-01

345

Ofatumumab and Bendamustine Hydrochloride With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Untreated Follicular Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

2014-10-16

346

Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2013-06-03

347

Rituximab, Rasburicase, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Advanced B-Cell Leukemia or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-09-10

348

Study of Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Patients With Relapsed Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-08-13

349

Feline pancreatic lipase: purification and validation of a clinically significant radioimmunoassay for the diagnosis of feline pancreatitis  

E-print Network

Serum lipase activity has traditionally been used for diagnosis of pancreatitis in human beings and dogs. However, serum lipase activity is not specific for exocrine pancreatic function and many cell types other than pancreatic acinar cells also...

Wilson, Benjamin Gregg

2005-02-17

350

Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (p<0.001, analysis of variance linear contrast; n=8 for each group). Pathological events relating to these components were observed, including presence of inflammatory cells, deposited collagen, and phenotype conversion of PSCs. We demonstrate that label-free nonlinear optical microscopy is an efficient tool for dissecting PSCs and other pancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

2013-05-01

351

Gastrointestinal lymphomas: Morphology, immunophenotype and molecular features  

PubMed Central

Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma comprises 10-15% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas and encompasses 30-40% of the total extranodal lymphomas. Approximately 60-75% of cases occur in the stomach, and then the small bowel, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum. Lymphoid neoplasms may consist of mature B, T and less commonly extranodal NK/T cells. Of these, the two most frequently encountered histologic subtypes are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma), where Helicobacter pylori infection is implicated in a number of cases, and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Several B cell lymphomas are associated with chromosomal aberrations. Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma, type I in particular, usually arises in a background of celiac disease. T cell gene rearrangement confirms clonality. NK/T cell neoplasms are invariably associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection and are often aggressive; thus, differentiation from a benign NK-cell enteropathy is paramount. Although incidence of other hematopoietic malignancies in the gastrointestinal tract such as plasma cell myeloma associated with amyloidosis, plasmablastic lymphoma, Hodgkin disease, histiocytic sarcoma and mast cell sarcoma is extremely rare, these entities have been documented, with the latter two demonstrating aggressive clinical behavior. Endoscopic ultrasonography is an important adjunct in disease staging and follow-up. Conservative antibiotic treatment of stage I MALT lymphomas with associated Helicobacter pylori infection achieves good clinical outcome with high remission rate. Chemotherapy, radiation and rarely surgery are reserved for advanced diseases or cases resistant to conservative therapy and those not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:22943012

Bautista-Quach, Marnelli A.; Ake, Christopher D.; Chen, Mingyi

2012-01-01

352

Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment  

SciTech Connect

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

Sarkar, Fazlul H. [Department of Pathology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 740 Hudson Webber Cancer Research Center, 110 E Warren, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)], E-mail: fsarkar@med.wayne.edu; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei [Department of Pathology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 740 Hudson Webber Cancer Research Center, 110 E Warren, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

2007-11-01

353

Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a comprehensive review.  

PubMed

Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors. Despite being relatively rare, representing just 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms, the incidence of pancreatic NET has increased over the past two decades. Although the primary treatment for localized NET is surgical resection, there is still a lack of effective therapeutic options for patients with advanced unresectable pancreatic NET. Recently, the targeted agents sunitinib malate (SUTENT®, Pfizer Inc, NYC) and everolimus (AFINITOR®, Novartis, Basel, Switzerland)-both with different mechanisms of action-received United States Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of progressive, well-differentiated, pancreatic NET in patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic disease. SUTENT® also received approval for this indication by the European Commission in 2010. Our article presents an overview of pancreatic NET, with a focus on their diagnostic work-up, clinical presentation and treatment options. Topics for further investigation of targeted therapy are also discussed. PMID:22437917

Zhou, Chenfei; Zhang, Jun; Zheng, Ying; Zhu, Zhenggang

2012-09-01

354

Spontaneous pancreatic pseudocyst-portal vein fistula: a rare and potentially life threatening complication of pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Pseudocyst formation following acute and chronic pancreatitis is a well known complication. A pancreatic pseudocyst fistulating into the portal vein is a rare and potentially fatal complication. We report a case of pancreatic pseudocyst – portal vein fistula, which was managed with a conservative approach. PMID:23317711

Raza, SS; Hakeem, A; Sheridan, M

2013-01-01

355

Pancreatic Cancer Center: Providing the Research Tools Necessary to Advance Pancreatic Cancer Patient Care  

E-print Network

Pancreatic Cancer Center: Providing the Research Tools Necessary to Advance Pancreatic Cancer the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, and PDAC patients have a dismal 5-year survival rate of 6 number of NCI-designated cancer centers have a specialized pancreatic cancer program. The creation

Zhou, Yaoqi

356

Transcriptional network governing the angiogenic switch in human pancreatic cancer  

E-print Network

Transcriptional network governing the angiogenic switch in human pancreatic cancer Amir Abdollahi by simultaneous regulations of multiple genes organized as transcrip- tional circuitries. In pancreatic cancer

Omiecinski, Curtis

357

Primary effusion lymphoma-like lymphoma in a patient with inflammatory bowel disease  

PubMed Central

A 77-year-old man with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and who was treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF), 6-mercaptopurine and corticosteroids, presented with primary effusion lymphoma-like lymphoma (PEL-like lymphoma) with massive ascites. The patient’s clinical course was complicated by acute renal insufficiency and hypotension, which led to death within 2 wk. In general, patients with IBD may have an increased risk for development of lymphoma, which is frequently associated with immunosuppressive and/or anti-TNF antibody therapies. PEL is a rare subset of lymphoma localized to serous body cavities, lacks tumor mass or nodal involvement, and is associated with infection by human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8). Primary neoplastic effusion may also be present in patients with large B-cell lymphoma without evidence of human immunodeficiency virus or HHV-8 infections. This type of lymphoma is classified as PEL-like lymphoma. Both PEL and PEL-like lymphoma types have been reported in patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy, but to the best of our knowledge, the case described herein represents the first PEL-like lymphoma occurring in a patient with IBD. PMID:24574759

Nussinson, Elchanan; Shibli, Fahmi; Shahbari, Azmi; Rock, Wasseem; Elias, Mazen; Elmalah, Irit

2014-01-01

358

Prognostic Analyses on Anatomical and Morphological Classification of Feline Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT The present study was carried out to analyze the prognosis of 163 cats with lymphoma classified anatomically and cytomorphologically. Anatomically, alimentary lymphoma was the most common form and showed significantly shorter survival than mediastinal and nasal lymphomas in cats. Cytomorphologically, there was no predominant subtype in feline lymphomas. Immunoblastic type (18%), centroblastic type (16%), globule leukocyte type (15%), lymphocytic type (12%), lymphoblastic type (12%), pleomorphic medium and large cell type (10%) and anaplastic large cell type (7%) were relatively common subtypes. Most of the cats with globule leukocyte lymphoma had the alimentary form. Comparing median survival time among classifications, cats with globule leukocyte lymphoma showed significantly shorter survival than those with high-grade and other low-grade lymphomas. Furthermore, cats with high-grade lymphomas showed significantly shorter survival than cats with other low-grade lymphomas. The present study indicated the clinical significance of anatomical and cytomorphological evaluation in feline lymphomas. PMID:24521793

SATO, Hirofumi; FUJINO, Yasuhito; CHINO, Junko; TAKAHASHI, Masashi; FUKUSHIMA, Kenjiro; GOTO-KOSHINO, Yuko; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki; OHNO, Koichi; TSUJIMOTO, Hajime

2014-01-01

359

Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage

2014-08-08

360

Saline Infusion Through the Pancreatic Duct Leads to Changes in Calcium Homeostasis Similar to Those Observed in Acute Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This work focuses on studying the early events associated with pancreatic damage after retrograde infusion through the pancreatic\\u000a duct in rats. We have analyzed changes in calcium homeostasis and secretory response in pancreatic acini from rats with taurocholate-induced\\u000a acute pancreatitis. Moreover, in order to test whether pancreatic duct manipulation can trigger damage inside pancreatic acinar\\u000a cells, we have studied both

Mónica García; Ernesto Hernández Barbáchano; Pilar Hernández Lorenzo; José Ignacio San Román; María A. López; Rafael Coveñas; José Julián Calvo

2009-01-01

361

Detection of Early-Stage Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an almost universally lethal disease, in large part, due to our inability to detect early-stage disease. Monoclonal antibody PAM4 is reactive with a unique biomarker expressed by greater than 85% of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. In this report, we examined the ability of a PAM4-based immunoassay to detect early-stage disease. Methods The PAM4-based immunoassay was used to quantitate antigen in the serum of healthy volunteers (N=19), patients with known pancreatic adenocarcinoma (N=68), and patients with a primary diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis (N=29). Results Sensitivity for detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma was 82%, with a false-positive rate of 5% for healthy controls. Patients with advanced disease had significantly higher antigen levels than those with early-stage disease (P<0.01), with a diagnostic sensitivity of 91%, 86%, and 62% for stage 3/4 advanced disease, stage-2, and stage-1, respectively. We also evaluated chronic pancreatitis sera, finding 38% positive for antigen; however, this was discordant with immunohistochemical findings that suggest the PAM4-antigen is not produced by inflamed pancreatic tissue. Furthermore, several of the serum-positive pancreatitis patients, for whom tissue specimens were available for pathological interpretation, had evidence of neoplastic precursor lesions. Conclusions These results suggest the use of the PAM4-serum assay to detect early-stage pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and that positive levels of PAM4-antigen are not derived from inflamed pancreatic tissues, but rather may provide evidence of subclinical pancreatic neoplasia. Impact The ability to detect pancreatic adenocarcinoma at an early stage could provide for early therapeutic intervention with potentially improved patient outcomes. PMID:20810605

Gold, David V.; Goggins, Michael; Modrak, David E.; Newsome, Guy; Liu, Mengling; Shi, Chanjuan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Goldenberg, David M.

2010-01-01

362

Can early endoscopic ultrasound predict pancreatic necrosis in acute pancreatitis?  

PubMed Central

Background Presence of pancreatic/extrapancreatic necroses (PN/EPN) is an important prognostic indicator in acute pancreatitis (AP) and their early detection is a challenge. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) provides high resolution images of pancreas but there is paucity of data on its role in AP. Methods Consecutive patients with AP seen at our center from December 2012-November 2013 and presenting within 5 days of onset of symptoms were prospectively enrolled. EUS was done on the day of admission with a radial echoendoscope and pancreatic/peripancreatic findings were compared with the abdominal computed tomography (CT) findings performed on day 7. Results Of the 46 patients evaluated, 14 were excluded, and 32 patients (22 male; age 40.68±12.46 years) underwent EUS at admission. The etiology of AP was alcohol in 16, gallstones in 13, and idiopathic in 3 patients. Necrotizing pancreatitis was present in 20 (62%) patients, and mean CT severity index was 6.45±2.96. In patients without PN (n=12), EUS revealed normal echo pattern in 6 patients and diffusely hyperechoic and enlarged pancreas in 6 patients. In patients with PN/EPN, EUS revealed multiple hypoechoic areas (>5 mm) in 5 patients, multiple hyperechoic areas (>5 mm) in 7 patients and mixed hypo and hyperechoic areas in 8 patients. Also, 13 of these patients had peripancreatic hypoechoic areas that correlated with EPN. Moreover, EUS detected common bile duct (CBD) stones in two patients, pleural effusion in 17 patients, and ascites in 15 patients. Conclusion EUS done at admission can reliably detect PN and co-existent disorders like CBD stones. PMID:25331790

Rana, Surinder S.; Bhasin, Deepak K.; Sharma, Vishal; Sharma, Ravi; Chaudhary, Vinita; Chhabra, Puneet

2014-01-01

363

Alisertib and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-10-02

364

Anaplastic large cell lymphoma: features presenting diagnostic challenges.  

PubMed

Anaplastic large cell lymphoma has histopathologic features that necessitate a broad differential diagnosis. Diagnostic considerations include carcinoma, melanoma, and hematopoietic malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, classical Hodgkin lymphoma, myeloid sarcoma, and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. Unusual features can include subtle sinusoidal involvement, histiocytic morphology, cytokeratin expression, CD15 expression, and variant patterns of anaplastic lymphoma kinase expression. Cases with unusual morphologic or immunohistochemical findings will be presented to highlight the complexity encountered in practice. PMID:25268191

Pletneva, Maria A; Smith, Lauren B

2014-10-01

365

[Acute pancreatitis: An overview of the management].  

PubMed

Over the past decades, the incidence and the number of hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis have increased in the Western countries. The two most common etiological factors of acute pancreatitis are gallstones (including small gallstones or microlithiasis) and alcohol abuse. Acute pancreatitis is associated with a significant mortality (4-10%) and 25% in case of pancreatic necrosis, especially. Edematous pancreatitis is benign and oral feeding can be restarted once abdominal pain is decreasing and inflammatory markers are improving. Enteral tube feeding should be the primary therapy in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis who require nutritional support. Enteral nutrition in acute pancreatitis can be administered via either the nasojejunal or nasogastric route. In case of necrosis, preventive antibiotics are not recommended. The single indication is infected necrosis confirmed by fine needle aspiration. The incidence trends of acute pancreatitis possibly reflect a change in the prevalence of main etiological factors (e.g. gallstones and alcohol consumption) and cofactors such as tobacco, obesity and genetic susceptibility. Priority is to search for associated causes, especially in cases with atypical symptoms. In case of first acute pancreatitis in patients older than 50years, the presence of a tumor (benign or malignant) has to be specifically ruled out, using CT-scan, MRI and endoscopic ultrasound. PMID:24837648

Rebours, V

2014-10-01

366

Exocrine pancreatic carcinogenesis and autotaxin expression.  

PubMed

Exocrine pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Genetic analysis suggests a causative role for environmental factors, but consistent epidemiological support is scarce and no biomarkers for monitoring the effects of chemical pancreatic carcinogens are available. With the objective to identify common traits for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors we studied the National Toxicology Program (NTP) bioassay database. We found that male rats were affected more often than female rats and identified eight chemicals that induced exocrine pancreatic tumors in males only. For a hypothesis generating process we used a text mining tool to analyse published literature for suggested mode of actions (MOA). The resulting MOA analysis suggested inflammatory responses as common feature. In cell studies we found that all the chemicals increased protein levels of the inflammatory protein autotaxin (ATX) in Panc-1, MIA PaCa-2 or Capan-2 cells. Induction of MMP-9 and increased invasive migration were also frequent effects, consistent with ATX activation. Testosterone has previously been implicated in pancreatic carcinogenesis and we found that it increased ATX levels. Our data show that ATX is a target for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors in rats. Several lines of evidence implicate ATX and its product lysophosphatidic acid in human pancreatic cancer. Mechanisms of action may include stimulated invasive growth and metastasis. ATX may interact with hormones or onco- or suppressor-genes often deregulated in exocrine pancreatic cancer. Our data suggest that ATX is a target for chemicals promoting pancreatic tumor development. PMID:22952646

Kadekar, Sandeep; Silins, Ilona; Korhonen, Anna; Dreij, Kristian; Al-Anati, Lauy; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

2012-01-01

367

Exocrine Pancreatic Carcinogenesis and Autotaxin Expression  

PubMed Central

Exocrine pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Genetic analysis suggests a causative role for environmental factors, but consistent epidemiological support is scarce and no biomarkers for monitoring the effects of chemical pancreatic carcinogens are available. With the objective to identify common traits for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors we studied the National Toxicology Program (NTP) bioassay database. We found that male rats were affected more often than female rats and identified eight chemicals that induced exocrine pancreatic tumors in males only. For a hypothesis generating process we used a text mining tool to analyse published literature for suggested mode of actions (MOA). The resulting MOA analysis suggested inflammatory responses as common feature. In cell studies we found that all the chemicals increased protein levels of the inflammatory protein autotaxin (ATX) in Panc-1, MIA PaCa-2 or Capan-2 cells. Induction of MMP-9 and increased invasive migration were also frequent effects, consistent with ATX activation. Testosterone has previously been implicated in pancreatic carcinogenesis and we found that it increased ATX levels. Our data show that ATX is a target for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors in rats. Several lines of evidence implicate ATX and its product lysophosphatidic acid in human pancreatic cancer. Mechanisms of action may include stimulated invasive growth and metastasis. ATX may interact with hormones or onco- or suppressor-genes often deregulated in exocrine pancreatic cancer. Our data suggest that ATX is a target for chemicals promoting pancreatic tumor development. PMID:22952646

Kadekar, Sandeep; Silins, Ilona; Korhonen, Anna; Dreij, Kristian; Al-Anati, Lauy; Hogberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

2012-01-01

368

Drug induced acute pancreatitis: incidence and severity.  

PubMed Central

To determine the incidence and severity of drug induced acute pancreatitis, data from 45 German centres of gastroenterology were evaluated. Among 1613 patients treated for acute pancreatitis in 1993, drug induced acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 22 patients (incidence 1.4%). Drugs held responsible were azathioprine, mesalazine/sulfasalazine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), oestrogens, frusemide, hydrochlorothiazide, and rifampicin. Pancreatic necrosis not exceeding 33% of the organ was found on ultrasonography or computed tomography, or both, in three patients (14%). Pancreatic pseudocysts did not occur. A decrease of arterial PO2 reflecting respiratory insufficiency, and an increase of serum creatinine, reflecting renal insufficiency as complications of acute pancreatitis were seen in two (9%) and four (18%) patients, respectively. Artificial ventilation was not needed, and dialysis was necessary in only one (5%) case. Two patients (9%) died of AIDS and tuberculosis, respectively; pancreatitis did not seem to have contributed materially to their death. In conclusion, drugs rarely cause acute pancreatitis, and drug induced acute pancreatitis usually runs a benign course. PMID:7489946

Lankisch, P G; Droge, M; Gottesleben, F

1995-01-01

369

Elevated DNA damage response in pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and intractable human malignant tumors and a leading cause of cancer-related death across the world, with incidence equaling mortality. Because of the extremely high malignance, this disease is usually diagnosed at its advanced stage and recurs even after surgical excision. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is generally thought to arise from pathological changes of pancreatic duct, and the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma accounts for more than 90 % of malignant neoplasms of the pancreas. To date, scientists have revealed several risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including smoking, family history, and aging. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Meanwhile, more mutations of DNA damage response factors have been identified in familial pancreatic cancers, implying a potential link between DNA damage and pancreatic cancer. DNA damage is a recurring phenomenon in our bodies which could be induced by exogenous agents and endogenous metabolism. Accumulated DNA lesions cause genomic instability which eventually results in tumorigenesis. In this study, we showed obvious DNA damages existed in human pancreatic cancer, which activated DNA damage response and the DNA repair pathway including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, DNA-PK, CHK1, and CHK2. The persistent DNA damage in pancreatic tissue may be the source for its tumorigenesis. PMID:25002126

Osterman, Michael; Kathawa, Deion; Liu, Diangang; Guo, Huan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Mo; Yu, Xiaochun; Li, Fei

2014-12-01

370

Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy.

Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A.; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T.; Jeon, Christie Y.; Pandol, Stephen J.

2014-01-01

371

Pathology of extra-nodal non Hodgkin lymphomas.  

PubMed

In the management of extra-nodal lymphomas it is important to determine whether the tumour has disseminated and whether lymph nodes are involved. Some extra-nodal lymphomas may be the result of random spread of nodal lymphoma. Specific homing, however, determines the site of many extra-nodal lymphomas, as exemplified by cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, which seem to be derived from skin-homing T-cells and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas that show features of the mucosal immune system. Enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma is derived from mucosal T-cells in patients with coeliac disease. Immunological sanctuary accounts for the localisation of primary brain, eye and testicular lymphoma. Mantle cell lymphoma frequently causes tumours in the gastrointestinal tract. Random biopsies have shown that a high proportion of patients with this lymphoma have extensive occult involvement of the gastrointestinal tract at the time of first diagnosis. Follicular lymphoma occurs at both nodal and extra-nodal sites, but uncommonly at both sites at the same time. Extra-nodal follicular lymphomas frequently lack t(14;18)(q32;q21) and do not express bcl-2, which are characteristics of the nodal disease. At extra-nodal sites, follicular lymphoma is more likely to be curable than nodal follicular lymphoma. The behaviour of extra-nodal lymphomas cannot be assumed to follow that of their nodal counterparts. PMID:22480571

Wright, D H

2012-06-01

372

Apoptosis: Targets in Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is characterized by poor prognosis, because of late diagnosis and lack of response to chemo- and/or radiation therapies. Resistance to apoptosis mainly causes this insensitivity to conventional therapies. Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a central regulator of tissue homeostasis. Certain genetic disturbances of apoptotic signaling pathways have been found in carcinomas leading to tumor development and progression. In the past few years, the knowledge about the complex pathways of apoptosis has strongly increased and new therapeutic approaches based on this knowledge are being developed. This review will focus on the role of apoptotic proteins contributing to pancreatic cancer development and progression and will demonstrate possible targets to influence this deadly disease. PMID:12605713

Westphal, Sabine; Kalthoff, Holger

2003-01-01

373

Gastric MALT lymphoma: old and new insights  

PubMed Central

The stomach is the most frequent site of extranodal lymphoma. Gastric lymphoma originating from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) is typically a low-grade, B-cell neoplasia strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Only certain H. pylori strains in some predisposed patients determine lymphoma development in the stomach, according to a strain-host-organ specific process. The clinical presentation is poorly specific, symptoms ranging from vague dyspepsia to alarm symptoms. Similarly, different endoscopy patterns have been described for gastric lymphoma. H. pylori eradication is advised as first-line therapy in early stage disease, and complete lymphoma remission is achieved in 75% of cases. Neoplasia stage, depth of infiltration in the gastric wall, presence of the API2-MALT1 translocation, localization in the stomach, and patient ethnicity have been identified as predictors of remission. Recent data suggests that H. pylori eradication therapy may be successful for gastric lymphoma treatment also in a small subgroup (15%) of H. pylori-negative patients. The overall 5-year survival and disease-free survival rates are as high as 90% and 75%, respectively. Management of patients who failed to achieve lymphoma remission following H. pylori eradication include radiotherapy, chemotherapy and, in selected cases, surgery. PMID:24714739

Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Ridola, Lorenzo; Repici, Alessandro; Manta, Raffaele; Andriani, Alessandro

2014-01-01

374

Signal transduction inhibitor therapy for lymphoma.  

PubMed

Current research in lymphoma is focused on two areas of lymphoma biology-the signal transduction pathways used to maintain the growth of malignant lymphocytes and the role of the tumor microenvironment in lymphoma growth and survival. This review focuses on three signaling pathways: the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/mTOR) pathway, the B-cell receptor/spleen tyrosine kinase (BCR/Syk) pathway, and the protein kinase C-beta (PKC-?) pathway, known to be important to lymphoma cells. The mTOR inhibitors temsirolimus and everolimus have demonstrated antitumor activity in all types of lymphoma, the Syk inhibitor fostamatinib has activity in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and the PKC-? inhibitor enzastaurin is being used as consolidation therapy after remission in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This review discusses the biology behind the development of each new agent and the results of initial clinical trials. The goal is to provide the hematologist/oncologist background information on these new agents and understand their current and potential role in the management of patients. PMID:21239804

Witzig, Thomas E; Gupta, Mamta

2010-01-01

375

B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma without mediastinal disease: mimicking nodular sclerosis classical Hodgkin lymphoma.  

PubMed

B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (BCLu-DLBCL/CHL), also known as gray-zone lymphoma, has overlapping clinical and biological characteristics of both diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL). These lymphomas are typically associated with mediastinal disease, and extranodal involvement is rare. In the present report, we describe a case of a 78-year-old woman with BCLu-DLBCL/CHL found to have extranodal lesions and no evidence of mediastinal disease. Although biopsy specimens were histologically similar to nodular sclerosis CHL, the tumor cells were positive for CD30 and mature B-cell markers, such as CD20, CD79a, PAX5, BOB.1, and OCT-2, but negative for CD15. Furthermore, the patient had extranodal lesions and an increased level of soluble IL-2 receptor. These findings are unusual in CHL. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient with BCLu-DLBCL/CHL. She received adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine, and dacarbazine therapy and exhibited partial response. Some cases without mediastinal disease, such as our case, have been reported; however, these cases are rare and further studies are required. PMID:23512149

Iwaki, Noriko; Sato, Yasuharu; Kurokawa, Toshiro; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Ohno, Kyotaro; Takeuchi, Mai; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Orita, Yorihisa; Nakao, Shinji; Yoshino, Tadashi

2013-09-01

376

Chyle leak following biliary pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Chylous ascites is a rare clinical entity that historically has been accompanied by high mortality due to the association with malignancy. Here we present a case of chylous ascites as a complication of mild pancreatitis in a young woman. We review the literature of similar cases, which revealed four similar cases with a range of outcomes. Treatment options vary from dietary restriction of medium chain fatty acids, total parental nutrition, radiological intervention and surgery. PMID:25056377

Lippey, Jocelyn F.; Yong, Tuck L.

2014-01-01

377

Locally advanced unresectable pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Twenty-five percent of patients with pancreatic cancer present with locally advanced disease that is unresectable, and the treatment strategy for these patients is controversial, with options including chemotherapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. Abstracts presented at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting (#4001, #4126, and #4024) addressed local control, quality of life, and prognostic factors associated with current regimens of induction chemotherapy and subsequent chemoradiation. PMID:25076335

Johung, Kimberly L; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W

2014-07-01

378

Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Secondary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-09-16

379

Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in pigeons.  

PubMed

Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is a well-studied syndrome in domestic animals. EPI occurs when severe progressive loss of tubulo-acinar tissue from atrophy or inflammatory destruction results in insufficient secretion of digestive enzymes and clinical signs of malabsorption. However, the literature on EPI in birds is limited. The syndrome has been previously described in several cases where the diagnosis was based on clinical signs due to malabsorption-like light-coloured voluminous faeces, voracious appetite, coprophagia and weight loss, and on the response to treatment with pancreatic enzyme formulas. To enable a more scientific approach to the diagnosis of pancreatic functional disorders in pigeons, reference values of plasma amylase (382 to 556 IU/l), lipase (0 to 5 IU/l), and faecal activities of amylase (13 to 16 IU/l) and trypsin (11 to 14 IU/l) were determined in 24 adult pigeons. A case of EPI in a racing pigeon (Columba livia domestica) is reported, based on the clinical signs and the measurement of faecal amylase and trypsin activity. PMID:16448944

Amann, Olga; Visschers, Merel J M; Dorrestein, Gerry M; Westerhof, Ineke; Lumeij, J T

2006-02-01

380

Current controversies in follicular lymphoma.  

PubMed

Follicular lymphoma (FL) is characterized by its responsiveness to initial therapy, a pattern of repeated relapses, and a tendency for histologic progression to a process resembling diffuse, large B-cell lymphoma. Treatment decisions are complicated by the many effective options now available including combinations of conventional chemotherapy and monoclonal antibody, radioimmunotherapy, new targeted agents, and autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation. For selected patients, "watch and wait" or involved field irradiation may still be the most appropriate strategy. When therapy is required, a combination of rituximab and conventional chemotherapy results in improved outcomes compared to chemotherapy alone. Radioimmunotherapy alone or in combination with chemotherapy is an attractive strategy for patients with relapsed disease and may prove to be appropriate first line therapy. The role of stem cell transplant in FL requires further investigation. Novel agents with varied mechanisms of action continue to be developed. Enrollment of patients into clinical trials designed to address the many unanswered questions in FL is essential to improving clinical outcomes. PMID:16410034

Aurora, Vikas; Winter, Jane N

2006-07-01

381

Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Etoposide, Dexamethasone, and Filgrastim For Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-03-13

382

Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors, Multiple Myeloma, or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma With or Without Impaired Liver or Kidney Function  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-04

383

Localised Extranodal Lymphoma of the Head and Neck: The Sheffield Lymphoma Group Experience (1971–2000)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: Over the 30-year period from 1971–2000, 3750 cases of lymphoma were referred to the Sheffield Lymphoma Group for investigation and treatment. Of these, 580 were extranodal presentations and, of these, 190 (33%) were localised to the head and neck region. The aim of this lymphoma database review was to evaluate the patient characteristics and survival rates for these patients.Materials

S. Hart; J. M. Horsman; C. R. Radstone; H. Hancock; J. R. Goepel; B. W. Hancock

2004-01-01

384

Blood Sample Markers of Reproductive Hormones in Assessing Ovarian Reserve in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin

2014-09-09

385

Romidepsin for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.  

PubMed

Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas are relatively rare lymphomas and the most common form is mycosis fungoides. Its rare leukemic variant is Sezary syndrome. Advanced-stage disease is typically treated with bexarotene (a retinoid), IFN-? or conventional chemotherapeutic agents, but relapses are inevitable. Histone deacetylase inhibitors that modify the epigenome are an attractive addition to the armamentarium. Based on two large Phase II studies, the US FDA approved intravenous romidepsin for patients with relapsed/refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Romidepsin provides a subset of patients with an opportunity for prolonged clinical responses with a tolerable side-effect profile. PMID:24295412

Prince, H Miles; Dickinson, Michael; Khot, Amit

2013-12-01

386

Radiation Pneumonitis after Radiotherapy of Neck Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Radiotherapy is still one of the effective means for treatment of malignant tumors up to now. Particularly, it is an indispensable effective measure for treatment of some lymphoma patients. In routine work, radiation pneumonitis (RP) is the most significant complication of acute treatment-related toxicities in lung cancer; however, serious radioactive pneumonia is rare for the radiotherapy of neck lymphoma because the volume of the lungs affected by radiation dose was very small. We report a lymphoma case, where the patient had undergone radiotherapy for the bilateral neck and bilateral supraclavicular/infraclavicular area. Following completion of radiotherapy, the patient developed severe radiation pneumonitis.

Wei, Min; Cai, Jun; Tong, Tao; Yu, Shihua; Yang, Yonghua; Zhang, Weijia; Yang, Jiyuan

2014-01-01

387

Axillary lymphoma masquerading as inflammatory breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Primary non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) of the breast, and its extranodal spread to the breast resulting from systemic lymphoma, are recognised albeit uncommon conditions. However, lymphoma involving the axilla, presenting with the clinical appearance of inflammatory breast carcinoma (IBC) without infiltration of breast dermal lymphatics has not been reported previously. As highlighted by the two cases presented here, this entity should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with clinical IBC. The cases highlight the importance of careful histological analysis to distinguish IBC from NHL, since management strategies and prognosis are quite different. PMID:21614245

Taubman, KL; McKay, MJ

2006-01-01

388

Oxaliplatin, Ifosfamide and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2014-02-21

389

Chronic pancreatitis of the pancreatic remnant is an independent risk factor for pancreatic fistula after distal pancreatectomy  

PubMed Central

Background There is an ongoing debate about the best closure technique after distal pancreatectomy (DP). The aim of the closure is to prevent the formation of a clinically relevant post-operative pancreatic fistula (POPF). Stapler technique seems to be equal compared with hand-sewn closure of the remnant. For both techniques, a fistula rate of approximately 30% has been reported. Methods We retrospectively analyzed our DPs between 01/2000 and 12/2010. In all cases, the pancreatic duct was over sewn with a separately stitched ligation of the pancreatic duct (5*0 PDS) followed by a single-stitched hand-sewn closure of the residual pancreatic gland. The POPF was classified according to the criteria of the International Study Group for Pancreatic Fistula (ISGPF). Univariate and multivariate analyses of potential risk factors for the formation of POPF were performed. Indications for operations included cystic tumors (n = 53), neuroendocrine tumors (n = 27), adenocarcinoma (n = 22), chronic pancreatitis (n = 9), metastasis (n = 6), and others (n = 7). Results During the period, we performed 124 DPs (? = 74, ? = 50). The mean age was 57.5 years (18–82). The POPF rates according to the ISGPF criteria were: no fistula, 54.8% (n = 68); grade A, 24.2% (n = 30); grade B, 19.3% (n = 24); and grade C, 1.7% (n = 2). Therefore, in 21.0% (n = 26) of the cases, a clinically relevant pancreatic fistula occurred. The mean postoperative stay was significantly higher after grade B/C fistula (26.3 days) compared with no fistula/grade A fistula (13.7 days) (p < 0.05). The uni- and multivariate analyses showed chronic pancreatitis of the pancreatic remnant to be an independent risk factor for the development of POPF (p = 0.004 OR 7.09). Conclusion By using a standardized hand-sewn closure technique of the pancreatic remnant after DP with separately stitched ligation of the pancreatic duct, a comparably low fistula rate can be achieved. Signs of chronic pancreatitis of the pancreatic remnant may represent a risk factor for the development of a pancreatic fistula after DP and therefore an anastomosis of the remnant to the intestine should be considered. PMID:25127883

2014-01-01

390

Pain sensation in pancreatic diseases is not uniform: The different facets of pancreatic pain  

PubMed Central

AIM: To systematically characterize specific pain patterns in the most frequent pancreatic diseases. METHODS: Pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 314), pancreatic cancer (n = 469), and other pancreatic tumors (n = 249) including mucinous (n = 20) and serous cystadenoma (n = 31), invasive (n = 37) and non-invasive intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN; n = 48), low stage (n = 18) and high stage neuroendocrine neoplasia (n = 44), and ampullary cancer (n = 51) was registered and correlated with clinicopathological data. Survival times were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Patients alive at the follow-up time were censored. Survival curves were compared statistically using the log-rank test. RESULTS: Forty-nine point one percent of pancreatic cancer patients revealed no pain, whereas in chronic pancreatitis only 18.3% were pain free. In contrary, moderate/severe pain was registered in 15.1% in pancreatic cancer patients that was increased in chronic pancreatitis with up to 34.2%. Serous cystadenoma was asymptomatic in most cases (58.1%), whereas 78.9% of all mucinous cystadenoma patients suffered pain. In neuroendocrine neoplasia pain was not a key clinical symptom since 64% of low stage neuroendocrine neoplasia and 59% of high stage neuroendocrine neoplasia patients were pain free. Cancer localization in the pancreatic body and patients with malignant pancreatic neoplasms were associated with more severe pain. Tumor grading and stage did not show any impact on pain. Only in pancreatic cancer, pain was directly associated with impaired survival. CONCLUSION: Pancreatic pain depicts different patterns of abdominal pain sensation according to the respective pancreatic disorder and does not allow a unification of the term pancreatic pain. PMID:25083089

D'Haese, Jan G; Hartel, Mark; Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Hinz, Ulf; Bergmann, Frank; Buchler, Markus W; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Guralp O

2014-01-01

391

Abdominal Manifestations of Lymphoma: Spectrum of Imaging Features  

PubMed Central

Non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphomas frequently involve many structures in the abdomen and pelvis. Extranodal disease is more common with Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma than with Hodgkin's lymphoma. Though it may be part of a systemic lymphoma, single onset of nodal lymphoma is not rare. Extranodal lymphoma has been described in virtually every organ and tissue. In decreasing order of frequency, the spleen, liver, gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, abdominal wall, genitourinary tract, adrenal, peritoneal cavity, and biliary tract are involved. The purpose of this review is to discuss and illustrate the spectrum of appearances of nodal and extranodal lymphomas, including AIDS-related lymphomas, in the abdominopelvic region using a multimodality approach, especially cross-sectional imaging techniques. The most common radiologic patterns of involvement are illustrated. Familiarity with the imaging manifestations that are diagnostically specific for lymphoma is important because imaging plays an important role in the noninvasive management of disease. PMID:24967280

Borba-Filho, Paulo; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Farias, Marcella

2013-01-01

392

Chidamide, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, functions as a tumor inhibitor by modulating the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and P21 in pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Chidamide is a newly designed histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor that has been applied in clinical trials. This study aimed to test the effect of Chidamide on proliferation and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cell lines and in vivo tumors, as well as to determine the underlying mechanism. The PaTu8988 pancreatic tumor cell line either in culture or inoculated in nude mice were used to evaluate the antitumor characteristics of Chidamide. Proliferation and apoptosis of cultured PaTu8988 cells were examined by CCK-8 assay and Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining assay, respectively. Alterations in protein expression, including Caspase-3, Bcl-2?like protein 4 (Bax), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and p21, were tested by western blot analysis. The mRNA of different HDACs was examined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments. Chidamide suppressed cell proliferation and induced early apoptosis of pancreatic tumor cells in a dose?dependent manner after 48 h of treatment. Similarly, the in vivo study using pancreatic tumor murine model showed that Chidamide administration significantly inhibited the growth of pancreatic tumor and induced tumor cell apoptosis. The in vitro and in vivo studies found that Chidamide treatment significantly decreased the expression of type I HDACs, uncleaved Caspase-3 and p21 and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 expression. The results from the in vitro and in vivo studies suggested Chidamide might suppress the proliferation of pancreatic tumor cells by downregulating the expression of type I HDACs and p21, and promoting mitochondrial apoptosis pathway-dependent cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The study provided more evidence for clinical administration of Chidamide that targets pancreatic tumor cells and identified potential molecular targets for the development of potent anticancer drugs. PMID:25384499

Zhao, Bin; He, Tianlin

2015-01-01

393

Bortezomib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

2013-12-02

394

Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-10-22

395

Prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Post-procedure pancreatitis is the most common complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography (ERCP) and carries a high morbidity and mortality occurring in at least 3%-5% of all procedures. We reviewed the available literature searching for “ERCP” and “pancreatitis” and “post-ERCP pancreatitis”. in PubMed and Medline. This review looks at the diagnosis, risk factors, causes and methods of preventing post-procedure pancreatitis. These include the evidence for patient selection, endoscopic techniques and pharmacological prophylaxis of ERCP induced pancreatitis. Selecting the right patient for the procedure by a risk benefits assessment is the best way of avoiding unnecessary ERCPs. Risk is particularly high in young women with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD). Many of the trials reviewed have rather few numbers of subjects and hence difficult to appraise. Meta-analyses have helped screen for promising modalities of prophylaxis. At present, evidence is emerging that pancreatic stenting of patients with SOD and rectally administered nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in a large unselected trial reduce the risk of post-procedure pancreatitis. A recent meta-analysis have demonstrated that rectally administered indomethecin, just before or after ERCP is associated with significantly lower rate of pancreatitis compared with placebo [OR = 0.49 (0.34-0.71); P = 0.0002]. Number needed to treat was 20. It is likely that one of these prophylactic measures will begin to be increasingly practised in high risk groups. PMID:24891970

Wong, Lin-Lee; Tsai, Her-Hsin

2014-01-01

396

CT of fluid collections associated with pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Fluid collections are an important component of severe pancreatitis because they may produce a detectable mass and may be responsible for prolongation of fever and pain. Among 59 cases of clinically verified pancreatitis, 32 were shown by CT to be complicated by pancreatic and/or extrapancreatic fluid collections. Pancreatic fluid collections, diagnosed in 16 patients, were typically on the anterior or anterolateral surface of the gland and were covered only by a thin layer of fibrous connective tissue. Extrapancreatic fluid collections were detected in the lesser sac (19 cases), anterior pararenal space (15), posterior pararenal space (six), in or around the left lobe of the liver (five), in the spleen (three), and in the mediastinum (one). The potential undesirable consequences of escape of pancreatic juice are necrosis, abscess formation, or prolonged inflammation of the peripancreatic tissues. Relative preservation of pancreatic integrity as observed by CT was regularly found in patients with large extrapancreatic fluid collections, suggesting that escape of pancreatic juice produces a beneficial decompression of the pancreatic duct system. PMID:6770619

Siegelman, S S; Copeland, B E; Saba, G P; Cameron, J L; Sanders, R C; Zerhouni, E A

1980-06-01

397

Polyamines in intestinal and pancreatic adaptation.  

PubMed Central

The intestinal mucosa is a rapidly proliferative tissue, with a highly dynamic cell population. Its total cellular mass is well controlled and can adapt, with hypo- or hyperplasia, to a wide variety of stimuli. Luminal nutrients, hormonal factors, and pancreatic and biliary secretions have all been implicated in the regulation of intestinal mucosal adaptation. Similarly, the same factors appear essential for the maintenance of exocrine pancreatic structure and function. The polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) and the key enzyme controlling their synthesis (ornithine decarboxylase, ODC) are important for many cell growth processes, and may play important roles in intestinal and pancreatic adaptation. During intestinal adaptation in response to jejunectomy, lactation and pancreatico-biliary diversion (PBD), intestinal contents of ODC and polyamines are increased, paralleling increases in mucosal proliferative indices and DNA synthesis. With administration of the specific inhibitor of ODC (difluoromethylornithine, DFMO) the increases in ODC and polyamines are suppressed, and intestinal adaptation is abrogated. In pancreatic hyperplasia induced by caerulein, pancreatic polyamines are increased. With DFMO administration, caerulein-induced increases in pancreatic DNA synthesis were inhibited and pancreatic hypertrophy was partially suppressed. PBD-induced pancreatic hypertrophy, however, was not affected by DFMO. Thus, the role of polyamines in the adaptation of the pancreas, with a relatively quiescent proliferative status, is as yet undefined. It seems clear, however, that the induction of ODC and the resultant increase in polyamine biosynthesis are critical for the normal growth and especially for adaptive hyperplasia of the intestinal mucosa. PMID:3121457

Luk, G D; Yang, P

1987-01-01

398

Pancreatography in chronic pancreatitis: international definitions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terminology in classification of pancreatograms was discussed at a recent international workshop on chronic pancreatitis. A new terminology based on morphological radiographic appearances and a new classification to describe the severity and localisation of pancreatogram changes were agreed. Pancreatograms in chronic pancreatitis are graded as normal or equivocal, or as showing mild, moderate, or marked changes, either diffuse or local.

A T Axon; M Classen; P B Cotton; M Cremer; P C Freeny; W R Lees

1984-01-01

399

Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer: an overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer, although infrequent, has an exceptionally high mortality rate, making it one of the four or five most common causes of cancer mortality in developed countries. The incidence of pancreatic cancer varies greatly across regions, which suggests roles for lifestyle factors, such as diet, or environmental factors, such as vitamin D exposure. Smoking is the most common known risk

Patrick Maisonneuve; Albert B. Lowenfels; Sara Raimondi

2009-01-01

400

Hispanics and Pancreatic Cancer: Things to Know  

MedlinePLUS

HISPANICS AND PANCREATIC CANCER: THINGS TO KNOW By the National Cancer Institute One of the leading causes of cancer?related deaths among ... a rare but often fatal disease known as pancreatic cancer. This cancer, which is often detected only after ...

401

Scientists Detect Early Sign of Pancreatic Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... please enable JavaScript. Scientists Detect Early Sign of Pancreatic Cancer Finding might lead one day to test for ... September 29, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Laboratory Tests Pancreatic Cancer SUNDAY, Sept. 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say ...

402

Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

2011-01-01

403

Pancreatoduodenectomy in the Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The value of surgical resection for patients with chronic pancreatitis has been debated on account of persistent symptoms and the morbidity of the operative procedure, both immediate and delayed. This paper explores the consequence of pancreatoduodenectomy in 175 patients with chronic pancreatitis who were operated on between 1976 and 1997. All patients were carefully selected after varying periods of conservative

R. Christopher G. Russell; Belinda A. Theis

2003-01-01

404

Transpapillary and transmural drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Endoscopic drainage of pseudocysts using the transpapillary and transmural approaches has been reported. We evaluated endoscopic drainage in 53 patients with symptomatic pancreatic pseudocysts in whom conservative management had failed.Methods: After preliminary endoscopic retrograde pancreatography, transpapillary drainage was attempted in 33 patients with pseudocysts that communicated with the main pancreatic duct. Transmural drainage of pseudocysts in contact with the

Kenneth F. Binmoeller; Hans Seifert; Andreas Walter; Nib Soehendra

1995-01-01

405

Pathogenesis of Pain in Chronic Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The pathophysiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis (CP) is incompletely understood. Several hypotheses have been advanced, including pancreatic and extrapancreatic causes. The existence of different hypotheses to explain the genesis of pain in CP also reflects the different therapeutic approaches to pain in these patients. Increased intraductal pressure as a result of single or multiple strictures and\\/or calculi is believed

Pierluigi Di Sebastiano; Fabio F. di Mola; Markus W. Büchler; Helmut Friess

2004-01-01

406

17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Epithelial Cancer, Malignant Lymphoma, or Sarcoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Chondrosarcoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2013-02-06

407

Precursor Lesions of Pancreatic Cancer: Molecular Pathology and Clinical Implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease, with near uniform 5-year mortality rates. The key to improving survival of pancreatic cancer rests upon early detection of this neoplasm at a resectable, and hence potentially curable, stage. Methods: We review the current state of the literature vis-à-vis the three common precursor lesions of pancreatic adenocarcinoma: pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal papillary mucinous

Mansher Singh; Anirban Maitra

2007-01-01

408

[The post-traumatic pancreatitis: about four cases].  

PubMed

The post-traumatic pancreatitis is the main reason of mortality in the traumatisms of the pancreas, its concurrence is related to the lesions of the pancreatic channels. It represents only 1% of the pancreatitis. In a descriptive retrospective study, four cases of post-traumatic pancreatitis are described. PMID:16546346

Faroudy, M; Mosadik, A; Mouelhi, S; Ababou, A; Lazreq, C; Sbihi, A

2006-06-01

409

What Is Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma?  

MedlinePLUS

... the section “ How is non-Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed? ” Spleen: The spleen is an organ under the lower part of ... left side of the body. An average adult spleen weighs about 5 ounces. The spleen makes lymphocytes ...

410

Pediatric Leukemia and Lymphoma Steering Committee  

Cancer.gov

The Pediatric Leukemia and Lymphoma Steering Committee (PLLSC) was established in 2011. PLLSC members include representatives from the Children's Oncology Group, pediatric and medical oncologists and other specialists, translational scientists, biostatisticians, patient advocates, and NCI staff.

411

International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)  

Cancer.gov

A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

412

Hypotension Associated with Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Hypotension is an extremely rare manifestation of Hodgkin lymphoma. We report the case of a patient who presented with new onset hypotension and was diagnosed with urosepsis and septic shock requiring pressor support for maintaining his blood pressure. computed tomography (CT) scan of abdomen showed liver lesions, which were new on comparison with a CT abdomen done 3 weeks back. Biopsy of the liver lesions and subsequently a bone marrow biopsy showed large atypical Reed-Sternberg cells, positive for CD15 and CD 30 and negative for CD45, CD3 and CD20 on immuno-histochemical staining, hence establishing the diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma. The mechanism involved in Hodgkin lymphoma causing hypotension remains anecdotal, but since it is mostly seen in patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma, it is hypothetically related to a complex interaction between cytokines and mediators of vasodilatation. Here we review relevant literature pertaining to presentation and pathogenesis of this elusive and rare association. PMID:25317321

Dang, Geetanjali; Hamad, Hussein; Mohajer, Roozbeh; Catchatourian, Rosalind; Kovarik, Paula

2014-01-01

413

Follicular Lymphoma in Adults (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... of white blood cell. Lymphocytes circulate in the body through a network referred to as the lymphatic system, which includes ... of tests are available to help determine which areas of the body have been affected by follicular lymphoma. Tests that ...

414

General Information about Primary CNS Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... into the bloodstream may then reach the brain. Steroid therapy Steroids are hormones made naturally in the body. They ... a laboratory and used as drugs. Glucocorticoids are steroid drugs that have an anticancer effect in lymphomas . ...

415

Study Suggests New Options for Follicular Lymphoma  

Cancer.gov

Treatment with a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody appears to be highly effective as consolidation after first-line therapy in patients with indolent, advanced-stage follicular lymphoma, according to the October 14, 2008, Journal of Clinical Oncology.

416