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1

Clues for Diagnosing Primary Pancreatic Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Primary pancreatic lymphoma (PPL), a localized lymphoma in the pancreas, accounts for <0.5% of all pancreatic masses and presents with symptoms favoring the more common adenocarcinoma. It is important to differentiate PPL from adenocarcinoma since treatment and prognosis differ considerably. PPL is potentially curable with chemotherapy, especially if it is diagnosed at early stages. A definitive diagnosis can only be based on histopathological findings. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-guided FNA) is a reliable, minimally invasive and cost-effective method for this purpose. Even though there are neither typical clinical features nor specific biomarker for the diagnosis of PPL, certain common presentations have been observed which may indicate PPL. We herein present the case of a 43-year-old man who was successfully diagnosed with PPL by EUS-guided FNA. His clinical, laboratory and radiographic findings supported PPL over adenocarcinoma as well. This case demonstrates that high clinical suspicion based on clinical, laboratory and imaging features is critical in PPL diagnosis and management.

Li, Zhongzhen; Zhang, Shaoxiong; Vasdani, Nadiya; Castillo, Eddy

2012-01-01

2

Unique intense uptake demonstrated by 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography in primary pancreatic lymphoma: A case report  

PubMed Central

Patients with primary pancreatic lymphoma (PPL), which is rare, require a different therapeutic approach and have a better prognosis than those with pancreatic cancer. However, conventional imaging modalities alone are not able to differentiate between pancreatic cancer and other rare tumors such as PPL, although the accurate diagnosis of PPL is crucial. The development of new modalities such as F-18 2?-deoxy-2fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) contributes to the evaluation of lymphoma staging. However, few reports are currently available regarding PET/CT findings in PPL. In this study, a 56-year old man with PPL was examined using FDG PET/CT imaging, which showed the unique intense uptake of FDG in the pancreas with atypical findings of malignancy in the CT scan and magnetic resonance images.

ABE, YOSHIYUKI; TAMURA, KATSUMI; SAKATA, IKUKO; ISHIDA, JIRO; MUKAI, MASAYA; OHTAKI, MAKOTO; NAKAMURA, MASATO; MACHIDA, KIKUO

2010-01-01

3

Primary pancreatic lymphoma - pancreatic tumours that are potentially curable without resection, a retrospective review of four cases  

PubMed Central

Background Primary pancreatic lymphomas (PPL) are rare tumours of the pancreas. Symptoms, imaging and tumour markers can mimic pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but they are much more amenable to treatment. Treatment for PPL remains controversial, particularly the role of surgical resection. Methods Four cases of primary pancreatic lymphoma were identified at Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia. A literature review of cases of PPL reported between 1985 and 2005 was conducted, and outcomes were contrasted. Results All four patients presented with upper abdominal symptoms associated with weight loss. One case was diagnosed without surgery. No patients underwent pancreatectomy. All patients were treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and two of four patients received rituximab. One patient died at 32 months. Three patients are disease free at 15, 25 and 64 months, one after successful retreatment. Literature review identified a further 103 patients in 11 case series. Outcomes in our series and other series of chemotherapy and radiotherapy compared favourably to surgical series. Conclusion Biopsy of all pancreatic masses is essential, to exclude potentially curable conditions such as PPL, and can be performed without laparotomy. Combined multimodality treatment, utilising chemotherapy and radiotherapy, without surgical resection is advocated but a cooperative prospective study would lead to further improvement in treatment outcomes.

Grimison, Peter S; Chin, Melvin T; Harrison, Michelle L; Goldstein, David

2006-01-01

4

Diagnosis, surgical intervention, and prognosis of primary pancreatic lymphoma.  

PubMed

Primary pancreatic lymphoma is a rare but treatable malignancy that may present as an isolated pancreatic mass. Most of these patients are assumed to have ductal malignancies of the pancreas and are denied surgical intervention. Controversy exists concerning the method of diagnosis and the need for and extent of surgical intervention for these malignancies. Over the past 15 years, from 1976-1991, we have treated seven patients with pancreatic lymphoma who initially presented with a pancreatic mass. There were five females and two males ranging in age from 60-86 years (mean = 68). All patients were symptomatic and complained of epigastric pain, jaundice, anorexia, or early satiety. The interval between onset of symptoms and treatment averaged 6 weeks. Over half of these patients presented with an epigastric mass and/or jaundice. Abdominal CT scan was accurate in identifying and localizing the pancreatic mass in all patients. The diameter of the pancreatic mass ranged from 3-12 cm (mean = 8.1 cm) and the mass was located in the head of the pancreas in five patients. All attempted percutaneous needle biopsies of the pancreatic mass were non-diagnostic. Operative lymph node biopsy or transduodenal/wedge biopsy of the pancreatic mass was successful in demonstrating pancreatic lymphoma in all patients. Two of the seven patients underwent biliary bypass. One of the seven patients died in the postoperative period. Three of these seven patients received chemotherapy and survived an average of 6.3 years. One patient is alive 8 years after diagnosis and treatment and is currently asymptomatic. Patients who did not receive postoperative chemotherapy survived an average of 5 months.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8338282

Tuchek, J M; De Jong, S A; Pickleman, J

1993-08-01

5

Pancreatic lymphoma. Is surgery mandatory for diagnosis or treatment?  

PubMed Central

From 1982 to 1986, nine patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma primarily involving the pancreas were managed at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. This group of nine patients represents 2.2% of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (nine of 402) and 4.9% of all patients presenting with pancreatic malignancies (nine of 182) at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions during this period. Computed tomography (CT) scan findings of a large pancreatic mass (6 cm) with extrapancreatic extension and significant retroperitoneal lymph node enlargement suggested lymphoma. Diagnosis was established by radiographically-guided needle biopsy in four patients, by laparotomy in four, and by peripheral lymph node biopsy in one. In five jaundiced patients, initial chemotherapy with the nonhepatotoxic agents cyclophosphamide and prednisone resulted in marked tumor regression, allowing for early resolution of jaundice and subsequent addition of more aggressive adriamycin containing combination chemotherapy. Overall, complete remission has occurred in six of nine patients, with a median survival of 24 months (range 4-69 months). It is concluded from this experience that the majority of patients with pancreatic lymphoma can be managed without surgery. Excellent control of symptoms, including jaundice, as well as long-term remission, can be obtained with chemotherapy alone. The only role for surgery in this setting may be to aid in establishing the diagnosis when percutaneous biopsy is nondiagnostic. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3.

Webb, T H; Lillemoe, K D; Pitt, H A; Jones, R J; Cameron, J L

1989-01-01

6

6-Mercaptopurine-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma.  

PubMed

Two children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma developed recurrent acute pancreatitis during treatment; the etiology was presumed to be secondary to 6-mercaptopurine (6MP). Both had no further attacks after discontinuation of 6MP. Acute pancreatitis secondary to 6MP is extremely rare in acute leukemia/lymphoma although it has been reported in patients with other conditions like inflammatory bowel disease; the reason for this difference is not clearly understood. PMID:23138114

Halalsheh, Hadeel; Bazzeh, Faiha; Alkayed, Khaldoun; Salami, Khadra; Madanat, Faris

2013-08-01

7

78 FR 20313 - PPL Electric Utilities Corporation; Notice of Filing  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...activities of its wholly owned subsidiary, PPL Receivables Corporation (PPL Receivables), using the equity method of accounting...requests authorization to continue to report PPL Receivables on a consolidated basis in the FERC Form...

2013-04-04

8

[Case of pancreatic mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma].  

PubMed

A 77-year-old woman underwent abdominal ultrasonic diagnosis in a screening test for diabetes mellitus. A 65 x 45 mm tumor with low echo level was revealed and located from the uncinate process of the pancreas to the body. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography demonstrated the pancreas had a low density area in the arterial phase and a comparable area in the equilibrium phase, compared with the parenchyma of the normal pancreas. Gallium-scintigraphy showed strong accumulation, consistent with the tumor. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma was diagnosed by endosonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNAB). Complete remission was achieved after radiation therapy. PMID:19057166

Miwa, Ichita; Maruyama, Yasuhiko; Kageoka, Masanobu; Nagata, Ken; Ohata, Akihiko; Noda, Yuji; Ikeya, Kentarou; Koda, Kenji; Watanabe, Fumitoshi

2008-12-01

9

Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... called Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of ... can't determine why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such ...

10

Kinetic behaviour of pancreatic lipase in five species using emulsions and monomolecular films of synthetic glycerides  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the absence of colipase and bile salts, using tributyrin emulsions or monomolecular films of dicaprin at low surface pressure, we observed that no significant lipase activity can be measured with Human Pancreatic Lipase (HuPL), Horse Pancreatic Lipase (HoPL) or Dog Pancreatic Lipase (DPL). Only Porcine Pancreatic Lipase (PPL) and recombinant Guinea Pig Pancreatic Lipase Related Protein of type 2

Youssef Gargouri; Abderraouf Bensalah; Isabelle Douchet; Robert Verger

1995-01-01

11

Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Pediatric lymphomas are the third most common malignancy in North American children, and account for approximately 12% of\\u000a all childhood malignant diseases (Weitzman and Arceci 2003). Lymphoma in children and adolescents is divided into two major\\u000a subtypes:\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Hodgkin lymphoma (HL)\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL)

Sue Zupanec

12

Pancreatitis  

MedlinePLUS

... as an ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) or MRCP (magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) may be required. An ERCP consists ... How is pancreatitis diagnosed? How is pancreatitis treated? NORTH AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY, HEPATOLOGY AND NUTRITION ...

13

77 FR 15814 - PPL Susquehanna, LLC; Application and Amendment to Facility Operating License Involving: Proposed...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Regulatory Commission. ACTION: License amendment request, opportunity...amendment to Facility Operating License No. NPF-22, issued to PPL...Systems--RHRSW [residual heat removal service water system] and...Before issuance of the proposed license amendment, the...

2012-03-16

14

Mercury Emission Control Technologies for PPL Montana-Colstrip Testing  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) was asked by PPL Montana LLC (PPL) to provide assistance and develop an approach to identify cost-effective options for mercury control at its coal-fired power plants. The work conducted focused on baseline mercury level and speciation measurement, short-term parametric testing, and week long testing of mercury control technology at Colstrip Unit 3. Three techniques and various combinations of these techniques were identified as viable options for mercury control. The options included oxidizing agents or sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) such as chlorine-based SEA1 and an EERC proprietary SEA2 with and without activated carbon injection. Baseline mercury emissions from Colstrip Unit 3 are comparatively low relative to other Powder River Basin (PRB) coal-fired systems and were found to range from 5 to 6.5 g/Nm3 (2.9 to 3.8 lb/TBtu), with a rough value of approximately 80% being elemental upstream of the scrubber and higher than 95% being elemental at the outlet. Levels in the stack were also greater than 95% elemental. Baseline mercury removal across the scrubber is fairly variable but generally tends to be about 5% to 10%. Parametric results of carbon injection alone yielded minimal reduction in Hg emissions. SEA1 injection resulted in 20% additional reduction over baseline with the maximum rate of 400 ppm (3 gal/min). Week long testing was conducted with the combination of SEA2 and carbon, with injection rates of 75 ppm (10.3 lb/hr) and 1.5 lb/MMacf (40 lb/hr), respectively. Reduction was found to be an additional 30% and, overall during the testing period, was measured to be 38% across the scrubber. The novel additive injection method, known as novel SEA2, is several orders of magnitude safer and less expensive than current SEA2 injection methods. However, used in conjunction with this plant configuration, the technology did not demonstrate a significant level of mercury reduction. Near-future use of this technique at Colstrip is not seen. All the additives injected resulted in some reduction in mercury emissions. However, the target reduction of 55% was not achieved. The primary reason for the lower removal rates is because of the lower levels of mercury in the flue gas stream and the lower capture level of fine particles by the scrubbers (relative to that for larger particles). The reaction and interaction of the SEA materials is with the finer fraction of the fly ash, because the SEA materials are vaporized during the combustion or reaction process and condense on the surfaces of entrained particles or form very small particles. Mercury will have a tendency to react and interact with the finer fraction of entrained ash and sorbent as a result of the higher surface areas of the finer particles. The ability to capture the finer fraction of fly ash is the key to controlling mercury. Cost estimates for mercury removal based on the performance of each sorbent during this project are projected to be extremely high. When viewed on a dollar-per-pound-of-mercury removed basis activated carbon was projected to cost nearly $1.2 million per pound of mercury removed. This value is roughly six times the cost of other sorbent-enhancing agents, which were projected to be closer to $200,000 per pound of mercury removed.

John P. Kay; Michael L. Jones; Steven A. Benson

2007-04-01

15

Bioaerosols standoff detection simultaneously refereed with particle concentration (ppl) and viability units (ACPLA)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Defence R&D Canada (DRDC) has developed, by the end of the 90s, a standoff bioaerosol sensor prototype based on intensified range-gated spectrometric detection of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) called SINBAHD. This LIDAR system was used to characterize spectrally the LIF of bioaerosol agent simulants and obscurants during 57 cross-wind open-air releases at Suffield, CAN in July 2007. An autoclave and gamma-irradiation killing procedures were performed on Bacillus subtilis var globigii (BG) samples before they were aerosolized, disseminated and spectrally characterized. Slight discrepancies were observed in the spectral characteristics of killed versus live samples but none between the two killing methodologies. Significant signature variabilities were observed from the different batches of Erwinia Herbicolas (EH). The generated cloud was simultaneously characterized in Agent Containing Particle per Liter of Air (ACPLA) by slit sampler units and in particle per litter of air (ppl) by an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). Correlation assessment between the stand-off sensor SINBAHD and the two referee point sensors was done, allowing an estimation of SINBAHD's sensitivity in ACPLA and in ppl. For a 20-m thick cloud at a range of 990 m, a detection limit of a few tens of ACPLA and a few ACPLA were obtained for BG and EH respectively. The extracted correlation between ACPLA and ppl data for releases performed with an agricultural sprayer showed a high degree of variability: 2 to 29% and 1 to 6% of ACPLA/ppl ratio for BG and EH, respectively.

Buteau, Sylvie; Simard, Jean-Robert; Rowsell, Susan

2009-09-01

16

Pancreatitis - discharge  

MedlinePLUS

Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis, or swelling of the pancreas You may have ...

17

Masquerade without a mass: an unusual cause of severe acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

After excluding the typical causes, the underlying etiology of severe acute pancreatitis is often elusive; tumors are on the differential but may be difficult to prove in the absence of a discrete mass on imaging. In this report, we describe the case of an elderly woman with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma masquerading as acute pancreatitis. To our knowledge, only twelve other cases of pancreatic B-cell lymphoma presenting as acute pancreatitis have been described. However, while other cases involved well-circumscribed tumors of the pancreas, this is the first known case of pancreatic lymphoma of a diffusely infiltrating pattern presenting as acute pancreatitis.

To, Christina A.; Quigley, Michael M.; Saven, Alan

2013-01-01

18

Plasmablastic lymphoma following transplantation  

PubMed Central

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a serious complication following solid organ as well as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation due to prolonged immunosuppressive therapy. Plasmablastic lymphoma, although classically associated with HIV infection, has since been described in transplant patients as a variant of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder with varying clinical presentations. Here we add two additional cases to the literature: one following lung transplantation and one following pancreatic transplantation. In addition, the demographic, therapeutic, and immunophenotypic characteristics from prior reported cases are summarized.

Keglovits, Latoya; Krause, John

2013-01-01

19

Plasmablastic lymphoma following transplantation.  

PubMed

Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a serious complication following solid organ as well as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation due to prolonged immunosuppressive therapy. Plasmablastic lymphoma, although classically associated with HIV infection, has since been described in transplant patients as a variant of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder with varying clinical presentations. Here we add two additional cases to the literature: one following lung transplantation and one following pancreatic transplantation. In addition, the demographic, therapeutic, and immunophenotypic characteristics from prior reported cases are summarized. PMID:23543973

Van Vrancken, Michael J; Keglovits, Latoya; Krause, John

2013-04-01

20

[Gastrointestinal lymphomas].  

PubMed

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas affecting extranodal tissues can be primitive or secondary. The area most frequently involved is the gastrointestinal tract. MALT-type lymphomas are B-cell lymphomas characterized by small cells originating from the lymphoid tissue of the mucosa. The criteria for a correct diagnosis of extranodal lymphomas are morphological, but include immunophenotypic and immunogenotypic analysis. Gastrointestinal lymphomas consist of B-cell and T-cell lymphomas. B cell-lymphomas include: small cell B-lymphomas, large cell B-lymphomas, immunoproliferative small intestinal disease; multiple lymphomatous polyposis, follicular lymphomas, B-cell lymphomas centrocytic type. T-cell lymphomas include enteropathy-associated and non enteropathy-associated lymphomas. PMID:8539463

Baroni, C D

21

Induction of phr gene expression in Escherichia coli strain KY706\\/pPL1 by UVA (365 nm) irradiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

W e report the induction of phr gene expression in the Escherichia coli strain KY706 pPL-1 by UVA irradiation. The induction of phr gene expression was monitored by the activity of ?-galactosidase enzyme and was found to depend on the UVA dose and the post irradiation incubation period in the nutrient medium. Mechanistic studies carried out using quenchers and enhancer

A. UPPAL; R. KOHLI; P. K. GUPTA; P. S. DUBEY

2003-01-01

22

76 FR 12954 - PPL EnergyPlus, LLC v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Complaint  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...No. EL11-25-000] PPL EnergyPlus, LLC v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Complaint...825e (2006), filed a formal complaint against PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. (PJM or Respondent), alleging that PJM failed to...

2011-03-09

23

Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor ?/? and B-Cell Lymphoma-6 in Regulation of Genes Involved in Metastasis and Migration in Pancreatic Cancer Cells  

PubMed Central

PPAR?/? is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates various cellular functions via induction of target genes directly or in concert with its associated transcriptional repressor, BCL-6. Matrix remodeling proteinases are frequently over-expressed in pancreatic cancer and are involved with metastasis. The present study tested the hypothesis that PPAR?/? is expressed in human pancreatic cancer cells and that its activation could regulate MMP-9, decreasing cancer cells ability to transverse the basement membrane. In human pancreatic cancer tissue there was significantly higher expression of MMP-9 and PPAR?/?, and lower levels of BCL-6 mRNA. PPAR?/? activation reduced the TNF?-induced expression of various genes implicated in metastasis and reduced the invasion through a basement membrane in cell culture models. Through the use of short hairpin RNA inhibitors of PPAR?/?, BCL-6, and MMP-9, it was evident that PPAR?/? was responsible for the ligand-dependent effects whereas BCL-6 dissociation upon GW501516 treatment was ultimately responsible for decreasing MMP-9 expression and hence invasion activity. These results suggest that PPAR?/? plays a role in regulating pancreatic cancer cell invasion through regulation of genes via ligand-dependent release of BCL-6 and that activation of the receptor may provide an alternative therapeutic method for controlling migration and metastasis.

Coleman, Jeffrey D.; Thompson, Jerry T.; Smith, Russell W.; Prokopczyk, Bogdan; Vanden Heuvel, John P.

2013-01-01

24

Isoamylacetate production by entrapped and covalently bound Candida rugosa and porcine pancreatic lipases.  

PubMed

Candida rugosa lipase (CRL) and porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) were immobilised by entrapping and also by covalent binding for use in synthesis of isoamyl acetate (IAAc), which has a typical banana flavour. Lipase entrapment was carried out by dripping sodium alginate (Na-Alg)-chitosan (Chi)-lipase mixture into CaCl(2)-glutaraldehyde (GAL) solution to obtain Ca-Alg/Chi(CRL/PPL). Immobilisation conditions were optimised as 1.5% Na-Alg, 1.5% chitosan and 0.15% GAL. Ca-Alg/Chi(CRL/PPL) samples showed the highest activity when they were dried upon reaching 27% of their initial weights. Covalent binding was achived with Chi modified with spacerarm via glutaraldehyde to get Chi(CRL/PPL). The highest IAAc production was observed when 1,3-diaminopropane was used as a spacer arm. The best ester yield was achieved in heptane, at 40 and 45°C reaction temperatures, 50mM IAA and 50 or 75 mM AA concentrations. The amount of IAAc was nearly 10 times higher for the batch type than for the continuous packed bed column reactor. PMID:22980809

Ozyilmaz, Gul; Ya??z, Esra

2012-07-20

25

Marginal Zone Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

Marginal Zone Lymphoma Overview Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The two main forms of lymphoma are Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) ... types of marginal zone lymphoma: Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) is the ...

26

Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

Lymphoma - non-Hodgkin's; Lymphocytic lymphoma; Histiocytic lymphoma; Lymphoblastic lymphoma; Cancer - non-Hodgkin's lymphoma ... in lymph tissues. They help prevent infections. Most lymphomas start in a type of white blood cells ...

27

A 25 mu m2, new poly-Si PMOS load (PPL) SRAM cell having excellent soft error immunity  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 25- mu m2 poly-Si PMOS load SRAM (static random access memory) cell, called a PPL cell, has been developed. The cell has been excellent retention characteristics, high soft-error immunity, and low standby power. These advantages are achieved using poly-Si PMOS loads and cross-coupled stacked capacitors formed between the NMOS and the stacked poly-Si PMOS. A large poly-Si PMOS ON

T. Yamanaka; T. Hashimoto; N. Hashimoto; T. Nishida; A. Shimuzu; K. Ishibashi; Y. Sakai; K. Shimohigashi; E. Takeda

1988-01-01

28

Hodgkin Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) is the world's largest voluntary health agency dedicated to blood cancer. The LLS mission: Cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease and myeloma, and improve the quality ...

29

Autoimmune pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Autoimmune pancreatitis is becoming a more widely recognized form of pancreatitis that can mimic pancreatic or biliary malignancy. The combination of serological, histological and radiographic findings makes it unique among pancreatic diseases. The presence of autoantibodies, IgG4 and a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate reflect its autoimmune etiology. The dramatic response to steroids is also a distinguishing feature and differentiates it from other pancreatic diseases. PMID:20477698

Barth, Erin; Savides, Thomas J

2009-11-01

30

Purification of porcine pancreatic lipase by aqueous two-phase systems of polyethylene glycol and potassium phosphate.  

PubMed

An aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) was applied for the purification of porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) from crude PPL using polyethylene glycol (PEG) and potassium phosphate. Phase diagrams for polyethylene glycol (PEG) and potassium phosphate dibasic were determined at room temperature to find an operating region to first form the ATPS. The PPL was preferentially partitioned into the PEG-rich phase in systems with molecular weights of 1000 and 1500 and concentrated in the phosphate-rich phase in systems with PEG of 4000. Moreover, instead of tie line length (TLL), we used a stability ratio without NaCl in the system, and we first applied fluorescence spectroscopy for the protein conformational analysis of the ATPS. The molecular weight of the purified lipase was determined to be approximately 52 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme was efficiently purified in PEG 1500/potassium phosphate (17/13, %) at a pH of 7.0 at 4 °C. This system obtained an enzyme partition coefficient of 12.7, an extraction efficiency of 94.7% and a purification factor of approximately 4. These results demonstrate that the aqueous two-phase system is a highly efficient method for PPL purification. PMID:23562905

Zhou, Yu-Jie; Hu, Cheng-Li; Wang, Na; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Yu, Xiao-Qi

2013-03-15

31

Pancreatic Carcinogenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer is an almost universally lethal disease. Research over the last two decades has shown that pancreatic cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease, caused by inherited germline and acquired somatic mutations in cancer-associated genes. Multiple alterations in genes that are important in pancreatic cancer progression have been identified, including tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and genome maintenance genes. Furthermore, the

Jan-Bart M. Koorstra; Steven R. Hustinx; G. Johan A. Offerhaus; Anirban Maitra

2008-01-01

32

Pancreatic panniculitis.  

PubMed

Pancreatic panniculitis (PP) is a rare variant of panniculitis characterized by subcutaneous fat necrosis, that affects 0.3-3% of patients across a range of different pancreatic disorders. It presents with painful, tender, erythematous to violaceous nodules that may undergo spontaneous ulceration and discharge of an oily brown, viscous material, resulting from liquefactive necrosis of adipocytes. These lesions usually involve the lower extremities, although may also spread over the buttocks, trunk, arms and scalp. In addition to the skin, fat necrosis may involve periarticular, abdominal and intramedullary adipose tissue. In 40% of cases, skin manifestations can precede by 1 to 7 months the abdominal symptoms of pancreatic disease, which include mostly acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, more frequently of acinar cell type, and pancreatic abnormalities. Histopathologically, PP shows characteristic features of mostly lobular panniculitis with marked necrosis of adipocytes. The necrotic adipocytes with finely granular and basophilic material in the cytoplasm due to calcium deposits are known as "ghost adipocytes". The treatment of pancreatic panniculitis is directed to the underlying pancreatic disease. The prognosis is poor in cases associated with pancreatic carcinoma. When there is widespread and persistent disease, frequent relapses, or ulceration, the possibility of an occult carcinoma of the pancreas should be always considered. While describing three patients seen at the Dermatology Section of the University of Genova from 1990 to 2012, we highlight that, in addition to the rarity of the disease, the precise diagnosis requires adequate samples consisting in large-scalpel incisional biopsies of fully developed lesions. PMID:23900163

Rongioletti, F; Caputo, V

2013-08-01

33

Obesity, Pancreatitis, and Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The only universally accepted risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer are a positive family history or a history\\u000a of smoking. Although the contribution of pancreatitis to pancreatic carcinogenesis has been debated for decades in the epidemiology\\u000a literature, the actual mechanism is still unclear. With the rising epidemic of obesity, scientists have begun to focus on\\u000a the contribution of

Andrew A. Gumbs

2008-01-01

34

Pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Introduction Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in higher-income countries, with 5-year survival only 10% even in people presenting with early-stage cancer. Risk factors include smoking, high alcohol intake, and dietary factors, while diabetes mellitus and previous pancreatitis may also increase the risk. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of surgical treatments in people with pancreatic cancer considered suitable for complete tumour resection? What are the effects of interventions to prevent pancreatic leak after pancreaticoduodenectomy in people with pancreatic cancer considered suitable for complete tumour resection? What are the effects of adjuvant treatments in people with completely resected pancreatic cancer? What are the effects of interventions in people with non-resectable (locally advanced or advanced) pancreatic cancer? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 46 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: chemoradiotherapy; chemoradiotherapy for non-resectable pancreatic cancer; chemoradiotherapy for resected pancreatic cancer; fibrin glue; fluorouracil-based chemotherapy (adjuvant) for resected pancreatic cancer (with or without surgery); fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for non-resectable pancreatic cancer; fluorouracil-based chemotherapy (systemic); fluorouracil-based combination chemotherapy; fluorouracil-based monotherapy for non-resectable pancreatic cancer; gemcitabine-based chemotherapy (adjuvant) for resected pancreatic cancer; gemcitabine-based chemotherapy (systemic); gemcitabine-based combination chemotherapy; gemcitabine-based monotherapy for non-resectable pancreatic cancer; lymphadenectomy (extended [radical], or standard) in people having pancreaticoduodenectomy; pancreatic duct occlusion; pancreaticoduodenectomy (pylorus-preserving); pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple's procedure); pancreaticogastrostomy reconstruction; pancreaticojejunostomy; and somatostatin and somatostatin analogues.

2010-01-01

35

Pediatric Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a As the third most common malignant neoplasm in childhood and adolescence, lymphoma is of significant interest to physicians\\u000a involved in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric oncologic patients. Considered a frequently lethal disease until the\\u000a late 1960’s, lymphoma now represents one of the most curable of pediatric cancers with long-term survival expected in a large\\u000a majority of children and adolescents

R. Paul Guillerman; Bruce R. Parker

36

Acute Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary ?-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess.

Geokas, Michael C.

1972-01-01

37

[Pancreatic ascites].  

PubMed

Two cases of pancreatic ascites have been presented. 1. A 29 year old man, heavy alcoholic, with fast growing ascites presented since long biochemic features of pancreatitis. The diagnosis of the pancreatic origin of ascites was made on the ground of the high level of amylase in the ascitic fluid. Conservative treatment was effectless. The patients refused surgical therapy. Then he died in septic shock. Autopsy confirmed the pancreatic origin of ascites. 2. A 43 year old man heavy alcoholic as well admitted because of fast growing ascites. As in the first case examination of the fluid confirmed the diagnosis of pancreatic origin of ascites. Again a high level of amylase and protein was found. After clinical treatment and parenteral nutrition the condition of the patient improved and he was dismissed 4 weeks later. PMID:7479248

Jasi?ski, A; Suchanek, W; Mitlener, S; Kryszewski, A

1995-03-01

38

Burkitt's lymphoma.  

PubMed

Burkitt's lymphoma is a highly aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and is the fastest growing human tumour. The disease is associated with Epstein-Barr virus and was one of the first tumours shown to have a chromosomal translocation that activates an oncogene (c-MYC). Burkitt's lymphoma is the most common childhood cancer in areas where malaria is holoendemic. The incidence is very high in immunosuppressed patients in non-endemic areas, especially when associated with HIV infection. Outcome with intensive chemotherapy has improved and is now excellent in children, but the prognosis is poor in elderly adults. The success of intensive treatment relies on good supportive care. The therapy offered in oncology units in low-income countries is not as aggressive as in centres in high-income countries and outcomes are less successful. Adjuvant monoclonal antibody therapy with rituximab shows promise for improved outcomes and reduced toxic effects in the future. PMID:22333947

Molyneux, Elizabeth M; Rochford, Rosemary; Griffin, Beverly; Newton, Robert; Jackson, Graham; Menon, Geetha; Harrison, Christine J; Israels, Trijn; Bailey, Simon

2012-02-13

39

The Lymphoma Information Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Lymphoma Information Network website strives to "put a bit of humanity and understanding to this disease, to gather lymphoma information and resources in one place, and to present information in an easy to understand and logical format." The award-winning site offers information sections on Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Fighting Lymphoma, and Surviving Lymphoma. The site also offers a special resource section for kids and teenagers, and information about childhood lymphoma. In addition, the site contains an extensive Glossary of Lymphoma Terms, The Lymphoma Blog, resources for independent research, book lists, and related links.

40

Pancreatic Carcinogenesis  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is an almost universally lethal disease. Research over the last two decades has shown that pancreatic cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease, caused by inherited germline and acquired somatic mutations in cancer-associated genes. Multiple alterations in genes that are important in pancreatic cancer progression have been identified, including tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and genome maintenance genes. Furthermore, the identification of noninvasive precursor lesions of pancreatic adenocarcinoma has led to the formulation of a multi-step progression model of pancreatic cancer and the subsequent identification of early and late genetic alterations culminating in invasive cancer. In addition, an increased understanding of the molecular basis of the disease has facilitated the identification of new drug targets enabling rational drug design. The elucidation of genetic alterations in combination with the development of high-throughput sensitive techniques should lead to the discovery of effective biomarkers for early detection of this malignancy. This review focuses mainly on the current knowledge about the molecular insights of the pathogenesis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

Koorstra, Jan-Bart M.; Hustinx, Steven R.; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Maitra, Anirban

2008-01-01

41

Hodgkin’s lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

Lymphoma - Hodgkin's; Hodgkin's disease; Cancer - Hodgkin's lymphoma ... The cause is not known. Hodgkin's lymphoma is most common among people ages 15 - 35 and 50 - 70. Past infection with the Epstein-Barr virus ( EBV ) is thought to ...

42

Radiology of lymphomas  

SciTech Connect

This book reviews the radiological aspects of lymphomas. The topics covered are: Classification of lymphomas as Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas; lymphomas of brain and spinal cord and the radiodiagnosis and chemotherapy; lymphomas of bones; lymph nodes of abdomen, chest and lymphomas of extranodal sites. Diagnostic techniques for lymphomas discussed are tracer techniques, computed tomography, ultrasonography and biopsy. Differential diagnosis of lymphomas from various other pathology of bone, brain and spinal cord is also discussed. Side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are also described.

Bruneton, J.N.; Schneider, M.

1986-01-01

43

Hereditary Pancreatitis and Familial Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Important advances in the understanding of pancreatic diseases have taken place through the application of molecular methods in the study of the inherited form of pancreatitis and pancreas cancer. Mutations of the cationic trypsinogen gene have been found to be causative for hereditary pancreatitis with important implications for the molecular pathogenesis of acute and chronic pancreatitis. A variety of cancer

Margaret D. Finch; Nathan Howes; Ian Ellis; Roger Mountford; Robert Sutton; Michael Raraty; John P. Neoptolemos

1997-01-01

44

Autoimmune Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, heterogeneous, fibroinflammatory disorder of the pancreas. It has gained increasing recognition due to a presentation that can mimic difficult to treat disorders such as pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma and primary sclerosing cholangitis. In contrast, autoimmune pancreatitis is a benign disease that is very responsive to therapy with corticosteroids. There are two types of AIP. Type 1 disease is the most common worldwide and is associated with extrapancreatic manifestations and elevated levels of IgG4-positive cells. Type 2 AIP is characterized by a paucity of IgG4-positive cells, and is more difficult to diagnose. This review provides an update on the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of AIP, with special emphasis on the two subtypes.

Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash A; Sheth, Sunil

2013-01-01

45

Hodgkin lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a B cell–derived cancer, is one of the most common lymphomas. In HL, the tumor cells — Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells — are usually very rare in the tissue. Although HRS cells are derived from mature B cells, they have largely lost their B cell phenotype and show a very unusual co-expression of markers of various hematopoietic cell types. HRS cells show deregulated activation of multiple signaling pathways and transcription factors. The activation of these pathways and factors is partly mediated through interactions of HRS cells with various other types of cells in the microenvironment, but also through genetic lesions. The transforming events involved in the pathogenesis of HL are only partly understood, but mutations affecting the NF-?B and JAK/STAT pathways are frequent. The dependency of HRS cells on microenvironmental interactions and deregulated signaling pathways may offer novel strategies for targeted therapies.

Kuppers, Ralf; Engert, Andreas; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

2012-01-01

46

Follicular Lymphoma and Mantle Cell Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter covers the commonly-encountered follicular lymphoma and the more aggressive but rare mantle cell lymphoma. These\\u000a two B-cell lymphomas are predominantly lymph node-based but show characteristic patterns of spread to the bone marrow and\\u000a gastrointestinal tract. Both lymphomas progress through recognizable histologic stages that are characterized by increasing\\u000a number of large tumor cells and accumulation of cell cycle genetic

Dan Jones

47

Grey Zone Lymphomas: Lymphomas with Intermediate Features  

PubMed Central

The current classification of lymphoid neoplasms is based on clinical information, morphology, immunophenotype, and molecular genetic characteristics. Despite technical and scientific progress, some aggressive B-cell lymphomas with features overlapping between two different types of lymphomas remain difficult to classify. The updated 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of Tumours of the Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues has addressed this problem by creation of two new provisional categories of B-cell lymphomas, unclassifiable; one with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma and the second with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma. We review here the diagnostic criteria of these two provisional entities and discuss new scientific findings in light of the 2008 WHO classification.

Hoeller, Sylvia; Copie-Bergman, Christiane

2012-01-01

48

Study to Assess Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Oral CC-223 for Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Multiple Myeloma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Neuroendocrine Tumors of Non-Pancreatic Origin; Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

2013-07-17

49

[Pancreatic cancer].  

PubMed

About 7200 new cases of pancreatic adenocarcinomas are diagnosed each year in France. At the time of diagnosis, an efficient carcinologic surgery will not be possible for nearly 80% of patients, in relation to loco-regional extension or metastatic dissemination. After surgical resection, the median survival of resected patients ranges from 12 to 20 months, with a high rate of relapses. Currently, the use of radiotherapy for patients with pancreatic cancer is controversial. In adjuvant setting, the standard treatment is six months of chemotherapy with FUFOL or gemcitabine. Chemoradiation (CRT) may improve the survival of patients with incompletely resected tumors (R1). This must be validated in a prospective trial. Neoadjuvant CRT is a promising treatment but always under evaluation. For the treatment of patients with locally advanced tumors, there is not a standart treatment. A strategy of initial chemotherapy followed by CRT for non progressive patients is under evaluation. Whereas in the first trials of CRT large fields were used, the current trend is to reduce the treated volumes to improve tolerance. The delineation of target volumes has been improved by the use of simulation CT. The aims of this work are to precise the radio-anatomical particularities, the pattern of spread of pancreatic cancer and the principles of 3D conformal radiotherapy illustrated with a clinical case. PMID:21129675

Huguet, F; Orthuon, A; Touboul, E; Marseguerra, R; Mornex, F

2010-11-01

50

Pancreatic ascites in childhood.  

PubMed

A case is reported of pancreatic ascites in a 14-year-old girl who had acute and chronic pancreatitis associated with pancreatic duct stones and a ruptured pancreatic duct. Abdominal erythema ab igne was considered to be an important physical sign of genuine severe abdominal pain. PMID:2144996

Mucklow, E S; Freeman, N V

1990-06-01

51

Treatment of Alcoholic Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by progressive and irreversible loss of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine function. The majority of cases in the Western world are related to alcohol consumption. Treatment of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis has been difficult, since the mechanisms of disease progression and the causes of pain are poorly understood. The conservative management of chronic pancreatitis focuses on (a) avoidance

Roland H. Pfützer; Alexander Schneider

2005-01-01

52

Pancreatic choledochal fistula complicating acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Summary Background: Biliary tract involvement in acute necrotizing pancreatitis is rare. Case Report: We report a case of a 53-year-old man who had a pancreatic choledochal fistula complicating acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The fistula was suspected at computed tomography and confirmed at surgery. The patient underwent necrosectomy, cholecystectomy and proximal biliary diversion. He is well at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: Simultaneous presence of air in the biliary tree and pancreatic collection is highly suggestive of a pancreaticobiliary fistula. Pancreatic necrosectomy and proximal biliary diversion resulted in closure of the fistula.

Brar, Rahat; Singh, Iqbal; Brar, Preetinder; Prasad, Abhishek; Doley, Rudra Prasad; Wig, Jai Dev

2012-01-01

53

Recurrence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma isolated to the right masticator and left psoas muscles  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   We present the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a patient who, following treatment for pancreatic non-Hodgkin's\\u000a lymphoma (NHL), relapsed with apparently isolated involvement of the right masticator space and left psoas muscles. Non-Hodgkin's\\u000a lymphoma arising from the masticator space muscles is very rare. In addition, simultaneous lymphomatous involvement of multiple\\u000a discrete skeletal muscle sites, in the absence

S. E. J. Connor; S. V. Chavda

2000-01-01

54

Lymphomas: Diagnosis, Treatment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The scope of this Cancergram includes Hodgkin's disease, adenolymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, lymphosarcoma, lymphoblastoma, lymphocytoma, reticulum cell sarcoma, mycosis fungoides, and any not otherwise specified lymphoma. Abstracts are included which conc...

1982-01-01

55

Lymphomas: Diagnosis, Treatment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The scope of this Cancergram includes Hodgkin's disease, adenolymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, lymphosarcoma, lymphoblastoma, lymphocytoma, reticulum cell sarcoma, mycosis fungoides, and any not otherwise specified lymphoma. Abstracts are included which conc...

1984-01-01

56

Lymphomas: Diagnosis, Treatment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The scope of this Cancergram includes Hodgkin's disease, adenolymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, lymphosarcoma, lymphoblastoma, lymphocytoma, reticulum cell sarcoma, mycosis fungoides, and any not otherwise specified lymphoma. Abstracts are included which conc...

1983-01-01

57

Lymphomas: Diagnosis, Treatment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The scope of this Cancergram includes Hodgkin's disease, adenolymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, lymphosarcoma, lymphoblastoma, lymphocytoma, reticulum cell sarcoma, mycosis fungoides, and any not otherwise specified lymphoma. Abstracts are included which conc...

1985-01-01

58

B-cell Lymphoma  

Cancer.gov

B-cell Lymphoma Lymphomas are cancers that arise from lymphoid cells, which are part of the immune system. The World Health Organization currently recognizes about 70 different types of lymphoma and divides them into four major groups: mature B-cell neoplasms,

59

Natural course of acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute pancreatitis comprises, in terms of clinical, pathologic, biochemical, and bacteriologic data, four entities. Interstitial\\u000a edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis are the most frequent clinical manifestations; pancreatic pseudocyst and\\u000a pancreatic abscess are late complications after necrotizing pancreatitis, developing after 3 to 5 weeks. Determinants of the\\u000a natural course of acute pancreatitis are pancreatic parenchymal necrosis, extrapancreatic retroperitoneal fatty tissue necrosis,

H. G. Beger; B. Rau; J. Mayer; U. Pralle

1997-01-01

60

[Primary intestinal T lymphoma].  

PubMed

Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma comprises a group of distinctive clinicopathological entities. They may be of B or T-cell type. Intestinal T-cell lymphomas are much less common and include the entity: lymphomas T enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma, the most common, and T-cell lymphoma without features of enteropathy. The morphologic and immunologic findings suggest that derived from mucosal T lymphocytes population. Clinically, the patients were usually males with constitutional symptoms and acute perforation and/or obstruction of the small bowel. Their prognosis are very poor and tumor are very aggressive. PMID:9595939

Remacha, B; Palau, A; Velicia, R; Caro-Patón, A; Ripollés, V

1998-03-01

61

Pancreatic-pleural fistula in chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Pancreatic-pleural fistula is a rare condition and few data related to its diagnosis and treatment are available. A fistulous connection linking the pancreas with the pleura via the diaphragm or mediastinum through the retroperitoneal area is formed. We report on a case with pancreatic-pleural fistula at its early stages in an alcoholic male patient aged 45 years with known chronic pancreatitis. The operation by Roux-en-Y jejuno-pseudocystostomy was followed by chest tube drainage. PMID:22560825

Elkaoui, Hakim; Atoini, Fouad; Bouchentouf, Sidi Mohamed; El Omari, Fatima; Mahi, Mohamed; Ait Ali, Abdelmounaim; Bounaim, Ahmed; Sair, Khalid; Zentar, Aziz

2012-04-04

62

Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR cholangiopancreatography findings in cats with cholangitis and pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Cholangiohepatitis/cholangitis is second only to hepatic lipidosis as the most common liver disease in cats and is often associated with concurrent pancreatitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) have developed into an accurate, highly sensitive and specific imaging tool for the diagnosis of biliary and pancreatic duct disorders in humans. In this prospective case series, 10 cats with suspected cholangitis and/or pancreatitis were enrolled based on clinical history, physical examination and appropriate diagnostic test results. MRI and MRCP sequences with secretin stimulation of the cranial abdomen were performed, and sonography and laparoscopic biopsies for histologic diagnosis were obtained for comparison. MRI detected pancreatic abnormalities in cats suspected of pancreatitis, including T1 pre-contrast hypointense and T2 hyperintense pancreatic parenchyma and a dilated pancreatic duct. The MRI findings of the liver were non-specific. Nine of 10 cats had biliary abnormalities, including gall bladder wall thickening, gall bladder wall moderate contrast enhancement and/or gall bladder debris. Eight of 10 cats had histologic evidence of pancreatitis, as well as hepatitis or cholangitis, with one cat diagnosed with hepatic lymphoma. The advantages of MRI/MRCP over sonography of these cats included the striking pancreatic signal changes associated with pancreatitis and the ability to comprehensibly assess and measure the pancreas and hepatobiliary structures without operator dependence or interference from bowel gas. MRI/MRCP imaging of the feline abdomen may be beneficial in cases with equivocal ultrasound imaging findings. PMID:23143839

Marolf, Angela J; Kraft, Susan L; Dunphy, Thomas R; Twedt, David C

2012-11-09

63

Pancreatic Neoplasms in Carnivorae.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In 18 cases of pancreatic neoplasms isolated in over 5,000 dissected dog and cat corpses, it was observed that the malignant pancreatic neoplasm, regardless of its histologic structure, had vast lymphogenic and hematogenic metastases. Histologically, the ...

S. M. Morozova I. V. Skorodumova

1975-01-01

64

Problems of pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatitis is not one disease but several and perhaps many. Diagnosis is imperfect in all forms and the usual lack of histologic\\u000a material has hampered attempts to understand the pathogenesis and possible interrelationships of the different forms of pancreatic\\u000a inflammation. Acute pancreatitis does not as a rule evolve into chronic pancreatitis, even after multiple recurrences. Recurrent\\u000a acute attacks can be

Andrew L. Warshaw

1986-01-01

65

Pancreatic cancer in chronic pancreatitis; aetiology, incidence, and early detection.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer are responsible for most of the burden of exocrine pancreatic disease. Glandular damage from recurrent bouts of acute pancreatitis can lead to irreversible changes characteristic of chronic pancreatitis. In recent decades accumulating evidence has defined longstanding pre-existing chronic pancreatitis as a strong risk factor for pancreatic cancer. The lag period between diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer is usually one or two decades: pancreatitis appearing a year or two before the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is often the result of tumour-related ductal obstruction. The risk of developing pancreatic cancer appears to be highest in rare types of pancreatitis with an early onset, such as hereditary pancreatitis and tropical pancreatitis. Even though there is a strong link between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, over a 20 year period only around five percent of patients with chronic pancreatitis will develop pancreatic cancer. Until the development of more sophisticated screening procedures, screening is not recommended for patients with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:20510834

Raimondi, Sara; Lowenfels, Albert B; Morselli-Labate, Antonio M; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Pezzilli, Raffaele

2010-06-01

66

Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to determine the cause and describe the natural history of acute pancreatitis complicating pregnancy and its effect on maternal and perinatal outcomes.STUDY DESIGN: Over the last decade we admitted 43 pregnant women with acute pancreatitis to our hospital. We reviewed presentation, diagnosis, management, and maternal and perinatal outcomes.RESULTS: The incidence of acute pancreatitis was one in

Kirk D. Ramin; Susan M. Ramin; Sherrie D. Richey; F. Gary Cunningham

1995-01-01

67

Classification of pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An international group of doctors interested in pancreatic disease met in Cambridge in March 1983, under the auspices of the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, to discuss the classification of pancreatitis in the light of developments that have taken place in the 20 years since the crucial conference in Marseille.

M Sarner; P B Cotton

1984-01-01

68

Marginal Zone Lymphomas  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a \\u000a Marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) encompasses a heterogeneous group of small B-cell lymphomas, characterized by a predominance of tumor cells with a\\u000a phenotype, homing pattern, and occasionally the appearance of the nonneoplastic marginal zone B cells that surround germinal centers and populate the white pulp of the spleen. Covered in this chapter are extranodal marginal\\u000a zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue

Rachel L. Sargent

69

Hepatitis C and Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epidemiologic and experimental data are presented that suggest the involvement of the hepatitis C virus in the pathogenesis\\u000a of some histotypes of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, in particular immunocytoma, marginal zone lymphoma, and diffuse large\\u000a cell lymphoma. Clinical presentation, including association with cryoglobulinemic syndrome, is described and therapeutic options\\u000a are discussed.

Federico Silvestri; Alessandra Sperotto; Renato Fanin

2002-01-01

70

[Intermediate lymphocytic lymphoma].  

PubMed

The characteristic features are presented of intermediate lymphocytic lymphomas which have suggested the pathomorphological and clinical peculiarity of this disease entity. They occur in two forms: diffuse and nodular which are two phases in the development of the disease. The phenotypic and karyotypic characteristics of these lymphomas resemble those of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, but their more malignant course is similar to that of centrocytic lymphomas. PMID:1413789

Ko?czalik, P; Hyjek, E

1992-02-01

71

Hodgkin lymphoma.  

PubMed

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a curable malignancy which shows a bimodal curve in incidence in economically developed countries; there is a putative association with Epstein-Barr virus. The WHO 2008 classification schema recognises two histological types of HL: the nodular lymphocyte predominant and the "classic" HL. The latter encompasses four entities: nodular sclerosis, mixed cellularity, lymphocyte depletion, and lymphocyte-rich. Most patients with HL present with asymptomatic superficial lymphadenopathy. The commonest sites of disease are the cervical, supraclavicular and mediastinal lymph nodes, while sub-diaphragmatic presentations and bone marrow and hepatic involvement are less common. Splenic involvement is usually concomitant with hepatic disease and systemic symptoms; extranodal presentations are quite rare. Systemic symptoms are present in ?35% of cases. The stage of disease is defined according to the Ann Arbor staging system or its Cotswolds variant, and staging work-up includes physical examination, chest X-rays, chest and abdominal CT scan, and bone marrow biopsy. (18)FDG-PET ((18)fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) plays a central role in staging, response assessment and prognosis definition. Classic HL usually spreads by contiguity within the lymphatic tissue network, with a late extension to adjacent and distant viscera. Mortality from HL has been progressively decreasing, as confirmed by the most recent 5-year survival figure of 81%. The list of putative prognostic factors in HL has been increasing, but most factors still require prospective validation. Some of these variables are used to stratify early-stage disease into "favourable" and "unfavourable" categories, with "unfavourable early-stage" being intermediate between "favourable early-stage" and "advanced-stage". ABVD (adriamycin(doxorubicin), bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) combination chemotherapy followed by involved-field irradiation is the standard treatment for patients with early-stage HL, with a 5-year OS >95%. Several trials assessing less intensive approaches for patients with favourable early-stage HL are ongoing. More intensified combinations, such as the BEACOPP (bleomycin, etoposide, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine (Oncovin), procarbazine, prednisone) regimen, are being investigated, usually in patients with unfavourable early-stage HL and interim PET+. ABVD is the standard chemotherapy treatment also for patients with advanced disease. Although some evidence suggests that more intensive combinations provide better disease control, the inevitable increased risk of relevant late toxicity worries investigators. Consequently, there has been a shift towards investigating the innovative strategy of a more aggressive schedule for patients with (18)FDG-PET positive results after the first 2 courses of ABVD. High-dose chemotherapy supported by ASCT (autologous stem cell transplantation) is considered the standard of care in patients with HL which has relapsed after, or is refractory to conventional chemoradiotherapy, while allogeneic transplant is a suitable tool for patients with chemorefractory disease and patients failed after ASCT. PMID:22867814

Gobbi, Paolo G; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Levis, Alessandro

2012-08-04

72

Do Pancreatic Duct Stents Cause or Prevent Pancreatic Sepsis?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundPancreatic sepsis can occur after contrast injection into an obstructed or disrupted pancreatic duct. Whether stents cause or prevent pancreatic sepsis is unknown. Accordingly, the pancreatic duct bacteriology in patients with pancreatic duct stents was retrospectively reviewed and contrasted with biliary cultures taken from patients at the time of bile duct stent retrieval and\\/or exchange.

Richard Kozarek; Oistein Hovde; Fouad Attia; Renee France

2003-01-01

73

Prospective risk of pancreatic cancer in familial pancreatic cancer kindreds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer have an in- creased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Quantification of this risk provides a rational basis for cancer risk counseling and for screening for early pancreatic cancer. In a prospective registry-based study, we esti- mated the risk of pancreatic cancer in individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer. Standardized incidence

Alison P. Klein; Kieran A. Brune; Gloria M. Petersen; Michael Goggins; Anne C. Tersmette; G. J. A. Offerhaus; C. Griffin; J. L. Cameron; C. H. J. Yeo; S. Kern; R. H. Hruban

2004-01-01

74

Receptor strategies in pancreatitis.  

PubMed Central

A variety of receptors on pancreatic acinar and duct cells regulate both pancreatic exocrine secretion and intracellular processes. These receptors are potential sites of action for therapeutic agents in the treatment of pancreatitis. Cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor antagonists, which may reduce the level of metabolic "stress" on acinar cells, have been shown to mitigate the severity of acute pancreatitis in a number of models. Not all studies have shown a benefit, however, and differences may exist between different structural classes of antagonists. Because increased pancreatic stimulation due to loss of feedback inhibition of CCK has been proposed to contribute to the pain of some patients with chronic pancreatitis, CCK receptor antagonists could also be of benefit in this setting. Somatostatin and its analogs diminish pancreatic secretion of water and electrolytes and have been effective in treating pancreatic fistulas and pseudocysts. These agents are also being evaluated for their ability to reduce pain in chronic pancreatitis (perhaps by reducing ductal pressure by diminishing secretory volume) and mitigating the severity of acute pancreatitis (possibly by reducing the metabolic load on acinar cells). Recently described secretin receptor antagonists may also have therapeutic value as a means of selectively inhibiting pancreatic secretion of water and electrolytes.

Grendell, J. H.

1992-01-01

75

Therapeutic pancreatic endoscopy.  

PubMed

The role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the management of pancreatic diseases is continuing to evolve. This article reviews recent publications spanning a wide range of topics related to therapeutic pancreatic endoscopy: Over the last 12 months, several case series have added to the literature on the short-term and long-term effectiveness of endoscopic therapy of pseudocysts, pancreatic abscesses and fistulas. Identification of a communication between pancreatic duct and a pseudocyst has been suggested to predict response to percutaneous drainage. The importance of identifying pancreatic leaks in patients with severe pancreatitis has been stressed. In addition, endotherapy has been reported to be effective in patients with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic removal of pancreatic stones after extracorporeal lithotripsy has been shown to result in long-term improvement in clinical outcomes in patients with chronic calcific pancreatitis. Other interesting publications addressed new techniques and tricks to achieve access to the difficult pancreatic duct. Finally, no review of pancreatic endotherapy would be complete without a reminder--as recently stated by a National Institutes of Health consensus panel--that there is considerable need for higher-quality and controlled trials in this and other areas of interventional endoscopy. PMID:12510226

Mergener, K; Kozarek, R A

2003-01-01

76

The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed Central

To date, there is no consensus on the evolution of chronic pancreatitis. Comfort's initial proposal of acute pancreatitis progressing to chronic pancreatitis was discarded by protagonists of the 'separate' theory. Sarles thus stresses the de novo evolution of chronic pancreatitis-acinar protein hypersecretion associated with an imbalance of pancreatic stone promoting and inhibiting factors. However, the 'necrosis-fibrosis sequence' hypothesis of Kloppel and Mallet resurrects the probability of acute pancreatitis leading to chronic pancreatitis. Dimagno offers a unifying concept that the degree of acinar injury determines the natural history of pancreatitis. Uninhibited release of toxic free radicals could be a common end point for various aetiologies resulting in acute or chronic pancreatitis. The pathogenesis of chronic calcifying pancreatitis of the tropics is possibly no different from alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Neurocrine and paracrine mechanisms have been offered to explain pain out of proportion to radiological and histological pancreatic abnormalities in minimal change chronic pancreatitis.

Sidhu, S. S.; Tandon, R. K.

1995-01-01

77

Inherited pancreatic cancer syndromes.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most challenging of all cancers. Genetic risk factors are believed to play a major role, but other than genes coding for blood group, genetic risks for sporadic cases remain elusive. However, several germline mutations have been identified that lead to hereditary pancreatic cancer, familial pancreatic cancer, and increased risk for pancreatic cancer as part of a familial cancer syndrome. The most important genes with variants increasing risk for pancreatic cancer include BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, CDKN2A, APC, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, PRSS1, and STK11. Recognition of members of high-risk families is important for understanding pancreatic cancer biology, for recommending risk reduction strategies and, in some cases, initiating cancer surveillance programs. Because the best methods for surveillance have not been established, the recommendation to refer at-risk patients to centers with ongoing research programs in pancreatic cancer surveillance is supported. PMID:23187834

Solomon, Sheila; Das, Siddhartha; Brand, Randall; Whitcomb, David C

78

[Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].  

PubMed

Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities. Gene profiling analysis shows that the expression of several genes is deregulated including PDGFRA (platelet-derived growth factor receptor) gene, encoding a receptor with tyrosine kinase activity. In angio-immunoblastic T-cell lymphomas molecular abnormalities are found in follicular helper T-cell (TFH) that express some distinctive markers such as CD10, PD-1, CXCR5 and the CXCL13 chemokine. ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a paradigme of T-cell lymphoma since it is associated with an X-ALK oncogenic fusion protein due to a translocation involving ALK gene at 2p23. ALK tyrosine kinase activates downstream pathways (Stat3/5b, Src kinases, PLC?, PI3 kinase) implicated in lymphomagenesis, proliferation and protection against apoptosis. Specific ALK inhibitors are currently in clinical evaluation. Lastly several lymphomas are associated with infectious agents that play a direct (EB virus, HTLV1) or indirect role (e.g. Helicobacter pylori in MALT lymphoma) in lymphomagenesis. PMID:21084243

Delsol, G

2010-11-01

79

Pancreolauryl test in chronic pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The pancreolauryl test was performed in 30 subjects with chronic pancreatitis, in order to evaluate its behavior in relation to the duration of the clinical history and the presence of pancreatic calcifications, diabetes mellitus, jaundice, and pancreatic pseudocysts.

A. Panucci; C. Angonese; G. Del Favero; C. Fabris; L. Marchioro; D. Basso; F. Di Mario; R. Naccarato

1986-01-01

80

Molecular Diagnosis of Burkitt's Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background The distinction between Burkitt's lymphoma and diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma is crucial because these two types of lymphoma require different treatments. We ex- amined whether gene-expression profiling could reliably distinguish Burkitt's lym- phoma from diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma. Methods Tumor-biopsy specimens from 303 patients with aggressive lymphomas were pro- filed for gene expression and were also classified according to morphology, immuno-

Sandeep S. Dave; Kai Fu; George W. Wright; Lloyd T. Lam; Philip Kluin; Evert-Jan Boerma; Timothy C. Greiner; Dennis D. Weisenburger; Andreas Rosenwald; German Ott; Hans-Konrad Müller-Hermelink; Randy D. Gascoyne; Jan Delabie; Lisa M. Rimsza; Rita M. Braziel; Thomas M. Grogan; Elias Campo; Elaine S. Jaffe; Bhavana J. Dave; Warren Sanger; Martin Bast; Julie M. Vose; James O. Armitage; Joseph M. Connors; Erlend B. Smeland; Stein Kvaloy; Harald Holte; Richard I. Fisher; Thomas P. Miller; Emilio Montserrat; Wyndham H. Wilson; Manisha Bahl; Hong Zhao; Liming Yang; John Powell; Richard Simon; Wing C. Chan; Louis M. Staudt

2006-01-01

81

Pathogenesis of Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Primary cutaneous lymphomas are now defined in the WHO EORTC classification on the basis of specific clinico-pathologic features\\u000a [1], but the underlying pathogenesis of these extranodal lymphomas has yet to be fully characterised. Primary cutaneous T-cell\\u000a lymphomas do not show diseasespecific translocations and are distinct from nodal lymphomas with a similar pathology. In contrast,\\u000a primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas appear to

Sean Whittaker

82

Dissolution of pancreatic stones.  

PubMed

Chronic calcific pancreatitis (CCP) is the most clear-cut form of chronic pancreatitis. Till date, the common treatment of CCP has been directed toward discontinuation of alcohol consumption if the disease is associated closely with alcohol abuse, relief of pain, enzyme replacement, and the management of some complications like diabetes mellitus, cyst or abscess of the pancreas, malnutrition etc. In 1979, the research group for chronic pancreatitis in Japan proposed the therapeutic policy for this disease as illustrated in Fig. 1. A plausible new treatment is the dissolution of protein precipitates or calcified stones in pancreatic ducts by oral or intravenous administration of drugs. PMID:2219444

Noda, A

83

Complications of pancreatic surgery  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic resection is the only treatment option that can lead to a meaningful prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and, in some instances, perhaps a potential chance for cure. With the advent of organ and function preserving procedures, its use in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis and other less common benign diseases of the pancreas is increasing. Furthermore, over the past two decades, with technical advances and centralization of care, pancreatic surgery has evolved into a safe procedure with mortality rates of <5%. However, postoperative morbidity rates are still substantial. This article reviews the more common procedure-related complications, their prevention and their treatment.

Ho, Choon-Kiat; Kleeff, Jorg; Friess, Helmut

2005-01-01

84

Pancreatic diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus caused by pancreatic exocrine disease is a unique clinical and metabolic form of diabetes. The diagnosis of pancreatic diabetes caused by chronic pancreatitis may be elusive because it is occasionally painless and often not accompanied by clinical malabsorption until after hyperglycemia occurs. Diabetic patients with pancreatic calcification or clinically demonstrable pancreatic exocrine dysfunction will manifest the unique aspects of pancreatic diabetes described herein. Like other forms of diabetes, the primary hormonal abnormality in pancreatic diabetes is decreased insulin secretion. Patients with this disorder are unique in that they have low glucagon levels that respond abnormally to several physiological stimuli, blunted epinephrine responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia, and malabsorption. In addition, they often have concomitant alcohol abuse with hepatic disease and poor nutrition. These characteristics result in increased levels of circulating gluconeogenic amino acids, decreased insulin requirements, a resistance to ketosis, low cholesterol levels, an increased risk of hypoglycemia while on insulin therapy, and the clinical impression of brittle diabetes. Retinopathy occurs at a rate equal to that of insulin-dependent diabetes but may be less severe in degree. Other complications of pancreatic diabetes have been less well studied but may be expected to be seen more frequently as these patients survive longer. The characteristics of pancreatic diabetes suggest that a conservative approach be taken in regard to intensive insulin therapy and tight blood glucose control. PMID:2693011

Sjoberg, R J; Kidd, G S

85

Hodgkin's Lymphoma (Hodgkin's Disease)  

MedlinePLUS

... used to treat Hodgkin's lymphoma. Side effects of chemotherapy depend on the specific drugs you're given. Common side effects include nausea and hair loss. Serious long-term complications can occur, such as heart damage, lung damage, ...

86

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary.

Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

2012-01-01

87

Autoimmune Pancreatitis – Recent Advances  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is recognized as a distinct clinical entity, identified as a chronic inflammatory process of the pancreas in which the autoimmune mechanism is involved. Clinically and histologically, AIP has two subsets: type 1 – lymphoplasmatic sclerosing pancreatitis with abundant infiltration of the pancreas and other affected organs with immunoglobulin G4-positive plasma cells, and type 2 – duct centric

I. Novotný; J. Lata; H. Nechutová

2010-01-01

88

Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Pancreatitis, once thought to be almost exclusively a disease of adults, is increasingly being found as the cause of abdominal pain in adolescents. The authors review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, managment, and complications of acute and chronic pancreatitis, noting that a high index of suspicion is needed to properly diagnose and provide optimal care to these patients. PMID:10358323

Berenson; Wyllie

1995-10-01

89

Pancreatitis in cats.  

PubMed

Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids. PMID:23148855

Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

2012-08-01

90

Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?  

PubMed

An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis-as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery. PMID:24132440

Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

2013-10-16

91

Lymphoma and Plasmacytoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a A lymphoma may affect the whole gland, but is often found only on one side. The regional lymph nodes are often affected as\\u000a well. In about 70% of cases lymphoma arises from a preexisting chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis) [6,7,20].\\u000a The tumor is strongly hypoechoic, often well marginated, but usually causes enlargement of the affected lobe. The echo pattern\\u000a varies

Arne Heilo; Eva Sigstad; Krystyna Grøholt

92

Hepatitis C and lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epidemiologic data presented in this review suggest the involvement of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the pathogenesis of some\\u000a histotypes of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, in particular immunocytoma and lymphomas growing primarily in the liver and major\\u000a salivary glands. Experimental data further support this hypothesis. Recent findings include demonstration that patients with\\u000a hematologic malignancies can be treated safely with standard and

Federico Silvestri; Alessandra Sperotto; Renato Fanin

2000-01-01

93

Hepatitis c and lymphoma.  

PubMed

Epidemiologic data presented in this review suggest the involvement of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the patho- genesis of some histotypes of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, in particular immunocytoma and lymphomas growing primarily in the liver and major salivary glands. Experimental data further support this hypothesis. Recent findings include demonstration that patients with hematologic malignancies can be treated safely with standard and high-dose chemotherapy even in the presence of HCV infection. PMID:11122840

Silvestri, F; Sperotto, A; Fanin, R

2000-03-01

94

Primary pulmonary Hodgkin's lymphoma  

PubMed Central

A 21-year-old man presented to hospital with a two-month history of productive cough with no other symptoms. Radiology revealed a cavitating lesion in the left upper lobe for which a variety of diagnoses were considered. A biopsy revealed primary pulmonary Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Primary pulmonary Hodgkin’s lymphoma is an uncommon initial presentation; lung lesions usually occur later in the course of the disease. Following diagnosis, the patient began chemotherapy and full remission was achieved.

Lluch-Garcia, R; Briones-Gomez, A; Castellano, E Monzo; Sanchez-Toril, F; Lopez, A; Brotons, B

2010-01-01

95

Testosterone Protects Against Glucotoxicity-Induced Apoptosis of Pancreatic ?-Cells (INS-1) and Male Mouse Pancreatic Islets.  

PubMed

Male hypogonadism associates with type 2 diabetes, and T can protect pancreatic ?-cells from glucotoxicity. However, the protective mechanism is still unclear. This study thus aims to examine the antiapoptotic mechanism of T in pancreatic ? cells cultured in high-glucose medium. T (0.0005-2 ?g/mL) was added to INS-1 cells cultured in basal glucose or high-glucose media. Then cellular apoptosis, oxidative stress, and cell viability were measured. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers and sensors and the antiapoptotic protein (B-cell lymphoma 2) were investigated by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. ER stress markers were also measured in male mouse pancreatic islet cultured in similar conditions. T (0.05 and 0.5 ?g/mL) did not have any effect on apoptosis and viability of INS-1 cells cultured in basal glucose medium, but it could reduce apoptosis and increase viability of INS-1 cells cultured in high-glucose medium. The protective effect of T is diminished by androgen receptor inhibitor. T (0.05 ?g/mL) could significantly reduce nitrotyrosine levels, mRNA, and protein levels of the ER stress markers and sensor those that were induced when INS-1 cells were cultured in high-glucose medium. It could also significantly increase the survival proteins, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase-2, and B-cell lymphoma 2 in INS-1 cells cultured in the same conditions. Similarly, it could reduce ER stress markers and increase sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase protein levels in male mouse pancreatic islets cultured in high-glucose medium. T can protect against male pancreatic ?-cell apoptosis from glucotoxicity via the reduction of both oxidative stress and ER stress. PMID:23970784

Hanchang, Wanthanee; Semprasert, Namoiy; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai; Kooptiwut, Suwattanee

2013-08-22

96

Laparoscopic pancreatic resections.  

PubMed

The last decade has seen an increase in the application of minimally invasive surgical procedures to the management of pancreatic disease. Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery is an advanced laparoscopic procedure with a significant learning curve. It should be considered only by surgeons with extensive experience in open pancreatic surgery who possess advanced laparoscopic 'skills. Early reports suggest that laparoscopic pancreatic surgery can be accomplished with acceptable morbidity and mortality for the resection of small benign and low-grade malignant lesions in the body and tail of the pancreas and for the internal drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts. Its role in the management of lesions in the head, neck, and uncinate process of the pancreas is yet to be determined. PMID:19845171

Nakeeb, Attila

2009-01-01

97

Pathophysiology of Retinal Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Retinal lymphoma, the most common form of intraocular lymphoma, is a high-grade malignancy, usually of B-cell type, and is associated with a poor prognosis because of frequent central nervous system (CNS) involvement. The neoplastic B-cells of retinal lymphoma have a characteristic morphology and immunophenotype, express certain chemokines and chemokine receptors, and produce interleukins (IL), e.g. IL-10. Together with the cytological features of these tumors, the immunophenotype, presence of immunoglobulin rearrangements, and biochemical profile aid the diagnosis of retinal lymphomas. Immunophenotyping and somatic mutation analysis suggest derivation of most retinal lymphomas from an early post-germinal centre B-cell. Chromosomal translocation data would suggest, however, that a subgroup of these neoplasms may arise from germinal centre B-cells, and these could be associated with a better prognosis. Further investigations, such as gene expression profiling, are required to identify oncogenic pathways potentially involved in retinal lymphoma development, and to identify new prognostic/therapeutic markers for this tumor.

Coupland, Sarah E.; Chan, Chi Chao; Smith, Justine

2009-01-01

98

Outcome differences after endoscopic drainage of pancreatic necrosis, acute pancreatic pseudocysts, and chronic pancreatic pseudocysts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Comparative outcomes after endoscopic drainage of specific types of symptomatic pancreatic fluid collections, defined by using standardized nomenclature, have not been described. This study sought to determine outcome differences after attempted endoscopic drainage of pancreatic fluid collections classified as pancreatic necrosis, acute pseudocyst, and chronic pseudocyst. Methods: Outcomes were retrospectively analyzed for consecutive patients with symptoms caused by pancreatic

Todd H. Baron; Gavin C. Harewood; Desiree E. Morgan; Munford Radford Yates

2002-01-01

99

Hereditary pancreatitis presenting with ascites.  

PubMed Central

We report a case of an adolescent girl who presented with painless massive ascites secondary to chronic pancreatitis and a ductal fistula. The diagnosis was delayed and an unnecessary laparotomy was performed, as initial evaluation of ascites did not include measurement of serum and ascitic amylase. Evidence of pancreatic abnormalities in asymptomatic relatives suggested an underlying hereditary pancreatitis. Hereditary pancreatitis presenting as pancreatic ascites, to our knowledge, has not been described previously.

Rao, S. S.; Riley, S. A.; Foster, P. N.; Losowsky, M. S.; Stone, W. D.

1986-01-01

100

Potent and specific antitumor effects of an anti-CD22-targeted cytotoxic ribonuclease: potential for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

LL2, an anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody against B-cell lymphoma, was covalently linked to the amphibian ribonuclease, on- conase, a member of the pancreatic RNase A superfamily. LL2 increased in vitro potency (10 000-fold) and specificity against human Daudi Burkitt lymphoma cells while decreasing systemic toxicity of onconase. Monensin further increased potency of LL2-onconase on Daudi cells (IC50, 20 and 1.5 pM,

Dianne L. Newton; Hans J. Hansen; Stanislaw M. Mikulski; David M. Goldenberg; Susanna M. Rybak

2001-01-01

101

506U78 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or T-cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-22

102

Fatal Pancreatic Panniculitis Associated with Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thick shadowy wall. We herein report a case of fatal pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with acute pancreatitis in a 50-yr-old man. He presented with a 3-week history of multiple tender skin nodules, abdominal pain and distension. Laboratory and radiologic findings revealed acute pancreatitis, and skin biopsy showed pancreatic panniculitis. Despite intensive medical care, he died of multi-organ failure 3 weeks after presentation.

Lee, Woo Sun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Woo; Paik, Chang Nyol; Kim, Hyung Ok

2007-01-01

103

Primary gynecologic lymphoma: imaging findings.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to review the imaging features, particularly on MR images, useful in identifying primary gynecologic lymphoma. CONCLUSION. Primary gynecologic lymphoma is rare. Nonetheless, the distinction between primary and secondary involvement is important because of critical differences in prognosis and treatment. The prospective diagnosis of primary gynecologic lymphoma enables immediate chemotherapy or radiation therapy and avoids unnecessary surgery, which delays treatment. Diagnostic imaging can be key in differentiating lymphoma from the far more common pelvic malignancies. PMID:24059405

Onyiuke, Ifeyinwa; Kirby, Amy B; McCarthy, Shirley

2013-10-01

104

Management of marginal zone lymphomas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  Marginal-zone lymphoma (MZL) includes three subtypes depending on the site of lymphoma involvement: extranodal marginal zone\\u000a B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma); splenic MZL; and nodal MZL. Although there is a common\\u000a cell of origin and similarities concerning a possible chronic antigenic stimulation by microbial pathogens and\\/or auto-antigens,\\u000a the clinical presentation is very different with symptoms related

Catherine Thieblemont; Bertrand Coiffier

2006-01-01

105

Plasmablastic lymphoma: a clinicopathologic correlation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is an uncommon, recently described B-cell–derived lymphoma that displays distinctive affinity for extranodal presentation in the oral cavity. Plasmablastic lymphoma is strongly associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, but has been reported in HIV-negative individuals. Plasmablastic lymphoma may be poorly recognized by pathologists, which is partly attributable to its relatively rare occurrence and unusual immunophenotype. Five

Gretchen S. Folk; Susan L. Abbondanzo; Esther L. Childers; Robert D. Foss

2006-01-01

106

Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

2013-06-17

107

Imaging acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis is a common condition (thought to be increasing in incidence worldwide), which has a highly variable clinical course. The radiologist plays a key role in the management of such patients, from diagnosis and staging to identification and treatment of complications, as well as in determining the underlying aetiology. The aim of this article is (i) to familiarise the reader with the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis, the appearances of the various stages of pancreatitis, the evidence for the use of staging classifications and the associated complications and (ii) to review current thoughts on optimising therapy.

Koo, B C; Chinogureyi, A; Shaw, A S

2010-01-01

108

Purine analogs in marginal-zone lymphomas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary In an area of lymphoma classification still being defined, marginal-zone lymphomas have distinctive immunohisto- chemical and cytogenetic features that distinguish them from mantle-cell and follicular lymphomas. There are three sub- types: the extranodal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas, the nodal monocytoid B-cell (MBCL) lymphomas, and the splenic marginal-zone lymphomas. The MALT lymphomas represent the neoplastic counterpart of the gut-associated

S. J. Horning

109

Therapeutic intervention and surgery of acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The clinical course of acute pancreatitis varies from mild to severe. Assessment of severity and etiology of acute pancreatitis\\u000a is important to determine the strategy of management for acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis is classified according to\\u000a its morphology into edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis. Edematous pancreatitis accounts for 80–90% of acute\\u000a pancreatitis and remission can be achieved in most of

Hodaka Amano; Tadahiro Takada; Shuji Isaji; Yoshifumi Takeyama; Koichi Hirata; Masahiro Yoshida; Toshihiko Mayumi; Eigoro Yamanouchi; Toshifumi Gabata; Masumi Kadoya; Takayuki Hattori; Masahiko Hirota; Yasutoshi Kimura; Kazunori Takeda; Keita Wada; Miho Sekimoto; Seiki Kiriyama; Masamichi Yokoe; Morihisa Hirota; Shinju Arata

2010-01-01

110

Current concepts in feline pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Pancreatitis is the most common disorder of the exocrine pancreas in cats and is clinically important in this species. Despite that fact, the pathophysiology of feline pancreatitis is poorly understood, and its etiology remains unknown in the majority of cases. Arriving at a clinical diagnosis of feline pancreatitis remains challenging because cats with pancreatitis exhibit mild and nonspecific clinical signs, which account for the low level of suspicion for this disease by veterinary clinicians. In addition, sensitive and specific tests for the diagnosis of feline pancreatitis were, until recently, not available. Suspicion of pancreatitis should be based on a detailed history and physical examination, hematologic, clinicopathologic, and imaging findings. A diagnosis of feline pancreatitis should be confirmed by measurement of feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity, abdominal ultrasound, pancreatic cytology, and/or pancreatic histopathology. Serum amylase and lipase concentrations are of no value, whereas feline trypsin-like immunoreactivity concentrations are of limited value for the diagnosis of feline pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound may be useful but requires experience, and normal findings do not exclude pancreatitis. Management of pancreatitis is based on supportive therapy and dietary measures. Finally, management of complications and/or concurrent diseases is also crucial in cats with pancreatitis. PMID:19081552

Xenoulis, Panagiotis G; Steiner, Jörg M

2008-11-01

111

Pancreatitis - series (image)  

MedlinePLUS

... that is most commonly caused by either alcohol toxicity or gallstones. Gallstones can lodge in the common ... pancreas into the intestine. Pancreatitis due to alcohol toxicity is most often seen in chronic alcoholic patients. ...

112

Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

... MD is Director of Pancreatic Disorders at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Hanover, NH. He graduated from ... Medical School. He did his residency at Dartmouth-Hitchcock and his fellowship at the Mayo Clinic in ...

113

Radioimmunoassay of Pancreatic Glucagon.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The author presents some of the problems and concepts related to the development of a radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon. A specific derivatization of glucagon for raising specific anti-glucagon antisera is introduced, and special procedures for dimi...

W. J. Nooijen

1979-01-01

114

Hodgkin’s Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a An estimated 8,490 new cases of Hodgkin’s lymphoma were diagnosed in the USA in 2010.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Reed–Sternberg cells are the malignant cells in classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma (CD15+, CD30+, and CD45?). In nodular lymphocyte-predominant\\u000a Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NLPHL), these cells express B-cell markers (CD20+, CD79a+, and CD45+) and are CD15? and CD30?.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a • \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Common presentation is an asymptomatic lymph node enlargement

Maryse Bernard; Richard W. Tsang

115

Blepharoplasty revealing orbital lymphoma.  

PubMed

Blepharoplasty is a frequent request in consultations of plastic surgery. Patients are often presenting with a progressive swelling of the eyelids. For functional or aesthetic reasons, we commonly perform a superior and/or inferior blepharoplasty to correct this problem. We present the case of a 72-year-old woman who consulted us with a prominent unattractive swelling of both lower eyelids. Because of the atypical and suspicious presentation, supplementary examinations were conducted, and the fat was also sent for analysis. A diagnosis of unilateral orbital lymphoma was obtained. The patient was treated as a primarily localized lymphoma with a positive outcome. When correctly diagnosed and treated, orbital lymphomas can have a very good prognosis. PMID:22214799

Marival, Talia; Carpentier, Séverine; Vandaele, Shiran; de Fontaine, Serge

2013-03-01

116

Primary effusion lymphoma.  

PubMed

Primary effusion lymphoma is a large cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma localized predominantly in body cavities and occasionally in extracavitary regions. It presents with characteristic lymphomatous effusions in the absence of solid tumor masses, and pleural, peritoneal, and pericardial spaces are most often involved. It is typically associated with human herpesvirus 8 infection in immunocompromised individuals, in the setting of human immunodeficiency virus infection, organ transplantation, or in rare cases advanced age. Histologically, primary effusion lymphoma is characterized by atypical lymphoid cells of B-cell lineage with large nuclei and prominent nucleoli. Demonstration of human herpesvirus 8 latent antigens is required for diagnosis, and treatment modalities are limited at this time. In this review, we aim to summarize clinicopathologic features of this rare and unique entity. PMID:23899073

Patel, Sanjay; Xiao, Philip

2013-08-01

117

Chemoprevention for pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

For a number of solid tumors, including pancreatic cancer, efforts aimed at disease prevention may be more successful than\\u000a currently available anticancer treatments. While specific interventions are emerging to prevent breast, prostate, lung, and\\u000a colorectal cancer, no trials of chemoprevention are being conducted in pancreatic cancer. Importantly, there are significant\\u000a obstacles to the conduct of such research. However, preclinical and

Robert A. Wolff

2003-01-01

118

Hereditary Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hereditary pancreatic cancer (PC) appears to be exceedingly heterogeneous, as evidenced by its association with a variety of integrally associated diverse cancers and\\/or differing mendelian inherited cancer syndromes, which include the Lynch syndrome II variant of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome in families with the BRCA2 mutation, hereditary pancreatitis, Peutz-Jeghers polyposis and the familial atypical multiple-mole melanoma

Henry T. Lynch; Randall E. Brand; Carolyn A. Deters; Trudy G. Shaw; Jane F. Lynch

2001-01-01

119

Familial Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In 2008, 37,680 individuals in the United States will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer (1) and approximately 5–10% of these cases will have a familial basis (2). Because of the location of the pancreas deep in the abdominal cavity, detection of this disease in its early stages is\\u000a difficult such that over 80% of pancreatic cancers have metastasized prior to

Kieran A. Brune; Alison P. Klein

120

Arsenic-Induced Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide has brought about tremendous advancement in the treatment of acute promyelocytic myelogenous leukemia (APML). In most instances, the benefits of these treatments outweigh the risks associated with their respective safety profiles. Although acute pancreatitis is not commonly associated with arsenic toxicity, it should be considered as a possible side effect. We report a case of arsenic-induced pancreatitis in a patient with APML.

Connelly, Sean; Zancosky, Krysia; Farah, Katie

2011-01-01

121

Locally advanced pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer is palliative, based on chemotherapy and according to response, chemoradiotherapy can be applied. The authors summarize three abstracts (#LBA146, #256 and #303) presented on the 2013 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, which were focused on treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. A discussion is presented about the different chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy regimens, that move away from gemcitabine-based treatment, and the effort to find less toxic, but efficient therapeutic combinations. PMID:23474552

Oikonomopoulos, Georgios M; Huber, Kathryn E; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

2013-03-10

122

[Retrotrigonal bladder lymphoma].  

PubMed

Presentation of one case of vesical involvement due to lymphoma in an 82-year old female which presented as a micturition syndrome, abdominal mass and later picture of obstructive uropathy with acute renal function impairment. Diagnosis was achieved by ultrasound and abdominal CAT, cystoscopy with of vesical biopsy, transvaginal mass biopsy and immunohistochemical techniques. The difficulties of a correct differential diagnosis with other vesical neoplasias as well as the need to differentiate primary from systemic vesical lymphoma were discussed, not only because of the separate prognosis but also for the different therapeutical approaches. PMID:9139535

Rodríguez Martín, F; Fernández Fernández, A; Gil Paraíso, A; Huarte Loza, E; Gil Fabra, J

123

Transformation of Follicular Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Histological transformation of follicular lymphoma (FL) to a more aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas is a pivotal event in the natural history of FL and is associated with poor outcome. While commonly observed in clinical practice and despite multiple studies designed to address its pathogenesis, the biology of this process represents an enigma. In this chapter we present a state of the art review summarizing the definition of histologic transformation, its incidence, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, treatment and outcome. Furthermore, we specifically emphasize gaps in our knowledge that should be addressed in future studies.

Lossos, Izidore S.; Gascoyne, Randy D.

2011-01-01

124

Monocytoid B cell lymphoma.  

PubMed Central

The clinical, light microscopic, ultrastructural, immunocytochemical and cytogenetic features of a case of monocytoid B cell lymphoma were investigated. The tumour initially affected the cervical and supraclavicular nodes, but 33 months later affected the left parotid salivary gland. The patient had subclinical Sjögren's syndrome. The neoplastic cells showed characteristic morphological features and had peri- and interfollicular distribution in the node. Immunocytochemically the tumour cells were L26, 4KB5, MB2, CD19, CD20, CD22 and IgM/kappa positive. Prominent plasmablastic plasmacytoid differentiation was present in the recurrent tumour, suggesting an origin from post-follicular B cells. The lymphoma cells showed unusual cytogenetic abnormalities. Images

Banerjee, S S; Harris, M; Eyden, B P; Radford, J A; Harrison, C J; Mainwaring, A R

1991-01-01

125

Autoimmune pancreatitis: current concepts.  

PubMed

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct type of chronic pancreatitis with unique clinical, pathological, serological, and imaging features. AIP usually presents with obstructive jaundice. Imaging studies often reveal enlargement of the pancreas with a pancreatic mass and strictures of the main pancreatic duct. Two subtypes of AIP have recently been identified. Type I AIP is more prevalent in elderly Asian males and is characterized by lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis, obliterative phlebitis, and infiltration of large numbers of IgG4-positive plasma cells. Type II AIP is more prevalent in Caucasians and is characterized by granulocyte epithelial lesions. Most patients with type I AIP have a significantly elevated serum IgG4 concentration, which is an important feature for diagnosis and for differentiating between AIP and other conditions such as pancreatic cancer. Extrapancreatic complications are common, such as sclerosing cholangitis, sclerosing sialadenitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis in type I AIP, and ulcerative colitis in type II AIP. A rapid response to glucocorticoids treatment is suggestive of AIP, but the relapse rate is high, warranting the use of immunosuppressant treatment. B-cell depletion with rituximab may be a promising therapy. The prognosis of AIP is generally benign if treated promptly, and spontaneous remission occurs in a proportion of patients. PMID:23526391

Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Fengchun

2013-03-23

126

Tropical chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients.

Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

2003-01-01

127

Genetics of pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review Chronic pancreatitis is a syndrome characterized by chronic inflammation of the pancreas, with variable pain, calcifications, necrosis, fatty replacement, fibrosis and scarring and other complications. Disease susceptibility, severity, progression and pain patterns vary widely and do not necessarily parallel one another. Much of the variability in susceptibility to recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis is now clearly shown to be related to genetic differences between patients. This review highlights recent advances and future directions in genetic research. Recent findings The strongest risk factors are associated with genetic variations in PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR, and to a lesser extent, CTRC and CASR. The latest research suggest that a single factor rarely causes pancreatitis, and the majority of patients with recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis have multiple variants in a gene, or epistatic interactions between multiple genes, coupled with environmental stressors. Summary Pancreatic diseases have a strong genetic component. Rather than a classic Mendelian disorder, recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis represents truly complex diseases with the interaction and synergism of multiple genetic and environmental factors. The future will require new predictive models to guide prevention and therapy.

LaRusch, Jessica; Whitcomb, David C.

2013-01-01

128

Radiation therapy for orbital lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To describe radiation techniques and evaluate outcomes for orbital lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients (and 62 eyes) with orbital lymphoma treated with radiotherapy between 1987 and 2003 were included. The majority had mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (48%) or follicular (30%) lymphoma. Seventeen patients had prior lymphoma at other sites, and 29 had primary orbital lymphoma. Median follow-up was 46 months. Results: The median dose was 30.6 Gy; one-third received <30 Gy. Electrons were used in 9 eyes with disease confined to the conjunctiva or eyelid, and photons in 53 eyes with involvement of intraorbital tissues to cover entire orbit. Local control rate was 98% for all patients and 100% for those with indolent lymphoma. Three of the 26 patients with localized primary lymphoma failed distantly, resulting in a 5-year freedom-from-distant-relapse rate of 89%. The 5-year disease-specific and overall survival rates were 95% and 88%, respectively. Late toxicity was mainly cataract formation in patients who received radiation without lens block. Conclusions A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for indolent orbital lymphoma. Distant relapse rate in patients with localized orbital lymphoma was lower than that reported for low-grade lymphoma presenting in other sites. Orbital radiotherapy can be used for salvage of recurrent indolent lymphoma.

Zhou Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: pzhou@partners.org; Ng, Andrea K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Silver, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Li Sigui [Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Hua Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mauch, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2005-11-01

129

Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-03-18

130

Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed to be involved in the underlying immune reaction. IgG4 antibodies have two unique biological functions, Fab-arm exchange and a rheumatoid factor-like activity, both of which may play immune-defensive roles. However, the exact role of IgG4 in this disease still remains to be clarified. It seems important to recognize this unique entity given that the disease is treatable with steroids.

2011-01-01

131

Recurrent Attacks of Autoimmune Pancreatitis Result in Pancreatic Stone Formation  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES:Autoimmune pancreatitis has been characterized by irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct and sonolucent swelling of the parenchyma, both of which are due to lymphoplasmacytic inflammation at the active stage of the disease, and by the absence of pancreatic stone formation. The aim of the present study was to confirm or deny whether or not this disease is progressive

Mari Takayama; Hideaki Hamano; Yasuhide Ochi; Hisanobu Saegusa; Kenichi Komatsu; Takashi Muraki; Norikazu Arakura; Yasuharu Imai; Osamu Hasebe; Shigeyuki Kawa

2004-01-01

132

Environmental Risk Factors for Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ?10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits

Claudia Nitsche; Peter Simon; F. Ulrich Weiss; Gabriele Fluhr; Eckhard Weber; Simone Gärtner; Claas O. Behn; Matthias Kraft; Jörg Ringel; Ali Aghdassi; Julia Mayerle; Markus M. Lerch

2011-01-01

133

Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis). Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson's disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis.

Kota, Sunil Kumar; Krishna, S.V.S.; Lakhtakia, Sandeep; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

2013-01-01

134

[The epidemiology of pancreatic cancer].  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is a relatively uncommon tumor, but even with early diagnosis, mortality rates are high, explaining why this form of cancer has now become a common cause of cancer mortality. There are no screening tests for early detection of pancreatic cancer. It is more common in men than women and is predominantly a disease of elderly people. There is wide variation in the incidence of pancreatic cancer around the world, suggesting that environmental factors are important in the pathogenesis. Smoking is the major known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, while dietary factors seem to be less important. Other possible risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes. Numerous inherited germ line mutations are associated with pancreatic cancer. Of these, hereditary pancreatitis confers the greatest risk, while BRCA2 mutations are the commonest inherited disorder. Polymorphisms in genes that control detoxification of environmental carcinogens and metabolic pathways may alter the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:20961843

Lakatos, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt

2010-10-31

135

[Mantle cell lymphoma diagnosis].  

PubMed

Recent classifications of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas based on combination of morphologic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic criteria have individualized mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). This clinico-biological entity which accounts for 3 to 10% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, now appears to be a biological and therapeutic model for the understanding and treatment of hematologic malignancies. The present study consisting of two cases of MCL collated at laboratory of hematology of Rabat Ibn Sina hospital. The morphological appearance of MCL is characterized by diffuse or nodular lymph infiltration in the mantle zone, the osteo-medullary biopsy shows an interstitial infringement characterized by the presence of lymphocytes resembling centrocytes with cleaved and angular nuclei, dispersed chromatin, inconspicuous nucleoli and scanty cytoplasm. The flow cytometry showed immunophenotype positive for surface Ig, CD19, CD20, CD22, CD79b, CD5 and cyclin D1, and negative for CD10, CD23 and CD25. In conclusion, the methods of diagnosis and prognosis evaluation of mantle cell lymphoma are based on the nodular, medullary and blood morphology, the immunophenotypic, cytogenetic and molecular study of neoplastic cells. PMID:23396434

Choukri, Mohammed; Taheri, Hafsa; Seddik, Rachid; Benkirane, Souad; Hamama, Afaf; Masrar, Azzelarab; Agoumi, Najia Benkirane; Chabraoui, Layachi

136

Imaging of blunt pancreatic trauma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Blunt pancreatic trauma is an exceedingly rare but life-threatening injury with significant mortality. Computed tomography\\u000a (CT) is commonly employed as the initial imaging modality in blunt trauma patients and affords a timely diagnosis of pancreatic\\u000a trauma. The CT findings of pancreatic trauma can be broadly categorized as direct signs, such as a pancreatic laceration,\\u000a which tend to be specific but

Satinder Rekhi; Stephan W. Anderson; James T. Rhea; Jorge A. Soto

2010-01-01

137

The challenge of pancreatic anastomosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and aims  Significant progress in surgical technique and perioperative management has substantially reduced the mortality rate of pancreatic\\u000a surgery. However, morbidity remains considerably high, even in expert hands and leakage from the pancreatic stump still accounts\\u000a for the majority of surgical complications after pancreatic head resection. For that reason, management of the pancreatic\\u000a remnant after partial pancreatoduodenectomy remains a challenge.

Axel Kleespies; Markus Albertsmeier; Firas Obeidat; Hendrik Seeliger; Karl-Walter Jauch; Christiane J. Bruns

2008-01-01

138

Primary lymphomas of bone.  

PubMed

Primary lymphomas of bone are uncommon malignancies. The vast majority of them are non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), whereas primary Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) of bone is extremely rare. Patients with primary NHL of bone commonly present with local bone pain, soft tissue swelling, and a mass or a pathological fracture. There is a slight male preponderance, and most patients are over 45-50 years of age. Primary NHL of bone can arise in any part of the skeleton, but long bones (femurs, tibia) are the most common sites of presentation. Comprehensive immunohistochemical studies are required to establish an accurate histological diagnosis of primary NHL of bone. Most cases of primary NHL of bone are classified as diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) in the World Health Organisation (WHO) classification of hematological malignancies. On full staging evaluation, most patients have disease of stage IE or IIE according to the Ann Arbor system. Several studies indicate that patients with primary NHL of bone have a favorable outcome, especially when treated by combined modality therapy. A number of studies reported that clinical stage is the most important prognostic variable in predicting overall survival. Interestingly, the rare occurrence of primary lymphoma of bone is in contrast with the frequency of plasma cell tumors in bone. This could be due to the fact that, during normal B-cell differentiation, the bone marrow is the normal site of homing of plasma cells which are terminally-differentiated, immunoglobulin-secreting post-germinal center B-cells. In this respect, there is circumstancial evidence that primary NHL of bone may represent tumors of post-germinal center B-cells. The present review summarizes data on the histogenesis of primary NHL of bone in view of the recent histogenetic classification of DLBCL on the basis of the B-cell differentiation gene expression profiles (germinal center vs. post-germinal center B-cell differentiation). PMID:16475714

Kitsoulis, Panagiotis; Vlychou, Marianna; Papoudou-Bai, Alexandra; Karatzias, Georgios; Charchanti, Antonia; Agnantis, Niki John; Bai, Maria

139

Pancreatic uncinate carcinoma: sonographic findings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Pancreatic carcinoma arising from the uncinate process (pancreatic uncinate carcinoma) is relatively rare. We wished to define its clinical manifestations and sonographic findings. Methods: Clinical and sonographic data of eight cases were reviewed. Results: The common bile duct and the pancreatic duct were not dilated until a very late stage. The lesion mimicked a mesenteric tumor in two cases.

M. Sato; H. Ishida; K. Konno; Y. Hamashima; H. Naganuma; T. Komatsuda; M. Funaoka; J. Ishida; S. Watanabe

2001-01-01

140

Gene therapy for pancreatitis pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis are clinical syndromes associated with severe pain that is difficult to manage. Thus, seeking additional pain reduction therapies is warranted. Excessive alcohol consumption over an extended period of time is the primary causal agent in pancreatitis. The efficacy of a replication defective Herpes (HSV-1, DPE) viral vector construct encoding the human preproenkephalin gene (HSV-Enk), used

K N Westlund

2009-01-01

141

Chronic pancreatitis: diagnosis and treatment.  

PubMed Central

Three-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is currently the most exciting new imaging technique for chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopy-assisted duodenal intubation during the secretin-cholecystokinin test reduces intubation time in difficult cases. The NBT-para-amino benzoic acid test has been refined to enhance its discriminant power. The cholesteryl-[C13]octanoate breath test and the faecal elastase test are newer highly sensitive and specific tubeless tests. Pain in chronic pancreatitis continues to be a vexing therapeutic issue. Enzyme treatment continues despite criticism. Neurotensin is the new suspected mediator of the feedback mechanism, which is downregulated by enzyme therapy. Steroid ganglion block is an exciting therapeutic tool for pain relief. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy, Dormia basketing and pancreatic stenting in conjunction with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy should be performed early in chronic pancreatitis to prevent parenchymal atrophy with ensuing exocrine and endocrine pancreatic dysfunction. The modified Puestow's procedure preserves endocrine and exocrine pancreatic functions besides relieving pain. Closed loop insulin infusion allows superior management of pancreatic diabetes following near total pancreatectomy. The standardised incidence rate of pancreatic cancer is 16.5 in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and 100 for tropical chronic pancreatitis. Aggressive treatment protocols combining neo-adjuvant chemoradiation and intra-operative radiation with surgery are being used to improve the prognosis in this dismal complication of chronic pancreatitis.

Sidhu, S.; Tandon, R. K.

1996-01-01

142

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: epidemiology and genetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is an important cause of death from cancer throughout the developed world. There are few established environmental risk factors, but a previous history of pancreatitis and exposure to tobacco and salted food appear to be the most important. A family history of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is not common in patients with this disease, but recent research has shown that

T Y Flanders; W D Foulkes

1996-01-01

143

Clinical pancreatic disorder I: Acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

The Annual American Pancreas Club is an important event for communicating around clinical pancreatic disorders, just as the European, Japanese, Indian, and the International Pancreatic association. Even though the meeting is only 1½ day there were 169 different abstracts and a “How do I do it session.” Among all these abstracts on the pancreas there are some real pearls, but they are almost always well hidden, never highlighted – all abstracts are similarly presented – and will too soon be forgotten. The present filing of the abstracts is one way (not the way) to get the pancreatic abstracts a little more read and a little more remembered – and perhaps a little more cited. It should also be understood that most of the abstracts are short summaries of hundreds of working hours (evenings, nights, weekends, holidays, you name them …) in the laboratory or in the clinic, often combined with blood, sweat and tears. The authors should be shown at least some respect, and their abstracts should not only be thought of as “just another little abstract” – and the best respect they can be shown are that they will be remembered to be another brick in our scientific wall. Now the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011 are gathered and filed with the aim to give them a larger audience than they have had in their original abstract book. However, it is obvious that most of clinical fellows do not have time to read all the abstracts. For them I have made a “clinical highlight section” of 10 percent of all the pancreatic abstracts. If someone else should have done some collection of abstract, there should probably have been other selections, but as this is not the case, the editor's choices are the highlighted ones. The article as series I of clinical highlight section is present, and more series will be present in the following issues. If readers will remember some of the abstracts better after reading this “abstract of abstracts”, it was worth the efforts – and without efforts there will be little progress.

Andren-Sandberg, Ake

2011-01-01

144

Lymphomas and Reticuloendothelial Neoplasms - SEER Pediatric Monograph  

Cancer.gov

ICCC II LYMPHOMAS AND RETICULOENDOTHELIAL NEOPLASMS INTRODUCTION The lymphomas, combining Hodgkin’s disease and the non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHL), are the third most frequent type of cancer in children following leukemia and malignant brain tumors.

145

Tests of pancreatic exocrine function - clinical significance in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders.  

PubMed

The pancreas functions as the main factory for digestive enzymes and therefore enables food utilisation. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, partial or complete loss of digestive enzyme synthesis, occurs primarily in disorders directly affecting pancreatic tissue integrity. However, other disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, such as coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome or gastric resection can either mimic or cause pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The overt clinical symptoms of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency are steatorrhoea and maldigestion, which frequently become apparent in advanced stages. Several direct and indirect function tests are available for assessment of pancreatic function but until today diagnosis of excretory insufficiency is difficult as in mild impairment clinically available function tests show limitations of diagnostic accuracy. This review focuses on diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders. PMID:19505669

Keller, Jutta; Aghdassi, Ali Alexander; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia V; Layer, Peter

2009-01-01

146

Histopathologically proven autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking neuroendocrine tumor or pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be difficult to distinguish from pancreatic cancer. We report a case of histopathologically proven AIP mimicking neuroendocrine tumor (NET) or pancreatic cancer in a 53-year-old man. He was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of a pancreatic mass detected on ultrasonography at a medical check-up. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a 15-mm hypoechoic mass located in the pancreatic body. Computed tomography revealed a tumor without any contrast enhancement, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the mass to be hyperintense on diffusion-weighted image. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed slight dilatation of a branch of the pancreatic duct without stricture of the main pancreatic duct. The common bile duct seemed intact. Under suspicion of a non-functioning NET or malignant neoplasm, laparotomy was performed. At laparotomy, an elastic firm and well-circumscribed mass was found suggestive of a non-functioning NET, thus enucleation was performed. Histopathologically, the lesion corresponded to AIP. PMID:22423237

Onda, Shinji; Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Kanehira, Masaru; Fujioka, Shuichi; Harada, Tohru; Hano, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Masaharu; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

2012-01-20

147

A Pancreatic Polypeptide-Producing Pancreatic Tumor Causing WDHA Syndrome.  

PubMed

We report the case of a 46-year-old female patient with WDHA (watery diarrhea/hypokalemia/achlorhydria) syndrome caused by a pancreatic polypeptide-producing tumor in the head of the pancreas. Whereas VIP and other pancreatic endocrine hormones were in the normal range, only serum levels of pancreatic polypeptide were elevated. Imaging studies identified a pancreatic tumor in the head of the gland. After laparotomy, the tumor of 3 cm in size was enucleated. Final pathology documented a pancreatic endocrine tumor with immunohistochemical staining demonstrating the presence of pancreatic polypeptide. The patient remained cured after a follow-up of more than three years. The present case illustrates that, although rare, WDHA syndrome may be associated with a pancreatic polypeptide-secreting endocrine tumor of the pancreas. PMID:21490894

Amrilleva, Vera; Slater, Emily P; Waldmann, Jens; Bonorden, Dorothee; Fendrich, Volker

2008-07-09

148

Atypical lymphoid hyperplasia mimicking lymphoma.  

PubMed

The distinction between reactive and neoplastic lymphoid infiltrates is a common problem in clinical practice and can be problematic. The clinical implications for both the patient and the treating clinician are profound. In this article, we discuss six of the common entities that can present as atypical lymphoid hyperplasia and thus can mimic malignant lymphomas, with emphasis on morphologic features, immunophenotypic findings, and molecular correlates that help distinguish these disorders from neoplastic conditions. The six conditions to be discussed in detail include reactive follicular hyperplasia versus follicular lymphoma; progressive transformation of germinal centers versus nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma; immunoblastic proliferations versus diffuse large B-cell lymphomas; variant forms of Castleman disease that may mimic a number of lymphoid cancers; Kikuchi's disease versus large cell lymphomas; and finally, dermatopathic lymphadenopathy and its distinction from lymph nodes showing early involvement by cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (Mycosis fungoides). PMID:19577167

Good, David J; Gascoyne, Randy D

2009-08-01

149

Cannabis-induced acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is a common disease. Despite the frequent use of cannabis worldwide, only six reports have described cases of acute pancreatitis secondary to the use of tetrahydrocannabinoid (THC). Here we describe two cases of THC-induced pancreatitis. The first case occurred in a 38-year-old man with multiple admissions for THC-induced pancreatitis; the second case involved a 22-year-old man with no previous medical history. In both cases, other possible causes of acute pancreatitis were ruled out. Key words: common disease, tetrahydrocannabinoid, etiology. PMID:23892868

Mikolaševi?, Ivana; Mili?, Sandra; Mijandruši?-Sin?i?, Brankica; Licul, Vanja; Stimac, Davor

2013-08-01

150

Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whereas it is estimated that 7800 new cases of Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) will be diagnosed in 2006, nodular lymphocyte predominant\\u000a Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) will only account for 3–8% of newly diagnosed HL (1, 2). The majority of the incidence is accounted\\u000a for by the classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) subtypes (nodular sclerosing, lymphocyte rich, lymphocyte depleted, and mixed\\u000a cellularity). There exists

Michelle A. Fanale; Anas Younes

151

Molecular Pathogenesis of Hodgkin Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a distinctive lymphoma subtype that accounts for approximately 30% of all lymphomas in the Western\\u000a world and approximately 5% in Japan. HL is characterized by the giant multinucleated tumor cells called Hodgkin\\/Reed-Sternberg\\u000a (H\\/RS) cells, but the cellular origin had long been unknown. Recent investigations have clarified that H\\/RS cells have a clonally\\u000a rearranged immunoglobulin gene in

Momoko Nishikori; Takashi Uchiyama

2006-01-01

152

Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP who have failed to respond to medical therapy and require intervention.

Tandan, Manu; Reddy, D Nageshwar

2013-01-01

153

Study of Alisertib (MLN8237) in Adults With Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Precursor B-lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; T-cell Lymphoma, Excluding Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Follicular Lymphoma With ? 50% Diffuse Large Cell Component

2013-07-23

154

Diagnosis of acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is still mainly based on the clinical signs and symptoms of the patients. Systemic organ failure, peritonitis and/or shock indicate severe disease, but to obtain optimal results of treatment the diagnosis of individual patients at high risk should be done before the development of systemic manifestations. A number of laboratory tests are valuable in the follow-up of the patients, but immediate onset of intensive therapy cannot be based on these tests. At present, contrast enhanced CT seems to be the most accurate method for the early detection of hemorrhagic/necrotizing forms of acute pancreatitis. PMID:2424764

Lempinen, M; Schröder, T

1986-01-01

155

Cystic pancreatic lymphangioma  

PubMed Central

Lymphangioma of the pancreas is a rare benign tumor of lymphatic origin. Retroperitoneal lymphangiomas account for 1% of all lymphangiomas. Herein, we report a case of cystic pancreatic lymphangioma diagnosed in 34 year-old female patient who was hospitalized for a slight pain in the epigastrium and vomiting. Radiological imaging revealed a large multiloculated cystic abdominal mass with enhancing septations involving the upper retroperitoneum. During the laparoscopic surgery, a well circumscribed polycystic tumor was completely excised preserving the pancreatic duct. The patient made a complete recovery and is disease-free 12 months postoperatively.

Gures, Nazim; Gurluler, Ercument; Alim, Altan; Berber, Ibrahim; Gurkan, Alihan

2012-01-01

156

Incidental Pancreatic Cystic Lesions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Incidental pancreatic cystic lesions (IPCL) are becoming an increasingly frequent clinical entity. Within this review, the\\u000a differential diagnosis, investigation, and management are discussed.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A MEDLINE search was performed for IPCL.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Incidence of IPCL varies from 0.2–0.7%, and 30–47% are premalignant or malignant. Pancreatic pseudocysts (PC), serous cystic\\u000a neoplasms (SCN), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN), and mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCN) are

Senarath Edirimanne; Saxon J. Connor

2008-01-01

157

Acute pancreatitis in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a There are no drugs that cure or abate pancreatitis. The treatment of patients with mild and moderate episodes of pancreatitis\\u000a (85%) is supportive and expectant. Central issues include the removal of the initiating process (if possible), relief of pain,\\u000a and maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be required for stone\\u000a extraction in patients

Steven L. Werlin

2001-01-01

158

Chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer patients present late in their course and surgical resection as a modality of treatment is of limited value. Majority develop loco-regional failure and distant metastasis, therefore, adjuvant therapy comprising of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are useful treatment options to achieve higher loco-regional control. Specialized irradiation techniques like intra-operative radiotherapy that help to increase the total tumor dose have been used, however, controvertible survival benefit was observed. Various studies have shown improved median and overall survival with chemoradiotherapy for advanced unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. The role of new agents such as topoisomerase I inhibitors also needs further clinical investigations.

Pathy, Sushmita; Chander, Subhash

2009-01-01

159

Genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited genetic factors also play an important role, with approximately 5-10% of pancreatic cancer patients reporting family history of pancreatic cancer. While the genetic basis for the majority of the familial clustering of pancreatic cancer remains unclear, several important pancreatic cancer genes have been identified. These consist of high penetrance genes including BRCA2 or PALB2, to more common genetic variation associated with a modest increase risk of pancreatic cancer such as genetic variation at the ABO blood group locus. Recent advances in genotyping and genetic sequencing have accelerated the rate at which novel pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes have been identified with several genes identified within the past few years. This review addresses our current understanding of the familial aggregation of pancreatic cancer, established pancreatic cancer susceptablity genes and how this knowledge informs risk assessment and screening for high-risk families. PMID:22162228

Klein, Alison P

2012-01-01

160

Urinary Kallikrein Excretion in Chronic Pancreatic Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Variations in urinary kallikrein in pancreatic diseases were ascertained, and possible influencing factors were investigated. Serum amylase and urinary excretion of glandular kallikrein, pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase),?-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and amylase were measured in 24 control subjects, 39 patients with pancreatic cancer, 49 with pancreatitis and 63 with extra-pancreatic diseases. Urinary kallikrein was found to be elevated in a substantial number of

Carlo Fabris; Maria Piera Panozzo; Daniela Basso; Giuseppe Del Favero; Mario Plebani; Martina Zaninotto; Paola Fogar; Tamara Meggiato; Paola Scalon; Chiara Ferrara; Remo Naccarato

1991-01-01

161

Endoscopic therapy for organized pancreatic necrosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND & AIMS: The treatment of patients with extensive pancreatic necrosis remains controversial; a subpopulation of patients with extensive acute pancreatic necrosis develop complex, organized collections. This study examined the feasibility of endoscopic drainage in patients with extensive organized pancreatic necrosis. METHODS: Eleven patients with organized pancreatic necrosis (8 sterile and 3 infected) after severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis underwent attempted

TH Baron; WG Thaggard; DE Morgan

1996-01-01

162

Endoscopic management of acute biliary pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis represents numerous unique challenges to the practicing digestive disease specialist. Clinical presentations of acute pancreatitis vary from trivial pain to severe acute illness with a significant risk of death. Urgent endoscopic treatment of acute pancreatitis is considered when there is causal evidence of biliary pancreatitis. This article focuses on the diagnosis and endoscopic treatment of acute biliary pancreatitis. PMID:24079788

Kuo, Vincent C; Tarnasky, Paul R

2013-10-01

163

Primary testicular lymphoma.  

PubMed

Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the testis (PTL) accounts for about 9% of testicular neoplasms and 1-2% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. It is the most common testicular malignancy in elder men. Anecdotal reports associated PTL development with trauma, chronic orchitis, cryptorchidism, or filariasis exist, but no case-control studies have confirmed their etiologic significance. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common histotype in primary forms; aggressive histologies, especially Burkitt's lymphoma, are prevalent in cases of secondary involvement of testis. The most common clinical presentation is a unilateral painless scrotal swelling, sometimes with sharp scrotal pain or hydrocele. Systemic B symptoms are present in 25-41% of patients with advanced stage. Less frequently, abdominal pain, and ascites can be seen in patients with involvement of retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Bilateral testicular involvement is detected in up to 35% of patients. Although good results with doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy, followed or not by radiotherapy, have been reported, a high proportion of patients with stage I-II diseases experience aggressive relapses, and patients with advanced disease have a very poor prognosis. PTL has a propensity to disseminate to other extranodal organs, including the controlateral testis, CNS, skin, Waldeyer's ring, lung, pleura, and soft tissue. Orchidectomy followed by R-CHOP combination, with CNS prophylaxis, and prophylactic irradiation of the contralateral testis is the recommended first-line treatment for patients with limited disease. Management of patients with advanced or relapsed disease should follow the worldwide recommendations for nodal DLBCL. PMID:17962036

Vitolo, Umberto; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Zucca, Emanuele

2007-10-24

164

Immunotherapy for Lymphomas  

Microsoft Academic Search

A growing list of immunotherapeutic strategies is now being employed to combat lymphoid malignancies. These efforts are warranted\\u000a given that B-cell lymphomas, particularly those of the common follicular subtype, are among the most “immune-responsive” of\\u000a all human cancers. Although systemic cytokine therapies for B-cell malignancies have been largely disappointing to date, monoclonal\\u000a antibody therapies, principally the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab, have

John M. Timmerman

2003-01-01

165

Primary colorectal lymphoma.  

PubMed

This study aimed at investigating the incidence, presentation, patient and tumor characteristics, treatment, and outcome of primary colorectal lymphomas (PCL) at a tertiary care center in Lebanon over a 25-year period. The Dawson's criteria were used for selection of eligible cases. The medical records were reviewed for demographic variables, the presence of risk factors, presenting signs and symptoms, method of diagnosis, histologic type, type of therapy, and condition at last follow-up. Nine cases of PCL were identified (12.7% of gastrointestinal lymphomas and 0.1% of colorectal malignancies). The mean age at presentation was 44.2 years with male predominance noted. Abdominal pain was the most common presentation (77.8%). Colonoscopy was performed for eight patients with non-specific gross tumor characteristics. Three patients had Burkitt's and six had diffuse large B-Cell lymphomas. The most common site of involvement was the cecum (55.6%) with all cases presenting in stage I(E). Surgery was performed for six patients followed by chemotherapy except for one, and three patients had chemotherapy only. The median survival time was 25 months and the 2-year survival time was approximated at 60%. It is concluded that PCL is a rare malignancy with well-identified disease characteristics yet controversial ideal management plan. PMID:19301158

Musallam, Khaled M; Hatoum, Hasan A; Barada, Kassem; Taher, Ali T; Salem, Mohamed E; Malek, Eliane M; Shamseddine, Ali I

2009-03-20

166

Oblimersen Sodium and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-03-11

167

Oral solid form of primary effusion lymphoma mimicking plasmablastic lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare large cell lymphoma subtype that usually is associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Features facilitating PEL identification are its clinical presentation, cytologic findings, immunophenotypic profile, and particularly, relation to human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) infection. Uncommonly, PEL may present as a solid form that predominantly involves the distal digestive tract and poses major diagnostic

José-Luis Mate; José-Tomás Navarro; Aurelio Ariza; Josep-Maria Ribera; Eva Castellà; Jordi Juncà; Cristina Tural; José-Francisco Nomdedeu; Beatriz Bellosillo; Sergi Serrano; Isabel Granada; Fuensanta Millá; Evarist Feliu

2004-01-01

168

MDX-010 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-04-08

169

Diabetes and pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Epidemiological studies clearly indicate that the risk of pancreatic cancer (PC) is increased in diabetic patients, but most studies focus on overall diabetes or type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and there are few studies on the risks of type 1 and type 3c (secondary) diabetes. Possible mechanisms for increased cancer risk in diabetes include cellular proliferative effects of hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and abnormalities in insulin/IGF receptor pathways. Recently, insulin and insulin secretagogues have been observed to increase the PC risk, while metformin treatment reduces the cancer risk in diabetic subjects. In addition, anticancer drugs used to treat PC may either cause diabetes or worsen coexisting diabetes. T3cDM has emerged as a major subset of diabetes and may have the highest risk of pancreatic carcinoma especially in patients with chronic pancreatitis. T3cDM is also a consequence of PC in at least 30% of patients. Distinguishing T3cDM from the more prevalent T2DM among new-onset diabetic patients can be aided by an assessment of clinical features and confirmed by finding a deficiency in postprandial pancreatic polypeptide release. In conclusion, diabetes and PC have a complex relationship that requires more clinical attention. The risk of developing PC can be reduced by aggressive prevention and treatment of T2DM and obesity and the prompt diagnosis of T3cDM may allow detection of a tumor at a potentially curable stage. PMID:22843556

Cui, YunFeng; Andersen, Dana K

2012-09-05

170

Chronic Pancreatitis in Children  

MedlinePLUS

... fewer than 10 grams of fat. About 20 potato chips contain 10 grams of fat, so it takes discipline to make sure to stay within this range. Patients who have lost the ability to digest food will be prescribed pills containing pancreatic enzymes to help with digestion. They may also be ...

171

Pancreatic pseudocysts in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic pseudocyst (PPC) is an uncommon condition in childhood and is almost always associated with blunt abdominal trauma. Additional disease within the pancreas is rare, unlike adult experience. Prior to the advent of ultrasonography (US) assessment of the cyst was difficult. Subsequently, it has become apparent that PPC may develop but still undergo spontaneous regression. We have reviewed eight children

Susan M. Sawyer; Patricia M. Davidson; N. McMullin; K. B. Stokes

1989-01-01

172

Pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Local parenchymal damage in acute pancreatitis has been well recognized for many years. This damage leads to a considerable leak of extracellular fluid and so to gross hypovolemia. It also produces the pain that is a major clinical feature of the disease. More recently, the autodigestive process has been recognized to generate, within and around the gland, a “broth” of

John E. Trapnell

1981-01-01

173

[A quite usual pancreatitis?].  

PubMed

History and clinical findings: A 55-year-old man suffered from severe acute abdominal pain. 10 years previously he had been diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. On palpation, there was pronounced abdominal tenderness and guarding.Investigations: Emergency CT revealed signs of intra- and extrahepatic cholestasis and biliar sludge; serum-lipase was increased.Treatment and course: Acute biliary pancreatitis was diagnosed. After admission the patient's condition deteriorated; acute renal failure and respiratory insufficiency developed. After 4 weeks of intensive care he was discharged to a rehabilitation facility via normal ward. At that time pancreatic sonography showed a walled-off necrosis. 7 weeks later colicky abdominal pain occurred again. Altough there were no signs of infection, suction-irrigation drainage was administered. This led to a secondary infection of the necrotic cavity, and 20 sessions of endoscopic necrosectomy were performed for 3 month. Then the patient was discharged to follow-up treatment in a stable condition.Conclusion: Even in supposedly "usual" acute pancreatitis complications can lead to a prolonged course. Sterile necroses should be managed very cautiously. PMID:24002875

Feisthammel, J; Mössner, J; Hoffmeister, A

2013-09-03

174

Study on chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer using MRS and pancreatic juice samples  

PubMed Central

AIM: To investigate the markers of pancreatic diseases and provide basic data and experimental methods for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. METHODS: There were 15 patients in the present study, among whom 10 had pancreatic cancer and 5, chronic pancreatitis. In all patients, pancreatic cancer or chronic pancreatitis was located on the head of the pancreas. Pathology data of all patients was confirmed by biopsy and surgery. Among the 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, 3 people had a medical history of long-term alcohol consumption. Of 5 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 4 men suffered from alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic juice samples were obtained from patients by endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography. Magnetic resonance spectroscopyn was performed on an 11.7-T scanner (Bruker DRX-500) using Call-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequences. The parameters were as follows: spectral width, 15 KHz; time domain, 64 K; number of scans, 512; and acquisition time, 2.128 s. RESULTS: The main component of pancreatic juice included leucine, iso-leucine, valine, lactate, alanine, acetate, aspartate, lysine, glycine, threonine, tyrosine, histidine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine. On performing 1D 1H and 2D total correlation spectroscopy, we found a triplet peak at the chemical shift of 1.19 ppm, which only appeared in the spectra of pancreatic juice obtained from patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. This triplet peak was considered the resonance of the methyl of ethoxy group, which may be associated with the metabolism of alcohol in the pancreas. CONCLUSION: The triplet peak, at the chemical shift of 1.19 ppm is likely to be the characteristic metabolite of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

Wang, Jian; Ma, Chao; Liao, Zhuan; Tian, Bing; Lu, Jian-Ping

2011-01-01

175

[Chronic pancreatitis and primary hyperparathyroidism].  

PubMed

The frequency of acute or chronic pancreatitis in primary hyperparathyroidism has decreased from the former 5-10% to 1-2% thanks to earlier diagnosis and operative treatment. Chronic pancreatitis, which occurs only in prolonged primary hyperparathyroidism, should therefore virtually disappear. We investigated this topic in a prospective long term study of chronic pancreatitis (1963-1992). Over the last three decades 336 patients with chronic pancreatitis have been studied at regular intervals. 245 suffered from alcohol-induced (84% with calcifications) and 91 from non-alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis (77% with calcifications). The average period of observation in the group with non-alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis was 10.6 years. Primary hyperparathyroidism was found in 6 patients (4 male, 2 female), i.e. 6.6% of non-alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis (100% with calcifications). They were evenly distributed over the 30 years' study period. 3 patients had acute attacks of pancreatitis prior to the diagnosis of chronic calcific pancreatitis (2 months, 3 + 8 years). In 3 patients with primary painless chronic calcific pancreatitis the condition was diagnosed twice incidentally and once because of diabetes mellitus. Chronic pancreatitis was diagnosed 3 times before primary hyperparathyroidism (8.3 +/- 2.1 years), once simultaneously and twice afterwards (2 + 14 years). In three patients chronic pancreatitis was initially misinterpreted as alcohol-induced. Severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency was present in 4 of 5 patients (no data in one), and diabetes mellitus in 3 of 6 patients. At the time of diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism, mean serum calcium was 3.08 +/- 0.43 mmol/l.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8073234

Bauer, S; Ammann, R

1994-07-30

176

Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... gastrointestinal tract, or skin. Getting the Facts Hepatosplenic Gamma-delta T-cell Lymphoma is an extremely rare and aggressive disease ... patients with enteropathy-type, NK/Tcell, or hepatosplenic gamma-delta T-cell lymphomas should discuss treatment options and potential clinical ...

177

Lipid content of malignant lymphomas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lipid staining, using oil red 0 and Sudan black B stain, was carried out on frozen sections of formalin-fixed tumour tissue from 142 cases of malignant lymphoma. Most cases of Burkitt's tumour contained abundant coarse lipid droplets both within the cytoplasm of the lymphoid cells and within non-neoplastic histiocytes scattered throughout the tumour. Lymphocytic lymphomas contained little stainable fat. Histiocytic

D. H. Wright

1968-01-01

178

Isolation of Diverse Structural Compartments of Natural Organic Matter from the Kolyma River Watershed in East Siberian Arctic Using DEAE-Cellulose, XAD-8 Resin, C18 and PPL Cartridges  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Natural Organic Matter (NOM) is an essential part of the global carbon cycle and plays a significant role in transport of organic carbon from terrestrial ecosystems into the World Ocean. The Arctic region is one of the most vulnerable with respect to climate change. The Kolyma River is one of the great Arctic Rivers. The particular feature of the Kolyma River watershed is its location in the continuous permafrost zone. Hence, research on structural composition of NOM in the Kolyma River basin is very important for understanding the carbon flux and NOM transformations on the way from permafrost to the Arctic Ocean under conditions of the changing climate. The purpose of this work was to isolate diverse structural compartments of NOM from permafrost mud streams and freshwater environments of the Kolyma River basin suited for further structural studies using a suite of different sorbents. Another goal was to assess applicability of these sorbents for developing a NOM fluxmeter - passive device for in situ measurement of fluxes. The following sorbents were used in this study: diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) cellulose , XAD-8 resin, Varian Bond Elute PPL and C18-cartridges. The choice of the sorbents was based on the following considerations. DEAE-cellulose is an anion-exchanging resin. It is suited the best for isolation of negatively charged NOM constituents of high and low molecular weight which represent the major part of freshwater NOM. Given positive charge inherent within the sorbent, sorption of negatively charged compartments from natural water occurs under flow through conditions without any prior treatment. This makes the DEAE cellulose very promising for in situ applications (e.g., for fluxmeter). Amberlite XAD-8 is a macroreticular resin which is used as a part of the standard protocol of International Humic Substances Society for isolation of freshwater humic substances (HS). The XAD-8 resin represents a neutral hydrophobic polymer. As a result, for isolation of HS, water should be acidified to transfer humic solutes into protonated form. The acidification step is a major disadvantage of this technique which makes it hardly suitable for in situ applications. Bond Elute C18 and PPL solid phase extraction cartridges were used for extraction of the most hydrophobic part of NOM. Both C18 and PPL demand prior acidification of water sample. Particular advantage of these sorbents is their suitability for very soft methanol elution of the sorbed sample that makes them ideal sorbents for samples aimed for structural analysis. All sorbents yielded very different recoveries of NOM of the total pool of organic carbon in the sampled water which accounted for DEAE - 85%, PPL - 65%, C18 - 65%, XAD-8 - 50%. The obtained samples were structurally characterized using elemental analysis and size exclusion chromatography. This study is part of the Polaris Project, an NSF-funded undergraduate field program based out of the Northeast Science Station in Cherskiy, Northeast Siberia (thepolarisproject.org).

Andzhushev, M.; Dubinenkov, I.; Holmes, R. M.; Hatfield, K.; Perminova, I.; Bulygina, E. B.; Konstantinov, A.

2011-12-01

179

Exocrine pancreatic enzyme and calcium secretion in health and pancreatitis.  

PubMed Central

Calcium, enzyme, and total protein secretion were measured in secretin stimulated pancreatic juice in health, "early" chronic pancreatitis, and in chronic calcific pancreatitis. Increased concentrations of trypsin, total protein, and calcium, and increased outputs of calcium and protein were shown to be present in the "early" stages of the disease, indicating that an environment conducive to the formation of protein plugs and possibly later calcification already exists.

Clain, J E; Barbezat, G O; Marks, I N

1981-01-01

180

Pancreatic islet autotransplantation with total pancreatectomy for chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Achieving pain relief and improving the quality of life are the main targets of treatment for patients with chronic pancreatitis. The use of total pancreatectomy to treat chronic pancreatitis is a radical and in some ways ideal strategy. However, total pancreatectomy is associated with severe diabetic control problems. Total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation can relieve severe pain and prevent the development of postsurgical diabetes. With islet autotransplantation, patients with chronic pancreatitis receive their own islet cells and therefore do not require immunosuppressive therapy. In the future, total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation may be considered a treatment option for chronic pancreatitis patients. PMID:23073847

Kuroki, Tamotsu; Adachi, Tomohiko; Ono, Shinichiro; Tanaka, Takayuki; Kitasato, Amane; Eguchi, Susumu

2012-10-17

181

Orbital involvement in nonendemic Burkitts lymphoma.  

PubMed

Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) is a rare monoclonal proliferation of Blymphocytes and is classified as a poorly differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma. Typically, Burkitt's lymphoma involves the jaw bones, but the orbit can also be involved. Burkitt"s lymphoma is seen, sporadically in India, and 3 cases of orbital Burkitt's lymphoma were diagnosed during the past 4 years. Three cases of acute proptosis in children are presented to us. The provisional clinical diagnosis was rhabdomyosarcoma and the histopathology revealed Burkitt's lymphoma. The fast growth rate, hematologic manifestations and the urgency of diagnosis are emphasized. We present 3 cases here and review prevailing concepts about Burkitt's lymphoma. PMID:23231065

Gupta, Rijuneeta; Yadav, Jagveer Singh; Yadav, Shilpa; Wadood, Abdul

2012-12-01

182

Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6?months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Goncalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

2012-01-01

183

New Developments in Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma presents in an advanced stage and has a dismal prognosis. Extensive recent research efforts have\\u000a provided us with greater insight into the etiology of pancreatic cancer and have also improved our means of prognostication.\\u000a Molecular analysis demonstrated that specific pathways involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis are perhaps more valuable to\\u000a study than single genetic aberrations. Previous risk factors, including

Julia B. Greer; Randall E. Brand

2011-01-01

184

Exocrine Pancreatic Function in Dyspepsia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of pancreatic diseases as the cause for dyspepsia differs in clinical materials between 0 and 25–30%. In parallel, the incidence rate of chronic pancreatitis varies between 0.7 and 10 per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The correct figures are unsettled. The main reason for the great variability in figures for frequency of chronic pancreatitis is probably the different clinical

H. Worning

1987-01-01

185

Molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Currently there is no early diagnostic\\u000a test and no effective treatment options for this deadly disease. Prevention of pancreatic cancer is difficult because little\\u000a is known about its etiology. The main modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer include cigarette smoking and dietary\\u000a factors. Information from molecular

Donghui Li; Li Jiao

2003-01-01

186

Imaging of Burkitt's lymphoma-abdominal manifestations.  

PubMed

Burkitt's lymphoma is an uncommon form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in adults. The diagnostic workup for Burkitt's lymphoma includes radiological imaging and like any other form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma definitive diagnosis is by histopathology. Imaging is necessary to determine the distribution and severity in terms of extent and organs of involvement to further assist in staging and thence to implement appropriate therapy. High incidence of intraabdominal involvement is seen in American Burkitt lymphoma. PMID:23575094

Satishchandra, Hanuman; Sridhar, Aralaguppe S; Pooja, Basavaradhya P

187

Primary Breast Lymphoma: A Rare Entity  

PubMed Central

In the past two decades there has been an increase in the incidence of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Hodgkin disease. This has been accompanied by an increase in the numbers of extranodal lymphoma. Despite this primary breast lymphoma is a rare disease. We present a case of a 74 year old female with primary breast lymphoma. Methods of imaging including PET/CT are discussed. Criteria for diagnosing primary breast lymphoma are presented. In addition diagnostic methods and therapeutic options are considered.

Meerkotter, Debra; Rubin, Grace; Joske, Fiona; Angunawela, Preethika; Khalafallah, Alhossain

2011-01-01

188

Identification of a Novel Kindred with Familial Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aims: Hereditary pancreatic cancer comprises about 10% of pancreatic cancer cases. Multiple causative mutations have been identified. Here we describe a pancreatitis\\/pancreatic cancer (P\\/PC) family, which demonstrates pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer resulting from an uncharacterized mutation. Methods: Family members completed evaluations to determine signs of mutation status. Select patients were screened for mutations associated with hereditary pancreatic diseases. Results: In

Jennifer LaFemina; Penelope A. Roberts; Yin P. Hung; James F. Gusella; Dushyant Sahani; Carlos Fernández-del Castillo; Andrew L. Warshaw; Sarah P. Thayer

2009-01-01

189

Update on Endoscopic Management of Main Pancreatic Duct Stones in Chronic Calcific Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic duct stones are a common complication during the natural course of chronic pancreatitis and often contribute to additional pain and pancreatitis. Abdominal pain, one of the major symptoms of chronic pancreatitis, is believed to be caused in part by obstruction of the pancreatic duct system (by stones or strictures) resulting in increasing intraductal pressure and parenchymal ischemia. Pancreatic stones can be managed by surgery, endoscopy, or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. In this review, updated management of pancreatic duct stones is discussed.

Choi, Eun Kwang

2012-01-01

190

Early management of acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to prevent or treat organ failure and to reduce infectious complications. This review addresses the management of acute pancreatitis in the first hours to days after onset of symptoms, including fluid therapy, nutrition and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. This review also discusses the recently revised Atlanta classification which provides new uniform terminology, thereby facilitating communication regarding severity and complications of pancreatitis. PMID:24160930

Schepers, Nicolien J; Besselink, Marc G H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bakker, Olaf J; Bruno, Marco J

2013-09-06

191

Update on experimental acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is a disease still not fully understood. Early pathophysiologic event escape clinical observation because patients typically present only some time after the acute onset of the disease. Also, many ethiologic factors can lead to acute pancreatitis and the clinical course can range from mild, self-limiting to severe and life- threatening. Therefore, experimental models are necessary for any research into early acute pancreatitis. In accordance with the varying clinical picture of acute pancreatitis, many different model exist. In this article, we describe the most commonly used models and show their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:23207612

Kahl, S; Mayer, J M

2012-12-01

192

Brain Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease with a 5-year survival rate below 5%. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced tumor stage and existence of distant metastases. However, involvement of the central nervous system is rare in pancreatic cancer. We retrospectively analyzed all cases of brain metastases in pancreatic cancer reported to date focusing on patient characteristics, clinical appearance, therapy and survival. Including our own, 12 cases of brain metastases originating from pancreatic cancer were identified. In three patients brain metastases were the first manifestation of pancreatic cancer. All other patients developed brain metastases during their clinical course. In most cases, the disease progressed rapidly and the patients died within weeks or months. However, two patients showed long-term survival. Of note, both patients received resection of the pancreatic cancer as well as curative resection of the metachronous brain metastases. Brain metastases in pancreatic cancer are a rare condition and usually predict a very poor prognosis. However, there is evidence that resection of brain metastases of pancreatic cancer can be immensely beneficial to patient’s survival, even with the chance for cure. Therefore, a surgical approach in metastatic pancreatic cancer should be considered in selective cases.

Lemke, Johannes; Scheele, Jan; Kapapa, Thomas; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Kornmann, Marko

2013-01-01

193

Chemoprevention strategies for pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis and it is often diagnosed at advanced stages, which makes it very difficult to treat. The low survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer points toward an increased need for novel therapeutic and chemopreventive strategies and early detection. Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Both synthetic as well as natural, diet-derived bioactive compounds have been evaluated as pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents and have been shown to have various degrees of efficacy in cellular and in vivo animal models. Some chemopreventive agents (for example curcumin, resveratrol, B-DIM) have also been reported to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic drugs (for example gemcitabine or erlotinib), which suggests the potential use of chemopreventive agents as potentiators of standard chemotherapy. Very few clinical trials with pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents have been completed and some are in early phases. Further development of pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents may prove to be tremendously valuable for individuals at high-risk of developing pancreatic cancer and patients who present with premalignant lesions. This Review discusses the current state of the pancreatic cancer chemoprevention field and highlights the challenges ahead.

Stan, Silvia D.; Singh, Shivendra V.; Brand, Randall E.

2010-01-01

194

Complications After Pancreatic Surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Pancreatic cancer is the fourth-leading cause of death from malignant disease; each year about 33,000 individuals in the United\\u000a States are diagnosed with this condition and more than 60,000 in Europe [1]. It is a devastating disease with a very poor prognosis and has a death rate roughly equal to its incidence rate. Contributing\\u000a to the high death rate is

F. Francesco Mola; Giuseppe Mascetta; Antonio Bonis; Pierluigi Sebastiano

195

Management of pancreatic abscesses.  

PubMed Central

The records of twenty-one patients treated for pancreatic abscesses were reviewed. Pancreatitis developed following alcohol ingestion, operative procedures, biliary tract disease, ulcers, and undetermined causes. The clinical findings included abdominal pain in 19 patients (90%); fever in 18 (86%); tenderness in 18 (86%); and leukocytosis in 18 (86%). Ultrasonographic examination aided the diagnosis in seven of 11 patients. Computerized tomography was useful in diagnosing eight of ten cases. There were twenty-nine hospital admissions, with a mean length of hospitalization of 76 days per patient. The operative findings varied with extent and duration of underlying pancreatitis. The surgical approach depended on clinical presentation and prior localization of the abscess. Eleven additional operations were performed. Complications included respiratory failure (three patients); fistula formation (five patients); hemorrhage (two patients); renal failure (one patient); and splenic vein thrombosis (one patient). Thirteen patients were treated with hyperalimentation and nine patients had gastrostomy and jejunostomy placed for decompression and feeding. Of 15 patients in whom microbial studies were reviewed, nine patients had polymicrobial infections. Three patients had Candida albicans. There was one death. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6.

Saxon, A; Reynolds, J T; Doolas, A

1981-01-01

196

Rituximab In Indolent Lymphomas  

PubMed Central

Indolent Non Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) comprises a group of incurable, generally slow growing lymphomas highly responsive to initial therapy with a relapsing and progressive course. Rituximab, an anti CD-20 antibody, has had a large impact on treatment of indolent NHL. Its effectiveness as a single agent and in conjunction with known chemotherapy regimens has made it a standard of care in the treatment of NHL. Analysis of data obtained from NHL clinical trials as well as data from the National Cancer Institute indicates that the overall survival of indolent NHL has improved since the discovery of rituximab. Given its effectiveness and tolerability, it is currently being investigated as a maintenance agent with encouraging results. This review summarizes several landmark trials utilizing rituximab as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy for treatment of NHL. In addition, a review of the studied rituximab maintenance dosing schedules and its impact on NHL will also be presented. Overall, rituximab has changed the landscape for treatment of indolent NHL however additional research is necessary to identify the optimal dosing schedule as well as patients most likely to respond to prolonged rituximab therapy.

Sousou, Tarek; Friedberg, Jonathan

2010-01-01

197

Primary gastric Hodgkin's lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Background Primary Hodgkin's disease of the stomach is an extremely rare entity. Nearly all cases of primary gastric lymphoma are of the non-Hodgkin's variety. Diagnoses in such cases are difficult due to considerable histological similarities between the 2 disease entities. Case presentation We report the case of a 77 year old lady with a 1 year history of weight loss and poor appetite. Physical examination was unremarkable. Subsequent multiple upper GI endoscopies revealed a large malignant looking ulcer which was deemed to be histologically benign. Following CT imaging the patient underwent a radical gastrectomy. Postoperatively histology and immunohistochemistry failed to confirm a diagnosis. As such a second opinion was sought. Employing an extended array of immunohistological staining a diagnosis of 'Classical Hodgkin's' disease of the stomach was achieved. Conclusion Our case illustrates the significant difficulties in achieving a rare diagnosis of primary Hodgkin's lymphoma of the stomach. The non-specific nature of symptoms and a lack of histological features make a preoperative diagnosis extremely difficult. While immunohistochemistry is widely employed in aiding the evaluation of such cases, one should be wary of the considerable overlap in differentiating between Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's disease entities using this technique.

Hossain, Fahad S; Koak, Yashwant; Khan, Farrukh H

2007-01-01

198

[A case of pancreatic carcinoma coexist with pancreatic pseudocyst].  

PubMed

Report of Pancreatic carcinoma coexist with Pancreatic pseudocyst is rare. We have experienced a case of pancreatic carcinoma which was diagnosed and resected by coexisted pancreatic pseudocyst. The patient aged 53 years, complained of epigastric distension and visited our hospital. There was no past history of abdominal injuries and he didn't drink much. A cyst 7cm in diameter was found at pancreatic tail lesion by our examination. By blood chemistry tumor marker CA19.9 was 310 and he complicated diabetes mellitus. We suspected pancreatic carcinoma coexist with pancreatic pseudocyst, so distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed. We found a solid tumor sized about 3cm in diameter at just proximal of pancreatic cyst. Since perioperative histological examination revealed adenocarcinoma, we performed lymph node dissection. The tumor was highly differentiated adenocarcinoma which invaded retroperitoneum in some lesion. The patient died 10 months later by recurrence. We concluded that we must take into account not only laboratory finding but their clinical course in such cases. PMID:2179708

Nagahama, T; Goseki, N; Inoue, Y; Taenaka, T; Nakamura, H; Habu, H; Endo, M

1990-01-01

199

Isolated gastric variceal bleeding caused by splenic lymphoma-associated splenic vein occlusion  

PubMed Central

Isolated gastric varices (IGV) can occur in patients with left-sided portal hypertension resulting from splenic vein occlusion caused by thrombosis or stenosis. In left-sided portal hypertension, blood flows retrogradely through the short and posterior gastric veins and the gastroepiploic veins, leading to the formation of an IGV. The most common causes of splenic vein occlusion are pancreatic diseases, such as pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis, or a pseudocyst. However, various other cancers, such as colon, gastric, or renal cancers, have also been known to cause splenic vein occlusion. Our patient presented with a rare case of IGV bleeding induced by splenic lymphoma-associated splenic vein occlusion. Splenectomy, splenic artery embolization, and stenting of the splenic vein are the current treatment choices. Chemotherapy, however, is an alternative effective treatment for splenic vein occlusion caused by chemotherapy-sensitive tumors. Our patient responded well to chemotherapy with a cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, oncovin, and prednisolone regimen, and the splenic vein occlusion resolved after the lymphoma regressed.

Chen, Bao-Chung; Wang, Hong-Hau; Lin, Yu-Chieh; Shih, Yu-Lueng; Chang, Wei-Kuo; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan

2013-01-01

200

Pneumothorax associated with malignant lymphoma.  

PubMed

An 82-year-old man was diagnosed with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma involving multiple lymph nodes and bone marrow. On radiological examinations no involvement of the lung was seen. He was treated with rituximab. Eighteen months later he was complicated with right pneumothorax, and surgery with bullectomy was finally performed. Histological examination disclosed the proliferation of abnormal B lymphocytes near the wall of the bulla and pleura. We conclude that the pneumothorax in this patient was associated with lymphoma. Thus, radiological examination does not disclose lymphomatous lesions, it is possible that lymphoma involves the pleura, and pleural involvement can cause pneumothorax. Surgery is an effective method of treating this rare complication. PMID:21048371

Matano, Sadaya; Satoh, Shigehiko; Sugiguchi, Shun; Sugimoto, Tatsuho

2010-11-01

201

[Pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphomas].  

PubMed

Non Hodgkin lymphoma represent about 5% of childhood cancer. They are the third most common group of cancers in children and adolescents, after cerebral tumours and leukemias. They differ from adult lymphomas as they are all high grade tumours, always diffuse and often associated with extra-nodal diseases. Three main histological subtypes predominate: Burkitt, lymphoblastic and anaplastic large cell lymphomas. As the clinical progression is growing fast and treatment different between the 3 subtypes, the diagnosis must be rapidly done and with accuracy. PMID:15785404

Brousse, Nicole; Vasiliu, Viorel; Michon, Jean; Canioni, Danielle

2004-12-01

202

[Current treatment of follicular lymphoma].  

PubMed

After diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma is the most frequent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It remains incurable, except for localized diseases. Advanced disease has to be treated only in the presence of clinical and/or biology aggressiveness. These patients should be treated by rituximab (Mab-Thera) associated to polychemotherapy comprising cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisone. After this therapy, the benefit of rituximab in maintenance has to be confirmed. Autologous stem cell transplantation is now reserved for young patients in first relapse. Allogenic stem cell transplantation is also an interesting option. The other therapeutic options comprise radio-immunotherapy with 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) and bortezomib (Velcade). PMID:19772198

Bonnet, C; Beguin, Y; Deprijck, B; de Leval, L; Fillet, G

2009-08-26

203

Proteomic analysis of pancreatic juice for the identification of biomarkers of pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Protein profiles of endoscopically collected pancreatic juice from normal, chronic pancreatitis patients and pancreatic cancer\\u000a patients were compared to identify diagnostic biomarkers of pancreatic cancer.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Secretin was injected intravenously and pancreatic juice was collected via selective cannulation of the pancreatic duct during\\u000a endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Pancreatic juices consisting of three pooled samples for normal control, chronic\\u000a pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer

Jeong Youp Park; Sun-A Kim; Joo Won Chung; Seungmin Bang; Seung Woo Park; Young-Ki Paik; Si Young Song

2011-01-01

204

Pancreatic stenting prevents pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & Aims: Patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction are at high risk of developing pancreatitis after endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Impaired pancreatic drainage caused by pancreatic sphincter hypertension is the likely explanation for this increased risk. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine if ductal drainage with pancreatic stenting protects against pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with

Paul R. Tarnasky; Yuko Y. Palesch; John T. Cunningham; Patrick D. Mauldin; Peter B. Cotton; Robert H. Hawes

1998-01-01

205

Anatomy-Specific Pancreatic Stump Management to Reduce the Risk of Pancreatic Fistula After Pancreatic Head Resection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The anatomical status of the pancreatic remnant after a pancreatic head resection varies greatly among patients. The aim of\\u000a the present study was to improve management of the pancreatic remnant for reducing pancreatic fistula after pancreatic head\\u000a resection.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Ninety-five consecutive patients who underwent an end-to-side, duct-to-mucosa pancreaticojejunostomy after pancreatic head\\u000a resection were included in the study. To approximate the pancreatic

Yoshitsugu Tajima; Tamotsu Kuroki; Noritsugu Tsuneoka; Tomohiko Adachi; Taiichiro Kosaka; Tatsuya Okamoto; Mitsuhisa Takatsuki; Susumu Eguchi; Takashi Kanematsu

2009-01-01

206

Telomerase activity in pure pancreatic juice for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer may be complementary to K-ras mutation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The usefulness of K-ras mutation in pancreatic juice for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is questionable. Telomerase is positive in pancreatic cancer but rarely in benign pancreatic diseases. We conducted this study to determine the usefulness of K-ras mutation and telomerase activity in pancreatic juice for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Methods: Pancreatic juice collected during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

Seung-Jae Myung; Myung-Hwan Kim; Yeon-Suk Kim; Hong-Ja Kim; Eun-Taek Park; Kyo-Sang Yoo; Byeung-Cheol Lim; Dong Wan Seo; Sung Koo Lee; Young Il Min; Ji Yeon Kim

2000-01-01

207

[Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].  

PubMed

The most important advances in chronic pancreatitis concern its etiopathogenesis, nutritional aspects, and improvements in diagnostic techniques and some treatment options. In the etiopathogenesis of this disease, the importance of smoking and its association with alcohol have been confirmed. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) secondary to chronic pancreatitis is associated with bone metabolism alterations (osteopenia and osteoporosis), a reduction in liposoluble vitamins and alterations in essential amino acid levels. Endoscopic ultrasound has been confirmed as the most highly developed technique for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, especially due to new image optimization technologies. Breath tests for the diagnosis of EPI continue to be developed (optimization of the C-13 mixed triglyceride test and the development of a new test based on C-13-labelled bicarbonate determination). Modest results in pain treatment have been achieved with the use of antioxidants, pancreatic enzymes and/or intravenous secretin. The association of chronic pancreatitis with pancreatic cancer requires strict follow-up, especially in patients with inflammatory masses in the context of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:23018013

Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique; Iglesias-García, Julio

2012-09-01

208

Texture patterns in pancreatic sonograms  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a retrospective study of 163 pancreatic sonograms, five internal echo patterns were correlated with the ultimate clinical diagnoses. Attention to the internal echo patterns of the pancreas can provide useful information in diagnosing pancreatic disease, including identification of abnormalities in glands of normal size and contour.

Axel Kunzmann; James D. Bowie; David Rochester

1979-01-01

209

Practical Guidelines for Acute Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: The following is a summary of the official guidelines of the Italian Association for the Study of the Pancreas regarding the medical, endoscopic and surgical management of acute pancreatitis. Statements: Clinical features together with elevation of the plasma concentrations of pancreatic enzymes are the cornerstones of diagnosis (recommendation A). Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) provides good evidence for the presence

R. Pezzilli; A. Zerbi; V. Di Carlo; C. Bassi; G. F. Delle Fave

2010-01-01

210

Pancreatic anastomotic failure after pancreaticoduodenectomy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Pancreatic anastomotic failure has historically been regarded as one of the most feared complications after pancreaticoduodenectomy.Methods: We reviewed our recent experience (59 cases), March 1994 to December 1998, with pancreaticoduodenectomy and compared preoperative and intraoperative characteristics as well as outcomes in those patients who experienced (n = 10) versus those who did not experience a postoperative pancreatic leak (n

Stephen R Grobmyer; David E Rivadeneira; Clayton A Goodman; Peter Mackrell; Michael D Lieberman; John M Daly

2000-01-01

211

Pancreatic cancer: chemotherapy and radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer in many cases appears in a non-curatively resectable stage when the diagnosis is made. Palliative treatment become an option in the patients with advanced stage. The present article reviewed chemotherapy and radiotherapy in various advanced stage of pancreatic cancer.

Andren-Sandberg, Ake

2011-01-01

212

Prognostic factors in acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prognostic factor scoring systems provide one method of predicting severity of acute pancreatitis. This paper reports the prospective assessment of a system using nine factors available within 48 hours of admission. This assessment does not include patient data used to compile the system. Of 405 episodes of acute pancreatitis occurring in a seven year period, 72% had severity correctly predicted

S L Blamey; C W Imrie; J ONeill; W H Gilmour; D C Carter

1984-01-01

213

Molecular Advances in Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our understanding of the molecular genetics of pancreatic cancer has advanced spectacularly over the last 5 years so that this tumour type is now one of the best characterised of all malignancies. A small proportion of cases results from inherited predisposition due to germline transmission of a mutated CDKN2 or BRCA2 gene, while patients with familial pancreatitis due to a

Nicholas R. Lemoine

1997-01-01

214

Chemoprevention strategies for pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis and is often diagnosed at an advanced stage, which makes it difficult to treat. The low survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer points towards an increased need for novel therapeutic and chemopreventive strategies and also early detection of this disease. Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a reduced risk

Shivendra V. Singh; Randall E. Brand; Silvia D. Stan

2010-01-01

215

Walled-off pancreatic necrosis  

PubMed Central

Walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN), formerly known as pancreatic abscess is a late complication of acute pancreatitis. It can be lethal, even though it is rare. This critical review provides an overview of the continually expanding knowledge about WOPN, by review of current data from references identified in Medline and PubMed, to September 2009, using key words, such as WOPN, infected pseudocyst, severe pancreatitis, pancreatic abscess, acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), pancreas, inflammation and alcoholism. WOPN comprises a later and local complication of ANP, occurring more than 4 wk after the initial attack, usually following development of pseudocysts and other pancreatic fluid collections. The mortality rate associated with WOPN is generally less than that of infected pancreatic necrosis. Surgical intervention had been the mainstay of treatment for infected peripancreatic fluid collection and abscesses for decades. Increasingly, percutaneous catheter drainage and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography have been used, and encouraging results have recently been reported in the medical literature, rendering these techniques invaluable in the treatment of WOPN. Applying the recommended therapeutic strategy, which comprises early treatment with antibiotics combined with restricted surgical intervention, fewer patients with ANP undergo surgery and interventions are ideally performed later in the course of the disease, when necrosis has become well demarcated.

Stamatakos, Michael; Stefanaki, Charikleia; Kontzoglou, Konstantinos; Stergiopoulos, Spyros; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Safioleas, Michael

2010-01-01

216

Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

2012-09-19

217

A Phase II Trial of Panobinostat and Lenalidomide in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

2013-07-15

218

Radioimmunotherapy in Mantle Cell Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), though characterized by the chromosomal translocation t(11; 14) (q13; q32), is a heterogeneous disease. Often termed an aggressive lymphoma in the U.S., but included in indolent lymphoma trials in Europe, MCL is not curable with standard immuno-chemotherapy. There is no single standard initial therapy for this disease. Although standard lymphoma therapies yield high response rates, relapse is inevitable. Unmet needs in MCL include better induction therapy, consolidation treatments to prolong first remission and better therapeutic options for relapsed disease. In this review, we evaluate the role of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in MCL, a novel strategy combining monoclonal antibodies with radioisotopes to deliver radiation directly to tumour tissue, both in the frontline and relapsed setting.

Skarbnik, Alan P.; Smith, Mitchell R.

2012-01-01

219

Severe acute pancreatitis: Clinical course and management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) develops in about 25% of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Severity of AP is linked to the presence of systemic organ dysfunctions and\\/or necrotizing pancreatitis pathomorphologically. Risk factors determining independently the outcome of SAP are early multi-organ failure, infection of necrosis and extended necrosis (> 50%). Up to one third of patients with necrotizing pancreatitis develop

Hans G Beger; Bettina M Rau

220

Pharmacological management of pain in chronic pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pain is the major presenting symptom of chronic pancreatitis. Patients with chronic pancreatitis experience substantial impairments in health-related quality of life. Pain may be considered as the most important factor affecting the quality of life. The pathogenesis of pancreatic pain is poorly understood. The cause of pain in chronic pancreatitis is probably multifactorial. This article discusses the various hypotheses that

A. A. J. van Esch; O. H. G. Wilder-Smith; J. B. M. J. Jansen; H. van Goor; J. P. H. Drenth

2006-01-01

221

Chronic Pancreatitis in Late Childhood and Adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute pancreatitis is unusual in pediatric patients, and chronic pancreatitis is even less common. Between 1983 and 1988, we diagnosed 24 patients in late childhood and adolescence with chronic pancreatitis. Our review revealed that chronic pancreatitis presents as recurrent abdominal pain in late childhood and adolescence. Individual laboratory and radiological investigations may be normal during acute exacerbations of pain, but

Prasad Mathew; Robert Wyllie; Maureen Caulfield; Rita Steffen; Marsha Kay

1994-01-01

222

Alcohol Abuse, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alcohol abuse is a common cause of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. There is a wide spectrum of pancreatic manifestations in heavy drinkers from no apparent disease in most individuals to acute inflammatory and necrotizing pancreatitis in a minority of individuals with some progressing to chronic pancreatitis characterized by replacement of the gland by fibrosis and chronic inflammation. Both smoking

Stephen J. Pandol; Fred S. Gorelick; Andreas Gerloff; Aurelia Lugea

2010-01-01

223

Cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis has a large number of causes. Major causes are alcohol and gallstones. Toxic causes, mainly represented by medication-induced pancreatitis account for less than 2% of the cases. Cannabis is an anecdotally reported cause of acute pancreatitis. Six cases have previously been reported. Herein we report a new case of cannabis-induced recurrent acute pancreatitis. PMID:23402090

Howaizi, Mehran; Chahine, Mouhamad; Haydar, Fadi; Jemaa, Yassine; Lapoile, Emmanuel

2012-12-01

224

Molecular regulation of pancreatic stellate cell function  

Microsoft Academic Search

Until now, no specific therapies are available to inhibit pancreatic fibrosis, a constant pathological feature of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. One major reason is the incomplete knowledge of the molecular principles underlying fibrogenesis in the pancreas. In the past few years, evidence has been accumulated that activated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are the predominant source of extracellular matrix (ECM)

Robert Jaster

2004-01-01

225

Proteomics studies of pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, with 4% survival 5 years after diagnosis. Biomarkers are desperately needed to improve earlier, more curable cancer diagnosis and to develop new effective therapeutic targets. The development of quantitative proteomics technologies in recent years offers great promise for understanding the complex molecular events of tumorigenesis at the protein level, and has stimulated great interest in applying the technology for pancreatic cancer studies. Proteomic studies of pancreatic tissues, juice, serum/plasma, and cell lines have recently attempted to identify differentially expressed proteins in pancreatic cancer to dissect the abnormal signaling pathways underlying oncogenesis, and to detect new biomarkers. It can be expected that the continuing evolution of proteomics technology with better resolution and sensitivity will greatly enhance our capability in combating pancreatic cancer.

Chen, Ru; Pan, Sheng; Aebersold, Ruedi; Brentnall, Teresa A.

2008-01-01

226

Acute pancreatitis following paracetamol overdose.  

PubMed

A 17-year-old woman presented with acute abdominal pain and vomiting 3 h after she attempted to commit suicide by ingesting 30×500 mg paracetamol tablets. The woman was found to have a raised amylase level, and a CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. According to the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, it is likely that the pancreatitis was induced by the paracetamol ingestion. A literature search reported 36 cases of pancreatitis following excessive doses of paracetamol, however this possible drug reaction is not widely recognised and not documented in the British National Formulary (BNF) list of possible adverse reactions from paracetamol. Being aware of the possibility that abdominal pain following paracetamol overdose may be a manifestation of pancreatitis can help the early detection and initiation of treatment for pancreatitis. PMID:22096469

Fernandes, Roland

2009-11-18

227

New developments in pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma presents in an advanced stage and has a dismal prognosis. Extensive recent research efforts have provided us with greater insight into the etiology of pancreatic cancer and have also improved our means of prognostication. Molecular analysis demonstrated that specific pathways involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis are perhaps more valuable to study than single genetic aberrations. Previous risk factors, including family history, body mass index, and current cigarette smoking, were validated and novel risks, such as ABO blood group alleles, were identified. Similar to other illnesses, combinations of healthful habits, such as not smoking, adhering to a Mediterranean dietary pattern, and engaging in physical activity, may decrease pancreatic cancer risk. Finally, CA 19-9 levels, the presence of diabetes mellitus, and a six-gene signature provided critical information regarding survival that could help guide treatment of individuals diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:21258973

Greer, Julia B; Brand, Randall E

2011-04-01

228

MORAb-004 in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-10-09

229

Staging Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas,are always treatable and frequently curable malignan- cies. However, choosing the most appropriate therapy requires accurate diagnosis and a carefulstagingevaluation.Newpatientswithnon-HodgkinLymphomashouldhavetheirtumors classified using the World Health Organization classification. The specific choice of therapy is dependent,on a careful staging evaluation. Patients with non-Hodgkin Lymphoma,are assigned an anatomic stage using the Ann Arbor system. However, patients should also be classified using

James O. Armitage

2010-01-01

230

Follicular colonization in thyroid lymphoma.  

PubMed Central

The presence of neoplastic (light chain restricted) B-cell follicles in low-grade B-cell gastrointestinal (GI) lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) has been explained on the basis of specific colonization of reactive follicles by centrocyte-like (CCL) cells. Low-grade B-cell thyroid lymphomas have been included in the category of MALT lymphoma, but the frequent presence of a follicular pattern in these tumors has contributed to the view that they are follicle center cell (FCC) tumors. We have reviewed the histology and investigated the phenotype and genotype of nine cases of primary low-grade B-cell lymphoma of the thyroid, all of which were distinguished by a predominantly follicular pattern. All cases also demonstrated features of MALT lymphoma, including CCL cells and lymphoepithelial lesions. The appearances and immunohistology of the follicles were those of follicular colonization as described in GI MALT lymphoma rather than FCC follicular lymphoma. The predominant pattern of follicular colonization was replacement of the follicle center by slightly enlarged CCL cells that showed a strikingly high proliferation rate. No evidence of the t(14;18) translocation was found in any case, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on DNA extracted from fresh (n = 1) or paraffin-embedded (n = 9) tissue. These findings argue against a FCC lineage for primary thyroid lymphomas and support their inclusion in the MALT category. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14

Isaacson, P. G.; Androulakis-Papachristou, A.; Diss, T. C.; Pan, L.; Wright, D. H.

1992-01-01

231

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas of Waldeyer's ring.  

PubMed

Lymphomas represent malignant lymphoproliferative diseases and they are generally classified as Hodgkin's (HL) or non-Hodgkin malignant lymphomas (NHML). Head and neck lymphomas represent one of the most common sites of extranodal lymphomas, second after the gastrointestinal tract. Waldeyer's ring structures include the palatine tonsils, the nasopharyngeal lymphatic tissue, and the lingual tonsil. We investigated 38 patients with malignant lymphoma with ages ranging from 21 to 95 years, all localized in the Waldeyer's ring. Good knowledge of the clinical characteristics of these lymphomas and the methods to establish the differential diagnosis are essential for a correct therapy of the disease. PMID:23303032

Salplahta, D; Com?nescu, Maria Victoria; Anghelina, F; Ioni??, Elena; Mogoant?, Carmen Aurelia; Anghelina, Liliana

2012-01-01

232

Pancreatic hamartoma diagnosed after surgical resection  

PubMed Central

A pancreatic hamartoma is a rare benign lesion that may be mistaken for malignancy. A pancreatic hamartoma can present with vague, non-specific symptoms, which can be difficult to diagnose despite modern diagnostic tools. We report here a pancreatic hamartoma diagnosed after surgical resection. A 52-year-old female presented with postprandial abdominal discomfort. Abdominal computed tomography and pancreatic magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 2.2 × 2.5-cm cystic mass in the pancreatic head. The patient underwent a pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histopathological and immunohistochemical studies helped make the diagnosis of pancreatic hamartoma. Here, we report a case of pancreatic hamartoma and review the relevant medical literature.

Kim, Ho-Hyun; Hur, Young-Hoe; Koh, Yang-Seok; Kim, Jung-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Jong; Kim, Jin-Woong; Kim, Young; Lee, Jae-Hyuk

2012-01-01

233

[Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids. PMID:18378104

De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lémann, M

2008-04-02

234

Mouse models of pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies ranking 4th among cancer-related death in the western world and in the United States, and potent therapeutic options are lacking. Although during the last few years there have been important advances in the understanding of the molecular events responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer, currently specific mechanisms of treatment resistance remain poorly understood and new effective systemic drugs need to be developed and probed. In vivo models to study pancreatic cancer and approach this issue remain limited and present different molecular features that must be considered in the studies depending on the purpose to fit special research themes. In the last few years, several genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine neoplasia have been developed. These models mimic the disease as they reproduce genetic alterations implicated in the progression of pancreatic cancer. Genetic alterations such as activating mutations in KRas, or TGFb and/or inactivation of tumoral suppressors such as p53, INK4A/ARF BRCA2 and Smad4 are the most common drivers to pancreatic carcinogenesis and have been used to create transgenic mice. These mouse models have a spectrum of pathologic changes, from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to lesions that progress histologically culminating in fully invasive and metastatic disease and represent the most useful preclinical model system. These models can characterize the cellular and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasia and cancer and constitute the best tool to investigate new therapeutic approaches, chemopreventive and/or anticancer treatments. Here, we review and update the current mouse models that reproduce different stages of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and will have clinical relevance in future pancreatic cancer developments. PMID:22493542

Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

2012-03-28

235

Primary cardiac lymphoma.  

PubMed

Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL) has rarely been reported in Chinese populations. PCL mostly occurs in the right atrium. The clinical manifestations may be variable and are attributed to its location, the presence of congestive heart failure, pericardial effusion, arrhythmia, and cardiomegaly. The prognosis is usually poor because it is usually found too late and therefore, clinicians should be aware of PCL. Imaging examinations are the best methods for initial diagnosis and include echocardiography, computed tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and radioisotope scan. However, the final diagnosis is made by pathology, such as cytologic examination of the effusive fluid and tissue biopsy. Because the tumors are difficult to resect, the main treatment for the disease is chemotherapy, which can be successful. Here, we report a 58-year-old man who had a tumor measuring 8 x 5 cm in the right atrium. By clinical staging, including chest X-ray, echocardiography, CT scan of the abdomen, MRI of the heart, whole body tumor Gallium scan, and gastrointestinal series, no metastatic lesion or involvement was found in other parts of the body. Pathologic findings including cytology of pericardial effusion and heart tumor biopsy revealed the case as a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. After chemotherapy with COP (cyclophosphamide + vincristine + prednisone) and CHOPBE (COP + doxorubicin + bleomycin + etoposide) regimens, the intracardiac tumor had disappeared, but the patient survived for 12 months in total, despite additional radiotherapy over the pericardial lesions. It was presumed that because the tumor was very large and involved all 3 layers of the heart, it did not respond as well to the therapy as expected. PMID:16689199

Hsueh, Shu-Ching; Chung, Ming-Teng; Fang, Richard; Hsiung, Ming-Chon; Young, Mason-Shing; Lu, Hsu-Feng

2006-04-01

236

Pancreatic surgery, not pancreatitis, is the primary cause of diabetes after acute fulminant pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute fulminant pancreatitis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To examine the outcome of conservative and surgical treatment of this disorder, 36 patients who survived an initial episode were restudied after a mean of six years. Fifty three per cent had developed diabetes mellitus, half of whom required insulin therapy. Pancreatic resection was associated with a 100% frequency of

J Eriksson; M Doepel; E Widén; L Halme; A Ekstrand; L Groop; K Höckerstedt

1992-01-01

237

Serum elastase 1 in chronic pancreatic disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Elastase 1 and immunoreactive trypsin were assessed by a RIA technique in the sera of 29 control subjects, 24 pancreatic cancer patients, 22 patients with chronic pancreatitis and 31 with extra-pancreatic diseases to ascertain and compare their usefulness in chronic pancreatic disease diagnosis. Increased levels of elastase 1 were detected in 60.9% of pancreatic cancer and in 61.1% of

G. Del Favero; C. Fabris; M. Plebani; A. Panucci; A. Piccoli; L. Perobelli; A. Burlina; R. Naccarato

1985-01-01

238

Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

2013-04-05

239

Apolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2013-07-15

240

Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2013-07-26

241

Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-22

242

NIH study shows Burkitt lymphoma is molecularly distinct from other lymphomas  

Cancer.gov

Scientists have uncovered a number of molecular signatures in Burkitt lymphoma, including unique genetic alterations that promote cell survival, that are not found in other lymphomas. These findings provide the first genetic evidence that Burkitt lymphoma is a cancer fundamentally distinct from other types of lymphoma.

243

Familial lymphoma including a report of familial primary upper small intestinal lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Presented are 3 families with lymphoma. Evidence is given regarding the possible significance of lymphoma in these families not that they disprove a genetic predisposition but that they are confirmatory to our present hypotheses regarding environmental factors and lymphoma, especially primary upper small intestinal lymphoma.

Abolghassem Banihashemi; Khosrow Nasr; Hadee Hedayatee; Hossein Mortazavee

1973-01-01

244

[Initial experience of treatment of primary intraocular lymphomas associated with primary CNS lymphomas].  

PubMed

Methods of diagnostics of primary intraocular lymphomas associated with primary CNS lymphomas are described. This article demonstrates the value of neurophtalmological assessment before surgery in patients with intracranial space occupying lesions. Three cases with bilateral primary intraocular lymphomas are presented. Authors analyzed initial results of intraocular lymphomas treatment with intravitreal methotrexate injections. PMID:23033588

Tropinskaia, O F; Grishina, E E; Serova, N K; Kobiakov, G L; Aronov, M S; Shishkina, L V

2012-01-01

245

Surgical Treatment of Necrotizing Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Surgical treatment in patients with severe acute pancreatitis is still a controversial subject, ranging from sole conservative to an aggressive approach. This article gives an overview of the literature with regard to indications for surgery, timing and techniques of operative treatment concepts in severe acute pancreatitis with special attention to the recommended necrosectomy and closed continuous lavage of the involved retroperitoneum. Taking into account recent findings from microbiological data we have developed a new algorithm in patients with acute pancreatitis. All patients with proven acute necrotizing pancreatitis receive an antibiotic therapy for 2 weeks beside the intensive care measures. So far only one third (33 percent) had infected pancreatic necroses in the 3rd week of the onset of the disease and were managed surgically. The delay resulted in optimal surgical conditions for necrosectomy and a mortality rate of 9 percent. This new concept and therapeutic approach with the early suitable antibiotic therapy in patients with proven necrotizing pancreatitis is recommended to (1) decrease the infection rate and (2) delay surgical intervention to the 3rd week of the disease with optimal surgical conditions. It seems that only patients with proven infected pancreatic necroses are candidates for surgical intervention.

Uhl, W.; Buchler, M.W.

1997-01-01

246

Second-Generation Therapeutic DNA Lymphoma Vaccines.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall goal of our proposal is to develop a lymphoma vaccine for clinical study. Our vaccine strategy aims to activate immune cells that can recognize and eventually eliminate tumor cells. Lymphoma uniquely expresses a tumor-specific antigen termed '...

L. W. Kwak

2008-01-01

247

Primary T-cell lymphoma of liver.  

PubMed

Primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL) is rare and represents approximately 0.016% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The majority of these are B-cell NHL of diffuse large B-cell type. Primary T-cell lymphoma constitutes approximately 5-10% of all PHLs arising in the liver, 90% being B-cell type. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma, ?? hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma and ?? hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma are the common T-cell lymphomas involving hepatic parenchyma. We encountered a case presenting with gross hepatomegaly extending beyond umbilicus, mild ascites, pedal oedema, icterus and dyspnoea. Haemogram showed moderate anaemia with counts. Bone marrow aspiration showed erythroid hyperplasia with dimorphic anaemia. There was no evidence of atypical lymphoid cells in peripheral blood of bone marrow. We present a rare case of primary T-cell lymphoma presenting as primary liver involvement without splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, bone marrow or peripheral blood involvement. PMID:23608840

Mishra, S; Shukla, A; Tripathi, A K; Kumar, A

2013-04-22

248

Carbohydrate in pancreatic ribonucleases.  

PubMed

A survey of the presence and compositions of carbohydrate chains attached to pancreatic ribonucleases is given. Carbohydrate chains may occur at asparagine residues in Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequences at four exposed sites of the molecule (positions 21, 34, 62 and 76). These sites form part of highly variant sequences in pancreatic ribonucleases with the consequence that the enzymes from very closely related species may differ in the presence or absence of carbohydrate. In a number of ribonucleases Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequences occur which carry carbohydrate in only a part of the molecules. The occurrence of Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequences entirely without any carbohydrate also has been demonstrated. Compositions of the carbohydrate moieties of ribonucleases from cow, sheep, pig, whales, giraffe, okapi, moose, horse, coypu, chinchilla, and guinea-pig are presented. Striking differences in complexity have been found, both between chains attached to the same site in different species (cow and giraffe), between chains attached to different sites of the same enzyme in one-species (pig) and even between chains attached to the same site in a single species (chinchilla). PMID:1261555

Beintema, J J; Gaastra, W; Scheffer, A J; Welling, G W

1976-04-01

249

What's New in Pancreatic Cancer Research and Treatment?  

MedlinePLUS

... Next Topic Additional resources for pancreatic cancer What`s new in pancreatic cancer research and treatment? Research into ... area of research in many types of cancer. New treatments for pancreatic neuroendocrine cancers Many pancreatic neuroendocrine ...

250

Molecular pathology of low grade malignant lymphomas  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the last ten years the combined efforts of pathologists and molecular biologists have helped define several new lymphoma\\u000a diagnostic categories. In particular, the recognition of chromosomal translocations which have activated the BCL1 and BCL2\\u000a proto-oncogenes have strong associations with specific types of non-Hodgkin’s malignant lymphomas such as mantle cell lymphoma\\u000a and follicular center cell lymphoma, respectively. This review will

Howard Ratech

1995-01-01

251

Lingual and renal lymphoma in a cat.  

PubMed

A domestic shorthair cat presented with a progressive history of polydipsia, lingual swelling and ulceration. The tongue was firm and grossly enlarged with associated regional lymphadenopathy. Surgical biopsies revealed lymphoma of the tongue. Following the procedure, the cat developed respiratory distress and was subsequently euthanased. Necropsy confirmed the diagnosis of lingual lymphoma and also identified lymphoma within the left kidney. This is the first report of lymphoma within the feline tongue in the literature. PMID:21208818

Bound, Nicola J; Priestnall, Simon L; Cariou, Matthieu P

2011-01-03

252

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Diagnosis and Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of malignan- cies of the lymphoid system. Based on the World Health Organiza- tion classification of hematological and lymphoid tumors, these diseases have been classified as B-cell and T-cell neoplasms. B- cell lymphomas account for approximately 90% of all lymphomas, and the 2 most common histological disease entities are follicular lymphoma and diffuse large

STEPHEN M. ANSELL; JAMES ARMITAGE

2005-01-01

253

Lennert's lymphoma presenting as prurigo nodularis.  

PubMed

Lennert's lymphoma is a peripheral T-cell lymphoma that only rarely involves the skin. We present the case of a forty-two-year-old man who experienced severe pruritus for ten months. He was repeatedly diagnosed as having neurodermatitis and prurigo nodularis before subtle hematologic clues suggested, and subsequent examination of bone and lymph node biopsy specimens confirmed, the diagnosis of Lennert's lymphoma. This report describes the case and presents a brief review of Lennert's lymphoma. PMID:8513688

Seeburger, J; Anderson-Wilms, N; Jacobs, R

1993-05-01

254

[Plasmoblastic lymphoma initially recognized as ovarian tumor].  

PubMed

Plasmablastic lymphoma is an uncommon B-cell lymphoma representing <3% of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection. It displays a distinctive affinity for extranodal presentation in the oral cavity. The case of a plasmablastic lymphoma present in the ovary, cervix and soft thigh tissues of a 27-year-old woman with human immunodeficiency infection is reported. PMID:22826973

Avilés-Salas, Alejandro; Chanona-Vilchis, José G; Candelaria-Hernández, Myrna G; Peña-Torres, María de Lourdes; Cuéllar-Mendoza, Miguel Enrique

2012-06-01

255

Quality metrics in pancreatic surgery.  

PubMed

As the practice of pancreatic surgery evolves to encompass a wider array of clinical indications, incorporate increasingly complex technologies, and provide care to an aging population with many comorbid conditions, systematic assessment of quality and outcomes in an effort to improve the quality of care is imperative. This article discusses the volume-outcomes relationship that exists in pancreatic surgery, trends in centralization of practice within the field, common outcomes measures, and the complexity of assessing quality metrics. It also highlights surgical outcomes from several high-volume institutions and recent developments in quality metrics within pancreatic surgery. PMID:23632153

Mohammed, Somala; Fisher, William E

2013-04-11

256

Acute haemorrhage associated with pancreatic pseudocyst and chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed

The present study reports 18 patients operated on for chronic pancreatitis complicated by bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneal cavity or the retroperitoneal space. Damage to the splenic artery by a pancreatic pseudocyst was the most common reason for the bleeding (10 patients, 56%) and the most common site was the duodenum (10 patients, 56%). Eleven patients were treated by transcystic multiple suture ligations combined with external drainage of the pseudocyst, and seven by pancreatic resection or total pancreatectomy. Hospital mortality was 33% (6 patients); two patients had undergone transcystic suture ligation, and four pancreatic resection. Five patients needed a reoperation because of further bleeding, four of them having been treated initially by transcystic suture ligation. Our results suggest that haemostasis by suture ligation is a method to be recommended if the patient's condition has been exacerbated by severe haemorrhage. PMID:6334475

Kiviluoto, T; Schröder, T; Kivilaakso, E; Lempinen, M

1984-01-01

257

[Pancreatic cancer or autoimmune pancreatitis: endosonography as a diagnostic reviser].  

PubMed

Conventional radiologic imaging (abdominal ultrasound, computer tomography) used in the differential diagnosis of post-hepatic jaundice can frequently provide inaccurate diagnosis. Inflammatory lesions may mimic neoplastic processes and malignancy may be accompanied by perifocal inflammation resulting in histological misdiagnosis. Furthermore, chronic and autoimmune pancreatitis are associated with an increased risk for pancreatic cancer. Radial endosonography has become a markedly important method in the imaging of the pancreas. It has a crucial role in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. The authors present three cases where the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer determined by conventional imaging techniques (abdominal ultrasound, computer tomography, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) was excluded or confirmed by the radial endosonography. The authors conclude that radial endosonography is an essential complementary method among imaging techniques of the pancreas and in tumor staging. Application of that may prevent unnecessary surgeries, which is obviously useful for patients and cost effective for health care providers. PMID:23291204

Szepes, Zoltán; Dobra, Mariann; Góg, Csaba; Zábrák, Edit; Makula, Éva; Tiszlavicz, László; Kiss, Tamás; Molnár, Tamás; Nagy, Ferenc; Czakó, László; Terzin, Viktória; Wittmann, Tibor

2013-01-13

258

Lingual and renal lymphoma in a cat  

Microsoft Academic Search

A domestic shorthair cat presented with a progressive history of polydipsia, lingual swelling and ulceration. The tongue was firm and grossly enlarged with associated regional lymphadenopathy. Surgical biopsies revealed lymphoma of the tongue. Following the procedure, the cat developed respiratory distress and was subsequently euthanased. Necropsy confirmed the diagnosis of lingual lymphoma and also identified lymphoma within the left kidney.

Nicola J. Bound; Simon L. Priestnall; Matthieu P. Cariou

2011-01-01

259

Non-hodgkin lymphomas of the thyroid  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-nine cases of non-Hodgkin lymphomas presenting in the thyroid were classified according to Rappaport and Lukes and Collins. In the Rappaport classification there were 19 histiocytic, three mixed, five nodular PDL and two undifferentiated lymphomas. According to Lukes and Collins, 21 cases were follicular center cell lymphomas, eight were immunoblastic sarcomas. Cases classified as histiocytic according to Rappaport fell into

Robert Maurer; Clive R. Taylor; Roger Terry; Robert J. Lukes

1979-01-01

260

Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric MALT lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Helicobacter pylori infection is implicated in the devel- opment of two different gastric cancers: gastric adeno- carcinoma and gastric MALT lymphoma. The association with the gastric MALT lymphoma is strong and causal. It is currently the only cancer which can be treated by a simple antibiotic treatment. However, the evolution of an H. pylori infection towards lymphoma is exceptional. Host

Lehours P; Mégraud F

2005-01-01

261

Viral Studies in Burkitt Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma, composed of a monomorphic population of medium-sized B cells with a high proliferation rate and a consistent MYC translocation. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with BL with different frequencies depending on the clinical variant. Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus, or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), infects a wide range of normal cells, having a well-established role in the pathogenesis of various neoplasms, including Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) and MCD-associated plasmablastic lymphoma. In secondary immunodeficiencies, such as HIV-1 infection and organ transplantation, HHV-8 is considered an opportunistic pathogen linked to the development of lymphomas in patients with AIDS and HIV+ patients. We studied the association of EBV and HHV-8 by immunohistochemical analysis, in situ hybridization, and polymerase chain reaction in a large number of well-characterized BLs. EBV was present in 45.0% of all BL cases with higher incidence in the pediatric group; most cases were EBV type A. We found no association of BL with HHV-8 in EBV+ BL or in EBV–cases, including the HIV+ BL group.

Queiroga, Eduardo M.; Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Harrington, William J.; Araujo, Iguaracyra; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

2009-01-01

262

Obesity in adult lymphoma survivors.  

PubMed

As a result of therapeutic advances, survivors of lymphoma are now living longer. However, their mortality is higher when compared to the general population, probably due to multiple factors. Survivors of childhood leukemia and lymphoma appear to have an increased prevalence of obesity. The objectives of this retrospective study were to analyze weight change after lymphoma treatment in an adult population and determine factors predictive of weight gain. Data were collected from 219 patients and analyzed sequentially at the initial visit and at 6, 12 and 18 months. There was a progressive increase in weight from the initial visit to 6 months (1.5% increase of initial body weight), 12 months (4.5%) and 18 months (6.4%). More than 9% of patients experienced weight gain greater than 20% during follow-up. There was a statistically significant association between the percentage of increase in weight and age, B symptoms and body mass index (BMI) at presentation. Younger patients, those with B symptoms or those with lower BMI manifested more weight gain (p = 0.0008, p = 0.0440 and p = 0.0009, respectively). Other assessed factors had no effect on weight gain including sex, race, lymphoma histology, disease outcome, radiation therapy, number of treatment regimens and use of steroids. Further studies are needed to explore long-term weight trends and their impact on the health of lymphoma survivors. PMID:21888618

Lynce, Filipa; Pehlivanova, Marieta; Catlett, Joseph; Malkovska, Vera

2011-10-24

263

Pancreatic carcinoma in fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes: An eastern India perspective  

PubMed Central

Fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) is a rare cause of diabetes (<1%) of uncertain etiology associated with >100-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We present 3 patients of FCPD with pancreatic cancer who had long duration of diabetes (19 years, 25 years, and 28 years, respectively), all of whom presented with anorexia, weight loss, and worsened glycemic control. Patient-1 in addition presented with deep venous thrombosis. All the 3 patients had evidence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Computerized tomography (CT) abdomen revealed atrophic pancreas, dilated pancreatic ducts, and multiple calculi in the head, body, and tail of pancreas in all of them. Patient-1 had 38 mm × 38 mm × 32 mm mass in the tail of pancreas with multiple target lesions were seen in the right lobe of liver. Patient-2 had a mass in the tail of pancreas (46 × 34 × 31 mm) encasing the celiac plexus and superior mesenteric artery infiltrating the splenic hilum and splenic flexure of colon. Patient-3 also had a mass in the tail of pancreas (33 × 31 × 22 mm), with multiple target lesions in the liver, suggestive of metastasis. All patients had elevated serum CA19-9 (828.8, 179.65, and 232 U/L, respectively; normal <40 U/L). Patients of FCPD with anorexia, weight loss, worsening of glycemic control should be evaluated to rule out pancreatic cancer. Studies are warranted to evaluate CA19-9 as a screening tool for diagnosing pancreatic cancer at an earlier stage in FCPD.

Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Dutta, Deep; Biswas, Kaushik; Sanyal, Triranjan; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

2012-01-01

264

Cure of incurable lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

The most potent method for augmenting the cytocidal power of monoclonal antibody (MAb) treatment is to conjugate radionuclides to the MAb to deliver systemic radiotherapy (radioimmunotherapy; RIT). The antigen, MAb, and its epitope can make a difference in the performance of the drug. Additionally, the radionuclide, radiochemistry, chelator for radiometals and the linker between the MAb and chelator can have a major influence on the performance of drugs (radiopharmaceuticals) for RIT. Smaller radionuclide carriers, such as antibody fragments and mimics, and those used for pretargeting strategies, have been described and evaluated. All of these changes in the drugs and strategies for RIT have documented potential for improved performance and patient outcomes. RIT is a promising new therapy that should be incorporated into the management of patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) soon after these patients have proven incurable. Predictable improvements using better drugs, strategies, and combinations with other drugs seem certain to make RIT integral to the management of patients with NHL, and likely lead to cure of currently incurable NHL.

De Nardo, Gerald L. [Radiodiagnosis and Therapy, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)]. E-mail: gldenardo@ucdavis.edu; Sysko, Vladimir V. [Radiodiagnosis and Therapy, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); De Nardo, Sally J. [Radiodiagnosis and Therapy, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

2006-10-01

265

Radioimmunotherapy in follicular lymphoma.  

PubMed

The exquisite sensitivity of haematological malignancies to targeted radiation make Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) a theoretically attractive therapeutic approach. Furthermore, impressive results initially achieved by the pioneers in this field and more recently in larger studies have demonstrated the high clinical activity of RIT in follicular NHL (FL). For more than a decade clinical RIT of FL has been dominated by targeting the CD20 antigen and a number of pivotal clinical studies have resulted in the approval by the US FDA (Food and Drug Administration) of two radioimmunconjugates, (131)I-tositumomab (Bexxar) and (90)Y-ibritumomab (Zevalin). (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan was subsequently approved within the EU in 2004 and more recently in the EU and in the US as a front line "consolidation" treatment in follicular NHL. Recent data have demonstrated that fractionated radioimmunotherapy targeting CD22 with (90)Y-epratuzumab tetraxetan achieved a high degree of durable complete responses in relapsed/refractory NHL. Despite the fact that these RIT agents clearly have unique non-cross reactive mechanisms of action with proven high clinical efficacy in patients resistant to both chemotherapy and rituximab, they have not been widely adopted by haemato-oncology community to date. This chapter reviews the progress that has been made in the development of clinical radioimmunotherapy in follicular lymphoma and suggest some guidelines to use it appropriately in first-line but also in the increasing number of patients emerging who are rituximab-refractory. PMID:21658624

Illidge, Tim; Morschhauser, Franck

2011-05-12

266

[Kidney transplantation and lymphomas].  

PubMed

Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) accounts for 30% of nonskin cancers after kidney transplants. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most frequent form of PTLD. The incidence of PTLD increases over time: from 1.2% at 5 years to 6.8% at 20 years. Its late occurrence is therefore not unusual. Moreover, not only is it more frequent but also more serious than the early type because of the lower responsiveness to therapy. Epstein-Barr virus (EVB) infection is one of the most important risk factors for this disease, along with the use of antilymphocyte agents, which should be avoided in EVB-negative patients. During the first year after transplant, EBV-PCR monitoring can be helpful for the early diagnosis of EBV-associated PTLD, especially in children. No effective strategy has yet been reported for the prevention of late PTLD. Interruption of immunosuppression is the first step of therapy, but it is rarely effective by itself. Rituximab (4-8 doses) is widely used and is successful in about 50% of cases. Chemotherapy becomes essential in relapsed or refractory disease, but it significantly increases the risk of life-threatening infections. The mortality rate is around 50% 12 months after diagnosis, often due to the side effects of chemotherapy. PMID:20922695

Sandrini, Silvio; Valerio, Francesca; Insalaco, Monica

267

Hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis: presentation and management.  

PubMed

Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is reported to cause 1-4% of acute pancreatitis (AP) episodes. HTG is also implicated in more than half of gestational pancreatitis cases. Disorders of lipoprotein metabolism are conventionally divided into primary (genetic) and secondary causes, including diabetes, hypothyroidism, and obesity. Serum triglyceride (TG) levels above 1,000 mg/dl are usually considered necessary to ascribe causation for AP. The mechanism for hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis (HTGP) is postulated to involve hydrolysis of TG by pancreatic lipase and release of free fatty acids that induce free radical damage. Multiple small studies on HTGP management have evaluated the use of insulin, heparin, or both. Many series have also reported use of apheresis to reduce TG levels. Subsequent control of HTG with dietary restrictions, antihyperlipidemic agents, and even regular apheresis has been shown anecdotally in case series to prevent future episodes of AP. However, large multicenter studies are needed to optimize future management guidelines for patients with HTGP. PMID:19293788

Tsuang, Wayne; Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Ruiz, Luis; Palascak, Joseph B; Gelrud, Andres

2009-03-17

268

Acute Pancreatitis (Beyond the Basics)  

MedlinePLUS

... patient might have about a given condition. These articles are best for patients who want a general overview and who prefer short, easy-to-read materials. Patient information: Pancreatitis (The ...

269

Basic Principles of Pancreatic Scanning.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The role and value of pancreatic scanning in the diagnosis of malignant disease were evaluated. It was found that, by employing the Anger scintillation camera and by utilizing dynamic visualization techniques, adequate pictures of the pancreas could be ob...

J. S. Stevenson C. D. Maynard

1973-01-01

270

Liprotamase Capsules Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

Text Version... that are given orally with each meal or snack.2,3,4 The objective of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is to deliver the enzymes with food to ... More results from www.fda.gov/downloads/advisorycommittees/committeesmeetingmaterials

271

Chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis  

PubMed Central

Recent discoveries of trypsinogen and trypsin inhibitor mutations in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) support the hypothesis that an inappropriate activation of pancreatic zymogens to active enzymes within the pancreatic parenchyma starts the inflammatory process. Current data suggest that CP may be inherited dominant, recessive, or complex as a result of mutations in the above mentioned or yet unidentified genes. Evaluation of patients with CP should include genetic testing. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene and is characterised by pancreatic insufficiency and chronic bronchopulmonary infection. The progression and severity of pulmonary disease differs considerably between people with identical CFTR mutations and does not seem to correlate with the type or class of the CFTR mutation. The identification of further disease modifying genetic factors will increase the pathophysiological understanding and may help to identify new therapeutic targets.

Witt, H

2003-01-01

272

Cytokine storm in acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Efforts to unravel the events in the evolution of tissue damage in acute pancreatitis have shown a number of inflammatory\\u000a mediators to be involved. The pathways of damage are similar, whatever the etiology of pancreatitis, with three phases of\\u000a progression: local acinar injury, systemic response, and generalized sepsis. The proinflammatory response is countered by\\u000a an anti-inflammatory response, and an

Rohit Makhija; Andrew N. Kingsnorth

2002-01-01

273

Total pancreatectomy for chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Ten instances of total pancreatectomy performed for chronic alcohol induced pancreatitis are reported. There was no hospital mortality, and all of the patients were free of pain. The most difficult problem was labile insulin sensitive diabetes in these patients who were chronic alcoholics. In addition, steatorrhea with weight loss, bleeding marginal ulcers and general weakness diminished working ability. The present data suggest that this procedure should be considered as the last resort in the treatment of severe instances of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:3883550

Kiviluoto, T; Schröder, T; Lempinen, M

1985-03-01

274

Hypertriglyceridemic Pancreatitis: Presentation and Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is reported to cause 1–4% of acute pancreatitis (AP) episodes. HTG is also implicated in more than half of gestational pancreatitis cases. Disorders of lipoprotein metabolism are conventionally divided into primary (genetic) and secondary causes, including diabetes, hypothyroidism, and obesity. Serum triglyceride (TG) levels above 1,000 mg\\/dl are usually considered necessary to ascribe causation for AP. The mechanism

Wayne Tsuang; Udayakumar Navaneethan; Luis Ruiz; Joseph B Palascak; Andres Gelrud

2009-01-01

275

Genesis of Pancreatic Ductal Neoplasia  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Pancreatic cancer is the fourth overall leading cause of cancer death in both genders, even though it is not among the most\\u000a frequent. Early detection and targeted therapeutic options, which can be obtained through a better understanding of the cellular\\u000a and molecular processes which lead to the development of pancreatic carcinoma, are key to improving the outcome of this highly

Barbara A. Centeno; Gregory M. Springett

276

Xenobiotics and tropical chronic pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The prevalence of chronic pancreatitis in tropical zones is far higher than in temperate zones, but there is no explanation\\u000a for this difference. Detailed social, occupational, and dietary histories were taken from 79 patients attending two hospitals\\u000a in Madras, South India. There were 53 apparently sporadic cases with both pancreatic calculi and diabetes; six apparently\\u000a sporadic cases with noncalcific disease,

J. M. Braganza; S. John; I. Padmalayam; V. Mohanfl; M. Viswanathan; S. Chari; M. Madanagopalan

1990-01-01

277

BRCA2 and pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many factors, including a family history of cancer, have been implicated in the development of pancreatic cancer. Among these\\u000a factors, germline BRCA2 mutations have been clearly associated with the development of this disease, while mutations in BRCA1 appear to have a limited role. Patients with pancreatic cancer and germline BRCA2 mutations tend to be Ashkenazi Jewish, have a younger than

Ali Naderi; Fergus J. Couch

2002-01-01

278

Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer death. This devastating disease has the horrible honour of close to equal incidence\\u000a and mortality rates. Late diagnosis and a constitutive resistance to every chemotherapy approach are responsible for this\\u000a scenario. However, molecular biology tools in cooperation with translational efforts have dissected several secrets that underlie\\u000a pancreatic cancer. Progressive acquisition of malignant,

Cristóbal Belda-Iniesta; Inmaculada Ibáñez de Cáceres; Jorge Barriuso; Javier de Castro Carpeño; Manuel González Barón; Jaime Feliú

2008-01-01

279

Long peritoneal lavage decreases pancreatic sepsis in acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed Central

Late infection of devitalized pancreatic and peripancreatic tissue has become the major cause of morbidity in severe acute pancreatitis. Previous experience found that peritoneal lavage for periods of 48 to 96 hours may reduce early systemic complications but did not decrease late pancreatic sepsis. A fortunate observation led to the present study of the influence of a longer period of lavage on late sepsis. Twenty-nine patients receiving primary nonoperative treatment for severe acute pancreatitis (three or more positive prognostic signs) were randomly assigned to short peritoneal lavage (SPL) for 2 days (15 patients) or to long peritoneal lavage (LPL) for 7 days (14 patients). Positive prognostic signs averaged 5 in both groups but the frequency of five or more signs was higher in LPL (71%) than in SPL (47%). Eleven patients in each group had early computed tomographic (CT) scans. Peripancreatic fluid collections were shown more commonly in LPL (82%) than in SPL (54%) patients. Longer lavage dramatically reduced the frequency of both pancreatic sepsis (22% LPL versus 40% SPL) and death from sepsis (0% LPL versus 20% SPL). Among patients with fluid collections on early CT scan, LPL led to a more marked reduction in both pancreatic sepsis (33% LPL versus 83% SPL) and death from sepsis (0% LPL versus 33% SPL). The differences were even more striking among 17 patients with five or more positive prognostic signs. In this group the incidence of pancreatic sepsis was 30% LPL versus 57% SPL and of death from sepsis 0% (LPL) versus 43% (SPL) (p = 0.05). In these patients, overall mortality was also reduced (20% LPL versus 43% SPL). When 20 patients treated by LPL were compared with 91 other patients with three or more positive prognostic signs who were treated without lavage or by lavage for periods of 2 to 4 days, the frequency of death from pancreatic sepsis was reduced from 13% to 5%. In those with five or more signs, the incidence of sepsis was reduced from 40% to 27% (p = 0.03) and of death for sepsis from 30% to 7% (p = 0.08). These findings indicate that lavage of the peritoneal cavity for 7 days may significantly reduce both the frequency and mortality rate of pancreatic sepsis in severe acute pancreatitis.

Ranson, J H; Berman, R S

1990-01-01

280

The spectrum of hematologic malignancies involving the pancreas: potential clinical mimics of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

Hematologic malignancies often involve the pancreas, causing potential diagnostic pitfalls and, rarely, potentially avoidable surgical resection. We review the spectrum of hematologic malignancies involving the pancreas and describe features useful in preoperative distinction from adenocarcinoma. Archived clinical, pathologic, and radiologic data (1965 to present) for hematologic malignancies involving the pancreas were reviewed and compared with the data for 157 surgically resected pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Of 42 cases, 27 (64%) were clinically "suspicious" for hematologic malignancies. Of the remaining 15 cases, 4 patients underwent resection for presumed pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Isolated pancreatic masses proved most difficult to identify clinically. Significant factors in distinguishing hematologic malignancies from adenocarcinoma included history of hematologic malignancy, young age, large tumor size, low CA19-9 level, B symptoms, and lack of jaundice or diabetes mellitus. Various hematologic malignancies involve the pancreas, most commonly diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Pancreatic masses are usually correctly identified clinically. Preoperative and operative sampling is strongly recommended when hematologic malignancies cannot be excluded. PMID:22338053

Rock, Jonathan; Bloomston, Mark; Lozanski, Gerard; Frankel, Wendy L

2012-03-01

281

Assessment of pancreatic duct strictures.  

PubMed

It should be fairly clear that the evaluation of pancreatic duct strictures is complex. Short of surgical resection, there is no gold standard that will provide an etiological diagnosis unless cancer is found on a biopsy specimen. To complicate matters further, much of the literature was generated in reference to differentiating between pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis. Using the same data to evaluate the patient with a pancreatic duct stricture may not be appropriate because the clinical scenario may not be comparable. Bearing these shortcomings in mind, however, a thoughtful history combined with the judicious use of abdominal imaging, ERCP, and the biopsy techniques discussed will lead to a clinical diagnosis that usually will prove to be correct in most cases. The role of tumor markers in patients with pancreatic duct strictures is still being defined. Although no tumor marker has proved especially helpful so far, the potential exists that a more useful one is just over the horizon. In situations in which the diagnosis remains uncertain, exploratory laparotomy in an appropriate surgical candidate by an experienced pancreatic surgeon will provide a definitive diagnosis in almost all cases. PMID:7728341

Jowell, P S

1995-01-01

282

Pancreatic carcinogenesis: apoptosis and angiogenesis.  

PubMed

Apoptosis and angiogenesis are critical biologic processes that are altered during carcinogenesis. Both apoptosis and angiogenesis may play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Despite numerous advances in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer, its prognosis remains dismal and a new therapeutic approach is much needed. Recent research has revealed that apoptosis and angiogenesis are closely interrelated. Several reports show that a tumor suppresser gene that is expressed in pancreatic carcinoma and related to malignant potential can induce apoptosis and also inhibit angiogenesis. At present, it is generally accepted that tumor growth in cancers, including pancreatic cancer, depends on angiogenesis. We have identified 2 new angiogenesis inhibitors from a conditioned medium of human pancreatic carcinoma cell line (BxPC-3): antiangiogenic antithrombin III (aaAT-III) and vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf). These molecules were able to regress tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mice, demonstrating potent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. Moreover, the angiogenesis inhibitors induced tumor dormancy in the animal model. These results suggest that antiangiogenic therapy using angiogenesis inhibitors may become a new strategy for treatment of pancreatic cancer in the near future. PMID:15084979

Onizuka, Shinya; Kawakami, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Ken; Fujioka, Hikaru; Miyashita, Kosei

2004-04-01

283

Vaccines for Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) remains a highly lethal disease; new therapeutic modalities are urgently needed. A number of immunotherapies tested in pre-clinical models have shown promise. Early phase clinical trials have demonstrated evidence of immune activation that in some cases correlates with clinical response. Moreover, recent evidence delineates inflammation’s intricate role in PDA, even at its earliest stages. PDA is thus ripe for immunotherapy; however, significant challenges remain before success can be realized. Future studies will need to focus on the discovery of novel PDA antigens, and the identification of the multiple immune suppressive pathways within the PDA tumor microenvironment that inhibit an effective PDA targeted immune response. Technologies are now available to rapidly advance discovery. Rapid translation of new discoveries into scientifically driven clinical trials testing combinations of immune agents will likely continue to shift the procarcinogenic tumor environment towards the most potent anticancer response.

Soares, Kevin C.; Zheng, Lei; Edil, Barish; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.

2012-01-01

284

Primary lymphoma of the ocular adnexa (orbital lymphoma) and primary intraocular lymphoma.  

PubMed

Lymphomas of the orbit and eye are rare conditions that should be treated as separate entities due to the differences in presumed aetiology, investigations, management and outcomes. Orbital lymphoma is most often of low-grade histology; thyroid eye disease may predispose and chlamydial infection has been suggested as a trigger. Commonly, stage IE, in most cases, can be managed with radiotherapy alone using either a kilovoltage portal for conjunctival disease or a wedged pair of megavoltage beams for more infiltrative disease to a dose of 30 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. However, medical therapy is being investigated, including a rituximab-only approach for conjunctival-only presentations. The cure rate for stage IE disease is very high. In contrast, primary ocular lymphoma is often of high-grade histology, in particular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and can be regarded as one end of primary central nervous system lymphoma - both eyes and brain being at risk. Immunosuppression predisposes to the disease. Management consists of an initial high-dose chemotherapy regimen with methotrexate. In most cases, this should be followed by radiotherapy to the whole brain and globes to a dose of 30-36 Gy with a boost to bulk/presenting disease. Cure rates are rarely above 50%. PMID:22521959

Woolf, D K; Ahmed, M; Plowman, P N

2012-04-20

285

Oblimersen and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumor or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2013-01-24

286

Follicular lymphoma-like B cells of uncertain significance (in situ follicular lymphoma) may infrequently progress, but precedes follicular lymphoma, is associated with other overt lymphomas and mimics follicular lymphoma in flow cytometric studies  

PubMed Central

In situ follicular lymphoma, more recently known as follicular lymphoma-like B cells of uncertain/undetermined significance is well accepted. However, the morphological criteria have evolved since it was first described and data are limited and conflicting regarding its clinical implications and whether the extent of involvement predicts an association with overt lymphoma. It is also unknown how often it will be identified by flow cytometric studies and how often it precedes overt follicular lymphomas. A multiparameter study of 31 biopsies with follicular lymphoma-like B cells of uncertain significance and 4 ‘benign’ lymph node biopsies that preceded an overt follicular lymphoma was, therefore, performed. Fifty-two percent of biopsies with follicular lymphoma-like B cells were associated with a prior or concurrent lymphoma but only 6% subsequently developed lymphoma (median follow up 26 months). Neither the number, proportion or density of BCL2+ germinal centers were associated with overt follicular lymphoma/diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Flow cytometric studies identified follicular lymphoma-like B cells in 8 of 15 evaluable cases. The proportion but not the absolute number of BCL2+ germinal centers was associated with the likelihood of positive flow cytometric studies (P<0.01). All 4 ‘benign’ biopsies that preceded an overt follicular lymphoma demonstrated follicular lymphoma-like B cells. Thus, although few patients with follicular lymphoma-like B cells of uncertain significance progress within the follow-up period, it at least precedes many follicular lymphomas. The extent of involvement does not predict the occurrence of prior or concurrent lymphomas. Flow cytometric studies demonstrating follicular lymphoma-like B cells must not be over-interpreted as they may only reflect follicular lymphoma-like B cells.

Pillai, Raju K.; Surti, Urvashi; Swerdlow, Steven H.

2013-01-01

287

Alisertib With and Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-05-21

288

[Early diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer].  

PubMed

Case of pancreatic cancer have increased in number, and the number of deaths from that disease has reached 20,000 in recent years in Japan. Only a few patients with pancreatic cancer can be cured. However, the prognosis in small pancreatic cancer such as TS1 less than 2 cm is relatively good if radical surgical resection is performed. Therefore early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is important to improve the dismal prognosis. Although clinical symptoms are not reliable for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, 30% of TS1 patients have abdominal or back pain. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that familial history of pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, diabetes, obesity, and smoking are possible high-risk factors for pancreatic cancer. Serum pancreatic enzyme and tumor markers in terms of CA19-9 and CEA are measured first. Ultrasonography (US) should be performed as soon as possible. Not only tumors but also slightly dilated main pancreatic ducts and/or small simple cysts that may represent indirect changes due to pancreatic cancer can be detected with US. Enhanced computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic US are also useful. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography yields more detailed images of branch ducts, and the cytology of pancreatic juice can be determined following examination. Unfortunately, position-emission tomography is not a reliable method for the diagnosis of small tumors in the pancreas. Finally, TNM staging of pancreatic cancer is performed based on the results of these imaging examinations. PMID:16878407

Shiratori, Keiko

2006-07-01

289

DNA Methylation Alterations in the Pancreatic Juice of Patients with Suspected Pancreatic Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

1 Pathology, 2 Medicine, 3 Surgery, 4 Oncology, and 5 Abstract Molecular markers of pancreatic neoplasia could aid in the evaluation of visible pancreatic lesions and indicate neoplasia invisible to imaging. We evaluated methylation-specific PCR (MSP) assays that detect aberrantly methylated DNA for their use as markers of pancreatic neoplasia. Methylation analysis was done on pancreatic juice collected endoscopically or

Hiroyuki Matsubayashi; Norihiro Sato; Alison Klein; Tadayoshi Abe; Keishi Yamashita; Charles J. Yeo; Anthony Kalloo; Ralph Hruban; Michael Goggins

290

Characterisation of Familial Pancreatic Cancer kindreds on the European Registry of Hereditary Pancreatitis and Familial Pancreatic Cancer (EUROPAC)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: In 10% of cases of pancreatic cancer there is a familial background to the disease. Mutated genes predisposing to pancreatic cancer syndromes include PRSS1 (associated with hereditary pancreatitis); STK11, MLH1, BRCA2 and p16INK4a. However, the gene responsible for the great majority of familial pancreatic cancers (FPC) is not known. Discovering the gene(s) responsible for FPC will: enable presymp- tomatic

I. Ellis; W. Greenhalf; N. Howes; A. Poll; G. Uomo; C. Pasquale

291

Fulminant Vasculitis: A Rare Fatal Complication of Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vasculitis is rarely associated with lymphoma; however, most cases associated with lymphoma are cutaneous. Systemic vasculitis in association with lymphoma is usually an indolent and non-fatal complication. Two patients presented to our department with fulminant vasculitis with a fatal course and were later diagnosed with lymphoma. A search of the literature for systemic fulminant vasculitis in association with lymphoma disclosed

Eyal Leshem; Yaron Davidovitz; Eyal Meltzer; Paul Fefer; Efrat Ofek; Yechezkel Sidi

2006-01-01

292

Update on endoscopic management of main pancreatic duct stones in chronic calcific pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Pancreatic duct stones are a common complication during the natural course of chronic pancreatitis and often contribute to additional pain and pancreatitis. Abdominal pain, one of the major symptoms of chronic pancreatitis, is believed to be caused in part by obstruction of the pancreatic duct system (by stones or strictures) resulting in increasing intraductal pressure and parenchymal ischemia. Pancreatic stones can be managed by surgery, endoscopy, or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. In this review, updated management of pancreatic duct stones is discussed. PMID:22403495

Choi, Eun Kwang; Lehman, Glen A

2012-02-28

293

Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

2013-04-09

294

Alpha 1 antitrypsin phenotypes and alcoholic pancreatitis.  

PubMed Central

Altered frequencies of alpha 1 antitrypsin phenotypes have been reported in patients with chronic pancreatitis, suggesting a possible genetic basis for individual susceptibility to this disease. Alpha 1 antitrypsin phenotypes, with particular regard to alcoholic pancreatitis, were studied. Patients with alcoholic pancreatitis were compared with alcoholic control subjects with no history of pancreatic disease. Serum alpha 1 antitrypsin concentrations were raised in pancreatitis patients sampled within one month of an acute attack of pancreatitis, but otherwise values were similar to those of control subjects. There were no significant differences in alpha 1 antitrypsin phenotypes between alcoholics with pancreatitis and alcoholic control subjects. This study of alpha 1 antitrypsin phenotypes provides no evidence of an inherited susceptibility to alcoholic pancreatitis.

Haber, P S; Wilson, J S; McGarity, B H; Hall, W; Thomas, M C; Pirola, R C

1991-01-01

295

Development of carcinoma in chronic calcific pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Development of carcinomas of the pancreas over an underlying chronic pancreatitis is a rare event. Diminution of pancreatic calcification, following the development of carcinoma, has been previously reported only once. We report another such case. PMID:2212748

Misra, S P; Thorat, V K; Vij, J C; Anand, B S

1990-06-01

296

Systematic Review: Pancreatic enzyme treatment of chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Pancreatic enzyme supplementation is standard treatment for malabsorption due to chronic pancreatitis. The FDA recently required all manufacturers to submit New Drug Applications (NDAs) to continue to market these agents because published data demonstrated variation in formulation, bioavailability, and shelf-life while providing limited data about efficacy and safety. AIM To systematically review the design and results of randomized, parallel-design trials of pancreatic enzyme supplements in chronic pancreatitis patients with steatorrhea. METHODS A computer-assisted search of MEDLINE and EMBASE was performed to identify relevant studies. Two authors performed duplicate data extraction on study design, improvement in coefficient of fat absorption (CFA), diarrhea, and adverse events using pre-specified forms. Agreement between investigators for data extraction was greater than 95%. RESULTS Of 619 articles found through literature searching, 20 potentially relevant articles were identified and 4 manuscripts met inclusion criteria. No studies performed head-to-head comparisons of different supplements. Enzyme supplementation is more likely to improve CFA compared to placebo, but fat malaborption remained abnormal. Important differences in patient population, study endpoint, study design, pancreatic enzyme dosage, and measurement of CFA were present across trials which precluded comparison of different agents. CONCLUSIONS Enzyme supplementation improves CFA compared to placebo but may not abolish steatorrhea.

Waljee, Akbar K.; DiMagno, Matthew J.; Wu, Bechien U.; Schoenfeld, Philip S.; Conwell, Darwin L.

2012-01-01

297

Relationship between pancreatic enzymes and pathological changes in the pancreas in acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  To clarify the relationship between changes in serum pancreatic enzymes and pathological changes in pancreatic parenchyma,\\u000a this study was performed by using rat models with acute pancreatitis. The models were rats with edematous and necrotizing\\u000a pancreatitis. Amylase, lipase, ribonuclease (RNase), and deoxyribonuclease (DNase I, II) in the serum were determined for\\u000a 48 h after the development of pancreatitis. Amylase and

Yoshio Kinami; Ichiro Kita

1989-01-01

298

Pancreatic glucagon secretion and exocrine function (BT-PABA test) in chronic pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plasma concentrations of pancreatic glucagon, C-peptide, and pancreatic polypeptide were measured during arginine stimulation in 16 patients with chronic pancreatitis, in eight subjects with idiopathic diabetes mellitus, and in seven healthy controls. The hormone responses were compared with exocrine pancreatic function as assessed using the urinary excretion rate ofp-aminobenzoic acid after oral ingestion ofn-benzoyl-l-tyrosyl-p-aminobenzoic acid (BT-PABA). The increase in pancreatic

U. Keller; E. Szöllösy; L. Varga; K. Gyr

1984-01-01

299

Childhood Solid Tumors and Lymphomas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The concept of this topic includes childhood tumors of the kidney, brain and CNS system, lymphomas and sarcomas and other soft tissue tumors. Leukemias are excluded from this Cancergram and are included in a separate Cancergram (CT03) on leukemias. Abstra...

1977-01-01

300

Ipilimumab and Rituximab In Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-08-05

301

Total parenteral nutrition in pancreatic disease.  

PubMed Central

Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) was given to 121 patients admitted with severe pancreatitis (73), chronic pancreatitis (23), or pancreatic malignancy (25) over 104 months. No adverse effects on the pancreas were detected from the TPN, including the provision of intravenous (IV) fat. Nutritional status was maintained or improved in all groups, including patients undergoing surgical procedures and those experiencing marked stress. No significant impact on the clinical course of pancreatitis was observed, although the death rate in acute pancreatitis (15.2%) and complicated pancreatitis (18.5%) compares favorably with other published series where early surgical intervention was undertaken. There was an increased risk of catheter-related sepsis in patients with complicated pancreatitis (14.8%) and with chronic pancreatitis (17.4%). No increase septic risk was seen in patients with acute pancreatitis or pancreatic malignancy. Eighty-two per cent of patients with acute pancreatitis required an average of 87 units of insulin per day while 78% of patients with chronic pancreatitis required an average of 54 units per day. In summary, TPN proved to be safe, effective, and well-tolerated in those patients with disorders of the pancreas.

Grant, J P; James, S; Grabowski, V; Trexler, K M

1984-01-01

302

The genetic predisposition to fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (previously known as tropical pancreatic diabetes) is a rare cause of diabetes confined to countries within the tropical belt. The aetiology of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes is thought to be environmental although the agent(s) is unknown. We have investigated a possible genetic basis of this disease by looking for restriction fragment length polymorphisms of genes implicated in the

P. K. Kambo; G. A. Hitman; V. Mohan; A. Ramachandran; C. Snehalatha; S. Suresh; K. Metcalfe; B. K. Ryait; M. Viswanathan

1989-01-01

303

Prevention and Intervention Strategies in Acute Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute pancreatitis is a common, costly, potentially lethal, and poorly understood disease, mostly caused by gallstones. In the past decade the incidence of acute pancreatitis in the Netherlands increased by 50% to over 3400 admissions in 2006, most likely due to an increase of gallstone disease. About 20% of patients will develop severe acute pancreatitis, a disease characterized by organ

M. G. H. Besselink

2008-01-01

304

Role of bacterial infections in pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including tobacco smoking, chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes, collectively account for less than half of all pancreatic cancer cases. Inflammation plays a key role in pancreatic carcinogenesis, but it is unclear what causes local inflammation, other than pancreatitis. Epidemiological data suggest that Helicobacter pylori may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, and more recently, data suggest that periodontal disease, and Porphyromonas gingivalis, a pathogen for periodontal disease, may also play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Individuals with periodontal disease have elevated markers of systemic inflammation, and oral bacteria can disseminate into the blood, stomach, heart and even reach the brain. These infections may contribute to the progression of pancreatic cancer by acting jointly with other pancreatic cancer risk factors that impact the inflammation and immune response, such as smoking and obesity, and the ABO genetic variant, recently linked to pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies. The complex interplay between bacteria, host immune response and environmental factors has been examined closely in relation to gastric cancer, but new research suggests bacteria may be playing a role in other gastrointestinal cancers. This review will summarize the literature on epidemiological studies examining infections that have been linked to pancreatic cancer and propose mechanistic pathways that may tie infections to pancreatic cancer. PMID:23843038

Michaud, Dominique S

2013-07-10

305

Uneven Lipomatosis: A pitfall in pancreatic Sonography  

Microsoft Academic Search

A marked difference in echogenicity between the anterior and posterior parts of the pancreatic head was demonstrated by pancreatic ultrasound in 4 patients. This finding could not be related to local pancreatic or peripancreatic pathology. In all patients the dorsal portion of the head, including the uncinate process, appeared less echogenic than the ventral part of the head, body, and

G. Marchal; E. Verbeken; W. Van Steenbergen; A. Baert; J. Lauweryns

1989-01-01

306

Heterotaxy syndrome with pancreatic malrotation: CT features  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the case of an asymptomatic elderly man with heterotaxy syndrome who presented with incomplete pancreatic rotation and an aplastic pancreatic uncinate process, polysplenia, nonrotation of the intestine, a midline liver, a midline gallbladder, a right-sided stomach, and interruption of the inferior vena cava with azygos continuation. To our knowledge, pancreatic malrotation with resultant oblique placement has not been

H. Ito; S. Ohgi; T. Kanno; T. Ishibashi

2003-01-01

307

Chronic Pancreatitis in the Elderly in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aim: Although the elderly comprise an increasingly large segment of the population, little has been written about chronic pancreatitis in this age group in Japan. In this study, we analyzed the clinical features of elderly Japanese patients with chronic pancreatitis and compared them with those of late-onset chronic pancreatitis patients in Western countries. Methods: Subjects were 182 patients (162 males

Terumi Kamisawa; Masami Yoshiike; Naoto Egawa; Hitoshi Nakajima; Kouji Tsuruta; Atsutake Okamoto; Teruo Nakamura

2004-01-01

308

Update on Endoscopic Treatment of Chronic Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Endoscopic therapy has been increasingly recognized as the effective therapy in selected patients with chronic pancreatitis. Utility of endotherapy in various conditions occurring in chronic pancreatitis is discussed. Its efficacy, limitations, and alternatives are addressed. For the best management of these complex entities, a multidisciplinary approach involving expertise in all pancreatic specialties is essential to achieve the goal.

Yoo, Byung Moo

2009-01-01

309

Pancreatitis as an unusual presentation of rhabdomyosarcoma.  

PubMed

The most common etiologies of acute pancreatitis in children are trauma, multi-system disease, drugs, infections, idiopathic and congenital anomalies of the pancreaticobiliary system. Acute pancreatitis is rarely associated with underlying childhood malignancies. We report a 12-year-old male with acute pancreatitis as the presenting symptom of an alveolar metastatic rhabdomyosarcoma. PMID:19213073

De Pasquale, Maria Debora; De Ioris, Maria Antonietta; Serra, Annalisa; Pessolano, Rosanna; Donfrancesco, Alberto; De Sio, Luigi

2009-07-01

310

The clinical significance of pancreatic steatosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

More research is now focused on pancreatic steatosis. Multiple definitions, clinical associations and synonyms for pancreatic steatosis are described in the literature and can be confusing. The integration and comparison of several studies concerning this topic is therefore challenging. In the past, pancreatic steatosis was considered an innocuous condition, a bystander of many underlying diseases (such as congenital syndromes, hemochromatosis

Erwin J. M. van Geenen; Mark M. Smits

2011-01-01

311

Pancreatic Necrosis Associated with Preeclampsia-Eclampsia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy is rare and commonly occurs in association with biliary disease. Preeclampsia is associated with microvascular abnormalities that may involve cerebral, placental, hepatic, renal and splanchnic circulation and rarely can cause acute pancreatitis. Case report A case of acute pancreatitis in a patient with preeclampsia-eclampsia where the diagnosis was missed initially that resulted in a protracted

Malvinder S Parmar

312

Acute pancreatitis in hepatitis A infection.  

PubMed

A 13 year old boy who was admitted for acute viral hepatitis due to hepatitis A virus developed acute pancreatitis which resolved completely with conservative treatment. Extensive evaluation did not reveal any other cause of pancreatitis and it was presumed that hepatitis A may result in acute pancreatitis. PMID:8693583

Amarapurkar, D N; Begani, M M; Mirchandani, K

313

Identification of a Novel Kindred with Familial Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background/Aims Hereditary pancreatic cancer comprises about 10% of pancreatic cancer cases. Multiple causative mutations have been identified. Here we describe a pancreatitis/pancreatic cancer (P/PC) family, which demonstrates pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer resulting from an uncharacterized mutation. Methods Family members completed evaluations to determine signs of mutation status. Select patients were screened for mutations associated with hereditary pancreatic diseases. Results In generation II, 12 siblings exhibit 6 cases of pancreatitis, 3 pancreatic cancer, and 2 obligate carrier status. The average age at pancreatitis diagnosis of enrolled members is 32.5 years; average age at pancreatic cancer diagnosis is 59 years. There is no association with known cancer syndromes. Those affected generally present with mild epigastric pain, and CT scans demonstrate characteristic fatty infiltration of the pancreatic body and tail with sparing of the head and neck. Full sequence analysis of genes associated with hereditary pancreatic disease failed to demonstrate known mutations or polymorphisms. Conclusion Based upon pedigree evaluation and preliminary DNA analysis, we believe that the family members with P/PC carry a novel genetic mutation resulting in hereditary pancreatitis. This mutation is autosomal dominant, expressed with high penetrance, and is part of a unique hereditary syndrome that significantly increases pancreatic cancer risk.

LaFemina, Jennifer; Roberts, Penelope A.; Hung, Yin P.; Gusella, James F.; Sahani, Dushyant; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Warshaw, Andrew L.; Thayer, Sarah P.

2009-01-01

314

Fenretinide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-09-26

315

Laparoscopic treatment of pancreatic insulinoma.  

PubMed

Laparoscopy and laparoscopic ultrasonography (LUS) have been proposed for the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic insulinoma. We present for cases of pancreatic insulinoma approached by laparoscopy guided by LUS. In three cases, insulinomas were in the pancreatic body and in one case in the pancreatic head. All lesions were detected preoperatively by abdominal US and confirmed by computed tomography. Laparoscopy was performed under general anesthesia. LUS was performed using a 10-mm flexible probe. In two cases the adenoma was enucleated using scissors and electrocoagulation, major vessels were controlled using clips, and enucleation was completed using a 30-mm endo-GIA. In one case a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen preservation was performed. In one case the adenoma was deep in the pancreatic head; minilaparotomy was performed and the adenoma enucleated. Patients were discharged in good health 5-7 days after surgery. The postoperative course was complicated in one case of enucleation by peripancreatic fluid collection that was treated percutaneously. Our experience confirms that accurate localization followed by excision of tumors via the laparoscopic approach constitute a significant advance in the management of insulinoma. PMID:12802660

Goletti, O; Celona, G; Monzani, F; Caraccio, N; Zocco, G; Lippolis, P V; Battini, A; Seccia, M; Cavina, E

2003-06-17

316

The current managements of pancreatic diabetes in Japan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic diabetes is secondary diabetes followed by progressions of pancreatic exocrine diseases, such as chronic pancreatitis,\\u000a pancreatic neoplasm and post-pancreatectomy. Because of destruction and reduction of the pancreatic endocrine and exocrine\\u000a functional compartments, patients with pancreatic diabetes frequently show malnutrition from maldigestion and malabsorption\\u000a by insufficiencies in pancreatic digestive enzymes, and show unstable glycemic control and prolonged hypoglycemia by insufficiencies

Ken Kawabe; Tetsuhide Ito; Hisato Igarashi; Ryoichi Takayanagi

2009-01-01

317

Pancreatic carcinoma in fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes: An eastern India perspective.  

PubMed

Fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) is a rare cause of diabetes (<1%) of uncertain etiology associated with >100-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We present 3 patients of FCPD with pancreatic cancer who had long duration of diabetes (19 years, 25 years, and 28 years, respectively), all of whom presented with anorexia, weight loss, and worsened glycemic control. Patient-1 in addition presented with deep venous thrombosis. All the 3 patients had evidence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Computerized tomography (CT) abdomen revealed atrophic pancreas, dilated pancreatic ducts, and multiple calculi in the head, body, and tail of pancreas in all of them. Patient-1 had 38 mm × 38 mm × 32 mm mass in the tail of pancreas with multiple target lesions were seen in the right lobe of liver. Patient-2 had a mass in the tail of pancreas (46 × 34 × 31 mm) encasing the celiac plexus and superior mesenteric artery infiltrating the splenic hilum and splenic flexure of colon. Patient-3 also had a mass in the tail of pancreas (33 × 31 × 22 mm), with multiple target lesions in the liver, suggestive of metastasis. All patients had elevated serum CA19-9 (828.8, 179.65, and 232 U/L, respectively; normal <40 U/L). Patients of FCPD with anorexia, weight loss, worsening of glycemic control should be evaluated to rule out pancreatic cancer. Studies are warranted to evaluate CA19-9 as a screening tool for diagnosing pancreatic cancer at an earlier stage in FCPD. PMID:23565475

Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Dutta, Deep; Biswas, Kaushik; Sanyal, Triranjan; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

2012-12-01

318

What You Need to Know about Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... NCI What You Need To Know About™ Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma In English En español Posted: 02/12/2008 What You Need To Know About? Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma About This Booklet What Is Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma? ...

319

What You Need to Know about Hodgkin Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... About NCI What You Need To Know About™ Hodgkin Lymphoma In English En español Posted: 07/31/2013 What You Need To Know About? Hodgkin Lymphoma About This Booklet The Lymph System Hodgkin Lymphoma ...

320

What Are the Key Statistics about Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma?  

MedlinePLUS

... for non-Hodgkin lymphoma? What are the key statistics about non-Hodgkin lymphoma? Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

321

Diagnosis and Treatment of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Cancergram focuses on a group of lymphomas which includes adenolymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, lymphosarcoma, lymphoblastoma, lymphocytoma, reticulum cell sarcoma, mycosis fungoides, and any not otherwise specified lymphoma with the exception of Hodgkin...

1977-01-01

322

Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody With or Without Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Children With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

2013-01-16

323

Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-08-05

324

Rituximab and Oblimersen in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Follicular Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

2013-01-04

325

Molecular forms of serum pancreatic stone protein in acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  \\u000a Conclusion: Elevation of serum pancreatic stone protein- (PSP) S1 suggests activation of trypsinogen in the pancreas. This information would prompt the start of intensive treatment and may\\u000a improve prognosis of acute pancreatitis (AP).\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Background: PSP exists in two molecular forms, PSP-S2–5 and PSP-S1. PSP-S1 is produced by enzyme cleavage of PSP-S2–5 by trypsin. Total serum PSP rose in AP,

Yasuyuki Nakae; Satoru Naruse; Motoji Kitagawa; Hiroshi Ishiguro; Masanori Kato; Shinobu Hayakawa; Takaharu Kondo; Tetsuo Hayakawa

1999-01-01

326

Role of Neurogenic Inflammation in Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Pain  

PubMed Central

Pain arising from pancreatic diseases can become chronic and difficult to treat. There is a paucity of knowledge regarding the mechanisms that sensitize neural pathways that transmit noxious information from visceral organs. In this review, neurogenic inflammation is presented as a possible amplifier of the noxious signal from peripheral organs including the pancreas. The nerve pathways that transmit pancreatic pain are also reviewed as a conduit of the amplified signals. It is likely that components of these visceral pain pathways can also be sensitized after neurogenic inflammation.

Vera-Portocarrero, Louis; Westlund, Karin N.

2009-01-01

327

Brachytherapy and pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Advances in diagnostic and therapeutic technology have not appreciably changed the outlook of patients with pancreatic cancer. While those patients presenting with localized resectable disease have the best prognosis, local control and intra-abdominal metastases remain significant obstacles to survival. Localized chemoradiation has modestly improved median survival in localized and locally advanced disease. Patients presenting with locally advanced disease at diagnosis benefit from surgical palliation which includes biliary and gastric bypass. Intraoperative interstitial brachytherapy has been effective when utilized at laparotomy to improve local control in locally advanced disease. Advances in laparoscopic techniques have provided the ability to more accurately stage patients prior to laparotomy and perform palliative procedures without the need for laparotomy. The utilization of high-dose-rate brachytherapy has proven effective in palliating obstructive symptoms with minimal morbidity on an outpatient basis. Recent efforts have focused on preoperative chemoradiation to improve resectability in selected patients and prophylactic hepatic irradiation to reduce metastases for patients with locally advanced disease. PMID:9143059

Bodner, W R; Hilaris, B S

328

Biochemical markers of acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Serum amylase remains the most commonly used biochemical marker for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, but its sensitivity can be reduced by late presentation, hypertriglyceridaemia, and chronic alcoholism. Urinary trypsinogen?2 is convenient, of comparable diagnostic accuracy, and provides greater (99%) negative predictive value. Early prediction of the severity of acute pancreatitis can be made by well validated scoring systems at 48 hours, but the novel serum markers procalcitonin and interleukin?6 allow earlier prediction (12 to 24 hours after admission). Serum alanine transaminase >150?IU/l and jaundice suggest a gallstone aetiology, requiring endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. For obscure aetiologies, serum calcium and triglycerides should be measured. Genetic polymorphisms may play an important role in “idiopathic” acute recurrent pancreatitis.

Matull, W R; Pereira, S P; O'Donohue, J W

2006-01-01

329

Aortic dissection presenting with pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Aortic dissections can be challenging to diagnose in the emergency department (ED) because patients can present with a variety of complaints. We present a case involving a woman with multiple comorbidities, who had experienced intermittent abdominal pain for several months, which worsened in the days leading up to her ED visit. She was diagnosed with pancreatitis based on her history and blood work but, incidentally, on computed tomographic scan, also was found to have a Stanford type B aortic dissection. Her dissection and pancreatitis were managed medically with tight blood pressure control without the need for surgical intervention. Several case studies associating acute aortic dissection with acute pancreatitis have been published, but it remains unclear whether these 2 conditions have a causal relationship. PMID:23602744

Pham, Thuy V; Nable, Jose V

2013-04-17

330

Evolutionary studies on pancreatic colipase.  

PubMed

In this evolutionary study the following criteria have been used to prove the existence of colipase: 1. It restores the activity of human and porcine pancreatic lipase inhibited by bile salt. 2. It cross-reacts with antisera to human and porcine colipases. 3. Its restoration of lipase activity, inhibited by bile salt, in the tributyrin assay system, is prevented by antiserum to colipase. 4. It is a heat-stable, low-molecular-weight protein (molecular weight about 10 000 by gel-filtration). The occurrence of colipase has been verified in the exocrine pancreatic cells from hagfish (Myxine glutinosa), ratfish (Chimaera monstrosa), rayfish (Raja radiata). Greenland shark (Somnius microcephalus) and dogfish (Squalus acanthius). No colipase activity could be found in the gastric juice of crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus). These results indicate that colipase envolved in the vertebrates before the organized exocrine pancreatic gland and occurred simultaneously with the bile salts/bile alcohols. PMID:6860687

Sternby, B; Larsson, A; Borgström, B

1983-02-01

331

Pancreatic Transplantation: Beta Cell Replacement.  

PubMed

Diabetes is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Complications of diabetes including renal failure, retinopathy, neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease limit both survival and quality of life. Pancreatic transplantation can restore euglycemia thereby stabilizing or even reversing secondary complications of diabetes as well as improving quality of life particularly in patients with labile diabetes. Recent evidence also shows an improved survival in diabetic patients that undergo pancreatic transplantation when combined with a kidney transplant. Pancreatic transplantation should more properly be referred to as beta cell replacement as the field today encompasses both whole organ and islet cell transplantation. We have outlined herein the indications and contraindications to islet or whole organ pancreas transplantation and we have described periprocedure care and short- and long-term prognosis. PMID:15345204

Bigam, David L.; Shapiro, AM James

2004-10-01

332

Technical Advances in Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS)-Guided Tissue Acquisition for Pancreatic Cancers: How Can We Get the Best Results with EUS-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration?  

PubMed Central

Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is one of the least invasive and most effective modality in diagnosing pancreatic adenocarcinoma in solid pancreatic lesions, with a higher diagnostic accuracy than cystic tumors. EUS-FNA has been shown to detect tumors less than 3 mm, due to high spatial resolution allowing the detection of very small lesions and vascular invasion, particularly in the pancreatic head and neck, which may not be detected on transverse computed tomography. Furthermore, this minimally invasive procedure is often ideal in the endoscopic procurement of tissue in patients with unresectable tumors. While EUS-FNA has been increasingly used as a diagnostic tool, most studies have collectively looked at all primary pancreatic solid lesions, including lymphomas and pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, whereas very few studies have examined the diagnostic utility of EUS-FNA of pancreatic ductal carcinoma only. As with any novel and advanced endoscopic procedure that may incorporate several practices and approaches, endoscopists have adopted diverse techniques to improve the tissue procurement practice and increase diagnostic accuracy. In this article, we present a review of literature to date and discuss currently practiced EUS-FNA technique, including indications, technical details, equipment, patient selection, and diagnostic accuracy.

Kedia, Prashant; Gaidhane, Monica

2013-01-01

333

Solitary lymphoblastic lymphoma of the thoracic spine.  

PubMed

Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma rarely originates from bone, and even more infrequently from a vertebral body. Lymphoblastic lymphoma is a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and results from an abnormality in adaptive immune cells. A 27-year-old man presented with a two-month history of night sweats, weight loss, and severe back pain. Radiological studies demonstrated an osteolytic lesion compressing the subarachnoid space at the T11 level. Posterolateral fusion with decompression was performed and a pathologic examination confirmed lymphoblastic lymphoma of the B-cell precursor type. To our knowledge, this is the first report of solitary lymphoblastic lymphoma from B-cell precursors in of the thoracic spine. Herein, we discuss the presenting symptoms and the management of this rare case of lymphoblastic lymphoma. PMID:23346332

Park, Dong Am; Park, Sang Gon; Kim, Seok Won

2012-12-31

334

Solitary Lymphoblastic Lymphoma of the Thoracic Spine  

PubMed Central

Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma rarely originates from bone, and even more infrequently from a vertebral body. Lymphoblastic lymphoma is a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and results from an abnormality in adaptive immune cells. A 27-year-old man presented with a two-month history of night sweats, weight loss, and severe back pain. Radiological studies demonstrated an osteolytic lesion compressing the subarachnoid space at the T11 level. Posterolateral fusion with decompression was performed and a pathologic examination confirmed lymphoblastic lymphoma of the B-cell precursor type. To our knowledge, this is the first report of solitary lymphoblastic lymphoma from B-cell precursors in of the thoracic spine. Herein, we discuss the presenting symptoms and the management of this rare case of lymphoblastic lymphoma.

Park, Dong Am; Park, Sang Gon

2012-01-01

335

Everolimus and Octreotide With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Beta Islet Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Islet Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic G-cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-cell Carcinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

2013-10-07

336

Bile and pancreatic juice exclusion activates acinar stress kinases and exacerbates gallstone pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Hypothesis: Bile and pancreatic juice exclusion from gut activates acinar stress kinases and exacerbates gallstone pancreatitis as evidenced by ameliorating effects of replacement therapy in an experimental model of duct ligation-induced acute pancreatitis. In early stages of gallstone pancreatitis, bile-pancreatic juice cannot enter the gut. Enteral exclusion worsens pancreatitis by causing feedback hyperstimulation of the exocrine pancreas that activates acinar cell stress kinases. Investigations using a unique surgical model, the Donor Rat Model, showed that duodenal replacement of bile-pancreatic juice in rats with duct ligation attenuates pancreatic stress kinase activation, reduces pancreatic cytokine production, and ameliorates pancreatic morphologic changes. These findings suggest that exclusion-induced acinar hyperstimulation, in the presence of duct obstruction, exacerbates acute pancreatitis via stress kinase activation. Although acinar hyperstimulation has often been implicated in acute pancreatitis pathogenesis, the lack of supporting evidence remains a conspicuous lacuna. The proposed hypothesis draws on fresh evidence to present a new paradigm that re-examines the role of exocrine pancreatic hyperstimulation in gallstone pancreatitis pathogenesis.

Samuel, Isaac

2008-01-01

337

Vorinostat and Combination Chemotherapy With Rituximab in Treating Patients With HIV-Related Diffuse Large B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Other Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

2013-05-06

338

[Extracorporeal hemocorrection in acute pancreatitis].  

PubMed

An experience with using 340 operations of extracorporeal hemocorrection in complex intensive therapy of 160 patients with acute pancreatitis has been generalized. In 111 of these patients (69%) pancreatic necrosis complicated by the syndrome of multiple organ failure was diagnosed. Based on the mechanisms of medical efficiency the authors have developed differential indications for using different extracorporeal technologies depending on the clinico-laboratory profile of the endogenous intoxication, structure and degree of organic and systemic dysfunctions. The adoption of such technologies allowed lethality to be reduced from 37.5 to 27.6%. PMID:11011409

Romanchishen, A F; Chalenko, V V; Dubchenko, S G; Pastukhova, N K; Zotikov, A G

2000-01-01

339

[Solid pseudopapillary epithelial pancreatic tumor].  

PubMed

Solid pseudopapillary pancreatic neoplasm-is a tumor, which appears rarely, predominantly in young women, has low malignant potential and unknown histogenesis. Morphological peculiarities of the tumor may be the same as in endocrinal tumors and ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma, with which it must be differed. Immunohistochemical investigation of the tumor does not permit to obtain information for strict diferential diagnosis conduction; macroscopic and microscopic peculiarities of the tumor while staining with hematoxilin and eosin give more important information for its diagnosis. The treatment is surgical and consists of radical resection of the tumor. PMID:19957740

Kuryk, O H; Kucher, M D; Iakovenko, V O; Kriuchyna, Ie A

2009-05-01

340

Primary malt lymphoma of the tongue.  

PubMed

Primitive malignant lymphoma mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) on the tongue are rare entities. We report here a case of an old woman (80 years old) with a tumor in the dorsum of the tongue, which was histologically diagnosed as an extra-nodal marginal B cell lymphoma. An inflammatory reaction resembling myoepithelial sialoadenitis was observed in the minor salivary glands adjacent at the tumour, suggesting a possible derivation of the lymphoma from a previous reactive process of unknown origin. PMID:15580125

Goteri, Gaia; Ascani, Giuliano; Filosa, Alessandra; Rubini, Corrado; Olay, Sonsoles; Balercia, Paolo

341

MALT lymphoma: from morphology to molecules  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hints that the growth of some lymphomas is stimulated by bacterial antigens and can be controlled by treatment with antibiotics first emerged in the 1970s. Subsequently, a specific type of B-cell lymphoma — mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma — was identified that is associated with bacterial infection and auto-antigen stimulation. This article chronicles the clinical, immunological and molecular developments in

Ming-Qing Du; Peter G. Isaacson

2004-01-01

342

Adult life after surviving lymphoma in childhood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Almost all pediatric lymphomas are malignant, high-grade tumors. The combined incidence of Hodgkin’s disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin\\u000a lymphoma (NHL) reaches 10 to 12 new cases a year per million children under the age of 16 years, representing about 10% of\\u000a all pediatric cancers. HD makes up to 40% and NHL 60% of pediatric lymphomas. During the last 20 years, cure rates raised

Nicolas X. von der Weid

2008-01-01

343

Imaging of primary and secondary renal lymphoma.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE. This article reviews the CT and MRI patterns of primary and secondary renal lymphomas and discusses the role of percutaneous biopsy in diagnosis and management. CONCLUSION. Renal lymphoma has a variable imaging spectrum and may mimic renal cell carcinoma. An awareness of the typical and atypical imaging features of both primary and secondary renal lymphomas can help the radiologist to suggest these diagnoses and recommend biopsy when appropriate. PMID:24147501

Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy; Iyer, Revathy; Devine, Catherine; Bhosale, Priya; Paulson, Erik

2013-11-01

344

Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas of Mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACTStudies of lymphoid neoplasms occurring in normal or genetically engineered mice have revealed parallels and differences to non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) of humans. Some mouse lymphomas have strong histologic similarities to the human NHL subsets including precursor B- and T-cell lymphoblastic, small lymphocytic, splenic marginal zone, and diffuse large-cell B-cell lymphomas (DLCL); whether molecular parallels also exist is under study. Others

Mitsuo Hori; Shao Xiang; Chen-Feng Qi; Sisir K. Chattopadhyay; Torgny N. Fredrickson; Janet W. Hartley; Alexander L. Kovalchuk; Georg W. Bornkamm; Siegfried Janz; Neal G. Copeland; Nancy A. Jenkins; Jerrold M. Ward; Herbert C. Morse

2001-01-01

345

Prediction of pancreatic necrosis by dynamic pancreatography.  

PubMed Central

Parenchymal necrosis has recently been recognized as the principal determinant of the incidence of secondary infection in acute pancreatitis. Because secondary infection of pancreatic necrosis accounts for more than 80% of all deaths from acute pancreatitis, a method for determining the presence or absence of parenchymal necrosis would offer considerable prognostic and therapeutic information. Thirty seven patients with unequivocal acute pancreatitis and five normal controls were prospectively studied with intravenous bolus, contrast-enhanced computed tomography (dynamic pancreatography). In the absence of pancreatic necrosis, there were no significant differences in parenchymal enhancement between any of the following patient groups: controls (5), uncomplicated pancreatitis (20), pancreatic abscess (7), or peripancreatic necrosis (4)(p less than 0.05). On the other hand, pancreatic parenchymal enhancement was significantly reduced or absent in all six patients with segmental or diffuse pancreatic necrosis (p less than 0.05). Postcontrast pancreatic parenchymal enhancement was also found to be inversely correlated with the number of Ranson signs (p less than 0.001). Dynamic pancreatography offers prognostic information and is a safe and reliable technique for predicting the presence or absence of pancreatic parenchymal necrosis. Images Figs. 1A and B. Figs. 3A and B. Figs. 4A and B. Fig. 5. Figs. 6A and B. Fig. 7.

Bradley, E L; Murphy, F; Ferguson, C

1989-01-01

346

Pancreatic trauma: acute and late manifestations.  

PubMed

A retrospective analysis of 47 patients with pancreatic trauma is presented. A total of 43 patients presented with acute pancreatic injury, 32 after blunt abdominal trauma. Isolated blunt pancreatic injuries were a considerable diagnostic problem with a mean delay from trauma to operation of 9.4 days. At operation peripancreatic drainage in mild injuries and distal resection in cases of ductal injury were the commonest procedures. The overall mortality was 19 per cent, but only three of the eight deaths were attributable to the pancreatic injury. The overall complication rate was 63 per cent and the pancreatic complication rate was 33 per cent. Four patients presented with chronic pancreatitis resulting from previously untreated blunt abdominal trauma 0.5-21 years earlier. Clinically, they did not differ from the manifestations of chronic pancreatitis of other aetiological origins. PMID:3349308

Leppäniemi, A; Haapiainen, R; Kiviluoto, T; Lempinen, M

1988-02-01

347

Cutaneous metastases secondary to pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

AIM: To evaluate prognoses after cutaneous metastases, derived from pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We treated two patients with cutaneous metastases from pancreatic cancer. We reviewed 40 reported patients in addition to our cases and analyzed clinical features of cutaneous metastases from pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: The median survival time (MST) was 5 mo after diagnoses of cutaneous metastases. The cumulative 2-year survival rate was 3.5%. The most frequent site of cutaneous metastases was the umbilicus. The MST of patients who were treated with chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (CRT) was 6.5 mo, which was statistically longer in comparison to patients without treatment. Prognoses of cutaneous metastases are similar to other metastatic sites from pancreatic cancer. Receiving chemotherapy or CRT was the only prognostic factor of cutaneous metastases from pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSION: The prognoses of cutaneous metastases are similar to other metastatic pancreatic cancers. Receiving chemotherapy or CRT was the only prognostic factor of cutaneous metastases from pancreatic cancer.

Horino, Kei; Takamori, Hiroshi; Ikuta, Yoshiaki; Nakahara, Osamu; Chikamoto, Akira; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Beppu, Toru; Baba, Hideo

2012-01-01

348

Management of blunt pancreatic trauma in children.  

PubMed

Blunt trauma to the abdomen accounts for the majority of abdominal injuries in children. Pancreatic injury is the fourth most common solid organ injury, following injuries to the spleen, liver and kidneys. The most common complications are the formation of pancreatic fistulae, pancreatitis and the development of pancreatic pseudocysts, which usually present several weeks after injury. The nonoperative management of minor pancreatic injury is well accepted; however, the treatment of more serious pancreatic injuries with capsular, ductal or parenchymal disruption in pediatric patients remains controversial. Based on the data presented in this literature review, although children with pancreatic injuries (without ductal disruption) do not appear to suffer increased morbidity following conservative management, patients with ductal disruption may benefit from operative intervention. PMID:23982392

Maeda, Kosaku; Ono, Shigeru; Baba, Katsuhisa; Kawahara, Insu

2013-10-01

349

Pharmaceutical development for treating pancreatic diseases.  

PubMed

The efficacy of medications to treat pancreatic diseases, even when proven effective by experimental studies, are difficult to prove by controlled clinical trials. In the treatment of acute pancreatitis, prophylactic antibiotics, somatostatin, protease inhibitors, and cholecystokinin (CCK)-receptor antagonists are advocated for use in the early stages of acute pancreatitis, but the data are insufficient to mandate prophylaxis use or recommend their use as a standard of care. In the treatment of chronic pancreatitis, digestive enzymes, oral active protease inhibitors, CCK-receptor antagonists, or somatostatin are administered for pain relief. Extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy and oral dissolution therapy with trimethadione are used to treat pancreatic stones. The goals of treatment of acute pancreatitis should be to ameliorate the severity of pancreatic inflammation or to prevent its complications. Although several treatments seem to be promising from the studies reviewed, these medications require prospective comparison with the standard procedures and long-term evaluation. PMID:9548690

Kitagawa, M; Naruse, S; Ishiguro, H; Hayakawa, T

1998-04-01

350

Pancreatic Exocrine Function in Maturity Onset Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Exocrine pancreatic function was studied in 14 inpatients with newly diagnosed maturity onset diabetes mellitus. Five patients had clinical and biochemical evidence of pancreatic disease (two carcinoma, three pancreatitis). The other nine patients had no clinical pancreatic disease but all except one had at least one abnormal result of pancreatic function tests. None of this group with idiopathic diabetes mellitus developed any clinical evidence of exocrine pancreatic disease over the next five years. Mild abnormalities of exocrine pancreatic function in newly diagnosed patients with diabetes but without clinical evidence of pancreatic disease do not usually develop into overt pancreatic disease, and are therefore probably clinically unimportant.

Baron, J. H.; Nabarro, J. D. N.

1973-01-01

351

Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma.  

PubMed

A distinctive type of low-grade extranodal lymphoma recapitulates the cytomorphologic features of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Typically, these MALT lymphomas arise from sites normally devoid of lymphoid tissue, but are preceded by chronic inflammatory, usually autoimmune, disorders that result in the accumulation of lymphoid tissue. The stomach is the most common site of MALT lymphoma, which arises from lymphoid tissue acquired as the result of Helicobacter pylori infection. The indolent clinical behavior of gastric MALT lymphoma coupled with certain histologic features suggests that its growth is subject to immunologic stimuli, and the role of H pylori in this respect has been examined in detail. In vitro experiments have shown that the growth of lymphoma cells is stimulated by contact with T cells, which, in turn, show strain specific responses to heat-killed H pylori. Clinically, approximately 70% of cases of stage IE gastric MALT lymphoma regress following eradication of H pylori with antibiotics. Large, deeply invasive tumors and those that have undergone high-grade transformation typically do not respond to antibiotic therapy. Other common sites of MALT lymphoma include the salivary glands, lung, and ocular adnexa. The clinicopathologic features of these lymphomas are remarkably similar to gastric MALT lymphoma, which suggests that they, too, may be antigen-driven. PMID:10319382

Isaacson, P G

1999-04-01

352

Care of the Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivor  

PubMed Central

Of those individuals diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma, 85% will survive and may be affected by residual effects of their cancer and its therapy (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, stem cell transplantation). Hodgkin lymphoma survivors are at risk of developing secondary malignancies, cardiovascular disease, pulmonary disease, thyroid disease, infertility, premature menopause, chronic fatigue, and psychosocial issues. These conditions usually have a long latency and therefore present years or decades after Hodgkin lymphoma treatment, when the patient’s care is being managed by a primary care provider. This review summarizes these unique potential medical and psychological sequelae of Hodgkin lymphoma, and provides screening and management recommendations.

Thompson, Carrie A.; Mauck, Karen; Havyer, Rachel; Bhagra, Anjali; Kalsi, Henna; Hayes, Sharonne N.

2011-01-01

353

Langerhans cell histiocytosis in sequential discordant lymphoma  

PubMed Central

B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the follicular subtype (grade 3/3) affecting the nasopharynx and breast, and containing foci of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, was diagnosed in a 56 year old white woman who was a longstanding heavy smoker. Four years before this she had developed stage 1a mixed cellularity Hodgkin lymphoma affecting the right inguinal region, which was treated by irradiation and chemotherapy without recurrence. Review of the original Hodgkin lymphoma histology demonstrated a small focus of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. This is thought to be the first recorded case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis occurring in a sequential discordant lymphoma. Its importance is discussed.

Adu-Poku, K; Thomas, D W; Khan, M K; Holgate, C S; Smith, M E F

2005-01-01

354

Pain in chronic pancreatitis: Managing beyond the pancreatic duct  

PubMed Central

Chronic pancreatitis (CP) continues to be a clinical challenge. Persistent or recurrent abdominal pain is the most compelling symptom that drives patients to seek medical care. Unfortunately, in spite of using several treatment approaches in the clinical setting, there is no single specific treatment modality that can be earmarked as a cure for this disease. Traditionally, ductal hypertension has been associated with causation of pain in CP; and patients are often subjected to endotherapy and surgery with a goal to decompress the pancreatic duct. Recent studies on humans (clinical and laboratory based) and experimental models have put forward several mechanisms, including neuroimmune alterations, which could be responsible for pain. This might explain the partial or no response to single modality treatment in a significant proportion of patients. The current review discusses the recent concepts of pain generation in CP and evidence based therapeutic approaches (other than ductal decompression) to handle persistent or recurrent pain. We focus primarily on parenchymal and neural components; and discuss the role of antioxidants and the existing controversies, drugs that interfere with neural transmission, pancreatic enzyme supplementation, celiac neurolysis, and pancreatic resection procedures. The review concludes with the treatment approach that we follow at our institute.

Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Reddy, D Nageshwar

2013-01-01

355

Pain in chronic pancreatitis: Managing beyond the pancreatic duct.  

PubMed

Chronic pancreatitis (CP) continues to be a clinical challenge. Persistent or recurrent abdominal pain is the most compelling symptom that drives patients to seek medical care. Unfortunately, in spite of using several treatment approaches in the clinical setting, there is no single specific treatment modality that can be earmarked as a cure for this disease. Traditionally, ductal hypertension has been associated with causation of pain in CP; and patients are often subjected to endotherapy and surgery with a goal to decompress the pancreatic duct. Recent studies on humans (clinical and laboratory based) and experimental models have put forward several mechanisms, including neuroimmune alterations, which could be responsible for pain. This might explain the partial or no response to single modality treatment in a significant proportion of patients. The current review discusses the recent concepts of pain generation in CP and evidence based therapeutic approaches (other than ductal decompression) to handle persistent or recurrent pain. We focus primarily on parenchymal and neural components; and discuss the role of antioxidants and the existing controversies, drugs that interfere with neural transmission, pancreatic enzyme supplementation, celiac neurolysis, and pancreatic resection procedures. The review concludes with the treatment approach that we follow at our institute. PMID:24151350

Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Nageshwar Reddy, D

2013-10-14

356

Lenalidomide and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-09-27

357

Natural history of acute pancreatitis and the role of infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacterial infection of pancreatic necrotic tissue is a frequent complication of severe acute pancreatitis. Infected pancreatic necrotic tissue is observed in 30–70% of all patients suffering from necrotizing pancreatitis. It is the leading cause of deaths in severe acute pancreatitis, with mortality rates ranging from 15 to 30%. The incidence of infection increases with the extent of the necrotic areas

Rainer Isenmann; Hans G. Beger

1999-01-01

358

Gastric Secretion of Acid in Patients with Pancreatic Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

In view of the destruction of pancreatic extract, used in the treatment of pancreatic insufficiency, by gastric juice, we measured the gastric secretory response to pentagastrin in patients with pancreatic disease. The patients with chronic pancreatitis and steatorrhoea secreted as much acid as patients with duodenal ulcer, emphasising the need for therapeutic gastric secretory inhibition to supplement treatment of pancreatic

J. H. B. Sounders; J. M. Cargill; K. G. Wormsley

1978-01-01

359

Relationship of necrosis to organ failure in severe acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Pancreatic necrosis and organ failure are principal determinants of severity in acute pancreatitis. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of necrosis to organ failure in severe acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Patients with necrotizing pancreatitis from May 1992 to January 1996 were retrospectively studied. Pancreatic necrosis was identified by characteristic findings on dynamic contrast-enhanced computerized

S Tenner; G Sica; M Hughes; E Noordhoek; S Feng; M Zinner; PA Banks

1997-01-01

360

The effect of pancreatic polypeptide and peptide YY on pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic exocrine secretion in the anesthetized dog  

SciTech Connect

Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and peptide YY (PYY) are inhibitors of pancreatic exocrine secretion in vivo but not in vitro, which suggests intermediate mechanisms of action. To examine the role of pancreatic blood flow in these inhibitory effects, xenon-133 gas clearance was used to measure pancreatic blood flow while simultaneously measuring pancreatic exocrine secretion. PP or PYY (400 pmol/kg/h) was administered during the intermediate hour of a 3-h secretin (125 ng/kg/h)/cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) (50 ng/kg/h) infusion. Exocrine secretion and pancreatic blood flow during the PP or PYY hours were compared with that observed in the first and third hours of the secretin/CCK-8 infusion. PP and PYY significantly inhibited secretin/CCK-8-induced pancreatic exocrine secretion. In addition, PYY (but not PP) significantly reduced pancreatic blood flow during secretin/CCK-8 stimulation. Nevertheless, there was no correlation between pancreatic blood flow and bicarbonate or protein outputs. It is concluded that changes in pancreatic blood flow do not mediate the inhibitory effects of PP or PYY on the exocrine pancreas.

DeMar, A.R.; Lake, R.; Fink, A.S. (Cincinnati VAMC, OH (USA))

1991-01-01

361

Treatment of Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  We are increasingly successful in the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma. Current risk adapted trials seek to maintain the excellent\\u000a efficacy of older therapies, while simultaneously limiting their late toxicities. Current management of early stage\\/favorable\\u000a disease involves the use of two to four cycles of tailored chemotherapy, often followed by low-dose, involved field radiation.\\u000a Those with intermediate and advanced stage

Michael R. Olson; Sarah S. Donaldson

2008-01-01

362

Lymphocyte-Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (LPHL) was first described in 1944 by Jackson and Parker as nodular paragranuloma\\u000a [1]. Other synonyms used were lymphocytic predominant Hodgkin disease, lymphocytic and histiocytic (L&H) predominant Hodgkindisease,\\u000a nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin disease, and nodular LPHL [2–5]. This term has become the one that is currently being\\u000a used. LPHL represents 5% of all HL cases and is a

Andreas Engert; Anas Younes

363

[Weiss' nasal lymphoma (histiocytic, malignant)].  

PubMed

We presented a patient with a deforming and necrotizing syndrome of the nasal pyramid. The histopathology demonstrated a lymphoma. The original works of Weiss are related. The diseases is characterized by: ecotaxis of the nasal pyramid, localized persistency during a long time, malaise in advanced studies and sensibility to radiations. We proposed the name linfoma histiocitico maligno nasal de Weiss and consider it as a autonomous entity. PMID:6384693

Pons, S; Ortiz Medina, A

1984-01-01

364

Burkitt lymphoma involving the clivus.  

PubMed

Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a rapidly dividing tumor that commonly presents itself in the jaw in its endemic form and the abdomen in the sporadic type. Central nervous system involvement at diagnosis is not uncommon, but there have been no previously published reports of BL involving the clivus. Increased tumor burden is associated with complications such as tumor lysis syndrome, and recognition of unusual presentations is important for timely management. We report 3 patients with BL involving the clivus at diagnosis. PMID:18391704

Aronson, Paul L; Reilly, Anne; Paessler, Michele; Kersun, Leslie S

2008-04-01

365

Vaccine Therapy With or Without Cryosurgery in Treating Patients With Residual, Relapsed, or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia With Nodal Disease

2013-05-17

366

Hodgkin's lymphoma: the pathologist's viewpoint  

PubMed Central

Despite its well known histological and clinical features, Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) has recently been the object of intense research activity, leading to a better understanding of its phenotype, molecular characteristics, histogenesis, and possible mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. There is complete consensus on the B cell derivation of the tumour in most cases, and on the relevance of Epstein-Barr virus infection and defective cytokinesis in at least a proportion of patients. The REAL/WHO classification recognises a basic distinction between lymphocyte predominance HL (LP-HL) and classic HL (CHL), reflecting the differences in clinical presentation and behaviour, morphology, phenotype, and molecular features. CHL has been classified into four subtypes: lymphocyte rich, nodular sclerosing, with mixed cellularity, and lymphocyte depleted. The borders between CHL and anaplastic large cell lymphoma have become sharper, whereas those between LP-HL and T cell rich B cell lymphoma remain ill defined. Treatments adjusted to the pathobiological characteristics of the tumour in at risk patients have been proposed and are on the way to being applied.

Pileri, S A; Ascani, S; Leoncini, L; Sabattini, E; Zinzani, P L; Piccaluga, P P; Pileri, A; Giunti, M; Falini, B; Bolis, G B; Stein, H

2002-01-01

367

Veränderungen der Lipoproteinlipase bei Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Alterations of blood lipids were investigated in 11 cases of pancreatitis. In 6 of these hyperlipoproteinaemia was present, which was classified as type V in four, and as type IV in two patients on account of the pattern of lipoprotein electrophoresis. Plasma lipoprotein lipase activity was reduced in 9 patients, the average being 152 mU\\/ml plasma as compared to

G. Oehler; K. Huth; F. W. Schmahl; L. Róka

1973-01-01

368

Death due to acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large retrospective autopsy study of patients was analyzed to evaluate the major etiologic and pathologic factors contributing to fatal acute pancreatitis (AP). From an autopsy population of 50,227 patients, 405 cases were identified where AP was defined as the official primary cause of death. AP was classified according to morphological and histological, but not biochemical, criteria. Patients with AP

Ian G. Renner; William T. Savage; Jose L. Pantoja; V. Jayne Renner

1985-01-01

369

Approaches Towards Endogenous Pancreatic Regeneration  

PubMed Central

The phenomenon of pancreatic regeneration in mammals has been well documented. It has been shown that pancreatic tissue is able to regenerate in several species of mammal after surgical insult. This tissue is also known to have the potential to maintain or increase its ?-cell mass in response to metabolic demands during pregnancy and obesity. Since deficiency in ?-cell mass is the hallmark of most forms of diabetes, it is worthwhile understanding pancreatic regeneration in the context of this disease. With this view in mind, this article aims to discuss the potential use in clinical strategies of knowledge that we obtained from studies carried out in animal models of diabetes. Approaches to achieve this goal involve the use of biomolecules, adult stem cells and gene therapy. Various molecules, such as glucagon-like peptide-1, ?-cellulin, nicotinamide, gastrin, epidermal growth factor-1 and thyroid hormone, play major roles in the initiation of endogenous islet regeneration in diabetes. The most accepted hypothesis is that these molecules stimulate islet precursor cells to undergo neogenesis or to induce replication of existing ?-cells, emphasizing the importance of pancreas-resident stem/progenitor cells in islet regeneration. Moreover, the potential of adult stem cell population from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, liver, spleen, or amniotic membrane, is also discussed with regard to their potential to induce pancreatic regeneration.

Banerjee, Meenal; Kanitkar, Meghana; Bhonde, Ramesh R.

2005-01-01

370

Pancreatic pathology in dasyurid marsupials.  

PubMed

The pancreas of 231 dasyurid marsupials was examined. Focal intestinal pancreatitis was found in 22 animals, an exocrine adenoma in an Antechinus macdonnellensis and in islet cell adenoma in an Antechinus apicalis. Glycogenic vacuolation of islet cells found in one Antechinus sp. nov. and one Antechinus rosamondae is taken as evidence for spontaneous diabetes mellitus. PMID:7431524

Attwood, H D; Woolley, P A

1980-04-01

371

Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNTs) are rare malignant neoplasms considered to be resistant to radiotherapy (RT), although data on efficacy are scarce. We reviewed our institutional experience to further delineate the role of RT for patients with PNTs. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 2006, 36 patients with PNTs were treated with RT to 49 sites. Of these 36 patients,

Joseph N. Contessa; Kent A. Griffith; Elizabeth Wolff; William Ensminger; Mark Zalupski; Theodore S. Lawrence; Edgar Ben-Josef

2009-01-01

372

Acute Suppuration of the Pancreatic Duct in a Patient with Tropical Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Background/Aim Pancreatic sepsis secondary to infected necrosis, pseudocyst, or pancreatic abscess is a well-known clinical entity. Acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct (ASPD) in the setting of chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal obstruction with septicemia is a rare complication that is seldom reported. It is our aim to report a case of ASPD with Klebsiella ornithinolytica, in the absence of pancreatic abscess or infected necrosis. Case Report A 46-year-old Asian-Indian man with chronic tropical pancreatitis who was admitted with recurrent epigastric pain that rapidly evolved into septic shock. A CT scan of abdomen revealed a dilated pancreatic duct with a large calculus. Broad-spectrum antibiotics, vasopressors and activated recombinant protein C were initiated. Emergency ERCP showed the papilla of Vater spontaneously expelling pus. Probing and stenting was instantly performed until pus drainage ceased. Repeat CT scan confirmed the absence of pancreatic necrosis or fluid collection, and decreasing ductal dilatation. Dramatic clinical improvement was observed within 36 hours after intervention. Blood cultures grew Klebsiella ornithinolytica. The patient completed his antibiotic course and was discharged. Conclusion ASPD without pancreatic abscess or infected necrosis is an exceptional clinical entity that should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic sepsis. A chronically diseased pancreas and diabetes may have predisposed to the uncommon pathogen. The presence of intraductal pancreatic stones obstructing outflow played a major role in promoting bacterial growth, suppuration and septicemia. Immediate drainage of the pancreatic duct with endoscopic intervention is critical and mandatory.

Deeb, Liliane S.; Bajaj, Jasmeet; Bhargava, Sandeep; Alcid, David; Pitchumoni, C.S.

2008-01-01

373

Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (excluding anaplastic large-cell lymphoma): results from the Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Classification Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is rare in most parts of the world. Therefore, we have evaluated the 96 cases of PTCL diagnosed within the Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Classification Project (NHLCP) (1378 cases) for their geographical distribution, pathologic features and diagnostic reliability, as well as clinical presentation and outcome. Materials and methods: Diagnoses of all cases were rendered independently by five

T. Rüdiger; D. D. Weisenburger; J. R. Anderson; J. O. Armitage; J. Diebold; K. A. MacLennan; B. N. Nathwani; F. Ullrich; H. K. Müller-Hermelink

2002-01-01

374

Follicular Lymphoma of the Thyroid Gland  

PubMed Central

The majority of lymphomas arising in the thyroid gland are MALT lymphomas and diffuse large B cell lymphomas, which arise from a background of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. Follicular lymphoma may also present in the thyroid gland, but its clinicopathological features at this site are not well characterised, leading to difficulties in diagnosis and clinical management. We have addressed this problem by studying the clinical, morphological, immunophenotypic and genetic features of 22 such cases. All cases showed morphology characteristic of follicular lymphoma, However, in many the interfollicular neoplastic infiltrate was particularly prominent and all lymphomas contained readily identifiable and often striking lymphoepithelial lesions, features heretofore considered indicative of MALT lymphoma at this site. Furthermore, 13 of 18 cases for whom sufficient evidence was available had clinical and/or histological evidence of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. Analysis of genetic and immunohistochemical features identified two distinct groups. In one group, similar to typical adult follicular lymphoma, cases carried a t(14;18)/IGH-BCL2 and/or expressed Bcl2, and were mostly CD10-positive and of WHO grade 1-2. Follicular lymphomas in the other group lacked IGH-BCL2 and Bcl-2 expression, were often of WHO grade 3 and were often CD10-negative, similar to the minority of follicular lymphomas previously described that are Bcl-2-negative and are often encountered at other extranodal sites. The two groups differed in clinical stage at presentation, 11 patients in the former group but none in the latter group having disease beyond the thyroid gland. Appreciation of the spectrum of morphological, immunophenotypic and genetic characteristics of follicular lymphoma presenting in the thyroid gland should aid both diagnosis and clinical management.

Diss, Timothy C.; Ye, Hongtao; Liu, Hongxiang; Goatly, Alison; Hamoudi, Rifat; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Dogan, Ahmet; Du, Ming-Qing; Isaacson, Peter G.

2008-01-01

375

Tanespimycin and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-03-18

376

Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

2013-10-07

377

Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-Positive Large B-Cell Lymphoma: An Underrecognized Aggressive Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-(ALK-) positive large B-cell lymphoma (ALK+ LBCL) is a rare, aggressive tumor characterized by an immunoblastic or plasmablastic morphologic appearance, expression of ALK, CD138, CD45, EMA, and often IgA by immunohistochemistry, and characteristic chromosomal translocations or rearrangements involving the ALK locus. The morphologic and immunophenotypic overlap of this tumor with other hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies may result in misdiagnosis. The tumor has been identified in both pediatric and adult populations and demonstrates a male predominance. Presentation is most often nodal, particularly cervical. No association with immunocompromise or geographic location has been recognized. The most common gene rearrangement is between clathrin and ALK (t(2;17)(p23;q23)), resulting in the CLTC-ALK chimeric protein, although other fusions have been described. Response to conventional chemotherapy is poor. The recent introduction of the small molecule ALK inhibitor, crizotinib, may provide a potential new therapeutic option for patients with this disease.

Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Nascimento, Alessandra F.

2012-01-01

378

Pleiotrophin promotes perineural invasion in pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Perineural invasion (PNI) in pancreatic cancer is an important cause of local recurrence, but little is known about its mechanism. Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an important neurotrophic factor. It is of interest that our recent experimental data showed its involvement in PNI of pancreatic cancer. PTN strongly presents in the cytoplasm of pancreatic cancer cells, and high expression of PTN and its receptor may contribute to the high PNI of pancreatic cancer. Correspondingly, PNI is prone to happen in PTN-positive tumors. We thus hypothesize that, as a neurite growth-promoting factor, PTN may promote PNI in pancreatic cancer. PTN is released at the time of tumor cell necrosis, and binds with its high-affinity receptor, N-syndecan on pancreatic nerves, to promote neural growth in pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, neural destruction leads to a distorted neural homeostasis. Neurons and Schwann cells produce more N-syndecan in an effort to repair the pancreatic nerves. However, the abundance of N-syndecan attracts further PTN-positive cancer cells to the site of injury, creating a vicious cycle. Ultimately, increased PTN and N-syndecan levels, due to the continuous nerve injury, may promote cancer invasion and propagation along the neural structures. Therefore, it is meaningful to discuss the relationship between PTN/N-syndecan signaling and PNI in pancreatic cancer, which may lead to a better understanding of the mechanism of PNI in pancreatic cancer.

Yao, Jun; Hu, Xiu-Feng; Feng, Xiao-Shan; Gao, She-Gan

2013-01-01

379

Activated Polyamine Catabolism in Acute Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Polyamines are essential for normal cellular growth and function. Activation of polyamine catabolism in transgenic rats overexpressing spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase, the key enzyme in polyamine catabolism, results in severe acute pancreatitis. Here, we investigated the role of polyamine catabolism in pancreatitis and studied the effect of polyamine analogues on the outcome of the disease. Polyamine depletion was associated with arginine- and cerulein-induced pancreatitis as well as with human acute necrotizing and chronic secondary pancreatitis. Substitution of depleted polyamine pools with methylspermidine partially prevented arginine-induced necrotizing pancreatitis whereas cerulein-induced edematous pancreatitis remained unaffected. Transgenic rats receiving methylated polyamine analogues after the induction of pancreatitis showed less pancreatic damage than the untreated rats. Most importantly, polyamine analogues dramatically rescued the animals from pancreatitis-associated mortality. Induction of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase in acinar cells isolated from transgenic rats resulted in increased trypsinogen activation. Pretreatment of acini with bismethylspermine prevented trypsinogen activation, indicating that premature proteolytic activation is one of the effects triggered by polyamine depletion. Our data suggest that activation of polyamine catabolism is a general pathway in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and that experimental disease can be ameliorated with stable polyamine analogues.

Hyvonen, Mervi T.; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Sinervirta, Riitta; Albrecht, Elke; Nordback, Isto; Sand, Juhani; Keinanen, Tuomo A.; Vepsalainen, Jouko; Grigorenko, Nikolay; Khomutov, Alex R.; Kruger, Burkhard; Janne, Juhani; Alhonen, Leena

2006-01-01

380

The Proteome of Normal Pancreatic Juice  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aims of this study were to characterize the proteome of normal pancreatic juice, to analyze the effect of secretin on the normal proteome, and to compare these results with published data from patients with pancreatic cancer. Methods Paired pancreatic fluid specimens (before and after intravenous secretin stimulation) were obtained during endoscopic pancreatography from three patients without significant pancreatic pathology. Proteins were identified and quantified by mass spectrometry-based protein quantification technology. The human RefSeq (NCBI) database was used to compare the data in normal patient samples with published data from three pancreatic cancer patients. Results A total of 285 proteins were identified in normal pancreatic juice. Ninety had sufficient amino acid sequences identified to characterize the protein with a high level of confidence. All 90 proteins were present before and after secretin administration but with altered relative concentrations, usually by 1-2 folds, after stimulation. Comparison with 170 published pancreatic cancer proteins yielded an overlap of only 42 proteins. Conclusions Normal pancreatic juice contains multiple proteins related to many biological processes. Secretin alters the concentration but not the spectrum of these proteins. The pancreatic juice proteome of normal and pancreatic cancer patients differ markedly.

Doyle, Courtney J; Yancey, Kyle; Pitt, Henry A; Wang, Mu; Bemis, Kerry; Yip-Schneider, Michele T.; Sherman, Stuart; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Goggins, Michael D.; Schmidt, C. Max

2011-01-01

381

Impaired Autophagy and Organellar Dysfunction in Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Recent findings from our group, obtained on experimental in vivo and ex vivo models of pancreatitis, reveal that this disease causes a profound dysfunction of key cellular organelles, lysosomes and mitochondria. We found that autophagy, the main cellular degradative, lysosome-driven process, is activated but also impaired in acute pancreatitis because of its’ inefficient progression/resolution (flux) resulting from defective function of lysosomes. One mechanism underlying the lysosomal dysfunction in pancreatitis is abnormal processing (maturation) and activation of cathepsins, major lysosomal hydrolases; another is a decrease in pancreatic levels of key lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP-1 and LAMP-2. Our data indicate that lysosomal dysfunction plays an important initiating role in pancreatitis pathobiology. The impaired autophagy mediates vacuole accumulation in acinar cells; furthermore, the abnormal maturation and activation of cathepsins leads to increase in intra-acinar trypsin, the hallmark of pancreatitis; and LAMP-2 deficiency causes inflammation and acinar cell necrosis. Thus, the autophagic and lysosomal dysfunctions mediate key pathologic responses of pancreatitis. On the other hand, we showed that pancreatitis causes acinar cell mitochondria depolarization, mediated by the permeability transition pore (PTP). Genetic (via deletion of cyclophilin D) inactivation of PTP prevents mitochondrial depolarization and greatly ameliorates the pathologic responses of pancreatitis. Further, our data suggest that mitochondrial damage, by stimulating autophagy, increases the demand for efficient lysosomal degradation and therefore aggravates the pathologic consequences of lysosomal dysfunction. Thus, the combined autophagic, lysosomal and mitochondrial dysfunctions are key to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

Gukovsky, Ilya; Pandol, Stephen J.; Mareninova, Olga A.; Shalbueva, Natalia; Jia, Wenzhuo; Gukovskaya, Anna S.

2011-01-01

382

On the aetiology of Hodgkin lymphoma.  

PubMed

The thesis is based on seven publications in English and a review of the literature. The studies were carried out to contribute to the understanding of Hodgkin lymphoma epidemiology through descriptions of its occurrence and its association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection presenting as infectious mononucleosis. The investigations were supported by the Danish Cancer Society, the Swedish Cancer Society, the Danish Cancer Research Foundation, the Nordic Cancer Union, the Lundbeck Foundation, Plan Danmark, Danish National Research Foundation, Lily Benthine Lund's Foundation, Aase og Ejnar Danielsen's Foundation, Grosserer L. F. Foght's Foundation, the Leukaemia Reseach Fund, the Kay Kendall Leukaemia Fund, and the U.S. National Institutes of Health. The work was carried out in the period 1999-2010 during my employment at the Department of Epidemiology Research at Statens Serum Institut. The employed study designs included population-based incidence surveys of Hodgkin lymphoma in the Nordic countries and in Singapore, register-based cohort studies to characterise the pattern of cancer occurrence in patients with infectious mononucleosis and their first degree relatives, a register-based cohort and a population-based case-control study to characterise the association between infectious mononucleosis and Hodgkin lymphoma taking tumour EBV-status into consideration, and a case-series analysis to assess the association between HLA class I alleles and EBV-positive and EBV-negative Hodgkin lymphomas. Analyses of Nordic incidence data demonstrated that the occurrence of Hodgkin lymphoma had increased markedly younger adults in the period 1978-97, whereas it had decreased among older adults. In combination, these developments led to an accentuation of the younger adult Hodgkin lymphoma incidence peak, which has been a hallmark of Hodgkin lymphoma epidemiology in the Western hemisphere for more than a half century. The opposing incidence trends in younger and older adults are consistent with the prevailing hypothesis of aetiological heterogeneity between Hodgkin lymphomas in different age groups. In contrast to Western industrialised countries, absence of a younger adult incidence peak has been a characteristic of Hodgkin lymphoma epidemiology in developing and Asian populations. A survey of Hodgkin lymphoma occurrence in Singapore 1968-2002 revealed increasing incidence rates and the emergence of an incidence peak in younger adults. The appearance of a younger adult incidence peak in conjunction to socio-economic transition towards Western world lifestyle in Singapore is compatible with the suspicion that Hodgkin lymphoma in younger adults is associated with correlates of socioeconomic affluence in childhood, such as delayed exposure to childhood infectious agents. EBV can be demonstrated in the malignant cells in a subset of Hodgkin lymphomas and it has been speculated that the virus' presence and absence may distinguish between aetiologically separate Hodgkin lymphoma entities. This possibility was explored in five investigations characterising the association between infectious mononucleosis and Hodgkin lymphoma. In these studies, infectious mononucleosis was not accompanied by an increased risk of cancer in general, but specifically with an increased risk of Hodgkin lymphoma. The increased risk of Hodgkin lymphoma decreased with time since infectious mononucleosis and because of the typical adolescent age at infectious mononucleosis it was most prominent for Hodgkin lymphoma in younger adults. Supplementing studies provided little support for the notion that the observed association between Hodgkin lymphoma and infectious mononucleosis was explained by confounding or biases. Analyses stratified by Hodgkin lymphoma EBV status indicated that the increased risk after infectious mononucleosis was confined to the subset of Hodgkin lymphomas that harbour the virus in the malignant cells. The genetic analyses pointed to increased and decreased risk of EBV-positive Hodgkin lymphoma associated with HLA-A*01 and HLA-A*02 alleles, r

Hjalgrim, Henrik

2012-07-01

383

Staging chest computed tomography and positron emission tomography in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma: utility or futility?  

PubMed

OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to determine if routine staging chest computed tomography (CT) or positron emission tomography (PET) scanning alters the clinical management of patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS: All new pancreas cancers seen in medical oncology, radiation oncology and surgery from 1 June 2008 to 20 June 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with metastatic disease on chest CT or PET, that had been unsuspected on initial imaging, were identified. RESULTS: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma was present in 247 consecutive patients. Abdominal CT demonstrated metastases in 108 (44%) and localized disease in 139 (56%) patients. Chest CT and PET were not performed in 15 (11%) of these 139 patients. In the remaining 124 patients, CT imaging suggested resectable disease in 46, borderline resectable disease in 52 and locally advanced disease in 26 patients. Chest CT demonstrated an unsuspected lymphoma in one patient with borderline resectable disease and PET identified extrapancreatic disease in two patients with locally advanced disease. Chest CT and PET added no information in 121 (98%) of the 124 patients. CONCLUSIONS: The addition of chest CT and PET to high-quality abdominal CT is of little clinical utility; additional sites of metastasis are rarely found. As the quality of abdominal imaging declines, the yield from other imaging modalities will increase. Dedicated pancreas-specific abdominal CT remains the cornerstone of initial staging in suspected or biopsy-proven pancreatic cancer. PMID:23496023

Pappas, Sam G; Christians, Kathleen K; Tolat, Parag P; Mautz, Alan P; Lal, Alysandra; McElroy, Lisa; Gamblin, T Clark; Turaga, Kiran K; Tsai, Susan; Erickson, Beth; Ritch, Paul; Evans, Douglas B

2013-03-15

384

Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided fine-needle pancreatic biopsy.  

PubMed

We reviewed the results of 187 consecutive ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsies of the pancreas in 171 patients to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the method. The final diagnosis obtained at operation, autopsy or follow-up were: adenocarcinoma (n = 83), metastatic cancer (n = 11), cystadenocarcinoma (n = 2), lymphoma (n = 2), malignant gastrinoma (n = 1), pseudocyst (n = 25), cyst (n = 13), chronic pancreatitis (n = 9), normal pancreas (n = 10), abscess (n = 7), benign islet-cell tumour (n = 5), cystadenoma (n = 3). Sufficient cytologic material was obtained in 95.3% of biopsies and the overall accuracy in distinguishing benign from malignant disease was 85.4%. False negative results were obtained in 12 patients (13.1%). Inconclusive results (CIII) were found in aspirates from one cyst and two islet cell tumours. There were no false-positive results. The only complication was a post-biopsy haematoma around the head of pancreas, which resolved spontaneously. Ultrasound-guided pancreatic fine-needle biopsy is a safe method and allows of a high degree of diagnostic accuracy. It has a high specificity. Its sensitivity in the detection of malignancy improves if biopsies are repeated in doubtful cases. It further permits tumours to be graded and allows complications of pancreatitis to be diagnosed. PMID:1739779

Tikkakoski, T; Siniluoto, T; Päivänsalo, M; Typpö, T; Turunen, J; Apaja-Sarkkinen, M

1992-02-01

385

Pancreatic surgery, not pancreatitis, is the primary cause of diabetes after acute fulminant pancreatitis.  

PubMed Central

Acute fulminant pancreatitis is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To examine the outcome of conservative and surgical treatment of this disorder, 36 patients who survived an initial episode were restudied after a mean of six years. Fifty three per cent had developed diabetes mellitus, half of whom required insulin therapy. Pancreatic resection was associated with a 100% frequency of diabetes, while only 26% of those treated with peritoneal lavage developed this (p less than 0.001). Insulin secretion and sensitivity were assessed using the hyperglycaemic glucose clamp technique. First phase insulin secretion was impaired in surgically treated patients (mean (SEM) 14 (5) microU/ml x 10 minutes) compared with conservatively treated patients and control subjects (144 (66) and 87 (12) microU/ml x 10 minutes, respectively; p less than 0.05). Second phase and 'maximal' insulin secretion were also impaired among the surgically treated patients compared with the conservatively treated patients and the controls. Insulin sensitivity was reduced among the surgically treated patients (2.88 (58) mg/kg.minute) when compared with conservatively treated patients and healthy control subjects (5.87 (1.02) and 6.45 (0.66) mg/kg.minute; p less than 0.05). Pancreatic resection is associated with a very high frequency of diabetes compared with peritoneal lavage, and these results favour conservative treatment of active fulminant pancreatitis whenever possible.

Eriksson, J; Doepel, M; Widen, E; Halme, L; Ekstrand, A; Groop, L; Hockerstedt, K

1992-01-01

386

[Unilateral primary adrenal lymphoma: a case report].  

PubMed

The authors report a case of unilateral primary adrenal lymphoma presenting with abdominal and dorsal pain. Primary lymphoma of the genitourinary tract, specifically adrenal localisation, is a rare disease. CT is the current best imaging modality for evaluating retroperitoneal masses and improving detection, characterization as well as assessing extension. Diagnosis is based on histology. PMID:15669567

Devaux, M; Ragu, N; Lacheheub, K; Thiebaut, C; Lopez, F M

2004-10-01

387

Hodgkin lymphoma of the oral mucosa.  

PubMed

In this report, we describe a rare case of relapsed nodular sclerosing Hodgkin lymphoma presenting as a lesion of the oral mucosa. Although this is an uncommon clinical scenario, health care professionals should be aware of this possibility. A brief differential diagnosis and review of Hodgkin lymphoma is discussed. PMID:22736151

Darling, Mark R; Cuddy, Karl K; Rizkalla, Kamilia

2012-06-27

388

Cerebral lymphoma presenting as a leukoencephalopathy  

PubMed Central

Cerebral lymphoma is infrequent in immunocompetent patients. This tumour usually appears on CT and MRI as a single lesion or as multiple lesions with mass effect and homogeneous enhancement after contrast administration. A patient is described with a cerebral lymphoma, confirmed by histopathological examination, who presented as a progressive leukoencephalopathy.??

Ayuso-Peralta, L; Orti-Pareja, M; Zurdo-Hernandez, M; Jimenez-Jimenez, F; Tejeiro-Martinez, J; Ricoy, J; de la Lama, A; Bernardo, A

2001-01-01

389

[Cholestatic icterus due to primary duodenal lymphoma].  

PubMed

Primary lymphoma of the duodenum presenting with obstructive jaundice is a rare entity. We report a case of primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the duodenum producing biliary obstruction, definitively diagnosed by ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy. Complete remission of the disease occurred after chemotherapy. PMID:13677829

Chat, L; Mahi, M; Chellaoui, M; Benamour-Ammar, H

2003-05-01

390

Feline lymphoma 2. Specific disease presentations  

Microsoft Academic Search

THIS article, the second of two on feline lymphoma, discusses how the disease can present to the veterinarian. Lymphoma is a differential diagnosis for a variety of clinical presentations in cats and can occur in, or spread to, any anatomical site that contains lymphoid tissue. A regionally localised disease must be assumed to have a systemic component unless proved otherwise.

Alison Hayes

2006-01-01

391

SPECT gallium imaging in abdominal lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

A case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the abdomen studied by gallium SPECT imaging is reported. The tomographic slices accurately demonstrated the location of residual disease after chemotherapy in the region of the transverse mesocolon. Previous transmission CT had shown considerable persistent retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, but was not helpful in determining the presence of viable lymphoma.

Adcock, K.A.; Friefeld, G.D.; Waldron, J.A. Jr.

1986-05-01

392

How Is Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Staged?  

MedlinePLUS

... organ outside of the lymph system (IE). Stage II Either of the following means the disease is stage II: The lymphoma is in 2 or more groups ... not the combination of underarm and groin nodes (II). The lymphoma extends from a single group of ...

393

Lymphoma Risk Varies for Celiac Disease Patients  

MedlinePLUS

... page, please enable JavaScript. Lymphoma Risk Varies for Celiac Disease Patients Blood cancer more common for those with ... Preidt Monday, August 5, 2013 Related MedlinePlus Pages Celiac Disease Diets Lymphoma MONDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Celiac ...

394

Autoimmune Pancreatitis as a New Clinical Entity (Three Cases of Autoimmune Pancreatitis with Effective Steroid Therapy)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The most common forms of chronic pancreatitisare related to alcohol ingestion, whereas the entity ofnon-alcohol-associated (idiopathic) pancreatitis ispoorly understood. Autoimmunity has been suggested as a possible etiologic factor of idiopathicchronic pancreatitis. A total of 362 Japanese patientsunderwent endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP)for suspected pancreatic disease, and 161 were diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis. Among them, we foundthree cases (1.86% incidence) of unique

Tetsuhide Ito; Itsuro Nakano; Shujiro Koyanagi; Toshihiko Miyahara; Yoshikatsu Migita; Keiichiro Ogoshi; Hironori Sakai; Shizu Matsunaga; Osamu Yasuda; Toshihiko Sumii; Hajime Nawata

1997-01-01

395

Rituximab, Rasburicase, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Advanced B-Cell Leukemia or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2013-06-11

396

Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for lymphoma involving the mediastinum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To determine the feasibility, potential advantage, and indications for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving excessively large mediastinal disease volumes or requiring repeat RT. Methods and materials: Sixteen patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 11) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 5) undergoing primary radiotherapy or repeat RT delivered via an IMRT plan

Karyn A. Goodman; Sean Toner; Margie Hunt; Elisa J. Wu; Joachim. Yahalom

2005-01-01

397

Middle Eastern intestinal lymphoma: a morphological and immunohistochemical study  

Microsoft Academic Search

A total of 31 cases of Middle Eastern gastrointestinal lymphoma (from Mosul, Iraq) has been analysed by conventional histology, and also by immunoperoxidase staining of trypsinised paraffin sections with anti-Ig and anti-J chain antisera. Histologically these neoplasms fell into three categories: undifferentiated lymphoma of Burkitt type (8 cases); follicle centre cell (FCC) lymphoma, resembling European lymphomas of FCC origin (15

P Isaacson; H S Al-Dewachi; D Y Mason

1983-01-01

398

Follicular lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation include two subtypes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Follicular lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation were described more than two decades ago. However, the possibility that some of these reported cases are marginal zone lymphomas or composite lymphomas must be considered. In addition, it is also uncertain whether follicular lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation have any unique cytogenetic or other features. Therefore, fluorescence immunophenotypic and interphase cytogenetic analysis of 14 well-characterized

Joel F Gradowski; Elaine S Jaffe; Roger A Warnke; Stefania Pittaluga; Urvashi Surti; Leena A Gole; Steven H Swerdlow

2010-01-01

399

New and Experimental Skin-Directed Therapies for Cutaneous Lymphomas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Primary cutaneous lymphomas (CLs) originate in the skin and should be differentiated from secondary skin infiltrates, which are manifestations of lymphomas of nodal or extranodal origin. These rare diseases include various lymphoproliferative disorders: cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, cutaneous B-cell lymphomas and some rare subtypes. As definitive cure is often not possible, it is important to control the disease and alleviate symptoms.

Arpad Farkas; Lajos Kemeny; Lars E. French; Reinhard Dummer

2009-01-01

400

Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Review of Neurologic Complications  

PubMed Central

Hodgkin's lymphoma is a hematolymphoid neoplasm, primarily of B cell lineage, that has unique histologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features. Neurologic complications of Hodgkin's Lymphoma can be separated into those that result directly from the disease, indirectly from the disease, or from its treatment. Direct neurologic dysfunction from Hodgkin's Lymphoma results from metastatic intracranial spinal disease, epidural metastases causing spinal cord/cauda equina compression, leptomeningeal metastases, or intradural intramedullary spinal cord metastases. Indirect neurologic dysfunction may be caused by paraneoplastic disorders (such as paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration or limbic encephalitis) and primary angiitis of the central nervous system. Hodgkin's lymphoma treatment typically includes chemotherapy or radiotherapy with potential treatment-related complications affecting the nervous system. Neurologic complications resulting from mantle-field radiotherapy include the “dropped head syndrome,” acute brachial plexopathy, and transient ischemic attacks/cerebral infarcts. Chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma may cause cerebral infarction (due to emboli from anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy) and peripheral neuropathy.

Grimm, Sean; Chamberlain, Marc

2011-01-01

401

Treatment options for ocular adnexal lymphoma (OAL)  

PubMed Central

Most lymphomas that involve the ocular adnexal structure are low grade, B cell, non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. The treatment depends upon the grade and stage of the disease. High grade lymhoma requires treatment with systemic chemotherapy whereas the localized low grade (extranodal marginal zone lymphoma) can be successfully managed with local radiotherapy. Chlamydia psittaci infection is associated with low grade ocular lymphoma; however there is wide geographic variation in the strength of this association. Blanket antibiotic therapy is not advised unless there is proof of an infective agent. The monoclonal antibody, rituximab, may be successful for CD20 positive lymphoma, although it is likely that rituximab will have better long-term results when used in combination with systemic chemotherapy.

Cohen, Victoria Mary Lendrum

2009-01-01

402

Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Review of Neurologic Complications.  

PubMed

Hodgkin's lymphoma is a hematolymphoid neoplasm, primarily of B cell lineage, that has unique histologic, immunophenotypic, and clinical features. Neurologic complications of Hodgkin's Lymphoma can be separated into those that result directly from the disease, indirectly from the disease, or from its treatment. Direct neurologic dysfunction from Hodgkin's Lymphoma results from metastatic intracranial spinal disease, epidural metastases causing spinal cord/cauda equina compression, leptomeningeal metastases, or intradural intramedullary spinal cord metastases. Indirect neurologic dysfunction may be caused by paraneoplastic disorders (such as paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration or limbic encephalitis) and primary angiitis of the central nervous system. Hodgkin's lymphoma treatment typically includes chemotherapy or radiotherapy with potential treatment-related complications affecting the nervous system. Neurologic complications resulting from mantle-field radiotherapy include the "dropped head syndrome," acute brachial plexopathy, and transient ischemic attacks/cerebral infarcts. Chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma may cause cerebral infarction (due to emboli from anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy) and peripheral neuropathy. PMID:20975772

Grimm, Sean; Chamberlain, Marc

2010-10-11

403

From MALT lymphoma to the CBM signalosome  

PubMed Central

The advent of molecular cytogenetics has led to the elucidation of genetic abnormalities that cause various congenital and oncological disorders. In B-cell lymphoma, for example, a number of chromosomal translocations have been identified in and associated with the etiology of specific subtypes of lymphoma. Several recurrent chromosomal translocations have been identified in extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma). Cloning and characterization of the products of three mutually exclusive translocation breakpoints found in MALT lymphoma led to the discovery of a novel NF?B-activating complex comprising the CARMA, Bcl10 and MALT1 proteins. This “CBM signalosome” acts downstream of the antigen receptors in lymphocytes as well as a number of non-lymphoid cell-surface receptors involved in a variety of biological processes. CBM signalosome activity is important for normal cellular functions and is perturbed in neoplastic and inflammatory disorders, making it a viable target for novel therapeutic design.

Rosebeck, Shaun; Rehman, Aasia O; Lucas, Peter C

2011-01-01

404

Transcatheter Embolization of Pseudoaneurysms Complicating Pancreatitis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic role of angiography in patients with pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis. Methods: Thirteen symptomatic pseudoaneurysms were treated in nine patients with pancreatitis. Eight patients had chronic pancreatitis and pseudocyst and one had acute pancreatitis. Clinical presentation included gastrointestinal bleeding in seven patients and epigastric pain without bleeding in two. All patients underwent transcatheter embolization. Results: Transcatheter embolization resulted in symptomatic resolution in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients, 18 and 28 days after embolization respectively, and was successfully treated by repeated emnbolization. One patient with severe pancreatitis died from sepsis 28 days after embolization. Follow-up was then available for eight patients with no relapse of bleeding after a mean follow-up of 32 months (range 9-48 months). Conclusion: Transcatheter embolization is safe and effective in the management of pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis.

Golzarian, Jafar; Nicaise, Nicole [Department of Radiology, Brussels University, Hopital Erasme, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Deviere, Jacques [Department of Gastroenterology, Brussels University, Hopital Erasme, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Ghysels, Marc; Wery, Didier; Dussaussois, Luc; Gansbeke, Daniel van; Struyven, Julien [Department of Radiology, Brussels University, Hopital Erasme, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium)

1997-11-15

405

Elective operations in chronic alcohol induced pancreatitis.  

PubMed

The role of surgical treatment in the management of chronic pancreatitis has increased, mainly because of improved diagnostic methods. In the present study, 83 consecutive patients who were operated upon for chronic alcohol induced pancreatitis between 1970 and 1980 are reviewed. The results indicate that the best results with regard to pain relief were achieved with lateral drainage operation in patients with dilated pancreatic ducts. A sufficient pancreatic resection gives satisfactory results in patients with nondilated ducts. Patients with severe pancreatic changes and a long history of alcoholism are best treated by extended pancreatic resections with regard to pain relief; however, most of the patients are still unable to work after the operation. A constant follow-up and active surgical attitude at the early stage of the disease before the circulus vitiosus of pain, drugs, inability to work and disturbances in social life are of paramount importance. PMID:6204392

Kiviluoto, T; Schröder, T; Lempinen, M

1984-07-01

406

Pancreatic Cancer: Pathogenesis, Prevention and Treatment  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-?B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-?B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei

2007-01-01

407

Models of acute and chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis have been created to examine mechanisms of pathogenesis, test therapeutic interventions, and study the influence of inflammation on the development of pancreatic cancer. In vitro models can be used to study early stage, short-term processes that involve acinar cell responses. Rodent models reproducibly develop mild or severe disease. One of the most commonly used pancreatitis models is created by administration of supraphysiologic concentrations of caerulein, an ortholog of cholecystokinin. Induction of chronic pancreatitis with factors thought to have a role in human disease, such as combinations of lipopolysaccharide and chronic ethanol feeding, might be relevant to human disease. Models of autoimmune chronic pancreatitis have also been developed. Most models, particularly of chronic pancreatitis, require further characterization to determine which features of human disease they include. PMID:23622127

Lerch, Markus M; Gorelick, Fred S

2013-06-01

408

Pancreatic hyperechogenicity on endoscopic ultrasound examination  

PubMed Central

There is an ongoing discussion on how to diagnose a hyperechogenic pancreas and what is the clinical significance of diffusely hyperechogenic pancreas. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are the more appropriate methods to diagnose pancreatic hyperechogenicity when compared with transcutaneous or endoscopic ultrasound examination. More importantly, pancreatic hyperechogenicity may not be a certain indicator of pancreatic fat infiltration. Even if it is true, we do not know the clinical significances of pancreatic fat accumulation. Some suggested that excess fat in the pancreas is associated with chronic pancreatitis. However, several histological studies on human alcoholic chronic pancreatitis did not prove the presence of fatty pancreas in such cases. Thus, except for aging, it is very rare to have truly steatotic pancreas in the absence of certain human diseases.

Ustundag, Yucel; Ceylan, Guray; Hekimoglu, Koray

2011-01-01

409

Prevention of Pancreatic Cancer and Strategies for Management of Familial Pancreatic Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

At the current time, pancreatic cancer remains a difficult and typically fatal disease. A number of case reports and case-control epidemiologic studies have suggested that familial aggregation plays a role in as many as 10% of all pancreatic cancers. During the last several years, genetic alterations responsible for syndromes linked with pancreatic cancer have been identified. These genes include BRCA2,

Ralph H. Hruban; Marcia I. Canto; Charles J. Yeo

2001-01-01

410

Immunologieal Assay of Pancreatic Ribonuclease in Serum as an Indicator of Pancreatic Cancer1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Serum levels of RNase activity, presumed to originate in the pancreas, have been suggested to be of use in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. We have used a radioimmunological assay of human pancreatic-like RNase to quantitate this protein in serum from normal blood donors and patients with a variety of diseases. Serum pancreatic-like RNase rises gradually with age, and its

Joachim L. Weickmann; Erik M. Olson; Dohn G. Glitz

1984-01-01

411

Pancreatic Secretion of Zinc and Copper in Normal Subjects and in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic secretion of zinc and copper in duodenal juice were measured in 7 healthy persons and in 9 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Stimulation with cholecystokinin and secretin increased secretion of zinc in healthy persons but not in patients. Copper secretion was not influenced. In patients with chronic pancreatitis, the correlations between zinc secretion, and amylase and trypsin secretion were significant

I. Gjørup; L. Petronijevic; E. Rubinstein; B. Andersen; H. Worning; F. Burcharth

1991-01-01

412

A pancreatic ductal leak should be sought to direct treatment in patients with acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The end result of leakage of pancreatic juice into the peripancreatic space can be sterile necrosis, infected necrosis, or rupture into an adjacent hollow viscus or blood vessel (eg, colon, small bowel, or pseudoaneurysm). If a pancreatic duct (PD) leak is present, should treatment be aimed at minimizing the sequela of the leakage of pancreatic juice and not just

Stanley T Lau; Erik J Simchuk; Richard A Kozarek; L. William Traverso

2001-01-01

413

GSFC preferred parts lists PPL-17  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A listing of preferred parts, part upgrading procedures, part derating guidelines, and part screening procedures to be used in the selection, procurement, and application of parts for Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) space systems and ground support equipment is contained.

Baldini, B. P.

1984-09-01

414

GSFC Preferred Parts List PPL-15  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A listing is presented of preferred electronic parts, part upgrading procedures, part derating guidelines, and part screening procedures to be used in the selection, procurement, and application of parts for Goddard Space Flight Center space systems and ground support equipment.

Adolphsen, J. W.

1980-10-01

415

Gastrointestinal lymphomas: Morphology, immunophenotype and molecular features  

PubMed Central

Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma comprises 10-15% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas and encompasses 30-40% of the total extranodal lymphomas. Approximately 60-75% of cases occur in the stomach, and then the small bowel, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum. Lymphoid neoplasms may consist of mature B, T and less commonly extranodal NK/T cells. Of these, the two most frequently encountered histologic subtypes are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma), where Helicobacter pylori infection is implicated in a number of cases, and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Several B cell lymphomas are associated with chromosomal aberrations. Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma, type I in particular, usually arises in a background of celiac disease. T cell gene rearrangement confirms clonality. NK/T cell neoplasms are invariably associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection and are often aggressive; thus, differentiation from a benign NK-cell enteropathy is paramount. Although incidence of other hematopoietic malignancies in the gastrointestinal tract such as plasma cell myeloma associated with amyloidosis, plasmablastic lymphoma, Hodgkin disease, histiocytic sarcoma and mast cell sarcoma is extremely rare, these entities have been documented, with the latter two demonstrating aggressive clinical behavior. Endoscopic ultrasonography is an important adjunct in disease staging and follow-up. Conservative antibiotic treatment of stage I MALT lymphomas with associated Helicobacter pylori infection achieves good clinical outcome with high remission rate. Chemotherapy, radiation and rarely surgery are reserved for advanced diseases or cases resistant to conservative therapy and those not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

Bautista-Quach, Marnelli A.; Ake, Christopher D.; Chen, Mingyi

2012-01-01

416

Gastrointestinal lymphomas: Morphology, immunophenotype and molecular features.  

PubMed

Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma comprises 10-15% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas and encompasses 30-40% of the total extranodal lymphomas. Approximately 60-75% of cases occur in the stomach, and then the small bowel, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum. Lymphoid neoplasms may consist of mature B, T and less commonly extranodal NK/T cells. Of these, the two most frequently encountered histologic subtypes are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma), where Helicobacter pylori infection is implicated in a number of cases, and diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Several B cell lymphomas are associated with chromosomal aberrations. Enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma, type I in particular, usually arises in a background of celiac disease. T cell gene rearrangement confirms clonality. NK/T cell neoplasms are invariably associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection and are often aggressive; thus, differentiation from a benign NK-cell enteropathy is paramount. Although incidence of other hematopoietic malignancies in the gastrointestinal tract such as plasma cell myeloma associated with amyloidosis, plasmablastic lymphoma, Hodgkin disease, histiocytic sarcoma and mast cell sarcoma is extremely rare, these entities have been documented, with the latter two demonstrating aggressive clinical behavior. Endoscopic ultrasonography is an important adjunct in disease staging and follow-up. Conservative antibiotic treatment of stage I MALT lymphomas with associated Helicobacter pylori infection achieves good clinical outcome with high remission rate. Chemotherapy, radiation and rarely surgery are reserved for advanced diseases or cases resistant to conservative therapy and those not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:22943012

Bautista-Quach, Marnelli A; Ake, Christopher D; Chen, Mingyi; Wang, Jun

2012-09-01

417

Renal lymphoma in cats: 28 cases (1977-1984).  

PubMed

Renal lymphoma was diagnosed, staged, and treated in 28 cats. Renal lymphoma staging was done according to clinical findings: 11 cats had stage-2 lymphomas, 5 had stage-3 lymphomas, 6 had stage-4 lymphomas, and 6 had stage-5 lymphomas. All cats were treated with chemotherapy: 17 cats had a complete response, 9 cats had a partial response, and 2 cats had no response. The cats with stage-2 lymphomas that were FeLV-test negative had the best response to treatment. PMID:3693001

Mooney, S C; Hayes, A A; Matus, R E; MacEwen, E G

1987-12-01

418

Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage

2013-10-08

419

[Computed tomography of pancreatic tumors].  

PubMed

Computed tomography (CT) and in particular multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT), also known as multislice CT (MSCT), is ideally suited for detecting pancreatic tumors because of the high spatial resolution.The method of choice is hydro-CT which involves distension of the stomach and duodenum by administration of 1-1.5 l water as a negative contrast medium under medically induced hypotension by administration of buscopan. The patient is laid on the right side at an angle of 30-45 degrees in order to obtain an artefact-free image of the close anatomical relationship around the pancreas head. In addition, curved MPRs or in rare cases 3D reconstructions could be very helpful in identifying the critical anatomic tumor site in the neighbourhood of the visceral vessel system. After the correct diagnosis of an adenocarcinoma has been made only 20% of all patients are shown to have a surgically resectable disease, but the overall survival rate is significantly higher after resection in combination with a multimodal tumor therapy strategy. The reason is that the correct diagnosis of the resectability of the tumor is one of the main criteria for overall survival of these patients. Currently practically all pancreatic tumors can be detected using MDCT and the detection rate varies between 70% and 100% (most recent literature references give a sensitivity of 89% and specificity up to 99%). In some rare cases the differentiation between focal necrotizing pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma can be difficult even with sophisticated protocols. Resectability can be correctly diagnosed with MDCT with a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 89%. MDCT is an ideal tool for the detection of neuroendocrine tumors, metastases and for the differentiation of cystic pancreatic lesions such as pseudocysts, microcystic adenomas or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Particularly, the differentiation of the latter into benign, borderline or malignant transformation is not always possible, but indirect signs, such as small nodules adjacent to the ductal wall, the diameter of the pancreatic duct, or a direct communication between cystic lesions and duct can be detected because of the high spatial resolution and is comparable to the findings in MRI. Moreover MD-CT is an ideal procedure for the differentiation of local tumor stages in patients under neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:19137277

Grenacher, L; Klauss, M

2009-02-01

420

Pancreatic Fluid Collections and Pseudocysts in Patients With Acute Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute pancreatitis (AP) has a wide range of pathological features, radiological appearances, and treatment options (1). In most cases, it is a mild and self-limiting disease. However, severe disease develops in approximately 20% of patients\\u000a associated with local and systemic complications (2–5). Fluid collections commonly complicate AP and occur in up to half of cases of patients with moderate-to-severe cases

Michael F. Byrne; John Baillie

421

Prognostic markers in acute pancreatitis: can pancreatic necrosis be predicted?  

PubMed Central

The value of six prognostic markers was assessed prospectively in 198 attacks of acute pancreatitis with specific attention to their ability to predict pancreatic necrosis. The Imrie Prognostic Score (IPS) was recorded within 48 h of diagnosis. The serum C-reactive protein (CRP) alpha 1 antiprotease (A1AP), alpha 2 macroglobulin (A2M), amylase and white cell count (WCC) were measured on days 1, 3 and 7. When comparing all severe clinical outcomes to mile outcomes, serum CRP concentrations were higher on all three days (P less than 0.02, less than 0.001, less than 0.001), A1AP concentrations were higher on day 3 (P less than 0.05), A2M concentrations were lower on day 7 (P less than 0.01) and WCC was higher on all three days (P less than 0.001, less than 0.001, less than 0.001). Serum amylase concentrations showed no significant differences. None of the measured parameters were helpful in distinguishing patients who subsequently developed pancreatic necrosis from patients who had other severe outcomes. Multivariate analysis revealed that the initial IPS showed greatest independent significance in predicting severe outcome followed by the WCC (days 1 and 7) and CRP (day 3). CRP and WCC may be clinically useful predictors of severe outcome to supplement the initial IPS. These methods are unlikely to distinguish pancreatic necrosis from other severe outcomes, but they may supplement clinical judgment in selecting a high risk group of patients for contrast enhanced computed tomography.

Leese, T.; Shaw, D.; Holliday, M.

1988-01-01

422

Pyogenic hepatic abscess after pancreatic resection for chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed Central

Seventeen patients underwent surgery for alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. Three patients later presented with pyogenic liver abscess. The time interval between surgery and presentation with hepatic abscess varied from 6 weeks to 3.5 years. All patients were diabetic, the presentation was insidious and all made an uneventful recovery, two with percutaneous drainage and one with antibiotics alone. The aetiology of this uncommon complication is discussed.

Ravichandran, D.; Carty, N. J.; Johnson, C. D.

1995-01-01

423

Pancreatic Perfusion CT in Early Stage of Severe Acute Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Early intensive care for severe acute pancreatitis is essential for improving SAP mortality rates. However, intensive therapies for SAP are often delayed because there is no ideal way to accurately evaluate severity in the early stages. Currently, perfusion CT has been shown useful to predict prognosis of SAP in the early stage. In this presented paper, we would like to review the clinical usefulness and limitations of perfusion CT for evaluation of local and systemic complications in early stage of SAP.

Tsuji, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Naoki; Tsutomu, Chiba

2012-01-01

424

An audit of fatal acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute pancreatitis has a mortality of about 10%: this figure has not changed over the last 20 years. A retrospective audit of fatal acute pancreatitis was performed in a teaching hospital with a catchment population of about 750,000 patients to examine patient characteristics. Using Hospital Activity Analysis code 577.0, all fatal cases of acute pancreatitis were studied in a six-year

A. K. Banerjee; A. Kaul; E. Bache; A. C. Parberry; J. Doran; M. L. Nicholson

1995-01-01

425

Role of ischemia in acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ischemia has been considered to play a role in the development of acute pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ischemia, caused by hemorrhagic shock, on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats. Acute pancreatitis was induced by the intravenous infusion of a supramaximally stimulating dose of cerulein (10 µg\\/kg\\/hr) for 6 hr. Hemorrhagic shock was induced

Takahisa Kyogoku; Tadao Manabe; Takayoshi Tobe

1992-01-01

426

Pancreatic trauma: Diagnostic and therapeutic strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  The management of pancreatic trauma provides trauma surgeons with diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The two most important\\u000a facts that must be established are the location of the injury in relation to the superior mesenteric artery and vein and the\\u000a status of the main pancreatic duct. If a pancreatic injury is discovered at the time of exploration and no main

Herb A. Phelan; Joseph P. Minei

2005-01-01

427

Preoperative chemoradiation in resectable pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite advancements in the field of surgical oncology, the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer still carries a grave and dismal\\u000a prognosis. Surgery alone for adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head or uncinate process has a median survival time of 12 months.\\u000a These grim statistics have led many to study the effects of combined multimodality therapy in the fight against pancreatic\\u000a cancer. The

Nicole M. Chandler; Jonathan J. Canete; Keith E. Stuart; Mark P. Callery

2003-01-01

428

Acute pancreatitis: Practical considerations in nutrition support  

Microsoft Academic Search

Acute pancreatitis is a clinical syndrome defined by a discrete episode of abdominal pain and elevations in serum enzyme levels.\\u000a Seventy-five percent to 85% of all pancreatic episodes are considered mild and self-limiting and do not require intervention\\u000a with nutrition support. Considering the significant risk of malnutrition in moderate to severe forms of pancreatic injury,\\u000a enteral nutrition has more recently

Leah Gramlich; Kendall Taft

2007-01-01

429

Major Duodenal Papilla in Autoimmune Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinctive form of chronic pancreatitis that can mimic pancreatobiliary malignancies. If AIP is properly diagnosed, it can be treated without laparotomy or pancreatic resection due to its dramatic response to steroid therapy. In addition to elevated serum IgG4 levels, IgG4 immunostaining of involved tissue is often used to support the diagnosis of AIP. The major

Myung-Hwan Kim; Sung-Hoon Moon; Terumi Kamisawa

2010-01-01

430

Complications following pancreatic transplantations: imaging features  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whole organ vascularized pancreatic transplant is a recognized treatment for diabetes and is increasingly being performed\\u000a worldwide. The procedure itself is complex and is associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Despite improvements\\u000a in surgical techniques, postoperative complications of pancreatic transplantation are still common and include graft rejection,\\u000a pancreatitis, peripancreatic fluid collections, exocrine leaks, vascular thrombosis, and hemorrhage. In this pictorial

S. Y. Liong; R. E. Dixon; N. Chalmers; A. Tavakoli; T. Augustine; S. O’Shea

2011-01-01

431

Interventional and surgical treatment of pancreatic abscess  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic abscess is one of the infectious complications of acute pancreatitis. It is a collection principally containing\\u000a pus, but it may also contain variable amounts of semisolid necrotic debris. Most of these abscesses evolve from the progressive\\u000a liquefaction of necrotic pancreatic and peripancreatic tissues, but some arise from infection of peripancreatic fluid or collections\\u000a elsewhere in the peritoneal cavity. Included

Kai Mithöfer; Peter R. Mueller; Andrew L. Warshaw

1997-01-01

432

Gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma followed by primary central nervous system lymphoma.  

PubMed

Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is one of the most common lymphomas and accounts for about 7% of all newly diagnosed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The clinical course of MALT lymphoma is relatively indolent and, in the majority of cases (50%), the lymphoma arises within the stomach. Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), an uncommon variant of extranodal NHL, can affect any part of the neuraxis, including the eyes, brain, leptomeninges, or spinal cord. Herein, we present a rare case of PCNSL, which occurred one year after radiochemotherapy of gastric MALT lymphoma. A 62-year-old man presented with a 3-day history of left facial palsy. One year ago, he underwent antibiotic eradication therapy of Helicobacter pylori, local stomach fractional radiotherapy, and chemotherapy for gastric MALT lymphoma. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a strong enhancing solid mass in the right frontal lobe. The tumor was completely removed, and the histological diagnosis of PCNSL developing from diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was made. Although elucidating the correlation between the first gastric MALT lymphoma and the second PCNSL seemed difficult, we have postulated and discussed some possible pathogeneses, together with a review of literature. PMID:22949970

Eom, Ki Seong; Park, Moo Rim; Choi, Keum Ha; Kim, Tae Young

2012-06-30

433

Interventional radiology in inflammatory pancreatic disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a review of the interventional radiological procedures in inflammatory pancreatic diseases including imaging guided biopsy, percutaneous aspiration and drainage, and transcatheter embolization of ruptured pseudoaneurysms.

Ba?ak Kumbasar; Bülent Acuna?

2001-01-01

434

Morphological characteristics of malignant T-cell lymphomas in baboons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifteen cases of generalized peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in baboons were phenotyped immunologically and morphologically. Using the updated Kiel classification the cases included low-grade and high-grade lymphomas and low-grade lymphomas that had transformed into high-grade lymphomas. In the low-grade group there were seven cases of lymphocytic type, partly corresponding to chronic lymphocytic leukaemia of T type and to T-zone lymphoma

Lelita A. Yakovleva; Karl Lennert; Merab G. Chikobava; Leonora V. Indzhiia; Igor N. Klotz; Boris A. Lapin

1993-01-01

435

Total skin electron beam therapy for cutaneous lymphomas and leukemias  

Microsoft Academic Search

Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEB) was used in the treatment of 33 patients with lymphoma and 13 patients with leukemia involving extensive segments of the skin surface. Twenty-two of 23 had lesions as a primary manifestation of lymphoma (primary cutaneous lymphoma-PCL) and 11 developed cutaneous lesions following disseminated nodal lymphoma (secondary cutaneous lymphoma-SCL). A once weekly fractionation scheme was

Lourdes Z. Nisce; Florence C. H. Chu; Hyun S. Lee; Daniel Filippa; Sanford Kempin; Morton Coleman

1982-01-01

436

AIDS-related lymphomas in Nigeria.  

PubMed

Aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), including primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma and non-endemic Burkitt's lymphoma have been recognized as AIDS-defining cancers in most developed countries. However, HIV/AIDS epidemics appear not to have been associated with higher incidence of lymphomas in Africa. We therefore carried out this study to highlight the significance or otherwise of HIV/AIDS epidemics in the pathogenesis of lymphomas in a population of Nigerians with the disease. Since January 1993 to the present, all patients with haematologic cancers are routinely screened (following appropriate counseling) for HIV infection. Patients with a histological diagnosis of malignant chronic lymphoproliferative diseases {non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL)} at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals' Complex, Ile-Ife from January 1993 to August 2008 were noted. Those patients confirmed to be HIV/AIDS positive among the cohort with lymphomas were retrospectively studied using their clinical case notes. Data obtained were analyzed using appropriate descriptive and inferential statistics. A total of 391 patients were histologically confirmed to have lymphoma {NHL-109, (27.9%); CLL-76, (19.4%); BL-178, (45.5%) and HL-28, (7.2%)} during the study period. Nine patients (2.3%) were confirmed to be HIV- positive, all within the age bracket 24-60 (median = 50) years. Six of these, five males and one female, ages 24-60 (median = 37.5) years, had NHL while another three, all females (age 50 - 68 years; median = 56 years) had CLL. None of the patients with HL and BL were HIV positive. Patients with NHL presented at advanced stage of the disease (at least clinical stage IIIb), and all those with CLL presented at stage C of the International Working Party Classification. All the HIV-positive patients with NHL succumbed to the disease within one to three weeks of admission into the hospital. The prevalence of AIDS-related lymphomas is 2.3% compared to 4.4% found in the general population. However, it is interesting that no single case of AIDS-associated BL was seen, despite the fact that Burkitt's lymphoma is endemic in this part of the world. All the patients presented at a very advanced stage of the disease with significantly shortened survival. PMID:20428636

Bolarinwa, R A; Ndakotsu, M A; Oyekunle, A A; Salawu, L; Akinola, N O; Durosinmi, M A

2009-10-01

437

Pain management in chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Abdominal pain is a major clinical problem in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The cause of pain is usually multifactorial with a complex interplay of factors contributing to a varying degree to the pain in an individual patient and, therefore, a rigid standardized approach for pain control tends to lead to suboptimal results. Pain management usually proceeds in a stepwise approach beginning with general lifestyle recommendations. Low fat diet, alcohol and smoking cessation are encouraged. Analgesics alone are needed in almost all patients. Maneuvers aimed at suppression of pancreatic secretion are routinely tried. Patients with ongoing symptoms may be candidates for more invasive options such as endoscopic therapy, and resective or drainage surgery. The role of pain modifying agents (antidepressants, gabapentin, pregabalin), celiac plexus block, antioxidants, octreotide and total pancreatectomy with islet cell auto transplantation remains to be determined.

Gachago, Cathia; Draganov, Peter V

2008-01-01

438

Endoscopic Palliation for Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is devastating due to its poor prognosis. Patients require a multidisciplinary approach to guide available options, mostly palliative because of advanced disease at presentation. Palliation including relief of biliary obstruction, gastric outlet obstruction, and cancer-related pain has become the focus in patients whose cancer is determined to be unresectable. Endoscopic stenting for biliary obstruction is an option for drainage to avoid the complications including jaundice, pruritus, infection, liver dysfunction and eventually failure. Enteral stents can relieve gastric obstruction and allow patients to resume oral intake. Pain is difficult to treat in cancer patients and endoscopic procedures such as pancreatic stenting and celiac plexus neurolysis can provide relief. The objective of endoscopic palliation is to primarily address symptoms as well improve quality of life.

Bakhru, Mihir; Tekola, Bezawit; Kahaleh, Michel

2011-01-01

439

Current management of pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The author seeks to provide an update on the current management of pancreatic carcinoma, including diagnosis and staging, surgical resection and adjuvant therapy for curative intent, and palliation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: During the 1960s and 1970s, the operative mortality and long-term survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma was so poor that some authors advocated abandoning the procedure. Several recent series have reported a marked improvement in perioperative results with 5-year survival in excess of 20%. Significant advances also have been made in areas of preoperative evaluation and palliation for advanced disease. CONCLUSION: Although carcinoma of the pancreas remains a disease with a poor prognosis, advances in the last decade have led to improvements in the overall management of this disease. Resection for curative intent currently should be accomplished with minimal perioperative mortality. Surgical palliation also may provide the optimal management of selected patients. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 7.

Lillemoe, K D

1995-01-01

440

Contraceptive pills and acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

This article reports a case of acute pancreatitis in a patient taking the oral contraceptive pill. A 32 year old mother had been on combined contraceptive pills since 1975. In 1978 she started having upper abdominal and retrosternal pain. She became critically ill with peripheral circulatory collapse, dyspnoea and cyanosis. A superficial thrombophlebitis was noted on the medial aspect of the right thigh. The diagnosis of pancreatitis was considered with history of recurrent abdominal pain. After several tests and supportive therapy (intravenous fluids, antibiotics, steriods), the woman started showing improvements in 48 hours and recovered in 10 days. This case differs from previously described cases in that the cholesterol and triglyceride levels were normal. The hypoglycemia has not been described previously. PMID:7320005

Mehrotra, T N; Mital, H S; Gupta, S K

1981-06-01

441

Chronic pancreatitis: diagnosis and treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three-dimensional magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography is currently the most exciting new imaging technique for chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopy-assisted duodenal intubation during the secretin-cholecystokinin test reduces intubation time in difficult cases. The NBT-para-amino benzoic acid test has been refined to enhance its discriminant power. The cholesteryl-[C13]octanoate breath test and the faecal elastase test are newer highly sensitive and specific tubeless tests. Pain in

S. Sidhu; R. K. Tandon

1996-01-01

442

Pancreatic Pain: A Mini Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pain management is one of the corner stones in the treatment of pancreatitis. There are a variety of pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies to manage the symptoms. Recognizing the type of pain, nociceptive or neuropathic, is essential for appropriate treatment. The pharmacological armamentarium currently available is substantial and includes adjuvant analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, and opioids that are customized to the etiology

Ricardo A. Cruciani; Subhash Jain

2008-01-01

443

Predicting severity of acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Severity stratification is a critical issue in acute pancreatitis that strongly influences diagnostic and therapeutic decision\\u000a making. According to the widely used Atlanta classification, “severe” disease comprises various local and systemic complications\\u000a that are associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, results from recent clinical studies indicate that these\\u000a complications vary in their effect on outcome, and many are

Bettina M. Rau

2007-01-01

444

Pancreatic transplantation: Beta cell replacement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  Diabetes is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Complications of diabetes including renal failure, retinopathy,\\u000a neuropathy, and cardiovascular disease limit both survival and quality of life. Pancreatic transplantation can restore euglycemia\\u000a thereby stabilizing or even reversing secondary complications of diabetes as well as improving quality of life particularly\\u000a in patients with labile diabetes. Recent evidence also shows

David L. Bigam; A. M. James Shapiro

2004-01-01

445

Overview of pancreatic cancer, 1989  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Pancreatic cancer remains a leading cause of death from cancer. Its incidence is rising throughout the world, not solely because\\u000a of improved diagnostic techniques. Diagnosis is followed relatively rapidly by the demise of the patient, and reasons for\\u000a this rapid course have been sought. Both patient and physician delay play roles in this course. In addition, spread of the\\u000a lesion

Isidore Cohn

1990-01-01

446

Glycosphingolipids in human pancreatic juice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Glycosphingolipids in human pancreatic juice were isolated and purified by DEAE and silica gel column chromatographs, and\\u000a further by HPLC on silica gel and reversed-phase columns. The structures of the glycosphingolipids were determined to be glucosylceramides\\u000a and lactosylceramides by means of fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry,1H-NMR spectroscopy, and component analysis involving GLC-mass spectrometry. The ceramide portions of the glucosylceramides\\u000a consist

Yuichiro Hamanaka; Sumiko Hamanaka; Toshio Kaneko; Takashi Suzuki; Minoru Suzuki; Akemi Suzuki

1995-01-01

447

Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may be useful as prophylaxis against Post Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography Pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor Gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL) is a nitrogen oxide (NO) donor, which relaxes the sphincter of Oddi. Studies show conflicting results when applied prior to ERCP and a large multicenter randomized study is warranted. Steroids administered as prophylaxis against PEP has been validated without effect in several randomized trials. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) indomethacin and diclofenac have in randomized studies showed potential as prophylaxis against PEP. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is a cytokine with anti-inflammatory properties but two trials testing IL-10 as prophylaxis to PEP have returned conflicting results. Antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) have a potential as rescue therapy but no clinical trials are currently being conducted. The antibiotics beta-lactams and quinolones reduce mortality when necrosis is present in pancreas and may also reduce incidence of infected necrosis. Evidence based pharmacological treatment of AP is limited and studies on the effect of potent anti-inflammatory drugs are warranted.

Bang, Ulrich Christian; Semb, Synne; N?jgaard, Camilla; Bendtsen, Flemming

2008-01-01

448

Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may be useful as prophylaxis against post endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL) is a nitrogen oxide (NO) donor, which relaxes the sphincter of Oddi. Studies show conflicting results when applied prior to ERCP and a large multicenter randomized study is warranted. Steroids administered as prophylaxis against PEP has been validated without effect in several randomized trials. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) indomethacin and diclofenac have in randomized studies showed potential as prophylaxis against PEP. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is a cytokine with anti-inflammatory properties but two trials testing IL-10 as prophylaxis to PEP have returned conflicting results. Antibodies against tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have a potential as rescue therapy but no clinical trials are currently being conducted. The antibiotics beta-lactams and quinolones reduce mortality when necrosis is present in pancreas and may also reduce incidence of infected necrosis. Evidence based pharmacological treatment of AP is limited and studies on the effect of potent anti-inflammatory drugs are warranted. PMID:18494044

Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla; Bendtsen, Flemming

2008-05-21

449

Cutaneous intravascular anaplastic large cell lymphoma.  

PubMed

Intravascular lymphoma (IL) is a rare variant of non-Hodgkin lymphoma with a predilection for skin. Most reported cases are large B cell lymphomas. Intravascular anaplastic large cell lymphoma (IALCL) is extremely rare. Retrospective analysis of a case of cutaneous IALCL was performed. Hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and immunohistochemical staining results were analyzed. The patient was a 47-year-old woman who had developed multiple erythematous patches and plaques on her back. The lesions responded well to CHOP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydoxorubicin, oncovin, prednisone) chemotherapy, but relapsed shortly after therapy. The patient was surviving with the disease for eight years but was ultimately lost to follow up. Histopathologically, the neoplasm evolved from IL to extravascular lymphoma. This was showed in biopsies obtained at different stages of the disease. The lymphoma cells stained positively for CD30, CD45, CD3, CD4, CD5 and Ki67, and lacked expression of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), CD8, CD45RA, CD45RO, CD20, CD79, CD56, perforin and granzyme B. Our results suggest that IALCL represents a distinct subtype of IL and is histopathologically and biologically different from IL with B, NK or T cell phenotype. PMID:20337769

Wang, Lei; Li, Chengxin; Gao, Tianwen

2011-02-01

450

B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma without mediastinal disease: mimicking nodular sclerosis classical Hodgkin lymphoma.  

PubMed

B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (BCLu-DLBCL/CHL), also known as gray-zone lymphoma, has overlapping clinical and biological characteristics of both diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL). These lymphomas are typically associated with mediastinal disease, and extranodal involvement is rare. In the present report, we describe a case of a 78-year-old woman with BCLu-DLBCL/CHL found to have extranodal lesions and no evidence of mediastinal disease. Although biopsy specimens were histologically similar to nodular sclerosis CHL, the tumor cells were positive for CD30 and mature B-cell markers, such as CD20, CD79a, PAX5, BOB.1, and OCT-2, but negative for CD15. Furthermore, the patient had extranodal lesions and an increased level of soluble IL-2 receptor. These findings are unusual in CHL. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient with BCLu-DLBCL/CHL. She received adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine, and dacarbazine therapy and exhibited partial response. Some cases without mediastinal disease, such as our case, have been reported; however, these cases are rare and further studies are required. PMID:23512149

Iwaki, Noriko; Sato, Yasuharu; Kurokawa, Toshiro; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Ohno, Kyotaro; Takeuchi, Mai; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Orita, Yorihisa; Nakao, Shinji; Yoshino, Tadashi

2013-03-20

451

[5-fluorouracil treatment of acute pancreatitis and of pancreatic and duodenal fistulae].  

PubMed

In acute pancreatitis the mechanism involved in the auto-amplification of morbid phenomena can be suppressed in most of the cases by inhibiting the pancreatic secretion. This can also enhance the repair of pancreatic, duodenal and jejunal fistulae. On the basis of experimental studies carried out by Johnson, and on the clinical studies of Guttmann, as well as on original studies done by the authors, Ftorafur was included in the complex therapy of acute pancreatitis, and of pancreatic and duodenal fistulae. A group of 14 cases of acute pancreatitis, were treated. These included 5 necrotic-haemorrhagic pancreatitis, and 9 oedematous pancreatitis. The drug was given by continuous intravenous perfusion in doses of 1,200-1,600 mg per day, for a period of 6-12 days. In all the cases the clinical improvement of the patients as well as recovery of normal values of blood amylase were spectacular, and full recovery was achieved in all the cases. Ftorafur was also used in 3 cases of pancreatic fistulae, and in 2 cases of duodenal fistulae, and recovery was also achieved in a very short time. On the basis of this experience, although small, the authors recommend the introduction of Ftorafur in the complex therapy of acute pancreatitis, as well as in that of pancreatic and duodenal fistulae. Following administration of Ftorafur no adverse effects were noted, and in the doses mentioned above this drug did not delay the repair of surgical wounds. PMID:2149191

Georgescu, T; Naftali, Z; Varga, A; Simon, G; Pan?, C; Cr?ciun, C; Nistor, V; Ilniczky, P; Bo?ianu, A; Kovács, M

452

Etiology and oncogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death overall. The factors that favor the development of pancreatic cancer can be divided into hereditary and acquired. Cancerogenesis is best explained by a "multi-hit" hypothesis, charcterized with the developmental sequence of cellular mutatitions, forcing mutant cell to inappropriate proliferation and preventing its repair and programmed cell death (apoptosis). The most common mutations involve K-ras gene, epidermal growth factor (EGF-R) and HER2 gene. Continuous stimulation and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) enhances the permeability of blood vessels provides nutrient supply to tumor site through newly formed vascular channels. This phenomena is known as vasculogenic mimicry. Loss of function of tumor-suppressor genes has been documented in pancreatic cancer, especially in CDKN2a, p53, DPC4 and BRCA2 genes. SDKN2A gene inactivation occurs in 95% of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. As regards acquired factors, smoking is only confirmed risk factor that increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes, alcohol consumption, central obesity in men, infection with Helicobacter pylori and chronic pancreatitis are suspected, but not proven risk factors. Consumption of fruits and vegetables does not protect, while the consumption of meat processed at high temperatures increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. According to some studies, lykopene and folate levels are reduced in pancreatic carcinoma patients, reduced folate intake increases the risk of pancreatic carcinoma (48%), and this risk can be diminished by introducing folate-rich foods to diet, not by using pharmaceutical product