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Sample records for pancreatic lymphoma ppl

  1. Partial Optimization of the 5-Terminal Codon Increased a Recombination Porcine Pancreatic Lipase (opPPL) Expression in Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Chen, Dan; Tang, Jiayong; Jia, Gang; Long, Dingbiao; Liu, Guangmang; Chen, Xiaoling; Shang, Haiying

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic lipase plays a key role in intestinal digestion of feed fat, and is often deficient in young animals such as weaning piglets. The objective of this study was to express and characterize a partial codon optimized porcine pancreatic lipase (opPPL). A 537 bp cDNA fragment encoding N-terminus amino acid residue of the mature porcine pancreatic lipase was synthesized according to the codon bias of Pichia pastoris and ligated to the full-length porcine pancreatic lipase cDNA fragment. The codon optimized PPL was cloned into the pPICZαA (Invitrogen, Beijing, China) vector. After the resultant opPPL/pPICZαΑ plasmid was transformed into P.pastoris, the over-expressed extracellular opPPL containing a His-tag to the C terminus was purified using Ni Sepharose affinity column (GE Healthcare, Piscataway, NJ, USA), and was characterized against the native enzyme (commercial PPL from porcine pancreas, Sigma). The opPPL exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 52 kDa, and showed optimal temperature (40°C), optimal pH (8.0), Km (0.041 mM), and Vmax (2.008 µmol.mg protein −1.min−1) similar to those of the commercial enzyme with p-NPP as the substrate. The recombinant enzyme was stable at 60°C, but lost 80% (P<0.05) of its activity after exposure to heat ≥60°C for 20 min. The codon optimization increased opPPL yield for ca 4 folds (146 mg.L−1 vs 36 mg.L−1) and total enzyme activity increased about 5 folds (1900 IU.L−1 vs 367 IU.L−1) compared with those native naPPL/pPICZαΑ tranformant. Comparison of gene copies and mRNA profiles between the two strains indicated the increased rePPL yields may partly be ascribed to the increased protein translational efficiency after codon optimization. In conclusion, we successfully optimized 5-terminal of porcine pancreatic lipase encoding gene and over-expressed the gene in P. pastoris as an extracellular, functional enzyme. The recombination enzyme demonstrates a potential for future use as an animal feed additive for animal improvement. PMID:25544987

  2. Burkitt lymphoma with unusual presentation: Acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Koca, Tugba; Aslan, Nagehan; Dereci, Selim; Akcam, Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatitis due to malignant infiltration is an uncommon condition in childhood. Pancreatic lymphomas constitute <2% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Only six reported cases with various clinical presentation have been documented in the literature. Described herein is the case of a nine-year-old boy with abdominal pain, jaundice, emesis, weight loss, diarrhea, who developed hyperlipidemia and cholestasis. Pancreatitis was suspected due to high amylase and lipase. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed diffuse enlargement of the pancreas. This sausage pancreas imaging was suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis, but the patient was diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma on bone marrow aspiration, and rapidly improved with chemotherapy. Burkitt lymphoma should be kept in mind when patients present with pancreatitis, especially with diffuse enlarged pancreas. PMID:26031558

  3. Plasmablastic Lymphoma Mimicking Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Cheema, Ahmad R.; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare B-cell neoplasm. It predominantly occurs in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and exhibits a highly aggressive clinical behavior. Case Presentation. We describe an unusual case of a 37-year-old HIV-positive male who presented with acute pancreatitis secondary to multiple peripancreatic masses compressing the pancreas. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed diffuse and cohesive pattern of large B-cells resembling immunoblasts or plasmablasts. The neoplastic cells were positive for BOB1 and MUM1, partially positive for CD79a, and negative for CD20, CD56, CD138, CD3, CD5, AE1/AE3, and HHV8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization was positive. These features were consistent with PBL. The patient was initiated on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy, demonstrating a striking response. Conclusion. To our research, this is the first report of PBL with the initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. The findings in this case suggest that PBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors.

  4. [Malignant pancreatic non-hodgkin's lymphoma manifesting as severe acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Mofredj, A; Cadranel, J F; Cazier, A; Traor, I; Coutarel, P; Levy, P

    1999-04-01

    Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the pancreas is a rare disease. Its diagnosis is difficult without histological examination. In fact, clinical and imaging findings are not pathognomonic. Acute pancreatitis associated with pancreatic lymphoma is extremely rare. We have found only 7 case reports in literature. We report herein a new case of pancreatic lymphoma which was revealed by a severe pancreatitis. PMID:10416118

  5. 78 FR 8509 - PPL Colstrip I, LLC, PPL Colstrip II, LLC, PPL Montana, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PPL Colstrip I, LLC, PPL Colstrip II, LLC, PPL Montana, LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on December 21, 2012, PPL Colstrip I, LLC (PPL Colstrip I), PPL Colstrip II, LLC (PPL Colstrip II) and PPL Montana, LLC (PPL Montana) (collectively, the PPL Companies) submitted to...

  6. Primary Pancreatic Lymphoma Simulating Acute Cholestatic Hepatitis in a 7-Year-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Nitesh; Alam, Seema; Rawat, Dinesh; Khanna, Rajeev; Bansal, Kalpana; Bihari, Chhagan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pancreatic lymphoma in children has been described infrequently in literature, and its acute presentation as cholestatic hepatitis is similarly rare. We report a case of a 7-year-old child with primary pancreatic lymphoma presenting as acute infective hepatitis, leading to delay in correct diagnosis and management. PMID:26157960

  7. Pancreatic cancer risk after treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Dores, G. M.; Curtis, R. E.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Stovall, M.; Hall, P.; Lynch, C. F.; Smith, S. A.; Weathers, R. E.; Storm, H. H.; Hodgson, D. C.; Kleinerman, R. A.; Joensuu, H.; Johannesen, T. B.; Andersson, M.; Holowaty, E. J.; Kaijser, M.; Pukkala, E.; Vaalavirta, L.; Fossa, S. D.; Langmark, F.; Travis, L. B.; Fraumeni, J. F.; Aleman, B. M.; Morton, L. M.; Gilbert, E. S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although elevated risks of pancreatic cancer have been observed in long-term survivors of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), no prior study has assessed the risk of second pancreatic cancer in relation to radiation dose and specific chemotherapeutic agents. Patients and methods We conducted an international casecontrol study within a cohort of 19 882 HL survivors diagnosed from 1953 to 2003 including 36 cases and 70 matched controls. Results Median ages at HL and pancreatic cancer diagnoses were 47 and 60.5 years, respectively; median time to pancreatic cancer was 19 years. Pancreatic cancer risk increased with increasing radiation dose to the pancreatic tumor location (Ptrend = 0.005) and increasing number of alkylating agent (AA)-containing cycles of chemotherapy (Ptrend = 0.008). The odds ratio (OR) for patients treated with both subdiaphragmatic radiation (?10 Gy) and ?6 AA-containing chemotherapy cycles (13 cases, 6 controls) compared with patients with neither treatment was 17.9 (95% confidence interval 3.5158). The joint effect of these two treatments was significantly greater than additive (P = 0.041) and nonsignificantly greater than multiplicative (P = 0.29). Especially high risks were observed among patients receiving ?8400 mg/m2 of procarbazine with nitrogen mustard or ?3900 mg/m2 of cyclophosphamide. Conclusion Our study demonstrates for the first time that both radiotherapy and chemotherapy substantially increase pancreatic cancer risks among HL survivors treated in the past. These findings extend the range of nonhematologic cancers associated with chemotherapy and add to the evidence that the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy can lead to especially large risks. PMID:25185241

  8. Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the immune system called the lymph system. There are many types of lymphoma. One type is Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of ...

  9. 77 FR 31843 - PPL Montana, LLC; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PPL Montana, LLC; Notice of Meeting a. Date and Time of Meeting: Thursday.... Purpose of Meeting: Commission staff will meet with PPL Montana, LLC (PPL Montana) and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes to discuss issues related to PPL Montana's petition for a declaratory...

  10. 78 FR 20313 - PPL Electric Utilities Corporation; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission PPL Electric Utilities Corporation; Notice of Filing Take notice that on March 26, 2013, PPL Electric Utilities Corporation (PPL) submitted to the Federal Energy...

  11. 77 FR 34037 - PPL Montana, LLC; Supplemental Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission PPL Montana, LLC; Supplemental Notice of Meeting May 31, 2012. On May 23... with PPL Montana, LLC and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes on Thursday, June 7, 2012 at...

  12. Stability measurements of PPL atmospheric pressure arc

    SciTech Connect

    Roquemore, L.; Zweben, S.J.; Wurden, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    Experiments on the stability of atmospheric pressure arcs have been started at PPL to understand and improve the performance of arc furnaces used for processing applications in metallurgy and hazardous waste treatment. Previous studies have suggested that the violent instabilities in such arcs may be due to kink modes. A 30 kW, 500 Amp CW DC experimental arc furnace was constructed with a graphite cathode and a molten steel anode. The arc plasma is diagnosed with 4000 frames/sec digital camera, Hall probes, and voltage and current monitors. Under certain conditions, the arc exhibits an intermittent helical instability, with the helix rotating at {approx}600 Hz. The nature of the instability is investigated. A possible instability mechanism is the self-magnetic field of the arc, with saturation occurring due to inhomogeneous heating in a helical arc. The effect of external DC and AC magnetic fields on the instability is investigated. Additionally, arc deflection due to external transverse magnetic field is investigated. The deflection angle is found to be proportional to the applied field, and is in good agreement with a simple model of the {rvec J} x {rvec b} force on the arc jet.

  13. 77 FR 20805 - Application to Export Electric Energy; PPL EnergyPlus, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Application to Export Electric Energy; PPL EnergyPlus, LLC AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, DOE. ACTION: Notice of application. SUMMARY: PPL EnergyPlus, LLC. (PPL EnergyPlus) has applied...

  14. 78 FR 77724 - PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption From the Requirement To Submit an...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... as described in 78 FR 4465 (January 22, 2013). On April 12, 2013, PPL submitted Revision 4 to the COL... COMMISSION PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption From the Requirement To Submit an... issuing an exemption in response to an October 18, 2013 request from PPL Bell Bend, LLC (PPL)....

  15. 77 FR 75674 - Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2, PPL Susquehanna, LLC, Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2, PPL Susquehanna, LLC, Exemption 1.0 Background PPL Susquehanna, LLC (the licensee) is the holder of Renewed Facility Operating License Nos. NPF-14 and NPF-22, which authorizes operation of...

  16. 77 FR 27450 - PPL Montana, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PPL Montana, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice that... CFR 385.207, PPL Montana, LLC, submitted a petition requesting the Commission to issue a declaratory... (ii) not authorized by the Montana Public Service Commission to be recovered by the Montana...

  17. Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Hodgkin Lymphoma KidsHealth > For Teens > Hodgkin Lymphoma Print A ... to check for disease, including lymphoma. What Is Hodgkin Lymphoma? Hodgkin lymphoma is a type of cancer ...

  18. Covalent immobilization of porcine pancreatic lipase on carboxyl-activated magnetic nanoparticles: characterization and application for enzymatic inhibition assays.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan-Ting; Ren, Xiao-Yun; Liu, Yi-Ming; Wei, Ying; Qing, Lin-Sen; Liao, Xun

    2014-05-01

    Using carboxyl functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carrier, a novel immobilized porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) was prepared through the 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling reaction. Transmission electron microscopic images showed that the synthesized nanoparticles (Fe3O4-SiO2) possessed three dimensional core-shell structures with an average diameter of ~20 nm. The effective enzyme immobilization onto the nanocomposite was confirmed by atomic force microscopic (AFM) analysis. Results from Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Bradford protein assay, and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that PPL was covalently attached to the surface of magnetic nanoparticles with a PPL immobilization yield of 50mg enzyme/g MNPs. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis revealed that the MNPs-PPL nanocomposite had a high saturation magnetization of 42.25 emug(-1). The properties of the immobilized PPL were investigated in comparison with the free enzyme counterpart. Enzymatic activity, reusability, thermo-stability, and storage stability of the immobilized PPL were found significantly superior to those of the free one. The Km and the Vmax values (0.02 mM, 6.40 Umg(-1) enzyme) indicated the enhanced activity of the immobilized PPL compared to those of the free enzyme (0.29 mM, 3.16 Umg(-1) enzyme). Furthermore, at an elevated temperature of 70 C, immobilized PPL retained 60% of its initial activity. The PPL-MNPs nanocomposite was applied in the enzyme inhibition assays using orlistat, and two natural products isolated from oolong tea (i.e., EGCG and EGC) as the test compounds. PMID:24656379

  19. Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Hodgkin Lymphoma KidsHealth > For Kids > Hodgkin Lymphoma Print A ... of the cool things he's missed. What Is Hodgkin Lymphoma? Lymphoma (say: lim-FOH-mah) is cancer ...

  20. Primary Pulmonary Lymphoma and Cutaneous Metastasis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Latif Moini, Ali; Farbod Ara, Tahmineh; Fazeli Mosleh Abadi, Masood

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma is the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, representing nearly one-third of all cases. Any organ can be involved, making a diagnostic biopsy imperative. When the lungs are the involved organs, it is called primary pulmonary lymphoma (PPL). Hereby, we present a case of PPL that demonstrated a single large mass on chest CT and had metastatic skin lesions. The diagnosis of PPL was performed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry staining of the transthoracic lung biopsy and skin lesion specimens. This case highlighted an unusual and subtle clinical presentation, and the importance of new onset pulmonary symptoms and a large lung mass on chest X-ray. Review of the literature on the patient`s radiographic presentation revealed various findings, the most common of which were single or multiple nodular lesions in one or two lungs. It highlighted the fact that this diagnosis should be considered in all cases with a lung mass and skin lesions. PMID:25763075

  1. Pancreatic metastasis from mycosis fungoides mimicking primary pancreatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ceriolo, Paola; Fausti, Valentina; Cinotti, Elisa; Bonadio, Silvia; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Bianchi, Giovanna; Orcioni, Giulio Fraternali; Fiocca, Roberto; Rongioletti, Franco; Pistoia, Vito; Borgonovo, Giacomo

    2016-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that can undergo local progression with possible systemic dissemination. We report a case of a patient affected by MF with a pancreatic mass that was a diagnostic challenge between primitive tumor and pancreatic metastasis from MF. Clinical setting findings and imaging studies raised the suspicion of a pancreatic primary neoplasm. A diagnostic clue was provided by the combined histomorphologic/immunohistochemical study of pancreatic and cutaneous biopsies, which revealed a pancreatic localization of MF. Considering the rarity of metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas, we next investigated whether chemokine-chemokine receptor interactions could be involved in the phenomenon to provide new insight into the possible mechanisms underlying metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas. Histological analyses of archival pancreatic tissue demonstrated that glucagon-secreting cells of the pancreatic islets expressed the CCL27 chemokine, which may have attracted in our case metastatic MF cells expressing the complementary receptor CCR10.

  2. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Solid Tumors With Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-11

    Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; AIDS Related Immunoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Glioma; Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  3. Mercury Emission Control Technologies for PPL Montana-Colstrip Testing

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Kay; Michael L. Jones; Steven A. Benson

    2007-04-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) was asked by PPL Montana LLC (PPL) to provide assistance and develop an approach to identify cost-effective options for mercury control at its coal-fired power plants. The work conducted focused on baseline mercury level and speciation measurement, short-term parametric testing, and week long testing of mercury control technology at Colstrip Unit 3. Three techniques and various combinations of these techniques were identified as viable options for mercury control. The options included oxidizing agents or sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) such as chlorine-based SEA1 and an EERC proprietary SEA2 with and without activated carbon injection. Baseline mercury emissions from Colstrip Unit 3 are comparatively low relative to other Powder River Basin (PRB) coal-fired systems and were found to range from 5 to 6.5 g/Nm3 (2.9 to 3.8 lb/TBtu), with a rough value of approximately 80% being elemental upstream of the scrubber and higher than 95% being elemental at the outlet. Levels in the stack were also greater than 95% elemental. Baseline mercury removal across the scrubber is fairly variable but generally tends to be about 5% to 10%. Parametric results of carbon injection alone yielded minimal reduction in Hg emissions. SEA1 injection resulted in 20% additional reduction over baseline with the maximum rate of 400 ppm (3 gal/min). Week long testing was conducted with the combination of SEA2 and carbon, with injection rates of 75 ppm (10.3 lb/hr) and 1.5 lb/MMacf (40 lb/hr), respectively. Reduction was found to be an additional 30% and, overall during the testing period, was measured to be 38% across the scrubber. The novel additive injection method, known as novel SEA2, is several orders of magnitude safer and less expensive than current SEA2 injection methods. However, used in conjunction with this plant configuration, the technology did not demonstrate a significant level of mercury reduction. Near-future use of this technique at Colstrip is not seen. All the additives injected resulted in some reduction in mercury emissions. However, the target reduction of 55% was not achieved. The primary reason for the lower removal rates is because of the lower levels of mercury in the flue gas stream and the lower capture level of fine particles by the scrubbers (relative to that for larger particles). The reaction and interaction of the SEA materials is with the finer fraction of the fly ash, because the SEA materials are vaporized during the combustion or reaction process and condense on the surfaces of entrained particles or form very small particles. Mercury will have a tendency to react and interact with the finer fraction of entrained ash and sorbent as a result of the higher surface areas of the finer particles. The ability to capture the finer fraction of fly ash is the key to controlling mercury. Cost estimates for mercury removal based on the performance of each sorbent during this project are projected to be extremely high. When viewed on a dollar-per-pound-of-mercury removed basis activated carbon was projected to cost nearly $1.2 million per pound of mercury removed. This value is roughly six times the cost of other sorbent-enhancing agents, which were projected to be closer to $200,000 per pound of mercury removed.

  4. Directed evolution of nitrilase PpL19 from Pseudomonas psychrotolerans L19 and identification of enantiocomplementary mutants toward mandelonitrile.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huihui; Wang, Hualei; Gao, Wenyuan; Chen, Lifeng; Wu, Kai; Wei, Dongzhi

    2015-12-25

    Nitrilase PpL19 from Pseudomonas psychrotolerans L19 can hydrolyze racemic mandelonitrile to (S)-mandelic acid with an enantiomeric excess (ee) value of 52.7%. In this study, random mutagenesis combined with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to identify the key residues responsible for nitrilase enantioselectivity. Five enzyme mutants exhibiting distinct selectivity were generated and four "hot spots" (M113, R128, A136, and I168) responsible for enantioselectivity toward mandelonitrile were identified and characterized. Furthermore, through saturation mutagenesis, positions 113 and 128 were confirmed to substantially influence the enantioselectivity of PpL19, and certain replacements of the methionine at position 113, in particular, were found to reverse the enantioselectivity of PpL19 from S- to R-selectivity. Two other single mutants of the enzyme, PpL19-A136Y and -I168Y, also showed reversed selectivity and preferentially produced (R)-mandelic acid (ee values: 66.7% and 74.3%, respectively). By combining the beneficial mutations, two enantiocomplementary nitrilase mutants, PpL19-LH and PpL19-GYY, were created, which exhibited high S- and R-selectivity toward mandelonitrile, respectively: PpL19-LH showed the highest S-selectivity toward mandelonitrile ever reported (91.1% ee), and, notably, the PpL19-GYY mutant was identified to be highly R-selective (90.1% ee) and thus an unexpected enantiocomplementary mutant for mandelonitrile. PMID:26577409

  5. 77 FR 36012 - PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant Combined License Application; Notice of Intent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... published in the Federal Register on January 6, 2009 (74 FR 470). On March 30, 2012, PPL submitted a revised... FR 55546; September 12, 2008). III. Discussion The purpose of this notice is to inform the public... COMMISSION PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant Combined License Application; Notice of...

  6. 78 FR 4465 - PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Combined License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ...) 76 FR 81992 (December 29, 2011). 2.0 Request/Action The regulations specified in 10 CFR 50.71(e)(3... COMMISSION PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Combined License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption 1.0 Background PPL Bell Bend, LLC, submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) a combined...

  7. 76 FR 81992 - PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Combined License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... COMMISSION PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Combined License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption 1.0 Background PPL Bell Bend, LLC submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) a..., Certifications, and Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This reactor is to be identified as Bell Bend...

  8. 77 FR 2973 - PPL Electric Utilities Corporation; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission PPL Electric Utilities Corporation; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice that on December 30, 2011, pursuant to section 219 of the Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 824s, Order No. 679, and 207 of the Rules...

  9. 75 FR 15462 - PPL Susquehanna, LLC; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... on the quality of the human environment 75 FR 13322; dated March 19, 2010. This exemption is... COMMISSION PPL Susquehanna, LLC; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption 1.0 Background.... NPF-14 and NPF-22, which authorize operation of the Susquehanna Steam Electric Station (SSES), Units...

  10. 78 FR 27216 - PPL Holtwood, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission PPL Holtwood, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing, Soliciting Comments, Motions To Intervene, and Protests Take notice that the following hydroelectric application has been filed with the Commission and...

  11. Bioaerosols standoff detection simultaneously refereed with particle concentration (ppl) and viability units (ACPLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buteau, Sylvie; Simard, Jean-Robert; Rowsell, Susan

    2009-09-01

    Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) called SINBAHD. This LIDAR system was used to characterize spectrally the LIF of bioaerosol agent simulants and obscurants during 57 cross-wind open-air releases at Suffield, CAN in July 2007. An autoclave and gamma-irradiation killing procedures were performed on Bacillus subtilis var globigii (BG) samples before they were aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized. Slight discrepancies were observed in the spectral characteristics of killed versus live samples but none between the two killing methodologies. Significant signature variabilities were observed from the different batches of Erwinia Herbicolas (EH). The generated cloud was simultaneously characterized in Agent Containing Particle per Liter of Air (ACPLA) by slit sampler units and in particle per litter of air (ppl) by an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). Correlation assessment between the stand-off sensor SINBAHD and the two referee point sensors was done, allowing an estimation of SINBAHD's sensitivity in ACPLA and in ppl. For a 20-m thick cloud at a range of 990 m, a detection limit of a few tens of ACPLA and a few ACPLA were obtained for BG and EH respectively. The extracted correlation between ACPLA and ppl data for releases performed with an agricultural sprayer showed a high degree of variability: 2 to 29% and 1 to 6% of ACPLA/ppl ratio for BG and EH, respectively.

  12. Synchronous primary pulmonary lymphoma presenting with pulmonary adenocarcinoma: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J X; Li, X Z; Xiang, R L; Gao, Z

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of synchronous lung tumors is rare, as reported in various clinical series, ranging from 0.2% to 8%. Most reported cases of synchronous tumors were shown to have the same histologic types of lung cancer. Among possible combinations, squamous cell carcinoma was by far the most common. Primary pulmonary lymphoma (PPL) is very rare in clinics accounting for only 0.5-1% of primary lung tumors. There is no report about synchronous primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma presenting with lung lymphoma. It can be easily misdiagnosed or missed. Although the treatment of PPL and synchronous pulmonary tumors has controversial, surgery with/without postoperative adjuvant radio-chemotherapy are used for most patients in present. We describe a case of synchronous primary lung tumors presenting with lymphoma and adenocarcinoma, in which expression of the cell surface antigens were evaluated immunohistochemically. By taking into consideration of the reported experiences, the author discusses the clinical features, prognostic criteria and therapeutic management of synchronous lung cancer and PPL. PMID:26548938

  13. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    Lymphoma - non-Hodgkin; Lymphocytic lymphoma; Histiocytic lymphoma; Lymphoblastic lymphoma; Cancer - non-Hodgkin lymphoma ... people, the cause of NHL is unknown. But lymphomas may develop in people with weakened immune systems, ...

  14. Hodgkin lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    Lymphoma - Hodgkin; Hodgkin disease; Cancer - Hodgkin lymphoma ... include: Bone marrow diseases (such as leukemia) Heart disease Inability to have children ( infertility ) Lung problems Other cancers Thyroid problems Keep following up with a doctor ...

  15. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  16. Pancreatic panniculitis.

    PubMed

    Garca-Romero, Diana; Vanaclocha, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an uncommon complication of pancreatic disease, most frequently pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The pathogenesis of the process remains unknown, but possibly the release of pancreatic enzymes may induce permeability of the microcirculation and cause fat necrosis. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis presents with tender, ill-defined, red-brown nodules in the lower extremities that may ulcerate and drain an oily substance and usually precedes pancreatic disease. The histopathologic picture consists of a mostly lobular panniculitis without vasculitis, with the presence of the typical ghost cells that correspond to necrotic and calcified adipocytes. Treatment should be directed at the underlying pancreatic disease. PMID:18793978

  17. PPL2ab neurons restore sexual responses in aged Drosophila males through dopamine.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Shu-Yun; Wu, Chia-Lin; Hsieh, Min-Yen; Lin, Chen-Ta; Wen, Rong-Kun; Chen, Lien-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Hui; Yu, Yhu-Wei; Wang, Horng-Dar; Su, Yi-Ju; Lin, Chun-Ju; Yang, Cian-Yi; Guan, Hsien-Yu; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Fu, Tsai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Male sexual desire typically declines with ageing. However, our understanding of the neurobiological basis for this phenomenon is limited by our knowledge of the brain circuitry and neuronal pathways controlling male sexual desire. A number of studies across species suggest that dopamine (DA) affects sexual desire. Here we use genetic tools and behavioural assays to identify a novel subset of DA neurons that regulate age-associated male courtship activity in Drosophila. We find that increasing DA levels in a subset of cells in the PPL2ab neuronal cluster is necessary and sufficient for increased sustained courtship in both young and aged male flies. Our results indicate that preventing the age-related decline in DA levels in PPL2ab neurons alleviates diminished courtship behaviours in male Drosophila. These results may provide the foundation for deciphering the circuitry involved in sexual motivation in the male Drosophila brain. PMID:26123524

  18. PPL2ab neurons restore sexual responses in aged Drosophila males through dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Shu-Yun; Wu, Chia-Lin; Hsieh, Min-Yen; Lin, Chen-Ta; Wen, Rong-Kun; Chen, Lien-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Hui; Yu, Yhu-Wei; Wang, Horng-Dar; Su, Yi-Ju; Lin, Chun-Ju; Yang, Cian-Yi; Guan, Hsien-Yu; Wang, Pei-Yu; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Fu, Tsai-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Male sexual desire typically declines with ageing. However, our understanding of the neurobiological basis for this phenomenon is limited by our knowledge of the brain circuitry and neuronal pathways controlling male sexual desire. A number of studies across species suggest that dopamine (DA) affects sexual desire. Here we use genetic tools and behavioural assays to identify a novel subset of DA neurons that regulate age-associated male courtship activity in Drosophila. We find that increasing DA levels in a subset of cells in the PPL2ab neuronal cluster is necessary and sufficient for increased sustained courtship in both young and aged male flies. Our results indicate that preventing the age-related decline in DA levels in PPL2ab neurons alleviates diminished courtship behaviours in male Drosophila. These results may provide the foundation for deciphering the circuitry involved in sexual motivation in the male Drosophila brain. PMID:26123524

  19. Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lymphoma. Nodal marginal zone lymphoma (sometimes called monocytoid B-cell lymphoma) occurs within the lymph nodes and accounts for about two percent of all B-cell lymphomas. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma occurs most often in ...

  20. Pancreatic metastasis from mycosis fungoides mimicking primary pancreatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Ceriolo, Paola; Fausti, Valentina; Cinotti, Elisa; Bonadio, Silvia; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Bianchi, Giovanna; Orcioni, Giulio Fraternali; Fiocca, Roberto; Rongioletti, Franco; Pistoia, Vito; Borgonovo, Giacomo

    2016-03-28

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that can undergo local progression with possible systemic dissemination. We report a case of a patient affected by MF with a pancreatic mass that was a diagnostic challenge between primitive tumor and pancreatic metastasis from MF. Clinical setting findings and imaging studies raised the suspicion of a pancreatic primary neoplasm. A diagnostic clue was provided by the combined histomorphologic/immunohistochemical study of pancreatic and cutaneous biopsies, which revealed a pancreatic localization of MF. Considering the rarity of metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas, we next investigated whether chemokine-chemokine receptor interactions could be involved in the phenomenon to provide new insight into the possible mechanisms underlying metastatic localization of MF to the pancreas. Histological analyses of archival pancreatic tissue demonstrated that glucagon-secreting cells of the pancreatic islets expressed the CCL27 chemokine, which may have attracted in our case metastatic MF cells expressing the complementary receptor CCR10. PMID:27022231

  1. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NPF Centers Animated Pancreas Patient About the Pancreas Pancreatic Cancer Chronic Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis Children/Pediatric Other Pancreas ... Common Disorders of the Pancreas Genetics & The Pancreas Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and Symptoms Diagnosis of Pancreatic ...

  2. Hereditary pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Charnley, Richard M

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition, which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis, progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age. The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis express one of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesised that one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causes pancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site so preventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas and prolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families with these two mutations have been identified in many countries and there are also other rarer mutations, which have also been linked to hereditary pancreatitis. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the same way as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlier age. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed for many years, particularly if they present with non-specific symptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always be considered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitis with a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients with the 2 common mutations are compared, those with the R122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger age and are more likely to require surgical intervention than those with N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40 % lifetime risk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between 50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests may become important. PMID:12508340

  3. Postburn pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, C M; Sheridan, R L; Schoenfeld, D A; Warshaw, A L; Tompkins, R G

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined the prevalence and complications of pancreatitis in severely burned patients. Factors predictive for the development of pancreatitis after burns are considered. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Pancreatitis has been documented at necropsy after burns; however, it is not clinically recognized as a common complication of burn injury. Recent improvements in survival rates could yield previously unrecognized complications, such as pancreatitis, particularly in those patients who previously would have not survived. The hypothesis is that pancreatitis is a frequent complication after major burn injury and causes significant morbidity for patients with large burns. METHODS: This retrospective review of adult patients with large burns examines postburn pancreatitis using stepwise logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Forty-nine of 121 (40%) patients developed hyperamylasemia or hyperlipasemia well after the admission period (23 +/- 3 days), and all enzyme abnormalities were temporally associated with emerging infections. Most of these patients (40/49, 82%) had symptoms of pancreatitis. Three patients (6%) had pancreatic pseudocysts or abscesses. Inhalation injury (p = 0.0001), associated trauma (p = 0.0311), and escharotomy (p = 0.0415) were risk factors for pancreatitis. Using Fischer's exact test, patients with pancreatitis had increased mortality and length of stay. Patients with high enzyme elevations and > or = 50% body surface area burned were at severe risk of pancreatic pseudocyst or abscess development (43%; 90% confidence interval of 23-77%). CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatitis is a frequent complication after large burn injuries. Patients at high risk for pancreatitis complications should receive surveillance examinations during their acute hospitalization. PMID:7543741

  4. Hereditary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Charnley, Richard M

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition, which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis, progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age. The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis express one of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesised that one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causes pancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site so preventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas and prolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families with these two mutations have been identified in many countries and there are also other rarer mutations, which have also been linked to hereditary pancreatitis. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the same way as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlier age. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed for many years, particularly if they present with non-specific symptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always be considered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitis with a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients with the 2 common mutations are compared, those with the R122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger age and are more likely to require surgical intervention than those with N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40% lifetime risk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between 50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests may become important. PMID:12508340

  5. PPL catalyzed four-component PASE synthesis of 5-monosubstituted barbiturates: Structure and pharmacological properties.

    PubMed

    Bihani, Manisha; Bora, Pranjal P; Verma, Alakesh K; Baruah, Reshita; Boruah, Hari Prasanna Deka; Bez, Ghanashyam

    2015-12-15

    Enzymatic four-component reactions are very rare although three-component enzymatic promiscuous reactions are widely reported. Herein, we report an efficient PASE protocol for the synthesis of potentially lipophilic zwitterionic 5-monosubstituted barbiturates by four component reaction of mixture of ethyl acetoacetate, hydrazine hydrate, aldehyde and barbituric acid in ethanol at room temperature. Seven different lipases were screened for their promiscuous activity towards the synthesis of 5-monosubstituted barbiturates and the lipase from porcine pancreas (PPL) found to give optimum efficiency. The zwitterionic 5-monosubstituted barbiturates with pyrazolyl ring showed promising pharmacological activity upon screening for antibacterial and apoptotic properties. PMID:26546212

  6. Chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review We review selected important clinical observations reported in 2012. Recent findings Celiac disease is a risk factor for pancreatitis. Patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis likely have chronic pancreatitis, do not benefit from pancreatic sphincterotomy, and may not benefit from biliary sphincterotomy. Analysis of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) images with an artificial neural network (ANN) program may improve chronic pancreatitis diagnosis compared with clinical interpretation of images. In a multicenter, randomized controlled trial of chronic pancreatitis patients, 90 000 USP U of pancreatin with meals decreased fat malabsorption compared with placebo. Detection of visceral pain in chronic pancreatitis predicts pain relief from various treatments, but nonvisceral pain due to altered central pain processing may respond to agents such as pregabalin. Predictors of surgical pain relief include onset of symptoms less than 3 years and preoperatively no opioid use and less than five endoscopic procedures. Total pancreatectomy for presumed painful chronic pancreatitis remains controversial. Summary Celiacs are at risk for pancreatitis. The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis may be enhanced by ANN analysis of EUS imaging. Treatment of fat malabsorption requires 90 000 USP U of lipase with meals. Relief of pain from organ directed treatment of chronic pancreatitis may depend upon timing of interventions and whether pain is visceral or nonvisceral. PMID:23852141

  7. Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of pancreatic cancer, and it is now clear that pancreatic cancer is a disease of inherited (germ-line) and somatic gene mutations. The genes mutated in pancreatic cancer include KRAS2, p16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, and these are accompanied by a substantial compendium of genomic and transcriptomic alterations that facilitate cell cycle deregulation, cell survival, invasion, and metastases. Pancreatic cancers do not arise de novo, and three distinct precursor lesions have been identified. Experimental models of pancreatic cancer have been developed in genetically engineered mice, which recapitulate the multistep progression of the cognate human disease. Although the putative cell of origin for pancreatic cancer remains elusive, minor populations of cells with stem-like properties have been identified that appear responsible for tumor initiation, metastases, and resistance of pancreatic cancer to conventional therapies. PMID:18039136

  8. Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a lymphoma , which is a cancer of the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system helps the body's immune system to filter out bacteria, viruses, and other unwanted substances. The lymphatic system includes the lymph nodes (which are sometimes called ...

  9. Burkitt lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Barr virus ( EBV ), the main cause of infectious mononucleosis . The North American form of Burkitt lymphoma is ... of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis Complete blood count (CBC) Examination of the spinal fluid Lymph node ...

  10. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePLUS

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. Patients who have a weakened immune system are at high risk of primary lymphoma of the ...

  11. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Home Cancers Selected for Study Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Last Updated: May 15, 2013 What is pancreatic cancer?Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic cancer, making up more than

  12. 76 FR 12954 - PPL EnergyPlus, LLC v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission PPL EnergyPlus, LLC v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Complaint Take... formal complaint against PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. (PJM or Respondent), alleging that PJM failed...

  13. 75 FR 17452 - PPL Susquehanna, LLC.; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 And 2; Correction to Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... appearing in the Federal Register on March 19, 2010 (75 FR 13322), that incorrectly stated the number of... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PPL Susquehanna, LLC.; Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 And 2; Correction to...

  14. 4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) and Its Lipation Product 2-Pentylpyrrole Lysine (2-PPL) in Peanuts.

    PubMed

    Globisch, Martin; Kaden, Diana; Henle, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    After synthesis of a deuterated 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) standard, the formation of 4-HNE during heating of peanut oil and whole peanuts, respectively, was measured by GC-MS. Whereas a significant increase in 4-HNE levels was observed for peanut oil, the amount of 4-HNE decreased when whole peanuts were roasted due to lipation reactions with amino acid side chains of the proteins. The ε-amino group of lysine was identified as the favored reaction partner of 4-HNE. After heating N(α)-acetyl-l-lysine and 4-HNE, a Schiff base, a novel pyridinium derivative, a 2-pentylpyrrol derivative and, following reduction and hydrolysis, a reduced, cyclized Michael adduct were identified. 2-Amino-6-(2-pentyl-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)hexanoic acid (2-PPL) was synthesized and quantitated in peanut proteins, which had been incubated with various amounts of 4-HNE by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS after enzymatic hydrolysis. At low 4-HNE concentrations the modification of lysine could be entirely explained by the formation of 2-PPL. Additionally, 2-PPL was quantified for the first time in peanut samples, and an increase depending on the roasting time was observed. 2-PPL represents a suitable marker to evaluate the extent of food protein lipation by 4-HNE. PMID:25945920

  15. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Pancreatic panniculitis.

    PubMed

    Rongioletti, F; Caputo, V

    2013-08-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis (PP) is a rare variant of panniculitis characterized by subcutaneous fat necrosis, that affects 0.3-3% of patients across a range of different pancreatic disorders. It presents with painful, tender, erythematous to violaceous nodules that may undergo spontaneous ulceration and discharge of an oily brown, viscous material, resulting from liquefactive necrosis of adipocytes. These lesions usually involve the lower extremities, although may also spread over the buttocks, trunk, arms and scalp. In addition to the skin, fat necrosis may involve periarticular, abdominal and intramedullary adipose tissue. In 40% of cases, skin manifestations can precede by 1 to 7 months the abdominal symptoms of pancreatic disease, which include mostly acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, more frequently of acinar cell type, and pancreatic abnormalities. Histopathologically, PP shows characteristic features of mostly lobular panniculitis with marked necrosis of adipocytes. The necrotic adipocytes with finely granular and basophilic material in the cytoplasm due to calcium deposits are known as "ghost adipocytes". The treatment of pancreatic panniculitis is directed to the underlying pancreatic disease. The prognosis is poor in cases associated with pancreatic carcinoma. When there is widespread and persistent disease, frequent relapses, or ulceration, the possibility of an occult carcinoma of the pancreas should be always considered. While describing three patients seen at the Dermatology Section of the University of Genova from 1990 to 2012, we highlight that, in addition to the rarity of the disease, the precise diagnosis requires adequate samples consisting in large-scalpel incisional biopsies of fully developed lesions. PMID:23900163

  17. Pancreatic cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a diet high in fat and low in fruits and vegetables Have diabetes Have long-term exposure to certain chemicals Have long-term inflammation of the pancreas ( chronic pancreatitis ) Smoke Pancreatic cancer is slightly more common in women than in ...

  18. Pancreatic tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Kumar, Amit; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic tuberculosis is very rare, but recently, there has been a spurt in the number of reports on pancreatic involvement by tuberculosis. It closely mimics pancreatic cancer, and before the advent of better imaging modalities it was often detected as a histological surprise in patients resected for a presumed pancreatic malignancy. The usual presentation involves abdominal pain, loss of appetite and weight, jaundice which can be associated with cholestasis, fever and night sweats, palpable abdominal lump, and peripheral lymphadenopathy. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen is an important tool for evaluation of patients with pancreatic tuberculosis. This CT imaging yields valuable information about the size and nature of tubercular lesions along with the presence of ascites and lymphadenopathy. However, there are no distinctive features on CT that distinguish it from pancreatic carcinoma. Endoscopic ultrasound provides high resolution images of the pancreatic lesions as well as an opportunity to sample these lesions for cytological confirmation. The presence of granulomas is the most common finding on histological/cytological examination with the presence of acid fast bacilli being observed only in minority of patients. As there are no randomized or comparative studies on treatment of pancreatic tuberculosis it is usually treated like other forms of tuberculosis. Excellent cure rates are reported with standard anti tubercular therapy given for 6-12?months. PMID:26414325

  19. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary ?-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  20. Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2015 9,050 % of All New Cancer Cases 0.5% Estimated Deaths in 2015 1,150 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2012, there were an estimated 189,626 people living with Hodgkin lymphoma in ...

  1. New biofuel integrating glycerol into its composition through the use of covalent immobilized pig pancreatic lipase.

    PubMed

    Luna, Diego; Posadillo, Alejandro; Caballero, Vernica; Verdugo, Cristbal; Bautista, Felipa M; Romero, Antonio A; Sancho, Enrique D; Luna, Carlos; Calero, Juan

    2012-01-01

    By using 1,3-specific Pig Pancreatic lipase (EC 3.1.1.3 or PPL), covalently immobilized on AlPO(4)/Sepiolite support as biocatalyst, a new second-generation biodiesel was obtained in the transesterification reaction of sunflower oil with ethanol and other alcohols of low molecular weight. The resulting biofuel is composed of fatty acid ethyl esters and monoglycerides (FAEE/MG) blended in a molar relation 2/1. This novel product, which integrates glycerol as monoacylglycerols (MG) into the biofuel composition, has similar physicochemical properties compared to those of conventional biodiesel and also avoids the removal step of this by-product. The biocatalyst was found to be strongly fixed to the inorganic support (75%). Nevertheless, the efficiency of the immobilized enzyme was reduced to half (49.1%) compared to that of the free PPL. The immobilized enzyme showed a remarkable stability as well as a great reusability (more than 40 successive reuses) without a significant loss of its initial catalytic activity. Immobilized and free enzymes exhibited different reaction mechanisms, according to the different results in the Arrhenius parameters (Ln A and Ea). However, the use of supported PPL was found to be very suitable for the repetitive production of biofuel due to its facile recyclability from the reaction mixture. PMID:22949849

  2. New Biofuel Integrating Glycerol into Its Composition Through the Use of Covalent Immobilized Pig Pancreatic Lipase

    PubMed Central

    Luna, Diego; Posadillo, Alejandro; Caballero, Verónica; Verdugo, Cristóbal; Bautista, Felipa M.; Romero, Antonio A.; Sancho, Enrique D.; Luna, Carlos; Calero, Juan

    2012-01-01

    By using 1,3-specific Pig Pancreatic lipase (EC 3.1.1.3 or PPL), covalently immobilized on AlPO4/Sepiolite support as biocatalyst, a new second-generation biodiesel was obtained in the transesterification reaction of sunflower oil with ethanol and other alcohols of low molecular weight. The resulting biofuel is composed of fatty acid ethyl esters and monoglycerides (FAEE/MG) blended in a molar relation 2/1. This novel product, which integrates glycerol as monoacylglycerols (MG) into the biofuel composition, has similar physicochemical properties compared to those of conventional biodiesel and also avoids the removal step of this by-product. The biocatalyst was found to be strongly fixed to the inorganic support (75%). Nevertheless, the efficiency of the immobilized enzyme was reduced to half (49.1%) compared to that of the free PPL. The immobilized enzyme showed a remarkable stability as well as a great reusability (more than 40 successive reuses) without a significant loss of its initial catalytic activity. Immobilized and free enzymes exhibited different reaction mechanisms, according to the different results in the Arrhenius parameters (Ln A and Ea). However, the use of supported PPL was found to be very suitable for the repetitive production of biofuel due to its facile recyclability from the reaction mixture. PMID:22949849

  3. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Lymphoma? A lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system . The lymphatic system is a part of the body's immune system. ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma, cancer cells form in the lymphatic system and start to grow. Most of the time, ...

  4. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... How Can I Stop Cutting? Scoliosis Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma KidsHealth > Teens > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Non-Hodgkin ... it can be cured. What Is Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma? A lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic ...

  5. Cloning, genetic analysis, and nucleotide sequence of a determinant coding for a 19-kilodalton peptidoglycan-associated protein (Ppl) of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, B; Schmid, A; Marre, R; Hacker, J

    1991-01-01

    A genomic library of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires disease in humans, was constructed in Escherichia coli K-12, and the recombinant clones were screened by immuno-colony blots with an antiserum raised against heat-killed L. pneumophila. Twenty-three clones coding for a Legionella-specific protein of 19 kDa were isolated. The 19-kDa protein, which represents an outer membrane protein, was found to be associated with the peptidoglycan layer both in L. pneumophila and in the recombinant E. coli clones. This was shown by electrophoresis and Western immunoblot analysis of bacterial cell membrane fractions with a monospecific polyclonal 19-kDa protein-specific antiserum. The protein was termed peptidoglycan-associated protein of L. pneumophila (Ppl). The corresponding genetic determinant, ppl, was subcloned on a 1.8-kb ClaI fragment. DNA sequence studies revealed that two open reading frames, pplA and pplB, coding for putative proteins of 18.9 and 16.8 kDa, respectively, were located on the ClaI fragment. Exonuclease III digestion studies confirmed that pplA is the gene coding for the peptidoglycan-associated 19-kDa protein of L. pneumophila. The amino acid sequence of PplA exhibits a high degree of homology to the sequences of the Pal lipoproteins of E. coli K-12 and Haemophilus influenzae. Images PMID:1855972

  6. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NPF Centers Animated Pancreas Patient About the Pancreas Pancreatic Cancer Chronic Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis Children/Pediatric Other Pancreas ... will be at an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer compared to the general population. The degree of ...

  7. Radiology of lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneton, J.N.; Schneider, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book reviews the radiological aspects of lymphomas. The topics covered are: Classification of lymphomas as Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas; lymphomas of brain and spinal cord and the radiodiagnosis and chemotherapy; lymphomas of bones; lymph nodes of abdomen, chest and lymphomas of extranodal sites. Diagnostic techniques for lymphomas discussed are tracer techniques, computed tomography, ultrasonography and biopsy. Differential diagnosis of lymphomas from various other pathology of bone, brain and spinal cord is also discussed. Side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are also described.

  8. Hypertriglyceridemia and Recurrent Pancreatitis following Splenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Butman, Michael; Taylor, David; Bostrm, Kristina; Quinones, Manuel; Nicholas, Susanne B.

    2007-01-01

    Hyperlipoproteinemia represents a constellation of clinical syndromes that frequently includes hypertriglyceridemia. Because of the degree of elevation in the triglyceride levels frequently seen in these syndromes, they are associated with complications not generally observed among those patients with essential hypertriglyceridemia, including as in this case report, recurrent pancreatitis. Here, we present a case of a patient with hyperlipoproteinemia who developed acute worsening of his hypertriglyceridemia and onset of acute panceatitis that became recurrent following elective splenectomy for suspected lymphoma. In particular, we discuss the dietary management of hypertriglyceridemia which significantly reduced the number of episodes of acute pancreatitis in this patient. PMID:21487553

  9. Hypertriglyceridemia and Recurrent Pancreatitis following Splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Butman, Michael; Taylor, David; Bostrm, Kristina; Quinones, Manuel; Nicholas, Susanne B

    2007-01-01

    Hyperlipoproteinemia represents a constellation of clinical syndromes that frequently includes hypertriglyceridemia. Because of the degree of elevation in the triglyceride levels frequently seen in these syndromes, they are associated with complications not generally observed among those patients with essential hypertriglyceridemia, including as in this case report, recurrent pancreatitis. Here, we present a case of a patient with hyperlipoproteinemia who developed acute worsening of his hypertriglyceridemia and onset of acute panceatitis that became recurrent following elective splenectomy for suspected lymphoma. In particular, we discuss the dietary management of hypertriglyceridemia which significantly reduced the number of episodes of acute pancreatitis in this patient. PMID:21487553

  10. Pancreatic Enzymes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... This fluid contains pancreatic enzymes to help with digestion and bicarbonate to neutralize stomach acid as it ... the formation of toxic substances due to incomplete digestion of proteins. Increased risk for intestinal infections. Amylase ...

  11. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ask you to take extra capsules, called pancreatic enzymes. These will help your body absorb fats in ... tell you how many. When you take these enzymes, you may also need to take another medicine ...

  12. [Malignant lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Asano, Naoko; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2014-06-01

    The WHO classification, considered as a bible for lymphoma diagnosis, is a list of disease units. It is expected that it will fully classify all diseases based on indicators with objectivity of constants, even in the present state, in which it cannot be said that the source, causes, and tumorigenesis mechanisms have been identified for all neoplasms. The indicators are the histology, phenotype, genotype, and clinical picture. In the current WHO classification, these indicators are described for each diseases unit, and considered as diagnostic items. While the importance of items which serve as indicators differ depending on each illness, the pathologic centering on a morphological finding does not change for lymphoma diagnosis in accordance with this WHO classification. An indispensable factor in order to evaluate this objective of pathologic diagnosis is phenotypic and genotype assessment. A phenotype is analyzed by immunohistochemistry techniques, and a genotype is clarified by various gene chromosome tests. Diagnostic applications using these test results are developed as follows: 1. Histological diagnosis based on the immunohistochemical features of lymphoma cells, 2. Identification of oncogene products, 3. Evaluation of biological prognostic factors, 4. Analysis of the inflammatory microenvironment of tumor cells. This paper describes all items. PMID:25151780

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  14. Chylous ascites as a consequence of idiopathic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Baban, Chwanrow Karim; Murphy, Michael; O'Sulleabhin, Cristir; O'Hanlon, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    Chylous ascites (chyloperitoneum) is a rare clinical condition, characterized by an accumulation of lymph fluid in the peritoneal cavity. Most commonly it is associated with abdominal malignancy (usually lymphoma). We present an unusual case of a woman who developed a persistent pseudocyst and recurrent chylous ascites following acute necrotizing pancreatitis. PMID:24501332

  15. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash A.; Sheth, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, heterogeneous, fibroinflammatory disorder of the pancreas. It has gained increasing recognition due to a presentation that can mimic difficult-to-treat disorders such as pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma and primary sclerosing cholangitis. In contrast, autoimmune pancreatitis is a benign disease that is very responsive to therapy with corticosteroids. There are two types of AIP. Type 1 disease is the most common worldwide and is associated with extrapancreatic manifestations and elevated levels of IgG4-positive cells. Type 2 AIP is characterized by a paucity of IgG4-positive cells and is more difficult to diagnose. This review provides an update on the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of AIP, with special emphasis on the two subtypes. PMID:24040625

  16. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Associated with Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Vecchiarelli, Silvia; Di Marco, Maria Cristina; Serra, Carla; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Fabbri, Dario; Rojas Mena, Betzab; Imbrogno, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), in contrast to other benign chronic pancreatic diseases, can be cured with immunosuppressant drugs, thus the differentiation of AIP from pancreatic cancer is of particular interest in clinical practice. There is the possibility that some patients with AIP may develop pancreatic cancer, and this possibility contributes to increasing our difficulties in differentiating AIP from pancreatic cancer. We herein report the case of a 70-year-old man in whom pancreatic adenocarcinoma and AIP were detected simultaneously. We must carefully monitor AIP patients for the simultaneous presence of pancreatic cancer, even when a diagnosis of AIP is confirmed. PMID:21769291

  17. [Pancreatitis in intestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Gubergrits, N B; Lukashevich, G M; Golubova, O A; Fomenko, P G

    2010-01-01

    In article review of the literature and own data about pathogenesis of pancreatitis and secondary pancreatic insufficiency in various diseases of small and large intestines is presented. The special attention is given to pancreatic insufficiency in celiac disease and in inflammatory bowel disease. The main directions of pancreatitis and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency therapy are grounded. PMID:21268323

  18. Study to Assess Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Oral CC-223 for Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-23

    Multiple Myeloma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Neuroendocrine Tumors of Non-Pancreatic Origin; Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

  19. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  20. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 View/Download: Small: 533x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 Description: Stage IV pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  1. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  2. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abate-Daga, Daniel; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains largely an incurable disease necessitating the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-transduced T cells represents an alternative treatment with curative potential. We present an overview of the engineering of novel CARs targeting prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), implications for the development of immunotherapies, and potential strategies to circumvent on-target/off-tumor toxicities. PMID:25083334

  3. [Pancreatic insulinomas].

    PubMed

    Miani, S; Boneschi, M; Erba, M; Eusebio, D; Giordanengo, F

    1993-12-01

    Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are neoplasms derived from APUD cells, characterized by hyperincretion of several peptides of hormonal activity. The incidence of these tumor is low. They are usually classified according to the predominant secreted peptide: gastrinoma, insulinoma, VIPoma, glucagonoma. Insulinoma is the most frequent endocrine pancreatic tumor, characterized by a peculiar clinical picture due to insulin action. This neoplasm is prevalently benign (90%), and may cause symptoms due to hypo-glycemia such as epilepsy, asthenia, deep coma, dizziness, hunger and epigastric pain. Surgery still constitutes the principal therapy for insulinoma treatment, but an accurate tumor identification is necessary. Selective arteriography of the pancreas and new diagnostic investigations as intraoperative US, selective sampling of pancreatic veins with insulin Quick-RIA, aid the diagnosis and more precise localization of the tumor. When surgical therapy is not practicable, for diffuse metastases, octreotide has an inhibitory effect upon hormone release, and may be combined with chemotherapy for controlling clinical symptoms. We review the clinical records of 2 patients from our Institute, who had hyper-insulinism due to benign insulinomas of the tail of the pancreas. Surgical treatment was performed with enucleation of the neoplasms. PMID:8177452

  4. Pegfilgrastim and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated, Relapsed, or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-20

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  5. Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangyu; Sun, Tao; Kong, Fanyang; Du, Yiqi; Li, Zhaoshen

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most lethal diseases with an incidence rate almost equal to the rate of mortality. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology that affects the pancreas. Epidemiological studies have identified CP to be a major risk factor for PC. Summary A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking CP and PC has identified several common pathways that provide targets for future interventions. This article reviews those components in the CP-PC connection, including the role of macrophages, the maintenance of genome stability, cytokines, and other nodal factors such as nuclear factor kappa B, COX-2 and reactive oxygen species. Key Message The molecular mechanisms that underlie CP and PC provide novel targets for future therapies for PC. Practical Implications The stromal-desmoplastic reaction plays an important role in initiating and sustaining chronic inflammation and tumor progression. Recently, two targeted anti-tumor agents, erlotinib and nab-paclitaxel, have shown promising therapeutic efficacy. Notably, both these agents target components (EGFR and SPARC) within the inflammatory stroma surrounding malignant cells, underscoring the importance of inflammation in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Identifying the common pathways linking CP and PC may help uncover additional novel targets for future therapies. PMID:26674754

  6. Severe Acute Pancreatitis and Necrotizing Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Rahul; Subramanian, Ram M

    2016-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis results in nearly 250,000 admissions annually. Acute pancreatitis varies widely in its clinical presentation. Pancreatic necrosis accounts for substantial additional morbidity, with mortality rates remaining as high as 10% to 20% despite advances in critical care. The extent of necrosis correlates well with the incidence of infected necrosis, multiorgan failure, need for pancreatic debridement, and morbidity and mortality. Having established the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis, goals of appropriately aggressive resuscitation should be established and adhered to in a multidisciplinary approach involving both medical and surgical critical care. PMID:27016168

  7. AT13387 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, or Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-11

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  8. Burkitt lymphoma is molecularly distinct from other lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have uncovered a number of molecular signatures in Burkitt lymphoma, including unique genetic alterations that promote cell survival, that are not found in other lymphomas. These findings provide the first genetic evidence that Burkitt lymphoma

  9. Primary Pulmonary Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Piña-Oviedo, Sergio; Weissferdt, Annikka; Kalhor, Neda; Moran, Cesar A

    2015-11-01

    Primary lung lymphoma (PLL) is a rare disease that comprises <0.5% of all primary lung tumors. It is defined as lymphoma confined to the lung with or without hilar lymph node involvement at the time of diagnosis or up to 3 months thereafter. Patients with PLL may be asymptomatic or manifest nonspecific clinical symptoms, for example, cough, chest pain, and dyspnea. Some individuals may be immunosupressed or have an autoimmune disorder. Radiologically, PLL can mimic pneumonia, lung carcinoma, or metastasis, and therefore, histologic confirmation is mandatory for definitive diagnosis. Primary lung marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue type comprises 70% to 80% of cases. Less common B-cell lymphomas include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, lymphomatoid granulomatosis (LyG), plasmacytoma, and other small lymphocytic lymphomas. PLLs of T-cell origin, largely represented by anaplastic large cell lymphoma, are extremely rare. LyG is an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven B-cell lymphoid neoplastic proliferation rich in T cells that produces vasculitis. The disease may present at different stages of progression. Differential diagnosis of PLL varies according to the lymphoma subtype: pulmonary mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma should be distinguished from reactive inflammatory conditions, whereas high-grade lymphomas may resemble poorly differentiated lung carcinoma, metastatic disease, and other lymphomas. LyG can resemble inflammatory, infectious, and other lymphoid neoplastic processes. A panel of immunohistochemical markers, flow cytometry, and molecular methods are necessary to confirm the diagnosis in the majority of cases. In this article we review the clinical, radiologic, pathologic, and molecular characteristics of several B-cell and T-cell PLLs with exception of Hodgkin lymphoma and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:26452211

  10. Lymphoma Microenvironment and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mina L; Fedoriw, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    Understanding of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment is poised to expand in the era of next-generation sequencing studies of the tumor cells themselves. Successful therapies of the future will rely on deeper appreciation of the interactions between elements of the microenvironment. Although the phenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of tumor cells in lymphomas has progressed faster than most other solid organ tumors, concrete advancements in understanding the lymphoma microenvironment have been fewer. This article explores the composition of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment; its role in immune surveillance, evasion, and drug resistance; and its potential role in the development of targeted therapies. PMID:26940270

  11. [Acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Chvez, R

    1991-01-01

    This article review newer concepts of diagnosis and therapy for patients with acute pancreatitis. Although the pathogenesis are incompletely understood, much progress has recently been made in treatment of symptoms and medical support of the critically ill patients. The most common associate factors include: biliary tract disease (lithiasis), alcohol abuse, trauma and hyperlipoproteinemia. Most patients have abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, fever, abdominal tenderness and hypovolemia of varying degrees. Renal clearance of amilase is increased, the ratio of renal clearance to that of creatinine is very important in patients with hypovolemia or an underlying renal disease. The definition of risk factors, with regard to morbility or mortality. Those patients at great risk require critical care treatment in an ICU and meticulous pulmonary, cardiac, hematological and metabolic monitoring and treatment of any the abdominal complications. PMID:1820183

  12. Lenalidomide and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-10

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  13. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-02

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  14. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a signi?cant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Action Network

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for pancreatic cancer. Learn more LEARN MORE OUR CORPORATE CHAMPIONS Corporate Champions stand beside us as we ... are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by law. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Networks tax identification number ...

  16. Pancreatic Cancer: Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... patients with pancreatic NETs. In rare cases, a liver transplant might be used to treat pancreatic NETs that ... Bureau Health On The Net National Health Council © 2016 American Cancer Society, Inc. All rights reserved. The ...

  17. Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Smith M. Therapies for mantle cell lymphoma: current challenges and a brighter future. Discovery Medicine. 2013 Mar;15(82):177-187. Review.. Vose J. Mantle cell lymphoma: 2013 update on diagnosis, risk-stratification, and clinical management. American Journal of ...

  18. Primary leptomeningeal plasmablastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Marlon S; Bota, Daniela A; Kim, Ronald C; Hasso, Anton N; Linskey, Mark E

    2011-09-01

    Lymphomas that develop in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients are predominantly aggressive B-cells lymphomas. The most common HIV-associated lymphomas include Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (that often involves the CNS), primary effusion lymphoma, and plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL). Of these, PBL is relatively uncommon and displays a distinct affinity for presentation in the oral cavity. In this manuscript we report a previously undescribed primary leptomeningeal form of PBL in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A 40-year-old HIV positive man presented with acute onset confusion, emesis, and altered mental status. Lumbar puncture showed numerous nucleated cells with atypical plasmocyte predominance. CSF flowcytometry showed kappa restriction with CD8 and CD38 positivity and negative lymphocyte markers, while the MRI showed diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement. As the extensive systemic work-up failed to reveal any disease outside the brain, an en bloc diagnostic brain and meningeal biopsy was performed. The biopsy specimen showed sheets of plasmacytoid cells with one or more large nuclei, prominent nuclear chromatin, scattered mitoses, and abundant cytoplasm, highly suggestive of plasmablastic lymphoma. HIV-associated malignancies have protean and often confusing presentations, which pose diagnostic difficulties posed to the practicing neurological-surgeons. Even in cases where an infectious cause is suspected for the meningeal enhancement, neoplastic involvement should be considered, and cytology and flow-cytometry should be routinely ordered on the CSF samples. PMID:21359853

  19. Biomarkers for lymphoma

    DOEpatents

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.

    2014-09-02

    A biomarker, method, test kit, and diagnostic system for detecting the presence of lymphoma in a person are disclosed. The lymphoma may be Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The person may be a high-risk subject. In one embodiment, a plasma sample from a person is obtained. The level of at least one protein listed in Table S3 in the plasma sample is measured. The level of at least one protein in the plasma sample is compared with the level in a normal or healthy subject. The lymphoma is diagnosed based upon the level of the at least one protein in the plasma sample in comparison to the normal or healthy level.

  20. Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma Overview Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The two main forms of lymphoma are ... develop into lymphomas: B-lymphocytes (B-cells) and T-lymphocytes (T-cells). Cancerous lymphocytes can travel to ...

  1. Pancreatic tuberculosis with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: A case report and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Meesiri, Somchai

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is a relatively rare disease that can mimic carcinoma, lymphoma, cystic neoplasia, retroperitoneal tumors, pancreatitis or pseudocysts. Here, I report the case of a 31-year-old immigrant Burmese woman who exhibited epigastralgia, fever, weight loss and an epigastric mass. The patient was diagnosed with pancreatic TB and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and was treated with antituberculous drugs and percutaneous catheter drainage without a laparotomy. The clinical presentation, radiographic investigation and management of pancreatic TB are summarized in this paper to emphasize the importance of considering this rare disease in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic masses concomitant with human immunodeficiency virus infection. I also emphasize the need for both histopathological and microbiological diagnosis via fine-needle aspiration. PMID:22363146

  2. Biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, G J; Gillespie, J; Guillou, P J

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of death from malignant disease in Western society. Apart from the fortunate few patients who present with a resectable small pancreatic adenocarcinoma, conventional treatment offers no hope of cure and has little palliative value. Over the past two decades major steps have been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic growth and neoplasia. This review sets out to explore these advances, firstly in the regulation of normal pancreatic growth, and secondly the mechanism which may be involved in malignant change of the exocrine pancreas. From an understanding of this new biology, new treatment strategies may be possible for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:1855689

  3. Oral Clofarabine for Relapsed/Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Follicular Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Low Grade B-cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large-cell Lymphoma

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  5. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound in the evaluation of pancreatic neoplasms-solid and cystic: A review

    PubMed Central

    Nelsen, Eric M; Buehler, Darya; Soni, Anurag V; Gopal, Deepak V

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms have a wide range of pathology, from pancreatic adenocarcinoma to cystic mucinous neoplasms. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with or without fine needle aspiration (FNA) is a helpful diagnostic tool in the work-up of pancreatic neoplasms. Its utility in pancreatic malignancy is well known. Over the last two decades EUS-FNA has become a procedure of choice for diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. EUS-FNA is highly sensitive and specific for solid lesions, with sensitivities as high as 80%-95% for pancreatic masses and specificity as high as 75%-100%. Multiple aspects of the procedure have been studied to optimize the rate of diagnosis with EUS-FNA including cytopathologist involvement, needle size, suctioning and experience of endoscopist. Onsite pathology is one of the most important elements in increasing diagnostic yield rate in EUS-FNA. EUS-FNA is valuable in diagnosing rare and atypical pancreatic neoplasms including neuroendocrine, lymphoma and metastatic disease. As more and more patients undergo cross sectional imaging, cystic lesions of the pancreas are becoming a more common occurrence and EUS-FNA of these lesions can be helpful for differentiation. This review covers the technical aspects of optimizing pancreatic neoplasm diagnosis rate, highlight rare pancreatic neoplasms and role of EUS-FNA, and also outline the important factors in diagnosis of cystic lesions by EUS-FNA. PMID:25901210

  7. Primary thyroid lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Dündar, Halit Ziya; Sarkut, Pınar; Kırdak, Türkay; Korun, Nusret

    2016-01-01

    Primary thyroid lymphoma is an uncommon thyroid malignancy. The treatment modalities significantly differ from other thyroid malignancies. Frequently it is accompanied by Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and it may be difficult to differentiate the two entities histologically. Patients typically present with suddenly growing mass in the thyroid gland. Discrimination between primary and secondary lymphoma is important due to variations in diagnostic tools, treatment modalities and prognosis. Surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy or combinations of these modalities may be applied in treatment. In this report, three cases with primary thyroid lymphoma in which three different treatment modalities have been applied are presented. PMID:26985163

  8. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Emergency Cerebral Palsy: Caring for Your Child Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma KidsHealth > For Parents > Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Print ... harmful substances out of the body. About Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a disease in ...

  9. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  10. Staging Primary CNS Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... therapy Steroids are hormones made naturally in the body. They can also be made in a laboratory and used as drugs. Glucocorticoids are steroid drugs that have an anticancer effect in lymphomas . New types of treatment are being ...

  11. Lymphoma Research Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Active Events For Professionals For Patients Get Involved Focus On Lymphoma Active Events Fundraising Events Attend a ... Kit Research Impact Overview Young Investigator Awards Disease Focus Areas Leadership and Strategy Implementation Scientific Advisory Board ...

  12. Ixazomib Citrate in Treating Patients With Untreated B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-18

    B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Hereditary pancreatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... characterized by recurrent episodes of inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). The pancreas produces enzymes that help digest food, and it ... leads to chronic pancreatitis, which occurs when the pancreas is persistently inflamed. Chronic pancreatitis usually develops by ...

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

  16. Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Narula, Ritesh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2015-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is an uncommon, but potentially fatal intraocular malignancy, which may occur with or without primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Considered to be a subset of PCNSL, it is mostly of diffuse large B-cell type. The diagnosis of PVRL poses a challenge not only to the clinician, but also to the pathologist. Despite aggressive treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, relapses or CNS involvement are common. PMID:25971162

  17. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Amir; Nasiri, Mohammad Reza Ghavam; Memar, Bahram; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Raziee, Hamid Reza; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Mohtashami, Samira

    2012-01-01

    Background: Extranodal lymphoma may arise anywhere outside lymph nodes mostly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as non-Hodgkin's disease. We reviewed the clinicopathological features and treatment results of patients with primary GI lymphoma. Materials and Methods: A total number of 30 cases with primary GI lymphoma were included in this study. Patients referred to the Radiation Oncology Department of Omid Hospital (Mashhad, Iran) during a 5-year period (2006-11). Clinical, paraclinical, and radiological data was collected from medical records of the patients. Results: Out of the 30 patients with primary GI lymphoma in the study, 12 were female (40%) and 18 were male (60%) (male to female ratio: 3/2). B symptoms were present in 27 patients (90%). Antidiuretic hormone (LDH) levels were elevated in 9 patients (32.1%). The most common primary site was stomach in 14 cases (46.7%). Other common sites included small intestine and colon each in 8 patients (26.7%). All patients had histopathologically proven non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The most common histologic subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) in 16 patients (53.3%). In addition, 28 patients (93.3%) received chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (CHOP regimen). The median course of chemotherapy was 6 cources. Moreover, 8 patients (26.7%) received radiotherapy with cobalt 60. The median follow-up time was 26 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 53% and the median survival time was 60 months. Conclusion: Primary GI lymphoma is commonly seen in stomach and small intestine and mostly is DLBCL or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. PMID:23626617

  18. Primary Lymphoma of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun Yong; Hahn, Jee Sook; Suh, Chang Ok; Yang, Woo Ick

    2002-01-01

    Background: Primary lymphoma of bone is a rare disease. There is yet no systematical evaluation of primary lymphoma of bone in Korea. Here we report our experience of sixteen cases with primary lymphoma of bone focusing on the survival. Methods: Sixteen cases, collected for 13 years, were evaluated on the clinical presentation, histologic subtype, stage and treatment outcomes of the primary bone lymphoma. Results: The most common presenting complaint was bone pain. Malignant lymphoma of bone involved a wide variety of sites, the most prevalent site of which in this study was the spine. Most of the cases were in the diffuse large B-cell category. The clinical stage of lymphoma was IEA in two cases, IIEA in three cases, IVEA in five cases and IVEB in three cases. All treated cases received systemic chemotherapy and ten cases among them were treated with combined modality therapy. Median overall survival was not reached after median follow-up period of 28 months and five-year overall survival rate was 54%. Conclusion: More promising therapeutic strategies are needed for survival improvement on more accumulated cases. PMID:12298430

  19. Autophagy and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gukovsky, Ilya

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the exocrine pancreas that carries considerable morbidity and mortality; its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Recent findings from experimental models and genetically altered mice summarized in this review reveal that autophagy, the principal cellular degradative pathway, is impaired in pancreatitis and that one cause of autophagy impairment is defective function of lysosomes. We propose that the lysosomal/autophagic dysfunction is a key initiating event in pancreatitis and a converging point of multiple deranged pathways. There is strong evidence supporting this hypothesis. Investigation of autophagy in pancreatitis has just started, and many questions about the upstream mechanisms mediating the lysosomal/autophagic dysfunction and the downstream links to pancreatitis pathologies need to be explored. Answers to these questions should provide insight into novel molecular targets and therapeutic strategies for treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:22961802

  20. Graft pancreatitis: literature review.

    PubMed

    Labruzzo, Cinzia; El Tayar, Adil R; Hakim, Nadey S

    2006-01-01

    Graft pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease leading to autodigestion of the gland. The failure of the pancreatic graft can be attributed to immunological or nonimmunological causes. It consists of a premature activation of pancreatic proenzymes. When complications such as bleeding or leaks have already occurred, surgical correction should be considered. The aim of this review is to draw the attention of surgeons to the complications that can easily be avoided. PMID:16774182

  1. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  2. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Milan R.; Eppolito, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 6881% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for genetic testing are discussed. PMID:23503650

  3. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, Jonas; Bdeker, Hans; Mssner, Joachim; Teich, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP) is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2), the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary) as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer. PMID:17204147

  4. Primary intraocular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sagoo, Mandeep S; Mehta, Hemal; Swampillai, Andrew J; Cohen, Victoria M L; Amin, Sepideh Z; Plowman, P Nicholas; Lightman, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Primary intraocular lymphoma (PIOL) is an ocular malignancy that is a subset of primary central system lymphoma (PCNSL). Approximately one-third of PIOL patients will have concurrent PCNSL at presentation, and 42-92% will develop PCNSL within a mean of 8-29 months. Although rare, the incidence has been rising in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent populations. The majority of PIOL is diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, though rare T-cell variants are described. Recently, PIOL has been classified by main site of involvement in the eye, with vitreoretinal lymphoma as the most common type of ocular lymphoma related to PCNSL. Diagnosis remains challenging for ophthalmologists and pathologists. PIOL can masquerade as noninfectious or infectious uveitis, white dot syndromes, or occasionally as other neoplasms such as metastatic cancers. Laboratory diagnosis by cytology has been much aided by the use of immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, biochemical finding of interleukin changes (IL10:IL6 ratio > 1), and cellular microdissection with polymerase chain reaction amplification for clonality. Use of several tests improves the diagnostic yield. Approaches to treatment have centered on systemic methotrexate-based chemotherapy, often with cytarabine (Ara-C) and radiotherapy. Use of intravitreal chemotherapy with methotrexate (0.4 mg/0.1 mL) is promising in controlling ocular disease, and intravitreal rituximab (anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) has also been tried. Despite these advances, prognosis remains poor. PMID:24560125

  5. Primary gastric lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Akwaa, Ahmad M; Siddiqui, Neelam; Al-Mofleh, Ibrahim A

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this review is to describe the various aspects of primary gastric lymphoma and the treatment options currently available. METHODS: After a systematic search of Pubmed, Medscape and MDconsult, we reviewed and retrieved literature regarding gastric lymphoma. RESULTS: Primary gastric lymphoma is rare however, the incidence of this malignancy is increasing. Chronic gastritis secondary to Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection has been considered a major predisposing factor for MALT lymphoma. Immune histochemical marker studies and molecular biology utilizing polymerase chain reaction have facilitated appropriate diagnosis and abolished the need for diagnostic surgical resection. Advances in imaging techniques including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Endoscopic Ultrasonography (EUS) have helped evaluation of tumor extension and invasion. The clinical course and prognosis of this disease is dependent on histopathological sub-type and stage at the time of diagnosis. Controversy remains regarding the best treatment for early stages of this disease. Chemotherapy, surgery and combination have been studied and shared almost comparable results with survival rate of 70%-90%. However, chemotherapy possesses the advantage of preserving gastric anatomy. Radiotherapy alone has been tried and showed good results. Stage IIIE, IVE disease treatment is solely by chemotherapy and surgical resection has been a remote consideration. CONCLUSION: We conclude that methods of diagnosis and staging of the primary gastric lymphoma have dramatically improved. The modalities of treatment are many and probably chemotherapy is superior because of high success rate, preservation of stomach and tolerable complications. PMID:14695759

  6. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-19

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  7. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Adult Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Unfavorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  8. Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Berenson; Wyllie

    1995-10-01

    Pancreatitis, once thought to be almost exclusively a disease of adults, is increasingly being found as the cause of abdominal pain in adolescents. The authors review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, managment, and complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis, noting that a high index of suspicion is needed to properly diagnose and provide optimal care to these patients. PMID:10358323

  9. Pancreatic Cancer Interest Group

    Cancer.gov

    Mission Statement Pancreatic cancer is the most deadliest of all cancers and there is no effective treatment. There are a number of investigators at NCI, both in the basic and clinical disciplines, who are working on pancreatic cancer and who would like t

  10. Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Yamabuki, Takumi; Ohara, Masanori; Kimura, Noriko; Okamura, Kunishige; Kuroda, Aki; Takahashi, Ryo; Komuro, Kazuteru; Iwashiro, Nozomu

    2014-01-01

    An unusual case of pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (P-AVM) combined with esophageal cancer is reported. A 59-year-old man was admitted with upper abdominal pain. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed numerous strongly enhanced abnormal vessels and a hypovascular lesion in the area of the pancreatic tail. Angiographic study of the celiac artery confirmed racemose vascular networks in the tail of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography revealed narrowing and displacement of the main pancreatic duct in the tail of the pancreas. Screening esophagoscopy showed a 0-IIa+IIc type tumor in the lower thoracic esophagus. Histological examination of esophagoscopic biopsies showed squamous cell carcinoma. Based on these findings, P-AVM or pancreatic cancer and esophageal cancer were diagnosed. Video-assisted thoracoscopic esophagectomy and distal pancreatectomy were performed. Histological examination of the resected pancreas revealed abundant abnormal vessels with intravascular thrombi. In addition, rupture of a dilated pancreatic duct with pancreatic stones and both severe atrophy and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma were observed. The final diagnoses were P-AVM consequent to severe chronic pancreatitis and esophageal carcinoma. The patient's postoperative course was relatively good. PMID:24574946

  11. Imatinib-induced pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Mahesh R.; Mathew, Shibi; Krishnadas, Devadas; Vinayakumar, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis is a rare but serious complication of many drugs, some of which have been well documented. Here we present a case of a middle-aged man with chronic myeloid leukemia who developed acute pancreatitis after being initiated on imatinib mesylate. The case history, the pharmacodynamics, uses, and adverse effects of imatinib mesylate are discussed in detail. PMID:20606838

  12. Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, Garth L.; Rajotte, Ray V.

    1992-01-01

    Transplantation of insulin-producing tissue offers a physiologic approach to restoration of glycemic control. Whereas transplantation of vascularized pancreatic grafts has recently achieved encouraging results, pancreatic islet cell transplantation holds the promise of low morbidity and reduced requirements for agressive immunosuppression for recipients. Islet cell transplantation was recently demonstrated to induce euglycemia with insulin independence. Imagesp1656-a PMID:21221366

  13. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The genetics of hereditary pancreatic cancer is a focus of research at Johns Hopkins. It has been estimated that ten percent of pancreatic cancers are hereditary. Many of these occur as part of rare medical syndromes. These include: Familial breast cancer gene(BRCA2) ...

  14. Progress Against Follicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, Jonathan H.; Oricchio, Elisa; Puvvada, Soham D.; Wendel, H. Guido

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review We wish to share recent progress in research and new therapies against follicular lymphoma (FL) and highlight exciting opportunities to improve the treatment of FL. Recent findings Follicular lymphoma has been somewhat neglected by the research community, but recent genomic studies have identified key genetic lesions in FL. In addition, a new murine model is available to explore the function of these lesions in development, progression, and treatment of FL. Moreover, new small molecule inhibitors are now available that target key pathways in FL including B-cell receptor signaling and histone modifiers. Summary FL is a very common and still incurable form of lymphoma. However recent genomic and in vivo biological studies are beginning to unveil the molecular drivers of FL. This coincides with the development of effective small molecule inhibitors against key targets. Together these developments suggest that we are at a long overdue watershed moment in the treatment of FL. PMID:23673338

  15. Primary pancreatic plasmacytoma.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Yasunori; Nonaka, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Eiji; Funaki, Naomi; Kono, Yukihiro; Mizuta, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-01

    We report an extremely rare case of primary pancreatic plasmacytoma. A 56-year-old man had a 4-cm mass in the pancreatic tail and received distal pancreatectomy. This mass mainly consisted of plasma cells, but we failed to demonstrate their monoclonality in spite of the immunohistological staining. One and a half years later, this patient's right inguinal node swelled, and this node also showed a dense plasma cell infiltration. A very precise immunohistological staining was performed for this lymph node and the previous pancreatic mass, and both were diffusely positive for kappa light chain, IgG, and CD38. In the absence of myeloma elsewhere, we thus reached the correct diagnosis of primary pancreatic plasmacytoma, which later metastasized to lymph nodes. In the presence of the plasma cell proliferation in a pancreatic mass, plasmacytoma should be taken into consideration, and a more careful immunohistological staining is definitely necessary. PMID:15170142

  16. Case 207: Hodgkin lymphoma with paraneoplastic hypercalcemic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mittra, Erik S; Davidzon, Guido

    2014-07-01

    A 15-year-old girl presented with a 2-month history of 30-lb (13.6 kg) weight loss, chest and abdominal pain, nausea, bilious emesis, cough, and shortness of breath. Initial blood count (performed at an outside hospital) showed elevated white blood cell and platelet counts but low hemoglobin and hematocrit levels. On examination, she had adenopathy in the left axillary and supraclavicular regions, fullness in the left chest, and abdominal guarding. Ultrasonography (US)-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the left anterior chest wall mass was nondiagnostic, and lumbar puncture and bone marrow biopsies were negative. At that time, the patient underwent several imaging studies-including chest radiography; bone scanning; contrast material-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis; and fluorine 18 ((18)F) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT-all performed within 1 week of each other. Pertinent serum laboratory values at the time of these tests were as follows: calcium level, 17 mg/dL (4.25 mmol/L) (normal range, 8.5-10.5 mg/dL [2.1-2.6 mmol/L]); ionized calcium level, 2.3 mmol/L (normal range, 1.1-1.3 mmol/L); lipase level, 2423 U/L (normal level, <300 U/L); amylase level, 1435 U/L (normal level, <140 U/L); lactate dehydrogenase level, 253 U/L (normal level, <240 U/L), albumin level, 2.6 g/dL (26 g/L) (normal level, 3.5-5.0 g/dL [35-50 g/L]), and creatinine level, 1.7 mg/dL (150.3 ?mol/L) (normal level, <1.2 mg/dL [<106.1 ?mol/L]). A follow-up PET/CT scan was performed approximately 2 months later after initial therapy. PMID:24956051

  17. Radiation therapy for orbital lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ping . E-mail: pzhou@partners.org; Ng, Andrea K.; Silver, Barbara; Li Sigui; Hua Ling; Mauch, Peter M.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To describe radiation techniques and evaluate outcomes for orbital lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients (and 62 eyes) with orbital lymphoma treated with radiotherapy between 1987 and 2003 were included. The majority had mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (48%) or follicular (30%) lymphoma. Seventeen patients had prior lymphoma at other sites, and 29 had primary orbital lymphoma. Median follow-up was 46 months. Results: The median dose was 30.6 Gy; one-third received <30 Gy. Electrons were used in 9 eyes with disease confined to the conjunctiva or eyelid, and photons in 53 eyes with involvement of intraorbital tissues to cover entire orbit. Local control rate was 98% for all patients and 100% for those with indolent lymphoma. Three of the 26 patients with localized primary lymphoma failed distantly, resulting in a 5-year freedom-from-distant-relapse rate of 89%. The 5-year disease-specific and overall survival rates were 95% and 88%, respectively. Late toxicity was mainly cataract formation in patients who received radiation without lens block. Conclusions A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for indolent orbital lymphoma. Distant relapse rate in patients with localized orbital lymphoma was lower than that reported for low-grade lymphoma presenting in other sites. Orbital radiotherapy can be used for salvage of recurrent indolent lymphoma.

  18. Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  19. Follicular Lymphoma Diagnosed With Medical Thoracoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sumera R; Lee, Paul J; Ghasemi, Mitra; Sosa, Andres F

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas may present with a recurrent pleural effusion, usually with involvement of other thoracic or extrathoracic sites. Lymphomas typically presenting with pleural disease include primary effusion lymphoma and pyothorax-associated lymphoma. We describe an unusual case of recurrent pleural effusion secondary to follicular lymphoma with no other known extrathoracic involvement at the time of diagnosis. PMID:26496088

  20. [Emphysematous necrotizing pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ghidirim, Gh; Gagauz, I; Mi?in, Ig; Gu?u, E; Vozian, M

    2005-01-01

    The authors present an additional case of emphysematous necrotizing pancreatitis caused by Escherichia coli. Emphysematous necrotizing pancreatitis represents a rare and potentially life-threatening infection and is characterized by gas formation within or around the pancreas. A 26-year-old man presented with severe upper abdominal pain and vomiting, 7 hours from onset. Acute pancreatitis was initially diagnosed based on high amylase level, abdominal ultrasonography and primary CT scan. On the 7th day he developed fever, increasing abdominal pain and shortness of breath. On the second abdominal CT scan, the pancreatic bed was filled with gas. The diagnosis of emphysematous necrotizing pancreatitis was confirmed at laparotomy. The patient was treated successfully by extensive pancreatic necrosectomy, open packing and scheduled repeated debridements. Culture from the lesser sac, and retroperitoneal space, examined for aerobes and anaerobes, revealed growth of Escherichia coli. The authors analyze and discuss pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of emphysematous necrotizing pancreatitis. Based on the available data and this case, early surgical debridement and appropriate antibiotics appear to be the preferred treatment. PMID:16106939

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Jani, Niraj; Buxbaum, James

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4 (IgG4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreatic manifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings. PMID:26558153

  2. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Niraj; Buxbaum, James

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4 (IgG4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreatic manifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings. PMID:26558153

  3. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP). PMID:25469024

  4. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  5. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  6. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek; Regal, Mohamed

    2015-12-29

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  7. Lymphoma: Immune Evasion Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ranjan; Hammerich, Linda; Peng, Paul; Brown, Brian; Merad, Miriam; Brody, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    While the cellular origin of lymphoma is often characterized by chromosomal translocations and other genetic aberrations, its growth and development into a malignant neoplasm is highly dependent upon its ability to escape natural host defenses. Neoplastic cells interact with a variety of non-malignant cells in the tumor milieu to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment. The resulting functional impairment and dysregulation of tumor-associated immune cells not only allows for passive growth of the malignancy but may even provide active growth signals upon which the tumor subsequently becomes dependent. In the past decade, the success of immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive cell transfer for relapsed or refractory lymphomas has validated immunotherapy as a possible treatment cornerstone. Here, we review the mechanisms by which lymphomas have been found to evade and even reprogram the immune system, including alterations in surface molecules, recruitment of immunosuppressive subpopulations, and secretion of anti-inflammatory factors. A fundamental understanding of the immune evasion strategies utilized by lymphomas may lead to better prognostic markers and guide the development of targeted interventions that are both safer and more effective than current standards of care. PMID:25941795

  8. [Mantle cell lymphoma diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Choukri, Mohammed; Taheri, Hafsa; Seddik, Rachid; Benkirane, Souad; Hamama, Afaf; Masrar, Azzelarab; Agoumi, Najia Benkirane; Chabraoui, Layachi

    2013-01-01

    Recent classifications of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas based on combination of morphologic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic criteria have individualized mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). This clinico-biological entity which accounts for 3 to 10% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, now appears to be a biological and therapeutic model for the understanding and treatment of hematologic malignancies. The present study consisting of two cases of MCL collated at laboratory of hematology of Rabat Ibn Sina hospital. The morphological appearance of MCL is characterized by diffuse or nodular lymph infiltration in the mantle zone, the osteo-medullary biopsy shows an interstitial infringement characterized by the presence of lymphocytes resembling centrocytes with cleaved and angular nuclei, dispersed chromatin, inconspicuous nucleoli and scanty cytoplasm. The flow cytometry showed immunophenotype positive for surface Ig, CD19, CD20, CD22, CD79b, CD5 and cyclin D1, and negative for CD10, CD23 and CD25. In conclusion, the methods of diagnosis and prognosis evaluation of mantle cell lymphoma are based on the nodular, medullary and blood morphology, the immunophenotypic, cytogenetic and molecular study of neoplastic cells. PMID:23396434

  9. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2015 71,850 % of All New Cancer Cases 4.3% Estimated Deaths in 2015 19,790 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2012, there were an estimated 549,625 people living with non-Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  10. Familial Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Gloria M

    2015-08-01

    Familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) kindreds have at least 2 first-degree relatives with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Studies of FPC have focused on the discovery of genetic cause and on the management of those at genetically high risk. Research reveals that a half dozen known hereditary syndromes or genes are associated with increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer, the most prominent of which are BRCA2 and CDKN2A. Genetic risk assessment and testing is already available. Owing to limited experience worldwide, guidance is often based on expert opinion, although all agree that research is needed to improve the shaping of options. PMID:26226902

  11. Pancreatic fistula and postoperative pancreatitis after pancreatoduodenectomy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudis, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The most serious complication after pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) is pancreatic fistula (PF) type C, either as a consequence or independently from postoperative pancreatitis (PP). Differentiating between these two types of complications is often very difficult, if not impossible. The most significant factor in early diagnosis of PP after PD is an abrupt change in clinical status. In our retrospective study we also observed significantly higher levels of serum concentrations of CRP and AMS comparing to PF without PP. Based on our findings, CT scan is not beneficial in the early diagnosis of PP. Meantime PF type C is indication to operative revision with mostly drainage procedure which is obviously not much technically demanding, there are no definite guidelines on how to proceed in PP. Therefore the surgeon’s experience determines not only whether PP will be diagnosed early enough and will be differentiated from PF without PP, but also whether a completion pancreatectomy will be performed in indicated cases. PMID:25392838

  12. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Daniel; Friess, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients. PMID:26681935

  13. [Experimental models of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Ceranowicz, Piotr; Cieszkowski, Jakub; Warzecha, Zygmunt; Dembi?ski, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a severe disease with high mortality. Clinical studies can bring some data about etiology, pathogenesis and the course of acute pancreatitis. However, studies concerning early events of this disease and the new concepts of treatment cannot be performed on humans, due to ethical reasons. Animal models of acute pancreatitis have been developed to solve this problem. This review presents currently used experimental models of acute pancreatitis, their properties and clinical relevance. Experimental models of acute pancreatitis can be divided into in vivo (non-invasive and invasive) and ex vivo models. The onset, development, severity and extent of acute pancreatitis, as well as the mortality, vary considerably between these different models. Animal models reproducibly produce mild, moderate or severe acute pancreatitis. One of the most commonly used models of acute pancreatitis is created by administration of supramaximal doses of cerulein, an analog of cholecystokinin. This model produces acute mild edematous pancreatitis in rats, whereas administration of cerulein in mice leads to the development of acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis evoked by retrograde administration of sodium taurocholate into the pancreatic duct is the most often used model of acute severe necrotizing pancreatitis in rats. Ex vivo models allow to eliminate the influence of hormonal and nervous factors on the development of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25720613

  14. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domnguez Muoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  15. Panobinostat and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-23

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Familial Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Henry T.; Lynch, Jane F.; Lanspa, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer’s high mortality rate equates closely with its incidence, thereby showing the need for development of biomarkers of its increased risk and a better understanding of its genetics, so that high-risk patients can be better targeted for screening and early potential lifesaving diagnosis. Its phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity is extensive and requires careful scrutiny of its pattern of cancer associations, such as malignant melanoma associated with pancreatic cancer, in the familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome, due to the CDKN2A germline mutation. This review is designed to depict several of the hereditary pancreatic cancer syndromes with particular attention given to the clinical application of this knowledge into improved control of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24281205

  17. Management of necrotizing pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Slavin, John; Ghaneh, Paula; Sutton, Robert; Hartley, Mark; Rowlands, Peter; Garvey, Conall; Hughes, Mark; Neoptolemos, John

    2001-01-01

    Infection complicating pancreatic necrosis leads to persisting sepsis, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and accounts for about half the deaths that occur following acute pancreatitis. Severe cases due to gallstones require urgent endoscopic sphincterotomy. Patients with pancreatic necrosis should be followed with serial contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) and if infection is suspected fine needle aspiration of the necrotic area for bacteriology (FNAB) should be undertaken. Treatment of sterile necrosis should initially be non-operative. In the presence of infection necrosectomy is indicated. Although traditionally this has been by open surgery, minimally invasive procedures are a promising new alternative. There are many unresolved issues in the management of pancreatic necrosis. These include, the use of antibiotic prophylaxis, the precise indications for and frequency of repeat CE-CT and FNAB, and the role of enteral feeding. PMID:11819813

  18. Hydration and Chronic Pancreatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    Fact Sheet - Hydration and Chronic Pancreatitis by Kathianne Sellers Proper hydration is important in the health of ... fluid needs are 8 cups per day. Kathianne Sellers, R.D., was a nutritionist at the Pancreas ...

  19. Pancreatic exocrine function testing

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.S.

    1981-11-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and para-aminobenzoic acid bound to a dipeptide. Of all these tests the secretin stimulation test is the most accurate and reliable if done by experienced personnel. However, the indirect tests are simpler to do and appear to be comparable to the secretin test at detecting pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. These indirect tests are becoming clinically available and clinicians should familiarize themselves with the strengths and weaknesses of each.

  20. Precursors to Pancreatic Cancer+

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban; Kern, Scott E.; Goggins, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is believed to arise from morphologically distinct non-invasive precursor lesions. These precursors include the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, the mucinous cystic neoplasm, and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are grossly visible mucin-producing epithelial neoplasms that arise in the main pancreatic duct or one of its branches. The cysts of mucinous cystic neoplasms do not communicate with the major pancreatic ducts and these neoplasms are characterized by a distinct ovarian-type stroma. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia is a microscopic lesion. This review focuses on the clinical significance of these three remarkable precursor lesions with emphasis on their clinical manifestations, detection, and treatment. PMID:17996793

  1. Primary pancreatic pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q-Y; Shen, Q-Y; Yan, S; Zheng, S-S

    2011-01-01

    Primary pancreatic leiomyosarcoma is a rare mesenchymal tumour that is believed to arise from the walls of the pancreatic blood vessels or the pancreatic duct. A 56-year-old female was referred with epigastric pain and abdominal mass. Preoperative computed tomography showed a large soft tissue mass in the pancreatic body and tail. Fine needle aspiration biopsy indicated a spindle cell type tumour. The patient received distal pancreatectomy with no adjuvant treatment. Histology revealed a pleomorphic spindle cell neoplasm with an immunoprofile suggestive of smooth muscle origin. The absence of other lesions in the body was consistent with the diagnosis of primary pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. The patient was well and tumour-free 14 months after surgery. Detailed immunohistochemical analyses are necessary in the diagnosis of this highly malignant tumour. Radical resection offers the only chance of long-term survival. PMID:21986161

  2. [Hereditary aspects of pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bak, Daniel; Sobczy?ska-Tomaszewska, Agnieszka; Bal, Jerzy

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatitis presents clinically as acute and chronic form. A common characteristic of these two forms is enzymatic autodigestion of pancreas in the course of the disease. It results from premature activation of pancreatic digestive enzymes and disturbance of subtle balance between proteolytic enzymes and their inhibitors. The way to understand the character of mechanisms leading to development of pancreatitis has been simplified by discovery of genetic factors, which are able to initiate pathological changes at tissue level. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene (first of all R122H and N29I mutations), which encodes for cationic trypsin, cause trypsin to be protected from autodegradation. These mutations also cause precursor of trypsin - trypsinogen, to be activated easier. On the other hand mutations in the SPINK1 gene have been identified. SPINK1 gene encodes for the most important protease inhibitor of the pancreatic fluid. The most frequent mutation, namely N34S, decrease SPINK1 protein in its activity. The link between the genotype and phenotype is not clear in every case. It is probable that pancreatitis will be recognized as poligenic with many genes engaged in the disease development. Pancreatic cancer is a frequent consequence of pancreatitis. It is a very invasive cancer with high mortality. In the course of pancreatic inflammation intensive cell proliferation takes place for regeneration of pancreas damage. It is the chance for amplification of pathological changes in DNA, which have arisen as a ROS's (Reactive Oxygen Species) and RNOS's (Reactive Nitrogen Oxide Species) action effect. ROS and RNOS are generated in the course of pancreas inflammation. PMID:13130170

  3. Locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Oikonomopoulos, Georgios M; Huber, Kathryn E; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-03-01

    Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer is palliative, based on chemotherapy and according to response, chemoradiotherapy can be applied. The authors summarize three abstracts (#LBA146, #256 and #303) presented on the 2013 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, which were focused on treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. A discussion is presented about the different chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy regimens, that move away from gemcitabine-based treatment, and the effort to find less toxic, but efficient therapeutic combinations. PMID:23474552

  4. Pancreatitis and atypical Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We report on pediatric patient with clinical and laboratory evidence of pancreatitis at onset of atypical Kawasaki disease (KD). In KD pancreatic inflammation was described previously, but clinical pancreatitis was rarely reported and its true incidence is unknown. In febrile pediatric patients suspected to have KD, but not fulfilling classical diagnostic criteria, signs of pancreatic inflammation may help in making correct diagnosis. Further analysis of cases with atypical KD developing pancreatitis may reveal if signs of pancreatic inflammation can be used as supportive diagnostic finding. PMID:20181201

  5. Pancreatitis and atypical Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Prokic, Dragan; Ristic, Goran; Paunovic, Zoran; Pasic, Srdjan

    2010-01-01

    We report on pediatric patient with clinical and laboratory evidence of pancreatitis at onset of atypical Kawasaki disease (KD). In KD pancreatic inflammation was described previously, but clinical pancreatitis was rarely reported and its true incidence is unknown.In febrile pediatric patients suspected to have KD, but not fulfilling classical diagnostic criteria, signs of pancreatic inflammation may help in making correct diagnosis. Further analysis of cases with atypical KD developing pancreatitis may reveal if signs of pancreatic inflammation can be used as supportive diagnostic finding. PMID:20181201

  6. [Diabetogenic tropical pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Assan, R; Assan, D; Thiebaut, M F; Laloux, S; Clauser, E; Boukersi, A

    1988-01-01

    The tropical calcifying pancreatitis and/or fibrous pancreatitis are responsible for a number of cases of juvenile insulin-dependent diabetes in the Third World countries. World wide distributed in the tropical areas of Asia, Africa and South America, they can also be observed in Europe, in migrants from these countries. Intensive epidemiological and biochemical studies are currently developed in order to shed light on the many obscure points. Classification of the typical calcifying pancreatitis and the related syndromes is a matter of debate. The pathological basis is calcification of the pancreas and echography of the gland may become a cheap convenient relatively specific tool for epidemiology. The clinical syndrome consists of chronic painful pancreatic episodes since childhood, associated with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, followed by the onset, during adolescence, of diabetes mellitus, which is most of the times insulin dependent. Patients' history is free of chronic alcoholism, but includes constantly chronic caloric and proteic malnutrition. Although insulin dependent this diabetes in not prone to ketosis, due presumably to carnitine deficiency and relative glucagon deficiency (or suppressibility). Insulin resistance is traditionally noted, the pathophysiology of which is unknown. The mechanism of calcification appearance is also undetermined. Either a deficiency in pancreatic stone protein, or the toxic effect of cyanogen glucosides present in cassava and other tropical foodstuffs, or the malnutrition-related deficiency in sulphur-containing aminoacids may be causal factors. No valid experimental model of the disease is available. PMID:3044866

  7. Management of necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, C F

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive management plan is presented for patients with severe acute pancreatitis. These patients may have pancreatic or peripancreatic necrosis or pancreatic fluid collections. Multiple organ failure often develops in patients with severe pancreatitis. We therefore recommend that all patients with acute pancreatitis be evaluated for pancreatic anatomy and function. If a patient is seriously ill, a computed tomographic (CT) scan with vascular enhancement should be done. Meanwhile, vigorous fluid replacement is necessary using Swan-Ganz monitoring. Patients with necrosis do not need surgical intervention unless the clinical course or CT scan-guided aspiration shows infection. The objective of an operation should be to remove all infected tissue and fluid. A preoperative CT scan with vascular enhancement should be used as a guide during the operation to ensure that all foci of infected necrosis or fluid are eliminated. We have found that open packing and irrigation with sodium oxychlorosene are helpful in patients with extensive necrosis or those who become infected early after the onset of symptoms. In all, 40% to 50% of patients treated by closed drainage will require reoperation because of incomplete debridement. Persistent sepsis is an indication for reoperation. Images PMID:8128676

  8. FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  9. Checkpoint blockade in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Armand, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapy (CBT) was born of the combination of several elements: the understanding of some of the important immune regulation pathways in humans; the recognition that tumors can engage those pathways to evade immune responses; and the clinical development of monoclonal antibodies targeting checkpoint receptors to restore effective anti-tumor immunity. This form of therapy, focused to date mostly on the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed-death 1 (PD-1) pathways, has already revolutionized the treatment of several solid tumors. Hematologic malignancies (HMs) offer a promising testing ground for this strategy, and several trials have already demonstrated evidence of therapeutic activity with checkpoint blockade, especially in lymphoma. This review will discuss the current clinical results of CBT in lymphoma in the context of their scientific underpinning, and build from this summary a projection of how the field may evolve in the near future. PMID:26637703

  10. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  11. Study of Alisertib (MLN8237) in Adults With Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-15

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Precursor B-lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; T-cell Lymphoma, Excluding Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Follicular Lymphoma With ? 50% Diffuse Large Cell Component

  12. Lymphoma Immunotherapy: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Zappasodi, Roberta; de Braud, Filippo; Di Nicola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The rationale to treat lymphomas with immunotherapy comes from long-standing evidence on their distinctive immune responsiveness. Indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, in particular, establish key interactions with the immune microenvironment to ensure prosurvival signals and prevent antitumor immune activation. However, reports of spontaneous regressions indicate that, under certain circumstances, patients develop therapeutic antitumor immunity. Several immunotherapeutic approaches have been thus developed to boost these effects in all patients. To date, targeting CD20 on malignant B cells with the antibody rituximab has been the most clinically effective strategy. However, relapse and resistance prevent to cure approximately half of B-NHL patients, underscoring the need of more effective therapies. The recognition of B-cell receptor variable regions as B-NHL unique antigens promoted the development of specific vaccines to immunize patients against their own tumor. Despite initial promising results, this strategy has not yet demonstrated a sufficient clinical benefit to reach the regulatory approval. Several novel agents are now available to stimulate immune effector functions or counteract immunosuppressive mechanisms, such as engineered antitumor T cells, co-stimulatory receptor agonist, and immune checkpoint-blocking antibodies. Thus, multiple elements can now be exploited in more effective combinations to break the barriers for the induction of anti-lymphoma immunity. PMID:26388871

  13. Pathobiology of Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Agostinelli, Claudio; Gazzola, Anna; Tripodo, Claudio; Bacci, Francesco; Sabattini, Elena; Sista, Maria Teresa; Mannu, Claudia; Sapienza, Maria Rosaria; Rossi, Maura; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Sagramoso-Sacchetti, Carlo A.; Righi, Simona; Pileri, Stefano A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite its well-known histological and clinical features, Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) has recently been the object of intense research activity, leading to a better understanding of its phenotype, molecular characteristics, histogenesis, and possible mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. There is complete consensus on the B-cell derivation of the tumor in most cases, and on the relevance of Epstein-Barr virus infection and defective cytokinesis in at least a proportion of patients. The REAL/WHO classification recognizes a basic distinction between lymphocyte predominance HL (LP-HL) and classic HL (cHL), reflecting the differences in clinical presentation and behavior, morphology, phenotype, and molecular features. cHL has been classified into four subtypes: lymphocyte rich, nodular sclerosing, with mixed cellularity, and lymphocyte depleted. The borders between cHL and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma have become sharper, whereas those between LP-HL and T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma remain ill defined. Treatments adjusted to the pathobiological characteristics of the tumor in at-risk patients have been proposed and are on the way to being applied. PMID:21253495

  14. Multiple Intestinal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mastalier, B; Deaconescu, Violeta; Elaiah, W; Drăghici, C; Popp, Cristiana; Zurac, Sabina; Balea, M; Tevet, Mihaela; Botezatu, C

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract is the most common location for extralymphonodular lymphomas. The small intestine is affected only in 9% of the cases. Intestinal lymphoma may have single or multiple location. This paper describes a case of multiple location in the small intestine of a non-Hodgkin B-cell in a 53 years old patient, who was initially diagnosed with bilateral pneumonia with pleurisy with E. coli, steeper on the right side, but the persistence of symptoms as fever, malaise, despite appropriate treatment, required further investigation. The CT exam observed fluid collection in the hypogastrium around a digestive loop. The patient underwent surgery, the intraoperative foundings being: a large mesenteric tumor - 5 cm in diameter, a terminal ileal mesenteric tumor, a mesenteric tumor - 6 cm in diameter, omentum with nodular formations, a tumor - 3.3/2.5.1 cm in the abdominal wall, pseudotumoral appendix. Segmental. enterectomy with entero-enterostomy, excision of mesenteric tumors, appendectomy and omentectomy were performed. Pathological diagnosis was non-Hodgkin marginal zone B-cell MALT type lymphoma of the small intestine with extension to the appendix, meso, omentum and abdominal wall. Postoperatively, the patient received chemotherapy for remission. PMID:26076564

  15. A pilot study of contrast harmonic endosonography using DEFINITY in the evaluation of suspected pancreatic and peri-ampullary malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Eng Kiong; Ang, Daphne; Kwek, Andrew Boon Eu; Fock, Kwong Ming

    2011-01-01

    Aim Contrast harmonic endosonography (CHEUS) is not widely available. This study assessed the utility of CHEUS using DEFINITY, a second generation ultrasonic contrast agent, in the evaluation of suspected pancreatic and peri-ampullary malignancies. Methods Prospectively enrolled patients with suspected pancreatic and peri-ampullary malignancies underwent EUS followed by CHEUS. The incremental yield of CHEUS over EUS was analyzed. The gold standard for diagnosis of malignancy was positive cytology or histology; a negative diagnosis for malignancy was based on negative cytology or histology and benign clinical course. Results Twenty-nine patients were enrolled and underwent CHEUS. The final diagnoses were: pancreatic adenocarcinoma (16/29); metastases to pancreas (4/29); pancreatitis with inflammatory mass (4/29); normal pancreas with focal fat sparing (1/29); ampulla adenocarcinoma (2/29); serous cystic neoplasm (1/29); peri-pancreatic lymph node due to lymphoma (1/29). One bengin case of chronic pancreatitis had calcification casting artifacts that prevented accurate EUS examination and was excluded, leaving 28 cases for comparative analysis between EUS and CHEUS. CHEUS enhanced tumor margins. CHEUS detected vascular invasion missed by EUS in 2/16 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Masses appeared hypoechoic with EUS. With CHEUS malignant masses had an inhomogeneous hypoechoic pattern associated with abnormal vessels while lesions due to focal pancreatitis or fat sparing were characterized by diffuse enhancement (p<0.001). Conclusion CHEUS improved the visualization of tumor margins and vascular invasion, and differentiated benign from malignant masses. PMID:22586529

  16. [The epidemiology of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Gbor; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2010-10-31

    Pancreatic cancer is a relatively uncommon tumor, but even with early diagnosis, mortality rates are high, explaining why this form of cancer has now become a common cause of cancer mortality. There are no screening tests for early detection of pancreatic cancer. It is more common in men than women and is predominantly a disease of elderly people. There is wide variation in the incidence of pancreatic cancer around the world, suggesting that environmental factors are important in the pathogenesis. Smoking is the major known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, while dietary factors seem to be less important. Other possible risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous inherited germ line mutations are associated with pancreatic cancer. Of these, hereditary pancreatitis confers the greatest risk, while BRCA2 mutations are the commonest inherited disorder. Polymorphisms in genes that control detoxification of environmental carcinogens and metabolic pathways may alter the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:20961843

  17. Endoscopic treatment of chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Heyries, Laurent; Sahel, Jose

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of chronic pancreatitis has been exclusively surgical for a long time. Recently, endoscopic therapy has become widely used as a primary therapeutic option. Initially performed for drainage of pancreatic cysts and pseudocysts, endoscopic treatments were adapted to biliary and pancreatic ducts stenosis. Pancreatic sphincterotomy which allows access to pancreatic ducts was firstly reported. Secondly, endoscopic methods of stenting, dilatation, and stones extraction of the bile ducts were applied to pancreatic ducts. Nevertheless, new improvements were necessary: failures of pancreatic stone extraction justified the development of extra-corporeal shock wave lithotripsy; dilatation of pancreatic stenosis was improved by forage with a new device; moreover endosonography allowed guidance for celiac block, gastro-cystostomy, duodeno-cystostomy and pancreatico-gastrostomy. Although endoscopic treatments are more and more frequently accepted, indications are still debated. PMID:18069750

  18. Pancreatic trauma: A concise review

    PubMed Central

    Debi, Uma; Kaur, Ravinder; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sinha, Anindita; Singh, Kartar

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the pancreas is rare and difficult to diagnose. In contrast, traumatic injuries to the liver, spleen and kidney are common and are usually identified with ease by imaging modalities. Pancreatic injuries are usually subtle to identify by different diagnostic imaging modalities, and these injuries are often overlooked in cases with extensive multiorgan trauma. The most evident findings of pancreatic injury are post-traumatic pancreatitis with blood, edema, and soft tissue infiltration of the anterior pararenal space. The alterations of post-traumatic pancreatitis may not be visualized within several hours following trauma as they are time dependent. Delayed diagnoses of traumatic pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of pancreatic injuries because early recognition of the disruption of the main pancreatic duct is important. We reviewed our experience with the use of various imaging modalities for diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma. PMID:24379625

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Balci, Numan Cem; Bieneman, B Kirke; Bilgin, Mehmet; Akduman, Isin E; Fattahi, Rana; Burton, Frank R

    2009-02-01

    Pancreatitis can occur in acute and chronic forms. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an important role in the early diagnosis of both conditions and complications that may arise from acute or chronic inflammation of the gland. Standard MRI techniques including T1-weighted and T2-weighted fat-suppressed imaging sequences together with contrast-enhanced imaging can both aid in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and demonstrate complications as pseudocysts, hemorrhage, and necrosis. Combined use of MRI and MR cholangiopancreatography can show both parenchymal findings that are associated with chronic pancreatitis including pancreatic size and signal and arterial enhancements, all of which are diminished in chronic pancreatitis. The degree of main pancreatic duct dilatation and/or the number of side branch ectasia determines the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and its severity. In this paper, we report the spectrum of imaging findings of acute and chronic pancreatitis on MRI and MR cholangiopancreatography. PMID:19687723

  20. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Krishna, S.V.S.; Lakhtakia, Sandeep; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis). Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson's disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis. PMID:24083160

  1. Secondary choroidal lymphoma in a child treated for Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanian, Aparna; Shields, Carol L; Longmire, Michelle; Hunt, David J

    2011-02-01

    A 9-year-old girl presented with a choroidal tumor 6 years after remission of Burkitt lymphoma with no evidence of systemic recurrence. The tumor regressed after plaque radiotherapy. The second tumor could have been related to previous chemotherapy, caused by Epstein-Barr virus infection, or the result of independent lymphoma cell growth. PMID:21397815

  2. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-11

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Lenalidomide and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-05

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mediastinal Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  4. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  5. Oblimersen Sodium and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  6. MDX-010 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-22

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  7. Geldanamycin Analogue in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-13

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD).

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2015-02-01

    Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) is an uncommon form of diabetes that occurs as a result of chronic calcific pancreatitis, in the absence of alcohol abuse. The disease is restricted to tropical regions of the world, and southern India has the highest known prevalence of FCPD. The typical patient with FCPD is a lean adolescent or young adult of either sex, presenting with history of recurrent bouts of abdominal pain and steatorrhea. Demonstration of large, discrete pancreatic calculi by plain radiographs or ultrasonography of the abdomen is diagnostic. While the exact etiology of FCPD is unknown, genetic, nutritional and inflammatory factors have been hypothesized to play a role. Diabetes in FCPD is often brittle and difficult to control; most patients require multiple doses of insulin for control of glycemia. However, in spite of high blood glucose levels, patients rarely develop ketosis. Malabsorption responds to pancreatic enzyme supplementation. Surgical removal of stones is indicated for symptomatic relief of intractable pain. While patients with FCPD develop microvascular complications as frequently as those with type 2 diabetes, macrovascular disease is uncommon. Development of pancreatic malignancy is the most dreaded complication and should be suspected in any patient who complains of weight loss, back pain or jaundice. PMID:25395047

  9. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV HIV-Associated Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-18

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Stage IIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVB Hodgkin Lymphoma

  10. Alternatively activated macrophages promote pancreatic fibrosis in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jing; Sharma, Vishal; Hsieh, Michael H.; Chawla, Ajay; Murali, Ramachandran; Pandol, Stephen J.; Habtezion, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive and irreversible inflammatory and fibrotic disease with no cure. Unlike acute pancreatitis, we find that alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) are dominant in mouse and human CP. AAMs are dependent on IL-4 and IL-13 signaling and we show that mice lacking IL-4R?, myeloid specific IL-4R?, and IL-4/IL-13 were less susceptible to pancreatic fibrosis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mouse and human pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are a source of IL-4/IL-13. Notably, we show that pharmacologic inhibition of IL-4/IL-13 in human ex-vivo studies as well as in established mouse CP decreases pancreatic AAMs and fibrosis. We identify a critical role for macrophages in pancreatic fibrosis and in turn PSCs as important inducers of macrophage alternative activation. Our study challenges and identifies pathways involved in cross talk between macrophages and PSCs that can be targeted to reverse or halt pancreatic fibrosis progression. PMID:25981357

  11. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-11

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  12. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment. PMID:9562770

  13. Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tandan, Manu; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP who have failed to respond to medical therapy and require intervention. PMID:24115811

  14. Nutrition and pancreatic cancer.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Pericleous M; Rossi RE; Mandair D; Whyand T; Caplin ME

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in men and women. Prognosis is poor with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. As there is no effective screening modality, the best way to reduce morbidity and mortality due to pancreatic cancer is by effective primary prevention.AIM: To evaluate the role of dietary components in pancreatic cancer.MATERIALS AND METHODS: Bibliographical searches were performed in PubMed using the terms "pancreatic cancer", together with "nutrition", "diet", "dietary factors", "lifestyle", "smoking", "alcohol" and "epidemiology".RESULTS: Fruits (particularly citrus) and vegetable consumption may be beneficial. The consumption of whole grains has been shown to reduce pancreatic cancer risk and fortification of whole grains with folate may confer further protection. Red meat, cooked at high temperatures, should be avoided, and replaced with poultry or fish. Total fat should be reduced. The use of curcumin and other flavonoids should be encouraged in the diet. There is no evidence for benefit from vitamin D supplementation. There may be benefit for dietary folate. Smoking and high Body Mass Index have both been inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk.CONCLUSION: The lack of randomized trials and the presence of confounding factors including smoking status, physical activity, distance of habitat from the equator, obesity, and diabetes may often result in inconclusive results. There is evidence to encourage the use of whole grain in the staple diet and supplementation within the diet of folate, curcumin and other flavanoids. Carefully designed randomized trials are required to further elucidate these important matters.

  15. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathology: changing landscape

    PubMed Central

    Brosens, Lodewijk A. A.; Hackeng, Wenzel M.; Offerhaus, G. Johan; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. At time of diagnosis the disease is usually advanced and only a minority of patients are eligible for surgical resection. The overall 5-year survival is 6%. However, survival of patients with early stage pancreatic cancer is significantly better. To improve the prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer, it is essential to diagnose and treat pancreatic cancer in the earliest stage. Prevention of pancreatic cancer by treating noninvasive precursor lesions just before they invade tissues can potentially lead to even better outcomes. Pancreatic carcinogenesis results from a stepwise progression in which accumulating genetic alterations drive neoplastic progression in well-defined precursor lesions, ultimately giving rise to an invasive adenocarcinoma. A thorough understanding of the genetic changes that drive pancreatic carcinogenesis can lead to identification of biomarkers for early detection and targets for therapy. Recent next-generation sequencing (NGS) studies have shed new light on our understanding of the natural history of pancreatic cancer and the precursor lesions that give rise to these cancers. Importantly, there is a significant window of opportunity for early detection and treatment between the first genetic alteration in a cell in the pancreas and development of full-blown pancreatic cancer. The current views on the pathology and genetics of pancreatic carcinogenesis that evolved from studies of pancreatic cancer and its precursor lesions are discussed in this review. PMID:26261723

  16. Pathogenic Microorganisms and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunsaier; Li, Jingnan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist, and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including smoking, chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, collectively account for less than half of all pancreatic cancer cases. Accumulating reports have demonstrated that there is an association between pathogenic microorganisms and pancreatic cancer. Summary A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that microbiota are likely to influence pancreatic carcinogenesis. This review summarizes the literature on studies examining infections that have been linked to pancreatic cancer. Key Message Helicobacter pylori infection may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer; chronic hepatitis virus and oral microbiota may also play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Practical Implications Considering the worldwide burden of the disease, the association between microbiota and pancreatic cancer in this review may provide new ideas to prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies in this direction are urgently needed. PMID:26673459

  17. Fenretinide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-30

    Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  18. Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-04

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  19. Vorinostat and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-12-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  20. A Proteomic Comparison of Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Pancreatic Tissue from Autoimmune Pancreatitis, Chronic Pancreatitis, and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A; Kadiyala, Vivek; Brizard, Scott; Banks, Peter A; Steen, Hanno; Conwell, Darwin L

    2015-01-01

    Context Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a standard for specimen preservation, and as such FFPE tissue banks are an untapped resource of histologically-characterized specimens for retrospective biomarker investigation for pancreatic disease. Objectives We use liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to compare FFPE specimens from three different diseases of the exocrine pancreas. Design We investigated the proteomic profile of FFPE pancreatic tissue from 9 archived specimens that were histologically classified as: autoimmune pancreatitis (n=3), chronic pancreatitis (n=3), and pancreatic cancer (n=3), using LC-MS/MS. Setting This is a proteomic analysis experiment of FFPE pancreatic tissue in an academic center. Patients FFPE tissue specimens were provided by Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (Boston, MA, USA). Interventions FFPE tissue specimens were collected via routine surgical resection procedures. Main outcome measures We compared proteins identified from chronic pancreatitis, autoimmune pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer FFPE pancreatic tissue. Results We identified 386 non-redundant proteins from 9 specimens. Following our filtering criteria, 73, 29, and 53 proteins were identified exclusively in autoimmune pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer specimens, respectively. Conclusions We report that differentially-expressed proteins can be identified among FFPE tissues specimens originating from individuals with different histological diagnoses. These proteins merit further confirmation with a greater number of specimens and orthogonal validation, such as immunohistochemistry. The mass spectrometry-based methodology used herein has the potential to enhance diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target discovery, further advancing pancreatic research. PMID:23846938

  1. Clinical and Pathologic Studies in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients Receiving Antibody Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-05-31

    Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Diffuse Large B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Follicular / Indolent B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Mantle Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Marginal Zone; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Peripheral T-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Waldenstr Macroglobulinemia

  2. Pancreatic vascular regulation in chronic pancreatitis in cats.

    PubMed

    Widdison, A L; Karanjia, N D; Reber, H A

    1995-01-01

    In experimental obstructive chronic pancreatitis the normal hyperaemic response to secretory stimulation is lost, suggesting abnormal vascular regulation. Vascular regulatory mechanisms were investigated by observing the effect of increments in portal pressure on pancreatic blood flow in normal cats and cats with chronic pancreatitis. Normal cats maintained pancreatic blood flow until portal pressure was > 15 mm Hg, after which it decreased. Total vascular resistance decreased until the portal pressure was 15 mm Hg and increased thereafter. These observations suggested that metabolic regulatory mechanisms prevailed while portal pressure was in the physiological range but myogenic mechanisms became dominant during portal hypertension. In chronic pancreatitis the basal pancreatic blood flow was reduced and was inversely proportional to portal pressure. Total vascular resistance increased as portal pressure increased. In chronic pancreatitis myogenic regulatory responses prevailed at all levels of portal pressure. In conclusion, intrinsic regulation of pancreatic blood flow was abnormal in cats with chronic pancreatitis. The loss of the predominance of metabolic regulation over the normal range of portal pressure may partly explain the reduction of pancreatic blood flow in response to secretory stimulation. PMID:7890217

  3. Intestinal Microbiome and Lymphoma Development

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mitsuko L.; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota and gut immune system must communicate to maintain a balance between tolerance and activation. Our immune system protects us from pathogenic microbes at the same time that our bodies are host to trillions of microbes, symbionts, mutualists, and some that are essential to human health. Since there is such a close interaction between the immune system and the intestinal microbiota, it is not surprising that some lymphomas such as mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma have been shown to be caused by the presence of certain bacteria. Animal models have played an important role in elucidating the causation and establishing the mechanism of bacteria-induced MALT lymphoma. In this review, we discuss different ways that animal models have been applied to investigate links between the gut microbiota and lymphoma and have helped to reveal the mechanisms of microbiota-induced lymphoma. While there is a paucity of published studies demonstrating the interplay between the microbiota and lymphoma development, we believe that the connection is real and that it can be exploited in the future to enhance our understanding of causation and to improve the prognosis and treatment of lymphoma. PMID:24855006

  4. Lymphoma Caused by Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mitsuko L.; Schiestl, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota and gut immune system must constantly communicate to maintain a balance between tolerance and activation: on the one hand, our immune system should protect us from pathogenic microbes and on the other hand, most of the millions of microbes in and on our body are innocuous symbionts and some can even be beneficial. Since there is such a close interaction between the immune system and the intestinal microbiota, it is not surprising that some lymphomas such as mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma have been shown to be caused by the presence of certain bacteria. Animal models played an important role in establishing causation and mechanism of bacteria-induced MALT lymphoma. In this review we discuss different ways that animal models have been applied to establish a link between the gut microbiota and lymphoma and how animal models have helped to elucidate mechanisms of microbiota-induced lymphoma. While there are not a plethora of studies demonstrating a connection between microbiota and lymphoma development, we believe that animal models are a system which can be exploited in the future to enhance our understanding of causation and improve prognosis and treatment of lymphoma. PMID:25257357

  5. Ibrutinib or Idelalisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-20

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  6. Hepatobiliary and pancreatic ascariasis.

    PubMed

    Khuroo, M S

    2001-03-01

    Ascariasis is a helminthic infection of global distribution with more than 1.4 billion persons infected throughout the world. The majority of infections occur in the developing countries of Asia and Latin America. Of 4 million people infected in the United States, a large percentage are immigrants from developing countries. Ascaris-related clinical disease is restricted to subjects with heavy worm load, and an estimated 1.2 to 2 million such cases, with 20,000 deaths, occur in endemic areas per year. More often, recurring moderate infections cause stunting of linear growth, cause reduced cognitive function, and contribute to existing malnutrition in children in endemic areas. HPA is a frequent cause of biliary and pancreatic disease in endemic areas. It occurs in adult women and can cause biliary colic, acute cholecystitis, acute cholangitis, acute pancreatitis, and hepatic abscess. RPC causing hepatic duct calculi is possibly an aftermath of recurrent biliary invasion in such areas. Ultrasonography can detect worms in the biliary tract and pancreas and is a useful noninvasive technique for diagnosis and follow-up of such patients. ERCP can help diagnose biliary and pancreatic ascariasis, including ascaris in the duodenum. Also, ERCP can be used to extract worms from the biliary and pancreatic ducts when indicated. Pyrantel pamoate, mebendazole, albendazole and levamisole are effective drugs and can be used for mass therapy to control ascariasis in endemic areas. PMID:11293175

  7. [Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Daiji; Shirai, Kohji

    2013-09-01

    In Japan, the frequency of acute pancreatitis is 27.7 per 100,000, which includes 1.4 % of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis(HTGP). Severity and complication rates with HTGP have been reported as higher in comparison to acute pancreatitis from other etiologies. Havel has suggested that hydrolysis of excessive triglyceride-rich lipoproteins releases high concentrations of free fatty acid(FFA). The FFA micelles injure the vascular endothelium and acinar cells of the pancreas, producing a self-perpetuating ischemic and acidic environment with resultant toxicity. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) abnormality has been reported to contribute to severe hypertriglyceridemia. However, patients without any LPL abnormality are often encountered clinically, suggesting that other factors may be involved in the development of severe hypertriglyceridemia. In 21 patients with HTGP, 9 patients(42.9 %) with apolipoprotein AV (ApoAV) Gly185-Cys polymorphism were observed, whereas 14.3 % with LPL gene variants. No patient had ApoCII deficiency. These results suggest that in addition to LPL gene variants, ApoAV variant may be numerously involved in HTGP. It is important for clinicians to routinely investigate pathogenesis of hypertriglyceridemia in case with pancreatitis because specific management may be needed. PMID:24205721

  8. Pancreatic Cancer Interest Group

    Cancer.gov

    Chairperson S. Perwez Hussain, Ph.D. Investigator Head, Pancreatic Cancer Unit Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis CCR, National Cancer Institute Building 37, Room 3044B Bethesda, MD 20862 Phone: 301.402.3431 Steering Committee Laufey Amundadottir, Ph.D. I

  9. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Burney, Saira; Irfan, Khadija; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Masud, Faisal

    2014-07-01

    Research suggests a possible link between type 2 diabetes and several malignancies. Animal models have shown that hyperinsulinemic state underlying diabetes promotes tumor formation through stimulation of insulin-IGF-1 pathway; a possible role of inflammation is also proposed. One such link which has been under considerable study for years is that between diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Although epidemiological evidence points towards a reciprocal link between the two, the cause-effect relationship still remains unclear. This link was the subject of a large German epidemiological study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2014 (Abstract #1604), which underscored the link between diabetes and some cancers. Schmidt et al. performed a retrospective database analysis over a 12 year period and reported an increased risk of certain types of cancer in diabetic patients. The most significant association (HR 2.17) was found for pancreatic cancer. Given the high mortality of pancreatic cancer, prevention through timely screening could play an important role in improving prognosis. Older subjects with recent-onset diabetes represent a high-risk group and hence are potential targets for pancreatic cancer screening thereby enabling its early diagnosis at a curable stage. PMID:25076332

  10. Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Limaiem, Faten; Khalfallah, Tahar; Farhat, Leila Ben; Bouraoui, Sadia; Lahmar, Ahlem; Mzabi, Sabeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are rare and constitute approximately 0.5% of all pancreatic neoplasms. Aims: The study was to describe clinicopathological features of pancreatic cystic tumors. Patients and Methods: In our retrospective study, we reviewed 10 cases of pancreatic cystic neoplasms that were diagnosed at the pathology department of Mongi Slim hospital over a 14-year period (2000-2013). We adopted the latest World Health Organization (WHO) classification (2010) in grouping all tumors. Results: There were one male and nine female patients (sex ratio M/F = 1:9) aged between 21 and 68 years (mean = 37.5 years). The most common clinical presentation was epigastric and abdominal pain (n = 6) followed by vomiting (n = 3). Abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan disclosed a cystic lesion of the pancreas ranging in size between 2 and 10 cm (mean = 6.75 cm). All patients underwent surgical treatment. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen established the diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (n = 2), serous cystic neoplasm (n = 2), mucinous cystadenoma (n = 4), mucinous cystadenocarcinoma (n = 1), and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with invasive carcinoma (n = 1). Conclusion: Better understanding of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is essential for clinicians to make accurate diagnosis and to provide the best management for patients. PMID:25210676

  11. Nutrition in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard; Irtun, Øivind; Olesen, Søren Schou; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Holst, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is a major player in nutrient digestion. In chronic pancreatitis both exocrine and endocrine insufficiency may develop leading to malnutrition over time. Maldigestion is often a late complication of chronic pancreatic and depends on the severity of the underlying disease. The severity of malnutrition is correlated with two major factors: (1) malabsorption and depletion of nutrients (e.g., alcoholism and pain) causes impaired nutritional status; and (2) increased metabolic activity due to the severity of the disease. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. Good nutritional practice includes screening to identify patients at risk, followed by a thoroughly nutritional assessment and nutrition plan for risk patients. Treatment should be multidisciplinary and the mainstay of treatment is abstinence from alcohol, pain treatment, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation. To achieve energy-end protein requirements, oral supplementation might be beneficial. Enteral nutrition may be used when patients do not have sufficient calorie intake as in pylero-duodenal-stenosis, inflammation or prior to surgery and can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis and should only be used in case of GI-tract obstruction or as a supplement to enteral nutrition. PMID:24259957

  12. Lymphoma relapse presenting as neurolymphomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, My; Awad, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare neurological manifestation of lymphoma characterized by malignant lymphoma cells infiltrating cranial or peripheral nerve, or their roots. We present the first reported Australian case of a patient whose initial presentation of relapsed mantle cell lymphoma was NL. Our case highlights that clinical and imaging findings of NL often mimic other neuropathies, and hence presents unique challenges that may lead to delayed diagnosis and management. We emphasize the importance of considering NL in the differential diagnosis and combining imaging with other diagnostic modalities such as lumbar puncture (LP) to aid in the diagnosis of NL particularly where there is acute neurological deterioration. PMID:26889293

  13. Pathologic Diagnosis of Cutaneous Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Werner; Mitteldorf, Christina

    2015-10-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas comprise a prognostically heterogeneous group of lymphocytic skin neoplasms, which display a broad spectrum of clinical, histologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features. The histopathological examination plays an essential role and is often the starting point in the diagnostic workup of cutaneous lymphomas. In most cases, the histopathological and the phenotypic analysis alone are limited to provide a list of differential diagnoses. As a consequence of overlapping clinical, histologic, phenotypic, and genetic features among several entities of cutaneous lymphomas, the clinicopathological correlation is of utmost importance to achieve the final diagnosis. PMID:26433840

  14. Cilengitide (EMD 121974) in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  15. Localized Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhe; Tian, Rui; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease with clinical presentations that greatly mimic pancreatic cancer (PC). It is critical for clinicians to distinguish AIP from PC because their treatments and prognoses are entirely different. Typical images show characteristic features such as diffuse pancreatic swelling and strictures of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). However, AIP may present as a localized pancreatic mass, in which case it is very difficult to differentiate from PC. Here, we report a case of a 40-year-old man with computed tomography (CT) imaging studies confirming an area of low-density neoplasm in the uncinate process of the pancreas with dilation in the common biliary duct (CBD) and MPD. Increased uptake in the uncinate mass was observed by positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan, which strongly suggested PC. Further laboratory analyses showed a marked elevation of serum IgG4. Because there was not enough evidence to rule out a diagnosis of malignancy, a histopathological biopsy became the criterion standard. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided needle biopsy failed. As an alternative, a pancreaticoduodenectomy was conducted for the biopsy, and pathological analysis confirmed IgG4-related sclerotic chronic pancreatitis with moderate lymphoplasmacellular infiltration. We suggest that an accurate preoperative diagnosis for localized AIP with MPD and CBD obstructions mimicking PC is of great importance. Radiological imaging findings, particularly observations of diffused enlargement of the pancreas and delayed enhancement during the venous and portal phases, are essential for diagnosing AIP. Careful consideration should be given if serum IgG4 was taken as a special indicator for a differential diagnosis between AIP and PC. A history of IgG4-related diseases involving the biliary, lacrimal, salivary, retroperitoneal, renal, or pulmonary systems should also be highlighted. Thus, the pathology of extrapancreatic organs can be utilized as diagnostic evidence when the pathology for a pancreatic mass is not available, as in the case presented here. Furthermore, cautious use of hormone therapy is indicated for patients who cannot be ruled out as having PC. The results of future studies on localized AIP are eagerly awaited. PMID:26496272

  16. [Surgery for pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Welsch, T; Bchler, M W; Schmidt, J

    2008-12-01

    Ductal pancreatic carcinomas are currently the fourth most common fatal cancer disease with a survival rate of less than 5 % when all stages are considered. Other malignant pancreatic tumours have markedly better prognoses. Even after complete resection and adjuvant chemotherapy, the 5-year survival rate amounts to merely 20 - 25%. Besides a high resistance to chemotherapy and early lympho- and haematogenic metastases, the reason for this is often tumour extension beyond the medial and dorsal resection margins. In standardised pathological examinations cancer cells can be detected in the resection margins in about 75 % of the cases, which reflect the aggressive and infiltrative tumour growth and probably explains the high rate of local recurrence. Standard operations for curative tumour resection are the pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD) and the left pancreatic resection with splenectomy in cases of pancreas tail tumours. In high-volume centres the mortality can be reduced to under 3 % and the long-term survival improved with an increase of the resection rate. Considering surgical complications, pancreatic fistulas with a prevalence of up to 10 % play a decisive role. The technique of the pancreatic anastomosis as well as closure of the pancreatic tail thus represents major surgical challenges. In view of the high recurrence rate of pancreatic carcinomas, extended surgical procedures have been examined in numerous studies. Although infiltration of the portal vein is not a contraindication for curative resection with vascular reconstruction which gives comparable survival rates, a radical, extended lymphadenectomy does not seem reasonable on the basis the available data. In selected, individual cases, patients may benefit from neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy to down-stage an unresectable tumour with subsequent tumour resection, a metastasis resection, or a resection of a local recurrence. An R0 resection and tumour-free lymph nodes (N0 stage) are the two factors that can provide the best prognosis for the patient with a median survival of 2 years and a good quality of life. Pancreas surgery is being increasingly oriented to the evidence-based data from randomised, controlled studies. In order to achieve a further and urgently needed improvement in treatment results, one should consider, if possible, all suitable patients for enrolment in current clinical studies on neoadjuvant, surgical, or adjuvant therapy. PMID:19053009

  17. MiR-148a regulates the growth and apoptosis in pancreatic cancer by targeting CCKBR and Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Min; Zang, Wenqiao; Chen, Xudong; Wang, Yuanyuan; Li, Ping; Du, Yuwen; Zhao, Guoqiang; Li, Li

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies have revealed that miR-148a is downregulated in pancreatic cancer. Bioinformatics analysis has shown cholecystokinin-B receptor (CCKBR) and B cell lymphoma (Bcl-2) to be potential targets of miR-148a. But the pathophysiologic role of miR-148a and its relevance to the growth and development of pancreatic cancer are yet to be investigated. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms where miR-148a acts as a tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer. Our results showed significant downregulation of miR-148a in 28 pancreatic cancer tissue samples and five pancreatic cancer cell lines, compared with their non-tumor counterparts by qRT-PCR. MiR-148a was found to not only inhibit the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and AsPC-1) in vitro by MTT assay and colony formation assay, but also to promote cells apoptosis in vitro by Annexin V-FITC apoptosis detection and caspase activity assay. Using western blot and luciferase activity assay, CCKBR and Bcl-2 were identified as targets of miR-148a. Moreover, we also found that the expression of Bcl-2 lacking in 3'UTR could abrogate the pro-apoptosis function of miR-148a. These findings suggest the importance of miR-148a's targeting of CCKBR and Bcl-2 in the regulation of pancreatic cancer growth and apoptosis. PMID:23975374

  18. A positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qiao; Yang, Zhe; Wang, Weiping; Guo, Ting; Jia, Zhuqing; Ma, Kangtao; Zhou, Chunyan

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • ISL-1 is highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL. • ISL-1 accelerates the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. • c-Myc positively regulates ISL-1 expression in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells. • ISL-1 and c-Myc forms an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex only in DLBCL. • Positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 does not exist in normal pancreatic β-cell. - Abstract: Insulin enhancer binding protein-1 (ISL-1), a LIM-homeodomain transcription factor, has been reported to play essential roles in promoting adult pancreatic β-cells proliferation. Recent studies indicate that ISL-1 may also involve in the occurrence of a variety of tumors. However, whether ISL-1 has any functional effect on tumorigenesis, and what are the differences on ISL-1 function in distinct conditions, are completely unknown. In this study, we found that ISL-1 was highly expressed in human pancreatic β-cells, as well as in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), but to a much less extent in other normal tissues or tumor specimens. Further study revealed that ISL-1 promoted the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and DLBCL cells, and also accelerated the tumorigenesis of DLBCL in vivo. We also found that ISL-1 could activate c-Myc transcription not only in pancreatic β-cells but also in DLBCL cells. However, a cell-specific feedback regulation was detectable only in DLBCL cells. This auto-regulatory loop was established by the interaction of ISL-1 and c-Myc to form an ISL-1/c-Myc transcriptional complex, and synergistically to promote ISL-1 transcription through binding on the ISL-1 promoter. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive feedback regulation of ISL-1 in DLBCL but not in pancreatic β-cells, which might result in the functional diversities of ISL-1 in different physiological and pathological processes.

  19. Acute pancreatitis: Etiology and common pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-Jun; Gao, Chun-Fang; Wei, Dong; Wang, Cun; Ding, Si-Qin

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The etiology and pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have been intensively investigated for centuries worldwide. Many causes of acute pancreatitis have been discovered, but the pathogenetic theories are controversial. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct. The majority of investigators accept that the main factors for acute billiary pancreatitis are pancreatic hyperstimulation and bile-pancreatic duct obstruction which increase pancreatic duct pressure and active trypsin reflux. Acute pancreatitis occurs when intracellular protective mechanisms to prevent trypsinogen activation or reduce trypsin activity are overwhelmed. However, little is known about the other acute pancreatitis. We hypothesize that acute biliary pancreatitis and other causes of acute pancreatitis possess a common pathogenesis. Pancreatic hyperstimulation and pancreatic duct obstruction increase pancreatic duct pressure, active trypsin reflux, and subsequent unregulated activation of trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells. Enzyme activation within the pancreas leads to auto-digestion of the gland and local inflammation. Once the hypothesis is confirmed, traditional therapeutic strategies against acute pancreatitis may be improved. Decompression of pancreatic duct pressure should be advocated in the treatment of acute pancreatitits which may greatly improve its outcome. PMID:19322914

  20. Management of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Giger, Urs; Stanga, Zeno; DeLegge, Mark H

    2004-02-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disorder that results in permanent impairment of the glandular anatomy of the pancreas with or without functional abnormalities. The pathogenesis of CP is usually unclear, except in the case of alcohol-induced disease. The most common symptoms of CP are abdominal pain, diarrhea, and weight loss often requiring recurring hospitalization. Over time, pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction may develop as the disease progresses, and a variety of complications can occur. Among the possible complications are nutrient malabsorption and diabetes mellitus. The treatment of CP is difficult and challenging for every physician. Relieving pain is the first step in treating CP. This symptom needs to be controlled, often with narcotics, which can cause dependence. Diarrhea usually indicates the presence of steatorrhea, which is often treated with a high-calorie, high-protein, and low-fat diet to minimize symptoms of the underlying disease and to promote weight retention or gain. Pancreatic replacement therapy is used to combat maldigestion and malabsorption. Patients with diabetes may need insulin therapy for glycemic control. The use of parenteral nutrition for bowel rest is a standard approach in patients with symptomatic CP. The use of jejunal enteral feeding recently has been evaluated for efficacy in CP patients. The role of pancreatic endotherapy in the management of CP is evolving. Several reports have suggested that endoscopic therapy aimed at decompressing the obstructed pancreatic duct can be associated with pain relief in some patients. Surgery should be considered in patients who fail medical therapy. PMID:16215095

  1. Pancreatitis and triaditis in cats: causes and treatment.

    PubMed

    Simpson, K W

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatitis in cats is frequently accompanied by concurrent disease in other organ systems. Co-morbidities include hepatic lipidosis, inflammatory liver disease, bile duct obstruction, diabetes mellitus, inflammatory bowel disease, vitamin deficiency (B12/cobalamin, folate or K), intestinal lymphoma, nephritis, pulmonary thromboembolism and pleural and peritoneal effusions. "Triaditis" is the term used to describe concurrent inflammation of the pancreas, liver and small intestines. Triaditis has been reported in 50 to 56% of cats diagnosed with pancreatitis and 32 to 50% of those with cholangitis/inflammatory liver disease. A definitive diagnosis of triaditis is based on the histopathological evaluation of each organ. However, the specific conditions of each organ that constitute a diagnosis of triaditis remains to be defined. While the aetiopathogenesis of pancreatitis and its relationship to inflammation in other organ systems is unclear, preliminary studies point to a heterogeneous group of conditions with differential involvement of host inflammatory and immune responses and enteric bacteria. Comprehensive, prospective studies that simultaneously evaluate the presence of predefined clinical, clinicopathological and histopathological abnormalities, coupled with high-resolution evaluation of pancreaticobiliary morphology, immunological profiling and screening for bacterial colonisation are required to advance diagnosis and therapy. PMID:25586805

  2. Delayed internal pancreatic fistula with pancreatic pleural effusion postsplenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shu-Guang; Chen, Zhe-Yu; Yan, Lu-Nan; Zeng, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of pancreatic pleural effusion, secondary to an internal pancreatic fistula, is a rare clinical syndrome and diagnosis is often missed. The key to the diagnosis is a dramatically elevated pleural fluid amylase. This pancreatic pleural effusion is also called a pancreatic pleural fistula. It is characterized by profuse pleural fluid and has a tendency to recur. Here we report a case of delayed internal pancreatic fistula with pancreatic pleural effusion emerging after splenectomy. From the treatment of this case, we conclude that the symptoms and signs of a subphrenic effusion are often obscure; abdominal computed tomography may be required to look for occult, intra-abdominal infection; and active conservative treatment should be carried out in the early period of this complication to reduce the need for endoscopy or surgery. PMID:20845520

  3. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  4. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E.; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L.; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E.; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F.; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  5. Patient Derived Cancer Cell Lines in Identifying Molecular Changes in Patients With Previously Untreated Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Gemcitabine Hydrochloride-Based Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-20

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  6. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cutaneous Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Angela M; Hurley, M Yadira

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are non-Hodgkin lymphomas, which are broadly divided into cutaneous T-cell lymphomas and cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. These classifications include numerous distinct entities, all with varying clinical presentations and disease courses. Herein, we will review the cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, including Mycosis Fungoides, Szary syndrome, CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, as well as other less common entities. Cutaneous B-cell lymphomas will also be discussed, including primary cutaneous marginal zoned lymphoma, cutaneous follicle-center lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, leg type, as well as other less common entities. Accurate and early diagnosis is key, as the treatment and prognosis varies significantly between conditions. PMID:26455060

  7. Inflammatory pancreatic masses: problems in differentiating focal pancreatitis from carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, C.C.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.; Mueller, P.R.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The authors studied 19 patients with focal inflammatory masses of the pancreas over an 18-month period. In 13 cases, transhepatic cholangiography and/or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were unsuccessful in differentiating pancreatitis from carcinoma. Eighteen patients had a history of alcohol abuse, and 12 had had pancreatitis previously. Pre-existing glandular injury appears to be a prerequisite to formation of focal inflammatory pancreatic masses.

  8. Rare gastrointestinal lymphomas: The endoscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Calogero; Bonanno, Giacomo; Giulietti, Giorgio; Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Spina, Paolo; Coppolino, Francesco; Cunsolo, Rosario; Raimondo, Francesco Di

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent up to 10% of gastrointestinal malignancies and about one third of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The most prominent histologies are mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the gastrointestinal tract can be the site of rarer lymphoma subtypes as a primary or secondary localization. Due to their rarity and the multifaceted histology, an endoscopic classification has not been validated yet. This review aims to analyze the endoscopic presentation of rare gastrointestinal lymphomas from disease diagnosis to follow-up, according to the involved site and lymphoma subtype. Existing, new and emerging endoscopic technologies have been examined. In particular, we investigated the diagnostic, prognostic and follow-up endoscopic features of T-cell and natural killer lymphomas, lymphomatous polyposis and mantle cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, plasma cell related disease, gastrointestinal lymphomas in immunodeficiency and Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract. Contrarily to more frequent gastrointestinal lymphomas, data about rare lymphomas are mostly extracted from case series and case reports. Due to the data paucity, a synergism between gastroenterologists and hematologists is required in order to better manage the disease. Indeed, clinical and prognostic features are different from nodal and extranodal or the bone marrow (in case of plasma cell disease) counterpart. Therefore, the approach should be based on the knowledge of the peculiar behavior and natural history of disease. PMID:26265987

  9. MS-275 and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  10. Isolated gastric variceal bleeding caused by splenic lymphoma-associated splenic vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bao-Chung; Wang, Hong-Hau; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Shih, Yu-Lueng; Chang, Wei-Kuo; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan

    2013-10-28

    Isolated gastric varices (IGV) can occur in patients with left-sided portal hypertension resulting from splenic vein occlusion caused by thrombosis or stenosis. In left-sided portal hypertension, blood flows retrogradely through the short and posterior gastric veins and the gastroepiploic veins, leading to the formation of an IGV. The most common causes of splenic vein occlusion are pancreatic diseases, such as pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis, or a pseudocyst. However, various other cancers, such as colon, gastric, or renal cancers, have also been known to cause splenic vein occlusion. Our patient presented with a rare case of IGV bleeding induced by splenic lymphoma-associated splenic vein occlusion. Splenectomy, splenic artery embolization, and stenting of the splenic vein are the current treatment choices. Chemotherapy, however, is an alternative effective treatment for splenic vein occlusion caused by chemotherapy-sensitive tumors. Our patient responded well to chemotherapy with a cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, oncovin, and prednisolone regimen, and the splenic vein occlusion resolved after the lymphoma regressed. PMID:24187474

  11. Diagnosis and management of lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Brian L

    2006-07-01

    The 42nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology was held in Atlanta, GA, June 2-6, 2006. Some of the presentations pertaining to the diagnosis and management of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are summarized in this review. Principal issues in indolent lymphoma included the role of maintenance therapy, novel agents such as bendamustine and pixantrone, and updates of predictive factors. Studies in aggressive lymphomas included standard regimens, such as rituximab-based chemotherapy and radioimmunotherapy, as well as novel salvage regimens. Advances in the management of mantle cell lymphoma with radioimmunotherapy, hyper-CVAD (cyclophosphamide/vincristine/doxorubicin/dexamethasone) and emerging agents, such as bortezomib and temsirolimus, were presented. PMID:16879767

  12. Role of pancreatic stellate cells in chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    McCarroll, Joshua A.; Naim, Stephanie; Sharbeen, George; Russia, Nelson; Lee, Julia; Kavallaris, Maria; Goldstein, David; Phillips, Phoebe A.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumor volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment following activation of PSCs, tumor progression, and chemoresistance is enhanced. This review will discuss how PSCs contribute to chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24782785

  13. Molecular mechanisms of pancreatic stone formation in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Shigeru B H; Azuma, Sakiko; Yoshikawa, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Akiko; Kyokane, Kazuhiro; Ko, Minoru S H; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory disease in which the pancreatic secretory parenchyma is destroyed and replaced by fibrosis. The presence of intraductal pancreatic stone(s) is important for the diagnosis of CP; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of pancreatic stone formation in CP were left largely unknown. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel expressed in the apical plasma membrane of pancreatic duct cells and plays a central role in [Formula: see text] secretion. In previous studies, we have found that CFTR is largely mislocalized to the cytoplasm of pancreatic duct cells in all forms of CP and corticosteroids normalizes the localization of CFTR to the proper apical membrane at least in autoimmune pancreatitis. From these observations, we could conclude that the mislocalization of CFTR is a cause of protein plug formation in CP, subsequently resulting in pancreatic stone formation. Considering our observation that the mislocalization of CFTR also occurs in alcoholic or idiopathic CP, it is very likely that these pathological conditions can also be treated by corticosteroids, thereby preventing pancreatic stone formation in these patients. Further studies are definitely required to clarify these fundamental issues. PMID:23133422

  14. Endoscopic Treatment of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis and Smoldering Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Das, Rohit; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is a challenging condition that can lead to chronic pancreatitis and long-term morbidity. Etiology-based treatment can potentially have an impact on the natural history of RAP and its progression to chronic pancreatitis. In cases of divisum-associated RAP and idiopathic RAP, several studies have been performed to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic therapy in alleviation of symptoms and frequency of AP events. This review discusses the literature available on these topic as well as touching on the role of endoscopic therapy in smoldering acute pancreatitis. PMID:26431601

  15. Role of pancreatic stellate cells in chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, Joshua A; Naim, Stephanie; Sharbeen, George; Russia, Nelson; Lee, Julia; Kavallaris, Maria; Goldstein, David; Phillips, Phoebe A

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumor volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment following activation of PSCs, tumor progression, and chemoresistance is enhanced. This review will discuss how PSCs contribute to chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24782785

  16. Groove pancreatitis and pancreatic heterotopia in the minor duodenal papilla.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Denis; Vibert, Eric; Yzet, Thierry; Geslin, Guillaume; Bartoli, Eric; Manaouil, David; Delcenserie, Richard; Brevet, Marie; Dupas, Jean-Louis; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2005-05-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of segmental chronic pancreatitis that involves the anatomic space between the head of the pancreas, the duodenum, and the common bile duct. We report 2 cases of groove pancreatitis with pancreatic heterotopia in the minor papilla. Patients were a 44-year-old woman and a 47-year-old man. Both had a past history of alcohol consumption and presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, and weight loss caused by duodenal stenosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed thickening of the duodenal wall and enlargement of the pancreatic head in both patients. In 1 patient, ultrasound endoscopy showed a dilated duct in the head of the pancreas. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed to rule out pancreatic adenocarcinoma and because of the severity of the symptoms. In both cases, gross and microscopic examinations showed fibrous scar of the groove area. The Santorini duct was dilated and contained protein plugs in both patients, with abscesses in 1 of them. In both cases, there were microscopic foci of heterotopic pancreas with mild fibrosis in the wall of the minor papilla. Groove pancreatitis is often diagnosed in middle-aged alcoholic men presenting with clinical symptoms caused by duodenal stenosis. The pathogenesis of this rare entity could be because of disturbance of the pancreatic secretion through the minor papilla. Pancreatitis in heterotopic pancreas located in the minor papilla and chronic consumption of alcohol seem to be important pathogenic factors. PMID:15841034

  17. Follicular pancreatitis: a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis-an additional mimic of pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajib K; Xie, Bill H; Patton, Kurt T; Lisovsky, Mikhail; Burks, Eric; Behrman, Stephen W; Klimstra, David; Deshpande, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Follicular pancreatitis is a recently described variant of chronic pancreatitis characterized clinically by the formation of a discrete pancreatic mass and histologically by the presence of florid lymphoid aggregates with reactive germinal centers. Our aim was to study the clinical and histologic features of follicular pancreatitis, as well as to critically examine potential overlap with autoimmune pancreatitis. Immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2, CD21, ? and ? light chains as well as IgG4 and IgG were performed. We found a total of 6 patients (male-female ratio, 2:1; mean age, 57 years) who fulfilled the diagnosis of follicular pancreatitis in our institutions. Four had an incidental diagnosis, while two presented with abdominal pain, fatigue, and elevated liver enzymes. On imaging, 3 patients had a discrete solid mass, whereas 2 cases showed a dilated main pancreatic duct, mimicking an intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasm on imaging. One patient had a lesion in the intra-pancreatic portion of the common bile duct. On histopathology, all cases showed numerous lymphoid follicles with Bcl-2-negative germinal centers either in a periductal or in a more diffuse (periductal and intra-parenchymal) fashion, but without attendant storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, or granulocytic epithelial lesions. IgG4-to-IgG ratio was <40% in 5 cases. A comparison cohort revealed germinal centers in 25% of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis and 2% of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis cases, but none were periductal in location. In conclusion, follicular pancreatitis, an under-recognized mimic of pancreatic neoplasms is characterized by intrapancreatic lymphoid follicles with reactive germinal centers. PMID:26563969

  18. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Gonçalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22655256

  19. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: epidemiology and genetics.

    PubMed Central

    Flanders, T Y; Foulkes, W D

    1996-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an important cause of death from cancer throughout the developed world. There are few established environmental risk factors, but a previous history of pancreatitis and exposure to tobacco and salted food appear to be the most important. A family history of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is not common in patients with this disease, but recent research has shown that pancreatic adenocarcinoma can be a feature of cancer susceptibility syndromes associated with germline mutations in p16, BRCA1, BRCA2, and APC. This highlights the need for a full family history in apparently sporadic cases. Somatic mutations in p16, BRCA2, and APC have also been reported in pancreatic cancer; however, K-RAS mutations appear to be the commonest oncogenic alteration. Recent advances in our understanding of the basis of hereditary cancer syndromes may be applicable to the diagnosis, treatment, and possibly prevention of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in the future. PMID:8950667

  20. Molecular Signatures of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seung-Mo; Park, Jason Y.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Context The introduction of genome- and epigenome-wide screening techniques has dramatically improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of pancreatic cancer. There are now 3 recognized histologic precursors of pancreatic cancer: pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, and mucinous cystic neoplasm. Each of these precursor lesions is associated with specific molecular alterations. Objective To understand the molecular characteristics of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesions. Data Sources PubMed (US National Library of Medicine). Conclusions In this review, we briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of pancreatic cancer. In addition, we characterize these molecular alterations in the context of the histologic subtypes of pancreatic cancer. PMID:21631264

  1. Follicular colonization in thyroid lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Isaacson, P. G.; Androulakis-Papachristou, A.; Diss, T. C.; Pan, L.; Wright, D. H.

    1992-01-01

    The presence of neoplastic (light chain restricted) B-cell follicles in low-grade B-cell gastrointestinal (GI) lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) has been explained on the basis of specific colonization of reactive follicles by centrocyte-like (CCL) cells. Low-grade B-cell thyroid lymphomas have been included in the category of MALT lymphoma, but the frequent presence of a follicular pattern in these tumors has contributed to the view that they are follicle center cell (FCC) tumors. We have reviewed the histology and investigated the phenotype and genotype of nine cases of primary low-grade B-cell lymphoma of the thyroid, all of which were distinguished by a predominantly follicular pattern. All cases also demonstrated features of MALT lymphoma, including CCL cells and lymphoepithelial lesions. The appearances and immunohistology of the follicles were those of follicular colonization as described in GI MALT lymphoma rather than FCC follicular lymphoma. The predominant pattern of follicular colonization was replacement of the follicle center by slightly enlarged CCL cells that showed a strikingly high proliferation rate. No evidence of the t(14;18) translocation was found in any case, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on DNA extracted from fresh (n = 1) or paraffin-embedded (n = 9) tissue. These findings argue against a FCC lineage for primary thyroid lymphomas and support their inclusion in the MALT category. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:1632470

  2. Epigenetic dysregulation in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Araf, Shamzah; Okosun, Jessica; Koniali, Lola; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Heward, James

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of next-generation sequencing technologies has led to a remarkable shift in our understanding of the genetic landscape of follicular lymphoma. While the disease has been synonymous with the t(14;18), the prevalence of alterations in genes that regulate the epigenome has been established as a pivotal hallmark of these lymphomas. Giant strides are being made in unraveling the biological consequences of these alterations in tumorigenesis opening up new opportunities for directed therapies. PMID:26698557

  3. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Gemcitabine and Bendamustine in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-20

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  5. Combination Chemotherapy, Rituximab, and Ixazomib Citrate in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-19

    Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; MYC Gene Mutation; Plasmablastic Lymphoma

  6. A Phase II Trial of Panobinostat and Lenalidomide in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-26

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  7. Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-21

    Childhood Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  8. Burkitt Lymphoma: beyond discoveries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    First described in 1958 in Uganda, Burkitt lymphoma (BL) attracted interest worldwide following reports of its uneven geographic distribution and rapidly fatal clinical course. Both suggested infectious etiology and curability. Seminal discoveries followed in quick succession. Viral etiology due to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was confirmed. Chromosomal translocations, involving cellular MYC, a protooncogene, were discovered, shown to be a hallmark of BL, and central to the genetic basis of cancer. Cure of BL using combination chemotherapy was demonstrated. Unfortunately, civil disturbance in Africa disrupted BL research and blunted its impact on education and oncology care in Africa. Important questions went unanswered. The risk of BL due to malaria or EBV was not quantified. Efforts to answer whether BL could be prevented by preventing malaria or early EBV infection were abandoned. The mechanism of malaria in BL is unknown. In Africa, BL remains mostly fatal and diagnosis is still made clinically. Unprecedented advances in molecular, genomics and proteomic technologies, promising to unlock mysteries of cancers, have re-awakened interest in BL. With return of stability to Africa, the unanswered questions about BL are re-attracting global interest. This interest now includes exploiting the knowledge gained about genetics, proteomics, and bioinformatics to enable the development of targeted less toxic treatment for BL; and simpler methods to diagnose BL with high accuracy and sensitivity. The articles in the Burkitt Lymphoma (BL): Beyond Discoveries in Infectious Agents and Cancer highlight BL as priority. Authors explore etiology, pathology, pathogenesis of BL, and whether knowledge gained in the studies of BL can catalyze sustainable cancer services in one of the worlds poorest served regions. PMID:24079372

  9. Molecular Pathogenesis of MALT Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Troppan, Katharina; Wenzl, Kerstin; Neumeister, Peter; Deutsch, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 8% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas are extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), also known as MALT lymphoma, which was first described in 1983 by Isaacson and Wright. MALT lymphomas arise at a wide range of different extranodal sites, with the highest frequency in the stomach, followed by lung, ocular adnexa, and thyroid, and with a low percentage in the small intestine. Interestingly, at least 3 different, apparently site-specific, chromosomal translocations and missense and frameshift mutations, all pathway-related genes affecting the NF-κB signal, have been implicated in the development and progression of MALT lymphoma. However, these genetic abnormalities alone are not sufficient for malignant transformation. There is now increasing evidence suggesting that the oncogenic product of translocation cooperates with immunological stimulation in oncogenesis, that is, the association with chronic bacterial infection or autoaggressive process. This review mainly discusses MALT lymphomas in terms of their genetic aberration and association with chronic infections and summarizes recent advances in their molecular pathogenesis. PMID:25922601

  10. MORAb-004 in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  11. Early detection of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Victoria M; Ahuja, Nita

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a low-incident but highly mortal disease. It accounts for only 3% of estimated new cancer cases each year but is currently the fourth common cause of cancer mortality. By 2030, it is expected to be the 2(nd) leading cause of cancer death. There is a clear need to diagnose and classify pancreatic cancer at earlier stages in order to give patients the best chance at a definitive cure through surgery. Three precursor lesions that distinctly lead to pancreatic adenocarcinoma have been identified, and we have increasing understanding the non-genetic and genetic risk factors for the disease. With increased understanding about the risk factors, the familial patters, and associated accumulation of genetic mutations involved in pancreatic cancer, we know that there are mutations that occur early in the development of pancreatic cancer and that improved genetic risk-based strategies in screening for pancreatic cancer may be possible and successful at saving or prolonging lives. The remaining challenge is that current standards for diagnosing pancreatic cancer remain too invasive and too costly for widespread screening for pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the promises of noninvasive methods of detection such as blood, saliva, and stool remain underdeveloped or lack robust testing. However, significant progress has been made, and we are drawing closer to a strategy for the screening and early detection of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26361402

  12. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  13. Early detection of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Nita

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a low-incident but highly mortal disease. It accounts for only 3% of estimated new cancer cases each year but is currently the fourth common cause of cancer mortality. By 2030, it is expected to be the 2nd leading cause of cancer death. There is a clear need to diagnose and classify pancreatic cancer at earlier stages in order to give patients the best chance at a definitive cure through surgery. Three precursor lesions that distinctly lead to pancreatic adenocarcinoma have been identified, and we have increasing understanding the non-genetic and genetic risk factors for the disease. With increased understanding about the risk factors, the familial patters, and associated accumulation of genetic mutations involved in pancreatic cancer, we know that there are mutations that occur early in the development of pancreatic cancer and that improved genetic risk-based strategies in screening for pancreatic cancer may be possible and successful at saving or prolonging lives. The remaining challenge is that current standards for diagnosing pancreatic cancer remain too invasive and too costly for widespread screening for pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the promises of noninvasive methods of detection such as blood, saliva, and stool remain underdeveloped or lack robust testing. However, significant progress has been made, and we are drawing closer to a strategy for the screening and early detection of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26361402

  14. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. PMID:25294271

  15. Chemoprevention strategies for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stan, Silvia D.; Singh, Shivendra V.; Brand, Randall E.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis and it is often diagnosed at advanced stages, which makes it very difficult to treat. The low survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer points toward an increased need for novel therapeutic and chemopreventive strategies and early detection. Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Both synthetic as well as natural, diet-derived bioactive compounds have been evaluated as pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents and have been shown to have various degrees of efficacy in cellular and in vivo animal models. Some chemopreventive agents (for example curcumin, resveratrol, B-DIM) have also been reported to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic drugs (for example gemcitabine or erlotinib), which suggests the potential use of chemopreventive agents as potentiators of standard chemotherapy. Very few clinical trials with pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents have been completed and some are in early phases. Further development of pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents may prove to be tremendously valuable for individuals at high-risk of developing pancreatic cancer and patients who present with premalignant lesions. This Review discusses the current state of the pancreatic cancer chemoprevention field and highlights the challenges ahead. PMID:20440279

  16. Acute pancreatitis secondary to ifosfamide.

    PubMed

    Gerson, R; Serrano, A; Villalobos, A; Sternbach, G L; Varon, J

    1997-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in cancer patients can be secondary to the malignant process itself. It is also a rare complication of antineoplastic agent administration. Ifosfamide is an effective drug in the treatment of several tumors and has known neurologic, renal, and hematologic toxicities. There is only one recent report in the literature of pancreatitis associated with ifosfamide. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman with small cell bronchogenic carcinoma without pancreatic metastases who developed acute pancreatitis after ifosfamide administration. PMID:9348053

  17. Agatolimod Sodium, Rituximab, and Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-04

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  18. Antibiosis of Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Alexander; Erhart, Wiebke; Schafmayer, Clemens; Held, Hanns-Christoph; Hampe, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Necrotizing pancreatitis is a life-threatening presentation of acute pancreatitis. The mortality of 20-80% initially depends on the persistence of organ failure and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and, in the later course of the disease, on secondary infection of the necrosis. The questions whether prophylactic antibiotics aiming to prevent this infection should be administered and which antibiotic is the best to use, as well as the problem of fungal infection under antibiotic treatment are still intriguing and insufficiently solved. Methods A search of the literature using PubMed was carried out, supplemented by a review of the programmes of the Digestive Disease Week (DDW) and the United European Gastroenterology Week (UEGW). Results Despite the widely practised prophylactic antibiotic administration in severe pancreatitis, no evidence for the benefit of this strategy exists. One of the drawbacks might be a tendency for disastrous fungal infection under prophylactic antibiotics. Bacterial translocation from the gut in the second week after the onset of symptoms is the major source for infection of pancreatic necrosis and provides a clear indication for antibiotic treatment. However, routine fine-needle aspiration for a calculated antibiotic therapy cannot be recommended, and all other tests offer only indirect signs. Important factors such as enteral versus parenteral feeding and the method of necrosectomy are mostly neglected in the trials but seem to be essential for the outcome of the patient. Conclusions Even though most meta-analyses including the newer double-blind, placebo-controlled trials on prophylactic antibiotics showed no beneficial effects in the prevention of infection of necrosis and/or outcome of the patients, this strategy is still widely used in clinical routine. Since nearly all trials published so far show systematic problems (i.e. inaccurate definition of the severity of the disease, poor statistical testing, and neglect of differences in the route of nutrition), there is a need for randomized controlled prospective trials with exact definitions of the disease. PMID:26286761

  19. Everolimus and Octreotide Acetate With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  20. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-18

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  1. Immunohistochemistry of Pancreatic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhwinder; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Baine, Michael J.; Kumar, Sushil; Batra, Surinder K.

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a valuable tool to visualize the distribution and localization of specific cellular components within morphologically preserved tissue sections or cell preparations. It combines the histologic morphology of tissues for detecting the actual antigen distribution, specificity of antibodyantigen interaction for optimal detection, and sensitivity of immunochemical methods for assessing the amount of antigen in tissues. It is routinely used clinically to diagnose type (benign or malignant), stage, and grade of cancer using specific tumor markers. The application of IHC ranges from disease diagnosis and prognosis to drug development and analysis of the pathobiological roles of various molecular players during disease development. Due to better availability of highly specific antibodies and optimal methodologies for performing immunohistochemical studies, IHC is being used at an expanding rate to understand pancreatic tumor biology as well as to study the fate of various molecular markers during the initiation, progression, and metastasis of pancreatic neoplasia. Herein, we describe the detailed protocol for IHC analyses of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia in tissues and fine needle aspirates from both human and mouse samples. PMID:23359148

  2. Nutrition in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Abou-Assi, S; O'Keefe, S J

    2001-03-01

    The majority of patients (80%) admitted with acute pancreatitis recovers after a few days of bowel rest and intravenous fluids. However, some cases progress to a fulminant disease complicated by a severe systemic inflammatory response and multiple organ failure, a condition in which mortality is related to the degree of negative nitrogen balance. The goal of nutrition support in this situation is to cover the increased metabolic demands without stimulating pancreatic secretion and exacerbating the "autodigestion" that characterizes the condition. Although human and animal studies have shown conflicting results regarding the effect of composition and location of feeding on pancreatic enzyme secretion, there is consensus that total parenteral nutrition (TPN), given at moderate infusion rates, does not significantly stimulate secretion in humans and that enteral diets stimulate enzyme secretion unless delivered below the jejunum. Consequently, until recently TPN has been the standard of therapy. The fact that the cost and complications of TPN can often outweigh its benefits (catheter sepsis, hyperglycemia) has led to a series of recent controlled clinical trials of modified enteral diets in which the diet is delivered by nasojejunal tube. Results have demonstrated that enteral nutrition, with either elemental or polymeric formulas, was cheaper, safer, and at the same time more effective in reducing the systemic inflammatory response. The pathophysiologic explanation for these observations needs further investigation. PMID:11246344

  3. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  4. Rituxan/Bendamustine/PCI-32765 in Relapsed DLBCL, MCL, or Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-22

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  5. Memory-enriched CAR-T Cells Immunotherapy for B Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-11

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  6. Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  7. Pancreatic cancer: Classifying pancreatic cancer using gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Ayars, Michael; Goggins, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Despite some advances in our understanding of the molecular characteristics of pancreatic cancer, much more progress is needed. In a new study, RNA profiling of pancreatic cancers was used to identify gene signatures of tumour cells and stromal cells to help predict patient outcomes. PMID:26484444

  8. Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arun D; Lewis, Hilel; Schachat, Andrew P

    2005-03-01

    This article discusses primary lymphoma of the central nervous system, which is a variant of extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that arises from specific sites such as the brain, spinal cord, meninges, or eyes. PMID:15763205

  9. Oncogenic Mechanisms in Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Roland; Ceribelli, Michele; Pittaluga, Stefania; Wright, George; Staudt, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a germinal center B-cell-derived cancer that was instrumental in the identification of MYC as an important human oncogene more than three decades ago. Recently, new genomics technologies have uncovered several additional oncogenic mechanisms that cooperate with MYC to create this highly aggressive cancer. The transcription factor TCF-3 is central to Burkitt lymphoma pathogenesis. TCF-3 is rendered constitutively active in Burkitt lymphoma by two related mechanisms: (1) somatic mutations that inactivate its negative regulator ID3, and (2) somatic mutations in TCF-3 that block the ability of ID3 to bind and interfere with its activity as a transcription factor. TCF-3 is also a master regulator of normal germinal center B-cell differentiation. Within the germinal center, TCF-3 up-regulates genes that are characteristically expressed in the rapidly dividing centroblasts, the putative cell of origin for Burkitt lymphoma, while repressing genes expressed in the less proliferative centrocytes. TCF-3 promotes antigen-independent (tonic) B-cell-receptor signaling in Burkitt lymphoma by transactivating immunoglobulin heavy- and light-chain genes while repressing PTPN6, which encodes the phosphatase SHP-1, a negative regulator of B-cell-receptor signaling. Tonic B-cell-receptor signaling sustains Burkitt lymphoma survival by engaging the PI3 kinase pathway. In addition, TCF-3 promotes cell-cycle progression by transactivating CCND3, encoding a D-type cyclin that regulates the G1S phase transition. Additionally, CCND3 accumulates oncogenic mutations that stabilize cyclin D3 protein expression and drive proliferation. These new insights into Burkitt lymphoma pathogenesis suggest new therapeutic strategies, which are sorely needed in developing regions of the world where this cancer is endemic. PMID:24492847

  10. Pancreatic polypepetide inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via a cholinergic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, G.; Louie, D.S.; Owyang, C. )

    1987-11-01

    In rat pancreatic slices, rat pancreatic polypeptide (PP) or C-terminal hexapeptide of PP (PP-(31-36)) inhibited potassium-stimulated amylase release in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was unaffected by addition of hexamethonium but blocked by atropine. In contrast, PP-(31-36) did not have any effect on acetylcholine- or cholecystokinin octapeptide-stimulated amylase release. In addition, when pancreatic slices were incubated with ({sup 3}H)choline, PP-(31-36) inhibited the potassium-evoked release of synthesized ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of PP was unaffected by adrenergic, dopaminergic, or opioid receptor antagonists. Thus PP inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine release. This newly identified pathway provides a novel mechanism for hormonal inhibition of pancreatic enzyme secretion via modulation of the classic neurotransmitter function.

  11. Pancreatic herniation: a rare cause of acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prashant; Turp, Matthew; Fellows, Sarah; Ellis, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common and potentially fatal condition, with several well-known causes including gallstones, excessive alcohol consumption and specific medications. We report a case of an 89-year-old man presenting with acute pancreatitis, which we believe to be secondary to a diaphragmatic herniation of the pancreas. This extremely rare anatomical abnormality can be found incidentally in the asymptomatic patient or may present with a variety of acute symptoms. However, there have been only isolated reports of these cases presenting as acute pancreatitis. While the majority of acute pancreatitis cases can be explained by common causes, it is important that clinicians be aware of and should consider investigating for other more unusual possibilities, such as pancreatic herniation, before labelling an episode as idiopathic. PMID:24343805

  12. Genetically Engineered Lymphocytes, Cyclophosphamide, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma or Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma or Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Intraocular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-22

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Central Nervous System; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Retinal Lymphoma

  14. The emerging role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided core biopsy for the evaluation of solid pancreatic masses.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, M; Koduru, P; Lanke, G; Bruno, M; Maitra, A; Giovannini, M

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal cancer with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection is the only curative treatment but only 20% are eligible for resection at the time of diagnosis. Early detection of cancer is of paramount importance in the management. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred modality for obtaining tissue diagnosis of pancreatic masses. However, the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA may be limited by several factors like availability of onsite cytopathology, adequacy of tissue core for histology, location of the mass, presence of underlying chronic pancreatitis, and experience of the endoscopist. Modern oncology is focusing on personalizing treatment based on tissue analysis of genetic aberrations and molecular biomarkers which are now available. Core tissue also aids in the diagnosis of disease entities like lymphoma, metastatic tumors, neuroendocrine tumors and autoimmune pancreatitis whose diagnosis rely on preserved tissue architecture and immunohistochemistry. Making accurate diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses is critical to avoid unnecessary resections in patients with benign lesions like focal lesions of chronic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis which mimic cancer. To overcome the limitations of FNA and to obtain adequate core tissue, a Tru-Cut biopsy needle was developed which met with variable success due to stiffness, cumbersome operation and technical failure using it in the duodenum/pancreatic head. More recently fine needle biopsy needles, with reverse bevel technology have become available in different sizes (19, 22, 25-gauge). The aim of this article was to review the emerging role of core biopsy needles in acquiring tissue in solid pancreatic masses and discuss its potential role in personalized medicine. PMID:25675155

  15. Alisertib and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-27

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  16. Groove Pancreatitis: A Rare form of Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Bharivi; Rzouq, Fadi; Saligram, Shreyas; Nawabi, Atta; Nicola, Marian; Dennis, Katie; Ernst, Carly; Abbaszadeh, Ali; Bonino, John; Olyaee, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the groove of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are the preferred imaging modalities. The treatment of choice is conservative although surgical intervention can sometimes be required. Case Report: A 57-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B presented with 4 days of epigastric pain. Abdominal exam revealed absent bowel sounds and epigastric tenderness. He had a creatinine of 1.72 mg/dL, potassium of 2.9 mmol/L, and a normal lipase level of 86 U/L. Liver enzymes and total bilirubin were normal. Computed tomography abdomen showed high-grade obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum without any obvious mass. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a mass at the duodenal bulb causing luminal narrowing, with biopsies negative for malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the region of the pancreatic head and descending duodenum. EUS revealed a 3 cm mass in the region of pancreatic head with irregular borders and no vascular invasion. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) was nondiagnostic. The patient then underwent a Whipple's procedure. Pathology of these specimens was negative for malignancy but was consistent with para-duodenal or groove pancreatitis. Conclusion: The low incidence of groove pancreatitis is partly due to lack of familiarity with the disease. Groove pancreatitis should be considered in the differential for patients presenting with pancreatic head lesions and no cholestatic jaundice, especially when a duodenal obstruction is present, and neither duodenal biopsies nor pancreatic head FNA confirm adenocarcinoma. PMID:26713302

  17. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Casari, Ilaria; Falasca, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26610570

  18. Pancreatic involvement in Legionella pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Franchini, S; Marinosci, A; Ferrante, L; Sabbadini, M G; Tresoldi, M; Dagna, L

    2015-06-01

    Legionella-associated pancreatitis has been rarely reported. Since this condition is very rarely suspected and investigated in patients with Legionella pneumonia, its incidence is probably underestimated. Here we report a case of Legionella pneumonia-associated pancreatitis and review the relevant related literature. PMID:25575464

  19. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Casari, Ilaria; Falasca, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26610570

  20. Myocardial function in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, K; Ramirez-Schon, G; Shah, P M; Agarwal, N; Delguercio, L R; Reynolds, B M

    1981-01-01

    Fifteen patients with acute pancreatitis had 68 physiologic cardiopulmonary assessments performed, and they were compared with 61 performed on normal postoperative patients, and 113 on 41 cirrhotics. It was found that the patients with pancreatitis have an elevated cardiac index (CI), which is not due to the hyperdynamic hemodynamic state found in cirrhotics. In spite of this, the Sarnoff curves demonstrated that pancreatitis was accompanied by a myocardial depression p less than 0.03, not found in hyperdynamic cirrhotics. Cirrhotics are unable to increase their oxygen consumption in response to an increase in CI, as do normal patients or those with acute pancreatitis. In cirrhotics the hemodynamic lesion occurs at the capillary level with the opening of arteriovenous shunts which rob the tissues of their nutritive blood supply, while the patient with acute pancreatitis has a primary myocardial depression and his peripheral vasculature reacts like that of a normal person. PMID:7247538

  1. Familial pancreatic cancer: genetic advances.

    PubMed

    Rustgi, Anil K

    2014-01-01

    Beset by poor prognosis, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is classified as familial or sporadic. This review elaborates on the known genetic syndromes that underlie familial pancreatic cancer, where there are opportunities for genetic counseling and testing as well as clinical monitoring of at-risk patients. Such subsets of familial pancreatic cancer involve germline cationic trypsinogen or PRSS1 mutations (hereditary pancreatitis), BRCA2 mutations (usually in association with hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome), CDKN2 mutations (familial atypical mole and multiple melanoma), or DNA repair gene mutations (e.g., ATM and PALB2, apart from those in BRCA2). However, the vast majority of familial pancreatic cancer cases have yet to have their genetic underpinnings elucidated, waiting in part for the results of deep sequencing efforts. PMID:24395243

  2. Blood tests for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Basnayake, Chamara; Ratnam, Dilip

    2015-01-01

    Summary The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis requires the presence of at least two of the three diagnostic criteria – characteristic abdominal pain, elevated serum amylase or lipase, and radiological evidence of pancreatitis. Serum concentrations of amylase and lipase rise within hours of the pancreatic injury. A threshold concentration 2–4 times the upper limit of normal is recommended for diagnosis. Serum lipase is now the preferred test due to its improved sensitivity, particularly in alcohol-induced pancreatitis. Its prolonged elevation creates a wider diagnostic window than amylase. Neither enzyme is useful in monitoring or predicting the severity of an episode of pancreatitis in adults. New biomarkers including trypsinogen and elastase have no significant advantage over amylase or lipase. PMID:26648641

  3. 17-DMAG in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  4. Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mauz-Krholz, Christine; Metzger, Monika L; Kelly, Kara M; Schwartz, Cindy L; Castellanos, Mauricio E; Dieckmann, Karin; Kluge, Regine; Krholz, Dieter

    2015-09-20

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is one of the most curable pediatric and adult cancers, with long-term survival rates now exceeding 90% after treatment with chemotherapy alone or combined with radiotherapy (RT). Of note, global collaboration in clinical trials within cooperative pediatric HL study groups has resulted in continued progress; however, survivors of pediatric HL are at high risk of potentially life-limiting second cancers and treatment-associated cardiovascular disease. Over the last three decades, all major pediatric and several adult HL study groups have followed the paradigm of response-based treatment adaptation and toxicity sparing through the reduction or elimination of RT and tailoring of chemotherapy. High treatment efficacy is achieved using dose-dense chemotherapy. Refinement and reduction of RT have been implemented on the basis of results from collaborative group studies, such that radiation has been completely eliminated for certain subgroups of patients. Because pediatric staging and response criteria are not uniform, comparing the results of trial series among different pediatric and adult study groups remains difficult; thus, initiatives to harmonize criteria are desperately needed. A dynamic harmonization process is of utmost importance to standardize therapeutic risk stratification and response definitions as well as improve the care of children with HL in resource-restricted environments. PMID:26304892

  5. Primary CNS lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Elizabeth H; Fox, Christopher P; Cwynarski, Kate

    2014-09-01

    Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the central nervous system is an aggressive malignancy that exhibits unique biological features and characteristic clinical behaviour, with overall long-term survival rates of around 20-40%. Clinical outcome has improved following the advent of chemoradiation protocols incorporating high-dose methotrexate in the mid-1980s, but disease relapse and adverse neurocognitive sequelae remain major clinical challenges. To address this, investigators have focused on improving drug therapy with novel cytotoxic combinations, monoclonal antibody therapy, and intensive chemotherapy consolidation approaches, in an attempt to improve disease control whilst reducing the requirement for whole-brain radiotherapy. Outcomes for patients that are older, immunocompromised, or have relapsed/refractory disease remain unsatisfactory and there is a paucity of clinical trial data to guide treatment of these groups. This review highlights recent advances in pathobiology, imaging, and clinical management of PCNSL and looks ahead to research priorities for this rare and challenging lymphoid malignancy. PMID:24969265

  6. Cure of incurable lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Nardo, Gerald L.

    2006-10-01

    The most potent method for augmenting the cytocidal power of monoclonal antibody (MAb) treatment is to conjugate radionuclides to the MAb to deliver systemic radiotherapy (radioimmunotherapy; RIT). The antigen, MAb, and its epitope can make a difference in the performance of the drug. Additionally, the radionuclide, radiochemistry, chelator for radiometals and the linker between the MAb and chelator can have a major influence on the performance of drugs (radiopharmaceuticals) for RIT. Smaller radionuclide carriers, such as antibody fragments and mimics, and those used for pretargeting strategies, have been described and evaluated. All of these changes in the drugs and strategies for RIT have documented potential for improved performance and patient outcomes. RIT is a promising new therapy that should be incorporated into the management of patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) soon after these patients have proven incurable. Predictable improvements using better drugs, strategies, and combinations with other drugs seem certain to make RIT integral to the management of patients with NHL, and likely lead to cure of currently incurable NHL.

  7. [Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lmann, M

    2008-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids. PMID:18378104

  8. Sex differences in gallstone pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, T V; Rimmer, S; Holt, S; Jeacock, J; Lucas, S

    1991-01-01

    From a computerized database comprising 28 pertinent items in each of a consecutive series of 664 patients with cholelithiasis, differences were studied between men and women. In 52 patients there was a documented attack of acute pancreatitis (7.8%). Twenty-five of 174 men had pancreatitis, compared with 27 of 490 women (p less than 0.0001). Men developed gallstones later in life than women, but suffered gallstone pancreatitis earlier in life and in the course of their gallstone-related disease. A history of flatulent dyspepsia, chronic cholecystitis, and biliary colic was less common in men than in women with pancreatitis (p less than 0.0001). Men with pancreatitis had fewer stones in their gallbladders than did women (p = 0.0002). The cystic duct and the common bile duct in the pancreatitic patient were more likely to be dilated (p less than 0.0001). In the nonpancreatic group, these ducts were larger in men. Pancreatic duct reflux on operative cholangiography was more common both in patients with pancreatitis 62% cf 14% (p less than 0.0001), and in men (p less than 0.001). Predisposition to pancreatitis relates to duct size rather than stone size per se. Men are more susceptible to gallstone migration at an early stage of their disease. In addition they have a larger diameter duct system and possibly a different anatomic disposition of the sphincter of Oddi, which predisposes them to a higher incidence of pancreatitis than women. The data suggest that it is cystic duct size that is critical in the pathogenesis of gallstone pancreatitis. PMID:1741646

  9. Alcohol consumption on pancreatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Baales, Jesus Maria; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Although the association between alcohol and pancreatic diseases has been recognized for a long time, the impact of alcohol consumption on pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer (PC) remains poorly defined. Nowadays there is not consensus about the epidemiology and the beverage type, dose and duration of alcohol consumption causing these diseases. The objective of this study was to review the epidemiology described in the literature for pancreatic diseases as a consequence of alcoholic behavior trying to understand the association between dose, type and frequency of alcohol consumption and risk of pancreatitis and PC. The majority of the studies conclude that high alcohol intake was associated with a higher risk of pancreatitis (around 2.5%-3% between heavy drinkers and 1.3% between non drinkers). About 70% of pancreatitis are due to chronic heavy alcohol consumption. Although this incidence rate differs between countries, it is clear that the risk of developing pancreatitis increases with increasing doses of alcohol and the average of alcohol consumption vary since 80 to 150 g/d for 10-15 years. With regard to PC, the role of alcohol consumption remains less clear, and low to moderate alcohol consumption do not appear to be associated with PC risk, and only chronic heavy drinking increase the risk compared with lightly drinkers. In a population of 10%-15% of heavy drinkers, 2%-5% of all PC cases could be attributed to alcohol consumption. However, as only a minority (less than 10% for pancreatitis and 5% for PC) of heavily drinkers develops these pancreatic diseases, there are other predisposing factors besides alcohol involved. Genetic variability and environmental exposures such as smoking and diet modify the risk and should be considered for further investigations. PMID:23429423

  10. Radiological Features of Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lo Re, Giuseppe; Federica, Vernuccio; Midiri, Federico; Picone, Dario; La Tona, Giuseppe; Galia, Massimo; Lo Casto, Antonio; Lagalla, Roberto; Midiri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent 5–20% of extranodal lymphomas and mainly occur in the stomach and small intestine. Clinical findings are not specific, thus often determining a delay in the diagnosis. Imaging features at conventional and cross-sectional imaging must be known by the radiologist since he/she plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and disease assessment, thus assisting in the choice of the optimal treatment to patients. This review focuses on the wide variety of imaging presentation of esophageal, gastric, and small and large bowel lymphoma presenting their main imaging appearances at conventional and cross-sectional imaging, mainly focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance, helping in the choice of the best imaging technique for the disease characterization and assessment and the recognition of potential complications. PMID:26819598

  11. Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Hodgkin's Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  12. CT and MRI Findings of Autoimmune Polymorph Bifocal Pancreatitis Mimicking Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Blker, Hendrik; Bahra, Marcus; Denecke, Timm; Grieser, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare type of chronic pancreatitis. It is supposed to be a pancreatic manifestation of an immune-complex modulated systemic disorder. In contrast, pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the most frequent malignant neoplasm of the pancreas. Within the rare type of focal autoimmune pancreatitis, only few presentations with multifocal pancreatic lesions have been described. Herein we report a case of a 58-year-old patient with autoimmune pancreatitis presenting with bifocal manifestations of the pancreatic head and tail, mimicking pancreatic adenocarcinoma clinically, on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Typical imaging findings of autoimmune pancreatitis are compared with typical findings in pancreatic carcinoma. The diagnostic dilemma of differentiating between both entities is discussed. A review of the present literature regarding multifocal presence of autoimmune pancreatitis is performed. PMID:26425636

  13. Minimally invasive treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cebulski, Włodzimierz; Słodkowski, Maciej; Krasnodębski, Ireneusz W.

    2014-01-01

    Infected pancreatic necrosis is a challenging complication that worsens prognosis in acute pancreatitis. For years, open necrosectomy has been the mainstay treatment option in infected pancreatic necrosis, although surgical debridement still results in high morbidity and mortality rates. Recently, many reports on minimally invasive treatment in infected pancreatic necrosis have been published. This paper presents a review of minimally invasive techniques and attempts to define their role in the management of infected pancreatic necrosis. PMID:25653725

  14. Imaging preoperatively for pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pietryga, Jason Alan

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy which is increasing in incidence and mortality. The fourth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S., pancreatic cancer is projected to become the second leading cause of cancer death by 2020. Patients with pancreatic cancer have an abysmal 5-year survival of 6%, and 90% of these patients eventually die from the disease. This is in large part due to the commonly advanced stage of disease at the time of diagnosis. Currently, the only potentially curative therapy for pancreatic carcinoma is complete surgical resection. Patients who undergo incomplete resection with residual disease have similar survival rates to those patients with metastatic disease and should be spared this relatively morbid surgery. Thus, the key to impacting prognosis is the detection of smaller and earlier stage lesions, and the key to optimal management is accurately determining which patients have potentially resectable surgery and which patients would not benefit from surgery. Cross-sectional imaging plays an essential role in both the diagnosis and appropriate staging of pancreatic carcinoma. The diagnosis and staging of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is performed with cross-sectional imaging. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) is the most commonly used, best-validated imaging modality for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. Modern contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been demonstrated to be equivalent to MDCT in detection and staging of pancreatic cancer. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is very sensitive for detecting pancreatic masses; however, due to limitations in adequate overall abdominal staging, it is generally used in addition to or after MDCT. Transabdominal ultrasound and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) have limited roles in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. Preoperative imaging is used to characterize patients as having resectable disease, borderline resectable disease, locally advanced disease (unresectable) and metastatic disease (unresectable). As the definitions of borderline resectable and unresectable may vary from institution to institution and within institutions, it is essential to accurately assess and describe the factors relevant to staging including: local extent of tumor, vascular involvement, lymph node involvement and distant metastatic disease. To facilitate this, standardized reporting templates for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma have been created and published. Structured reporting for pancreatic cancer has been reported to provide superior evaluation of pancreatic cancer, facilitate surgical planning, and increase surgeons confidence about tumor resectability. PMID:26261722

  15. Diagnosis of lymphoma by endoscopic ultrasound-assisted transendoscopic direct retroperitoneal lymph node biopsy: A case report (with video)

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jintao; Sun, Beibei; Wang, Sheng; Ge, Nan; Wang, Guoxin; Wu, Weichao; Liu, Xiang; Sun, Siyu

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction in the early 1990s, endoscopic ultrasound-assisted fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been used for sampling of extraintestinal mass lesions and peri-intestinal lymphadenopathy. Although EUS-FNA is highly accurate, lymphomas can be challenging to diagnose using EUS-FNA. We present the case of a 60-year-old male who had experienced upper abdominal discomfort for 1 month. Computerized tomography (CT) examination revealed multiple soft-tissue shadows located above the pancreatic body. The biggest shadow had a cross-sectional area of 7.7 cm 7.2 cm. Positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT) imaging showed increased uptake of 18F-FDG by these soft-tissue shadows. To investigate further, EUS was performed and it revealed the presence of multiple hypoechoic round lymph nodes. During the procedure, EUS-FNA was performed, but only a few dyskaryotic cells were observed by cytological evaluation. EUS-assisted retroperitoneoscopy and lymph node biopsy were performed to obtain more tissue for immunohistochemical analysis and subclassification of lymphoma. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, germinal center B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by this technique. EUS-assisted transendoscopic retroperitoneal lymph node biopsy is an alternative procedure for the diagnosis of lymphomas. PMID:25789289

  16. Topotecan combined with Ifosfamide, Etoposide, and L-asparaginase (TIEL) regimen improves outcomes in aggressive T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shao, YaJuan; Guan, Mei; Chen, ShuChang; Jia, Ning; Wang, YuZhou

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new regimen consisting of Topotecan, Ifosfamide, Etoposide, and L-asparaginase (TIEL) in treating aggressive T-cell lymphoma. Twenty-four patients were included in the research, eighteen males and six females. Half of the patients were in stages III and IV, and nearly half of them experienced failure of at least one regimen. Eleven were diagnosed as peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), five extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, non-specific, four angioimmunoblastic, and four anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (2 ALK positive). Patients were given 98 cycles of TIEL altogether. The responsive rate to TIEL was 76.9% among 13 cases who received the regimen as the first-line treatment. Among 11 cases, TIEL was the second- or more-line treatment, the responsive rate was 63.6%. The median PFS was 32.021.0 (95% CI 0-73.29) months. Median overall survival (OS) was not reached yet. Approximately 41.3% of patients showed the third- to fourth-degree hematological side effects. Non-hematological toxicity included nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abnormal liver function. Among those patients received L-asparaginase, nine experienced mild abnormal coagulation function after 7days of initiating chemotherapy, and no pancreatic injury was found. TIEL regimen is effective for aggressive T-cell lymphoma with controllable side effect and can be used for more patients. PMID:25428395

  17. Oblimersen and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumor or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. Alvocidib, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Lymphoproliferative Disorders or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  19. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-06

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  20. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  1. Molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Yuriko; Horii, Akira

    2014-01-01

    By genomic and epigenomic screening techniques, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of pancreatic cancer. The comprehensive studies of the pancreatic cancer genome have revealed that most genetic alterations are identified to be associated with specific core signaling pathways including high-frequency mutated genes such as KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4 along with several low-frequency mutated genes. Three types of histological precursors of pancreatic cancer: pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, mucinous cystic neoplasm, and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, had been recognized by morphological studies and the recent genomic screening techniques revealed that each of these precursor lesions were associated with specific molecular alterations. In the familial pancreatic cancer cases, several responsible genes were discovered. Epigenetic changes also play an important role in the progression of pancreatic cancer. Several tumor suppressor genes were silenced due to aberrant promoter CpG island hypermethylation. Several genetically engineered mouse models, based on the Kras mutation, were created, and provided reliable tools to identify the key molecules responsible for the development or progression of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24471965

  2. Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Savio G; Neale, Rachel E

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death, and it is projected that within the next two decades it will become the second most common cause of death due to cancer. Few patients are diagnosed when surgical resection is feasible and the efficacy of existing chemotherapeutic agents for advanced/metastatic cancer is limited. Thus, there is a need to identify agents that can prevent pancreatic cancer or improve survival in those affected. Vitamin D and its analogues, with their ability to regulate cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis and angiogenesis, may be promising agents. This review explores the published literature about the potential role of vitamin D and its analogues in preventing or treating pancreatic cancer. The vitamin D system is altered in pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer tissue expresses vitamin D receptors, but the calcitriol analogues may affect pancreatic cancer tissue by mechanisms that do not involve interaction with its receptors. Experimental evidence postulates multiple potential mechanisms by which calcitriol analogues may exert their anti-cancer effect, the most common being by action on cyclin-dependent kinases p21 and p27. Use of calcitriol analogues in pancreatic cancer remains largely underexplored and warrants further clinical trials. PMID:26276715

  3. Surgical Treatment of Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, W.; Bchler, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    Surgical treatment in patients with severe acute pancreatitis is still a controversial subject, ranging from sole conservative to an aggressive approach. This article gives an overview of the literature with regard to indications for surgery, timing and techniques of operative treatment concepts in severe acute pancreatitis with special attention to the recommended necrosectomy and closed continuous lavage of the involved retroperitoneum. Taking into account recent findings from microbiological data we have developed a new algorithm in patients with acute pancreatitis. All patients with proven acute necrotizing pancreatitis receive an antibiotic therapy for 2 weeks beside the intensive care measures. So far only one third (33 percent) had infected pancreatic necroses in the 3rd week of the onset of the disease and were managed surgically. The delay resulted in optimal surgical conditions for necrosectomy and a mortality rate of 9 percent. This new concept and therapeutic approach with the early suitable antibiotic therapy in patients with proven necrotizing pancreatitis is recommended to (1) decrease the infection rate and (2) delay surgical intervention to the 3rd week of the disease with optimal surgical conditions. It seems that only patients with proven infected pancreatic necroses are candidates for surgical intervention.

  4. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  5. Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. Alisertib With and Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-15

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  7. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  8. Pancreatic transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Cicalese, L; Giacomoni, A; Rastellini, C; Benedetti, E

    1999-01-01

    Pancreatic transplantation recently became a routine treatment for Type I diabetic patients with uremia or for those who previously received a kidney transplant with 1 year graft and patient survival of over 80% and 90%, respectively. Despite the life-long need for immunosuppression, this is clearly acceptable when compared to the need for dialysis and insulin therapy, and it reduces the evolution of diabetic complications. Isolated pancreatic transplant is less commonly applied because of the need for immunosuppression and the high rate of complications. However, this can still be an acceptable option for individual patients with brittle diabetes and hypoglycemic unawareness. Despite the fact that pancreas transplantation is an effective treatment for selected Type I diabetics, it remains a difficult surgical procedure with many potential complications and with several issues still subject to debate. In this article, the authors describe the procedure in all of its aspects and variations, and offer, through a review of the recent literature, insights on the current status of this transplant PMID:10667809

  9. [Hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Sanduende Otero, Y; Figueira Moure, A; Rama-Maceiras, P; Bautista Guilln, A; Diguez Fernndez, M

    2003-11-01

    A 33-year-old secundipara with a history of gestational diabetes and familial hypertriglyceridemia exacerbated during her previous pregnancy was admitted in the 36th week of gestation with diffuse abdominal pain, vomiting, low-grade fever, and general malaise. A blood sample had a lipemic, milky-pink appearance and plasma concentrations were as follows: triglycerides 2173 mg/dL, cholesterol 320 mg/dL, amylase 801 U/L, lactate dehydrogenase 650 U/L, creatinine 1.5 mg/dL, glucose 380 mg/dL, and left-shifted white cells. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed and owing to signs of fetal distress, a cesarean was performed under light general anesthesia with propofol, succinylcholine, and sevoflurane. After the umbilical cord was cut, rocoronium and fentanyl were administered. The neonate was healthy and the patient's condition evolved favorably with conservative treatment. The incidence of pancreatitis during pregnancy is low but related morbidity and mortality are high. The usual cause is biliary tract disease, although rare metabolic alterations such as hyperlipidemia may occasionally act as the trigger. Early diagnosis and treatment are the keys to successful surgery and postoperative recovery. PMID:14753142

  10. Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Christina; Nielsen, Lecia Mller; Lelic, Dina; Drewes, Asbjrn Mohr

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of the pancreatic secretory parenchyma. Despite the heterogeneity in pathogenesis and involved risk factors, processes such as necrosis/apoptosis, inflammation or duct obstruction are involved. This fibrosing process ultimately leads to progressive loss of the lobular morphology and structure of the pancreas, deformation of the large ducts and severe changes in the arrangement and composition of the islets. These conditions lead to irreversible morphological and structural changes resulting in impairment of both exocrine and endocrine functions. The prevalence of the disease is largely dependent on culture and geography. The etiological risk-factors associated with CP are multiple and involve both genetic and environmental factors. Throughout this review the M-ANNHEIM classification system will be used, comprising a detailed description of risk factors such as: alcohol-consumption, nicotine-consumption, nutritional factors, hereditary factors, efferent duct factors, immunological factors and miscellaneous and rare metabolic factors. Increased knowledge of the different etiological factors may encourage the use of further advanced diagnostic tools, which potentially will help clinicians to diagnose CP at an earlier stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical picture, it is not surprising that treatment of patients with CP is challenging and often unsuccessful. PMID:24259953

  11. Pancreatic insulinomas: Laparoscopic management

    PubMed Central

    Antonakis, Pantelis T; Ashrafian, Hutan; Martinez-Isla, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors that are most commonly benign, solitary, and intrapancreatic. Uncontrolled insulin overproduction from the tumor produces neurological and adrenergic symptoms of hypoglycemia. Biochemical diagnosis is confirmed by the presence of Whipples triad, along with corroborating measurements of blood glucose, insulin, proinsulin, C-peptide, ?-hydroxybutyrate, and negative tests for hypoglycemic agents during a supervised fasting period. This is accompanied by accurate preoperative localization using both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities. Following this, careful preoperative planning is required, with the ensuing procedure being preferably carried out laparoscopically. An integral part of the laparoscopic approach is the application of laparoscopic intraoperative ultrasound, which is indispensable for accurate intraoperative localization of the lesion in the pancreatic region. The extent of laparoscopic resection is dependent on preoperative and intraoperative findings, but most commonly involves tumor enucleation or distal pancreatectomy. When performed in an experienced surgical unit, laparoscopic resection is associated with minimal mortality and excellent long-term cure rates. Furthermore, this approach confers equivalent safety and efficacy rates to open resection, while improving cosmesis and reducing hospital stay. As such, laparoscopic resection should be considered in all cases of benign insulinoma where adequate surgical expertise is available. PMID:26566426

  12. Brentuximab Vedotin + Rituximab as Frontline Therapy for Pts w/ CD30+ and/or EBV+ Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-28

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Epstein-Barr Virus Infection; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoid

  13. What's New in Pancreatic Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for pancreatic cancer What’s new in pancreatic cancer research and treatment? Research into ... area of research in many types of cancer. New treatments for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) Many pancreatic ...

  14. Chronic pancreatitis: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Duggan, Sinead N; Ní Chonchubhair, Hazel M; Lawal, Oladapo; O’Connor, Donal B; Conlon, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Typical clinical symptoms of chronic pancreatitis are vague and non-specific and therefore diagnostic tests are required, none of which provide absolute diagnostic certainly, especially in the early stages of disease. Recently-published guidelines bring much needed structure to the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected chronic pancreatitis. In addition, novel diagnostic modalities bring promise for the future. The assessment and diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency remains challenging and this review contests the accepted perspective that steatorrhea only occurs with > 90% destruction of the gland. PMID:26900292

  15. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:25628906

  16. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  17. Acute mediastinitis arising from pancreatic mediastinal fistula in recurrent pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Choe, In Soo; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Sun Moon; Song, Kyung Ho; Koo, Hoon Sup; Park, Jung Ho; Pyo, Jin Sil; Kim, Ji Yeong; Choi, In Seok

    2014-10-28

    Acute mediastinitis is a fatal disease that usually originates from esophageal perforation and surgical infection. Rare cases of descending necrotizing mediastinitis can occur following oral cavity and pharynx infection or can be a complication of pancreatitis. The most common thoracic complications of pancreatic disease are reactive pleural effusion and pneumonia, while rare complications include thoracic conditions, such as pancreaticopleural fistula with massive pleural effusion or hemothorax and extension of pseudocyst into the mediastinum. There have been no reports of acute mediastinitis originating from pancreatitis in South Korea. In this report, we present the case of a 50-year-old female suffering from acute mediastinitis with pleural effusion arising from recurrent pancreatitis that improved after surgical intervention. PMID:25356062

  18. Acute mediastinitis arising from pancreatic mediastinal fistula in recurrent pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Choe, In Soo; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Sun Moon; Song, Kyung Ho; Koo, Hoon Sup; Park, Jung Ho; Pyo, Jin Sil; Kim, Ji Yeong; Choi, In Seok

    2014-01-01

    Acute mediastinitis is a fatal disease that usually originates from esophageal perforation and surgical infection. Rare cases of descending necrotizing mediastinitis can occur following oral cavity and pharynx infection or can be a complication of pancreatitis. The most common thoracic complications of pancreatic disease are reactive pleural effusion and pneumonia, while rare complications include thoracic conditions, such as pancreaticopleural fistula with massive pleural effusion or hemothorax and extension of pseudocyst into the mediastinum. There have been no reports of acute mediastinitis originating from pancreatitis in South Korea. In this report, we present the case of a 50-year-old female suffering from acute mediastinitis with pleural effusion arising from recurrent pancreatitis that improved after surgical intervention. PMID:25356062

  19. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-05

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  20. Study of BKM120 & Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-20

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-31

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Cellular backpackers deliver lymphoma drugs.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    Researchers have attached capsules containing the drug SN-38, a relative of irinotecan, to T cells. When infused into mice with a cancer similar to Burkitt lymphoma, the T cells entered the spleen, lymph nodes, and bone marrow where B-cell tumors occurred, increasing the amount of drug reaching the tumors compared with other methods, and prolonging survival. PMID:26112672

  3. Visceral larva migrans mimicking lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bachmeyer, Claude; Lamarque, Grard; Morariu, Rodica; Molina, Thierry; Boure, Patrice; Delmer, Alain

    2003-04-01

    We report a case of visceral larva migrans in an adult with fever, night sweats, weight loss, hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and eosinophilia-mimicking lymphoma. Visceral larva migrans was diagnosed subsequently because of negative findings for malignancy and positive serologic test result for Toxocara canis. Progressive improvement was observed with albendazole therapy. PMID:12684326

  4. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Computational diagnosis of canine lymphoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkes, E. M.; Alexandrakis, I.; Slater, K.; Tuli, R.; Gorban, A. N.

    2014-03-01

    One out of four dogs will develop cancer in their lifetime and 20% of those will be lymphoma cases. PetScreen developed a lymphoma blood test using serum samples collected from several veterinary practices. The samples were fractionated and analysed by mass spectrometry. Two protein peaks, with the highest diagnostic power, were selected and further identified as acute phase proteins, C-Reactive Protein and Haptoglobin. Data mining methods were then applied to the collected data for the development of an online computer-assisted veterinary diagnostic tool. The generated software can be used as a diagnostic, monitoring and screening tool. Initially, the diagnosis of lymphoma was formulated as a classification problem and then later refined as a lymphoma risk estimation. Three methods, decision trees, kNN and probability density evaluation, were used for classification and risk estimation and several preprocessing approaches were implemented to create the diagnostic system. For the differential diagnosis the best solution gave a sensitivity and specificity of 83.5% and 77%, respectively (using three input features, CRP, Haptoglobin and standard clinical symptom). For the screening task, the decision tree method provided the best result, with sensitivity and specificity of 81.4% and >99%, respectively (using the same input features). Furthermore, the development and application of new techniques for the generation of risk maps allowed their user-friendly visualization.

  6. A novel immunohistochemical classifier to distinguish Hodgkin lymphoma from ALK anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Döring, Claudia; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Agostinelli, Claudio; Piccaluga, Pier P; Facchetti, Fabio; Pileri, Stefano; Küppers, Ralf; Newrzela, Sebastian; Hartmann, Sylvia

    2014-10-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma and ALK(-) anaplastic large cell lymphoma share many features like strong CD30 expression and usually loss of B- and T-cell markers. However, their clinical course is dramatically different with curability rates of >90% for classical Hodgkin lymphoma and an unfavorable prognosis for anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma and ALK(-) anaplastic large cell lymphoma can usually be distinguished by PAX5 expression in the Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma and expression of cytotoxic molecules in tumor cells of anaplastic large cell lymphoma. However, in some cases the differential diagnosis is difficult owing to absence of established markers. To be able to better classify these cases, we reevaluated gene expression data of microdissected tumor cells of both lymphomas for differentially expressed genes. A classifier was established, comprising four genes strongly expressed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (MDC/CCL22, CD83, STAT3, and TUBB2B). Applying this classifier to a test cohort, Hodgkin lymphoma was successfully distinguished from ALK(-) anaplastic large cell lymphoma with an accuracy of 97% (43/44). MDC/CCL22, CD83, and STAT3 have also been found to be expressed in antigen-presenting cells. Therefore, based on our established classifier, Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells differ from tumor cells of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, which can successfully be applied for practical purposes in histopathologic diagnostics. PMID:24633193

  7. Expression of laminin in pancreatic neoplasms and in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Haglund, C; Roberts, P J; Nordling, S; Ekblom, P

    1984-09-01

    The distribution of laminin, a basement membrane glycoprotein, was studied by immunohistological techniques in 10 samples of normal pancreatic tissue, in 15 samples of chronic pancreatitis, and in 33 pancreatic neoplasms. Sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens were pretreated with pepsin and immunostained for laminin. As judged by the expression of laminin, normal pancreatic glands were surrounded by a continuous, intact basement membrane. In chronic pancreatitis the basement membrane was also mainly continuous, but focally weaker and thinner than around normal glands. In pancreatic adenocarcinomas laminin was irregularly distributed and in large areas totally absent. In anaplastic carcinomas no extracellular laminin was seen, but two cases showed some intracellular laminin in a punctate pattern. The findings suggest that these cancers have defects in the deposition of a basement membrane or that it is degraded. Our data suggest that the integrity of the basement membrane correlates with the degree of malignancy in ductal adenocarcinomas, but this is not the case for mucinous cystic neoplasms or for islet cell tumors. In these neoplasms a nearly intact basement membrane was seen both in malignant tumors and in their benign counterparts. PMID:6089598

  8. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma and Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-07

    Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  10. Carfilzomib, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-21

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  11. Carfilzomib and Hyper-CVAD in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-22

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  12. Surgery for pancreatic cancer - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    Claudius C, Lillemoe KD. Palliative Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer. In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical Therapy . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2014: 481-487. Jensen EH, Borja-Cacho D, ...

  13. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  14. Overview of Exocrine Pancreatic Pathobiology

    PubMed Central

    Pandiri, Arun R

    2014-01-01

    Exocrine pancreas is a source of several enzymes that are essential for the digestive process. The exocrine pancreatic secretion is tightly regulated by the neuroendocrine system. The endocrine pancreas is tightly integrated anatomically and physiologically with the exocrine pancreas and modulates its function. Compound-induced pancreatitis is not a common event in toxicology or drug development but it becomes a significant liability when encountered. Understanding the species-specific differences in physiology is essential to understand the underlying pathobiology of pancreatic disease in animal models and its relevance to human disease. This review will mainly focus on understanding the morphology and physiology of the pancreas, unique islet-exocrine interactions, and pancreatitis. PMID:24190915

  15. Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Low-Grade Follicular Lymphoma, Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia, or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-16

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  16. Canagliflozin-Associated Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajanshu

    2014-09-01

    Canagliflozin is a new drug in class of sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors used for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We describe a patient who developed moderately severe acute pancreatitis as an untoward consequence after being initiated on this drug. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of canagliflozin-associated acute pancreatitis in clinical literature. PMID:25187092

  17. AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  18. Genetic Testing Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  19. Laryngeal Lymphoma: The High and Low Grades of Rare Lymphoma Involvement Sites

    PubMed Central

    Degaetano, James; Farrugia, Eric; Magri, Claude; Refalo, Nicholas; Camilleri, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The larynx is an extremely rare site of involvement by lymphomatous disease. We present two cases of isolated laryngeal high-grade and another low-grade lymphoma, together with a literature review of laryngeal lymphoma management. PMID:25140179

  20. What Are the Key Statistics about Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for non-Hodgkin lymphoma? What are the key statistics about non-Hodgkin lymphoma? Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) ... coming years. Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Last Medical Review: ...

  1. What's New in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Additional resources for non-Hodgkin lymphoma What’s new in non-Hodgkin lymphoma research and treatment? Research ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma is focused on looking at new and better ways to treat this disease. Chemotherapy ...

  2. Pancreatic cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ya-Yun; Yuan, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Studies are emerging in support of the cancer stem cells (CSCs) theory which considers that a tiny subset of cancer cells is exclusively responsible for the initiation and malignant behavior of a cancer. This cell population, also termed CSCs, possesses the capacity both to self-renew, producing progeny that have the identical tumorigenic potential, and to differentiate into the bulk of cancer cells, helping serve the formation of the tumor entities, which, altogether, build the hierarchically organized structure of a cancer. In this review, we try to articulate the complicated signaling pathways regulating the retention of the characteristics of pancreatic CSCs, and in the wake of which, we seek to offer insights into the CSCs-relevant targeted therapeutics which are, in the meantime, confronted with bigger challenges than ever. PMID:26045976

  3. Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

    2004-04-01

    Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

  4. Pancreatic cancer: Advances in treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Somala; Van Buren II, George; Fisher, William E

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality and the incidence of this disease is expected to continue increasing. While patients with pancreatic cancer have traditionally faced a dismal prognosis, over the past several years various advances in diagnosis and treatment have begun to positively impact this disease. Identification of effective combinations of existing chemotherapeutic agents, such as the FOLFIRINOX and the gemcitabine + nab-paclitaxel regimen, has improved survival for selected patients although concerns regarding their toxicity profiles remain. A better understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis has identified several pre-malignant precursor lesions, such as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, and cystic neoplasms. Imaging technology has also evolved dramatically so as to allow early detection of these lesions and thereby facilitate earlier management. Surgery remains a cornerstone of treatment for patients with resectable pancreatic tumors, and advances in surgical technique have allowed patients to undergo resection with decreasing perioperative morbidity and mortality. Surgery has also become feasible in selected patients with borderline resectable tumors as a result of neoadjuvant therapy. Furthermore, pancreatectomy involving vascular reconstruction and pancreatectomy with minimally invasive techniques have demonstrated safety without significantly compromising oncologic outcomes. Lastly, a deeper understanding of molecular aberrations contributing to the development of pancreatic cancer shows promise for future development of more targeted and safe therapeutic agents. PMID:25071330

  5. Pancreatic Cancer, Inflammation and Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Zambirinis, Constantinos P.; Pushalkar, Smruti; Saxena, Deepak; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Inflammatory conditions such as pancreatitis represent a well-known risk for pancreatic cancer development. Yet only in the past two decades has pancreatic cancer been recognized as an inflammation-driven cancer, and the precise mechanisms underlying the pathogenic role of inflammation are beginning to be explored in detail. A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that bacteria are likely to influence this process by activating immune receptors and perpetuating cancer-associated inflammation. The recent explosion of investigations into the human microbiome have highlighted how perturbations of commensal bacterial populations can promote inflammation and promote disease processes, including carcinogenesis. The elucidation of the interplay between inflammation and microbiome in the context of pancreatic carcinogenesis will provide novel targets for intervention in order to both prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies towards this direction are urgently needed. PMID:24855007

  6. [Surgical management of pancreatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Kim, Song Cheol

    2008-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a major problematic concern among all forms of gastrointestinal malignancies because of its poor prognosis. Although significant progress has been made in the surgical treatment in terms of increased resection rate and decreased treatment-related morbidity and mortality, the true survival rate still remains below 5% today. Surgical options for pancreatic cancer are based on the its unique anatomy and physiology, catastrophic tumor biology, experience of surgeon, and status of patients. Four main options exist for the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer. These include standard "Whipple" pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), pylorus preserving PD (PPPD), distal pancreatectomy (left-side pancreatectomy), and total pancreatectomy according to the location of tumor. Portal vein involvement by tumor is regarded as an anatomical extension of disease, and en bloc resection of portal vein with tumor is recommended if technically feasible, which is stated in 2002 AJCC tumor staging for pancreatic cancer. In comparison of the survival rates between standard and extended resection of pancreatic head cancer, no significant survival benefit was demonstrated from the prospective reports. PPPD may be superior to standard PD in respect to nutrition and quality of life without any deleterious effect upon long term survival or tumor recurrence. New surgical treatment modalities including modified extended pancreatectomy, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and radical antegrade modular distal pancreatectomy have been tried to improve the patients' survival. However, early diagnosis and treatment remain as key factors for the cure of pancreatic cancer irrespective of various surgical trials. PMID:18349571

  7. Oncolytic virotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wennier, Sonia; Li, Shoudong; McFadden, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Within the past decade, many oncolytic viruses (OVs) have been studied as potential treatments for pancreatic cancer and some of these are currently under clinical trials. The applicability of certain OVs, such as adenoviruses, herpesviruses and reoviruses, for the treatment of pancreatic cancer has been intensively studied for several years, whereas the applicability of other more recently investigated OVs, such as poxviruses and parvoviruses, is only starting to be determined. At the same time, studies have identified key characteristics of pancreatic cancer biology that provide a better understanding of the important factors or pathways involved in this disease. This review aims to summarise the different replication-competent OVs proposed as therapeutics for pancreatic cancer. It also focuses on the unique biology of these viruses that makes them exciting candidate virotherapies for pancreatic cancer and discusses how they could be genetically manipulated or combined with other drugs to improve their efficacy based on what is currently known about the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer. PMID:21676289

  8. Rituximab With or Without Yttrium Y-90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Untreated Follicular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma

  9. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-28

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  10. Bortezomib and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Mantle Cell Lymphoma Who Have Previously Undergone Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-07

    Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  11. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody With or Without Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Children With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  12. 3-AP and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. Primary Gastric Burkitts Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Swarupa; Mehta, Anurag; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Anila; Louis, A. Robert; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Saxena, Upasna; Simson, David K.; Dewan, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    The primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkins lymphoma, although rare, is among the most common extra-nodal lymphomas, considering that gastric lymphomas are more common than intestinal lymphomas. Burkitts lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive form of B-cell lymphoma that is typically endemic in Africa, while non-endemic cases are found in the rest of the world. Primary gastric BL is extremely rare and only around 50 cases have been reported worldwide. Here we present the case of a young HIV-negative male, who was referred to our department with a stage IV gastric BL. He was planned for palliative chemotherapy, but after the first cycle of chemotherapy he succumbed to the progression of the disease. PMID:25568743

  14. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-19

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  15. Bortezomib, Ifosfamide, and Vinorelbine Tartrate in Treating Young Patients With Hodgkin's Lymphoma That is Recurrent or Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  16. Genetically Engineered Lymphocyte Therapy After Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk, Intermediate-Grade, B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-10

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  17. Somatostatin prevents acute pancreatitis after pancreatic duct sphincter hydrostatic balloon dilation in patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Guelrud, M; Mendoza, S; Viera, L; Gelrud, D

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether prophylactic somatostatin infusion can prevent pancreatitis after hydrostatic balloon dilation of the pancreatic duct sphincter segment in 16 patients with idiopathic recurrent pancreatitis. This study demonstrated that prophylactic administration of somatostatin before, during, and after the procedure diminished the incidence and severity of acute pancreatitis. We recommend consideration of such prophylaxis in patients undergoing this procedure. PMID:1672278

  18. Lymphomas: diagnosis, treatment. Cancergram CT05

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The scope of this Cancergram includes Hodgkin's disease, adenolymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, lymphosarcoma, lymphoblastoma, lymphocytoma, reticulum cell sarcoma, mycosis fungoides, and any not otherwise specified lymphoma. Abstracts are included which concern all clinical aspects of the various forms of lymphoma, such as diagnosis and staging, supportive care, evaluation, and therapy. Animal models, tissue culture experiments, carcinogenesis and other preclinical studies are generally excluded, except for those considered to have direct clinical relevance.

  19. Bilateral conjunctival follicular lymphoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Wall, Palak B; Traboulsi, Elias I; Hsi, Eric D; Singh, Arun D

    2015-04-01

    Follicular lymphoma is exceedingly rare in children. We present the case of a 10-year-old patient with a conjunctival lesion on the left eye who later developed a similar lesion on the right eye. Excisional biopsy of the left eye lesion revealed follicular lymphoma. The patient was treated with systemic rituximab. To our knowledge, only 4 other cases of pediatric conjunctival follicular lymphoma have been reported, all of which were isolated lesions that were treated with excisional biopsy alone. PMID:25824110

  20. PXD101 and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  1. Fusion Protein Cytokine Therapy After Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  2. Utility of PET/CT in diagnosis, staging, assessment of resectability and metabolic response of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Yi; Yang, Feng; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

    2014-11-14

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common gastrointestinal tumors, with its incidence staying at a high level in both the United States and China. However, the overall 5-year survival rate of pancreatic cancer is still extremely low. Surgery remains the only potential chance for long-term survival. Early diagnosis and precise staging are crucial to make proper clinical decision for surgery candidates. Despite advances in diagnostic technology such as computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasound, diagnosis, staging and monitoring of the metabolic response remain a challenge for this devastating disease. Positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), a relatively novel modality, combines metabolic detection with anatomic information. It has been widely used in oncology and achieves good results in breast cancer, lung cancer and lymphoma. Its utilization in pancreatic cancer has also been widely accepted. However, the value of PET/CT in pancreatic disease is still controversial. Will PET/CT change the treatment strategy for potential surgery candidates? What kind of patients benefits most from this exam? In this review, we focus on the utility of PET/CT in diagnosis, staging, and assessment of resectability of pancreatic cancer. In addition, its ability to monitor metabolic response and recurrence after treatment will be emphasis of discussion. We hope to provide answers to the questions above, which clinicians care most about. PMID:25400441

  3. [Double sphincterostomy of pancreatic and choledochal sphincters in the treatment of chronic recurrent pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Guelrud, M; Mendoza, S; Plaz, J; Mujica, V

    1991-01-01

    The treatment of recurrent chronic pancreatitis is controversial. Some patients may have sphincter of Oddi motor abnormalities. Although widely used in the biliary tree, little data is available on endoscopic sphincterotomy of the pancreatic sphincter. This report describes 5 patients with recurrent chronic pancreatitis, who had pancreatic sphincterotomy for hypertensive sphincter of Oddi. Four patients continue long-term follow-up with marked reduction of chronic pain of attacks of recurrent pancreatitis. It is concluded that endoscopic sphincterotomy of the pancreatic sphincter may improve pain in chronic pancreatitis and may obviate the need for surgery. PMID:1688212

  4. Loss of Periostin Results in Impaired Regeneration and Pancreatic Atrophy after Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Simone; Regel, Ivonne; Steiger, Katja; Wagner, Nadine; Thorwirth, Manja; Schlitter, Anna M; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jrg; Erkan, Mert

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule periostin (POSTN, encoded by POSTN), which is secreted by activated pancreatic stellate cells, has important functions in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the role of POSTN in acute pancreatitis and subsequent regeneration processes has not been addressed so far. We analyzed the function of POSTN in pancreatic exocrine regeneration after the induction of a severe acute pancreatitis. Postn-deficient mice and wild-type control animals received repetitive cerulein injections, and a detailed histologic analysis of pancreatic tissues was performed. Although there was no difference in pancreatitis severity in the acute inflammatory phase, the recovery of the exocrine pancreas was massively impaired in Postn-deficient mice. Loss of Postn expression was accompanied by strong pancreatic atrophy and acinar-to-adipocyte differentiation, which was also reflected in gene expression patterns. Our data suggest that POSTN is a crucial factor for proper exocrine lineage-specific regeneration after severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:26632158

  5. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma--clinicopathological pattern.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, M; Khan, A H; Mansoor, A; Khan, M A; Saeed, S

    1992-09-01

    A study of histopathological and clinical features of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 495 consecutive cases, diagnosed at AFIP during 1984-1989 is presented. Children below the age of 15 years were not included in this study. The relative frequency of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was 4.29% in our material. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was more frequent than Hodgkin's disease, ratio being 2.44:1. Lymphadenopathy (78.78%), fever (33.08%), weight loss (31.62%) and anemia (30.14%) were the main presenting features. New working formulation was used for morphological characterisation. Follicular lymphoma constituted 8.08% of all cases. Follicular lymphoma was seen only in older age whereas diffuse lymphoma occurred in all age groups. Intermediate and high grade lymphoma represented 73.54% of all NHL. Small lymphocytic lymphoma was common in low grade tumours (13.13%). Extra nodal lymphoma was encountered in a significant proportion (21.22%), gastrointestinal tract being the most frequent site. This study outlines certain interesting features of NHL in Pakistan. PMID:1433803

  6. Lipolysis of visceral adipocyte triglyceride by pancreatic lipases converts mild acute pancreatitis to severe pancreatitis independent of necrosis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram N; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Cline, Rachel A; DeLany, James P; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2015-03-01

    Visceral fat necrosis has been associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for over 100 years; however, its pathogenesis and role in SAP outcomes are poorly understood. Based on recent work suggesting that pancreatic fat lipolysis plays an important role in SAP, we evaluated the role of pancreatic lipases in SAP-associated visceral fat necrosis, the inflammatory response, local injury, and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP). For this, cerulein pancreatitis was induced in lean and obese mice, alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat and parameters of AP induction (serum amylase and lipase), fat necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure, and inflammatory response were assessed. Pancreatic lipases were measured in fat necrosis and were overexpressed in 3T3-L1 cells. We noted obesity to convert mild cerulein AP to SAP with greater cytokines, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and multisystem organ failure, and 100% mortality without affecting AP induction or pancreatic necrosis. Increased pancreatic lipase amounts and activity were noted in the extensive visceral fat necrosis of dying obese mice. Lipase inhibition reduced fat necrosis, UFAs, organ failure, and mortality but not the parameters of AP induction. Pancreatic lipase expression increased lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. We conclude that UFAs generated via lipolysis of visceral fat by pancreatic lipases convert mild AP to SAP independent of pancreatic necrosis and the inflammatory response. PMID:25579844

  7. Checkpoint inhibitors in Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jezeršek Novaković, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is unusual among cancers in that it consists of a small number of malignant Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells in a sea of immune system cells, including T cells. Most of these T cells are reversibly inactivated in different ways and their reactivation may induce a very strong immune response to cancer cells. One way of reactivation of T cells is with antibodies blocking the CTLA-4 and especially with antibodies directed against PD-1 or the PD-L1 ligand thereby reversing the tumor-induced downregulation of T-cell function and augmenting antitumor immune activity at the priming (CTLA-4) or tissue effector (PD-1) phase. Immune checkpoint inhibitors have been evidenced as an additional treatment option with substantial effectiveness and acceptable toxicity in heavily pretreated patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma. Particularly, PD-1 blockade with nivolumab and pembrolizumab has demonstrated significant single-agent activity in this select population. PMID:26560962

  8. Ibrutinib for mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tucker, David L; Rule, Simon A

    2016-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare and aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Ibrutinib is a first-in-class, oral inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase which acts by downstream inhibition of the B-cell receptor. Early clinical trials have demonstrated excellent tolerability and a modest side-effect profile in relapsed/refractory MCL. Although the majority of disease responses are partial, efficacy data are impressive with more than two-thirds of patients demonstrating a durable response. This article focuses on all aspects of ibrutinib in the context of MCL, including a summary of the basic pharmacology and pharmacokinetics; a review of the safety and efficacy data published to date and a discussion of the future implications in MCL. PMID:26759179

  9. Gastric lymphoma: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Doglioni, Claudio; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrs J M; Savio, Antonella

    2011-03-01

    The diagnosis of gastric MALT lymphoma is frequently difficult for the general histopathologist. During recent years there have been relevant changes in the therapeutic approach to gastric MALT lymphoma and our knowledge about its pathogenesis has greatly improved. The management of this disease actually requires a close cooperation between the histopathologist and the clinicians. The histology report of biopsies of a newly diagnosed or of an already treated case implies information of clinical and therapeutical relevance. This paper aims at giving the histopathologist a general knowledge about the state of art of this disease and its management. The diagnostic process leading to a complete and competent report is then described step by step. PMID:21459337

  10. Molecular Profiling of Aggressive Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Maura; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Gazzola, Anna; Sapienza, Maria Rosaria; Pileri, Stefano A.; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    In the last years, several studies of molecular profiling of aggressive lymphomas were performed. In particular, it was shown that DLBCL can be distinguished in two different entities according to GEP. Specifically, ABC and GCB subtypes were characterized by having different pathogenetic and clinical features. In addition, it was demonstrated that DLBCLs are distinct from BL. Indeed, the latter is a unique molecular entity. However, relevant pathological differences emerged among the clinical subtypes. More recently, microRNA profiling provided further information concerning BL-DLBCL distinction as well as for their subclassification. In this paper, the authors based on their own experience and the most updated literature review, the main concept on molecular profiling of aggressive lymphomas. PMID:22190944

  11. ROLE OF PANCREATIC FAT IN THE OUTCOMES OF PANCREATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Chathur; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P.

    2014-01-01

    The role of obesity in relation to various disease processes is being increasingly studied, with reports over the last several years increasingly mentioning its association with worse outcomes in acute disease. Obesity has also gained recognition as a risk factor for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) [18]. The mortality in SAP may be as high as 30% and is usually attributable to multi system organ failure (MSOF) earlier in the disease, and complications of necrotizing pancreatitis later [911]. To date there is no specific treatment for acute pancreatitis (AP) and the management is largely expectant and supportive. Obesity in general has also been associated with poor outcomes in sepsis and other pathological states including trauma and burns [1214]. With the role of unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) as propagators in SAP having recently come to light [15] and with the recognition of acute lipotoxicity, there is now an opportunity to explore different strategies to reduce the mortality and morbidity in SAP and potentially other disease states associated with such a pathophysiology. In this review we will discuss the role of fat and implications of the consequent acute lipotoxicity on the outcomes of acute pancreatitis in lean and obese states and during acute on chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25278311

  12. Pancreatic resection combined with intraoperative radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, T J; Barbot, D J; Rosato, F E

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to analyze a single center's experience in the treatment of pancreatic carcinoma with a combination of pancreatic resection and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Pancreatic cancer is the most lethal form of gastrointestinal malignancy. Historically, it carries a 20% 1-year survival and a 5-year survival of 3% to 5%. Since 1987, patients at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital have been offered IORT in an attempt to improve their survival. METHODS: The authors reviewed all patients treated at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital with pancreatic adenocarcinoma from 1987 to 1994. From this population, 14 patients were identified who received IORT in conjunction with curative surgery. Duration of hospital stay, perioperative complications, duration of postoperative ileus, and survival were assessed by retrospective review. RESULTS: Of the 14 patients, 6 were male and 8 were female. Patient median age was 61. Six patients had stage I disease, 2 had stage II, 6 had stage III. Two patients had total pancreatectomy, 2 had distal pancreatectomy, and the remaining had pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple resection). Median survival was 16 months with a 15.5% 5-year survival. Postoperative complications, duration of hospital stay, and duration of postoperative ileus were not adversely affected by the addition of IORT when compared to in-house control subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Intraoperative radiation therapy is a useful adjunct to surgical resection as treatment of pancreatic cancer. The authors' data suggested it can prolong median survival and long-term survival without adding significant morbidity. PMID:9242339

  13. Proliferation indices in malignant lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, J

    1989-01-01

    In view of the importance of adjusting therapy to prognostic groups in malignant lymphomas, there have been numerous attempts over the past two decades to assess proliferation rates in these neoplasms. The techniques employed include radiolabelled thymidine uptake, DNA flow cytometry, the application of antibodies to proliferation-associated antigens and the enumeration of nucleolar organizer regions. The evolution of these methods is reviewed and their usefulness is evaluated. PMID:2680181

  14. Concurrent acute pancreatitis and pericardial effusion

    PubMed Central

    Kayar, Yusuf; Turkdogan, Kenan Ahmet; Baysal, Birol; Gultekin, Nigar; Danalioglu, Ahmet; Ince, Ali Tuzun; Senturk, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    While pleural effusion and ascites secondary to acute pancreatitis are common, clinically relevant pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade are observed rarely. In a study by Pezzilli et al., pleural effusion was noted in 7 of the 21 patients with acute pancreatitis whereas the authors detected pericardial effusion development in only three. The authors asserted that pleural effusion was associated with severe acute pancreatitis, while pericardial effusion and the severity of acute pancreatitis were not significantly related. PMID:26327959

  15. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-23

    Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  16. Lenalidomide and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-23

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  17. Hodgkin's lymphoma: the pathologist's viewpoint

    PubMed Central

    Pileri, S A; Ascani, S; Leoncini, L; Sabattini, E; Zinzani, P L; Piccaluga, P P; Pileri, A; Giunti, M; Falini, B; Bolis, G B; Stein, H

    2002-01-01

    Despite its well known histological and clinical features, Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) has recently been the object of intense research activity, leading to a better understanding of its phenotype, molecular characteristics, histogenesis, and possible mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. There is complete consensus on the B cell derivation of the tumour in most cases, and on the relevance of Epstein-Barr virus infection and defective cytokinesis in at least a proportion of patients. The REAL/WHO classification recognises a basic distinction between lymphocyte predominance HL (LP-HL) and classic HL (CHL), reflecting the differences in clinical presentation and behaviour, morphology, phenotype, and molecular features. CHL has been classified into four subtypes: lymphocyte rich, nodular sclerosing, with mixed cellularity, and lymphocyte depleted. The borders between CHL and anaplastic large cell lymphoma have become sharper, whereas those between LP-HL and T cell rich B cell lymphoma remain ill defined. Treatments adjusted to the pathobiological characteristics of the tumour in at risk patients have been proposed and are on the way to being applied. PMID:11896065

  18. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  19. Stress kinase inhibition modulates acute experimental pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Fleischer, F.; Dabew, R.; ke, B. G; Wagner, ACC

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To examine the role of p38 during acute experimental cerulein pancreatitis. METHODS: Rats were treated with cerulein with or without a specific JNK inhibitor (CEP1347) and/or a specific p38 inhbitor (SB203580) and pancreatic stress kinase activity was determined. Parameters to assess pancreatitis included trypsin, amylase, lipase, pancreatic weight and histology. RESULTS: JNK inhibition with CEP1347 ameliorated pancreatitis, reducing pancreatic edema. In contrast, p38 inhibition with SB203580 aggravated pancreatitis with higher trypsin levels and, with induction of acinar necrosis not normally found after cerulein hyperstimulation. Simultaneous treatment with both CEP1347 and SB203580 mutually abolished the effects of either compound on cerulein pancreatitis. CONCLUSION: Stress kinases modulate pancreatitis differentially. JNK seems to promote pancreatitis development, possibly by supporting inflammatory reactions such as edema formation while its inhibition ameliorates pancreatitis. In contrast, p38 may help reduce organ destruction while inhibition of p38 during induction of cerulein pancreatitis leads to the occurrence of acinar necrosis. PMID:11819771

  20. Blunt pancreatic trauma: A persistent diagnostic conundrum?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atin; Panda, Ananya; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-02-28

    Blunt pancreatic trauma is an uncommon injury but has high morbidity and mortality. In modern era of trauma care, pancreatic trauma remains a persistent challenge to radiologists and surgeons alike. Early detection of pancreatic trauma is essential to prevent subsequent complications. However early pancreatic injury is often subtle on computed tomography (CT) and can be missed unless specifically looked for. Signs of pancreatic injury on CT include laceration, transection, bulky pancreas, heterogeneous enhancement, peripancreatic fluid and signs of pancreatitis. Pan-creatic ductal injury is a vital decision-making parameter as ductal injury is an indication for laparotomy. While lacerations involving more than half of pancreatic parenchyma are suggestive of ductal injury on CT, ductal injuries can be directly assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or encoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Pancreatic trauma also shows temporal evolution with increase in extent of injury with time. Hence early CT scans may underestimate the extent of injures and sequential imaging with CT or MRI is important in pancreatic trauma. Sequential imaging is also needed for successful non-operative management of pancreatic injury. Accurate early detection on initial CT and adopting a multimodality and sequential imaging strategy can improve outcome in pancreatic trauma. PMID:26981225

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Lindkvist, Bjrn

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an important cause of maldigestion and a major complication in chronic pancreatitis. Normal digestion requires adequate stimulation of pancreatic secretion, sufficient production of digestive enzymes by pancreatic acinar cells, a pancreatic duct system without significant outflow obstruction and adequate mixing of the pancreatic juice with ingested food. Failure in any of these steps may result in pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, which leads to steatorrhea, weight loss and malnutrition-related complications, such as osteoporosis. Methods evaluating digestion, such as fecal fat quantification and the 13C-mixed triglycerides test, are the most accurate tests for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, but the probability of the diagnosis can also be estimated based on symptoms, signs of malnutrition in blood tests, fecal elastase 1 levels and signs of morphologically severe chronic pancreatitis on imaging. Treatment for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency includes support to stop smoking and alcohol consumption, dietary consultation, enzyme replacement therapy and a structured follow-up of nutritional status and the effect of treatment. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is administered in the form of enteric-coated minimicrospheres during meals. The dose should be in proportion to the fat content of the meal, usually 40-50000 lipase units per main meal, and half the dose is required for a snack. In cases that do not respond to initial treatment, the doses can be doubled, and proton inhibitors can be added to the treatment. This review focuses on current concepts of the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. PMID:24259956

  2. Non-radiological investigation of pancreatic disease.

    PubMed

    Brown, C M; Valori, R M

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is investigated by long established techniques: either by duodenal intubation studies, or by indirect functional methods. Serum markers and specific gastrointestinal hormones are available for the diagnosis of pancreatic inflammation, carcinoma, and rare pancreatic endocrine tumours. The clinical utility of these diagnostic tests is discussed in this article. PMID:8535594

  3. Biological characterization of adult MYC-translocation-positive mature B-cell lymphomas other than molecular Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Sietse M; Kreuz, Markus; Kohler, Christian W; Rosolowski, Maciej; Hasenclever, Dirk; Hummel, Michael; Kppers, Ralf; Lenze, Dido; Ott, German; Pott, Christiane; Richter, Julia; Rosenwald, Andreas; Szczepanowski, Monika; Schwaenen, Carsten; Stein, Harald; Trautmann, Heiko; Wessendorf, Swen; Trmper, Lorenz; Loeffler, Markus; Spang, Rainer; Kluin, Philip M; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomal translocations affecting the MYC oncogene are the biological hallmark of Burkitt lymphomas but also occur in a subset of other mature B-cell lymphomas. If accompanied by a chromosomal break targeting the BCL2 and/or BCL6 oncogene these MYC translocation-positive (MYC(+)) lymphomas are called double-hit lymphomas, otherwise the term single-hit lymphomas is applied. In order to characterize the biological features of these MYC(+) lymphomas other than Burkitt lymphoma we explored, after exclusion of molecular Burkitt lymphoma as defined by gene expression profiling, the molecular, pathological and clinical aspects of 80 MYC-translocation-positive lymphomas (31 single-hit, 46 double-hit and 3 MYC(+)-lymphomas with unknown BCL6 status). Comparison of single-hit and double-hit lymphomas revealed no difference in MYC partner (IG/non-IG), genomic complexity, MYC expression or gene expression profile. Double-hit lymphomas more frequently showed a germinal center B-cell-like gene expression profile and had higher IGH and MYC mutation frequencies. Gene expression profiling revealed 130 differentially expressed genes between BCL6(+)/MYC(+) and BCL2(+)/MYC(+) double-hit lymphomas. BCL2(+)/MYC(+) double-hit lymphomas more frequently showed a germinal center B-like gene expression profile. Analysis of all lymphomas according to MYC partner (IG/non-IG) revealed no substantial differences. In this series of lymphomas, in which immunochemotherapy was administered in only a minority of cases, single-hit and double-hit lymphomas had a similar poor outcome in contrast to the outcome of molecular Burkitt lymphoma and lymphomas without the MYC break. Our data suggest that, after excluding molecular Burkitt lymphoma and pediatric cases, MYC(+) lymphomas are biologically quite homogeneous with single-hit and double-hit lymphomas as well as IG-MYC and non-IG-MYC(+) lymphomas sharing various molecular characteristics. PMID:24179151

  4. Endocytoscopic findings of lymphomas of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The gastric lesions of various lymphomas were observed at the cellular level using endocytoscopy. Methods Endocytoscopy and magnifying endoscopy with narrow band imaging (NBI) were performed in 17 patients with lymphomas of the stomach. The lesions consisted of 7 with low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), 5 with gastric involvement by adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), 4 with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and 1 with peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Results On conventional endoscopy, 9 were classified as having superficial spreading type, 7 were mass-forming type, and 1 was diffuse infiltrating type. Anti-H. pylori treatment was given in the 7 MALT lymphoma cases. NBI magnification endoscopy invariably showed dilatation or ballooning and destruction of gastric pits and elongation and distortion in microvessels. Endocytoscopy showed mucosal aggregation of interstitial cellular elements in almost all gastric lymphoma cases. The nuclear diversity in size and configuration was exclusively seen in gastric lymphomas other than MALT lymphoma, whereas the nuclei of MALT lymphoma cells were regular and small to moderate in size. Inter-glandular infiltration by lymphomatous cell elements was frequently observed in MALT lymphoma and DLBCL, but it was uncommon in peripheral gastric T-cell malignancies. Endocytoscopy could identify the disease-specific histology, the lymphoepithelial origin, as inter-glandular infiltration of cellular components in MALT lymphoma and the possibly related DLBCL cases. Complete regression (CR) was observed in 2 of the 7 MALT lymphoma patients. In the 2 patients with CR who underwent repeat endocytoscopy, the ultra-high magnification abnormalities returned to normal, while they were unchanged in those without tumor regression. Conclusions On endocytoscopy, intra-glandular aggregation of cellular components was invariably identified in lymphomas of the stomach. Nuclear regularity in size and configuration may indicate the cytological grade, differentiating the indolent low-grade from aggressive lymphoproliferative diseases. The inter-glandular infiltration seen on endocytoscopy can indicate the lymphoepithelial lesions seen in MALT lymphoma and related DLBCL. Endocytoscopy would be applicable for virtual histopathological diagnosis of different lymphoproliferative disorders and their clinical assessment during ongoing endoscopy. PMID:24369830

  5. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  6. PCMdb: Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagpal, Gandharva; Sharma, Minakshi; Kumar, Shailesh; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most aggressive malignancy and urgently requires new biomarkers to facilitate early detection. For providing impetus to the biomarker discovery, we have developed Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database (PCMDB, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/pcmdb/), a comprehensive resource dedicated to methylation of genes in pancreatic cancer. Data was collected and compiled manually from published literature. PCMdb has 65907 entries for methylation status of 4342 unique genes. In PCMdb, data was compiled for both cancer cell lines (53565 entries for 88 cell lines) and cancer tissues (12342 entries for 3078 tissue samples). Among these entries, 47.22% entries reported a high level of methylation for the corresponding genes while 10.87% entries reported low level of methylation. PCMdb covers five major subtypes of pancreatic cancer; however, most of the entries were compiled for adenocarcinomas (88.38%) and mucinous neoplasms (5.76%). A user-friendly interface has been developed for data browsing, searching and analysis. We anticipate that PCMdb will be helpful for pancreatic cancer biomarker discovery.

  7. Pharmacological Ascorbate Radiosensitizes Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Cieslak, John A; Welsh, Jessemae L; Sibenaller, Zita A; Allen, Bryan G; Wagner, Brett A; Kalen, Amanda L; Doskey, Claire M; Strother, Robert K; Button, Anna M; Mott, Sarah L; Smith, Brian; Tsai, Susan; Mezhir, James; Goswami, Prabhat C; Spitz, Douglas R; Buettner, Garry R; Cullen, Joseph J

    2015-08-15

    The toxicity of pharmacologic ascorbate is mediated by the generation of H2O2 via the oxidation of ascorbate. Because pancreatic cancer cells are sensitive to H2O2 generated by ascorbate, they would also be expected to become sensitized to agents that increase oxidative damage such as ionizing radiation. The current study demonstrates that pharmacologic ascorbate enhances the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation as seen by decreased cell viability and clonogenic survival in all pancreatic cancer cell lines examined, but not in nontumorigenic pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. Ascorbate radiosensitization was associated with an increase in oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, which was reversed by catalase. In mice with established heterotopic and orthotopic pancreatic tumor xenografts, pharmacologic ascorbate combined with ionizing radiation decreased tumor growth and increased survival, without damaging the gastrointestinal tract or increasing systemic changes in parameters indicative of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate the potential clinical utility of pharmacologic ascorbate as a radiosensitizer in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26081808

  8. Innovative treatments for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, S M; Hrig, H; Kaufman, H L

    2001-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States with little or no impact from conventional treatment options. Significant advances in understanding basic immunology have renewed interest in using immunotherapy to treat pancreatic cancer. Cancer immunotherapy, including humanized MAbs, cytokines, and potent vaccine strategies, has been successful in animal models and is being evaluated in clinical trials. Gene therapy is also being explored using methods to inactivate oncogenes, replace defective tumor suppressor genes, confer enhanced chemosensitivity to tumor cells, and increase immunogenicity of tumor cells. Angiogenesis, an essential step in the growth and metastasis of pancreatic cancer, has been targeted by many antiangiogenic agents. Several clinical trials have been initiated to evaluate the role of these innovative strategies in patients with pancreatic cancer with increasingly sophisticated correlative studies to learn more about the mechanisms of tumor rejection with these agents. The rapid translation of basic science discoveries to clinical trials should result in the development of new effective treatments for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:11459285

  9. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases. PMID:26675058

  10. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Cryosurgery in Treating Patients With Residual, Relapsed, or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia With Nodal Disease

  11. The malignant lymphomas in Africa.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, P

    1991-10-01

    Africa, the "dark continent" and the source of such wonderful tales as King Solomon's Mines and Jock of the Bushveld, has an equally enthralling story to tell about malignant disease in general and the lymphomas in particular as they occur among its varied people. It is uncertain how far back in history contact existed with the rest of the world, primarily in the form of slave trading and colonization by, among others, the Portuguese and the British. Until recent times, however, Africa's secrets have remained largely undisturbed. Fragments of medical information are recorded in the diaries of those early, intrepid explorers, such as Albert Cook, Henry Stanley, David Livingstone, and Albert Schweitzer. However, it is only in recent years that the great natural experiments that have for so long been underestimated, and very much less understood, belatedly started to attract attention. Examples are the systematic studies by Denis Burkitt, who through perseverance unraveled the lymphoma that now bears his name, and the thought-provoking description of the immunoproliferative small intestinal disease carried out by the Cape Town group, with both illustrating the axiom that "the study of man is man." Despite such occasional outstanding achievements, there is still considerable paucity of data pertaining to the various lymphoreticular malignancies, so that only limited conclusions are possible. Certainly, lymphoma in Africa differs from that elsewhere in the world. In part, this may reflect a background of immunologic disturbance attributable to parasitic infestation, viral infection, rampant malnutrition, and the impact of a wide variety of vectors, such as mosquitoes, in disease transmission. Striking differences exist in the distribution of these tumors as the incidence and pattern are followed from the equator to the milder climates in the south. This confirmed phenomenon gives rise to the tantalizing suggestion that, to some significant extent, the changes reflect the influence of geography. Thus, there may be associated alterations in the fauna and flora that determine the presence of intermediary hosts that have an impact on the eventual expression of the malignant clone. Many questions remain unanswered. For example, how can the lower incidence of Hodgkin's disease and the predominance of high-grade malignancies in the tropics and subtropics be explained? To what extent does the lymphocytic and plasmacytic hyperplasia, ascribed to intense antigenic stimulus in Burkitt's lymphoma and myeloma--perhaps even other lymphomas, such as IPSID--predispose the host to a mutational event that leads to the emergence of each distinctive neoplasm?(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1938763

  12. Tanespimycin and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  13. Shock and terminal pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Becker, V; Stollhoff, K

    1985-03-01

    63% of 523 lethal cases of shock showed a DIC-syndrome. First of all the lung was affected with 69% of the cases with DIC-syndrome, followed by the pancreas with 52%. In search of disseminated intravascular coagulation, the pancreas is a very favourable organ since other acute superimposed findings normally don't exist. 18% of the cases with DIC-syndrome showed in addition to the DIC-syndrome a terminal pancreatitis resp. a tryptic necrosis. The pathogenesis of the tryptic necrosis can be explained by a decrease of blood supply in shock, which makes autodigestion possible. The tryptic necrosis differs from the hypoxic necrosis phenomenologically. The hypoxia as pathogenetic principle (Franz Bchner) causes the tryptic necrosis in an indirect way: it provides the conditions for autodigestion. This study aims to encourage to examine the pancreas of lethal cases of shock more regularly since this examination is an enrichment as well for the anatomic diagnosis of shock as for the comprehension of the pancreas. PMID:4001028

  14. Pancreatic pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Shirafkan MD, Ali; Boroumand MD, Nahal; Komak MD, Spogmai; Duchini MD, Andrea; Cicalese MD, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a primary malignancy that arises from the embryonic mesenchyme with the potential to differentiate into skeletal muscle. RMS of the biliary tree is extremely rare. We report a case of an undifferentiated pleomorphic RMS involving the liver and pancreas. Presentation of case A 62 year old Caucasian woman with rapidly growing abdominal mass and a history of endometrial adenocarcinoma underwent laparotomy due to compression symptoms and concerns of malignancy. A large mass arising from the pancreas and extending into the liver was identified and resected with a distal pancreatectomy associated with a left lateral liver segmentectomy. A diagnosis of pleomorphic RMS was made from the pathology specimen. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy were also performed. Unfortunately the patient died 2 years following treatment due to recurrence of the disease. Discussion P-RMS in the biliary tree is extremely rare (0.5%) and mostly seen in infants and children. Preoperative diagnosis is challenging since the symptoms are unspecific. Preoperative imaging rarely contributes to the final diagnosis. The only possible treatment for adult RMS is surgical resection of the tumor followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Long-term prognosis of P-RMS reported (predominantly of limbs) is poor. To our knowledge, no previous cases of RMS originating from the pancreas have been reported. Conclusion However RMS is an extremely rare tumor in adults, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with atypical pancreatic and liver lesions. PMID:26092712

  15. Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH-R) in Treating Patients With MYC-Associated B-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Salvia Hispanica Seed in Reducing Risk of Disease Recurrence in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; B Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Burkitt Leukemia; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Mycosis Fungoides; Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis-Like T-Cell Lymphoma; Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  17. Brentuximab Vedotin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory CD30+ Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-31

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  18. Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  19. Rituximab and Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-23

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  20. Metabolism addiction in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Blum, R; Kloog, Y

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, an aggressively invasive, treatment-resistant malignancy and the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, is usually detectable only when already inevitably fatal. Despite advances in genetic screening, mapping and molecular characterization, its pathology remains largely elusive. Renewed research interest in longstanding doctrines of tumor metabolism has led to the emergence of aberrant signaling pathways as critical factors modulating central metabolic networks that fuel pancreatic tumors. Such pathways, including those of Ras signaling, glutamine-regulatory enzymes, lipid metabolism and autophagy, are directly affected by genetic mutations and extreme tumor microenvironments that typify pancreatic tumor cells. Elucidation of these metabolic networks can be expected to yield more potent therapies against this deadly disease. PMID:24556680

  1. Pancreatic pathophysiology in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Meyerholz, David K; Engelhardt, John F

    2016-01-01

    The pancreas is one of the earliest, and most commonly affected, organs in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Studying the pathogenesis of pancreatic disease is limited in CF patients, due to its early clinical onset, co-morbidities and lack of tissue samples from the early phases of disease. In recent years, several new CF animal models have been developed that have advanced our understanding of both CF exocrine and endocrine pancreatic disease. Additionally, these models have helped us to better define the influence of pancreatic lesions on CF disease progression in other organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract and lung. Copyright Copyright 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26365583

  2. Colosplenic contained perforation secondary to colonic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Andrei; Arrese, David; Bach, John A

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of patient with colosplenic perforation from a colonic lymphoma. He initially was diagnosed with a splenic abscess subsequently developed a contained colonic perforation, underwent surgical treatment and intraoperatively was diagnosed with lymphoma. This is a rare entity in a non-immunocompromised host and has been scarcely reported. PMID:26557492

  3. Treatment of patients with transformed lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Montoto, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    Histologic transformation (HT) is a frequent event in the clinical course of patients with indolent lymphoma. Most of the available data in the literature comes from studies on transformation of follicular lymphoma (FL), as this is the most common indolent lymphoma; however, HT is also well documented following small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (SLL/CLL), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL), or marginal zone lymphoma (MZL), amongst other types of lymphoma, albeit most of the studies on transformation in these subtypes are case reports or short series. The outcome of patients with HT has traditionally been considered dismal with a median overall survival (OS) of around 1 year in most of the published studies. This prompted many authors to include stem cell transplant (SCT) as part of the treatment strategy for young and fit patients with HT. However, recent articles suggest that the outcome of patients with transformed lymphoma might be improving, questioning the need for such intensive therapies. The management of patients with HT is challenged by the heterogeneity of the population in terms of previous number and type of therapy lines and from their exclusion from prospective clinical trials. This review will examine whether the advent of new therapies has impacted on the prognosis of HT and on current treatment strategies. PMID:26637780

  4. Management of the marginal zone lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Vannata, Barbara; Stathis, Anastasios; Zucca, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Marginal zone lymphomas (MZL) represent around 8 % of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. During the last decades a number of studies have addressed the mechanisms underlying the disease development. Extranodal MZL lymphoma usually arises in mucosal sites where lymphocytes are not normally present from a background of either autoimmune processes, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis or Sjögren syndrome or chronic infectious conditions. In the context of a persistent antigenic stimulation, successive genetic abnormalities can progressively hit a B-cell clone among the reactive B-cells of the chronic inflammatory tissue and give rise to a MALT lymphoma. The best evidence of an etiopathogenetic link is available for the association between Helicobacter pylori-positive gastritis and gastric MALT lymphoma. Indeed, a successful eradication of this micro-organism with antibiotics can be followed by gastric MALT lymphoma regression in more than 2/3 of cases. Other microbial agents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of MZL arising in the skin (Borrelia burgdorferi), in the ocular adnexa (Chlamydophila psittaci), and in the small intestine (Campylobacter jejuni). The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has also been reported higher in MZL patients (particularly of the splenic type) than in the control population, suggesting a possible causative role of the virus. In non-gastric MALT lymphoma and in splenic MZL the role of the antimicrobial therapy is, however, less clear. This review summarizes the recent advances in Marginal Zone Lymphomas, addressing the critical points in their diagnosis, staging and clinical management. PMID:25655612

  5. Pancreatic surgery: evolution and current tailored approach

    PubMed Central

    Muina Mii?, Dubravka; Glav?i?, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Surgical resection of pancreatic cancer offers the only chance for prolonged survival. Pancretic resections are technically challenging, and are accompanied by a substantial risk for postoperative complications, the most significant complication being a pancreatic fistula. Risk factors for development of pancreatic leakage are now well known, and several prophylactic pharmacological measures, as well as technical interventions have been suggested in prevention of pancreatic fistula. With better postoperative care and improved radiological interventions, most frequently complications can be managed conservatively. This review also attempts to address some of the controversies related to optimal management of the pancreatic remnant after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:25392836

  6. Transpapillary drainage of pancreatic parenchymal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Smoczy?ski, Marian; Adrych, Krystian

    2015-01-01

    In the last two decades the strategy of treatment of necrotizing pancreatitis has changed. Endoscopic therapy of patients with symptomatic walled-off pancreatic necrosis has a high rate of efficiency. Here we present a description of a patient with parenchymal limited necrosis of the pancreas and a disruption of the main pancreatic duct. In the treatment, active transpapillary drainage of the pancreatic necrosis (through the major duodenal papilla) was performed and insertion of an endoprosthesis into the main pancreatic duct (through the minor duodenal papilla) was applied, which enabled a bypass over the infiltration and resulted in complete resolution. PMID:26649102

  7. A Case of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis due to Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong Kyoung; Kwak, Min Sun; Kim, Jai Hwan; Jang, Eun Sun; Hwang, Sung Wook; Hwang, Jin Hyeok; Joo, Li Jin; Yoon, Yoo Seok; Kim, Hae Ryoung

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is an extremely rare condition with various clinical manifestations. We report herein a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis due to pancreatic AVM in a 49-year-old man. This patient presented with epigastric pain that had developed after consuming alcohol 2 days prior to admission. Serum amylase and lipase levels were elevated and computed tomography revealed focal low-attenuation lesions with peripancreatic infiltrations in the pancreatic tail and multiple collateral vessels around the low-attenuation lesions. He was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis and pancreatic AVM. Although he had stopped drinking after the first attack of acute pancreatitis, his pancreatitis recurred twice within 3 months. He underwent a distal pancreatectomy after the third attack of acute pancreatitis. He was free of symptoms for 2 years after the pancreatectomy. PMID:20479928

  8. Notch Signaling in Pancreatic Development.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu-Yan; Zhai, Wen-Jun; Teng, Chun-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays a significant role in embryonic cell fate determination and adult tissue homeostasis. Various studies have demonstrated the deep involvement of Notch signaling in the development of the pancreas and the lateral inhibition of Notch signaling in pancreatic progenitor differentiation and maintenance. The targeted inactivation of the Notch pathway components promotes premature differentiation of the endocrine pancreas. However, there is still the contrary opinion that Notch signaling specifies the endocrine lineage. Here, we review the current knowledge of the Notch signaling pathway in pancreatic development and its crosstalk with the Wingless and INT-1 (Wnt) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathways. PMID:26729103

  9. Notch Signaling in Pancreatic Development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu-Yan; Zhai, Wen-Jun; Teng, Chun-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays a significant role in embryonic cell fate determination and adult tissue homeostasis. Various studies have demonstrated the deep involvement of Notch signaling in the development of the pancreas and the lateral inhibition of Notch signaling in pancreatic progenitor differentiation and maintenance. The targeted inactivation of the Notch pathway components promotes premature differentiation of the endocrine pancreas. However, there is still the contrary opinion that Notch signaling specifies the endocrine lineage. Here, we review the current knowledge of the Notch signaling pathway in pancreatic development and its crosstalk with the Wingless and INT-1 (Wnt) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) pathways. PMID:26729103

  10. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Dawra, Rajinder K.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review In this article, we review important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of pancreatitis. Recent Findings The relative contribution of intra-pancreatic trypsinogen activation and NF?B activation, the two major early independent cellular events in the etiology of pancreatitis, have been investigated using novel genetic models. Trypsinogen activation has traditionally held the spotlight for many decades as it is believed to be the central pathogenic event of pancreatitis However, recent experimental evidence points to the role of trypsin activation in early acinar cell damage but not in the inflammatory response of acute pancreatitis through NF?B activation. Further, chronic pancreatitis in the caerulein model develops independently of typsinogen activation. Sustained activation of the NF?B pathway, but not persistent intra-acinar expression of active trypsin, was shown to result in chronic pancreatitis. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling was shown to mediate downstream effects of pathologic rise in intracellular calcium. IL-6 was identified as a key cytokine mediating pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Summary Recent advances challenge the long-believed trypsin-centered understanding of pancreatitis. It is becoming increasingly clear that activation of intense inflammatory signaling mechanisms in acinar cells is crucial to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, which may explain the strong systemic inflammatory response in pancreatitis. PMID:23892538

  11. Molecular mechanisms of alcohol associated pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Clemens, Dahn L; Wells, Mark A; Schneider, Katrina J; Singh, Shailender

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is commonly associated with the development of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Despite this close association, the fact that only a small percentage of human beings who abuse alcohol develop pancreatitis indicates that alcohol abuse alone is not sufficient to initiate clinical pancreatitis. This contention is further supported by the fact that administration of ethanol to experimental animals does not cause pancreatitis. Because of these findings, it is widely believed that ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to injury and additional factors trigger the development of overt pancreatitis. How ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to pancreatitis is not entirely known. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ethanol and its metabolites have a number of deleterious effects on acinar cells. Important acinar cells properties that are affected by ethanol include: calcium signaling, secretion of zymogens, autophagy, cellular regeneration, the unfolded protein response, and mitochondrial membrane integrity. In addition to the actions of ethanol on acinar cells, it is apparent that ethanol also affects pancreatic stellate cells. Pancreatic stellate cells have a critical role in normal tissue repair and the pathologic fibrotic response. Given that ethanol and its metabolites affect so many pancreatic functions, and that all of these effects occur simultaneously, it is likely that none of these effects is THE effect. Instead, it is most likely that the cumulative effect of ethanol on the pancreas predisposes the organ to pancreatitis. The focus of this article is to highlight some of the important mechanisms by which ethanol alters pancreatic functions and may predispose the pancreas to disease. PMID:25133017

  12. Novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shing-Chun; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has become the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the last two decades. Only 3%-15% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had 5 year survival rate. Drug resistance, high metastasis, poor prognosis and tumour relapse contributed to the malignancies and difficulties in treating pancreatic cancer. The current standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however its efficacy is far from satisfactory, one of the reasons is due to the complex tumour microenvironment which decreases effective drug delivery to target cancer cell. Studies of the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer have revealed that activation of KRAS, overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2, inactivation of p16INK4A and loss of p53 activities occurred in pancreatic cancer. Co-administration of gemcitabine and targeting the molecular pathological events happened in pancreatic cancer has brought an enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of gemcitabine. Therefore, studies looking for novel targets in hindering pancreatic tumour growth are emerging rapidly. In order to give a better understanding of the current findings and to seek the direction in future pancreatic cancer research; in this review we will focus on targets suppressing tumour metastatsis and progression, KRAS activated downstream effectors, the relationship of Notch signaling and Nodal/Activin signaling with pancreatic cancer cells, the current findings of non-coding RNAs in inhibiting pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, brief discussion in transcription remodeling by epigenetic modifiers (e.g., HDAC, BMI1, EZH2) and the plausible therapeutic applications of cancer stem cell and hyaluronan in tumour environment. PMID:25152585

  13. Pancreatic involvement in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonlugur, Ugur; Mirici, Arzu; Karaayvaz, Muammer

    2014-01-01

    Background Few data are available concerning incidence, clinical picture, and prognosis for pancreatic metastases of small cell lung carcinoma. In this paper we review the related literature available in English language. Conclusions Although pancreatic metastases are generally asymptomatic, they can rarely produce clinical symptoms or functional abnormalities. The widespread use of multi-detector computerised tomography (CT) in contemporary medical practice has led to an increased detection of pancreatic metastases in oncology patients. Tissue diagnosis is imperative because radiological techniques alone are incapable of differentiating them from primary pancreatic tumours. Pancreatic metastases occur in the relative end stage of small cell lung cancer. The main complications of these lesions, although rare, are acute pancreatitis and obstructive jaundice. Early chemotherapy can provide a survival benefit even in patients with mild acute pancreatitis or extrahepatic biliary obstruction. PMID:24587774

  14. Rituximab, Lenalidomide, and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Follicular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-12

    Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  15. Study of Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Patients With Relapsed Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-09

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  16. Rituximab, Rasburicase, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Advanced B-Cell Leukemia or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-10

    Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  18. Study of Bortezomib and Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma or NK/T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-26

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma (Not Otherwise Specified); Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma Nasal Type; Enteropathy- Type T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) (ALK-1 Negative); Relapsed ALCL (ALK-1 Positive) Post Autologous Transplant

  19. Ileocolonic schistosomiasis presenting as lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zimbalist, E; Gettenberg, G; Brejt, H

    1987-05-01

    The blood flukes of the genus Schistosome have a wide geographic distribution. Schistosoma japonicum is found in the Far East while Schistosoma mansoni is found in Africa, South America, the Middle East, and the Carribean. There are numerous other species of Schistosome; however, japonicum, mansoni, and hematobium account for the majority of human disease. Infection of the gastrointestinal tract is not uncommon in the United States. Recognition of this disease is important for appropriate medical therapy and avoidance of unnecessary surgery. A case of schistosomiasis simulating small bowel lymphoma is presented and salient features of this infection are reviewed. PMID:3107371

  20. Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic ? Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeek, Petr; Dlaskov, Andrea; Plecit-Hlavat, Lydie

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed mechanisms that determine reactive oxygen species (redox) homeostasis, redox information signaling and metabolic/regulatory function of autocrine insulin signaling in pancreatic ? cells, and consequences of oxidative stress and dysregulation of redox/information signaling for their dysfunction. We emphasize the role of mitochondrion in ? cell molecular physiology and pathology, including the antioxidant role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2. Since in pancreatic ? cells pyruvate cannot be easily diverted towards lactate dehydrogenase for lactate formation, the respiration and oxidative phosphorylation intensity are governed by the availability of glucose, leading to a certain ATP/ADP ratio, whereas in other cell types, cell demand dictates respiration/metabolism rates. Moreover, we examine the possibility that type 2 diabetes mellitus might be considered as an inevitable result of progressive self-accelerating oxidative stress and concomitantly dysregulated information signaling in peripheral tissues as well as in pancreatic ? cells. It is because the redox signaling is inherent to the insulin receptor signaling mechanism and its impairment leads to the oxidative and nitrosative stress. Also emerging concepts, admiting participation of redox signaling even in glucose sensing and insulin release in pancreatic ? cells, fit in this view. For example, NADPH has been firmly established to be a modulator of glucose-stimulated insulin release. PMID:23304259

  1. Endoscopic management of chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Cremer, M; Deviere, J; Delhaye, M; Vandermeeren, A; Baize, M

    1993-01-01

    The indications of endoscopic management for chronic pancreatitis are strictly related to the classification of severe types and to the particular anatomy of the ducts: 1. Impacted or distal calculi: endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy (EPS) alone followed by ESWL when extraction fails. 2. Stone(s) and stricture: EPS, ESWL, NPC, and then 10F plastic stenting. 3. Relapsing strictures (with upwards dilatation) after 6 to 12 months stenting: silicone covered self expanding stent in a trial, versus surgical pancreaticojejunostomy. 4. Paraduodenal cyst bulging into the duodenum: ECD. 5. Jaundice and/or cholestasis due to stricture of the intrapancreatic CBD: 10F single or multiple plastic stent for calibration during 3 months. For relapsing cholestasis and stricture, 30F metal mesh stent versus surgical hepaticojejunostomy. The indications of endoscopic management for chronic pancreatitis are specific and require complete imaging and functional check up (ERCP, CT scanner, endosonography, pancreatic function tests). The technique is quite difficult and requires definition fluoroscopy, appropriate devices and experienced team. On this condition, the complication rate is very low and usually medically controlled. Treatment does not compromise any further surgery. Endoscopy allows to avoid or to postpone surgery which indication will become better defined and selected in the future. PMID:8368044

  2. Endoscopic Treatment of Pancreatic Calculi

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal. PMID:24944986

  3. Fictitious pancreatitis in choledochal cyst.

    PubMed

    Stringel, G; Filler, R M

    1982-08-01

    The classical presentation of choledocal cyst has been regarded as a triad of abdominal pain, jaundice and a palpable abdominal mass; unusual presentations include rupture of the choledocal cyst with bile peritonitis, pancreatitis and bleeding esophageal varices. We are reporting 3 children presenting clinically as recurrent acute pancreatitis with elevated serum amylase and found to have type I choledocal cyst. Despite elevated serum amylase there was no evidence of pancreatic inflammation at laparotomy. High amylase concentration was found in fluid contained within the cyst. This was probably responsible for the elevated serum amylase and also the inflammatory reaction seen in the wall of the choledocal cyst. These cases support the hypothesis that pancreatic reflux into the bile ducts is the etiological factor in the development of choledocal cyst. Our 3 cases were treated by cyst excision and have remained asymptomatic. The presence of hyperamylasemia should not delay appropriate surgical management. The treatment of choice is cyst excision, since it will eliminate factors contributing to the development of cholangitis and hyperamylasemia. PMID:6181241

  4. Molecular mechanisms of pancreatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Raghuwansh P; Saluja, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is still not well understood. This articles reviews recent advances in our understanding of AP with emphasis on literature published during the last year. Recent Findings Zymogen activation was shown to be sufficient to induce AP. Another key early event, NFkB activation has previously been shown to induce AP. The relationship between these two key early steps is beginning to be clarified. The mechanisms responsible for zymogen activation- pathologic calcium signaling, pH changes, colocalization and autophagy; mechanisms of NFkB activation and potential therapeutic targets both upstream and downstream of these key events have been explored. Additional key findings have been elucidation of the dual role of oxidative stress in AP and role of bioenergetics in determining mode of cell death, recognition of endoplasmic reticulum stress as an early step and duct cells as important players in pancreatic injury. Summary Current findings have provided further insight into the roles and mechanisms of zymogen activation and inflammatory pathways in pancreatic injury. Future studies are being undertaken to establish the relative contributions of these pathways during acute pancreatitis which will be critical to identifying successful therapeutic targets. PMID:21844752

  5. Molecular mechanisms of pancreatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Raghuwansh P; Saluja, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is still not well understood. This articles reviews recent advances in our understanding of AP with emphasis on literature published during the last year. Recent Findings Zymogen activation was shown to be sufficient to induce AP. Another key early event, NFkB activation has previously been shown to induce AP. The relationship between these two key early steps is beginning to be clarified. The mechanisms responsible for zymogen activation- pathologic calcium signaling, pH changes, colocalization and autophagy; mechanisms of NFkB activation and potential therapeutic targets both upstream and downstream of these key events have been explored. Additional key findings have been elucidation of the dual role of oxidative stress in AP and role of bioenergetics in determining mode of cell death, recognition of endoplasmic reticulum stress as an early step and duct cells as important players in pancreatic injury. Summary Current findings have provided further insight into the roles and mechanisms of zymogen activation and inflammatory pathways in pancreatic injury. Future studies are being undertaken to establish the relative contributions of these pathways during acute pancreatitis which will be critical to identifying successful therapeutic targets. PMID:22885948

  6. Respiratory failure in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, A. K.; Haggie, S. J.; Jones, R. B.; Basran, G. S.

    1995-01-01

    There are a number of important pulmonary complications of acute pancreatitis which make a significant contribution to the morbidity and mortality of the condition. The pathophysiology and management guidelines are given for each and approaches towards better treatment in the future are discussed. PMID:7644392

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing pancreatic cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  8. Pancreatic torsion in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Brabson, Tamera L.; Maki, Lynn C.; Newell, Susan M.; Ralphs, S. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A 6-month-old male intact Cane Corso mastiff dog was presented for a recent history of vomiting, abdominal pain, and lethargy. A diagnosis of pancreatic torsion was made during abdominal exploratory surgery and was confirmed with histopathology. The dog underwent partial pancreatectomy and recovered with no complications. PMID:25969579

  9. Isolation of Diverse Structural Compartments of Natural Organic Matter from the Kolyma River Watershed in East Siberian Arctic Using DEAE-Cellulose, XAD-8 Resin, C18 and PPL Cartridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andzhushev, M.; Dubinenkov, I.; Holmes, R. M.; Hatfield, K.; Perminova, I.; Bulygina, E. B.; Konstantinov, A.

    2011-12-01

    Natural Organic Matter (NOM) is an essential part of the global carbon cycle and plays a significant role in transport of organic carbon from terrestrial ecosystems into the World Ocean. The Arctic region is one of the most vulnerable with respect to climate change. The Kolyma River is one of the great Arctic Rivers. The particular feature of the Kolyma River watershed is its location in the continuous permafrost zone. Hence, research on structural composition of NOM in the Kolyma River basin is very important for understanding the carbon flux and NOM transformations on the way from permafrost to the Arctic Ocean under conditions of the changing climate. The purpose of this work was to isolate diverse structural compartments of NOM from permafrost mud streams and freshwater environments of the Kolyma River basin suited for further structural studies using a suite of different sorbents. Another goal was to assess applicability of these sorbents for developing a NOM fluxmeter - passive device for in situ measurement of fluxes. The following sorbents were used in this study: diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) cellulose , XAD-8 resin, Varian Bond Elute PPL and C18-cartridges. The choice of the sorbents was based on the following considerations. DEAE-cellulose is an anion-exchanging resin. It is suited the best for isolation of negatively charged NOM constituents of high and low molecular weight which represent the major part of freshwater NOM. Given positive charge inherent within the sorbent, sorption of negatively charged compartments from natural water occurs under flow through conditions without any prior treatment. This makes the DEAE cellulose very promising for in situ applications (e.g., for fluxmeter). Amberlite XAD-8 is a macroreticular resin which is used as a part of the standard protocol of International Humic Substances Society for isolation of freshwater humic substances (HS). The XAD-8 resin represents a neutral hydrophobic polymer. As a result, for isolation of HS, water should be acidified to transfer humic solutes into protonated form. The acidification step is a major disadvantage of this technique which makes it hardly suitable for in situ applications. Bond Elute C18 and PPL solid phase extraction cartridges were used for extraction of the most hydrophobic part of NOM. Both C18 and PPL demand prior acidification of water sample. Particular advantage of these sorbents is their suitability for very soft methanol elution of the sorbed sample that makes them ideal sorbents for samples aimed for structural analysis. All sorbents yielded very different recoveries of NOM of the total pool of organic carbon in the sampled water which accounted for DEAE - 85%, PPL - 65%, C18 - 65%, XAD-8 - 50%. The obtained samples were structurally characterized using elemental analysis and size exclusion chromatography. This study is part of the Polaris Project, an NSF-funded undergraduate field program based out of the Northeast Science Station in Cherskiy, Northeast Siberia (thepolarisproject.org).

  10. Primary testicular Burkitt lymphoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Kksal, Yavuz; Yalin, Bilgehan; Uner, Aysegl; Akyz, Canan; Han, Unsal; Bykpamuku, Mnevver

    2005-12-01

    A 13-year-old boy was referred to the authors' hospital following a right inguinal orchiectomy for a right scrotal mass. Histopathological examination revealed Burkitt lymphoma. The left testis was found to be small with heterogeneous parenchyma by scrotal ultrasound (US) and other systemic investigations were negative for lymphoma involvement. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy showed no evidence of involvement in the left testis. Considering stage I Burkitt lymphoma, chemotherapy was started. Following the first course, US findings changed: the volume of the left testis decreased and the parenchyma became homogeneous. The left testis was considered to be involved by lymphoma at initial diagnosis and chemotherapy was intensified. At the end of 5 months of chemotherapy the left testis was again heterogeneous in US. A wedge-biopsy was negative for lymphoma. The patient is under regular follow-up and is in complete remission 19 months after the end of chemotherapy. Primary testicular lymphoma is quite rare in children and experience is limited. Changes in testicular size and parenchyma by US should not necessarily indicate involvement by lymphoma in pubertal boys. PMID:16251177

  11. Nutrition in the management of necrotizing pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    O'Keefe, Stephen J D; Broderick, Timothy; Turner, Maryann; Stevens, Stacie; O'Keefe, J Sebastian

    2003-07-01

    Comparative trials have shown that enteral feeding (EN) is better than total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in acute pancreatitis. However, the following case report of a 64-year-old man with necrotizing pancreatitis suggests that EN may cause complications in patients with ductular damage. In the second week, this patient with acute pancreatitis developed >50% pancreatic necrosis, resulting in gastroduodenal obstruction and pain, leading to the use of TPN. A trial of EN delivered past the obstruction was associated with increased abdominal pain, leukocytosis, and pancreatic fluid accumulation. Measurement of the pancreatic response to feeding showed a 90% reduction in enzyme secretion compared to healthy volunteers, but no change in the uptake of stable isotope labeled amino acids into secreted trypsin. This suggests that enzymes were being synthesized by the remaining pancreatic tissue, but that some of the secretions were leaking into the inflammatory mass. Symptoms resolved after reinstitution of TPN and bowel rest. A further trial of EN was successful when the tube was advanced to the distal jejunum to avoid pancreatic stimulation. After 3 weeks of home EN, he was readmitted for surgical evacuation of an infected fluid collection. Although enteral feeding is generally better than TPN in the nutritional management of acute pancreatitis, there may be a subgroup of patients with ductular damage due to necrotizing disease in whom TPN and pancreatic rest may be safer. PMID:15017674

  12. The Proteome of Normal Pancreatic Juice

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Courtney J; Yancey, Kyle; Pitt, Henry A; Wang, Mu; Bemis, Kerry; Yip-Schneider, Michele T.; Sherman, Stuart; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Goggins, Michael D.; Schmidt, C. Max

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to characterize the proteome of normal pancreatic juice, to analyze the effect of secretin on the normal proteome, and to compare these results with published data from patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods Paired pancreatic fluid specimens (before and after intravenous secretin stimulation) were obtained during endoscopic pancreatography from three patients without significant pancreatic pathology. Proteins were identified and quantified by mass spectrometry-based protein quantification technology. The human RefSeq (NCBI) database was used to compare the data in normal patient samples with published data from three pancreatic cancer patients. Results A total of 285 proteins were identified in normal pancreatic juice. Ninety had sufficient amino acid sequences identified to characterize the protein with a high level of confidence. All 90 proteins were present before and after secretin administration but with altered relative concentrations, usually by 1-2 folds, after stimulation. Comparison with 170 published pancreatic cancer proteins yielded an overlap of only 42 proteins. Conclusions Normal pancreatic juice contains multiple proteins related to many biological processes. Secretin alters the concentration but not the spectrum of these proteins. The pancreatic juice proteome of normal and pancreatic cancer patients differ markedly. PMID:22129531

  13. Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

  14. Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Phil A; Zen, Yoh; Chari, Suresh T

    2015-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a form of chronic pancreatitis that is characterized clinically by frequent presentation with obstructive jaundice, histologically by a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with fibrosis, and therapeutically by a dramatic response to corticosteroid therapy. Two distinct diseases, type 1 and type 2 AIP, share these features. However, these 2 diseases have unique pancreatic histopathologic patterns and differ significantly in their demographic profiles, clinical presentation, and natural history. Recognizing the popular and long-standing association of the term "AIP" with what is now called "type 1 AIP," we suggest using "AIP" solely for type 1 AIP and to acknowledge its own distinct disease status by using "idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis" (IDCP) for type 2 AIP. AIP is the pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). The etiopathogenesis of AIP and IgG4-RD is largely unknown. However, the remarkable effectiveness of B-cell depletion therapy with rituximab in patients with AIP and IgG4-RD highlights the crucial role of B cells in its pathogenesis. IDCP is less commonly recognized, and little is known about its pathogenesis. IDCP has no biomarker but is associated with inflammatory bowel disease in ~25% of patients. Recently, the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP identified combinations of features that are diagnostic of both diseases. Both AIP and IDCP are corticosteroid responsive; however, relapses are common in AIP and rare in IDCP. Therefore, maintenance therapy with either an immunomodulator (eg, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, or mycophenolate mofetil) or rituximab is often necessary for patients with AIP. Long-term survival is excellent for both patients with AIP and patients with IDCP. PMID:25770706

  16. Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL Suppress Glucose Signaling in Pancreatic ?-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Dan S.; White, Sarah A.; Widenmaier, Scott B.; Saran, Varun V.; Taghizadeh, Farnaz; Hu, Xiaoke; Allard, Michael F.; Johnson, James D.

    2013-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins are established regulators of cell survival, but their involvement in the normal function of primary cells has only recently begun to receive attention. In this study, we demonstrate that chemical and genetic loss-of-function of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL significantly augments glucose-dependent metabolic and Ca2+ signals in primary pancreatic ?-cells. Antagonism of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL by two distinct small-molecule compounds rapidly hyperpolarized ?-cell mitochondria, increased cytosolic Ca2+, and stimulated insulin release via the ATP-dependent pathway in ?-cell under substimulatory glucose conditions. Experiments with single and double BaxBak knockout ?-cells established that this occurred independently of these proapoptotic binding partners. Pancreatic ?-cells from Bcl-2?/? mice responded to glucose with significantly increased NAD(P)H levels and cytosolic Ca2+ signals, as well as significantly augmented insulin secretion. Inducible deletion of Bcl-xL in adult mouse ?-cells also increased glucose-stimulated NAD(P)H and Ca2+ responses and resulted in an improvement of in vivo glucose tolerance in the conditional Bcl-xL knockout animals. Our work suggests that prosurvival Bcl proteins normally dampen the ?-cell response to glucose and thus reveals these core apoptosis proteins as integrators of cell death and physiology in pancreatic ?-cells. PMID:22933114

  17. HIV-Resistant Gene Modified Stem Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Lymphoma With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    HIV Infection; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  18. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-31

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Secondary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  19. What Are the Key Statistics about Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... factors for pancreatic cancer? What are the key statistics about pancreatic cancer? The American Cancer Society’s most ... risk factors (listed in the next section ). For statistics related to survival, see the section “ Pancreatic cancer ...

  20. Dasatinib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride Alone in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-29

    Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

  1. PanScan, the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium, and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium consists of more than a dozen prospective epidemiologic cohort studies within the NCI Cohort Consortium, whose leaders work together to investigate the etiology and natural history of pancreatic cancer.

  2. Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Etoposide, Dexamethasone, and Filgrastim For Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  3. Genetics of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yu; Feldman, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) comprises a group of T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas unified by common morphologic and immunophenotypic characteristics, but with a spectrum of clinical presentations and behaviors. Early identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements in some ALCLs led to recognition of ALK as an important diagnostic and prognostic biomarker, and a key driver of ALCL pathobiology. Rearrangements and other genetic abnormalities of ALK subsequently were identified in diverse other human malignancies. Recent clinical, pathologic, and genetic data have begun to shed light on ALK-negative ALCLs, revealing significant heterogeneity within this more ill-defined entity. PMID:26104084

  4. Genetics of anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yu; Feldman, Andrew L

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) comprises a group of T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas unified by common morphologic and immunophenotypic characteristics, but with a spectrum of clinical presentations and behaviors. Early identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements in some ALCLs led to recognition of ALK as an important diagnostic and prognostic biomarker, and a key driver of ALCL pathobiology. Rearrangements and other genetic abnormalities of ALK subsequently were identified in diverse other human malignancies. Recent clinical, pathologic, and genetic data have begun to shed light on ALK-negative ALCLs, revealing significant heterogeneity within this more ill-defined entity. PMID:26104084

  5. [Current management of marginal zone lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Bonnet, C; Lejeune, M; Van Kemseke, C; Bron, D; Beguin, Y

    2015-08-26

    Marginal zone lymphomas (MZL) encompass three sub-types: MALT (Mucosae Associated Lymphoid Tissue) MZL, nodal MZL and splenic MZL. Immunophenotyping is essential for accurate diagnosis. Helicobacter Pylori is frequently associated with gastric localizations and its eradication can be sufficient for cure. Treatment of nodal MZL is similar to that of follicular lymphoma. Eradication of hepatitis C virus, frequently associated with splenic MZL development, can be sufficient. Without HCV infection, splenectomy constitutes first line therapy. As other indolent lymphomas, disseminated MZL are incurable and treatment should be started only in symptomatic patients. PMID:26502581

  6. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors, Multiple Myeloma, or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma With or Without Impaired Liver or Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  7. Gemcitabine Hydrochloride and Cisplatin With or Without Veliparib or Veliparib Alone in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-27

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  8. [On PACAP-aggravated experimental acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Chen, Youdai; Zhou, Zongguang; Chen, Youqin; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Hongkai; Zheng, Xuelian

    2004-12-01

    The role of PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide), a peptidergic transmitter, in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis is not yet clear. This experiment was conducted to examine the action of exogenous PACAP on rat pancreas and on the course of experimental acute pancreatitis. The results showed that 5-30 microg/kg of PACAP slightly raised the serum amylase level, induced pancreatic edema (23.88% +/- 2.532%-25.86% +/- 1.974% of experiment groups versus 29.21% +/- 5.657% of control group), inflammatory cell infiltration, vacuolization of acinar cells, and occasionally fatty and parenchymal necroses. 15-30 microg/kg of PACAP aggravated cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis; the pancreatic edema became more marked (13.45% +/- 2.045%-17.66% +/- 4.652% of expreiment groups versus 21.83% +/- 3.013% of cerulein group, P<0.05), the serum amylase level became higher; and ascites, pancreatic bleeding, fatty and parenchymal necroses, and extensive vacuolization of acinar cells appeared. For sodium taurocholate-induced pancreatitis, 5-10 microg/kg of PACAP mildly attenuated the pancreatic edema, reduced the serum amylase level (1986.91 +/- 710.97-2944.33 +/- 1182.47 IU/L vs 3690.87 +/- 2277.99 IU/L, P<0.05), whereas it caused multifocal hemorrhage and prominent necrosis in pancreas. Except the cerulein-induced pancreatitis groups, other groups were found to have reduced pancreatic functional capillary density (FCD); when pancreatic edema was taken into consideration and calibrated FCD was introduced (FCD weighted against pancreatic wet/dry ratio), all groups revealed increases in pancreatic functional capillaries when compared with normal control. In conclusion, PACAP is proinflammatory in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis, PACAP plus cerulein can induce acute hemorrhagic/necrotizing pancreatitis, and the action of PACAP on cerulein-induced panceatitis may differ from that on sodium taurocholate-induced one. In this experiment, pancreatic FCD was underestimated due to pancreatic edema. PMID:15646343

  9. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Malignant Neoplasm; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrm Macroglobulinemia

  10. Oxaliplatin, Ifosfamide and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (p<0.001, analysis of variance linear contrast; n=8 for each group). Pathological events relating to these components were observed, including presence of inflammatory cells, deposited collagen, and phenotype conversion of PSCs. We demonstrate that label-free nonlinear optical microscopy is an efficient tool for dissecting PSCs and other pancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  12. Ibrutinib Before and After Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-14

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  13. Current status of endotherapy for chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kwek, Andrew Boon Eu; Ang, Tiing Leong; Maydeo, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is associated with varied morphological complications, including intraductal stones, main pancreatic ductal strictures, distal biliary strictures and pseudocysts. Endoscopic therapy provides a less invasive alternative to surgery. In addition, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy improves the success rate of endoscopic clearance of intraductal stones. However, recent data from randomised trials have shown better long-term outcomes with surgical drainage for obstructive pancreatic ductal disease. In patients with distal biliary strictures, stent insertion leads to good immediate drainage, but after stent removal, recurrent narrowing is common. Endoscopic drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts has excellent outcome and should be accompanied by pancreatic ductal stenting when a ductal communication is evident. In those who remain symptomatic, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided coeliac plexus block may provide effective but short-term pain relief. In this review, we present the current evidence for the role of endotherapy in the management of patients with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25630314

  14. Potential targets for pancreatic cancer immunotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Lindzy F; Hawkins, William G; Goedegebuure, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with an overall 5-year survival of less than 5%. As there is ample evidence that pancreatic adenocarcinomas elicit antitumor immune responses, identification of pancreatic cancer-associated antigens has spurred the development of vaccination-based strategies for treatment. While promising results have been observed in animal tumor models, most clinical studies have found only limited success. As most trials were performed in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, the contribution of immune suppressor mechanisms should be taken into account. In this article, we detail recent work in tumor antigen vaccination and the recently identified mechanisms of immune suppression in pancreatic cancer. We offer our perspective on how to increase the clinical efficacy of vaccines for pancreatic cancer. PMID:21463193

  15. Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Fazlul H. Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Pancreatic cancer: pathogenesis, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Fazlul H; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei

    2007-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-kappaB pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-kappaB, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:17174370

  17. Transcatheter Embolization of Pseudoaneurysms Complicating Pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Golzarian, Jafar; Nicaise, Nicole; Deviere, Jacques; Ghysels, Marc; Wery, Didier; Dussaussois, Luc; Gansbeke, Daniel van; Struyven, Julien

    1997-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic role of angiography in patients with pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis. Methods: Thirteen symptomatic pseudoaneurysms were treated in nine patients with pancreatitis. Eight patients had chronic pancreatitis and pseudocyst and one had acute pancreatitis. Clinical presentation included gastrointestinal bleeding in seven patients and epigastric pain without bleeding in two. All patients underwent transcatheter embolization. Results: Transcatheter embolization resulted in symptomatic resolution in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients, 18 and 28 days after embolization respectively, and was successfully treated by repeated emnbolization. One patient with severe pancreatitis died from sepsis 28 days after embolization. Follow-up was then available for eight patients with no relapse of bleeding after a mean follow-up of 32 months (range 9-48 months). Conclusion: Transcatheter embolization is safe and effective in the management of pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis.

  18. Pancreatic Cancer: Clinical Significance of Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Ohuchida, Kenoki; Ohtsuka, Takao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Hashizume, Makoto; Tanaka, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Background Improvement in the prognosis of patients with pancreatic cancer, novel effective screening and diagnostic strategies and treatments are needed. Recent advances in the understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis and tumor microenvironment have allowed identification of biomarkers for screening, diagnosis and prediction of cancer treatments, including novel therapies targeting specific cancer or stromal cell subpopulations. Personalized therapy in pancreatic cancer is also promising as several drugs such as S1, capecitabine and gemcitabine reportedly have significant therapeutic effects. Predictive markers are thus needed to select patients most likely to benefit from therapies based on gemcitabine or other drugs. Summary We review the clinical significance of promising screening, diagnostic, predictive and prognostic biomarkers based on genetic and epigenetic alterations and microRNA abnormalities in pancreatic cancer. We also review new types of biomarkers based on stromal cells, such as pancreatic stellate cells, in the microenvironment of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and idiopathic haemochromatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, P. L.; Thien, T.; Lamers, C. B.; Yap, S. H.; Reekers, P.; Strijk, S.

    1984-01-01

    The case history of a 34-year-old patient with precirrhotic idiopathic haemochromatosis and severe chronic steatorrhoea is presented. The pancreas had a normal appearance on ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography. However, pancreatic function tests revealed significant abnormalities. The pancreatic output of trypsin, amylase, lipase and bicarbonate was deficient and basal and stimulated serum pancreatic polypeptide levels were subnormal. In contrast, the oral glucose tolerance test was unimpaired. The pancreatic insufficiency had started suddenly during a summer vacation and may have had a viral aetiology. The hypothesis is advanced that in haemochromatosis the iron-laden pancreatic acinar and PP-producing cells are more susceptible to damage by viruses than normal pancreatic cells. PMID:6494088

  20. Valproic Acid Limits Pancreatic Recovery after Pancreatitis by Inhibiting Histone Deacetylases and Preventing Acinar Redifferentiation Programs.

    PubMed

    Eisses, John F; Criscimanna, Angela; Dionise, Zachary R; Orabi, Abrahim I; Javed, Tanveer A; Sarwar, Sheharyar; Jin, Shunqian; Zhou, Lili; Singh, Sucha; Poddar, Minakshi; Davis, Amy W; Tosun, Akif Burak; Ozolek, John A; Lowe, Mark E; Monga, Satdarshan P; Rohde, Gustavo K; Esni, Farzad; Husain, Sohail Z

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms by which drugs induce pancreatitis are unknown. A definite cause of pancreatitis is due to the antiepileptic drug valproic acid (VPA). On the basis of three crucial observations-that VPA inhibits histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDACs mediate pancreas development, and aspects of pancreas development are recapitulated during recovery of the pancreas after injury-we hypothesized that VPA does not cause injury on its own, but it predisposes patients to pancreatitis by inhibiting HDACs and provoking an imbalance in pancreatic recovery. In an experimental model of pancreatic injury, we found that VPA delayed recovery of the pancreas and reduced acinar cell proliferation. In addition, pancreatic expression of class I HDACs (which are the primary VPA targets) increased in the midphase of pancreatic recovery. VPA administration inhibited pancreatic HDAC activity and led to the persistence of acinar-to-ductal metaplastic complexes, with prolonged Sox9 expression and sustained β-catenin nuclear activation, findings that characterize a delay in regenerative reprogramming. These effects were not observed with valpromide, an analog of VPA that lacks HDAC inhibition. This is the first report, to our knowledge, that VPA shifts the balance toward pancreatic injury and pancreatitis through HDAC inhibition. The work also identifies a new paradigm for therapies that could exploit epigenetic reprogramming to enhance pancreatic recovery and disorders of pancreatic injury. PMID:26476347

  1. Mesenteric venous collateral vessels mimicking cystic pancreatic neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, B; Robbins, J B; Zeglis, M D; Scheiman, J M; Simeone, D M; Francis, I R

    2010-01-01

    We report an unusual case of intrapancreatic mesenteric venous collateral vessels following partial pancreatic surgical resection resembling pancreatic neoplasm upon greyscale sonographic and unenhanced CT examinations. PMID:20675462

  2. Surgical therapy in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Neal, C P; Dennison, A R; Garcea, G

    2012-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas which causes chronic pain, as well as exocrine and endocrine failure in the majority of patients, together producing social and domestic upheaval and a very poor quality of life. At least half of patients will require surgical intervention at some stage in their disease, primarily for the treatment of persistent pain. Available data have now confirmed that surgical intervention may produce superior results to conservative and endoscopic treatment. Comprehensive individual patient assessment is crucial to optimal surgical management, however, in order to determine which morphological disease variant (large duct disease, distal stricture with focal disease, expanded head or small duct/minimal change disease) is present in the individual patient, as a wide and differing range of surgical approaches are possible depending upon the specific abnormality within the gland. This review comprehensively assesses the evidence for these differing approaches to surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis. Surgical drainage procedures should be limited to a small number of patients with a dilated duct and no pancreatic head mass. Similarly, a small population presenting with a focal stricture and tail only disease may be successfully treated by distal pancreatectomy. Long-term results of both of these procedure types are poor, however. More impressive results have been yielded for the surgical treatment of the expanded head, for which a range of surgical options now exist. Evidence from level I studies and a recent meta-analysis suggests that duodenum-preserving resections offer benefits compared to pancreaticoduodenectomy, though the results of the ongoing, multicentre ChroPac trial are awaited to confirm this. Further data are also needed to determine which of the duodenum-preserving procedures provides optimal results. In relation to small duct/minimal change disease total pancreatectomy represents the only valid surgical option for the treatment of pain. Though previously dismissed as a valid treatment due to the resultant brittle diabetes, the advent of islet cell autotransplantation has enabled this procedure to produce excellent long-term results in relation to pain, endocrine status and quality of life. Given these excellent short- and long-term results of surgical therapy for chronic pancreatitis, and the poor symptom control provided by conservative and endoscopic treatment (coupled to near inevitable progression to exocrine and endocrine failure), it is likely that future years will see a further shift towards the earlier and more frequent surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis. Furthermore, the expansion of islet cell autotransplantation to a wider range of pancreatic resections has the potential to even further improve the outcomes of surgical treatment for this problematic yet increasingly common disease. PMID:23207614

  3. Can early endoscopic ultrasound predict pancreatic necrosis in acute pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder S.; Bhasin, Deepak K.; Sharma, Vishal; Sharma, Ravi; Chaudhary, Vinita; Chhabra, Puneet

    2014-01-01

    Background Presence of pancreatic/extrapancreatic necroses (PN/EPN) is an important prognostic indicator in acute pancreatitis (AP) and their early detection is a challenge. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) provides high resolution images of pancreas but there is paucity of data on its role in AP. Methods Consecutive patients with AP seen at our center from December 2012-November 2013 and presenting within 5 days of onset of symptoms were prospectively enrolled. EUS was done on the day of admission with a radial echoendoscope and pancreatic/peripancreatic findings were compared with the abdominal computed tomography (CT) findings performed on day 7. Results Of the 46 patients evaluated, 14 were excluded, and 32 patients (22 male; age 40.6812.46 years) underwent EUS at admission. The etiology of AP was alcohol in 16, gallstones in 13, and idiopathic in 3 patients. Necrotizing pancreatitis was present in 20 (62%) patients, and mean CT severity index was 6.452.96. In patients without PN (n=12), EUS revealed normal echo pattern in 6 patients and diffusely hyperechoic and enlarged pancreas in 6 patients. In patients with PN/EPN, EUS revealed multiple hypoechoic areas (>5 mm) in 5 patients, multiple hyperechoic areas (>5 mm) in 7 patients and mixed hypo and hyperechoic areas in 8 patients. Also, 13 of these patients had peripancreatic hypoechoic areas that correlated with EPN. Moreover, EUS detected common bile duct (CBD) stones in two patients, pleural effusion in 17 patients, and ascites in 15 patients. Conclusion EUS done at admission can reliably detect PN and co-existent disorders like CBD stones. PMID:25331790

  4. Bortezomib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  5. [Diagnosis and therapy of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Bergamini, C; Luchetti, P; Tieghi, C

    1984-06-23

    A retrospective analysis of 83 cases of acute pancreatitis treated in the General Surgery Division of the G. Fornaroli Hospital in Magenta (Milan) is presented. It is emphasised that acute pancreatitis should be suspected in all hospitalised acute abdominal cases and the need for prompt medical and surgical treatment is also underlined, during acute pancreatitis are analysed and discussed with a review of the most appropriate therapeutic measures. PMID:6738906

  6. Advances in immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer: 2013.

    PubMed

    DeVito, Nicholas C; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the more difficult malignancies to treat, and there is a great need for less toxic, effective regimens. Immunotherapy has shown potential in the treatment of pancreatic cancer, and at ASCO 2013 there were several progressive advances in its clinical application. Abstracts #3067, #3049, #3007, #4040, #LBA4004, and #3090 will be discussed. New developments in the field of immunotherapy are promising novel treatments for pancreatic neoplasms with tolerable side effect profiles. PMID:23846925

  7. Pancreatic cystic tumors.

    PubMed

    Salvia, R; Festa, L; Butturini, G; Tonsi, A; Sartori, N; Biasutti, C; Capelli, P; Pederzoli, P

    2004-04-01

    Cystic tumors of the pancreas are less frequent than other tumors in neoplastic pancreatic pathology, but in recent years the literature has reported an increasing number. After the first report by Becourt in 1830, cystic tumors were classified into 2 different types by Compagno and Oertel in 1978: benign tumors with glycogen-rich cells and mucinous cystic neoplasms with overt and latent malignancy. The WHO classification of exocrine tumors of the pancreas, published in 1996, is based on the histopathological features of the epithelial wall, which are the main factor in differential diagnosis with cystic lesions of the pancreas. Thanks to the knowledge acquired up to now, a surgical procedure is not always required because the therapeutic choice is conditioned by the correct classification of this heterogeneous group of tumors. Clinical signs are not really useful in the clinical work up, most patients have no symptoms and when clinical signs are present, they may help us to pinpoint the organ of origin but never to identify the type of pathology. In the last few years, the great improvement in imaging has enabled us not only to discriminate cystic from solid lesions, but also to identify the features of the lesions and label them preoperatively. More invasive diagnostic procedures such as fine needle aspiration and intracystic fluid tumor marker level are not really useful because they are not sensitive and the cystic wall can show different degrees of dysplasia and de-epithelialization. These are the reasons for sending the entire specimen to pathology. Good cooperation between surgeons, pathologists, radiologists and gastroenterologists is mandatory to increase the chances of making a proper diagnosis. Therefore, we must analyze all the information we have, such as age, sex, clinical history, location of the tumor and radiological features, in order to avoid the mistake of treating a cystic neoplasm as a benign lesion or as a pseudocyst, as described in the literature. Except for inoperable cases due to the critical condition of the patient or non-resectable lesions, surgical treatment differs with the diagnosis. Cystic tumors of the pancreas, therefore, are a heterogeneous group of tumors, with a real problem regarding differential diagnosis between neoplastic and inflammatory lesions. Even with a proper work up, some perplexity may remain about the nature of the lesion and in these cases the surgical procedure has a therapeutic value as well as playing a diagnostic role. The role of surgery is central in the treatment of these tumors because it could be curative when complete resection is possible. In this way, the lack of good therapeutic results with chemotherapy and radiotherapy force the surgeon to go ahead with the procedure. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms represent a new and, from the epidemiological point of view, important chapter in the world of cystic tumors. The margin of resection is important and the surgeon has to be aware that in order to have a curative resection, total pancreatectomy is sometimes required. In the last few years the therapeutic approach has changed thanks to new knowledge of the biological behavior of these tumors. In fact, from a surgical approach in all cases, we are now discussing the possibility of a follow-up not only for asymptomatic serous cystadenomas but also for the little branch side intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) in critical patients. A follow-up could be planned even for solid pseudopapillary tumors but it seems risky to leave untreated big tumors in young patients without a certain diagnosis and with so few studies reported in the literature. PMID:15238892

  8. Treatment Options for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... virus type I or Epstein-Barr virus infection. Helicobacter pylori infection. Taking immunosuppressant drugs after an organ transplant. Signs ... lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma , antibiotic therapy to treat Helicobacter pylori infection is given first. For tumors that do not ...

  9. Can Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Be Prevented?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... linked to some lymphomas of the stomach. Treating H. pylori infections with antibiotics and antacids may lower this risk, ... has not been proven yet. Most people with H. pylori infection have no symptoms, and some have only mild ...

  10. Stages of Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... virus type I or Epstein-Barr virus infection. Helicobacter pylori infection. Taking immunosuppressant drugs after an organ transplant. Signs ... lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma , antibiotic therapy to treat Helicobacter pylori infection is given first. For tumors that do not ...

  11. Risk factors identified for certain lymphoma subtypes

    Cancer.gov

    In a large international collaborative analysis of risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scientists were able to quantify risk associated with medical history, lifestyle factors, family history of blood or lymph-borne cancers, and occupation for 11

  12. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hodgkin A lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system, which is a part of the body's immune ... not aware of the inner workings of our lymphatic systems unless the lymph nodes , or glands, become swollen. ...

  13. Burkitt lymphoma involving jejunum in children

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Feng, Jiexiong; Sun, Xiaoyi

    2014-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy presented with 3-month bloody stool from unknown origin and progressive anemia. In this case report, we review the incidence, diagnosis, pathology, treatment and prognosis of Burkitt Lymphoma. PMID:25568790

  14. Targeted drug induces responses in aggressive lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Preliminary results from clinical trials in a subtype of lymphoma show that for a number of patients whose disease was not cured by other treatments, the drug ibrutinib can provide significant anti-cancer responses with modest side effects.

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Primary CNS Lymphoma)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... therapy Steroids are hormones made naturally in the body. They can also be made in a laboratory and used as drugs. Glucocorticoids are steroid drugs that have an anticancer effect in lymphomas . New types of treatment are being ...

  16. Treatment Options for Primary CNS Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... therapy Steroids are hormones made naturally in the body. They can also be made in a laboratory and used as drugs. Glucocorticoids are steroid drugs that have an anticancer effect in lymphomas . New types of treatment are being ...

  17. General Information about Primary CNS Lymphoma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... therapy Steroids are hormones made naturally in the body. They can also be made in a laboratory and used as drugs. Glucocorticoids are steroid drugs that have an anticancer effect in lymphomas . New types of treatment are being ...

  18. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

    Cancer.gov

    A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

  19. Hypotension Associated with Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Geetanjali; Hamad, Hussein; Mohajer, Roozbeh; Catchatourian, Rosalind; Kovarik, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Hypotension is an extremely rare manifestation of Hodgkin lymphoma. We report the case of a patient who presented with new onset hypotension and was diagnosed with urosepsis and septic shock requiring pressor support for maintaining his blood pressure. computed tomography (CT) scan of abdomen showed liver lesions, which were new on comparison with a CT abdomen done 3 weeks back. Biopsy of the liver lesions and subsequently a bone marrow biopsy showed large atypical Reed-Sternberg cells, positive for CD15 and CD 30 and negative for CD45, CD3 and CD20 on immuno-histochemical staining, hence establishing the diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma. The mechanism involved in Hodgkin lymphoma causing hypotension remains anecdotal, but since it is mostly seen in patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma, it is hypothetically related to a complex interaction between cytokines and mediators of vasodilatation. Here we review relevant literature pertaining to presentation and pathogenesis of this elusive and rare association. PMID:25317321

  20. Primary Vitreoretinal Lymphoma Masquerading as Refractory Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Zloto, Ofira; Elkader, Amir E. Abd; Fabian, Ido Didi; Vishnevskia-Dai, Vicktoria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a patient with primary vitreoretinal lymphoma masquerading as retinitis. Methods Retrospective review of the patient's clinical, histopathological and imaging records. Results Cytopathology was negative for malignancy, and preliminary polymerase chain reaction results supported the diagnosis of varicella zoster virus retinitis. Therefore, the patient was treated with antiviral therapy. However, under this treatment, the retinitis progressed. As a result, primary vitreoretinal lymphoma was suspected, and empirical treatment with intravitreal methotrexate injections was started. Under this treatment, the ocular features improved. Five months after initial ocular presentation and ocular resolution, the patient presented with central nervous system lymphoma. Conclusion This case should raise the awareness of the variable clinical presentations, the challenging diagnosis and treatment of primary vitreoretinal lymphoma. All cases should be continuously systemically evaluated. PMID:26557084

  1. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Epithelial Cancer, Malignant Lymphoma, or Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Chondrosarcoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  2. Genetic predisposition to lymphomas in mice.

    PubMed

    Hiai, H

    1996-10-01

    The spontaneous mouse lymphoma is a model of multifactorial genetic disease. It is induced by the endogenous murine leukemia virus (MuLV), whose genome is inherited as a Mendelian dominant trait. Lymphoma development takes place in multiple stages affected by many host genetic and epigenetic factors. An inbred strain SL/Kh with a high incidence of pre-B lymphomas has been established and the genetic predisposition of SL/Kh mice to lymphomas is being studied in the crosses with other inbred strains of mice. In the cross to the NFS/N lacking endogenous MuLV genome, it has been shown that lymphomas are induced by the expression of Emv-11 provirus (Chr. 7), and the types of B-lineage lymphomas are determined by combinations of the host genes, Esl-1 (Chr. 17) and Foc-1 (Chr. 4). Another gene, Tlsm-1 (Chr. 7) that determines the type of lymphomas to be T-lineage, is identified in the cross with AKR/Ms, with a high incidence of T-lymphomas. The role of the thymus in the development of T-lymphomas in the mouse, and the possible relevance of Tlsm-1 in this step, is discussed. The length of the latent period is determined by a gene Lia-1 (Chr. 17). A maternal resistance factor that is a maternal antibody to MuLV transmitted via milk and that epigenetically inhibits MuLV expression in SL/Ni-Eco-, one of subline of SL/NI mice, has been shown. Weak but definitive maternal resistance also operates in SL/Ni-Eco+, a subline lacking the maternal antibody to MuLV. In the latter, there is a recessive resistance gene Nir-1 (Chr. 4). In the cross with MSM/Ms, a wild mice-derived inbred strain, two resistance genes, Msmr-1 (Chr. 17) and Msmr-2 (Chr. 18), have been identified. In SL/Kh, all of these host genetic and epigenetic factors are favorable for lymphoma development. This model offers not only an understanding of the pathogenesis of virus-induced lymphomas but also may provide starting material for the comparative approach to homologous human diseases. PMID:8916139

  3. An unreported complication of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Muthukumarasamy, G; Shanmugam, V; Yule, SR; Ravindran, R

    2007-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis constitutes 3% of all admissions with abdominal pain. There are reports of osteal fat necrosis leading to periosteal reactions and osteolytic lesions following severe pancreatitis, particularly in long bones. A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with acute pancretitis, who later developed spinal discitis secondary to necrotizing pancreatitis. He was treated conservatively with antibiotics and after a month he recovered completely without any neurological deficit. This case is reported for its unusual and unreported spinal complications after acute pancreatitis. PMID:17659740

  4. Systemic Therapies for Advanced Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Raj, Nitya; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are an uncommon tumor type and compose 1% to 2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. They are rarely localized at presentation and are typically diagnosed in the presence of metastatic disease. The management poses a significant challenge because of the heterogeneous clinical presentations and varying degrees of aggressiveness. A variety of systemic therapies have been developed for the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, including somatostatin analogues, a select group of cytotoxic chemotherapy agents, and targeted or biological agents. This article reviews the available systemic therapy options for advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:26614372

  5. Exocrine Pancreatic Carcinogenesis and Autotaxin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kadekar, Sandeep; Silins, Ilona; Korhonen, Anna; Dreij, Kristian; Al-Anati, Lauy; Hgberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    Exocrine pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Genetic analysis suggests a causative role for environmental factors, but consistent epidemiological support is scarce and no biomarkers for monitoring the effects of chemical pancreatic carcinogens are available. With the objective to identify common traits for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors we studied the National Toxicology Program (NTP) bioassay database. We found that male rats were affected more often than female rats and identified eight chemicals that induced exocrine pancreatic tumors in males only. For a hypothesis generating process we used a text mining tool to analyse published literature for suggested mode of actions (MOA). The resulting MOA analysis suggested inflammatory responses as common feature. In cell studies we found that all the chemicals increased protein levels of the inflammatory protein autotaxin (ATX) in Panc-1, MIA PaCa-2 or Capan-2 cells. Induction of MMP-9 and increased invasive migration were also frequent effects, consistent with ATX activation. Testosterone has previously been implicated in pancreatic carcinogenesis and we found that it increased ATX levels. Our data show that ATX is a target for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors in rats. Several lines of evidence implicate ATX and its product lysophosphatidic acid in human pancreatic cancer. Mechanisms of action may include stimulated invasive growth and metastasis. ATX may interact with hormones or onco- or suppressor-genes often deregulated in exocrine pancreatic cancer. Our data suggest that ATX is a target for chemicals promoting pancreatic tumor development. PMID:22952646

  6. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A.; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T.; Jeon, Christie Y.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy. PMID:25426078

  7. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?

    PubMed Central

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

  8. Acute pancreatitis: international classification and nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Bollen, T L

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing and it is associated with a major healthcare concern. New insights in the pathophysiology, better imaging techniques, and novel treatment options for complicated AP prompted the update of the 1992 Atlanta Classification. Updated nomenclature for pancreatic collections based on imaging criteria is proposed. Adoption of the newly Revised Classification of Acute Pancreatitis 2012 by radiologists should help standardise reports and facilitate accurate conveyance of relevant findings to referring physicians involved in the care of patients with AP. This review will clarify the nomenclature of pancreatic collections in the setting of AP. PMID:26602933

  9. Advances in cryoablation for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Mei; Niu, Li-Zhi; Chen, Ji-Bing; Xu, Ke-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a common cancer of the digestive system with a poor prognosis. It is characterized by insidious onset, rapid progression, a high degree of malignancy and early metastasis. At present, radical surgery is considered the only curative option for treatment, however, the majority of patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed too late to undergo surgery. The sensitivity of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy or radiotherapy is also poor. As a result, there is no standard treatment for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Cryoablation is generally considered to be an effective palliative treatment for pancreatic cancer. It has the advantages of minimal invasion and improved targeting, and is potentially safe with less pain to the patients. It is especially suitable in patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer. However, our initial findings suggest that cryotherapy combined with 125-iodine seed implantation, immunotherapy or various other treatments for advanced pancreatic cancer can improve survival in patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Although these findings require further in-depth study, the initial results are encouraging. This paper reviews the safety and efficacy of cryoablation, including combined approaches, in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26811625

  10. Reconstruction after pancreatic trauma by pancreaticogastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Gonzalo Martín; Morillas, Patricia Jiménez; Pino, José C. Rodríguez; Canis, José M. Morón; Argenté, Francesc X. González

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic lesions are very infrequent after closed abdominal trauma (5% of cases) with a complication rate that affects 30–40% of patients, and a mortality rate that can reach 39%. In our experience, closed abdominal traumatisms occurring at typical popular horse-riding festivals in our region constitute a high risk of pancreatic trauma. The purpose of the present paper is to raise awareness about our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic lesions secondary to closed abdominal traumatism. Presentation of case We present the clinical cases of two young patients who, after suffering blunt abdominal trauma secondary to the impact of a horse during the celebration of typical horse-riding festival, were diagnosed with pancreatic trauma type III. The treatment was surgical in both cases and consisted in performing a pancreaticogastric anastomosis with preservation of the distal pancreas and spleen. The postoperative period was uneventful and, at present, both patients are asymptomatic. Discussion Signs and symptoms caused by pancreatic lesion are unspecific and difficult to objectify. With some limitations CT is the imaging test of choice for diagnosis and staging in the acute phase. The Wirsung section is indication for surgical treatment. The most extended surgical procedure in these cases is the resection of pancreatic body, tail, and spleen. Conclusion The identification of a pancreatic injury after closed abdominal trauma requires a high suspicion based on the injury mechanism. A safer option may be the distal pancreatic preservation with pancreaticogastric anastomosis in grade III lesions with healthy pancreatic tissue. PMID:25744560

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis with extraocular muscles involvement.

    PubMed

    Yousuf Tasneem, Abbas Ali; Yousuf, Hamza Aasim; Luck, Nasir Hassan; Abbas, Zaigham; Anis, Sabiha; Hassan, Syed Mujahid

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is characterised by diffuse enlargement of pancreas, narrowing of pancreatic duct, lymphoplasmacytic infiltrations and fibrosis. The disease is responsive to corticosteroid. We report the case of a 32-year-old male who presented with unilateral exophthalmos and obstructive jaundice secondary to pancreatic head mass and biliary tract stricture. Serum immunoglobulin G level was raised with a very high immunoglobulin G4 subclass. Ophthalmological imaging revealed unilateral thickening of extraocular muscles. The patient responded well to corticosteroid with resolution of biliary strictures, pancreatic head mass and exophthalmos. PMID:26440848

  12. New drugs in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Arbuck, S G; Sorensen, J M; Christian, M C; Ho, P; Pluda, J M; Cheson, B D

    1997-01-01

    While novel agents designed to target molecular abnormalities involved in lymphoma pathogenesis are most likely to improve current therapeutic results, cytotoxic therapy remains the main-stay of therapy. Several new chemotherapy agents, including purine antimetabolites, taxanes, camptothecins, suramin, and protein kinase C inhibitors, are discussed. Other issues important in lymphoma drug development, including the limited patient population available for evaluation of investigational agents, are also considered. PMID:9187445

  13. Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL) diagnostic difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Skalec, Karolina; Litwin, Linda; Drozdz, Katarzyna; Gac, Pawel; Jazwiec, Przemyslaw; Zymlinski, Robert; Molenda, Wlodzimierz; Szuba, Andrzej; Janczak, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL) is the very rare disease that is associated with a high mortality rate. A prompt and proper diagnosis may affect the prognosis, and proper treatment may improve life expectancy. This report documents the case of a 74-year-old female with primary cardiac lymphoma. Unfortunately, the patient died from heart failure on her 23rd day in hospital. PMID:26702288

  14. A Phase II Study of Single Agent Brentuximab Vedotin in Relapsed/Refractory CD30 Low (<10%) Mature T Cell Lymphoma (TCL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-12

    T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepato-splenic T-cell Lymphoma; Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T-cell Lymphoma; NK T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Mycosis Fungoides

  15. CTOP/ITE/MTX Compared With CHOP as the First-line Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Young Patients With T Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-24

    ALK-negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Peripherial T Cell Lymphoma,Not Otherwise Specified; Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T Cell Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis Like T Cell Lymphoma

  16. Radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Everaert, Bert R; Van den Heuvel, Paul

    2014-04-01

    The long-term cardiac complications of radio(chemo)therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma include coronary artery disease, cardiac arrhythmias, valvular disease, pericardial disease, cardiomyopathy and heart failure. The extent of myocardial damage after radiotherapy is dependent on the dose, the volume and the technique of chest irradiation. Also, patient-specific factors, such as the age of the patient at the time of treatment and the presence of classical cardiac risk factors are supposed to be important. The relative risk of cardiovascular events is estimated to be 2 to 7 times higher than the general population. The patient's clinical picture can vary from asymptomatic to an acute presentation of end-stage coronary artery or valvular disease. PMID:24783474

  17. Salvage therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Quddus, Fahd; Armitage, James O

    2009-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is a clonal lymphoid malignancy that affects over 7000 patients in the United States annually. The disease remains one of the great success stories in the recent history of cancer treatment. More than 80% of HL patients will be expected to be long-term survivors because of recent advances in radiation therapy and combined chemotherapy. However, for the subset of patients who relapse after initial therapy, HL remains a challenging disease. Indeed, for patients who relapse after salvage high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant, effective therapeutic options remain limited, and further new therapies are warranted. This article provides a review of the current literature regarding salvage therapy for HL. PMID:19390313

  18. Gene Therapy After Frontline Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-06

    AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; HIV Infection

  19. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With HTLV-Associated T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-15

    Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Chronic Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; Lymphomatous Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  20. Transmission of naturally occurring lymphoma in macaque monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, R D; Blake, B J; Chalifoux, L V; Sehgal, P K; King, N W; Letvin, N L

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneously occurring rhesus monkey lymphomas were transmitted into healthy rhesus monkeys by using tumor cell suspensions. The naturally arising tumors included an immunoblastic sarcoma and an undifferentiated lymphoma. Recipient animals developed undifferentiated lymphomas, poorly differentiated lymphomas, or parenchymal lymphoproliferative abnormalities suggestive of early lesions of lymphoma. Some of these animals developed such opportunistic infections as cytomegalovirus hepatitis and cryptosporidiosis. They also showed evidence of an abnormal circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cell. These findings, all characteristic of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) of macaques, suggest a link between these transmissible lymphomas and AIDS in macaque monkeys. Images PMID:6576377