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1

Partial Optimization of the 5-Terminal Codon Increased a Recombination Porcine Pancreatic Lipase (opPPL) Expression in Pichia pastoris  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic lipase plays a key role in intestinal digestion of feed fat, and is often deficient in young animals such as weaning piglets. The objective of this study was to express and characterize a partial codon optimized porcine pancreatic lipase (opPPL). A 537 bp cDNA fragment encoding N-terminus amino acid residue of the mature porcine pancreatic lipase was synthesized according to the codon bias of Pichia pastoris and ligated to the full-length porcine pancreatic lipase cDNA fragment. The codon optimized PPL was cloned into the pPICZ?A (Invitrogen, Beijing, China) vector. After the resultant opPPL/pPICZ?? plasmid was transformed into P.pastoris, the over-expressed extracellular opPPL containing a His-tag to the C terminus was purified using Ni Sepharose affinity column (GE Healthcare, Piscataway, NJ, USA), and was characterized against the native enzyme (commercial PPL from porcine pancreas, Sigma). The opPPL exhibited a molecular mass of approximately 52 kDa, and showed optimal temperature (40°C), optimal pH (8.0), Km (0.041 mM), and Vmax (2.008 µmol.mg protein ?1.min?1) similar to those of the commercial enzyme with p-NPP as the substrate. The recombinant enzyme was stable at 60°C, but lost 80% (P<0.05) of its activity after exposure to heat ?60°C for 20 min. The codon optimization increased opPPL yield for ca 4 folds (146 mg.L?1 vs 36 mg.L?1) and total enzyme activity increased about 5 folds (1900 IU.L?1 vs 367 IU.L?1) compared with those native naPPL/pPICZ?? tranformant. Comparison of gene copies and mRNA profiles between the two strains indicated the increased rePPL yields may partly be ascribed to the increased protein translational efficiency after codon optimization. In conclusion, we successfully optimized 5-terminal of porcine pancreatic lipase encoding gene and over-expressed the gene in P. pastoris as an extracellular, functional enzyme. The recombination enzyme demonstrates a potential for future use as an animal feed additive for animal improvement. PMID:25544987

Zhao, Hua; Chen, Dan; Tang, Jiayong; Jia, Gang; Long, Dingbiao; Liu, Guangmang; Chen, Xiaoling; Shang, Haiying

2014-01-01

2

Curative Chemoradiotherapy of Primary Pancreatic Lymphoma with Vertebral Metastasis: Palliation of Persistent Biliary Stricture by Roux-en-Y Hepaticojejunostomy  

PubMed Central

Primary pancreatic lymphoma (PPL) is a rare tumor that usually presents with the clinical picture of advanced adenocarcinoma but has a much better prognosis. A 38-year-old man was referred after percutaneous transhepatic external biliary drainage for obstructive jaundice. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography had revealed a 5-cm pancreatic head mass that caused biliary tract dilation. Computed tomography angiography showed that the mass encased the celiac trunk as well as the common hepatic and splenic arteries. MRI also revealed a metastatic lesion at the third lumbar vertebra. Serum carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels were within normal range. The initial diagnosis was inoperable pancreatic adenocarcinoma; however, Tru-Cut pancreatic biopsy showed a large B cell lymphoma. After 6 sessions of chemotherapy and 21 sessions of radiotherapy, both the pancreatic mass and the vertebral metastasis had disappeared. However, he had persistent distal common bile duct stricture that could not be negotiated by either the endoscopic or percutaneous route. A Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy was performed. The patient stayed alive without recurrence for 52 months after the initial diagnosis and 45 months after completion of oncologic treatment. In conclusion, a large pancreatic mass with grossly involved peripancreatic lymph nodes, without ascites, liver or splenic metastasis, should alert the clinician to the possibility of PPL. Cure is possible by chemoradiotherapy even in the presence of vertebral metastasis. Persistent stricture in the distal common bile duct may require a biliodigestive anastomosis. PMID:22171216

Serin, Kür?at Rahmi; Güven, Koray; Özden, ?lgin; Do?an, Öner; Gök, Kaan; Demir, Cumhur; Emre, Ali

2011-01-01

3

Frequency of occurrence and characteristics of primary pancreatic lymphoma during endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration: A retrospective study  

PubMed Central

Background Primary pancreatic lymphoma is a rare tumour of the pancreas. Data on the role of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration for its diagnosis are scant. Aim To identify the frequency of occurrence, sonographic characteristics and cytological findings that are predictive of primary pancreatic lymphoma. Methods Pancreatic lymphoma cases were identified by retrospective review of solid pancreatic masses over 10-year period. Results 12/2397 (0.5%) lesions were identified. Patients were predominantly white (92%) and male (58%). Mean largest dimension was 47.5 mm and 83.3% were located in the head. The mass appeared heterogeneous in 75% and peripancreatic lymphadenopathy was noted in 58%. None of the patients showed features of chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic ductal dilation. Rapid onsite analysis revealed atypical lymphocytes in 92%. Flow cytometry confirmed diagnosis in 75% of cases. Conclusions Primary pancreatic lymphoma is encountered in 0.5% of patients undergoing endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration. A large heterogeneous mass, in the absence of chronic pancreatitis or pancreatic duct dilation that reveals atypical lymphocytes on fine needle aspiration is suggestive. PMID:24560534

Ramesh, Jayapal; Hebert-Magee, Shantel; Kim, Hwasoon; Trevino, Jessica; Varadarajulu, Shyam

2014-01-01

4

Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have ... system or have certain types of infections. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as Swollen, painless ...

5

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PPL IN BRITAIN  

E-print Network

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE PPL IN BRITAIN STUDY ABROAD PROGRAM at the UNIVERSITY OF EAST: _____________________________________________________________________________________________________ Last First Middle Program Location Abroad Enrolled: Undergraduate:_______ Graduate:_______ Personal Information (Please notify us of any change

Suzuki, Masatsugu

6

PP&L experience with substation reliability centered maintenance  

SciTech Connect

This paper is intended to present a summary of Pennsylvania Power & Light`s (PP&L) experience with substation Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM). The purpose of this summary is to first explain the process used by PP&L to implement substation RCM, second to explain the differences that are apparent from the use of the classical RCM analysis as compared to the method used by PP&L, and third to provide several insights into the process.

Santarelli, P.D. [Pennsylvania Power & Light Company, Hazleton, PA (United States)

1996-08-01

7

Pancreatic lipase selectively hydrolyses DPA over EPA and DHA due to location of double bonds in the fatty acid rather than regioselectivity.  

PubMed

The enzymatic hydrolysis of canola, anchovy and seal oils with different types and amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids was measured using porcine pancreatic lipase (PPL) to establish the fatty acid selectivity of PPL. Substrates were subjected to the same conditions of hydrolysis, with percent hydrolysis monitored using Iatroscan and fatty acid selectivity monitored using gas chromatography (GC). Regardless of their distribution on the glycerol backbone, as monitored by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), ?-linolenic acid (ALA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) were rapidly cleaved by PPL while eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and stearidonic acid (STA) were hydrolysed more slowly. Results show that PPL preferentially hydrolyses ALA and DPA over EPA, DHA and STA, and this selectivity is due to fatty acid rather than regioselectivity. The primary structural factor associated with resistance to PPL appears to be the distance of the first double bond from the ester linkage being hydrolysed. PMID:24799209

Akanbi, Taiwo O; Sinclair, Andrew J; Barrow, Colin J

2014-10-01

8

Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Lymphoma; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2012-03-21

9

Primary pulmonary lymphoma mimicking a refractory lung abscess: A case report  

PubMed Central

The current study presents a case of primary pulmonary lymphoma (PPL) mimicking refractory lung abscess that was diagnosed at autopsy. An 80-year-old male with clinically inapparent aspiration presented with a large cavitated mass and pleural effusion. A lung abscess and empyema was diagnosed, therefore, antibiotics were administered and the pleural effusion was drained. Various examinations, including a biopsy, yielded no specific diagnosis. The lesion was considered inoperable due to the poor general condition of the patient. Subsequently, the mass that had been diagnosed as a refractory lung abscess became enlarged and a repeat biopsy resulted in a diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient succumbed to sudden respiratory failure, and the final diagnosis of PPL was confirmed at autopsy. PPL is a rare disease that accounts for 0.45% of all pulmonary malignant tumors and is difficult to diagnose in inoperable cases. Therefore, patients with PPL who do not undergo surgery can be misdiagnosed and consequently treated inappropriately. PPL should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of a refractory lung abscess.

MATSUMOTO, TAKESHI; OTSUKA, KOJIRO; FUNAYAMA, YUKI; IMAI, YUKIHIRO; TOMII, KEISUKE

2015-01-01

10

Primary Pulmonary Lymphoma and Cutaneous Metastasis: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Diffuse large B cell lymphoma is the most common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, representing nearly one-third of all cases. Any organ can be involved, making a diagnostic biopsy imperative. When the lungs are the involved organs, it is called primary pulmonary lymphoma (PPL). Hereby, we present a case of PPL that demonstrated a single large mass on chest CT and had metastatic skin lesions. The diagnosis of PPL was performed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry staining of the transthoracic lung biopsy and skin lesion specimens. This case highlighted an unusual and subtle clinical presentation, and the importance of new onset pulmonary symptoms and a large lung mass on chest X-ray. Review of the literature on the patient`s radiographic presentation revealed various findings, the most common of which were single or multiple nodular lesions in one or two lungs. It highlighted the fact that this diagnosis should be considered in all cases with a lung mass and skin lesions.

Latif Moini, Ali; Farbod Ara, Tahmineh; Fazeli Mosleh Abadi, Masood

2014-01-01

11

76 FR 76490 - PPL Susquehanna, LLC and Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc.-Acquisition Exemption-Pennsylvania...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...and a point of connection with North Shore Railroad Company (NSRR) at milepost...acquisition of the Line came to light in North Shore R.R.--Acquis. & Operation Exemption--PPL Susquehanna, LLC (North Shore), FD 35377, where NSRR,...

2011-12-07

12

77 FR 74548 - North Shore Railroad Company-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-PPL Susquehanna, LLC  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Transportation Board [Docket No. FD 35377] North Shore Railroad Company--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--PPL Susquehanna, LLC North Shore Railroad Company (North Shore), a Class III rail carrier, has filed a...

2012-12-14

13

PPl 15: The First Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Binary  

E-print Network

PPl 15 is the first object to have been confirmed as a brown dwarf by the lithium test (in 1995), though its inferred mass was very close to the substellar limit. It is a member of the Pleiades open cluster. Its position in a cluster color-magnitude diagram suggested that it might be binary, and preliminary indications that it is a double-lined spectroscopic binary were reported by us in 1997. Here we report on the results of a consecutive week of Keck HIRES observations of this system, which yield its orbit. It has a period of about 5.8 days, and an eccentricity of 0.4+/-0.05. The rotation of the stars is slow for this class of objects. Because the system luminosity is divided between 2 objects with a mass ratio of 0.85, this renders each of them an incontrovertible brown dwarf, with masses between 60-70 jupiters. We show that component B is a little redder than A by studying their wavelength-dependent line ratios, and that this variation is compatible with the mass ratio. We confirm that the system has lithium, but cannot support the original conclusion that it is depleted (which would be surprising, given the new masses). This is a system of very close objects which, if they had combined, would have produced a low mass star. We discuss the implications of this discovery for the theories of binary formation and formation of very low mass objects.

Gibor Basri; Eduardo Martin

1999-08-02

14

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

Lymphoma - non-Hodgkin; Lymphocytic lymphoma; Histiocytic lymphoma; Lymphoblastic lymphoma; Cancer - non-Hodgkin lymphoma ... National Cancer Institute: PDQ Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma ... Available at http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/ ...

15

Pancreatic Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

16

Canine lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets,

Weller

1986-01-01

17

Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

Saif, Muhammad Wasif

2014-01-01

18

Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Solid Tumors With Liver Dysfunction  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; AIDS Related Immunoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Extra-Adrenal Paraganglioma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Hepatic Complication; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Male Breast Carcinoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Nasal Cavity Inverted Papilloma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Olfactory Neuroblastoma; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Inverted Schneiderian Papilloma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip Basal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasal Type NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Keratinizing Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Olfactory Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Regional Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sar

2015-03-10

19

Hereditary Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  The term “hereditary pancreatitis,” as it is currently used and understood, should probably be amended to “autosomal dominant\\u000a hereditary pancreatitis.” The recent discovery of the association between minor variants of the CFTR gene and chronic pancreatitis\\u000a without significant pulmonary pathology has introduced the concept of autosomal recessive hereditary pancreatitis. The autosomal\\u000a dominant form is relatively rare. It is characterized

Lawrence K. Gates

1999-01-01

20

STANFORD CUTANEOUS LYMPHOMA PROGRAM  

E-print Network

, other unspecified cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphomas, and cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. Our physicians disorders (lymphomatoid papulosis and anaplastic large cell lymphoma), subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphoma, gamma-delta T-cell lymphoma, CD8+ aggressive epidermotropic T-cell lymphoma, NK/T-cell lymphoma

Kay, Mark A.

21

Chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review We review selected important clinical observations reported in 2012. Recent findings Celiac disease is a risk factor for pancreatitis. Patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis likely have chronic pancreatitis, do not benefit from pancreatic sphincterotomy, and may not benefit from biliary sphincterotomy. Analysis of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) images with an artificial neural network (ANN) program may improve chronic pancreatitis diagnosis compared with clinical interpretation of images. In a multicenter, randomized controlled trial of chronic pancreatitis patients, 90 000 USP U of pancreatin with meals decreased fat malabsorption compared with placebo. Detection of visceral pain in chronic pancreatitis predicts pain relief from various treatments, but nonvisceral pain due to altered central pain processing may respond to agents such as pregabalin. Predictors of surgical pain relief include onset of symptoms less than 3 years and preoperatively no opioid use and less than five endoscopic procedures. Total pancreatectomy for presumed painful chronic pancreatitis remains controversial. Summary Celiacs are at risk for pancreatitis. The diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis may be enhanced by ANN analysis of EUS imaging. Treatment of fat malabsorption requires 90 000 USP U of lipase with meals. Relief of pain from organ directed treatment of chronic pancreatitis may depend upon timing of interventions and whether pain is visceral or nonvisceral. PMID:23852141

DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

2015-01-01

22

Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma  

Cancer.gov

Home Cancers Selected for Study Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Last Updated: May 15, 2013 What is pancreatic cancer?Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic cancer, making up more than

23

Software Strategies and Hardware Upgrades to the PPL Data Acquisition System (DAS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes upgrades to the Data Acquisition System for the Experimental Projects Department at PPL, especially in support of the PBX-M upgrade to be completed this year. Hardware and software maintenance problems with the old configuration, consisting of a DEC KL-10 and eight PDP-11's, are described. The real-time software and hardware performance requirements and projections for CAMAC I\\/O and

W. M. Davis; P. Roney; T. Gibney; P. Funk; M. Keller; N. Sauthoff; S. Davis; G. Bates; M. Corneliussen; H. Fishman; K. Tuttle-Frank; L. Ratzan; S. Kaye

1987-01-01

24

Primary lymphoma of the brain  

MedlinePLUS

Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. Patients who have a weakened immune system are at high risk of primary lymphoma of the ...

25

PPL2 Translesion Polymerase Is Essential for the Completion of Chromosomal DNA Replication in the African Trypanosome  

PubMed Central

Summary Faithful copying of the genome is essential for life. In eukaryotes, a single archaeo-eukaryotic primase (AEP), DNA primase, is required for the initiation and progression of DNA replication. Here we have identified additional eukaryotic AEP-like proteins with DNA-dependent primase and/or polymerase activity. Uniquely, the genomes of trypanosomatids, a group of kinetoplastid protozoa of significant medical importance, encode two PrimPol-like (PPL) proteins. In the African trypanosome, PPL2 is a nuclear enzyme present in G2 phase cells. Following PPL2 knockdown, a cell-cycle arrest occurs after the bulk of DNA synthesis, the DNA damage response is activated, and cells fail to recover. Consistent with this phenotype, PPL2 replicates damaged DNA templates in vitro, including templates containing the UV-induced pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproduct. Furthermore, PPL2 accumulates at sites of nuclear DNA damage. Taken together, our results indicate an essential role for PPL2 in postreplication tolerance of endogenous DNA damage, thus allowing completion of genome duplication. PMID:24267450

Rudd, Sean G.; Glover, Lucy; Jozwiakowski, Stanislaw K.; Horn, David; Doherty, Aidan J.

2013-01-01

26

PPL2 translesion polymerase is essential for the completion of chromosomal DNA replication in the African trypanosome.  

PubMed

Faithful copying of the genome is essential for life. In eukaryotes, a single archaeo-eukaryotic primase (AEP), DNA primase, is required for the initiation and progression of DNA replication. Here we have identified additional eukaryotic AEP-like proteins with DNA-dependent primase and/or polymerase activity. Uniquely, the genomes of trypanosomatids, a group of kinetoplastid protozoa of significant medical importance, encode two PrimPol-like (PPL) proteins. In the African trypanosome, PPL2 is a nuclear enzyme present in G2 phase cells. Following PPL2 knockdown, a cell-cycle arrest occurs after the bulk of DNA synthesis, the DNA damage response is activated, and cells fail to recover. Consistent with this phenotype, PPL2 replicates damaged DNA templates in vitro, including templates containing the UV-induced pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproduct. Furthermore, PPL2 accumulates at sites of nuclear DNA damage. Taken together, our results indicate an essential role for PPL2 in postreplication tolerance of endogenous DNA damage, thus allowing completion of genome duplication. PMID:24267450

Rudd, Sean G; Glover, Lucy; Jozwiakowski, Stanislaw K; Horn, David; Doherty, Aidan J

2013-11-21

27

Hodgkin Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... a lymphoma , which is a cancer of the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system helps the body's immune system to filter out bacteria, viruses, and other unwanted substances. The lymphatic system includes the lymph nodes (which are sometimes called ...

28

Tropical pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Tropical pancreatitis is an uncommon cause of acute, and often chronic, relapsing pancreatitis. Patients present with abdominal pain, weight loss, pancreatic calcifications, and glucose intolerance or diabetes mellitus. Etiologies include a protein-calorie malnourished state, a variety of exogenous food toxins, pancreatic duct anomalies, and a possible genetic predisposition. Chronic cyanide exposure from the diet may contribute to this disease, seen often in India, Asia, and Africa. The pancreatic duct of these patients often is markedly dilated, and may contain stones, with or without strictures. The risk of ductal carcinoma with this disease is accentuated. Treatment may be frustrating, and may include pancreatic enzymes, duct manipulations at endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, octreotide, celiac axis blocks for pain control, or surgery via drainage and/or resection. PMID:12080228

Petersen, John M

2002-07-01

29

Pancreatic panniculitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic disease.Objective: Our purpose was to study the clinical and histopathologic features of this disease.Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of 11 patients.Results: In five patients subcutaneous fat necrosis preceded the diagnosis of pancreatic disease by

Patrick R Dahl; W. P Daniel Su; Kip C Cullimore; Charles H Dicken

1995-01-01

30

PANCREATIC CANCER 14. PANCREATIC CANCER  

E-print Network

common cancer in Ireland, accounting for 2.6% of all malignant neoplasms, excluding non-melanoma skin.7% 1.8% % of all new cancer cases excluding non-melanoma skin cancer 2.6% 2.5% 2.8% 2.5% 2.3% 2PANCREATIC CANCER 125 14. PANCREATIC CANCER 14.1. SUMMARY Pancreatic cancer was the eleventh most

Paxton, Anthony T.

31

Lactoferrin in Chronic Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The present review is focused on the clinical significance of lactoferrin in pancreatic secretions and stone formation in chronic pancreatitis, and of serum anti-lactoferrin antibody in autoimmune pancreatitis. Lactoferrin secretion is increased in pancreatic secretions in calcified and non-calcified chronic pancreatitis. Lactoferrin, pancreatic stone protein and trypsin are present in pancreatic stones. We cannot conclude which protein is more

Chun Xiang Jin; Tetsuo Hayakawa; Motoji Kitagawa; Hiroshi Ishiguro

2009-01-01

32

Canine lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

Weller, R.E.

1986-10-01

33

[Follicular lymphoma].  

PubMed

Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the most popular indolent lymphoma. In discussing the appropriate first-line therapy, FL patients are divided into 3 clinical categories: 1) localized-stage FL in which local irradiation is recommended and 30-50% of patients experience long progression-free survival, 2) low-tumor burden advanced-stage FL in which watchful waiting strategy is generally recommended, 3) high-tumor burden advanced-stage FL in which CHOP plus rituximab(R) is recommended and bendamustine plus R is a potent therapeutic option. In relapsed/refractory FL, re-biopsy is needed to evaluate the possible histological transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Relapsed/refractory FL patients should be registered in clinical study because the optimal treatment in such patients is unconfirmed. PMID:24724409

Tomita, Naoto

2014-03-01

34

The Lymphoma Information Network  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Lymphoma Information Network website strives to "put a bit of humanity and understanding to this disease, to gather lymphoma information and resources in one place, and to present information in an easy to understand and logical format." The award-winning site offers information sections on Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Fighting Lymphoma, and Surviving Lymphoma. The site also offers a special resource section for kids and teenagers, and information about childhood lymphoma. In addition, the site contains an extensive Glossary of Lymphoma Terms, The Lymphoma Blog, resources for independent research, book lists, and related links.

35

Chronic Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/? pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

2012-01-01

36

Lymphoma...241 Chapter 22  

E-print Network

Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma made up 84.9% of male and 86.3% of female cases of lymphoma diagnosed during survival from Hodgkin's lymphoma was 73.5% for males and 74.5% for females , while for non-Hodgkin of Ireland during 2000-2004. Nor were there any differences for Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

Paxton, Anthony T.

37

Hereditary Pancreatitis  

MedlinePLUS

... that are high in carbohydrates and low in protein and fat. Pancreatic enzymes such as Creon, Pancrease, and Violiase are helpful in providing improved digestion and a reduction in diarrhea and pain for ...

38

Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma l Lymphomatoid papulosis2 Aggressive clinical behavior l Sézary syndrome l Primary cutaneous ... lymphoma l Primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma Intermediate-aggressive clinical behavior l Primary cutaneous diffuse large B- ...

39

Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

2014-07-30

40

Radiology of lymphomas  

SciTech Connect

This book reviews the radiological aspects of lymphomas. The topics covered are: Classification of lymphomas as Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas; lymphomas of brain and spinal cord and the radiodiagnosis and chemotherapy; lymphomas of bones; lymph nodes of abdomen, chest and lymphomas of extranodal sites. Diagnostic techniques for lymphomas discussed are tracer techniques, computed tomography, ultrasonography and biopsy. Differential diagnosis of lymphomas from various other pathology of bone, brain and spinal cord is also discussed. Side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are also described.

Bruneton, J.N.; Schneider, M.

1986-01-01

41

Pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

In recent years, it has become clear that the current standard therapeutic options for pancreatic cancer are not adequate and still do not meet the criteria to cure patients suffering from this lethal disease. Although research over the past decade has shown very interesting and promising new therapeutic options for these patients, only minor clinical success was achieved. Therefore, there is still an urgent need for new approaches that deal with early detection and new therapeutic options in pancreatic cancer. To provide optimal care for patients with pancreatic cancer, we need to understand better its complex molecular biology and thus to identify new target molecules that promote the proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer cells. In spite of significant progress in curing cancers with chemotherapy, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most resistant solid tumour cancers and many studies suggest that drug-resistant cancer cells are the most aggressive with the highest relapse and metastatic rates. In this context, activated Notch signalling is strongly linked with chemoresistance and therefore reflects a rational new target to circumvent resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Here, we have focused our discussion on the latest research, current therapy options and recently identified target molecules such as Notch-2 and the heparin-binding growth factor midkine, which exhibit a wide range of cancer-relevant functions and therefore provide attractive new therapeutic target molecules, in terms of pancreatic cancer and other cancers also. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24024905

Güngör, C; Hofmann, B T; Wolters-Eisfeld, G; Bockhorn, M

2014-01-01

42

[Pancreatic ultrasonography].  

PubMed

Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%. PMID:24950816

Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

2015-04-01

43

Chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive fibroinflammatory disease that exists in large-duct (often with intraductal calculi) or small-duct form. In many patients this disease results from a complex mix of environmental (eg, alcohol, cigarettes, and occupational chemicals) and genetic factors (eg, mutation in a trypsin-controlling gene or the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator); a few patients have hereditary or autoimmune disease. Pain in the form of recurrent attacks of pancreatitis (representing paralysis of apical exocytosis in acinar cells) or constant and disabling pain is usually the main symptom. Management of the pain is mainly empirical, involving potent analgesics, duct drainage by endoscopic or surgical means, and partial or total pancreatectomy. However, steroids rapidly reduce symptoms in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis, and micronutrient therapy to correct electrophilic stress is emerging as a promising treatment in the other patients. Steatorrhoea, diabetes, local complications, and psychosocial issues associated with the disease are additional therapeutic challenges. PMID:21397320

Braganza, Joan M; Lee, Stephen H; McCloy, Rory F; McMahon, Michael J

2011-04-01

44

Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) remains a rarity despite the high incidence of tuberculosis in many of the African and Asian countries. Presentation as discrete pancreatic mass often masquerades as pancreatic neoplasm and diagnosis may require histology. Extra-hepatic portal hypertension due to splenic vein thrombosis complicating pancreatic TB has been reported in the literature. We report here a case of isolated pancreatic TB with pancreatic head mass mimicking neoplasm with extra-hepatic portal hypertension. The possibility of TB should be considered in the list of differential diagnoses of pancreatic mass and an endoscopic, ultrasound-guided biopsy might help to clinch the diagnosis of this potentially curable disease. PMID:24759351

Zacharia, George S.; Antony, Rajany; Kolassery, Sandesh; Ramachandran, Thazhath M.

2014-01-01

45

Software strategies and hardware upgrades to the PPL data acquisition system (DAS)  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes upgrades to the Data Acquisition System for the Experimental Projects Department at PPL, especially in support of the PBX-M upgrade to be completed this year. Hardware and software maintenance problems with the old configuration, consisting of a DEC KL-10 and eight PDP-11's, are described. The real-time software and hardware performance requirements and projections for CAMAC I/O and data analysis and display are presented. Described are three applications that have realtime requirements and are located on separate processors, connected to PPPL's VAX Cluster by an Ethernet link. Building upon a previous large software base, general-purpose subroutine libraries and utilities are being emphasized. The most useful of these are described. The use of software packages from DEC, third-party vendors, and the fusion community, is also described. The new approaches to software development that are being incorporated into the DAS efforts are discussed. Specific future challenges are also described.

Davis, W.M.; Roney, P.; Gibney, T.; Funk, P.; Keller, M.; Sauthoff, N.; Davis, S.; Bates, G.; Corneliussen, M.; Fishman, H.

1987-08-01

46

Pancreatic pseudocyst  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic pseudocysts are complications of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Initial diagnosis is accomplished most often by cross-sectional imaging. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration has become the preferred test to help distinguish pseudocyst from other cystic lesions of the pancreas. Most pseudocysts resolve spontaneously with supportive care. The size of the pseudocyst and the length of time the cyst has been present are poor predictors for the potential of pseudocyst resolution or complications, but in general, larger cysts are more likely to be symptomatic or cause complications. The main two indications for some type of invasive drainage procedure are persistent patient symptoms or the presence of complications (infection, gastric outlet or biliary obstruction, bleeding). Three different strategies for pancreatic pseudocysts drainage are available: endoscopic (transpapillary or transmural) drainage, percutaneous catheter drainage, or open surgery. To date, no prospective controlled studies have compared directly these approaches. As a result, the management varies based on local expertise, but in general, endoscopic drainage is becoming the preferred approach because it is less invasive than surgery, avoids the need for external drain, and has a high long-term success rate. A tailored therapeutic approach taking into consideration patient preferences and involving multidisciplinary team of therapeutic endoscopist, interventional radiologist and pancreatic surgeon should be considered in all cases. PMID:19115466

Habashi, Samir; Draganov, Peter V

2009-01-01

47

Pancreatic Enzymes  

MedlinePLUS

... the formation of toxic substances due to incomplete digestion of proteins. Increased risk for intestinal infections. Amylase Amylase breaks down carbohydrates (starch) into sugars which are more easily absorbed by the body. This ... needed for digestion. Having an insufficient amount of pancreatic enzymes is ...

48

Study to Assess Safety, Pharmacokinetics, and Efficacy of Oral CC-223 for Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Multiple Myeloma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Glioblastoma Multiforme; Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Neuroendocrine Tumors of Non-Pancreatic Origin; Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer

2013-07-17

49

Stages of Pancreatic Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Stages of Pancreatic Cancer Key Points for This Section Tests and procedures to stage pancreatic cancer are usually done at the same ... III Stage IV Tests and procedures to stage pancreatic cancer are usually done at the same time as ...

50

Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?  

MedlinePLUS

... Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? Cancer of the pancreas is a genetic ... found in cigarette smoke. The genetics of hereditary pancreatic cancer is a focus of research at Johns Hopkins. ...

51

Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4  

MedlinePLUS

... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 View/Download: Small: 533x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4 Description: Stage IV pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

52

Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3  

MedlinePLUS

... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

53

Pancreatic Cancer: Surgery  

MedlinePLUS

... Topic Ablation or embolization treatments for pancreatic cancer Surgery for pancreatic cancer There are 2 general types ... and risks of such surgery carefully. Potentially curative surgery Fewer than 1 in 5 pancreatic cancers appear ...

54

Pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic serous cystadenoma  

PubMed Central

Solitary pancreatic involvement of tuberculosis is rare, especially in an immunocompetent individual, and it may be misdiagnosed as pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Pancreatic cystic neoplasms are being identified in increasing numbers, probably because of the frequent use of radiology and advances in endoscopic techniques. However, they are composed of a variety of neoplasms with a wide range of malignant potential, and it is often difficult to differentiate pancreatic tuberculosis mimicking cystic neoplasms from benign or malignant pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Non-surgical diagnosis of pancreatic tuberculosis is inconclusive and continues to be a challenge in many cases. If so, then laparotomy should be employed to establish the diagnosis. Therefore, pancreatic tuberculosis should be kept in mind during the differential diagnosis of solitary cystic masses in the pancreas. We report a patient who had solitary pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic serous cystadenoma. PMID:19248204

Hong, Seung Goun; Kim, Jae Seon; Joo, Moon Kyung; Lee, Kwang Gyun; Kim, Key Hyeon; Oh, Cho Rong; Park, Jong-Jae; Bak, Young-Tae

2009-01-01

55

Stages of Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

Stages of Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Key Points for This Section After childhood Hodgkin lymphoma has been diagnosed, tests are done to find out ... lymphoma is divided into risk groups. After childhood Hodgkin lymphoma has been diagnosed, tests are done to ...

56

New Biofuel Integrating Glycerol into Its Composition Through the Use of Covalent Immobilized Pig Pancreatic Lipase  

PubMed Central

By using 1,3-specific Pig Pancreatic lipase (EC 3.1.1.3 or PPL), covalently immobilized on AlPO4/Sepiolite support as biocatalyst, a new second-generation biodiesel was obtained in the transesterification reaction of sunflower oil with ethanol and other alcohols of low molecular weight. The resulting biofuel is composed of fatty acid ethyl esters and monoglycerides (FAEE/MG) blended in a molar relation 2/1. This novel product, which integrates glycerol as monoacylglycerols (MG) into the biofuel composition, has similar physicochemical properties compared to those of conventional biodiesel and also avoids the removal step of this by-product. The biocatalyst was found to be strongly fixed to the inorganic support (75%). Nevertheless, the efficiency of the immobilized enzyme was reduced to half (49.1%) compared to that of the free PPL. The immobilized enzyme showed a remarkable stability as well as a great reusability (more than 40 successive reuses) without a significant loss of its initial catalytic activity. Immobilized and free enzymes exhibited different reaction mechanisms, according to the different results in the Arrhenius parameters (Ln A and Ea). However, the use of supported PPL was found to be very suitable for the repetitive production of biofuel due to its facile recyclability from the reaction mixture. PMID:22949849

Luna, Diego; Posadillo, Alejandro; Caballero, Verónica; Verdugo, Cristóbal; Bautista, Felipa M.; Romero, Antonio A.; Sancho, Enrique D.; Luna, Carlos; Calero, Juan

2012-01-01

57

Primary gallbladder small lymphocytic lymphoma as a rare postcholecystectomy finding.  

PubMed

Introduction. Primary lymphoma of the gallbladder is an extremely rare entity with approximately 50 cases reported so far. In many of these cases the presenting symptoms were mimicking symptomatic gallstone disease and the diagnosis was made postoperatively, especially when the preoperative imaging results were far from suspicious for malignant disease. Patients and Methods. We report a case of primary lymphoma of the gallbladder in an 85-year-old man with gallstone disease, who was admitted for elective cholecystectomy 2?months after an episode of acute cholecystitis and pancreatitis. Histological evaluation of the specimen revealed a small lymphocytic lymphoma of the gallbladder. This type of primary gallbladder lymphoma has not been previously reported. Discussion. The most common primary lymphomas of the gallbladder are MALT lymphomas and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, although a variety of other histological types have been reported. The association of these lesions with chronic inflammation is the most convincing theory for their pathogenesis. For lesions confined to the gallbladder, cholecystectomy is considered to be sufficient, while supplementary chemotherapy significantly improves prognosis in more advanced disease. PMID:24891962

Psarras, Kyriakos; Symeonidis, Nikolaos; Vlachaki, Euthymia; Baltatzis, Minas; Papatolios, Georgios; Pavlidis, Efstathios; Mouratidou, Christina; Venizelos, Ioannis; Pavlidis, Theodoros; Sakantamis, Athanasios; Nikolaidou, Christina

2014-01-01

58

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... Lymphoma? A lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system. The lymphatic system is a part of the body's immune system ... people don't notice the workings of their lymphatic systems; in fact, the only time you might be ...

59

Cloning, genetic analysis, and nucleotide sequence of a determinant coding for a 19-kilodalton peptidoglycan-associated protein (Ppl) of Legionella pneumophila.  

PubMed Central

A genomic library of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires disease in humans, was constructed in Escherichia coli K-12, and the recombinant clones were screened by immuno-colony blots with an antiserum raised against heat-killed L. pneumophila. Twenty-three clones coding for a Legionella-specific protein of 19 kDa were isolated. The 19-kDa protein, which represents an outer membrane protein, was found to be associated with the peptidoglycan layer both in L. pneumophila and in the recombinant E. coli clones. This was shown by electrophoresis and Western immunoblot analysis of bacterial cell membrane fractions with a monospecific polyclonal 19-kDa protein-specific antiserum. The protein was termed peptidoglycan-associated protein of L. pneumophila (Ppl). The corresponding genetic determinant, ppl, was subcloned on a 1.8-kb ClaI fragment. DNA sequence studies revealed that two open reading frames, pplA and pplB, coding for putative proteins of 18.9 and 16.8 kDa, respectively, were located on the ClaI fragment. Exonuclease III digestion studies confirmed that pplA is the gene coding for the peptidoglycan-associated 19-kDa protein of L. pneumophila. The amino acid sequence of PplA exhibits a high degree of homology to the sequences of the Pal lipoproteins of E. coli K-12 and Haemophilus influenzae. Images PMID:1855972

Ludwig, B; Schmid, A; Marre, R; Hacker, J

1991-01-01

60

The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

2013-01-01

61

Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

2014-01-01

62

Pegfilgrastim and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated, Relapsed, or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Marginal Zone Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2015-01-12

63

Pancreatic hamartoma.  

PubMed

Pancreatic hamartoma is a rare benign lesion and may be mistaken for a malignancy, as demonstrated by two cases. The first case was a 29-year-old man who presented with a 7-month history of intermittent upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting and a 15-kg weight loss. CT and MRI revealed a mass in the head of the pancreas. The second case was a 62-year-old man who presented with a 2-year history of intermittent abdominal pain, vomiting and a 25-kg weight loss. Although positron emission tomography was normal, CT revealed thickening of the duodenal wall and endoluminal ultrasonography revealed a tumour in the head of the pancreas. Both patients recovered from uneventful Kausch-Whipple pancreatoduodenectomy (in the first patient, it was pylorus-preserving), and in each case the histological diagnosis was hamartoma. Pancreatic hamartoma can present with vague, non-specific symptoms which, despite modern diagnostic tools, can be difficult to diagnose. Surgical resection with histopathological examination is required to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:15340246

McFaul, C D; Vitone, L J; Campbell, F; Azadeh, B; Hughes, M L; Garvey, C J; Ghaneh, P; Neoptolemos, J P

2004-01-01

64

Groove pancreatitis associated with true pancreatic cyst.  

PubMed

We report a case of groove pancreatitis (GP) associated with a true pancreatic cyst. An 81-year-old man who had suffered epigastric pain for 4 months was referred to Saisekai Kure Hospital. Computed tomography and endoscopic retrograde pancreatography showed a cystic lesion in the groove area of the pancreas. Serum amylase elevation and imaging findings suggested GP due to the cyst. Six weeks of medical treatment did not improve the clinical symptoms. Therefore, pancreatoduodenectomy was performed. Histologic examination revealed a true cyst with intraluminal necrosis, which produced a protein plug that obstructed the Santorini duct. The parenchyma surrounding the groove area showed marked fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration. GP due to true pancreatic cyst was diagnosed. Although GP is usually caused by overconsumption of alcohol, which leads to changes in the pancreatic juice and the ultimate blockage of pancreatic outflow, the histologic features in our patient suggest that true pancreatic cyst stands as a secondary cause of GP. PMID:17653641

Sanada, Yuichi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Kunita, Satoko; Jinushi, Kazuto; Matsuura, Hideo

2007-01-01

65

A patient with chronic hepatitis C and a pancreatic mass in endoscopic ultrasound.  

PubMed

We report a rare case of pancreas tumor (lymphoma) in a patient with a history of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection without treatment, with a high viral load (20,199,805 IU/ml). He presented with abdominal pain, jaundice, weight loss and sweating. Computed tomography showed a hypodense mass located in the head of the pancreas, and immunohistochemistry of a specimen obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration revealed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the pancreas, B cell type. An association of HCV infection with pancreatic lymphoma has only been reported rarely in the literature and its clinical significance is uncertain. PMID:22855657

Ghobakhlou, Mehdi; Mohammad Alizadeh, Amir Houshang; Naderi, Nosratollah; Haghighi, Shirin; Molaei, Mahsa; Rafiezadeh, Mitra; Zali, Mohammad Reza

2012-05-01

66

A Patient with Chronic Hepatitis C and a Pancreatic Mass in Endoscopic Ultrasound  

PubMed Central

We report a rare case of pancreas tumor (lymphoma) in a patient with a history of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection without treatment, with a high viral load (20,199,805 IU/ml). He presented with abdominal pain, jaundice, weight loss and sweating. Computed tomography showed a hypodense mass located in the head of the pancreas, and immunohistochemistry of a specimen obtained by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration revealed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the pancreas, B cell type. An association of HCV infection with pancreatic lymphoma has only been reported rarely in the literature and its clinical significance is uncertain. PMID:22855657

Ghobakhlou, Mehdi; Alizadeh, Amir Houshang Mohammad; Naderi, Nosratollah; Haghighi, Shirin; Molaei, Mahsa; Rafiezadeh, Mitra; Zali, Mohammad Reza

2012-01-01

67

Primary adrenal lymphoma.  

PubMed

Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the adrenal gland is rare. We report the case of a 56-year-old patient suffering from B symptoms. The CT scan showed a bilateral adrenal mass without any lymph nodes. Scan-guided biopsies led to the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The medullar biopsy eliminated a secondary lymphoma. The patient was treated by immunochemotherapy with a complete response before autologous stem cell transplantation. PMID:25035679

Kacem, Karima; Zriba, Sami; Lakhal, Raihane Ben; Bouteraa, Walid; Aissaoui, Lamia; Amor, Ramzi Ben; Abdennebi, Yosr Ben; Ali, Zaher Belhadj; Abid, Hela Ben; Meddeb, Balkis

2014-06-01

68

Primary Adrenal Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Primary non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the adrenal gland is rare. We report the case of a 56-year-old patient suffering from B symptoms. The CT scan showed a bilateral adrenal mass without any lymph nodes. Scan-guided biopsies led to the diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The medullar biopsy eliminated a secondary lymphoma. The patient was treated by immunochemotherapy with a complete response before autologous stem cell transplantation. PMID:25035679

Kacem, Karima; Zriba, Sami; Lakhal, Raihane Ben; Bouteraa, Walid; Aissaoui, Lamia; Amor, Ramzi Ben; Abdennebi, Yosr Ben; Ali, Zaher Belhadj; Abid, Hela Ben; Meddeb, Balkis

2014-01-01

69

Acute Pancreatitis in Children  

MedlinePLUS

... pancreatitis in children include physical injury, certain medications, gallstones, or problems in the anatomy of the ducts ( ... some treatable causes of acute pancreatitis. These include gallstone disease, high blood calcium, high blood triglycerides, and ...

70

Pancreatic Islet Transplantation  

MedlinePLUS

... alternative sites, such as muscle tissue or another organ. [ Top ] What are the benefits and risks of pancreatic islet allo-transplantation? The benefits of pancreatic islet allo-transplantation include ...

71

Pancreatitis-imaging approach  

PubMed Central

Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a signi?cant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

2014-01-01

72

Pancreatic function assessment.  

PubMed

Several non invasive tests are available to assess pancreatic function, but no one is routinely used in clinical practice to diagnose chronic pancreatitis, due to their poor sensitivity in diagnosing mild pancreatic insufficiency. (13)C breath tests share the same limits of the other non invasive functional tests, but the mixed triglyceride breath test seems to be useful in finding the correct dosage of enzyme substitutive therapy to prevent malnutrition in patients with known pancreatic insufficiency. PMID:24443071

Laterza, L; Scaldaferri, F; Bruno, G; Agnes, A; Boškoski, I; Ianiro, G; Gerardi, V; Ojetti, V; Alfieri, S; Gasbarrini, A

2013-01-01

73

Classification of pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

An international group of doctors interested in pancreatic disease met in Cambridge in March 1983, under the auspices of the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, to discuss the classification of pancreatitis in the light of developments that have taken place in the 20 years since the crucial conference in Marseille.

M Sarner; P B Cotton

1984-01-01

74

Endocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency in Chronic Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is considered to be a rare cause of diabetes mellitus. However, in both the developed and developing world, there is an increasing number of patients suffering from pancreatitis probably due to lifestyle changes, which is partially associated with both social factors and the poor health status of immigrants. Owing to these circumstances, CP has evolved with one

Nicholas Angelopoulos; Christos Dervenis; Anastasia Goula; Grigorios Rombopoulos; Sarantis Livadas; Dimitrios Kaltsas; Victoria Kaltzidou; George Tolis

2005-01-01

75

Biology of pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of death from malignant disease in Western society. Apart from the fortunate few patients who present with a resectable small pancreatic adenocarcinoma, conventional treatment offers no hope of cure and has little palliative value. Over the past two decades major steps have been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic growth and neoplasia. This review sets out to explore these advances, firstly in the regulation of normal pancreatic growth, and secondly the mechanism which may be involved in malignant change of the exocrine pancreas. From an understanding of this new biology, new treatment strategies may be possible for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:1855689

Poston, G J; Gillespie, J; Guillou, P J

1991-01-01

76

Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

Li, Donghui

2011-01-01

77

Biomarkers for lymphoma  

DOEpatents

A biomarker, method, test kit, and diagnostic system for detecting the presence of lymphoma in a person are disclosed. The lymphoma may be Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The person may be a high-risk subject. In one embodiment, a plasma sample from a person is obtained. The level of at least one protein listed in Table S3 in the plasma sample is measured. The level of at least one protein in the plasma sample is compared with the level in a normal or healthy subject. The lymphoma is diagnosed based upon the level of the at least one protein in the plasma sample in comparison to the normal or healthy level.

Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.

2014-09-02

78

Endoscopic ultrasound in the evaluation of pancreatic neoplasms-solid and cystic: A review  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic neoplasms have a wide range of pathology, from pancreatic adenocarcinoma to cystic mucinous neoplasms. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with or without fine needle aspiration (FNA) is a helpful diagnostic tool in the work-up of pancreatic neoplasms. Its utility in pancreatic malignancy is well known. Over the last two decades EUS-FNA has become a procedure of choice for diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. EUS-FNA is highly sensitive and specific for solid lesions, with sensitivities as high as 80%-95% for pancreatic masses and specificity as high as 75%-100%. Multiple aspects of the procedure have been studied to optimize the rate of diagnosis with EUS-FNA including cytopathologist involvement, needle size, suctioning and experience of endoscopist. Onsite pathology is one of the most important elements in increasing diagnostic yield rate in EUS-FNA. EUS-FNA is valuable in diagnosing rare and atypical pancreatic neoplasms including neuroendocrine, lymphoma and metastatic disease. As more and more patients undergo cross sectional imaging, cystic lesions of the pancreas are becoming a more common occurrence and EUS-FNA of these lesions can be helpful for differentiation. This review covers the technical aspects of optimizing pancreatic neoplasm diagnosis rate, highlight rare pancreatic neoplasms and role of EUS-FNA, and also outline the important factors in diagnosis of cystic lesions by EUS-FNA.

Nelsen, Eric M; Buehler, Darya; Soni, Anurag V; Gopal, Deepak V

2015-01-01

79

Treatment Options for Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... Search for Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®) Treatment Options for Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Early Favorable Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment of early favorable ...

80

Follicular lymphoma involving the orbit.  

PubMed

Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is the fifth most common malignancy, with an annual incidence in the UK of 8/100,000. Until recently this incidence had been rising over the past two decades. The WHO classification divides non-Hodgkin's lymphomas into B- or T-cell neoplasms, with 85% of general lymphomas and almost all orbital lymphomas consisting of B-cell tumours. A case of systemic follicular lymphoma, with later orbital involvement, is presented. PMID:17984509

Yap, Yew Chong; Ardeshna, Kirit; Kosmin, Alan; Rose, Geoffrey E

2007-01-01

81

Angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas.  

PubMed

Under the generic diagnosis of angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas are included several subtypes of lymphomas histopathologically characterized either by the predominantly endovascular-endoluminal presence of neoplastic lymphocytes of B-T or NK/T cell origin, or by a pathologic process centered around a blood vessels secondarily infiltrated and invaded by the spreading infiltrate. This group of lymphoproliferative disorders is heterogeneous regarding phenotype, but they share common features that are multiorgan involvement, worse prognosis, and, frequently Ebstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomic integration. At onset, some of these rare lymphomas, e.g. intravascular large cell lymphoma or lymphomatoid granulomatosis (Liebow dieases), are misdiagnosed as inflammatory diseases. The actual treatments of these disorders are based upon chemotherapy and/or chemotherapy plus bone marrow transplantation with variable results. Therapeutic approaches for EBV related angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas, similarly to those employed for other viral induced lymphoproliferative disease would comprise the employment of chemotherapy together with drugs able to interfere with viral infection. Such an approach has been used in rare cases of EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly, a lymphoproliferative disorders which development is linked to immunosuppression due to senescence. The present review will focus on intravascular and angiocentric lymphomas providing histopathologic, immunophenotypical and molecular data useful to overcome to a specific diagnosis and to differentiate them from other lymphoproliferative disorders showing a secondary vascular engulfment and infiltration and some vasculitides showing overlapping histopathologic features. PMID:25531150

Tomasini, D; Berti, E

2015-02-01

82

Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B  

MedlinePLUS

... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; illustration ...

83

Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A  

MedlinePLUS

... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing ...

84

Primary leptomeningeal lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Objective: To evaluate clinical presentation, optimal diagnostic evaluation and treatment, and outcome in primary leptomeningeal lymphoma, a rare form of primary CNS lymphoma without parenchymal or systemic involvement. Methods: The International Primary CNS Lymphoma Collaborative Group, a multidisciplinary group of physicians with a particular interest in primary CNS lymphoma, retrospectively identified cases of lymphoma isolated to the leptomeninges as diagnosed by CSF cytology, flow cytometry, or biopsy, without systemic or parenchymal brain/spinal cord lymphoma or immunodeficiency. Results: Forty-eight patients were identified, with median age at diagnosis of 51 years and median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2. Presenting symptoms were multifocal in 68%. Leptomeningeal enhancement was seen in 74% and CSF profile was abnormal in all cases. CSF cytology detected malignant lymphocytes in 67%. Flow cytometry identified monoclonal population in 80%, as did receptor gene rearrangement studies in 71%. Sixty-two percent had B-cell lymphoma, 19% T-cell, and 19% unclassified. Treatment varied and included fractionated radiotherapy (36%), systemic chemotherapy (78%), and intra-CSF chemotherapy (66%), with 66% receiving ?2 modalities. Seventy-one percent had a favorable clinical response; ultimately, 44% received salvage treatment. Median overall survival was 24 months, with 11 patients still alive at 50 months follow-up. Conclusion: Primary leptomeningeal lymphoma is a rare form of primary CNS lymphoma. Patients usually present with multifocal symptoms, with evidence of leptomeningeal enhancement and diagnostic CSF analysis. Although treatment is highly variable, patients have a better prognosis than previously reported and a subset may be cured. PMID:24107866

Taylor, Jennie W.; Flanagan, Eoin P.; O'Neill, Brian P.; Siegal, Tali; Omuro, Antonio; DeAngelis, Lisa; Baehring, Joachim; Nishikawa, Ryo; Pinto, Fernando; Chamberlain, Marc; Hoang-Xuan, Khe; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Alberto; Batchelor, Tracy; Blay, Jean-Yves; Korfel, Agnieszka; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Lopes, Maria-Beatriz S.

2013-01-01

85

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... harmful substances out of the body. About Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a disease in which cancer cells ... cells) and are grouped under the heading of Hodgkin lymphoma. All other forms of lymphoma fall into ...

86

Stages of AIDS-Related Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... follows: Peripheral/systemic lymphoma Primary CNS lymphoma After AIDS-related lymphoma has been diagnosed, tests are done ... to other parts of the body. Stages of AIDS-related lymphoma may include E and S. AIDS-related ...

87

Autophagy and pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the exocrine pancreas that carries considerable morbidity and mortality; its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Recent findings from experimental models and genetically altered mice summarized in this review reveal that autophagy, the principal cellular degradative pathway, is impaired in pancreatitis and that one cause of autophagy impairment is defective function of lysosomes. We propose that the lysosomal/autophagic dysfunction is a key initiating event in pancreatitis and a converging point of multiple deranged pathways. There is strong evidence supporting this hypothesis. Investigation of autophagy in pancreatitis has just started, and many questions about the “upstream” mechanisms mediating the lysosomal/autophagic dysfunction and the “downstream” links to pancreatitis pathologies need to be explored. Answers to these questions should provide insight into novel molecular targets and therapeutic strategies for treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:22961802

Gukovsky, Ilya

2012-01-01

88

How Is Pancreatic Cancer Diagnosed?  

MedlinePLUS

... is low blood glucose with high levels of insulin and C-peptide. Other pancreatic hormones, such as gastrin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide, and VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide) ...

89

Nutrition in Acute Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Acute pancreatitis is one of the most common diseases in gastroenterology\\/surgery. The incidence of acute pancreatitis ranges\\u000a from 10 to 46 per 100,000 people per year. Recent studies have suggested a slightly higher incidence of acute pancreatitis\\u000a at 56.5 per 100,000 people, which may be linked to socioeconomic deprivation (Ellis et al. 2009). Two percent of all hospital\\u000a admissions are

Hemant M. Kocher; Christos Dervenis; Attila Oláh; William R. Murray; Barry Clements; Clement W. Imrie

90

Ixazomib Citrate in Treating Patients With Untreated B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2015-03-16

91

Pancreatic Pseudocyst: Therapeutic Dilemma  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic pseudocyst develops in both acute and chronic pancreatitis. It is an entity likely to either remain asymptomatic or develop devastating complications. Despite being diagnosed easily, treatment exercise is still at crossroads whether in the form of internal or external drainage or endoscopic, laparoscopic, or open intervention with a good radiological guidance. The therapeutic dilemma whether to treat a patient with a pancreatic pseudocyst, as well as when and with what technique, is a difficult one. This paper is intended to get information about diagnostic and therapeutic exercises most appropriate for acute and chronic pancreatic pseudocyst. PMID:22577595

Khanna, A. K.; Tiwary, Satyendra K.; Kumar, Puneet

2012-01-01

92

Pancreatitis, pregnancy and gallstones.  

PubMed

In an 18 year hospital experience of over 500 patients with primary acute pancreatitis, 20 developed the disease either while pregnant (7 patients) or within five months of pregnancy (13 patients). Eighteen of the 20 patients had gallstones and adequate biliary surgery abolished further attacks of pancreatitis. Only two patients had surgery during the acute phase of their illness. The single fetal death was associated with early surgical intervention and there were no maternal deaths. We found no evidence of a specific link between pregnancy and pancreatitis but there is a marked association between pancreatitis and gallstones. PMID:7362789

McKay, A J; O'Neill, J; Imrie, C W

1980-01-01

93

Lymphoma Coding Guidelines  

Cancer.gov

Coding Guidelines LYMPHOMA M9590/3-M9738/3 See the Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Neoplasm Case Reportability and Coding Manual and the Hematopoietic Database (DB) for more information and coding instructions. First Course of Therapy Do not code

94

Lymphoma Research Foundation  

MedlinePLUS

... HOPE Inspirational Stories from Members of the Lymphoma Community "After surviving DLBCL, long time Family Video employee ... Fundraising Events Attend a Patient Program Event Calendar Community Engagement Become an Advocate Opportunities for Health Care ...

95

Marginal Zone Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... parts of the body, including the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, blood, or other organs, and form ... marginal zone lymphoma occurs most often in the spleen and blood. It has been associated with Hepatitis ...

96

Staging Primary CNS Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... normal cells than chemotherapy or radiation therapy do. Monoclonal antibody therapy is one type of targeted therapy being studied in the treatment of primary CNS lymphoma. Monoclonal antibody therapy is a cancer treatment that uses antibodies made ...

97

International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium  

Cancer.gov

The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Formed in 2001, the Consortium is a group of international investigators who have completed or have ongoing case-control studies and who discuss and undertake research projects that pool data across studies or otherwise undertake collaborative research.

98

Pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & Aims: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) maintains a computerized file of all hospital discharges since 1970. In taking advantage of this large database, the present study aimed to determine whether pancreatitis is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Methods: A case control study compared the occurrence of pancreatitis in 2639 patients with pancreatic cancer and a matched

Pradeep Bansal; Amnon Sonnenberg

1995-01-01

99

Pancreatitis in cats.  

PubMed

Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids. PMID:23148855

Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

2012-08-01

100

Testosterone protects against glucotoxicity-induced apoptosis of pancreatic ?-cells (INS-1) and male mouse pancreatic islets.  

PubMed

Male hypogonadism associates with type 2 diabetes, and T can protect pancreatic ?-cells from glucotoxicity. However, the protective mechanism is still unclear. This study thus aims to examine the antiapoptotic mechanism of T in pancreatic ? cells cultured in high-glucose medium. T (0.0005-2 ?g/mL) was added to INS-1 cells cultured in basal glucose or high-glucose media. Then cellular apoptosis, oxidative stress, and cell viability were measured. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers and sensors and the antiapoptotic protein (B-cell lymphoma 2) were investigated by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. ER stress markers were also measured in male mouse pancreatic islet cultured in similar conditions. T (0.05 and 0.5 ?g/mL) did not have any effect on apoptosis and viability of INS-1 cells cultured in basal glucose medium, but it could reduce apoptosis and increase viability of INS-1 cells cultured in high-glucose medium. The protective effect of T is diminished by androgen receptor inhibitor. T (0.05 ?g/mL) could significantly reduce nitrotyrosine levels, mRNA, and protein levels of the ER stress markers and sensor those that were induced when INS-1 cells were cultured in high-glucose medium. It could also significantly increase the survival proteins, sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase-2, and B-cell lymphoma 2 in INS-1 cells cultured in the same conditions. Similarly, it could reduce ER stress markers and increase sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase protein levels in male mouse pancreatic islets cultured in high-glucose medium. T can protect against male pancreatic ?-cell apoptosis from glucotoxicity via the reduction of both oxidative stress and ER stress. PMID:23970784

Hanchang, Wanthanee; Semprasert, Namoiy; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai; Kooptiwut, Suwattanee

2013-11-01

101

506U78 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or T-cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-22

102

Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Unfavorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

2014-05-07

103

Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

2013-10-30

104

Obatoclax and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Aggressive Relapsed or Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2013-05-01

105

Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis that is increasingly being reported. The presentation and clinical image findings of AIP sometimes resemble those of several pancreatic malignancies, but the therapeutic strategy differs appreciably. Therefore, accurate diagnosis is necessary for cases of AIP. To date, AIP is classified into two distinct subtypes from the viewpoints of etiology, serum markers, histology, other organ involvements, and frequency of relapse: type 1 is related to IgG4 (lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis) and type 2 is related to a granulocytic epithelial lesion (idiopathic duct-centric chronic pancreatitis). Both types of AIP are characterized by focal or diffuse pancreatic enlargement accompanied with a narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, and both show dramatic responses to corticosteroid. Unlike type 2, type 1 is characteristically associated with increasing levels of serum IgG4 and positive serum autoantibodies, abundant infiltration of IgG4-positive plasmacytes, frequent extrapancreatic lesions, and relapse. These findings have led several countries to propose diagnostic criteria for AIP, which consist of essentially similar diagnostic items; however, several differences exist for each country, mainly due to differences in the definition of AIP and the modalities used to diagnose this disease. An attempt to unite the diagnostic criteria worldwide was made with the publication in 2011 of the international consensus diagnostic criteria for AIP, established at the 2010 Congress of the International Association of Pancreatology (IAP). PMID:25469024

Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Kakushima, Naomi; Takizawa, Kohei; Tanaka, Masaki; Imai, Kenichiro; Hotta, Kinichi; Ono, Hiroyuki

2014-01-01

106

Progress Against Follicular Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review We wish to share recent progress in research and new therapies against follicular lymphoma (FL) and highlight exciting opportunities to improve the treatment of FL. Recent findings Follicular lymphoma has been somewhat neglected by the research community, but recent genomic studies have identified key genetic lesions in FL. In addition, a new murine model is available to explore the function of these lesions in development, progression, and treatment of FL. Moreover, new small molecule inhibitors are now available that target key pathways in FL including B-cell receptor signaling and histone modifiers. Summary FL is a very common and still incurable form of lymphoma. However recent genomic and in vivo biological studies are beginning to unveil the molecular drivers of FL. This coincides with the development of effective small molecule inhibitors against key targets. Together these developments suggest that we are at a long overdue watershed moment in the treatment of FL. PMID:23673338

Schatz, Jonathan H.; Oricchio, Elisa; Puvvada, Soham D.; Wendel, H. Guido

2013-01-01

107

[Treatment of acute pancreatitis].  

PubMed

The experience with the treatment of 482 patients with acute pancreatitis under the conditions of a central district hospital is presented. An outline for the conservative treatment depending upon the severity of the patient's status, when admitted to a surgical department, is suggested. 80 cases were operated upon; most of them with destructive forms of pancreatitis and with complications of the disease. The success of the treatment of acute pancreatitis depends upon complex, intensive conservative treatment rendered in due time. Total lethality was 6.2%, the postoperative one-32.5%. PMID:695204

Guzeev, A I

1978-08-01

108

[Complications in acute pancreatitis].  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is discussed from the point of view her complications. The survey of local, organ and system complication is demonstrated, and the Atlanta classification is recalled. The complications are demonstrated at the mild acute pancreatitis and also at the severe acute pancreatitis. The complications are demonstrated on the own group of patients (period 1995-1997). Severe respiratory failure came later, but the letality was high. The renale or hepatorenale failure came formerly and equally as DIC were combined with practically absolutely letality. PMID:10084859

Krska, Z; Pesková, M; Sváb, J; Výborný, J

1998-12-01

109

Radiation therapy for orbital lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To describe radiation techniques and evaluate outcomes for orbital lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients (and 62 eyes) with orbital lymphoma treated with radiotherapy between 1987 and 2003 were included. The majority had mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (48%) or follicular (30%) lymphoma. Seventeen patients had prior lymphoma at other sites, and 29 had primary orbital lymphoma. Median follow-up was 46 months. Results: The median dose was 30.6 Gy; one-third received <30 Gy. Electrons were used in 9 eyes with disease confined to the conjunctiva or eyelid, and photons in 53 eyes with involvement of intraorbital tissues to cover entire orbit. Local control rate was 98% for all patients and 100% for those with indolent lymphoma. Three of the 26 patients with localized primary lymphoma failed distantly, resulting in a 5-year freedom-from-distant-relapse rate of 89%. The 5-year disease-specific and overall survival rates were 95% and 88%, respectively. Late toxicity was mainly cataract formation in patients who received radiation without lens block. Conclusions A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for indolent orbital lymphoma. Distant relapse rate in patients with localized orbital lymphoma was lower than that reported for low-grade lymphoma presenting in other sites. Orbital radiotherapy can be used for salvage of recurrent indolent lymphoma.

Zhou Ping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: pzhou@partners.org; Ng, Andrea K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Silver, Barbara [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Li Sigui [Department of Biostatistical Sciences, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Hua Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Mauch, Peter M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2005-11-01

110

Molecular Profiling of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma and Chronic Pancreatitis Identifies Multiple Genes Differentially Regulated in Pancreatic Cancer 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The molecular basis of pancreatic cancer is not understood. Previous attempts to determine the specific genes expressed in pancreatic cancer have been hampered by similarities between adenocarcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. In the current study, microarrays (Affymetrix) were used to profile gene expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (10), pancreatic cancer cell lines (7), chronic pancreatitis (5), and normal pancreas (5). Molecular profiling

Craig D. Logsdon; Diane M. Simeone; Charles Binkley; Thiruvengadam Arumugam; Joel K. Greenson; Thomas J. Giordano; David E. Misek; Samir Hanash

2003-01-01

111

Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-09-02

112

Molecular marker from pancreatic 'juices' helps identify pancreatic cancer  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have developed a promising method to distinguish between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis — two disorders that are difficult to tell apart. A molecular marker obtained from pancreatic "juices" can identify almost all cases of pancreatic cancer, their study shows. The findings were being presented at Digestive Disease Week 2013 in Orlando, Fla. Pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis both produce the same signs of disease in the pancreas, such as inflammation, but cancer in the organ is a life-threatening disorder that must be treated immediately and aggressively.

113

Missing pancreatic isthmus during pancreaticoduodenectomy  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic malformations usually represent a surgical challenge, however, depending on the anatomical location even complex procedures such as pancreatic head resection may be facilitated. In a 78-year-old-woman the unique observation of a missing pancreatic isthmus was made during pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Resection of the pancreatic head could be performed without the usual cross-section at the isthmus, the pancreatic remnant was drained by pancreaticogastrostomy. Complete agenesis of the dorsal pancreas with missing neck, body and tail of the pancreas has been shown to be associated with malignant pancreatic tumors, as demonstrated in this case of partial agenesis (missing isthmus) of the dorsal pancreas. The missing pancreatic isthmus is a unique, not yet described finding during pancreatic exploration for tumor resection. In the absence of previous abdominal trauma, a partial agenesis of the dorsal pancreas could explain this malformation. PMID:25733670

Knoop, Michael; Weinhold, Manon; Becker, Andreas

2015-01-01

114

Pancreatic Cancer Action Network  

MedlinePLUS

Skip to content Top Menu Facing Pancreatic Cancer One-to-One Support Overview Call us with your questions Email us with your questions Request an information packet Recently Diagnosed Overview Get ...

115

Pancreatic enzyme replacement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of the addition of sodium bicarbonate, aluminum hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, or cimetidine to supplemental pancreatic enzyme therapy was investigated in patients with severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Steatorrhea was reduced with the administration of three enzyme tablets with meals (73 vs 29 g\\/24 hr). The coadministration of enzyme tablets with either sodium bicarbonate (16.6 g\\/24 hr,P=0.08), or

David Y. Graham

1982-01-01

116

Arsenic-Induced Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide has brought about tremendous advancement in the treatment of acute promyelocytic myelogenous leukemia (APML). In most instances, the benefits of these treatments outweigh the risks associated with their respective safety profiles. Although acute pancreatitis is not commonly associated with arsenic toxicity, it should be considered as a possible side effect. We report a case of arsenic-induced pancreatitis in a patient with APML. PMID:22606427

Connelly, Sean; Zancosky, Krysia; Farah, Katie

2011-01-01

117

Chemoprevention for pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

For a number of solid tumors, including pancreatic cancer, efforts aimed at disease prevention may be more successful than\\u000a currently available anticancer treatments. While specific interventions are emerging to prevent breast, prostate, lung, and\\u000a colorectal cancer, no trials of chemoprevention are being conducted in pancreatic cancer. Importantly, there are significant\\u000a obstacles to the conduct of such research. However, preclinical and

Robert A. Wolff

2003-01-01

118

Primary gastric Hodgkin's lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Primary Hodgkin's disease of the stomach is an extremely rare entity. Nearly all cases of primary gastric lymphoma are of the non-Hodgkin's variety. Diagnoses in such cases are difficult due to considerable histological similarities between the 2 disease entities. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a 77 year old lady with a 1 year history of weight loss

Fahad S Hossain; Yashwant Koak; Farrukh H Khan

2007-01-01

119

Lymphoma Steering Committee Roster  

Cancer.gov

Lymphoma Steering Committee Roster Co-chairs Ranjana Advani, M.D. Stanford University Medical Center Palo Alto, CA Thomas Witzig, M.D. Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN Members Stephen Ansell, M.D., Ph.D. Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN Michael Crump, M.D. Princess

120

Lymphoma Steering Committee Roster  

Cancer.gov

Lymphoma Steering Committee Roster Co-chairs Oliver Press, M.D.Fred Hutchinson Cancer CenterSeattle, WAD Julie M. Vose, M.D.University of Nebraska Medical CenterOmaha, NE Members Michael Crump, M.D.Princess Margaret HospitalToronto, Canada Stephen Forman,

121

Tropical chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients. PMID:14654569

Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

2003-01-01

122

Cutaneous malignant lymphomas: update 2006.  

PubMed

Cutaneous lymphomas represent a unique group of lymphomas and are the second most frequent extranodal lymphomas. As with other neoplasias, the pathogenesis is based mainly on a stepwise accumulation of mutations of suppressor genes and oncogenes caused by genetic, environmental or infectious factors. The diagnostic work-up includes clinical, histological, imaging and hematological investigations and in many cases immunohistochemical and molecular biological analyses. The current WHO/EORTC classification of cutaneous lymphomas differentiates "mature T-cell and NK-cell lymphomas", "mature B-cell lymphomas" and "immature hematopoietic malignancies", their variants and subgroups. It is compatible with the WHO classification for neoplasias of the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissue and respects the organ-specific peculiarities of primary cutaneous lymphomas. The assignment of the various types of cutaneous lymphomas into prognostic categories (pre-lymphomatous "abortive" disorders; definite malignant lymphomas of low-grade malignancy; definite malignant lymphomas of high-grade malignancy) provides essential information on the biological behavior and allows an appropriate planning of the therapeutic strategy, which may be topical or systemic and aggressive or non-aggressive. Besides the classical options for therapy, there are new and "experimental" strategies, the efficacy of which has to be studied in clinical trials. PMID:17081267

Burg, Günter; Kempf, Werner; Cozzio, Antonio; Döbbeling, Udo; Feit, Josef; Golling, Philippa; Michaelis, Sonja; Schärer, Leo; Nestle, Frank; Dummer, Reinhard

2006-11-01

123

Treatment Options for Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... Search for Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®) Treatment Options for Children and Adolescents with Hodgkin Lymphoma Low-Risk Classical Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment ...

124

Lymphoma Guide: Information for Patients and Caregivers  

MedlinePLUS

... more information? HL The Lymphoma Guide I page Lymphoma Stages Patients are also divided into “A” or “B” ... do other tests to stage the disease. See Lymphoma Stages on page 15 for descriptions of the stages. ...

125

Treatment Options for AIDS-Related Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... Dictionary Search for Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®) Treatment Options for AIDS-Related Lymphoma AIDS-Related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma There ...

126

Treatment Option Overview (AIDS Related-Lymphoma)  

MedlinePLUS

... are different types of treatment for patients with AIDS-related lymphoma. Different types of treatment are available ... patients who have not started treatment. Treatment of AIDS-related lymphoma combines treatment of the lymphoma with ...

127

Panobinostat and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-10-13

128

Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed to be involved in the underlying immune reaction. IgG4 antibodies have two unique biological functions, Fab-arm exchange and a rheumatoid factor-like activity, both of which may play immune-defensive roles. However, the exact role of IgG4 in this disease still remains to be clarified. It seems important to recognize this unique entity given that the disease is treatable with steroids. PMID:22151922

2011-01-01

129

SGN-30 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

2015-02-10

130

Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis). Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson's disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis. PMID:24083160

Kota, Sunil Kumar; Krishna, S V S; Lakhtakia, Sandeep; Modi, Kirtikumar D

2013-09-01

131

General Information about Pancreatic Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... on Unusual Cancers of Childhood . Smoking and health history can affect the risk of pancreatic cancer. Anything ... following: Smoking. Being very overweight. Having a personal history of diabetes or chronic pancreatitis . Having a family ...

132

Pancreatic trauma: A concise review  

PubMed Central

Traumatic injury to the pancreas is rare and difficult to diagnose. In contrast, traumatic injuries to the liver, spleen and kidney are common and are usually identified with ease by imaging modalities. Pancreatic injuries are usually subtle to identify by different diagnostic imaging modalities, and these injuries are often overlooked in cases with extensive multiorgan trauma. The most evident findings of pancreatic injury are post-traumatic pancreatitis with blood, edema, and soft tissue infiltration of the anterior pararenal space. The alterations of post-traumatic pancreatitis may not be visualized within several hours following trauma as they are time dependent. Delayed diagnoses of traumatic pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of pancreatic injuries because early recognition of the disruption of the main pancreatic duct is important. We reviewed our experience with the use of various imaging modalities for diagnosis of blunt pancreatic trauma. PMID:24379625

Debi, Uma; Kaur, Ravinder; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sinha, Anindita; Singh, Kartar

2013-01-01

133

Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.  

PubMed

During August 1989-August 1994 at the referral-based obstetric practice of MacKay Memorial Hospital in Taipei, Taiwan, obstetricians saw 8 pregnant women with acute pancreatitis. All but 1 patient had gallstones and/or hyperlipidemia. None had ever been diagnosed with pancreatitis or gallstones in the past. None suffered from alcoholism. One woman was lost to follow-up at 33 weeks gestation. No pregnant woman died. Magnesium sulfate and nifedipine controlled preterm labor in 2 patients. Two women underwent cesarean section (fetal distress and elective). Pancreatitis struck all but 1 during the 3rd trimester of pregnancy. One woman presented at 23 weeks gestation with loss of consciousness, abnormally low volume of circulating plasma in the body, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and a dead fetus. She also had diabetes mellitus which had gone untreated for 2 years. After spontaneous delivery of the dead fetus, she developed metabolic encephalopathy, sepsis, respiratory distress, and acute renal failure. She completely recovered and left the hospital 62 days after arriving. Physicians instituted conservative treatment for pancreatitis and a fat-restricted diet for hyperlipidemia. Labor was induced in 3 women after determining fetal lung maturity. Pancreatitis symptoms diminished after delivery. At 2 weeks postpartum, they underwent cholecystectomy. In fact, all but 3 women underwent cholecystectomy. Five patients had a fever greater than 38 degrees Celsius upon admission. Three patients were jaundiced. All 8 patients experienced nausea and/or vomiting and abdominal pain. Six women had low serum calcium levels. Only 1 had a serum lactic dehydrogenase level above 350 IU/L. Primiparous women were just as likely to develop pancreatitis during pregnancy as multiparous women. These findings suggest that early diagnosis and prompt treatment of acute pancreatitis are essential to a favorable outcome. PMID:7660765

Chen, C P; Wang, K G; Su, T H; Yang, Y C

1995-09-01

134

Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

Petrov, Max

2013-01-01

135

Uncommon pancreatic tumors and pseudotumors.  

PubMed

A heterogeneous group of uncommon neoplastic and non-neoplastic pancreatic pathologies exists that can mimic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. These "imitators" are unique and may demonstrate characteristic clinical and imaging features. Imaging characteristics of some of these diverse lesions are not well described in the literature, and erroneous diagnoses of these entities as pancreatic carcinoma may be responsible for unnecessary surgeries. Knowledge of these selected pancreatic pathologies is essential to facilitate optimal patient management. PMID:25063236

Lalwani, Neeraj; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ganeshan, Dhakshina Moorthy; Shanbhogue, Alampady K; Dighe, Manjiri K; Tiwari, Hina Arif; Maximin, Suresh; Monti, Serena; Ragucci, Monica; Prasad, Srinivasa R

2015-01-01

136

Proteomics of Human Pancreatic Juice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic juice has recently been characterized in detail using proteomic methods. The cataloging of proteins from healthy\\u000a individuals and those diagnosed with pancreatic cancer has revealed the presence of a number of proteins in pancreatic juice\\u000a that could serve as potential biomarkers for cancer. Because obtaining pancreatic juice is not trivial, it is possible that\\u000a these biomarkers can be detected

Mads Grønborg; Anirban Maitra; Akhilesh Pandey

137

Pancreatic carcinoma in a cockatiel.  

PubMed

A female cockatiel was examined because of abdominal distention, decreased appetite, and weight loss. Although abdominocentesis, bacteriologic culture, radiography, and ultrasonography were performed, the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma was obtained only after exploratory laparotomy and histologic examination. The resected abdominal mass was pancreatic carcinoma. The bird survived for 56 days after surgery. Necropsy confirmed abdominal metastatic pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:3654323

Swartout, M S; Wyman, M

1987-08-15

138

Chronic pancreatitis in African diabetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Steatorrhea due to chronic pancreatitis was found in 23% of a consecutive series of 107 new African diabetics; 3 had pancreatic calcification. Of 16, 14 had definitely abnormal exocrine secretion on pancreatic function testing using secretin-pancreozymin stimulation. The morphology and function of the small intestine were normal by local standards. When compared with diabetics without steatorrhea they weighed less, their

A. C. B. Wicks; D. J. Clain

1975-01-01

139

Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma

2015-03-10

140

Clinical pancreatic disorder I: Acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

The Annual American Pancreas Club is an important event for communicating around clinical pancreatic disorders, just as the European, Japanese, Indian, and the International Pancreatic association. Even though the meeting is only 1½ day there were 169 different abstracts and a "How do I do it session." Among all these abstracts on the pancreas there are some real pearls, but they are almost always well hidden, never highlighted - all abstracts are similarly presented - and will too soon be forgotten. The present filing of the abstracts is one way (not the way) to get the pancreatic abstracts a little more read and a little more remembered - and perhaps a little more cited. It should also be understood that most of the abstracts are short summaries of hundreds of working hours (evenings, nights, weekends, holidays, you name them …) in the laboratory or in the clinic, often combined with blood, sweat and tears. The authors should be shown at least some respect, and their abstracts should not only be thought of as "just another little abstract" - and the best respect they can be shown are that they will be remembered to be another brick in our scientific wall.Now the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011 are gathered and filed with the aim to give them a larger audience than they have had in their original abstract book. However, it is obvious that most of clinical fellows do not have time to read all the abstracts. For them I have made a "clinical highlight section" of 10 percent of all the pancreatic abstracts. If someone else should have done some collection of abstract, there should probably have been other selections, but as this is not the case, the editor's choices are the highlighted ones.The article as series I of clinical highlight section is present, and more series will be present in the following issues. If readers will remember some of the abstracts better after reading this "abstract of abstracts", it was worth the efforts - and without efforts there will be little progress. PMID:22555122

Andrén-Sandberg, Ake

2011-07-01

141

[Groove pancreatitis: a rare segmental form of chronic pancreatitis].  

PubMed

Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of segmental chronic pancreatitis which is localized within the head of the pancreas, the duodenum and the common bile duct. Symptoms are due to common bile duct stenosis or duodenal stenosis. Radiologically, there is a pancreatic mass, which hinders differential diagnosis with pancreatic carcinoma. We report here a case of groove pancreatitis observed in a 41-year-old man treated by pancreatoduodenectomy. Histological features of the groove scar were noted. Our case and cases reported in the literature lead to hypotheses concerning the pathogenesis and clinical, biological, and radiological features suggestive of the diagnosis. PMID:12193865

Brihier, Hélène; Perlemuter, Gabriel; Boytchev, Isabelle; Kuoch, Viseth; Lorand, Isabelle; Lazure, Thierry; Buffet, Catherine

2002-01-01

142

Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD).  

PubMed

Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) is an uncommon form of diabetes that occurs as a result of chronic calcific pancreatitis, in the absence of alcohol abuse. The disease is restricted to tropical regions of the world, and southern India has the highest known prevalence of FCPD. The typical patient with FCPD is a lean adolescent or young adult of either sex, presenting with history of recurrent bouts of abdominal pain and steatorrhea. Demonstration of large, discrete pancreatic calculi by plain radiographs or ultrasonography of the abdomen is diagnostic. While the exact etiology of FCPD is unknown, genetic, nutritional and inflammatory factors have been hypothesized to play a role. Diabetes in FCPD is often brittle and difficult to control; most patients require multiple doses of insulin for control of glycemia. However, in spite of high blood glucose levels, patients rarely develop ketosis. Malabsorption responds to pancreatic enzyme supplementation. Surgical removal of stones is indicated for symptomatic relief of intractable pain. While patients with FCPD develop microvascular complications as frequently as those with type 2 diabetes, macrovascular disease is uncommon. Development of pancreatic malignancy is the most dreaded complication and should be suspected in any patient who complains of weight loss, back pain or jaundice. PMID:25395047

Unnikrishnan, Ranjit; Mohan, Viswanathan

2015-02-01

143

Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This chapter covers T and B lymphoblastic neoplasms, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and lymphoblastic lymphoma\\u000a (LBL). Morphologic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic features are discussed along with the parameters of various modalities\\u000a used in their diagnosis. The techniques and utility of minimum residual disease (MRD) measurement after therapy is discussed,\\u000a as are new insights into the molecular biology of leukemogenesis gleaned

Andrea M. Sheehan

144

Lymphoma Research Foundation: Patient Multimedia Library  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Lymphoma Research Foundation (LRF) is a "voluntary health organization devoted exclusively to funding lymphoma research and providing patients and healthcare professionals with critical information on the disease." The LRF Patient Multimedia Library offers an archived collection of informative online articles and videos addressing different aspects of lymphoma. Library categories include Lymphoma Overview, Lymphoma Treatment, Coping Issues, Clinical Trials, and Advocacy Issues. Examples of video and article titles include Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma 101; A Genetic Look at Lymphoma; Treating Lymphoma: Will a Customized Vaccine Work; Accuracy in Lymphoma Diagnosis; The Thriving Survivor; and more. The Library also offers archived videos from a 2003 Educational Forum on Lymphoma. In addition to the Library, the LRF site contains sections on Research, Lymphoma Education, Patient Conferences, and Patient Support.

145

Burkitt lymphoma in adults.  

PubMed

The diagnosis of Burkitt Lymphoma (BL) and B-cell lymphomas unclassifiable with features intermediate between Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma and BL (BLU) in adults remains problematic even with immunophenotyping and MYC gene analysis. Gene expression profiling may improve categorization but is not routinely available. BL and its variants should be treated with specific regimens incorporating intensive courses of chemotherapy with fractionated alkylating agents and cell cycle phase-specific agents that readily cross the blood brain barrier. Subsequent courses should be given as soon as haematological recovery occurs, with the whole course completed within a few months. A number of regimens have been developed that encompass these principles but there have been no comparative randomized trials. The results from several studies suggest that the addition of rituximab is highly efficacious and this may be particularly valuable in older patients. It is usual to employ 'risk-adapted' strategies in the treatment of BL but these must be continually re-evaluated, and 'response-adapted' approaches should be explored. The role of transplantation is limited and largely confined to autologous transplants in patients who only achieve a partial response on front-line therapy or who have a chemosensitive relapse. Further advances will be greatly facilitated by randomized trials, which will require international collaboration. PMID:21923642

Linch, David C

2012-03-01

146

Oblimersen Sodium and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-05-13

147

[Diagnostics and treatment of choroidal lymphoma].  

PubMed

Choroidal lymphoma is a rare disease and can be classified into primary and secondary choroidal lymphomas. Primary choroidal lymphoma is a low-grade extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma and secondary choroidal lymphomas present ocular manifestations of disseminated systemic lymphomas. Typical clinical features of choroidal lymphoma are multifocal, yellow-whitish choroidal infiltrates. The vitreous body is usually clear and cell-free. Choroidal lymphoma has a tendency to extend through the sclera. In contrast to primary choroidal lymphoma, which is more often unilateral, does not show signs of anterior segment involvement and has a slow progression, secondary choroidal lymphoma is more often bilateral, has a rapidly progressive course with anterior segment and vitreous involvement and belongs to the high-grade lymphomas. The definitive diagnosis of choroidal lymphoma can only be confirmed by histopathological examination of biopsy tissue. The choroidal biopsy is the gold standard in the diagnostics of choroidal lymphoma. To date, no standardized treatment for choroidal lymphoma has been established. The treatment modalities include external beam radiotherapy, immunotherapy with rituximab and chemotherapy. The prognosis for survival of primary choroidal lymphoma is usually good. The prognosis of secondary choroidal lymphoma depends on the malignancy grade of systemic lymphoma. PMID:25693876

Doycheva, D; Zierhut, M; Süsskind, D; Bartz-Schmidt, K U; Deuter, C

2015-03-01

148

Laparoscopic pancreatic surgery.  

PubMed

Laparoscopic pancreatectomy may be associated with lower operative morbidity, less postoperative pain, lower wound infection rates, decreased physiological stress, and fewer postoperative hernias and bowel obstructions. In this review, we summarize the current data on laparoscopic and robotic assisted pancreaticoduodenectomy/distal pancreatectomy/central pancreatectomy. We reviewed the indications, the perioperative and oncologic outcomes, and the cost analysis following minimally invasive pancreatic resections. In conclusion, we found minimally invasive approaches to pancreatic resections are feasible, safe, and appear to have comparable oncologic outcomes to the standard open approaches when performed by experienced surgeons at high-volume centers. The potential advantages of a minimally invasive approach to pancreatic surgery, such as reduced blood loss and shorter length of hospital stay, have now been well established. The overall cost of laparoscopic pancreatectomy appears to be similar to that of the open approach. PMID:25077736

He, J; Pawlik, T M; Makary, M A; Wolfgang, C L; Weiss, M J

2014-12-01

149

Imaging in pancreatic transplants  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic transplantation, performed alone or in conjunction with kidney transplantation, is an effective treatment for advanced type I diabetes mellitus and select patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Following advancements in surgical technique, postoperative management, and immunosuppression, pancreatic transplantation has significantly improved the length and quality of life for patients suffering from pancreatic dysfunction. While computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have more limited utility, ultrasound is the preferred initial imaging modality to evaluate the transplanted pancreas; gray-scale assesses the parenchyma and fluid collections, while Doppler interrogation assesses vascular flow and viability. Ultrasound is also useful to guide percutaneous interventions for the transplanted pancreas. With knowledge of the surgical anatomy and common complications, the abdominal radiologist plays a central role in the perioperative and postoperative evaluation of the transplanted pancreas. PMID:25489127

Heller, Matthew T; Bhargava, Puneet

2014-01-01

150

MDX-010 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-05-22

151

Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP who have failed to respond to medical therapy and require intervention. PMID:24115811

Tandan, Manu; Reddy, D Nageshwar

2013-01-01

152

Geldanamycin Analogue in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2013-12-13

153

Gallstone pancreatitis: a review.  

PubMed

Gallstone disease is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis in the Western world. In most cases, gallstone pancreatitis is a mild and self-limiting disease, and patients may proceed without complications to cholecystectomy to prevent future recurrence. Severe disease occurs in about 20% of cases and is associated with significant mortality; meticulous management is critical. A thorough understanding of the disease process, diagnosis, severity stratification, and principles of management is essential to the appropriate care of patients presenting with this disease. This article reviews these topics with a focus on surgical management, including appropriate timing and choice of interventions. PMID:24679420

Cucher, Daniel; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Green, Donald J; Jie, Tun; Ong, Evan S

2014-04-01

154

Cystic pancreatic lymphangioma.  

PubMed

Lymphangioma of the pancreas is a rare benign tumor of lymphatic origin. Retroperitoneal lymphangiomas account for 1% of all lymphangiomas. Herein, we report a case of cystic pancreatic lymphangioma diagnosed in 34 year-old female patient who was hospitalized for a slight pain in the epigastrium and vomiting. Radiological imaging revealed a large multiloculated cystic abdominal mass with enhancing septations involving the upper retroperitoneum. During the laparoscopic surgery, a well circumscribed polycystic tumor was completely excised preserving the pancreatic duct. The patient made a complete recovery and is disease-free 12 months postoperatively. PMID:22826784

Gure?, Nazim; Gurluler, Ercument; Alim, Altan; Berber, Ibrahim; Gurkan, Alihan

2012-04-12

155

Endoscopic management of acute biliary pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis represents numerous unique challenges to the practicing digestive disease specialist. Clinical presentations of acute pancreatitis vary from trivial pain to severe acute illness with a significant risk of death. Urgent endoscopic treatment of acute pancreatitis is considered when there is causal evidence of biliary pancreatitis. This article focuses on the diagnosis and endoscopic treatment of acute biliary pancreatitis. PMID:24079788

Kuo, Vincent C; Tarnasky, Paul R

2013-10-01

156

Lymphoma of the Urinary Bladder  

PubMed Central

Background. Lymphoma of the urinary bladder (LUB) is rare. Aims. To review the literature on LUB. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results. LUB can be either primary or secondary. The tumour has female predominance; most cases occur in middle-age women. Secondary LUB occurs in 10% to 25% of leukemias/lymphomas and in advanced-stage systemic lymphoma. Less than 100 cases have been reported. MALT typically affects adults older than 60 years; 75% are female. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is also common and may arise from transformation of MALT. LUB presents with haematuria, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, and abdominal or back pain. Macroscopic examination of LUBs show large discrete tumours centred in the dome or lateral walls of the bladder. Positive staining of LUB varies by the subtype of lymphoma; B-cell lymphomas are CD20 positive. MALT lymphoma is positively stained for CD20, CD19, and FMC7 and negatively stained for CD5, CD10, and CD11c. LUB stains negatively with Pan-keratin, vimentin, CK20, and CK7. MALT lymphoma exhibits t(11; 18)(q21: 21). Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the MALT type of LUB with no recurrence. Conclusions. LUB is diagnosed by its characteristic morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics. Radiotherapy is a useful treatment. PMID:24511310

Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

2014-01-01

157

Intraocular lymphoma: a clinical perspective  

PubMed Central

Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is a rare malignancy that is speculated to arise extraocularly, and preferentially invade and flourish in the ocular and CNS microenvironments. The eye is involved in about 20% of primary central nervous system lymphomas, but the brain is eventually involved in about 80% of PVRL. Most are B-cell lymphomas with small numbers of T-cell lymphomas metastatic to the vitreous and retina. Metastatic systemic B-cell lymphoma usually involves choroid. Primary choroidal lymphoma is rare. Intraocular lymphoma can usually be distinguished from uveitis clinically, although there are overlaps, which may be pronounced in eyes with a large component of reactive inflammation related to tumor surveillance and control. There are controversies in diagnosis and treatment. Diagnosis through examination of ocular fluid is technically difficult and can utilize cytology, immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, molecular detection of gene rearrangements, and cytokine profiling. Treatment of intraocular lymphoma without detectable CNS disease could consist of a full course of systemic chemotherapy with ocular adjunctive treatment, or ocular treatment alone depending on the preference of the clinical center. In ocular only cases where the vitreous has been debulked to improve vision and there is no sight-threatening involvement of the RPE, orbital irradiation or intravitreal chemotherapy stabilizes the intraocular process but does not seem to modify the CNS component, which can present symptomatically in an advanced state. This is a highly malignant disease with a poor prognosis. Close collaboration with a pathologist and oncologist, and good communication with patients is essential. PMID:23196650

Davis, J L

2013-01-01

158

Fenretinide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-09-30

159

Pancreatitis induced by nitrofurantoin.  

PubMed Central

The case of a woman is described who suffered from acute pancreatitis related to the ingestion of low dose nitrofurantoin, as shown by involuntary rechallenge. Because this is only the second case reported in published works, this side effect must be rare and is probably dependent on individual susceptibility. PMID:8200574

Christophe, J L

1994-01-01

160

Diabetes and pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Research suggests a possible link between type 2 diabetes and several malignancies. Animal models have shown that hyperinsulinemic state underlying diabetes promotes tumor formation through stimulation of insulin-IGF-1 pathway; a possible role of inflammation is also proposed. One such link which has been under considerable study for years is that between diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Although epidemiological evidence points towards a reciprocal link between the two, the cause-effect relationship still remains unclear. This link was the subject of a large German epidemiological study presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting 2014 (Abstract #1604), which underscored the link between diabetes and some cancers. Schmidt et al. performed a retrospective database analysis over a 12 year period and reported an increased risk of certain types of cancer in diabetic patients. The most significant association (HR 2.17) was found for pancreatic cancer. Given the high mortality of pancreatic cancer, prevention through timely screening could play an important role in improving prognosis. Older subjects with recent-onset diabetes represent a high-risk group and hence are potential targets for pancreatic cancer screening thereby enabling its early diagnosis at a curable stage. PMID:25076332

Burney, Saira; Irfan, Khadija; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Masud, Faisal

2014-07-01

161

[Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis].  

PubMed

In Japan, the frequency of acute pancreatitis is 27.7 per 100,000, which includes 1.4 % of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis(HTGP). Severity and complication rates with HTGP have been reported as higher in comparison to acute pancreatitis from other etiologies. Havel has suggested that hydrolysis of excessive triglyceride-rich lipoproteins releases high concentrations of free fatty acid(FFA). The FFA micelles injure the vascular endothelium and acinar cells of the pancreas, producing a self-perpetuating ischemic and acidic environment with resultant toxicity. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) abnormality has been reported to contribute to severe hypertriglyceridemia. However, patients without any LPL abnormality are often encountered clinically, suggesting that other factors may be involved in the development of severe hypertriglyceridemia. In 21 patients with HTGP, 9 patients(42.9 %) with apolipoprotein AV (ApoAV) Gly185-Cys polymorphism were observed, whereas 14.3 % with LPL gene variants. No patient had ApoCII deficiency. These results suggest that in addition to LPL gene variants, ApoAV variant may be numerously involved in HTGP. It is important for clinicians to routinely investigate pathogenesis of hypertriglyceridemia in case with pancreatitis because specific management may be needed. PMID:24205721

Nagayama, Daiji; Shirai, Kohji

2013-09-01

162

Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2014-12-02

163

Reduction of miR-29c enhances pancreatic cancer cell migration and stem cell-like phenotype.  

PubMed

The hallmarks of pancreatic cancer are limitless replicative potential as well as tissue invasion and metastasis, leading to an extremely aggressive disease with shockingly high lethality. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these characteristics remain largely unclear. Herein, we report the results of a differential miRNA expression screen that compared pancreatic cancer tissues and normal pancreatic tissues, where the pancreatic cancer tissues had highly downregulated miR-29c with relative Wnt cascade hyperactivation. MiR-29c directly suppressed the following Wnt upstream regulators: frequently rearranged in advanced T-cell lymphomas 2 (FRAT2), low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), Frizzled-4 (FZD4) and Frizzled-5 (FZD5). Furthermore, transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) inhibited miR-29c expression, leading to Wnt activation. Significantly, our results were consistent with an important correlation between miR-29c levels and TGF-? hyperactivation and the activated Wnt cascade in human pancreatic cancer specimens. These findings reveal a novel mechanism for Wnt hyperactivation in pancreatic cancer and may suggest a new target for clinical intervention in pancreatic cancer. PMID:25605017

Jiang, Jianxin; Yu, Chao; Chen, Meiyuan; Zhang, Hao; Tian, Se; Sun, Chengyi

2015-02-20

164

Vorinostat and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2010-12-08

165

Lenalidomide and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2015-03-02

166

Patient Derived Cancer Cell Lines in Identifying Molecular Changes in Patients With Previously Untreated Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Gemcitabine Hydrochloride-Based Chemotherapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

2015-04-07

167

Clinical and Pathologic Studies in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients Receiving Antibody Treatment  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Diffuse Large B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Follicular / Indolent B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Mantle Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Marginal Zone; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Peripheral T-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Waldenstr Macroglobulinemia

2011-05-31

168

Imaging of musculoskeletal lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Abstract Lymphoma of the musculoskeletal system involving the bone, muscle or skin is commonly due to secondary involvement from disseminated disease but can occasionally present as primary extranodal disease. Although radiological features are traditionally known to be non-specific, recognition of certain characteristics using summation of imaging modalities as well as knowledge of clinical features can help in making the diagnosis. Imaging also plays an integral role in treatment response assessments, especially via positron emission tomography/computed tomography functional imaging. PMID:24334414

Ong, Keh Oon

2013-01-01

169

Magnetic resonance imaging for acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis is characterized by acute chemical injury of the pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissue. The increased frequency of death in acute pancreatitis is directly correlated with the degree and progress of pancreatic necrosis. Moreover, the occurrence of some local complications in acute pancreatitis, such as pancreatic hemorrhage, peripancreatic abscess or large pseudocyst, and pseudoaneurysm, could influence the choice of treatment for these patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to help evaluate the presence and degree of pancreatic necrosis, and is crucial for identifying complications of acute pancreatitis and predicting prognosis. The purpose of this article is to describe MRI techniques for acute pancreatitis, to review the spectrum of pancreatic and peripancreatic patterns, as well as to survey various complications secondary to acute pancreatitis on MRI. The role of MRI in the initial evaluation and staging of acute pancreatitis is emphasized. PMID:21160684

Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

2010-01-01

170

Treatment Options by Stage (Pancreatic Cancer)  

MedlinePLUS

... Search for Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®) Treatment Options by Stage Stages I and II Pancreatic Cancer Treatment of stage I and stage II pancreatic cancer ...

171

Alisertib, Bortezomib, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma or B-cell Low Grade Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2014-11-21

172

Alterations in pancreatic ductal morphology following polyethylene pancreatic stent therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Polyethylene stents placed in the main pancreatic duct induce morphologic alterations that may resemble chronic pancreatitis.Methods: We reviewed the sequential pancreatograms of stented patients who had long-term follow-up after stent removal.Results: Forty patients (66%) had a normal baseline pancreatogram, whereas 21 (34%) showed changes of chronic pancreatitis. In 49 of 61 patients (80.3%), one or more had new morphologic

Milton T. Smith; Stuart Sherman; Steven O. Ikenberry; Robert H. Hawes; Glen A. Lehman

1996-01-01

173

How I treat CNS lymphomas  

PubMed Central

The pathogenesis of primary and secondary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma poses a unique set of diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic challenges. During the past 10 years, there has been significant progress in the elucidation of the molecular properties of CNS lymphomas and their microenvironment, as well as evolution in the development of novel treatment strategies. Although a CNS lymphoma diagnosis was once assumed to be uniformly associated with a dismal prognosis, it is now reasonable to anticipate long-term survival, and possibly a cure, for a significant fraction of CNS lymphoma patients. The pathogenesis of CNS lymphomas affects multiple compartments within the neuroaxis, and proper treatment of the CNS lymphoma patient requires a multidisciplinary team with expertise not only in hematology/oncology but also in neurology, neuroradiology, neurosurgery, clinical neuropsychology, ophthalmology, pathology, and radiation oncology. Given the evolving principles of management and the evidence for improvements in survival, our goal is to provide an overview of current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of CNS lymphomas and to highlight promising strategies that we believe to be most effective in establishing diagnosis, staging, and therapeutic management. PMID:23963042

Gupta, Neel K.; Mannis, Gabriel N.; LaMarre, Amanda K.; Treseler, Patrick

2013-01-01

174

Lymphoma Caused by Intestinal Microbiota  

PubMed Central

The intestinal microbiota and gut immune system must constantly communicate to maintain a balance between tolerance and activation: on the one hand, our immune system should protect us from pathogenic microbes and on the other hand, most of the millions of microbes in and on our body are innocuous symbionts and some can even be beneficial. Since there is such a close interaction between the immune system and the intestinal microbiota, it is not surprising that some lymphomas such as mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma have been shown to be caused by the presence of certain bacteria. Animal models played an important role in establishing causation and mechanism of bacteria-induced MALT lymphoma. In this review we discuss different ways that animal models have been applied to establish a link between the gut microbiota and lymphoma and how animal models have helped to elucidate mechanisms of microbiota-induced lymphoma. While there are not a plethora of studies demonstrating a connection between microbiota and lymphoma development, we believe that animal models are a system which can be exploited in the future to enhance our understanding of causation and improve prognosis and treatment of lymphoma. PMID:25257357

Yamamoto, Mitsuko L.; Schiestl, Robert H.

2014-01-01

175

Groove pancreatitis and pancreatic heterotopia in the minor duodenal papilla.  

PubMed

Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of segmental chronic pancreatitis that involves the anatomic space between the head of the pancreas, the duodenum, and the common bile duct. We report 2 cases of groove pancreatitis with pancreatic heterotopia in the minor papilla. Patients were a 44-year-old woman and a 47-year-old man. Both had a past history of alcohol consumption and presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, and weight loss caused by duodenal stenosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed thickening of the duodenal wall and enlargement of the pancreatic head in both patients. In 1 patient, ultrasound endoscopy showed a dilated duct in the head of the pancreas. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed to rule out pancreatic adenocarcinoma and because of the severity of the symptoms. In both cases, gross and microscopic examinations showed fibrous scar of the groove area. The Santorini duct was dilated and contained protein plugs in both patients, with abscesses in 1 of them. In both cases, there were microscopic foci of heterotopic pancreas with mild fibrosis in the wall of the minor papilla. Groove pancreatitis is often diagnosed in middle-aged alcoholic men presenting with clinical symptoms caused by duodenal stenosis. The pathogenesis of this rare entity could be because of disturbance of the pancreatic secretion through the minor papilla. Pancreatitis in heterotopic pancreas located in the minor papilla and chronic consumption of alcohol seem to be important pathogenic factors. PMID:15841034

Chatelain, Denis; Vibert, Eric; Yzet, Thierry; Geslin, Guillaume; Bartoli, Eric; Manaouil, David; Delcenserie, Richard; Brevet, Marie; Dupas, Jean-Louis; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

2005-05-01

176

Cilengitide (EMD 121974) in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2013-01-23

177

Treatment of follicular lymphoma.  

PubMed

Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the most common subtype of indolent lymphomas. Several lines of evidence suggest that the prognosis of patients with FL has improved since the introduction of rituximab, although cure cannot be achieved. Although the treatment paradigm for FL has changed over the past decade with the introduction of rituximab and other agents, there is still no standard therapy to fit all patients. Instead, treatment decisions are made taking into consideration disease status (stage, tumor burden, and presence of symptoms) and patient factors including patient preferences. Rituximab-containing chemotherapy such as R-CHOP, R-CVP, and bendamustine plus rituximab is usually recommended for symptomatic patients. However, optimal rituximab-containing chemotherapy has not been established. Rituximab maintenance is one of the post-induction options for patients responding to first-line chemoimmunotherapy. For patients without symptoms and low-tumor burden, both expectant management (watchful waiting) and rituximab monotherapy are reasonable options. A very limited proportion of patients with FL are diagnosed at stage I with rigorous staging using bone marrow biopsy and whole-body imaging with computed tomography (CT) and/or positron emission tomography/CT. Although local radiotherapy has been the standard approach for these patients, its role is being questioned. Patients with FL who achieve remission eventually relapse and require salvage therapy. The salvage regimen should be chosen taking into account previous treatment and its response duration. Moreover, the presence of histological transformation should be assessed. PMID:24942944

Izutsu, Koji

2014-01-01

178

Primary CNS Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Primary CNS Lymphoma (PCNSL) accounts for 3% of all primary brain tumors with a median age at onset of about 62 years. In the vast majority of cases, PCNSL presents as unifocal or multifocal enhancing lesions on MRI, frequently adjacent to the ventricles. Stereotactic biopsy is the diagnostic procedure of choice revealing high-grade malignant non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma in more than 90% of cases. Therapy is not evidence based. When eligible, patients should be included in clinical trials. In patients younger than 60 years cure is the aim. Polychemotherapy based on high-dose methotrexate (MTX) or alternatively high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue should be offered to patients eligible for this regimens. For patients over 60 years of age no curative regimen with acceptable toxicity has yet been established. An MTX-based chemotherapy, for example, in combination with temozolomide, is recommended. The role of radiotherapy as part of the initial treatment is not established; however, the combination of radiotherapy with MTX-based chemotherapy potentially leads to severe long-term neurotoxic sequelae. Therefore, radiotherapy as part of the initial therapy is not recommended by the author outside clinical trials. At relapse or in cases of refractory disease, patients will frequently benefit of salvage therapy, which depends on the initial treatment. PMID:21180644

2009-01-01

179

Molecular Signatures of Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Context The introduction of genome- and epigenome-wide screening techniques has dramatically improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of pancreatic cancer. There are now 3 recognized histologic precursors of pancreatic cancer: pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, and mucinous cystic neoplasm. Each of these precursor lesions is associated with specific molecular alterations. Objective To understand the molecular characteristics of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and its precursor lesions. Data Sources PubMed (US National Library of Medicine). Conclusions In this review, we briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of pancreatic cancer. In addition, we characterize these molecular alterations in the context of the histologic subtypes of pancreatic cancer. PMID:21631264

Hong, Seung-Mo; Park, Jason Y.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Goggins, Michael

2011-01-01

180

Diarrhoea due to pancreatic diseases.  

PubMed

The exocrine pancreas provides essential digestive enzymes necessary for the proper breakdown and absorption of ingested food in humans. Any disruption of this process can lead to malabsorption and resultant diarrhoea. Typically, disruption of over 90 percent of the pancreatic parenchyma is needed to result in diarrhoea. This disruption can result from widespread pancreatic necrosis in acute pancreatitis, fibrotic replacement of the parenchyma as seen in chronic pancreatitis and in patients with pancreatic cancer where normal tissue is replaced by tumour and/or the pancreatic duct becomes obstructed. Several uncommon tumours of the pancreas can also cause diarrhoea through the secretion of hormones. This article will explore each of these diseases, including the pathogenesis and treatment. PMID:23384807

Brelian, Daniel; Tenner, Scott

2012-10-01

181

Acute pancreatitis after kidney transplantation.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is a rare but life-threatening complication in patients with transplanted kidney. The incidence of acute pancreatitis after kidney transplantation ranges from 2% to 7%, with mortality rate between 50 and 100%. We report a case of a female patient aged 46 years, developing an interstitial acute pancreatitis 8 years following a renal transplantation. The specific aethiological factor was not clearly established, although possibility of biliary pancreatitis with spontaneous stone elimination and/or medication-induced pancreatitis remains the strongest. Every patient after renal transplantation with an acute onset of abdominal pain should be promptly evaluated for presence of pancreatitis with a careful application of the most appropriate diagnostic procedure for each individual patient. PMID:23259142

Tabakovic, Mithat; Salkic, Nermin N; Bosnjic, Jasmina; Alibegovic, Ervin

2012-01-01

182

Cellular stress drives pancreatic plasticity.  

PubMed

Controversy has long surrounded research on pancreatic beta cell regeneration. Some groups have used nonphysiological experimental methodologies to build support for the existence of pancreatic progenitor cells within the adult pancreas that constantly replenish the beta cell pool; others argue strongly against this mode of regeneration. Recent research has reinvigorated enthusiasm for the harnessing of pancreatic plasticity for therapeutic application--for example, the transdifferentiation of human pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-secreting beta-like cells in vitro; the conversion of mouse pancreatic acinar cells to beta-like cells in vivo via cytokine treatment; and the potential redifferentiation of dedifferentiated mouse beta cells in vivo. Here, we highlight key findings in this provocative field and provide a perspective on possible exploitation of human pancreatic plasticity for therapeutic beta cell regeneration. PMID:25653218

Valdez, Ivan A; Teo, Adrian K K; Kulkarni, Rohit N

2015-02-01

183

Molecular epidemiology of pancreatic cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Currently there is no early diagnostic\\u000a test and no effective treatment options for this deadly disease. Prevention of pancreatic cancer is difficult because little\\u000a is known about its etiology. The main modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer include cigarette smoking and dietary\\u000a factors. Information from molecular

Donghui Li; Li Jiao

2003-01-01

184

Pancreatic endocrine tumors: Recent advances  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) can be divided on a clinical and pathologic basis into ten classes (insulinomas, gastrinomas (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome), VIPomas (Verner-Morrison syndrome, WDHA, pancreatic cholera), glucagonomas, somatostatinomas, ACTH-releasing tumors (ACTHomas), growth hormone-releasing factor secreting tumors (GRFomas), nonfunctioning or pancreatic polypeptide secreting tumors (non- functioning PET), PETs causing carcinoid syndrome and PETs causing hypercalcemia)). Recent reports suggest calcitonin- secreting

R. T. Jensen

185

Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases  

PubMed Central

A possible role for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and inducing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smoking habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecular mimicry between H. pylori ?-carbonic anhydrase (?-CA) and human CA type II, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal and acinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pancreatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the genesis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare. PMID:25400980

Bulajic, Milutin; Panic, Nikola; Löhr, Johannes Matthias

2014-01-01

186

Pancreatitis and diabetes in cats.  

PubMed

Pancreatitis is an important potential cause and complicating factor in cases of diabetes mellitus. Pancreatitis can lead to development of diabetes mellitus, which may be transient (diabetic remission) or permanent through destruction and loss of ? cells. Pancreatitis can also be a complicating factor in management of diabetic cats by exacerbating or inducing peripheral insulin resistance, particularly at times of intensified pancreatitic inflammation. Pancreatitis is commonly associated with other inflammatory conditions-especially inflammatory bowel disease and cholangiohepatitis-and its presence makes management of diabetes mellitus more challenging. PMID:23522174

Caney, Sarah M A

2013-03-01

187

Chemoprevention strategies for pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis and it is often diagnosed at advanced stages, which makes it very difficult to treat. The low survival rate of patients with pancreatic cancer points toward an increased need for novel therapeutic and chemopreventive strategies and early detection. Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables has been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Both synthetic as well as natural, diet-derived bioactive compounds have been evaluated as pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents and have been shown to have various degrees of efficacy in cellular and in vivo animal models. Some chemopreventive agents (for example curcumin, resveratrol, B-DIM) have also been reported to sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic drugs (for example gemcitabine or erlotinib), which suggests the potential use of chemopreventive agents as potentiators of standard chemotherapy. Very few clinical trials with pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents have been completed and some are in early phases. Further development of pancreatic cancer chemopreventive agents may prove to be tremendously valuable for individuals at high-risk of developing pancreatic cancer and patients who present with premalignant lesions. This Review discusses the current state of the pancreatic cancer chemoprevention field and highlights the challenges ahead. PMID:20440279

Stan, Silvia D.; Singh, Shivendra V.; Brand, Randall E.

2010-01-01

188

Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in Children  

PubMed Central

Objective Necrotizing pancreatitis is very rare in children. In this case series, we describe the etiologic factors, course, and outcome of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in children. Study Design We performed a retrospective study of children with necrotizing pancreatitis diagnosed over the last 21 years at Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital. Computed tomography (CT) scan criteria were used to diagnose necrotizing pancreatitis and to assess severity index. Charts were reviewed to collect demographic data, etiology, details of hospital stay, complications, and outcome. Results Eight children (mean age 12.8 years; range 4 to 20.7 years) had necrotizing pancreatitis. Etiologic factors were medications, diabetes, gallstones, and alcohol. All patients had a prolonged hospitalization (9 to 40 days; mean 18 days) and five patients required admission to the pediatric intensive care unit. During the hospital stay, patients developed complications involving the respiratory, hematological, renal, metabolic, and circulatory systems. All patients had aggressive supportive medical therapy and none required surgical intervention. There were no deaths attributable to pancreatitis. Late complications following hospital discharge occurred in six patients and included pseudocysts, transient hyperglycemia, diabetes, and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The CT severity index correlated with the risk of complications. Conclusions Acute necrotizing pancreatitis has a variable etiology in children. CT scan is useful for the diagnosis and assessment of severity. Necrotizing pancreatitis in children is associated with severe acute and late complications and requires intensive medical therapy. PMID:23102790

Raizner, Aileen; Phatak, Uma Padhye; Baker, Kenneth; Patel, Mohini G.; Husain, Sohail Z.; Pashankar, Dinesh S.

2015-01-01

189

Brain Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease with a 5-year survival rate below 5%. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced tumor stage and existence of distant metastases. However, involvement of the central nervous system is rare in pancreatic cancer. We retrospectively analyzed all cases of brain metastases in pancreatic cancer reported to date focusing on patient characteristics, clinical appearance, therapy and survival. Including our own, 12 cases of brain metastases originating from pancreatic cancer were identified. In three patients brain metastases were the first manifestation of pancreatic cancer. All other patients developed brain metastases during their clinical course. In most cases, the disease progressed rapidly and the patients died within weeks or months. However, two patients showed long-term survival. Of note, both patients received resection of the pancreatic cancer as well as curative resection of the metachronous brain metastases. Brain metastases in pancreatic cancer are a rare condition and usually predict a very poor prognosis. However, there is evidence that resection of brain metastases of pancreatic cancer can be immensely beneficial to patient’s survival, even with the chance for cure. Therefore, a surgical approach in metastatic pancreatic cancer should be considered in selective cases. PMID:23429199

Lemke, Johannes; Scheele, Jan; Kapapa, Thomas; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Kornmann, Marko

2013-01-01

190

MS-275 and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-23

191

Everolimus and Octreotide Acetate With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

2015-01-05

192

Review of pancreatic trauma.  

PubMed Central

In reviewing the literature on pancreatic trauma (1,984 cases), I found that it resulted from penetrating trauma in 73% and blunt trauma in 27% of cases. Associated injuries were common (average 3.0 per patient). Increased mortality was associated with shotgun wounds, an increasing number of associated injuries, the proximity of the injury to the head of the pancreas, preoperative shock, and massive hemorrhage. High mortality was found for total pancreatectomy, duct reanastomosis, and lack of surgical treatment, with lower mortality for Roux-en-Y anastomoses, suture and drainage, distal pancreatectomy, and duodenal exclusion and diverticulization techniques. Most patients required drainage only. The preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic trauma is difficult, with the diagnosis usually made during surgical repair for associated injuries. Blood studies such as amylase levels, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, and plain radiographs are not reliable. Computed tomographic scanning may be superior, but data are limited. PMID:2669347

Glancy, K E

1989-01-01

193

Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-08

194

Gemcitabine and Bendamustine in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

2014-08-08

195

A Phase II Trial of Panobinostat and Lenalidomide in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

2013-07-15

196

Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

2013-10-24

197

Management of Pancreatic Pseudocysts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Operative internal drainage has been standard treatment for chronic unresolved pancreatic pseudocysts (PPs). Recently, percutaneous external drainage (PED) has become the primary mode of treatment at many medical centers.Study Design: A retrospective chart review was performed of 96 patients with PPs who were managed between 1987 and 1996. Longterm followup information was obtained by telephone and mail questionnaire.Results: Twenty-seven

Hadar Spivak; John R Galloway; J Richard Amerson; Aaron S Fink; Gene D Branum; Richard D Redvanly; William S Richardson; Susan J Mauren; J Patrick Waring; John G Hunter

1998-01-01

198

Immunohistochemistry of Pancreatic Neoplasia  

PubMed Central

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a valuable tool to visualize the distribution and localization of specific cellular components within morphologically preserved tissue sections or cell preparations. It combines the histologic morphology of tissues for detecting the actual antigen distribution, specificity of antibody–antigen interaction for optimal detection, and sensitivity of immunochemical methods for assessing the amount of antigen in tissues. It is routinely used clinically to diagnose type (benign or malignant), stage, and grade of cancer using specific tumor markers. The application of IHC ranges from disease diagnosis and prognosis to drug development and analysis of the pathobiological roles of various molecular players during disease development. Due to better availability of highly specific antibodies and optimal methodologies for performing immunohistochemical studies, IHC is being used at an expanding rate to understand pancreatic tumor biology as well as to study the fate of various molecular markers during the initiation, progression, and metastasis of pancreatic neoplasia. Herein, we describe the detailed protocol for IHC analyses of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia in tissues and fine needle aspirates from both human and mouse samples. PMID:23359148

Kaur, Sukhwinder; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Baine, Michael J.; Kumar, Sushil; Batra, Surinder K.

2013-01-01

199

[Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].  

PubMed

Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

Scollo, P; Licitra, G

1993-12-01

200

Pancreatic Cancer Database: an integrative resource for pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. The etiology of pancreatic cancer is heterogeneous with a wide range of alterations that have already been reported at the level of the genome, transcriptome, and proteome. The past decade has witnessed a large number of experimental studies using high-throughput technology platforms to identify genes whose expression at the transcript or protein levels is altered in pancreatic cancer. Based on expression studies, a number of molecules have also been proposed as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of this deadly cancer. Currently, there are no repositories which provide an integrative view of multiple Omics data sets from published research on pancreatic cancer. Here, we describe the development of a web-based resource, Pancreatic Cancer Database (http://www.pancreaticcancerdatabase.org), as a unified platform for pancreatic cancer research. PCD contains manually curated information pertaining to quantitative alterations in miRNA, mRNA, and proteins obtained from small-scale as well as high-throughput studies of pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We believe that PCD will serve as an integrative platform for scientific community involved in pancreatic cancer research. PMID:24839966

Thomas, Joji Kurian; Kim, Min-Sik; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Raju, Rajesh; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Khan, Aafaque Ahmad; Sakamuri, Sruthi; Tankala, Shantal Gupta; Singal, Mukul; Nair, Bipin; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava; Maitra, Anirban; Gowda, Harsha; Hruban, Ralph H; Pandey, Akhilesh

2014-08-01

201

Lymphomas of the gastrointestinal tract  

Microsoft Academic Search

The gastrointestinal tract is the most frequently involved extranodal localization, representing 30–40% of extranodal lymphomas\\u000a and from 4% to 20% of all non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) cases1, 2. In Western countries the most common location is the stomach (approximately 50–60%), followed by the small intestines (30%)\\u000a and the large intestine (around 10%)3. Involvement of the oesophagus is very rare. These proportions

E. Zucca

202

Sinonasal lymphoma: a case report.  

PubMed

Sinonasal lymphomas are uncommon malignancies. They are difficult to differentiate from carcinomas, and immunohistochemistry is needed to make the diagnosis. We describe an unusual case of a T cell lymphoma that involved only the paranasal sinuses in a middle-aged man. The patient presented with a complete loss of vision in one eye and lateral rectus muscle palsy, but no nasal symptoms. PMID:16771026

Kamath, M Panduranga; Kamath, Gurudath; Bhojwani, Kiran; Pai, Mukhta; Shameem, Ahamed; Agarwal, Salil

2006-05-01

203

MORAb-004 in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2015-01-09

204

Intestinal lymphoma: a case report.  

PubMed

Primary intestinal lymphoma is rare representing about 0.5% of all colonic malignancies. It can be classified into two principal categories: follicular B cell lymphomas and intestinal T cell lymphomas. Other intestinal diseases are very important such as immunoproliferative small intestinal disease (IPSID), a prelymphomatous process, and MALT lymphomas, caused by infection of Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori). We present a 79-year-old male patient which presented with abdominal pain in the upper parts of abdomen of four months' duration, colic timpanists, tenderness, distention, weight loss. Sometimes the abdominal pain decreased expelling diarrheal dejections. Histological and immune-histochemical tests on bioptic piece helped to reach the diagnosis of lymphoma but only after histological investigation on operative piece was made the diagnosis of B-cell lymphoma. This case report shows that an accurate diagnosis, the evaluation of the extension and the presence of particular infections and/or co morbidities (H. Pylori positive, age, performance status) are fundamental to decide the therapeutic protocol. PMID:22195372

Malaguarnera, M; Giordano, M; Rando, A; Puzzo, L; Trainiti, M; Consoli, A S; Catania, V E

2011-11-01

205

Pancreatic polypepetide inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via a cholinergic pathway  

SciTech Connect

In rat pancreatic slices, rat pancreatic polypeptide (PP) or C-terminal hexapeptide of PP (PP-(31-36)) inhibited potassium-stimulated amylase release in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was unaffected by addition of hexamethonium but blocked by atropine. In contrast, PP-(31-36) did not have any effect on acetylcholine- or cholecystokinin octapeptide-stimulated amylase release. In addition, when pancreatic slices were incubated with ({sup 3}H)choline, PP-(31-36) inhibited the potassium-evoked release of synthesized ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of PP was unaffected by adrenergic, dopaminergic, or opioid receptor antagonists. Thus PP inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine release. This newly identified pathway provides a novel mechanism for hormonal inhibition of pancreatic enzyme secretion via modulation of the classic neurotransmitter function.

Jung, G.; Louie, D.S.; Owyang, C. (Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor (USA))

1987-11-01

206

The emerging role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided core biopsy for the evaluation of solid pancreatic masses.  

PubMed

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is a lethal cancer with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Surgical resection is the only curative treatment but only 20% are eligible for resection at the time of diagnosis. Early detection of cancer is of paramount importance in the management. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the preferred modality for obtaining tissue diagnosis of pancreatic masses. However, the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA may be limited by several factors like availability of onsite cytopathology, adequacy of tissue core for histology, location of the mass, presence of underlying chronic pancreatitis, and experience of the endoscopist. Modern oncology is focusing on personalizing treatment based on tissue analysis of genetic aberrations and molecular biomarkers which are now available. Core tissue also aids in the diagnosis of disease entities like lymphoma, metastatic tumors, neuroendocrine tumors and autoimmune pancreatitis whose diagnosis rely on preserved tissue architecture and immunohistochemistry. Making accurate diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses is critical to avoid unnecessary resections in patients with benign lesions like focal lesions of chronic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis which mimic cancer. To overcome the limitations of FNA and to obtain adequate core tissue, a Tru-Cut biopsy needle was developed which met with variable success due to stiffness, cumbersome operation and technical failure using it in the duodenum/pancreatic head. More recently fine needle biopsy needles, with reverse bevel technology have become available in different sizes (19, 22, 25-gauge). The aim of this article was to review the emerging role of core biopsy needles in acquiring tissue in solid pancreatic masses and discuss its potential role in personalized medicine. PMID:25675155

Bhutani, M; Koduru, P; Lanke, G; Bruno, M; Maitra, A; Giovannini, M

2015-06-01

207

Acute Suppuration of the Pancreatic Duct in a Patient with Tropical Pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background\\/Aim: Pancreatic sepsis secondary to infected necrosis, pseudocyst, or pancreatic abscess is a well-known clinical entity. Acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct (ASPD) in the setting of chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal obstruction with septicemia is a rare complication that is seldom reported. It is our aim to report a case of ASPD with Klebsiella ornithinolytica, in the absence

Liliane S. Deeb; Jasmeet Bajaj; Sandeep Bhargava; David Alcid; C. S. Pitchumoni

2008-01-01

208

Pancreatic stenting prevents pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & Aims: Patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction are at high risk of developing pancreatitis after endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Impaired pancreatic drainage caused by pancreatic sphincter hypertension is the likely explanation for this increased risk. A prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted to determine if ductal drainage with pancreatic stenting protects against pancreatitis after biliary sphincterotomy in patients with

Paul R. Tarnasky; Yuko Y. Palesch; John T. Cunningham; Patrick D. Mauldin; Peter B. Cotton; Robert H. Hawes

1998-01-01

209

The Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Controls Cell Shape and Growth of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma through Cdc42 Activation  

E-print Network

, New York, New York Abstract Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma;68(21):8899­907] Introduction Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma classified among TThe Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Controls Cell Shape and Growth of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

Kirchhausen, Tomas

210

Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

2015-03-10

211

Pancreatic cancer: chemotherapy and radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer in many cases appears in a non-curatively resectable stage when the diagnosis is made. Palliative treatment become an option in the patients with advanced stage. The present article reviewed chemotherapy and radiotherapy in various advanced stage of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22540056

Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

2011-01-01

212

Biochemical markers of acute pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Serum amylase remains the most commonly used biochemical marker for the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, but its sensitivity can be reduced by late presentation, hypertriglyceridaemia, and chronic alcoholism. Urinary trypsinogen-2 is convenient, of comparable diagnostic accuracy, and provides greater (99%) negative predictive value. Early prediction of the severity of acute pancreatitis can be made by well validated scoring systems at

W R Matull; S P Pereira; J W O’Donohue

2006-01-01

213

Pursuing Pancreatic Cancer's Deadly Secret  

MedlinePLUS

... Preidt Friday, January 16, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Genes and Gene Therapy Pancreatic Cancer FRIDAY, Jan. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- ... HealthDay . All rights reserved. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Pancreatic Cancer Recent Health News Page last updated ...

214

Pancreatic cancer biology and genetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive and devastating disease, which is characterized by invasiveness, rapid progression and profound resistance to treatment. Advances in pathological classification and cancer genetics have improved our descriptive understanding of this disease; however, important aspects of pancreatic cancer biology remain poorly understood. What is the pathogenic role of specific gene mutations? What is the cell of

Nabeel Bardeesy; Ronald A. DePinho

2002-01-01

215

Rituxan/Bendamustine/PCI-32765 in Relapsed DLBCL, MCL, or Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2014-03-28

216

Apolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2013-07-15

217

Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2014-03-05

218

Oxaliplatin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-22

219

Transformation of follicular lymphoma to diffuse large-cell lymphoma: Alternative patterns with  

E-print Network

Transformation of follicular lymphoma to diffuse large-cell lymphoma: Alternative patterns lymphoma (FL) is frequently char- acterized by transformation to a more aggressive diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We compared the gene-expression profiles between transformed DLBCL and their antecedent

Botstein, David

220

NIH study shows Burkitt lymphoma is molecularly distinct from other lymphomas  

Cancer.gov

Scientists have uncovered a number of molecular signatures in Burkitt lymphoma, including unique genetic alterations that promote cell survival, that are not found in other lymphomas. These findings provide the first genetic evidence that Burkitt lymphoma is a cancer fundamentally distinct from other types of lymphoma.

221

Alpha 1 antitrypsin phenotypes and alcoholic pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Altered frequencies of alpha 1 antitrypsin phenotypes have been reported in patients with chronic pancreatitis, suggesting a possible genetic basis for individual susceptibility to this disease. Alpha 1 antitrypsin phenotypes, with particular regard to alcoholic pancreatitis, were studied. Patients with alcoholic pancreatitis were compared with alcoholic control subjects with no history of pancreatic disease. Serum alpha 1 antitrypsin concentrations were

P S Haber; J S Wilson; B H McGarity; W Hall; M C Thomas; R C Pirola

1991-01-01

222

Tratamiento del dolor en la pancreatitis crónica  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abdominal pain is the most frequent symptom in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Between 70 and 90% of patients experience pain at some point in the course of their disease. In patients with alcoholic pancreatitis, pain is usually experienced at disease onset. Two distinct forms of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis can be distinguished: in early-onset (juvenile) idiopathic chronic pancreatitis, pain occurs initially,

Luisa Guarner; Monder Abu-Suboh; Joan Dot; Jorge Olsina

2009-01-01

223

Autoimmune pancreatitis: a surgical dilemma.  

PubMed

Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is defined as a particular form of pancreatitis that often manifests as obstructive jaundice associated with a pancreatic mass or an obstructive bile duct lesion, and that has an excellent response to corticosteroid treatment. The prevalence of AIP worldwide is unknown, and it is considered as a rare entity. The clinical and radiological presentation of AIP can mimic bilio-pancreatic cancer, presenting difficulties for diagnosis and obliging the surgeon to balance decision-making between the potential risk presented by the misdiagnosis of a deadly disease against the desire to avoid unnecessary major surgery for a disease that responds effectively to corticosteroid treatment. In this review we detail the current and critical points for the diagnosis, classification and treatment for AIP, with a special emphasis on surgical series and the methods to differentiate between this pathology and bilio-pancreatic cancer. PMID:25066570

Saavedra-Perez, David; Vaquero, Eva C; Ayuso, Juan R; Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano

2014-12-01

224

Familial pancreatic cancer: genetic advances  

PubMed Central

Beset by poor prognosis, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is classified as familial or sporadic. This review elaborates on the known genetic syndromes that underlie familial pancreatic cancer, where there are opportunities for genetic counseling and testing as well as clinical monitoring of at-risk patients. Such subsets of familial pancreatic cancer involve germline cationic trypsinogen or PRSS1 mutations (hereditary pancreatitis), BRCA2 mutations (usually in association with hereditary breast–ovarian cancer syndrome), CDKN2 mutations (familial atypical mole and multiple melanoma), or DNA repair gene mutations (e.g., ATM and PALB2, apart from those in BRCA2). However, the vast majority of familial pancreatic cancer cases have yet to have their genetic underpinnings elucidated, waiting in part for the results of deep sequencing efforts. PMID:24395243

Rustgi, Anil K.

2014-01-01

225

Myocardial function in acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed Central

Fifteen patients with acute pancreatitis had 68 physiologic cardiopulmonary assessments performed, and they were compared with 61 performed on normal postoperative patients, and 113 on 41 cirrhotics. It was found that the patients with pancreatitis have an elevated cardiac index (CI), which is not due to the hyperdynamic hemodynamic state found in cirrhotics. In spite of this, the Sarnoff curves demonstrated that pancreatitis was accompanied by a myocardial depression p less than 0.03, not found in hyperdynamic cirrhotics. Cirrhotics are unable to increase their oxygen consumption in response to an increase in CI, as do normal patients or those with acute pancreatitis. In cirrhotics the hemodynamic lesion occurs at the capillary level with the opening of arteriovenous shunts which rob the tissues of their nutritive blood supply, while the patient with acute pancreatitis has a primary myocardial depression and his peripheral vasculature reacts like that of a normal person. PMID:7247538

Ito, K; Ramirez-Schon, G; Shah, P M; Agarwal, N; Delguercio, L R; Reynolds, B M

1981-01-01

226

Mouse models of pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies ranking 4th among cancer-related death in the western world and in the United States, and potent therapeutic options are lacking. Although during the last few years there have been important advances in the understanding of the molecular events responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer, currently specific mechanisms of treatment resistance remain poorly understood and new effective systemic drugs need to be developed and probed. In vivo models to study pancreatic cancer and approach this issue remain limited and present different molecular features that must be considered in the studies depending on the purpose to fit special research themes. In the last few years, several genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine neoplasia have been developed. These models mimic the disease as they reproduce genetic alterations implicated in the progression of pancreatic cancer. Genetic alterations such as activating mutations in KRas, or TGFb and/or inactivation of tumoral suppressors such as p53, INK4A/ARF BRCA2 and Smad4 are the most common drivers to pancreatic carcinogenesis and have been used to create transgenic mice. These mouse models have a spectrum of pathologic changes, from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to lesions that progress histologically culminating in fully invasive and metastatic disease and represent the most useful preclinical model system. These models can characterize the cellular and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasia and cancer and constitute the best tool to investigate new therapeutic approaches, chemopreventive and/or anticancer treatments. Here, we review and update the current mouse models that reproduce different stages of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and will have clinical relevance in future pancreatic cancer developments. PMID:22493542

Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Hijona, Elizabeth; Cosme, Angel; Bujanda, Luis

2012-01-01

227

Genetically Engineered Lymphocytes, Cyclophosphamide, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma or Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-08-04

228

General Information about Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... lymphoma. Signs of adult Hodgkin lymphoma include swollen lymph nodes, fever, night sweats, and weight loss. These and ... skin. Feeling very tired. Tests that examine the lymph nodes are used to detect (find) and diagnose adult ...

229

Primary T-cell lymphoma of liver  

PubMed Central

Primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL) is rare and represents approximately 0.016% of all cases of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). The majority of these are B-cell NHL of diffuse large B-cell type. Primary T-cell lymphoma constitutes approximately 5–10% of all PHLs arising in the liver, 90% being B-cell type. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma, ?? hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma and ?? hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma are the common T-cell lymphomas involving hepatic parenchyma. We encountered a case presenting with gross hepatomegaly extending beyond umbilicus, mild ascites, pedal oedema, icterus and dyspnoea. Haemogram showed moderate anaemia with counts. Bone marrow aspiration showed erythroid hyperplasia with dimorphic anaemia. There was no evidence of atypical lymphoid cells in peripheral blood of bone marrow. We present a rare case of primary T-cell lymphoma presenting as primary liver involvement without splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, bone marrow or peripheral blood involvement. PMID:23608840

Mishra, S; Shukla, A; Tripathi, AK; Kumar, A

2013-01-01

230

Stages of Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... lymph nodes are in the body. Indolent or aggressive : Indolent lymphomas : These tend to grow and spread slowly and have few symptoms . Aggressive lymphomas : These grow and spread quickly and have ...

231

Endoscopic management of pancreatic pseudocysts and necrosis.  

PubMed

Over the last several years, there have been refinements in the understanding and nomenclature regarding the natural history of acute pancreatitis. Patients with acute pancreatitis frequently develop acute pancreatic collections that, over time, may evolve into pancreatic pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis. Endoscopic management of these local complications of acute pancreatitis continues to evolve. Treatment strategies range from simple drainage of liquefied contents to repeated direct endoscopic necrosectomy of a complex necrotic collection. In patients with chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic pseudocysts may arise as a consequence of pancreatic ductal obstruction that then leads to pancreatic ductal disruption. In this review, we focus on the indications, techniques and outcomes for endoscopic therapy of pancreatic pseudocysts and walled-off necrosis. PMID:25222140

Law, Ryan; Baron, Todd H

2015-02-01

232

Primary breast lymphomas: a multicentric experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Primary Breast Lymphomas (PBL) represent 0,38-0,70% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL), 1,7-2,2% of all extranodal NHL and only 0,04-0,5% of all breast cancer. Most frequent PBLs are the diffuse large B cell lymphomas; in any case-reports MALT lymphomas lack or are a rare occurrence. Their incidence is growing. From 1880 (first breast resection for \\

Nicola Avenia; Alessandro Sanguinetti; Roberto Cirocchi; Giovanni Bistoni; Stefano Trastulli; Fabio D'Ajello; Francesco Barberini; Giuseppe Cavallaro; Antonio Rulli; Angelo Sidoni; Giuseppe Noya; Giorgio De Toma; Francesco Sciannameo

2010-01-01

233

Rare primary extranodal lymphomas: diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of the genital tract  

Microsoft Academic Search

Primary non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) of the genital tract is a rare entity. Etiology and pathogenesis of these NHLs are unknown,\\u000a although there might be a possible association between chronic inflammation and lymphomas. The most common histological subtype\\u000a is the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We report two cases of uterine lymphoma and one case of prostate lymphoma in this paper.\\u000a The

Péter Rajnics; Judit Demeter; Judit Csomor; László Krenács; László Pajor; Balázs Kollár; Zsuzsanna Kertész; Miklós Egyed

2009-01-01

234

Minimally invasive treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis  

PubMed Central

Infected pancreatic necrosis is a challenging complication that worsens prognosis in acute pancreatitis. For years, open necrosectomy has been the mainstay treatment option in infected pancreatic necrosis, although surgical debridement still results in high morbidity and mortality rates. Recently, many reports on minimally invasive treatment in infected pancreatic necrosis have been published. This paper presents a review of minimally invasive techniques and attempts to define their role in the management of infected pancreatic necrosis. PMID:25653725

Cebulski, W?odzimierz; S?odkowski, Maciej; Krasnod?bski, Ireneusz W.

2014-01-01

235

The Diagnostic Challenges of Autoimmune Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare but important differential diagnosis from pancreatic cancer. This autoimmune disease can mimic pancreatic cancer by its clinical symptoms, including weight loss and jaundice. Furthermore imaging findings may include a mass of the pancreas. Here we present the case of a 67-year-old male patient diagnosed with autoimmune pancreatitis but showing the well-known symptoms of pancreatic cancer. This emphasizes the difficulties of histological findings and the importance of the correct diagnostic process. PMID:25802499

Papp, Kata; Angst, Eliane; Seidel, Stefan; Flury-Frei, Renata; Hetzer, Franc Heinrich

2015-01-01

236

Venous complications of pancreatitis: a review.  

PubMed

Pancreatitis is notorious to cause vascular complications. While arterial complications include pseudoaneurysm formation with a propensity to bleed, venous complications can be quite myriad. Venous involvement in pancreatitis often presents with thrombosis. From time to time case reports and series of unusual venous complications associated with pancreatitis have, however, been described. In this article, we review multitudinous venous complications in the setting of pancreatitis and propose a system to classify pancreatitis associated venous complications. PMID:25640778

Aswani, Yashant; Hira, Priya

2015-01-01

237

Intracytoplasmic immunoglobulin crystals in follicular lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report a case of follicular lymphoma with crystal inclusions. Swollen lymph nodes taken from the left neck of a 53- year-old Japanese woman were replaced by follicular proliferation of atypical centroblastic and centrocytic cells with intracytoplasmic crystal inclusions. The crystals were confined to lymphoma cells and were not found in histiocytes. Lymphoma cells were positively immunostained with [lambda] light

Ryuichi Wada; Yoshihito Ebina; Hidekachi Kurotaki; Soroku Yagihashi

2002-01-01

238

Bilateral adrenal lymphoma presenting as Addison's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe an unusual case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the adrenals which presented as Addison's disease. Examination of tissue taken by computed tomography guided biopsy revealed a high grade B cell centroblastic lymphoma. The patient was treated with chemotherapy but died from invasive aspergillosis. Autopsy confirmed bilateral adrenal involvement by lymphoma.

A. Pagliuca; D. S. Gillett; J. R. Salisbury; R. N. Basu; G. J. Mufti

1989-01-01

239

General Information about AIDS-Related Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Key Points for This Section AIDS-related lymphoma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. AIDS-related lymphoma is a disease in which malignant ( ...

240

17-DMAG in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-24

241

Rituximab and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2011-08-11

242

Clusters of lymphoma in ferrets.  

PubMed

Cluster outbreaks of lymphoma and leukemia have been associated with viral infections in many species including humans, cattle, and cats. This study describes epidemiological, clinical, and pathological features of cluster outbreaks of lymphoma in multiferret households and examines and compares the Aleutian disease virus (ADV) and feline leukemia virus (FeLV) status of cases, ferrets at risk, and controls. Three ferret groups with 21 cases of histologically diagnosed lymphoma (12.6% cumulative incidence) and their cohabitants (n = 35) were examined and compared with three control groups (n = 52) of cohabitating ferrets without lymphoma. A familial distribution was observed in one group but most cases were not consanguinous. Ferrets greater than 3 years of age developed chronic disease in two of the groups and 2-year-old adults had acute disease in the remaining group. Lymphocytosis, splenomegaly, and lymphadenopathy were prominent features. Histologically, predominantly small noncleaved cell and polymorphous lymphoid lesions were observed. All of the ferrets with lymphoma that were tested for ADV and FeLV using serology or PCR were negative. The rate of ADV antibody among cases or ferrets at risk was not significantly different from controls. None of the cluster ferrets were seropositive for FeLV p27 antigen using a monoclonal ELISA. Infection with a novel ferret virus is suspected, but an etiological agent has not yet been identified. PMID:8630683

Erdman, S E; Kanki, P J; Moore, F M; Brown, S A; Kawasaki, T A; Mikule, K W; Travers, K U; Badylak, S F; Fox, J G

1996-01-01

243

Molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

By genomic and epigenomic screening techniques, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of pancreatic cancer. The comprehensive studies of the pancreatic cancer genome have revealed that most genetic alterations are identified to be associated with specific core signaling pathways including high-frequency mutated genes such as KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4 along with several low-frequency mutated genes. Three types of histological precursors of pancreatic cancer: pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, mucinous cystic neoplasm, and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, had been recognized by morphological studies and the recent genomic screening techniques revealed that each of these precursor lesions were associated with specific molecular alterations. In the familial pancreatic cancer cases, several responsible genes were discovered. Epigenetic changes also play an important role in the progression of pancreatic cancer. Several tumor suppressor genes were silenced due to aberrant promoter CpG island hypermethylation. Several genetically engineered mouse models, based on the Kras mutation, were created, and provided reliable tools to identify the key molecules responsible for the development or progression of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24471965

Saiki, Yuriko; Horii, Akira

2014-01-01

244

Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-?B and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

2015-01-01

245

Radioimmunotherapy in follicular lymphoma.  

PubMed

The exquisite sensitivity of haematological malignancies to targeted radiation make Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) a theoretically attractive therapeutic approach. Furthermore, impressive results initially achieved by the pioneers in this field and more recently in larger studies have demonstrated the high clinical activity of RIT in follicular NHL (FL). For more than a decade clinical RIT of FL has been dominated by targeting the CD20 antigen and a number of pivotal clinical studies have resulted in the approval by the US FDA (Food and Drug Administration) of two radioimmunconjugates, (131)I-tositumomab (Bexxar) and (90)Y-ibritumomab (Zevalin). (90)Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan was subsequently approved within the EU in 2004 and more recently in the EU and in the US as a front line "consolidation" treatment in follicular NHL. Recent data have demonstrated that fractionated radioimmunotherapy targeting CD22 with (90)Y-epratuzumab tetraxetan achieved a high degree of durable complete responses in relapsed/refractory NHL. Despite the fact that these RIT agents clearly have unique non-cross reactive mechanisms of action with proven high clinical efficacy in patients resistant to both chemotherapy and rituximab, they have not been widely adopted by haemato-oncology community to date. This chapter reviews the progress that has been made in the development of clinical radioimmunotherapy in follicular lymphoma and suggest some guidelines to use it appropriately in first-line but also in the increasing number of patients emerging who are rituximab-refractory. PMID:21658624

Illidge, Tim; Morschhauser, Franck

2011-06-01

246

Cure of incurable lymphoma  

SciTech Connect

The most potent method for augmenting the cytocidal power of monoclonal antibody (MAb) treatment is to conjugate radionuclides to the MAb to deliver systemic radiotherapy (radioimmunotherapy; RIT). The antigen, MAb, and its epitope can make a difference in the performance of the drug. Additionally, the radionuclide, radiochemistry, chelator for radiometals and the linker between the MAb and chelator can have a major influence on the performance of drugs (radiopharmaceuticals) for RIT. Smaller radionuclide carriers, such as antibody fragments and mimics, and those used for pretargeting strategies, have been described and evaluated. All of these changes in the drugs and strategies for RIT have documented potential for improved performance and patient outcomes. RIT is a promising new therapy that should be incorporated into the management of patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) soon after these patients have proven incurable. Predictable improvements using better drugs, strategies, and combinations with other drugs seem certain to make RIT integral to the management of patients with NHL, and likely lead to cure of currently incurable NHL.

De Nardo, Gerald L. [Radiodiagnosis and Therapy, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)]. E-mail: gldenardo@ucdavis.edu; Sysko, Vladimir V. [Radiodiagnosis and Therapy, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); De Nardo, Sally J. [Radiodiagnosis and Therapy, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)

2006-10-01

247

Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Hodgkin's Disease  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-22

248

Diagnosis of lymphoma by endoscopic ultrasound-assisted transendoscopic direct retroperitoneal lymph node biopsy: A case report (with video).  

PubMed

Since its introduction in the early 1990s, endoscopic ultrasound-assisted fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been used for sampling of extraintestinal mass lesions and peri-intestinal lymphadenopathy. Although EUS-FNA is highly accurate, lymphomas can be challenging to diagnose using EUS-FNA. We present the case of a 60-year-old male who had experienced upper abdominal discomfort for 1 month. Computerized tomography (CT) examination revealed multiple soft-tissue shadows located above the pancreatic body. The biggest shadow had a cross-sectional area of 7.7 cm × 7.2 cm. Positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT) imaging showed increased uptake of (18)F-FDG by these soft-tissue shadows. To investigate further, EUS was performed and it revealed the presence of multiple hypoechoic round lymph nodes. During the procedure, EUS-FNA was performed, but only a few dyskaryotic cells were observed by cytological evaluation. EUS-assisted retroperitoneoscopy and lymph node biopsy were performed to obtain more tissue for immunohistochemical analysis and subclassification of lymphoma. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, germinal center B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by this technique. EUS-assisted transendoscopic retroperitoneal lymph node biopsy is an alternative procedure for the diagnosis of lymphomas. PMID:25789289

Guo, Jintao; Sun, Beibei; Wang, Sheng; Ge, Nan; Wang, Guoxin; Wu, Weichao; Liu, Xiang; Sun, Siyu

2015-01-01

249

Diagnosis of lymphoma by endoscopic ultrasound-assisted transendoscopic direct retroperitoneal lymph node biopsy: A case report (with video)  

PubMed Central

Since its introduction in the early 1990s, endoscopic ultrasound-assisted fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been used for sampling of extraintestinal mass lesions and peri-intestinal lymphadenopathy. Although EUS-FNA is highly accurate, lymphomas can be challenging to diagnose using EUS-FNA. We present the case of a 60-year-old male who had experienced upper abdominal discomfort for 1 month. Computerized tomography (CT) examination revealed multiple soft-tissue shadows located above the pancreatic body. The biggest shadow had a cross-sectional area of 7.7 cm × 7.2 cm. Positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT) imaging showed increased uptake of 18F-FDG by these soft-tissue shadows. To investigate further, EUS was performed and it revealed the presence of multiple hypoechoic round lymph nodes. During the procedure, EUS-FNA was performed, but only a few dyskaryotic cells were observed by cytological evaluation. EUS-assisted retroperitoneoscopy and lymph node biopsy were performed to obtain more tissue for immunohistochemical analysis and subclassification of lymphoma. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, germinal center B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by this technique. EUS-assisted transendoscopic retroperitoneal lymph node biopsy is an alternative procedure for the diagnosis of lymphomas.

Guo, Jintao; Sun, Beibei; Wang, Sheng; Ge, Nan; Wang, Guoxin; Wu, Weichao; Liu, Xiang; Sun, Siyu

2015-01-01

250

What's New in Pancreatic Cancer Research and Treatment?  

MedlinePLUS

... Next Topic Additional resources for pancreatic cancer What’s new in pancreatic cancer research and treatment? Research into ... area of research in many types of cancer. New treatments for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) Many pancreatic ...

251

[Pancreatic tumors: recent developments].  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer (PC) still typically has a poor prognosis. In addition to smoking, obesity and new-onset diabetes mellitus are considered to be significant risk factors. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) remains the mainstay for diagnosis and on which the majority of advances are based. In this sense, needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (nCLE) is gaining importance in the differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions and studies comparing different needle types (cytology vs. histology) for EUS-guided puncture. Intravenous contrast (IC-EUS) and elastography are additional tools associated with EUS that can assist in diagnosing PC. Regarding prognostic factors, the importance of the role of mesenteric-portal vein resection was emphasized, given the limited advances in treatment, as in previous years. Regarding cystic tumors, work focuses on validating the new international guidelines from Fukuoka 2012 (revised Sendai criteria) and on determining predictors of cystic lesion malignancy, mainly of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). From a therapeutic point of view, there are theories regarding the usefulness of alcohol and the gemcitabine-paclitaxel combination in the ablation of small mucinous cystic lesions through EUS-injection. PMID:25294272

Lariño Noia, José

2014-09-01

252

Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy  

PubMed Central

This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:25628906

Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

2015-01-01

253

Acute Pancreatitis Complicating Severe Dengue  

PubMed Central

Dengue is an arthropod borne viral infection endemic in tropical and subtropical continent. Severe dengue is life threatening. Various atypical presentations of dengue have been documented. But we present a rare and fatal complication of severe dengue in form of acute pancreatitis. A 27-year-old male had presented with severe dengue in decompensated shock and with pain in abdomen due to pancreatitis. The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in dengue is not clearly understood, but various mechanisms are postulated. The awareness and timely recognition of this complication is very important for proper management. PMID:24926168

Jain, Vishakha; Gupta, OP; Rao, Tarun; Rao, Siddharth

2014-01-01

254

Acute mediastinitis arising from pancreatic mediastinal fistula in recurrent pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Acute mediastinitis is a fatal disease that usually originates from esophageal perforation and surgical infection. Rare cases of descending necrotizing mediastinitis can occur following oral cavity and pharynx infection or can be a complication of pancreatitis. The most common thoracic complications of pancreatic disease are reactive pleural effusion and pneumonia, while rare complications include thoracic conditions, such as pancreaticopleural fistula with massive pleural effusion or hemothorax and extension of pseudocyst into the mediastinum. There have been no reports of acute mediastinitis originating from pancreatitis in South Korea. In this report, we present the case of a 50-year-old female suffering from acute mediastinitis with pleural effusion arising from recurrent pancreatitis that improved after surgical intervention. PMID:25356062

Choe, In Soo; Kim, Yong Seok; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Sun Moon; Song, Kyung Ho; Koo, Hoon Sup; Park, Jung Ho; Pyo, Jin Sil; Kim, Ji Yeong; Choi, In Seok

2014-01-01

255

The leaking pancreatic duct in childhood chronic pancreatitis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The leaking pancreatic duct in childhood chronic pancreatitis presents with ascites and pleural effusion and is a potentially\\u000a lethal condition. Seven children with this condition were seen in the period 2003–2006. The correct diagnosis was not entertained\\u000a till a raised serum amylase was discovered. The diagnosis was confirmed by very high levels of amylase in the aspirated abdominal\\u000a or pleural

Dhruva Nath Ghosh; Sudipta Sen; Jacob Chacko; Gordon Thomas; Sampath Karl; John Mathai

2007-01-01

256

Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update  

PubMed Central

Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

2014-01-01

257

The role of diagnostic radiology in pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Acute pancreatitis is a frequent inflammatory and necrotic process of pancreas and peripancreatic field. To detect the presence of infected or sterile necrotic components and hemorrhage of the pancreatic paranchyma is important for therapeutic approach. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible exocrine dysfunction, progressive loss of pancreatic tissue and morphological changes of the pancreatic canal. Imaging modalities play a primary role in the management of both acute and cronic pancreatitis. CT and MR imaging confirm the diagnosis and detect the severity of disease. In chronic pancreatitis, MRCP after Secretin administration, Spiral CT and endoscopic US seems to replace diagnostic ERCP. However differentiation of pseudotumor of chronic pancreatitis from the pancreatic carcinoma is difficult with either imaging modalities. PMID:11335094

Elmas, N

2001-05-01

258

Oblimersen and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumor or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2013-01-24

259

Alvocidib, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Lymphoproliferative Disorders or Mantle Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-06-03

260

Primary central nervous system lymphoma.  

PubMed

Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is an unusual form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is restricted to the central nervous system. Although it presents with focal neurologic symptoms, it is characterized pathologically by diffuse infiltration of the brain. PCNSL is sensitive to corticosteroids, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. High-dose methotrexate-based regimens form the cornerstone of multimodality therapy and have significantly improved response rates and survival. Prolonged survival can be associated with devastating neurotoxicity to which the elderly are particularly susceptible. PMID:17964031

Mohile, Nimish A; Abrey, Lauren E

2007-11-01

261

[Thyroid lymphoma. A case report].  

PubMed

Thyroid lymphoma represents less than 1% of malignant thyroid tumors and its diagnosis is difficult. We report a 25 years old woman, admitted with the diagnosis of diffuse euthyroid goiter and thyroid cancer. She was subjected to a subtotal thyroidectomy and the pathological study of the surgical piece showed a Hodgkin lymphoma, subtype nodular sclerosis. The patient was treated with three cycles of chemotherapy, using cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone, doxorubicin, blemycin, vinblastin and radiotherapy. She refused to continue treatment after the third cycle and after 3 years and 5 months of follow up, is well and free of disease. PMID:11050841

Pérez, J A; Ramírez, R; Carpio, D; Carrasco, C; Pérez, A

2000-07-01

262

Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

2014-10-07

263

Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-12-06

264

Genetics of Pancreatitis with a focus on the Pancreatic Ducts  

PubMed Central

Genetic risk for acute pancreatitis (AP), recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) are increasingly recognized. The exocrine pancreas is composed of both acinar cells and duct cells, with genetic factors associated with AP, RAP and CP linked to one cell type or the other. Increased susceptibility to pancreatitis occurs when the normal physiological mechanisms that allow the pancreas to respond to common stresses or injury are altered. Currently, most our knowledge about genetics focuses on three genes that play critical roles in pancreatic function (PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1) such that isolated defects lead to disease. However, recent data suggest that more complex combination of genetic and environmental factors are also as important, or more important than Mendelian genetic risk. Understanding of complex interactions requires modeling of these factors so that the response to stresses or injury can be simulated and critical interactions understood. A simple duct cell model is given to illustration the relationship between CFTR, CASR, aquaporins, claudins, and SPINK1, and how they interact. The role of CFTR variants in pancreatic diseases is then discussed. PMID:23207607

LaRusch, Jessica; Whitcomb, David C

2013-01-01

265

Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-12-15

266

Alisertib With and Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-12-10

267

[Indolent lymphomas: classification, clinical presentation and treatment  

PubMed

The malignant lymphomas comprise a heterogeneous group of neoplastic diseases of the lymphatic system. In the WHO classification 70 different entities are subdivided. Each type of lymphoma is defined as a disease with specific clinical characteristics, as well as morphological, immunophenotypic and genetic characteristics. The indolent lymphomas include follicular lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, small cell lymphocytic lymhoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia, prolymphocytic leukemia and hairy cell leukemia. Indolent lymphomas are characterized by slow growth and a chronic course of the disease. Antibody-based therapies, have significantly improved the prognosis, nevertheless there is no curative treatment. Watch and wait is still an reasonable option in asymptomatic patients. The goal of therapy has been to maintain the best quality of life. and to avoid late toxicities. The following review presents the current treatment options. PMID:23531907

Zenhäusern, Reinhard

2013-03-27

268

506U78 in Treating Patients With Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

2013-01-15

269

CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

2014-10-31

270

Brentuximab Vedotin + Rituximab as Frontline Therapy for Pts w/ CD30+ and/or EBV+ Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Epstein-Barr Virus Infection; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoid

2014-09-10

271

Overview of Exocrine Pancreatic Pathobiology  

PubMed Central

Exocrine pancreas is a source of several enzymes that are essential for the digestive process. The exocrine pancreatic secretion is tightly regulated by the neuroendocrine system. The endocrine pancreas is tightly integrated anatomically and physiologically with the exocrine pancreas and modulates its function. Compound-induced pancreatitis is not a common event in toxicology or drug development but it becomes a significant liability when encountered. Understanding the species-specific differences in physiology is essential to understand the underlying pathobiology of pancreatic disease in animal models and its relevance to human disease. This review will mainly focus on understanding the morphology and physiology of the pancreas, unique islet-exocrine interactions, and pancreatitis. PMID:24190915

Pandiri, Arun R

2014-01-01

272

Endoscopic Therapy in Chronic Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a debilitating disease that can result in chronic abdominal pain, malnutrition, and other related complications. The main aims of treatment are to control symptoms, prevent disease progression, and correct any complications. A multidisciplinary approach involving medical, endoscopic, and surgical therapy is important. Endoscopic therapy plays a specific role in carefully selected patients as primary interventional therapy when medical measures fail or in patients who are not suitable for surgery. Endoscopic therapy is also used as a bridge to surgery or as a means to assess the potential response to pancreatic surgery. This review addresses the role of endoscopic therapy in relief of obstruction of the pancreatic duct (PD) and bile du ct, closure of PD leaks, and drainage of pseudocysts in CP. The role of endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block for pain in chronic pancreatitis is also discussed. PMID:22205838

Tan, Damien Meng Yew

2011-01-01

273

Dynamic CT of pancreatic tumors  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic computed tomography was performed on 19 patients with clinically diagnosed pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. There were 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, three with inflammatory pancreatic masses, two with cystadenoma, one with insuloma, and three with peripancreatic tumors. Computed tomography was performed with a Varian-V-360-3 scanner; scanning was for 30 consecutive sec at 3 sec intervals after the bolus injection of 50 ml of contrast medium into the antecubital vein. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) may be more useful than conventional contrast CT because it facilitates: (1) correct evaluation of tumor vascularity allowing a differential diagnosis; (2) location of the boundary between tumor and a nontumor tissue; (3) detection of small tumors; and (4) visualization of pancreatic invasion by peripancreatic tumors. In addition, contrast enhancement and the degree of vascular proliferation can be quantitatively assessed by analyzing time-density curves.

Hosoki, T.

1983-05-01

274

Valsartan-induced acute pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Gastrointestinal toxicity is uncommon among patients treated with angiotensin II receptor antagonists. A 58-year-old man presented with nausea, vomiting and constant pain in the epigastrium that radiated to the flanks. He received treatment with valsartan (160 mg daily) for hypertension. The clinical, biochemical and radiological findings were compatible with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. After the patient achieved a clinical and biochemical recovery, the valsartan therapy was started again. Six weeks later, he returned to the hospital with an attack of pancreatitis. Subsequently, he returned with repeated attacks of pancreatitis twice, and the valsartan was discontinued. Ten months after the treatment, the patient had no complaints. When severe abdominal symptoms occur for no apparent reason during treatment with valsartan, a diagnosis of pancreatitis should be considered. PMID:24694480

Can, Burak; Sali, Mursel; Batman, Adnan; Yilmaz, Hasan; Korkmaz, Ugur; Celebi, Altay; Senturk, Omer; Hulagu, Sadettin

2014-01-01

275

Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer  

Cancer.gov

This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

276

[Artificial nutrition in acute pancreatitis].  

PubMed

Nutritional support in acute pancreatitis. Despite increasing knowledge and available guidelines in the fields of nutritional support in pancreatic diseases there do still exist a lot of controversies, aversions, delusions in the clinical work. Hungarian Society of Clinical Nutrition has already published it's own guideline on nutrition in pancreatic diseases in 2002. European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ESPEN) also published a Consensus Statement based on the proposals of an international Consensus Conference with active Hungarian participation. The aim of this article is to clear up habitual considerations of some physicians and to share current knowledge from physiology/pathophysiology to quality control upon these guidelines, meta-analyses, and, the daily practice of Hungarian pioneers of nutrition support in pancreatic diseases. PMID:15997665

Harsányi, László

2005-05-29

277

Recent Advances in Autoimmune Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Although the pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis remains unclear, this report presents recent evidence of the clinical aspects of this disease: mild abdominal symptoms, usually without acute attacks of pancreatitis; occasional presence of obstructive jaundice; elevated levels of serum gammaglobulin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, or IgG4; presence of autoantibodies; diffuse enlargement of the pancreas; irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct (sclerosing pancreatitis), often with intrapancreatic biliary stenosis or coexisting biliary lesions (sclerosing cholangitis similar to primary sclerosing cholangitis) seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography; fibrotic changes with lymphocyte and IgG4-positive plasmacyte infiltration and obliterative phlebitis; occasional association with other systemic lesions (such as sialadenitis), retroperitoneal fibrosis, and interstitial renal tubular disorders; and response to steroid therapy. Based upon these findings, several sets of diagnostic criteria have been proposed. Further studies and international consensus for diagnostic criteria and pathogenetic mechanisms are needed. PMID:21904518

Uchida, Kazushige; Fukui, Toshiro; Matsushita, Mitsunobu; Takaoka, Makoto

2008-01-01

278

Pancreatic endocrine tumors.  

PubMed

Pancreatic endocrine tumors have been steadily growing in incidence and prevalence during the last two decades, showing an incidence of 4-5/1,000,000 population. They represent a heterogeneous group with very varying tumor biology and prognosis. About half of the patients present clinical symptoms and syndromes related to substances released from the tumors (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, insulinoma, glucagonoma, etc) and the other half are so-called nonfunctioning tumors mainly presenting with symptoms such as obstruction, jaundice, bleeding, and abdominal mass. Ten percent to 15% of the pancreatic endocrine tumors are part of an inherited syndrome such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1), von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), neurofibromatosis, or tuberousclerosis. The diagnosis is based on histopathology demonstrating neuroendocrine features such as positive staining for chromogranin A and specific hormones such as gastrin, proinsulin, and glucagon. Moreover, the biochemical diagnosis includes measurement of chromogranins A and B or specific hormones such as gastrin, insulin, glucagon, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in the circulation. In addition to standard localization procedures, radiology (computed tomography [CT] scan, magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], ultrasound [US]), somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, and most recently positron emission tomography with specific isotopes such as (11)C-5 hydroxytryptamin ((11)C-5-HTP), fluorodopa and (68)Ga-1,4,7,10-tetra-azacyclododecane-N,N',N?,N?-tetra-acetic acid (DOTA)-octreotate are performed. Surgery is still one of the cornerstones in the management of pancreatic endocrine tumors, but curative surgery is rarely obtained in most cases because of metastatic disease. Debulking and other cytoreductive procedures might facilitate systemic treatment. Cytotoxic drugs, biological agents, such as somatostatin analogs, alpha interferons, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and tyrosine kinase inhibitors are routinely used. Tumor-targeted radioactive treatment is available in many centres in Europe and is effective in patients with tumors that express high content of somatostatin receptors type 2 and 5. In the future, treatment will be based on tumor biology and molecular genetics with the aim of so-called personalized medicine. PMID:21167379

Oberg, Kjell

2010-12-01

279

Incidental Pancreatic Cysts  

PubMed Central

Hypothesis Widespread use of computed tomography and ultrasound has led to the identification of increasing numbers of patients with asymptomatic cystic lesions of the pancreas. Design Retrospective case series of patients with pancreatic cystic lesions. Setting University-affiliated tertiary care referral center. Patients Two hundred twelve patients with pancreatic cystic lesions seen in our surgical practice during 5 years (April 1997-March 2002). Main Outcome Measures Presence or absence of symptoms, cyst size and location, cytologic or pathologic diagnosis, surgical treatment, and outcome. Results Seventy-eight (36.7%) of 212 patients were asymptomatic. Incidental cysts were smaller (3.3 ± 1.9 vs 4.6 ± 2.7 cm; P<.001) and were found in older patients (65 ± 13 vs 56 ± 15 years; P<.001). Seventy-eight percent of the asymptomatic patients and 87% of those with symptoms underwent surgery, with a single operative death in the entire group (0.5%). Seventeen percent of asymptomatic cysts were serous cystadenomas; 28%, mucinous cystic neoplasms; 27%, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms; and 2.5%, ductal adenocarcinomas. The respective numbers for symptomatic cysts were 7%, 16%, 40%, and 9%. Ten percent of asymptomatic patients had a variety of other cystic lesions, and in 12%, no definitive cytologic or pathologic diagnosis was obtained. Overall, 17% of asymptomatic patients had in situ or invasive cancer, and 42% had a premalignant lesion. When evaluated as a function of size, only 1 (3.5%) of 28 asymptomatic cysts smaller than 2 cm had cancer compared with 13 (26%) of 50 cysts larger than 2 cm (P = .04). The proportion of premalignant lesions, however, remained high in both groups (46% and 38%, respectively). Pseudocysts comprised only 3.8% of asymptomatic cysts compared with 19.4% of symptomatic cysts (P = .003). Conclusions Incidental pancreatic cysts are common, occur in older patients, are smaller than symptomatic cysts, and are unlikely to be pseudocysts. More than half of them are either malignant or premalignant lesions and therefore cannot be dismissed. PMID:12686529

Fernández-del Castillo, Carlos; Targarona, Javier; Thayer, Sarah P.; Rattner, David W.; Brugge, William R.; Warshaw, Andrew L.

2014-01-01

280

Genomic Landscapes of Pancreatic Neoplasia  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease with a dismal prognosis. However, recent advances in sequencing and bioinformatic technology have led to the systematic characterization of the genomes of all major tumor types in the pancreas. This characterization has revealed the unique genomic landscape of each tumor type. This knowledge will pave the way for improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to pancreatic tumors that take advantage of the genetic alterations in these neoplasms.

Wood, Laura D.; Hruban, Ralph H.

2015-01-01

281

Medical Management of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In 2008, an estimated 34,290 people died from pancreatic cancer and 37,680 new cases were diagnosed. Despite modern treatment, 90% of patients die within 1 year of diagnosis. Pancreatectomy is still the only potentially curative approach, but most patients have incurable disease by the time they

Daniela Freitas; Gustavo Dos Santos Fernandes; Paulo M. Hoff; Jose Eduardo Cunha

2009-01-01

282

Study of BKM120 & Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2015-03-18

283

Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-01-31

284

[Surgical management of pancreatic cancer].  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is a major problematic concern among all forms of gastrointestinal malignancies because of its poor prognosis. Although significant progress has been made in the surgical treatment in terms of increased resection rate and decreased treatment-related morbidity and mortality, the true survival rate still remains below 5% today. Surgical options for pancreatic cancer are based on the its unique anatomy and physiology, catastrophic tumor biology, experience of surgeon, and status of patients. Four main options exist for the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer. These include standard "Whipple" pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), pylorus preserving PD (PPPD), distal pancreatectomy (left-side pancreatectomy), and total pancreatectomy according to the location of tumor. Portal vein involvement by tumor is regarded as an anatomical extension of disease, and en bloc resection of portal vein with tumor is recommended if technically feasible, which is stated in 2002 AJCC tumor staging for pancreatic cancer. In comparison of the survival rates between standard and extended resection of pancreatic head cancer, no significant survival benefit was demonstrated from the prospective reports. PPPD may be superior to standard PD in respect to nutrition and quality of life without any deleterious effect upon long term survival or tumor recurrence. New surgical treatment modalities including modified extended pancreatectomy, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and radical antegrade modular distal pancreatectomy have been tried to improve the patients' survival. However, early diagnosis and treatment remain as key factors for the cure of pancreatic cancer irrespective of various surgical trials. PMID:18349571

Kim, Song Cheol

2008-02-01

285

Oncolytic virotherapy for pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Within the past decade, many oncolytic viruses (OVs) have been studied as potential treatments for pancreatic cancer and some of these are currently under clinical trials. The applicability of certain OVs, such as adenoviruses, herpesviruses and reoviruses, for the treatment of pancreatic cancer has been intensively studied for several years, whereas the applicability of other more recently investigated OVs, such as poxviruses and parvoviruses, is only starting to be determined. At the same time, studies have identified key characteristics of pancreatic cancer biology that provide a better understanding of the important factors or pathways involved in this disease. This review aims to summarise the different replication-competent OVs proposed as therapeutics for pancreatic cancer. It also focuses on the unique biology of these viruses that makes them exciting candidate virotherapies for pancreatic cancer and discusses how they could be genetically manipulated or combined with other drugs to improve their efficacy based on what is currently known about the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer. PMID:21676289

Wennier, Sonia; Li, Shoudong; McFadden, Grant

2011-01-01

286

Pancreatic cancer: Advances in treatment  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer mortality and the incidence of this disease is expected to continue increasing. While patients with pancreatic cancer have traditionally faced a dismal prognosis, over the past several years various advances in diagnosis and treatment have begun to positively impact this disease. Identification of effective combinations of existing chemotherapeutic agents, such as the FOLFIRINOX and the gemcitabine + nab-paclitaxel regimen, has improved survival for selected patients although concerns regarding their toxicity profiles remain. A better understanding of pancreatic carcinogenesis has identified several pre-malignant precursor lesions, such as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, and cystic neoplasms. Imaging technology has also evolved dramatically so as to allow early detection of these lesions and thereby facilitate earlier management. Surgery remains a cornerstone of treatment for patients with resectable pancreatic tumors, and advances in surgical technique have allowed patients to undergo resection with decreasing perioperative morbidity and mortality. Surgery has also become feasible in selected patients with borderline resectable tumors as a result of neoadjuvant therapy. Furthermore, pancreatectomy involving vascular reconstruction and pancreatectomy with minimally invasive techniques have demonstrated safety without significantly compromising oncologic outcomes. Lastly, a deeper understanding of molecular aberrations contributing to the development of pancreatic cancer shows promise for future development of more targeted and safe therapeutic agents. PMID:25071330

Mohammed, Somala; Van Buren II, George; Fisher, William E

2014-01-01

287

Genetic abnormalities in pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

The incidence and mortality of pancreatic adenocarcinoma are nearly coincident having a five-year survival of less than 5%. Enormous advances have been made in our knowledge of the molecular alterations commonly present in ductal cancer and other pancreatic malignancies. One significant outcome of these studies is the recognition that common ductal cancers have a distinct molecular fingerprint compared to other nonductal or endocrine tumors. Ductal carcinomas typically show alteration of K-ras, p53, p16INK4, DPC4 and FHIT, while other pancreatic tumor types show different aberrations. Among those tumors arising from the exocrine pancreas, only ampullary cancers have a molecular fingerprint that may involve some of the same genes most frequently altered in common ductal cancers. Significant molecular heterogeneity also exists among pancreatic endocrine tumors. Nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumors have frequent mutations in MEN-1 and may be further subdivided into two clinically relevant subgroups based on the amount of chromosomal alterations. The present review will provide a brief overview of the genetic alterations that have been identified in the various subgroups of pancreatic tumors. These results have important implications for the development of genetic screening tests, early diagnosis, and prognostic genetic markers. PMID:12537585

Moore, Patrick S; Beghelli, Stefania; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Scarpa, Aldo

2003-01-01

288

Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma  

Cancer.gov

This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

289

Idiopathic Myelofibrosis Complicated by Lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

2 cases of diffuse large-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma developing in conjunction with idiopathic myelofibrosis are described. In neither case could any predisposition to neoplastic transformation be discerned. The possible pathogenetic implications of this association are discussed, and a brief literature review of the relationship between myeloproliferative and lymphoproliferative disease is presented.Copyright © 1985 S. Karger AG, Basel

R. J. Epstein; D. E. Joshua; H. Kronenberg

1985-01-01

290

[Unusual cause of abdominal lymphomas].  

PubMed

A 72 year old HIV-negative patient without relevant immunosuppression presented with abdominal lymphomas and inflammatory signs in the colon. Mycobacterium intracellulare was grown from colonic biopsies and stool. There was no sign of malignancy or chronic inflammatory bowel disease. We diagnosed an atypical, gastrointestinal mycobacteriosis und treated the patient accordingly. This led to a good response. PMID:20945056

Halevy, D; Schöntag, S; Küper-Steffen, R; Lobmann, R

2011-06-01

291

Malignant lymphomas and occupational exposures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of potential risk factors for Hodgkin's disease (HD) and for non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) were evaluated in a case-referent study encompassing 54 cases of HD, 106 cases of NHL, and 275 referents, all alive. Exposure information was obtained by questionnaires posted to the subjects. Crude rate ratios were increased for various occupational exposures including solvents, welding, wood preservatives, phenoxy

B Persson; A M Dahlander; M Fredriksson; H N Brage; C G Ohlson; O Axelson

1989-01-01

292

Hepatosplenic lymphoma in a dog  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe a case of a dog with hepatosplenic lymphoma, a disease characterized by infiltration of the liver, spleen, and bone marrow with gammadelta T cells, absence of peripheral lymphadenopathy, and an aggressive clinical course. Physical examination findings, hematologic and biochemical abnormalities, and clinical course of the disease in this patient were similar to those in humans. Immunophenotyping of liver

Michael M Fry; W. Vernau; C Bromel; P A Pesavento; P. F. Moore

2003-01-01

293

Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prognosis of follicular lymphomas (FL) is heterogeneous and numerous treatments may be proposed. A validated prognostic index (PI) would help in evalu- ating and choosing these treatments. Characteristics at diagnosis were col- lected from 4167 patients with FL diag- nosed between 1985 and 1992. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to propose a PI. This index was then tested

Philippe Solal-Celigny; Pascal Roy; Philippe Colombat; Josephine White; Jim O. Armitage; Reyes Arranz-Saez; Wing Y. Au; Monica Bellei; Pauline Brice; Dolores Caballero; Bertrand Coiffier; Eulogio Conde-Garcia; Chantal Doyen; Massimo Federico; Richard I. Fisher; Javier F. Garcia-Conde; Cesare Guglielmi; Michael LeBlanc; Andrew T. Lister; Armando Lopez-Guillermo; Peter McLaughlin; Noel Milpied; Nicolas Mounier; Stephen J. Proctor; Ama Rohatiner; Paul Smith; Umberto Vitolo; Pier-Luigi Zinzani; Emanuele Zucca; Emili Montserrat; J. Bernard; Hopital H. Mondor; M. D. Anderson; CHU L. Huriez

2004-01-01

294

Molecular Pathogenesis of MALT lymphoma  

E-print Network

cellular pathways, biological processes and molecular functions showed that translocation-positive MALT lymphomas were characterized by an enhanced expression of NF-?B target genes, particularly TLR6, CCR2, CD69 and BCL2, while translocation-negative cases...

Hamoudi, Rifat A

2010-01-01

295

Computational diagnosis of canine lymphoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One out of four dogs will develop cancer in their lifetime and 20% of those will be lymphoma cases. PetScreen developed a lymphoma blood test using serum samples collected from several veterinary practices. The samples were fractionated and analysed by mass spectrometry. Two protein peaks, with the highest diagnostic power, were selected and further identified as acute phase proteins, C-Reactive Protein and Haptoglobin. Data mining methods were then applied to the collected data for the development of an online computer-assisted veterinary diagnostic tool. The generated software can be used as a diagnostic, monitoring and screening tool. Initially, the diagnosis of lymphoma was formulated as a classification problem and then later refined as a lymphoma risk estimation. Three methods, decision trees, kNN and probability density evaluation, were used for classification and risk estimation and several preprocessing approaches were implemented to create the diagnostic system. For the differential diagnosis the best solution gave a sensitivity and specificity of 83.5% and 77%, respectively (using three input features, CRP, Haptoglobin and standard clinical symptom). For the screening task, the decision tree method provided the best result, with sensitivity and specificity of 81.4% and >99%, respectively (using the same input features). Furthermore, the development and application of new techniques for the generation of risk maps allowed their user-friendly visualization.

Mirkes, E. M.; Alexandrakis, I.; Slater, K.; Tuli, R.; Gorban, A. N.

2014-03-01

296

Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma and Liver Dysfunction  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-02-21

297

Diagnosis of pancreatitis in dogs and cats.  

PubMed

Pancreatitis is the most common disorder of the exocrine pancreas in both dogs and cats. Ante-mortem diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis can be challenging. The clinical picture of dogs and cats with pancreatitis varies greatly (from very mild to severe or even fatal) and is characterised by non-specific findings. Complete blood count, serum biochemistry profile and urinalysis should always be performed in dogs and cats suspected of having pancreatitis, although findings are not-specific for pancreatitis. Serum amylase and lipase activities and trypsin-like immunoreactivity (TLI) concentrations have no or only limited clinical value for the diagnosis of pancreatitis in either dogs or cats. Conversely, serum pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity (PLI) concentration is currently considered to be the clinicopathological test of choice for the diagnosis of canine and feline pancreatitis. Abdominal radiography is a useful diagnostic tool for the exclusion of other diseases that may cause similar clinical signs to those of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasonography can be very useful for the diagnosis of pancreatitis, but this depends largely on the clinician's experience. Histopathological examination of the pancreas is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis and classification of pancreatitis, but it is not without limitations. In clinical practice, a combination of careful evaluation of the animal's history, serum PLI concentration and abdominal ultrasonography, together with pancreatic cytology or histopathology when indicated or possible, is considered to be the most practical and reliable means for an accurate diagnosis or exclusion of pancreatitis compared with other diagnostic modalities. PMID:25586803

Xenoulis, P G

2015-01-01

298

Multiple recurrent pancreatic cysts with associated pancreatic inflammation and atrophy in a cat  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous reports of true pancreatic cysts in cats have suggested that pancreatic cysts in cats are benign incidental findings. This case report describes the progressive clinical course and diagnostic findings in a cat with multiple recurrent pancreatic cysts. The presenting clinical signs included diarrhea, intermittent vomiting, polyphagia, and marked weight loss. Pancreatic cysts were identified via abdominal ultrasound and computed

Erinne M. Branter; Katrina R. Viviano

2010-01-01

299

Mabs against Pancreatic cancer Therapeutic antibodies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer  

E-print Network

Mabs against Pancreatic cancer 1 Therapeutic antibodies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer pancreatic cancer inserm-00497886,version1-6Jul2010 Author manuscript, published in "TheScientificWorldJournal (electronic resource) 2010;10:1107-20" DOI : 10.1100/tsw.2010.103 #12;Mabs against Pancreatic cancer 2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

300

Pancreatic Cancer Center: Providing the Research Tools Necessary to Advance Pancreatic Cancer Patient Care  

E-print Network

Pancreatic Cancer Center: Providing the Research Tools Necessary to Advance Pancreatic Cancer number of NCI-designated cancer centers have a specialized pancreatic cancer program. The creation of the IUPUI Signature Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research has been the foundation for putting IUPUI, the IU

Zhou, Yaoqi

301

Carfilzomib, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

2015-02-16

302

Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Low-Grade Follicular Lymphoma, Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia, or Mantle Cell Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2015-01-16

303

Vol. 101 (2002) ACT A PHY SIC A POLON IC A A No . 4 A ppl icati on of t he Ele ct ro { Op tic al K err  

E-print Network

Vol. 101 (2002) ACT A PHY SIC A POLON IC A A No . 4 A ppl icati on of t he Ele ct ro { Op tic al K, m ainly by minim izing the e~ect of the electri c Ùeld on a system. T echniques using a pul sed electri c Ùeld [12{ 17] and an alterna ti ng Ùeld [18] have emerged. Sti ll, the theo reti cal di£ cul ti

2002-01-01

304

AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2014-11-20

305

Utility of PET/CT in diagnosis, staging, assessment of resectability and metabolic response of pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common gastrointestinal tumors, with its incidence staying at a high level in both the United States and China. However, the overall 5-year survival rate of pancreatic cancer is still extremely low. Surgery remains the only potential chance for long-term survival. Early diagnosis and precise staging are crucial to make proper clinical decision for surgery candidates. Despite advances in diagnostic technology such as computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasound, diagnosis, staging and monitoring of the metabolic response remain a challenge for this devastating disease. Positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT), a relatively novel modality, combines metabolic detection with anatomic information. It has been widely used in oncology and achieves good results in breast cancer, lung cancer and lymphoma. Its utilization in pancreatic cancer has also been widely accepted. However, the value of PET/CT in pancreatic disease is still controversial. Will PET/CT change the treatment strategy for potential surgery candidates? What kind of patients benefits most from this exam? In this review, we focus on the utility of PET/CT in diagnosis, staging, and assessment of resectability of pancreatic cancer. In addition, its ability to monitor metabolic response and recurrence after treatment will be emphasis of discussion. We hope to provide answers to the questions above, which clinicians care most about. PMID:25400441

Wang, Xiao-Yi; Yang, Feng; Jin, Chen; Fu, De-Liang

2014-01-01

306

Arterial pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis: literature review.  

PubMed

Arterial pseudoaneurysm formation of visceral arteries as a vascular complication of pancreatitis, either acute or chronic, is an uncommon phenomenon. This review article discusses the incidence, pathophysiology, imaging, treatment strategies, and prognosis of mesenteric pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis. PMID:25279846

Verde, Franco; Fishman, Elliot K; Johnson, Pamela T

2015-01-01

307

Cancer Stem Cells Found in Pancreatic Tumors  

Cancer.gov

Researchers have detected cancer stem cells in tumors from patients with pancreatic cancer. Experiments in mice suggest that these cancer stem cells may help explain the aggressive growth and spread of pancreatic tumors seen in patients.

308

Pancreatic Cancer: Targeted Treatments Hold Promise  

MedlinePLUS

... mail this page Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Pancreatic Cancer: Targeted Treatments Hold Promise Search the Consumer Updates ... Scientists are working to develop breakthrough therapies for pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest cancers affecting both men ...

309

What You Need to Know about Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

MedlinePLUS

... Español What You Need To Know About™ Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma This booklet is about non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a cancer that starts in the immune system. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is also called NHL. PDF This booklet ...

310

What Are the Key Statistics about Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma?  

MedlinePLUS

... for non-Hodgkin lymphoma? What are the key statistics about non-Hodgkin lymphoma? Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

311

Rituximab With or Without Yttrium Y-90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Untreated Follicular Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma

2015-02-20

312

A case of conjunctival follicular lymphoma mimicking mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma.  

PubMed

Ocular adnexal lymphoma may involve the eyelids, conjunctiva, orbital tissue, or lacrimal structures. The majority are non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphomas of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma type. Follicular lymphomas represent a small percentage of ocular adnexa lymphomas, particularly in Japan. We report a 68-year-old female patient who presented with a salmon pink patch-like lesion of the left conjunctiva, suspected of being (MALT) lymphoma. However, histologic and immunohistologic examinations were consistent with follicular lymphoma. This case demonstrates the importance of considering such rare lymphomas when making a diagnosis of ocular adnexal lymphoid neoplasms. [J Clin Exp Hematop 53(1): 49-52, 2013]. PMID:23801133

Abd Al-Kader, Lamia; Sato, Yasuharu; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Ohshima, Koh-Ichi; Sogabe, Yuka; Fujii, Kazuhiro; Iwaki, Noriko; Yoshino, Tadashi

2013-01-01

313

Vorinostat and Combination Chemotherapy With Rituximab in Treating Patients With HIV-Related Diffuse Large B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Other Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

2015-03-05

314

Rituximab and Oblimersen in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Follicular Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

2013-01-04

315

Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody With or Without Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Children With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

2013-01-16

316

Association of Pancreatic Fatty Infiltration With Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: Fatty infiltration (FI) in the pancreas is positively correlated with high body mass index (BMI) or obesity, and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), which are well-known risk factors of pancreatic cancer. However, the association of FI in the pancreas with pancreatic cancer is unclear. Recently, we have shown that Syrian golden hamsters feature FI of the pancreas, the severity of which increases along with the progression of carcinogenesis induced by a chemical carcinogen. To translate the results to a clinical setting, we investigated whether FI in the pancreas is associated with pancreatic cancer in a series of patients who had undergone pancreatoduodenectomy. METHODS: In the series, we identified 102 cases with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and 85 controls with cancers except for PDAC. The degree of FI was evaluated histopathologically from the area occupied by adipocytes in pancreas sections, and was compared between the cases and controls. RESULTS: The degree of FI in the pancreas was significantly higher in cases than in controls (median 26 vs. 15%, P<0.001) and positively associated with PDAC, even after adjustment for BMI, prevalence of DM and other confounding factors (odds ratio (OR), 6.1; P<0.001). BMI was identified as the most significantly associated factor with FI in the pancreas. CONCLUSIONS: There is a positive correlation between FI in the pancreas and pancreatic cancer. PMID:24622469

Hori, Mika; Takahashi, Mami; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Yamaji, Taiki; Mutoh, Michihiro; Ishigamori, Rikako; Furuta, Koh; Okusaka, Takuji; Shimada, Kazuaki; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kanai, Yae; Nakagama, Hitoshi

2014-01-01

317

3-AP and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-09-27

318

Pancreatic Stellate Cell Activation and MMP Production in Experimental Pancreatic Fibrosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. The early events in pancreatic fibrosis are poorly understood. We examined the production of collagen and matrix metalloproteinases as well as the activation of pancreatic stellate cells in a rodent model of pancreatic fibrosis.Materials and methods. Pancreatitis was induced in rats by hyperstimulation with cerulein (50 ?g\\/kg\\/day ip) and concurrent pancreatic duct obstruction (SHOP model) for 96 h (n

Tokuyasu Yokota; Woody Denham; Kenric Murayama; Carolyn Pelham; Raymond Joehl; Richard H. Bell

2002-01-01

319

Genetics of pancreatitis: the 2014 update.  

PubMed

Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease in which pancreatic secretory parenchyma is destroyed and replaced by fibrous tissue, eventually leading to malnutrition and diabetes. Alcohol is the leading cause in Western countries, but genetic factors are also implicated. Since the identification of mutations in the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene as a cause of hereditary pancreatitis in 1996, we have seen great progress in our understanding of the genetics of pancreatitis. It has been established that mutations in the genes related to the activation and inactivation of trypsin(ogen) such as PRSS1, serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and chymotrypsin C (CTRC) genes are associated with pancreatitis. In 2013, carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1) was identified as a novel pancreatitis susceptibility gene. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in pancreatic acinar cells resulting from the mis-folding of mutated pancreatic enzymes has been shown to act as a novel mechanism underlying the susceptibility to pancreatitis. In Japan, the nationwide survey revealed 171 patients (96 males and 75 females) with hereditary pancreatitis in 59 families based on the European Registry of Hereditary Pancreatitis and Familial Pancreatic Cancer criteria. Because about 30% of families with hereditary pancreatitis do not carry mutations in any of the known pancreatitis susceptibility genes, other yet unidentified genes might be involved. Next generation sequencers can perform billions of sequencing reactions with a read length of 150-250 nucleotides. Comprehensive analysis using next generation sequencers will be a promising strategy to identify novel pancreatitis-associated genes and further clarify the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. PMID:24522117

Masamune, Atsushi

2014-01-01

320

Bortezomib, Ifosfamide, and Vinorelbine Tartrate in Treating Young Patients With Hodgkin's Lymphoma That is Recurrent or Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

2014-06-18

321

Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Idelalisib in Japanese Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (With or Without Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia); Marginal Zone Lymphoma

2015-02-24

322

Genetically Engineered Lymphocyte Therapy After Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk, Intermediate-Grade, B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

2014-08-01

323

Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2015-02-02

324

Primary Gastric Burkitt’s Lymphoma  

PubMed Central

The primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, although rare, is among the most common extra-nodal lymphomas, considering that gastric lymphomas are more common than intestinal lymphomas. Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive form of B-cell lymphoma that is typically endemic in Africa, while non-endemic cases are found in the rest of the world. Primary gastric BL is extremely rare and only around 50 cases have been reported worldwide. Here we present the case of a young HIV-negative male, who was referred to our department with a stage IV gastric BL. He was planned for palliative chemotherapy, but after the first cycle of chemotherapy he succumbed to the progression of the disease. PMID:25568743

Mitra, Swarupa; Mehta, Anurag; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Anila; Louis, A. Robert; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Saxena, Upasna; Simson, David K.; Dewan, Abhinav

2014-01-01

325

Epidemiology of Coffee and Pancreatic Cancer1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association between pancreatic cancer and putative risk factors was examined using 275 incident cases and 7994 con trols interviewed in six United States cities for a major study of tobacco-related diseases. From the comparison population were excluded patients with other diseases postulated to be associ ated with pancreatic cancer (e.g., other pancreatic diseases and diseases of the gallbladder) and

E. L. Wynder; M. Polansky

1983-01-01

326

Acute Pancreatitis Due to a Duodenal Ulcer  

PubMed Central

Duodenal ulcers and acute pancreatitis are two of the most commonly encountered gastrointestinal diseases among the general population. However, duodenal ulcer-induced pancreatitis is very rarely reported worldwide. This report elaborates on a distinct medical treatment that contributes to partial or complete treatment of acute pancreatitis induced by a duodenal ulcer scar. PMID:25505728

Pyeon, Sung Ik; Kim, Yong Tae; Lee, Ban Seok; Lee, Sang Ho; Lee, Jae Nam; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Oh, Kong Jin

2014-01-01

327

Proinflammatory cytokines: an insight into pancreatic oncogenesis.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease, being one of the five leading death causes among oncologic patients. It is usually diagnosed late due to the paucity of clinical signs, and the current therapy means have limited success. One of the documented risk factors for developing pancreatic adenocarcinoma is chronic pancreatitis. It is postulated that a chronic inflammatory disease has a potential of evolving toward neoplasia, a fact that could account for a percentage of the pancreatic cancers. Starting from this assumption, we intended to analyze the serum reflection of some molecules with proinflammatory roles, and compare them in healthy individuals, in patients with chronic pancreatitis and with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Additionally, we performed a biochemical and hematological assessment of the study groups, and compared the results with the immunological parameters analyzed in the same subjects. We found significantly higher levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha and Interleukin 6 in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma sera (with higher levels in the pancreatitis group than in the cancer group), compared to healthy controls. Additionally, we found significantly higher levels of interleukin 8 and Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-3 alpha in pancreatic cancer, compared to chronic pancreatitis and controls. We also identified numerous correlations between the abovementioned cytokines/chemokines and biochemical parameters, not very much studied before. Our results plead for a pathogenic role of chronic inflammation in pancreatic carcinogenesis, thus offering a potential tool for earliy diagnose or targets for therapy. PMID:21462832

Miron, Nicolae; Miron, Mirela-Mihaela; Milea, Viorica Ghizela Iolana; Cristea, Victor

2010-01-01

328

Pathogenesis of Infection in Pancreatic Inflammatory Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The majority of cases of acute pancreatitis are mild and the patient recovers quickly, with little morbidity. Severe acute pancreatitis associated with significant amounts of pancreatic necrosis is a more serious disease. This is especially so when it is accompanied by infection of the necrotic pancreas or peripancreatic tissue, which significantly increases both the mortality rate and the morbidity of

Howard A. Reber

2001-01-01

329

Signaling and transcriptional control of pancreatic organogenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of several new studies encourage a revision of fundamental hypotheses concerning the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying pancreatic morphogenesis and cell differentiation in the embryo. The roles of FGF- and BMP-signaling indicate a fundamental difference in the induction of the dorsal and the ventral pancreatic anlage. Final commitment to the pancreatic fate requires the action of several transcriptional

Seung K Kim; Raymond J MacDonald

2002-01-01

330

Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.  

PubMed

Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an important cause of maldigestion and a major complication in chronic pancreatitis. Normal digestion requires adequate stimulation of pancreatic secretion, sufficient production of digestive enzymes by pancreatic acinar cells, a pancreatic duct system without significant outflow obstruction and adequate mixing of the pancreatic juice with ingested food. Failure in any of these steps may result in pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, which leads to steatorrhea, weight loss and malnutrition-related complications, such as osteoporosis. Methods evaluating digestion, such as fecal fat quantification and the (13)C-mixed triglycerides test, are the most accurate tests for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, but the probability of the diagnosis can also be estimated based on symptoms, signs of malnutrition in blood tests, fecal elastase 1 levels and signs of morphologically severe chronic pancreatitis on imaging. Treatment for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency includes support to stop smoking and alcohol consumption, dietary consultation, enzyme replacement therapy and a structured follow-up of nutritional status and the effect of treatment. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is administered in the form of enteric-coated minimicrospheres during meals. The dose should be in proportion to the fat content of the meal, usually 40-50000 lipase units per main meal, and half the dose is required for a snack. In cases that do not respond to initial treatment, the doses can be doubled, and proton inhibitors can be added to the treatment. This review focuses on current concepts of the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. PMID:24259956

Lindkvist, Björn

2013-11-14

331

Acute pancreatitis induced by anticancer chemotherapy.  

PubMed

Drug-induced pancreatitis is rare (1.4-2%). This report describes a 20-year-old female patient who developed acute pancreatitis while being treated for neurosarcoma of abdominal wall with the ifosfamide and doxorubicin regimen. Although it is unusual, it is important to consider chemotherapeutic agents as a possible etiology for acute pancreatitis in patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:24455804

Ben Kridis, W; Khanfir, A; Frikha, M

2013-01-01

332

Study Yields Genetic Insights into Pancreatic Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... please enable JavaScript. Study Yields Genetic Insights Into Pancreatic Cancer Multiple gene mutations identified that could be targets ... 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Genes and Gene Therapy Pancreatic Cancer THURSDAY, April 9, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Most pancreatic ...

333

The clinical significance of pancreatic steatosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

More research is now focused on pancreatic steatosis. Multiple definitions, clinical associations and synonyms for pancreatic steatosis are described in the literature and can be confusing. The integration and comparison of several studies concerning this topic is therefore challenging. In the past, pancreatic steatosis was considered an innocuous condition, a bystander of many underlying diseases (such as congenital syndromes, hemochromatosis

Erwin J. M. van Geenen; Mark M. Smits

2011-01-01

334

Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an important cause of maldigestion and a major complication in chronic pancreatitis. Normal digestion requires adequate stimulation of pancreatic secretion, sufficient production of digestive enzymes by pancreatic acinar cells, a pancreatic duct system without significant outflow obstruction and adequate mixing of the pancreatic juice with ingested food. Failure in any of these steps may result in pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, which leads to steatorrhea, weight loss and malnutrition-related complications, such as osteoporosis. Methods evaluating digestion, such as fecal fat quantification and the 13C-mixed triglycerides test, are the most accurate tests for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, but the probability of the diagnosis can also be estimated based on symptoms, signs of malnutrition in blood tests, fecal elastase 1 levels and signs of morphologically severe chronic pancreatitis on imaging. Treatment for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency includes support to stop smoking and alcohol consumption, dietary consultation, enzyme replacement therapy and a structured follow-up of nutritional status and the effect of treatment. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is administered in the form of enteric-coated minimicrospheres during meals. The dose should be in proportion to the fat content of the meal, usually 40-50000 lipase units per main meal, and half the dose is required for a snack. In cases that do not respond to initial treatment, the doses can be doubled, and proton inhibitors can be added to the treatment. This review focuses on current concepts of the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. PMID:24259956

Lindkvist, Björn

2013-01-01

335

[Grey zone lymphomas: limitations of the classification of aggressive B-cell lymphomas].  

PubMed

Grey zone lymphomas are lymphatic tumors that cannot be assigned to a defined lymphoma entity due to morphological, clinical or genetic reasons. As a defining criterion they present with features of two overlapping entities or features that are intermediate. Such lymphomas may represent a grey zone in the differentiation between indolent and aggressive lymphomas. Often they may show morphological features of one entity but be more related to another entity with respect to the immunophenotype and/or genetic constitution, such as lymphomas in the grey zone between primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma and primary nodal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The B-cell lymphoma, unclassified, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma has recently been recognized as a provisional category in the updated WHO 2008 classification of malignant lymphomas. This corresponds to a practical lymphoma category that obviously contains several entities with a Burkitt-like appearance and aggressive clinical behavior. Genetically, tumors in this category are frequently characterized by an atypical MYC translocation and complex karyotypic alterations. As yet, no adequate therapy concept exists. PMID:23494279

Ott, M M; Horn, H; Rosenwald, A; Ott, G

2013-05-01

336

PXD101 and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2013-05-01

337

Fusion Protein Cytokine Therapy After Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2014-07-14

338

What's New in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Research and Treatment?  

MedlinePLUS

... standard treatment for this type of lymphoma. Monoclonal antibodies Lymphoma cells contain certain chemicals on their surface. Monoclonal antibodies that recognize these substances can be targeted to ...

339

Diagnosis of systemic metastatic retinal lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Purpose Systemic metastatic retinal lymphoma (SMRL) is exceptionally rare, as systemic lymphomas most often metastasize to the uvea. We have evaluated a series of SMRL cases to elucidate the clinical and pathological features of SMRL. Methods The pathologic specimens of intraocular lymphomas (IOLs) at the National Eye Institute from 1991–2009 were retrospectively reviewed. These cases were diagnosed by cytology, cytokine measurement (ELISA for interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-6 levels), and Immunoglobulin-Heavy (IgH) and T-cell-receptor (TCR) gene analyses. Results There were 9 B-SMRLs among 96 B-cell retina lymphomas (9.4%) and 3 T-SMRLs among 5 T-cell retinal lymphomas (60%) from a total of 116 IOLs. The original sites were nasopharynx (3), testis (2), skin (2), breast (1), blood (1), retroperitoneum (1), ileo-cecum (1) and stomach (1). Cytology of vitreous samples illustrated atypical lymphoma cells with either B- or T- monoclonality. More B-SMRLs had a high ratio of vitreal IL-10 to IL-6 than T-SMRLs. Molecular pathology demonstrated lymphoma cells with gene rearrangements of IgH in all B-SMRLs and TCR in all T-SMRLs. Conclusions SMRL and primary retinal lymphoma present with similar clinical manifestations. Systemic T-cell lymphoma invades the retina and vitreous more aggressively than systemic B-cell lymphoma. A diagnosis of SMRL is made when there is a clinical history of systemic lymphoma (particularly from nasopharynx, testis, and skin) and lymphoma cells are identified in the vitreous or retina. Molecular analysis is more useful than vitreal cytokine measurement for SMRL diagnosis. PMID:19958292

Cao, Xiaoguang; Shen, Defen; Callanan, David G.; Mochizuki, Manabu; Chan, Chi-Chao

2009-01-01

340

Lymphomas: diagnosis, treatment. Cancergram CT05  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this Cancergram includes Hodgkin's disease, adenolymphoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, lymphosarcoma, lymphoblastoma, lymphocytoma, reticulum cell sarcoma, mycosis fungoides, and any not otherwise specified lymphoma. Abstracts are included which concern all clinical aspects of the various forms of lymphoma, such as diagnosis and staging, supportive care, evaluation, and therapy. Animal models, tissue culture experiments, carcinogenesis and other preclinical studies are generally excluded, except for those considered to have direct clinical relevance.

Not Available

1985-01-01

341

Mechanisms of B-cell lymphoma pathogenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chromosomal translocations involving the immunoglobulin loci are a hallmark of many types of B-cell lymphoma. Other factors, however, also have important roles in the pathogenesis of B-cell malignancies. Most B-cell lymphomas depend on the expression of a B-cell receptor (BCR) for survival, and in several B-cell malignancies antigen activation of lymphoma cells through BCR signalling seems to be an important

Ralf Küppers

2005-01-01

342

Primary ovarian lymphoma--a rare entity.  

PubMed

Primary ovarian lymphoma is very rare. Ovarian involvement by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is usually secondary, occurring as part of a systemic disease. We report a case of primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the ovary manifesting as advanced ovarian cancer. The diagnosis was confirmed on histological and immunohistochemical analysis. The patient was treated with surgery followed by chemotherapy using rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone (R-CHOP) regimen. PMID:23905454

Afshan, Anjum; Sadaf, Nigar

2013-04-01

343

Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

2014-01-01

344

Pharmacogenomics update in pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths in United States. Despite advances in understanding cancer biology and therapeutics, this malignancy carries a grave prognosis with a poor overall survival rate. This is especially true for patients with locally advanced and metastatic disease that are not amenable to surgical resection. Given advances in human genome sequencing and pharmacogenomics, we now better understand the complex genetic makeup of these tumors and numerous gene mutations have been identified that could be potential targets for drug development. In this review, we discuss two abstract (Abstracts #208 and #192) presented at the 2014 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium about pancreatic cancer genome sequencing and their implications for the future of this disease. We discuss what is known about the genome of pancreatic tumors, including common mutations like KRAS, TP53 and SMAD4, as well as discovery of additional mutations. In particular, KRAS2 mutations in a subset of patients with pancreatic cancer are discussed. While limited in size and clinical correlativity, these abstracts provide at least seven novel/targetable mutations and elucidate biologic differences in tumors with wild type and mutant KRAS. These are important steps in understanding tumor biology and genetic basis of pancreatic cancer to help develop targeted drug therapies in the fast approaching era of personalized medicine. PMID:24618431

Puri, Aditi; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

2014-03-01

345

PCMdb: Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pancreatic cancer is the fifth most aggressive malignancy and urgently requires new biomarkers to facilitate early detection. For providing impetus to the biomarker discovery, we have developed Pancreatic Cancer Methylation Database (PCMDB, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/pcmdb/), a comprehensive resource dedicated to methylation of genes in pancreatic cancer. Data was collected and compiled manually from published literature. PCMdb has 65907 entries for methylation status of 4342 unique genes. In PCMdb, data was compiled for both cancer cell lines (53565 entries for 88 cell lines) and cancer tissues (12342 entries for 3078 tissue samples). Among these entries, 47.22% entries reported a high level of methylation for the corresponding genes while 10.87% entries reported low level of methylation. PCMdb covers five major subtypes of pancreatic cancer; however, most of the entries were compiled for adenocarcinomas (88.38%) and mucinous neoplasms (5.76%). A user-friendly interface has been developed for data browsing, searching and analysis. We anticipate that PCMdb will be helpful for pancreatic cancer biomarker discovery.

Nagpal, Gandharva; Sharma, Minakshi; Kumar, Shailesh; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Gupta, Sudheer; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

2014-02-01

346

Pancreatic carcinoma in fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes: An eastern India perspective.  

PubMed

Fibrocalcific pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) is a rare cause of diabetes (<1%) of uncertain etiology associated with >100-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We present 3 patients of FCPD with pancreatic cancer who had long duration of diabetes (19 years, 25 years, and 28 years, respectively), all of whom presented with anorexia, weight loss, and worsened glycemic control. Patient-1 in addition presented with deep venous thrombosis. All the 3 patients had evidence of metastasis at the time of diagnosis. Computerized tomography (CT) abdomen revealed atrophic pancreas, dilated pancreatic ducts, and multiple calculi in the head, body, and tail of pancreas in all of them. Patient-1 had 38 mm × 38 mm × 32 mm mass in the tail of pancreas with multiple target lesions were seen in the right lobe of liver. Patient-2 had a mass in the tail of pancreas (46 × 34 × 31 mm) encasing the celiac plexus and superior mesenteric artery infiltrating the splenic hilum and splenic flexure of colon. Patient-3 also had a mass in the tail of pancreas (33 × 31 × 22 mm), with multiple target lesions in the liver, suggestive of metastasis. All patients had elevated serum CA19-9 (828.8, 179.65, and 232 U/L, respectively; normal <40 U/L). Patients of FCPD with anorexia, weight loss, worsening of glycemic control should be evaluated to rule out pancreatic cancer. Studies are warranted to evaluate CA19-9 as a screening tool for diagnosing pancreatic cancer at an earlier stage in FCPD. PMID:23565475

Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Dutta, Deep; Biswas, Kaushik; Sanyal, Triranjan; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

2012-12-01

347

New therapies in non-Hodgkin lymphoma.  

PubMed

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas are among the most prevalent hematologic malignancies. Although the addition of rituximab (R) to chemotherapy has made a big impact in the treatment of B cell lymphomas, most of them are not cured yet. The panorama in natural killer/T cell lymphomas is more unsatisfactory, thus representing a group of diseases where effective therapies constitute an urgent medical need. In recent years, several new antineoplastic agents have been tested in clinical trials showing promising results. The aim of this review is to update information of these studies that are already changing the scenario of the treatment of patients with Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:25582186

Novelli, Silvana; Sierra, Jorge; Briones, Javier

2015-03-01

348

Minimal change disease associated with MALT lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low-grade Extranodal Marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, a subtype of non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma,\\u000a involving the kidney is a rare clinical entity. Association of Minimal change disease nephrotic range proteinuria with Hodgkin’s\\u000a lymphoma is well described, however is extremely uncommon with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. We describe a patient who presented\\u000a with nephrotic syndrome and a kidney biopsy revealed marginal zone

Rahil Kasmani; Vamsee Priya Marina; Syed Abidi; Bikram Johar; Deepak Malhotra

349

Multiple pancreatic pseudocyst disease.  

PubMed Central

In an effort to determine the incidence of multiple pseudocyst disease and establish the optimal approach to this problem, the records of 91 consecutive patients diagnosed during a 36-month period as having pancreatic pseudocyst disease by sonography or computerized tomographic scanning were reviewed. Thirteen patients (14.3%) had multiple cysts; all received sonograms and six had CT scans. The combined false negative and false positive rate with sonography was 9%. Spontaneous resolution occurred involving five cysts (18%) up to 6.5 cm in size. The diagnosis of cyst multiplicity was confirmed at operation in seven cases; two of the seven operations were excisional and the remaining patients received drainage procedures. There were no operative deaths; complications included one patient who required chronic enzyme replacement therapy after excision and another patient who developed a subphrenic abscess after attempted percutaneous drainage. The incidence of multiple pseudocyst disease in our series is just over 14%. The possibility of multiplicity should be carefully investigated in each patient with pseudocyst disease. In light of the rate of spontaneous resolution, not all patients with multiple pseudocysts may require operative therapy. Because of the 7.7% false negative diagnoses with sonography, CT scanning is especially helpful when the diagnosis of multiple pseudocysts is suspected or in preoperative preparation of pseudocyst drainage. If an operation becomes necessary, a drainage procedure rather than excision should be used whenever possible to maximize gland salvage. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6691732

Goulet, R J; Goodman, J; Schaffer, R; Dallemand, S; Andersen, D K

1984-01-01

350

Primary central nervous system lymphoma.  

PubMed

Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) that is restricted entirely to the brain, leptomeninges, eyes, and rarely the spinal cord. It typically presents with focal neurologic symptoms and is characterized by diffuse infiltration of the brain. Corticosteroids are useful for symptomatic treatment but can interfere with definitive pathological diagnosis. PCNSL is radiosensitive and responds to whole-brain radiotherapy. The use of preirradiation high-dose methotrexate-based regimens has significantly improved response rates and patient survival. Longer survival, however, is often marred by devastating neurotoxicity to which the elderly are particularly susceptible. Newer regimens aim to minimize such toxicity while maintaining the survival benefit of combined modality treatment. PMID:17591569

Mohile, Nimish A; Abrey, Lauren E

2007-07-01

351

Fluid resuscitation in acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis remains a clinical challenge, despite an exponential increase in our knowledge of its complex pathophysiological changes. Early fluid therapy is the cornerstone of treatment and is universally recommended; however, there is a lack of consensus regarding the type, rate, amount and end points of fluid replacement. Further confusion is added with the newer studies reporting better results with controlled fluid therapy. This review focuses on the pathophysiology of fluid depletion in acute pancreatitis, as well as the rationale for fluid replacement, the type, optimal amount, rate of infusion and monitoring of such patients. The basic goal of fluid epletion should be to prevent or minimize the systemic response to inflammatory markers. For this review, various studies and reviews were critically evaluated, along with authors’ recommendations, for predicted severe or severe pancreatitis based on the available evidence. PMID:25561779

Aggarwal, Aakash; Manrai, Manish; Kochhar, Rakesh

2014-01-01

352

Metabolism addiction in pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, an aggressively invasive, treatment-resistant malignancy and the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, is usually detectable only when already inevitably fatal. Despite advances in genetic screening, mapping and molecular characterization, its pathology remains largely elusive. Renewed research interest in longstanding doctrines of tumor metabolism has led to the emergence of aberrant signaling pathways as critical factors modulating central metabolic networks that fuel pancreatic tumors. Such pathways, including those of Ras signaling, glutamine-regulatory enzymes, lipid metabolism and autophagy, are directly affected by genetic mutations and extreme tumor microenvironments that typify pancreatic tumor cells. Elucidation of these metabolic networks can be expected to yield more potent therapies against this deadly disease. PMID:24556680

Blum, R; Kloog, Y

2014-01-01

353

Pancreatic surgery: evolution and current tailored approach  

PubMed Central

Surgical resection of pancreatic cancer offers the only chance for prolonged survival. Pancretic resections are technically challenging, and are accompanied by a substantial risk for postoperative complications, the most significant complication being a pancreatic fistula. Risk factors for development of pancreatic leakage are now well known, and several prophylactic pharmacological measures, as well as technical interventions have been suggested in prevention of pancreatic fistula. With better postoperative care and improved radiological interventions, most frequently complications can be managed conservatively. This review also attempts to address some of the controversies related to optimal management of the pancreatic remnant after pancreaticoduodenectomy. PMID:25392836

Mužina Miši?, Dubravka; Glav?i?, Goran

2014-01-01

354

Hydrocarbon exposure, pancreatitis, and bile acids.  

PubMed Central

The data on hydrocarbon induced pancreatitis are conflicting. This question was therefore studied in a non-selected population exposed to hydrocarbons and in "formerly" exposed workers. Neither the past clinical history nor the pancreatic tests provided any evidence for a causal relation between exposure and pancreatitis. No signs of hydrocarbon induced liver damage were seen either. As a healthy worker effect cannot be totally excluded, however, a case-control study in a group of patients suffering from non-alcohol induced pancreatitis could give useful indications for finally excluding the possibility of pancreatitis being induced by hydrocarbons. PMID:2271391

Hotz, P; Pilliod, J; Bourgeois, R; Boillat, M A

1990-01-01

355

Target therapies in pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed

Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) occurs in the majority of cases with early locoregional spread and distant metastases at diagnosis, leading to dismal prognosis and limited treatment options. Traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy provides only modest benefit to patients with PDAC. Identification of different molecular pathways, overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells, has provided the opportunity to develop targeted therapies (monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors) and peculiar new class of taxanes with a crucial therapeutic role in this cancer setting. A phase III trial has shown that erlotinib in combination with gemcitabine was clinically irrelevant and skin toxicity can be a positive prognostic factor. Moreover, the combination of cetuximab or erlotinib with radiotherapy in advanced pancreatic cancer has shown to be synergistic and a reversal of radio-resistance has been suggested by inhibition of VEGF/EGFR pathway. To overcome EGFR-inhibition therapy resistance several alternative pathways targets are under investigation (IGF- 1R, MMPs, Hedgehog proteins, m-TOR, MEK, COX-2) and provide the rationale for clinical use in phase II/III studies. Also nab-paclitaxel, a new taxanes class, uses high pancreatic albumin-binding protein SPARC levels to act in cancer cells with a less toxic and more effective dose with respect to classic taxanes. Understanding of molecular pathogenesis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma continues to expand. However, many promising data in preclinic and phase I/II trials did not yield promise in phase III trials, suggesting that identification of predictive biomarkers for these new agents is mandatory. The knowledge of biologic and molecular aspects of pancreatic cancer can be the basis for future therapeutic developments. PMID:23992319

Silvestris, Nicola; Gnoni, Antonio; Brunetti, Anna Elisabetta; Vincenti, Leonardo; Santini, Daniele; Tonini, Giuseppe; Merchionne, Francesca; Maiello, Evaristo; Lorusso, Vito; Nardulli, Patrizia; Azzariti, Amalia; Reni, Michele

2014-01-01

356

Vaccine Therapy With or Without Cryosurgery in Treating Patients With Residual, Relapsed, or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia With Nodal Disease

2014-09-12

357

New Insights into the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review In this article, we review important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of pancreatitis. Recent Findings The relative contribution of intra-pancreatic trypsinogen activation and NF?B activation, the two major early independent cellular events in the etiology of pancreatitis, have been investigated using novel genetic models. Trypsinogen activation has traditionally held the spotlight for many decades as it is believed to be the central pathogenic event of pancreatitis However, recent experimental evidence points to the role of trypsin activation in early acinar cell damage but not in the inflammatory response of acute pancreatitis through NF?B activation. Further, chronic pancreatitis in the caerulein model develops independently of typsinogen activation. Sustained activation of the NF?B pathway, but not persistent intra-acinar expression of active trypsin, was shown to result in chronic pancreatitis. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling was shown to mediate downstream effects of pathologic rise in intracellular calcium. IL-6 was identified as a key cytokine mediating pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Summary Recent advances challenge the long-believed trypsin-centered understanding of pancreatitis. It is becoming increasingly clear that activation of intense inflammatory signaling mechanisms in acinar cells is crucial to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, which may explain the strong systemic inflammatory response in pancreatitis. PMID:23892538

Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Dawra, Rajinder K.; Saluja, Ashok K.

2014-01-01

358

Novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer has become the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the last two decades. Only 3%-15% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had 5 year survival rate. Drug resistance, high metastasis, poor prognosis and tumour relapse contributed to the malignancies and difficulties in treating pancreatic cancer. The current standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however its efficacy is far from satisfactory, one of the reasons is due to the complex tumour microenvironment which decreases effective drug delivery to target cancer cell. Studies of the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer have revealed that activation of KRAS, overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2, inactivation of p16(INK4A) and loss of p53 activities occurred in pancreatic cancer. Co-administration of gemcitabine and targeting the molecular pathological events happened in pancreatic cancer has brought an enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of gemcitabine. Therefore, studies looking for novel targets in hindering pancreatic tumour growth are emerging rapidly. In order to give a better understanding of the current findings and to seek the direction in future pancreatic cancer research; in this review we will focus on targets suppressing tumour metastatsis and progression, KRAS activated downstream effectors, the relationship of Notch signaling and Nodal/Activin signaling with pancreatic cancer cells, the current findings of non-coding RNAs in inhibiting pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, brief discussion in transcription remodeling by epigenetic modifiers (e.g., HDAC, BMI1, EZH2) and the plausible therapeutic applications of cancer stem cell and hyaluronan in tumour environment. PMID:25152585

Tang, Shing-Chun; Chen, Yang-Chao

2014-08-21

359

Molecular mechanisms of alcohol associated pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Alcohol abuse is commonly associated with the development of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Despite this close association, the fact that only a small percentage of human beings who abuse alcohol develop pancreatitis indicates that alcohol abuse alone is not sufficient to initiate clinical pancreatitis. This contention is further supported by the fact that administration of ethanol to experimental animals does not cause pancreatitis. Because of these findings, it is widely believed that ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to injury and additional factors trigger the development of overt pancreatitis. How ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to pancreatitis is not entirely known. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ethanol and its metabolites have a number of deleterious effects on acinar cells. Important acinar cells properties that are affected by ethanol include: calcium signaling, secretion of zymogens, autophagy, cellular regeneration, the unfolded protein response, and mitochondrial membrane integrity. In addition to the actions of ethanol on acinar cells, it is apparent that ethanol also affects pancreatic stellate cells. Pancreatic stellate cells have a critical role in normal tissue repair and the pathologic fibrotic response. Given that ethanol and its metabolites affect so many pancreatic functions, and that all of these effects occur simultaneously, it is likely that none of these effects is “THE” effect. Instead, it is most likely that the cumulative effect of ethanol on the pancreas predisposes the organ to pancreatitis. The focus of this article is to highlight some of the important mechanisms by which ethanol alters pancreatic functions and may predispose the pancreas to disease. PMID:25133017

Clemens, Dahn L; Wells, Mark A; Schneider, Katrina J; Singh, Shailender

2014-01-01

360

Novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer has become the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the last two decades. Only 3%-15% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had 5 year survival rate. Drug resistance, high metastasis, poor prognosis and tumour relapse contributed to the malignancies and difficulties in treating pancreatic cancer. The current standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however its efficacy is far from satisfactory, one of the reasons is due to the complex tumour microenvironment which decreases effective drug delivery to target cancer cell. Studies of the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer have revealed that activation of KRAS, overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2, inactivation of p16INK4A and loss of p53 activities occurred in pancreatic cancer. Co-administration of gemcitabine and targeting the molecular pathological events happened in pancreatic cancer has brought an enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of gemcitabine. Therefore, studies looking for novel targets in hindering pancreatic tumour growth are emerging rapidly. In order to give a better understanding of the current findings and to seek the direction in future pancreatic cancer research; in this review we will focus on targets suppressing tumour metastatsis and progression, KRAS activated downstream effectors, the relationship of Notch signaling and Nodal/Activin signaling with pancreatic cancer cells, the current findings of non-coding RNAs in inhibiting pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, brief discussion in transcription remodeling by epigenetic modifiers (e.g., HDAC, BMI1, EZH2) and the plausible therapeutic applications of cancer stem cell and hyaluronan in tumour environment. PMID:25152585

Tang, Shing-Chun; Chen, Yang-Chao

2014-01-01

361

Autoimmune Pancreatitis - A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Autoiommune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease that has distinct histological, immunological, serological and radiological findings. It is characterised histologically by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, storiform fibrosis, obliterative phelibitis and presence of IgG4 positive plasma cells and lymphocytes. Elevated serum levels of IgG4 are also noted. It is usually misdiagnosed preoperatively as pancreatic cancer. It may involve extrapancreatic sites also and responds well to steroid therapy. Here, we share our experience of AIP in a 52-year-old male.

Rathi, KR; Sahai, Kavita; Jakhmola, CK

2015-01-01

362

Pancreatic neoplasms: MR imaging and pathologic correlation.  

PubMed

Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can aid in the detection and characterization of many pancreatic neoplasms. The MR imaging appearances of common pancreatic neoplasms such as ductal adenocarcinoma are well-known. However, MR imaging features of more unusual pancreatic neoplasms are not well understood. Such tumors include mucin-hyper-secreting carcinoma, serous microcystic neoplasm, mucinous macrocystic neoplasm, solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm, multiple cysts associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease, acinar cell carcinoma, pancreaticoblastoma, and endocrine neoplasms (eg, nonfunctioning islet cell tumors, insulinoma, and gastrinoma). In general, pancreatic neoplasms demonstrate high signal intensity on T2-weighted images; the signal intensity on T1-weighted images is more variable but is often intermediate or low. Gadolinium enhancement is often helpful in further characterizing pancreatic neoplasms. The gross and histologic features of pancreatic neoplasms are also not well-known. Correlation with the underlying pathologic features enhances understanding of the MR imaging characteristics of both common and unusual pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:9084072

Mergo, P J; Helmberger, T K; Buetow, P C; Helmberger, R C; Ros, P R

1997-01-01

363

Ultrasonography in diagnosing chronic pancreatitis: New aspects  

PubMed Central

The course and outcome is poor for most patients with pancreatic diseases. Advances in pancreatic imaging are important in the detection of pancreatic diseases at early stages. Ultrasonography as a diagnostic tool has made, virtually speaking a technical revolution in medical imaging in the new millennium. It has not only become the preferred method for first line imaging, but also, increasingly to clarify the interpretation of other imaging modalities to obtain efficient clinical decision. We review ultrasonography modalities, focusing on advanced pancreatic imaging and its potential to substantially improve diagnosis of pancreatic diseases at earlier stages. In the first section, we describe scanning techniques and examination protocols. Their consequences for image quality and the ability to obtain complete and detailed visualization of the pancreas are discussed. In the second section we outline ultrasonographic characteristics of pancreatic diseases with emphasis on chronic pancreatitis. Finally, new developments in ultrasonography of the pancreas such as contrast enhanced ultrasound and elastography are enlightened. PMID:24259955

Dimcevski, Georg; Erchinger, Friedemann G; Havre, Roald; Gilja, Odd Helge

2013-01-01

364

Endocytoscopic findings of lymphomas of the stomach  

PubMed Central

Background The gastric lesions of various lymphomas were observed at the cellular level using endocytoscopy. Methods Endocytoscopy and magnifying endoscopy with narrow band imaging (NBI) were performed in 17 patients with lymphomas of the stomach. The lesions consisted of 7 with low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), 5 with gastric involvement by adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), 4 with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and 1 with peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Results On conventional endoscopy, 9 were classified as having superficial spreading type, 7 were mass-forming type, and 1 was diffuse infiltrating type. Anti-H. pylori treatment was given in the 7 MALT lymphoma cases. NBI magnification endoscopy invariably showed dilatation or ballooning and destruction of gastric pits and elongation and distortion in microvessels. Endocytoscopy showed mucosal aggregation of interstitial cellular elements in almost all gastric lymphoma cases. The nuclear diversity in size and configuration was exclusively seen in gastric lymphomas other than MALT lymphoma, whereas the nuclei of MALT lymphoma cells were regular and small to moderate in size. Inter-glandular infiltration by lymphomatous cell elements was frequently observed in MALT lymphoma and DLBCL, but it was uncommon in peripheral gastric T-cell malignancies. Endocytoscopy could identify the disease-specific histology, the lymphoepithelial origin, as inter-glandular infiltration of cellular components in MALT lymphoma and the possibly related DLBCL cases. Complete regression (CR) was observed in 2 of the 7 MALT lymphoma patients. In the 2 patients with CR who underwent repeat endocytoscopy, the ultra-high magnification abnormalities returned to normal, while they were unchanged in those without tumor regression. Conclusions On endocytoscopy, intra-glandular aggregation of cellular components was invariably identified in lymphomas of the stomach. Nuclear regularity in size and configuration may indicate the cytological grade, differentiating the indolent low-grade from aggressive lymphoproliferative diseases. The inter-glandular infiltration seen on endocytoscopy can indicate the lymphoepithelial lesions seen in MALT lymphoma and related DLBCL. Endocytoscopy would be applicable for virtual histopathological diagnosis of different lymphoproliferative disorders and their clinical assessment during ongoing endoscopy. PMID:24369830

2013-01-01

365

Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2014-12-04

366

Tanespimycin and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-02-21

367

Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH-R) in Treating Patients With MYC-Associated B-Cell Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2015-02-13

368

Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

2015-03-26

369

Rituximab and Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

2013-08-23

370

Brentuximab Vedotin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory CD30+ Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2015-03-04

371

Pain in chronic pancreatitis: Managing beyond the pancreatic duct  

PubMed Central

Chronic pancreatitis (CP) continues to be a clinical challenge. Persistent or recurrent abdominal pain is the most compelling symptom that drives patients to seek medical care. Unfortunately, in spite of using several treatment approaches in the clinical setting, there is no single specific treatment modality that can be earmarked as a cure for this disease. Traditionally, ductal hypertension has been associated with causation of pain in CP; and patients are often subjected to endotherapy and surgery with a goal to decompress the pancreatic duct. Recent studies on humans (clinical and laboratory based) and experimental models have put forward several mechanisms, including neuroimmune alterations, which could be responsible for pain. This might explain the partial or no response to single modality treatment in a significant proportion of patients. The current review discusses the recent concepts of pain generation in CP and evidence based therapeutic approaches (other than ductal decompression) to handle persistent or recurrent pain. We focus primarily on parenchymal and neural components; and discuss the role of antioxidants and the existing controversies, drugs that interfere with neural transmission, pancreatic enzyme supplementation, celiac neurolysis, and pancreatic resection procedures. The review concludes with the treatment approach that we follow at our institute. PMID:24151350

Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Reddy, D Nageshwar

2013-01-01

372

Vascularisation Pattern of Chronic Pancreatitis Compared with Pancreatic Carcinoma: Results from Contrast-Enhanced Endoscopic Ultrasound  

PubMed Central

Discriminating between focal chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer is always a challenge in clinical medicine. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound using Doppler techniques can uniquely reveal different vascularisation patterns in pancreatic tissue alterated by chronic inflammatory processes and even allows a discrimination from pancreatic cancer. This paper will describe the basics of contrast-enhanced high mechanical index endoscopic ultrasound (CEHMI EUS) and contrast enhanced low mechanical index endoscopic ultrasound (CELMI EUS) and explain the pathophysiological differences of the vascularisation of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Furthermore it will discuss how to use these techniques in daily clinical practice. PMID:22844642

Hocke, Michael; Dietrich, Christoph F.

2012-01-01

373

Management of the marginal zone lymphomas.  

PubMed

Marginal zone lymphomas (MZL) represent around 8 % of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. During the last decades a number of studies have addressed the mechanisms underlying the disease development. Extranodal MZL lymphoma usually arises in mucosal sites where lymphocytes are not normally present from a background of either autoimmune processes, such as Hashimoto thyroiditis or Sjögren syndrome or chronic infectious conditions. In the context of a persistent antigenic stimulation, successive genetic abnormalities can progressively hit a B-cell clone among the reactive B-cells of the chronic inflammatory tissue and give rise to a MALT lymphoma. The best evidence of an etiopathogenetic link is available for the association between Helicobacter pylori-positive gastritis and gastric MALT lymphoma. Indeed, a successful eradication of this micro-organism with antibiotics can be followed by gastric MALT lymphoma regression in more than 2/3 of cases. Other microbial agents have been implicated in the pathogenesis of MZL arising in the skin (Borrelia burgdorferi), in the ocular adnexa (Chlamydophila psittaci), and in the small intestine (Campylobacter jejuni). The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has also been reported higher in MZL patients (particularly of the splenic type) than in the control population, suggesting a possible causative role of the virus. In non-gastric MALT lymphoma and in splenic MZL the role of the antimicrobial therapy is, however, less clear. This review summarizes the recent advances in Marginal Zone Lymphomas, addressing the critical points in their diagnosis, staging and clinical management. PMID:25655612

Vannata, Barbara; Stathis, Anastasios; Zucca, Emanuele

2015-01-01

374

Peripheral blood hemophagocytosis in an unusual lymphoma.  

PubMed

We describe a patient with fever, pancytopenia, and hepato-splenomegaly associated with the finding of neoplastic lymphoid cells and histiocytes with hemophagocytosis in the peripheral smear; the diagnostic features were suggestive for a biological overlap between a large B-cell lymphoma with intravascular involvement and the Asian variant of intravascular B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25678965

Fragasso, Alberto; Mannarella, Clara; Ciancio, Angela; Scarciolla, Oronzo

2015-01-01

375

Peripheral blood hemophagocytosis in an unusual lymphoma  

PubMed Central

Key Clinical Message We describe a patient with fever, pancytopenia, and hepato-splenomegaly associated with the finding of neoplastic lymphoid cells and histiocytes with hemophagocytosis in the peripheral smear; the diagnostic features were suggestive for a biological overlap between a large B-cell lymphoma with intravascular involvement and the Asian variant of intravascular B-cell lymphoma. PMID:25678965

Fragasso, Alberto; Mannarella, Clara; Ciancio, Angela; Scarciolla, Oronzo

2015-01-01

376

Follicular Lymphoma Presenting with Leptomeningeal Disease  

PubMed Central

Follicular lymphoma is generally an indolent B cell lymphoproliferative disorder of transformed follicular center B cells. Central nervous system metastasis is a very rare complication portending a very poor prognosis. We report a rare case of follicular lymphoma presenting with leptomeningeal involvement achieving a complete remission after initial therapy. PMID:25544910

Costa, Ricardo; Costa, Renata

2014-01-01

377

Practical update on canine lymphoma : 2. Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

LYMPHOMA is the most rewarding cancer to treat with chemotherapy. Although a cure is hardly ever achieved and rarely the primary goal, chemotherapy can provide a good quality of life for the patient for a prolonged period of time. This article discusses the treatment options for managing lymphoma in dogs. An article published in the September issue (In Practice, volume

Robyn Gear

2009-01-01

378

High-dose therapy for indolent lymphoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stem-cell transplantation (SCT) has become the treatment of choice for patients with relapsed aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). However, the role of SCT in the management of patients with indolent NHL remains controversial. Indolent follicular lymphomas are diseases which are generally incurable with conventional therapy. Although patients can survive for prolonged periods, the median duration of first remission is approximately 3

Nicolas Mounier; Gérard Socié; Christian Gisselbrecht

2002-01-01

379

Acute Suppuration of the Pancreatic Duct in a Patient with Tropical Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Background/Aim Pancreatic sepsis secondary to infected necrosis, pseudocyst, or pancreatic abscess is a well-known clinical entity. Acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct (ASPD) in the setting of chronic calcific pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal obstruction with septicemia is a rare complication that is seldom reported. It is our aim to report a case of ASPD with Klebsiella ornithinolytica, in the absence of pancreatic abscess or infected necrosis. Case Report A 46-year-old Asian-Indian man with chronic tropical pancreatitis who was admitted with recurrent epigastric pain that rapidly evolved into septic shock. A CT scan of abdomen revealed a dilated pancreatic duct with a large calculus. Broad-spectrum antibiotics, vasopressors and activated recombinant protein C were initiated. Emergency ERCP showed the papilla of Vater spontaneously expelling pus. Probing and stenting was instantly performed until pus drainage ceased. Repeat CT scan confirmed the absence of pancreatic necrosis or fluid collection, and decreasing ductal dilatation. Dramatic clinical improvement was observed within 36 hours after intervention. Blood cultures grew Klebsiella ornithinolytica. The patient completed his antibiotic course and was discharged. Conclusion ASPD without pancreatic abscess or infected necrosis is an exceptional clinical entity that should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic sepsis. A chronically diseased pancreas and diabetes may have predisposed to the uncommon pathogen. The presence of intraductal pancreatic stones obstructing outflow played a major role in promoting bacterial growth, suppuration and septicemia. Immediate drainage of the pancreatic duct with endoscopic intervention is critical and mandatory. PMID:21490834

Deeb, Liliane S.; Bajaj, Jasmeet; Bhargava, Sandeep; Alcid, David; Pitchumoni, C.S.

2008-01-01

380

[Hepatic and pancreatic laparoscopic surgery].  

PubMed

The development of laparoscopic surgery also includes the more complex procedures of abdominal surgery such as those that affect the liver and the pancreas. From diagnostic laparoscopy, accompanied by laparoscopic echography, to major hepatic or pancreatic resections, the laparoscopic approach has spread and today encompasses practically all of the surgical procedures in hepatopancreatic pathology. Without forgetting that the aim of minimally invasive surgery is not a better aesthetic result but the reduction of postoperative complications, it is undeniable that the laparoscopic approach has brought great benefits for the patient in every type of surgery except, for the time being, in the case of big resections such as left or right hepatectomy or resections of segments VII and VIII. Pancreatic surgery has undergone a great development with laparoscopy, especially in the field of distal pancreatectomy due to cystic and neuroendocrine tumours where the approach of choice is laparoscopic. Laparoscopy similarly plays an important role, together with echolaparoscopy, in staging pancreatic tumours, prior to open surgery or for indicating suitable treatment. In coming years, it is to be hoped that it will continue to undergo an exponential development and, together with the advances in robotics, it will be possible to witness a greater impact of the laparoscopic approach on the field of hepatic and pancreatic surgery. PMID:16511579

Pardo, F; Rotellar, F; Valentí, V; Pastor, C; Poveda, I; Martí-Cruchaga, P; Zozaya, G

2005-01-01

381

Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic ? Cells  

PubMed Central

We reviewed mechanisms that determine reactive oxygen species (redox) homeostasis, redox information signaling and metabolic/regulatory function of autocrine insulin signaling in pancreatic ? cells, and consequences of oxidative stress and dysregulation of redox/information signaling for their dysfunction. We emphasize the role of mitochondrion in ? cell molecular physiology and pathology, including the antioxidant role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2. Since in pancreatic ? cells pyruvate cannot be easily diverted towards lactate dehydrogenase for lactate formation, the respiration and oxidative phosphorylation intensity are governed by the availability of glucose, leading to a certain ATP/ADP ratio, whereas in other cell types, cell demand dictates respiration/metabolism rates. Moreover, we examine the possibility that type 2 diabetes mellitus might be considered as an inevitable result of progressive self-accelerating oxidative stress and concomitantly dysregulated information signaling in peripheral tissues as well as in pancreatic ? cells. It is because the redox signaling is inherent to the insulin receptor signaling mechanism and its impairment leads to the oxidative and nitrosative stress. Also emerging concepts, admiting participation of redox signaling even in glucose sensing and insulin release in pancreatic ? cells, fit in this view. For example, NADPH has been firmly established to be a modulator of glucose-stimulated insulin release. PMID:23304259

Ježek, Petr; Dlasková, Andrea; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie

2012-01-01

382

Approaches Towards Endogenous Pancreatic Regeneration  

PubMed Central

The phenomenon of pancreatic regeneration in mammals has been well documented. It has been shown that pancreatic tissue is able to regenerate in several species of mammal after surgical insult. This tissue is also known to have the potential to maintain or increase its ?-cell mass in response to metabolic demands during pregnancy and obesity. Since deficiency in ?-cell mass is the hallmark of most forms of diabetes, it is worthwhile understanding pancreatic regeneration in the context of this disease. With this view in mind, this article aims to discuss the potential use in clinical strategies of knowledge that we obtained from studies carried out in animal models of diabetes. Approaches to achieve this goal involve the use of biomolecules, adult stem cells and gene therapy. Various molecules, such as glucagon-like peptide-1, ?-cellulin, nicotinamide, gastrin, epidermal growth factor-1 and thyroid hormone, play major roles in the initiation of endogenous islet regeneration in diabetes. The most accepted hypothesis is that these molecules stimulate islet precursor cells to undergo neogenesis or to induce replication of existing ?-cells, emphasizing the importance of pancreas-resident stem/progenitor cells in islet regeneration. Moreover, the potential of adult stem cell population from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, liver, spleen, or amniotic membrane, is also discussed with regard to their potential to induce pancreatic regeneration. PMID:17491691

Banerjee, Meenal; Kanitkar, Meghana; Bhonde, Ramesh R.

2005-01-01

383

Endoscopic Treatment of Pancreatic Calculi  

PubMed Central

Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease that destroys pancreatic parenchyma and alters ductal stricture, leading to ductal destruction and abdominal pain. Pancreatic duct stones (PDSs) are a common complication of chronic pancreatitis that requires treatment to relieve abdominal pain and improve pancreas function. Endoscopic therapy, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and surgery are treatment modalities of PDSs, although lingering controversies have hindered a consensus recommendation. Many comparative studies have reported that surgery is the superior treatment because of reduced duration and frequency of hospitalization, cost, pain relief, and reintervention, while endoscopic therapy is effective and less invasive but cannot be used in all patients. Surgery is the treatment of choice when endoscopic therapy has failed, malignancy is suspected, or duodenal stricture is present. However, in patients with the appropriate indications or at high-risk for surgery, endoscopic therapy in combination with ESWL can be considered a first-line treatment. We expect that the development of advanced endoscopic techniques and equipment will expand the role of endoscopic treatment in PDS removal. PMID:24944986

Kim, Yong Hoon; Jang, Sung Ill; Rhee, Kwangwon

2014-01-01

384

Taxanes: impact on pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Taxanes are core therapeutic components for several advanced malignancies, and have been studied extensively in pancreatic adenocarcinomas with mixed results. Although the triplet combination FOLFIRINOX improves outcomes for patients with metastatic disease, it is compounded by significant toxicity, and novel regimens, rationally designed and based on thorough mechanistic activity on the tumor targets, are clearly needed. Solvent-based taxanes, docetaxel and paclitaxel, have little activity as single agents, but combinations with fluoropyrimidines and gemcitabine show efficacy, albeit they have not undergone testing in phase III trials. Pancreatic cancer is characterized by an abundant desmoplastic, fibroinflammatory and hypoperfused stroma, which has been blamed for its overall chemoresistance. Nanoparticle bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) has been pharmacologically designed as a novel water-soluble agent, with improved therapeutic index compared with the cremophor-based formulation, capable of achieving higher systemic exposure. In preclinical systems, when combined with gemcitabine, nab-paclitaxel increased intratumoral gemcitabine delivery, possibly due to inducing stromal 'collapse' and through inhibition of the gemcitabine-catabolizing enzyme cytidine deaminase. Most recently, the combination of nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine demonstrated significant survival benefit with good tolerability in metastatic pancreatic cancer in the phase III trial MPACT, and now represents one of the gold-standard regimens for this disease. Although taxanes are overall potent chemotherapeutics for various cancers, it is clear that for meaningful results in pancreatic adenocarcinomas, rationally designed combinations and novel technologies for drug delivery are likely to be most successful. PMID:24463484

Chiorean, E Gabriela; Von Hoff, Daniel D

2014-05-01

385

Automated Image Analysis of Hodgkin lymphoma  

E-print Network

Hodgkin lymphoma is an unusual type of lymphoma, arising from malignant B-cells. Morphological and immunohistochemical features of malignant cells and their distribution differ from other cancer types. Based on systematic tissue image analysis, computer-aided exploration can provide new insights into Hodgkin lymphoma pathology. In this paper, we report results from an image analysis of CD30 immunostained Hodgkin lymphoma tissue section images. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic application of image analysis to a set of tissue sections of Hodgkin lymphoma. We have implemented an automatic procedure to handle and explore image data in Aperio's SVS format. We use pre-processing approaches on a down-scaled image to separate the image objects from the background. Then, we apply a supervised classification method to assign pixels to predefined classes. Our pre-processing method is able to separate the tissue content of images from the image background. We analyzed three immunohistologically ...

Schmitz, Alexander; Schäfer, Hendrik; Döring, Claudia; Ackermann, Jörg; Dichter, Norbert; Hartmann, Sylvia; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Koch, Ina

2012-01-01

386

FDG-PET/CT in lymphoma.  

PubMed

Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases that arise from the constituent cells of the immune system or from their precursors. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET/CT) is now the cornerstone of staging procedures in the state-of-the-art management of Hodgkin's disease and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It plays an important role in staging, restaging, prognostication, planning appropriate treatment strategies, monitoring therapy, and detecting recurrence. However, its role in indolent lymphomas is still unclear and calls for further investigational trials. The protean PET/CT manifestations of lymphoma necessitate a familiarity with the spectrum of imaging findings to enable accurate diagnosis. A meticulous evaluation of PET/CT findings, an understanding of its role in the management of lymphomas, and knowledge of its limitations are mandatory for the optimal utilization of this technique. PMID:24604942

D'souza, Maria M; Jaimini, Abhinav; Bansal, Abhishek; Tripathi, Madhavi; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Tripathi, Rajendra Prashad

2013-10-01

387

Ofatumumab and Bendamustine Hydrochloride With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Untreated Follicular Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

2015-03-23

388

Extranodal marginal zone (MALT) lymphoma in common variable immunodeficiency  

Microsoft Academic Search

We describe two patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) who developed extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (formerly described as mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma or MALT lymphoma). One patient, with documented pernicious anaemia and chronic atrophic gastritis with metaplasia, developed a Helicobacter pylori-positive extranodal marginal zone lymphoma in the stomach. Three triple regimens of antibiotics were necessary to eliminate the H. pylori,

I. M. Desar; M. Keuter; J. M. M. Raemaekers; J. B. M. J. Jansen

2006-01-01

389

Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

2013-06-03

390

Rituximab, Rasburicase, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Advanced B-Cell Leukemia or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

2014-09-10

391

Study of Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Patients With Relapsed Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2014-08-13

392

Rituximab, Lenalidomide, and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Follicular Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

2015-03-10

393

Acute pancreatitis in children and adolescents  

PubMed Central

In this Topic Highlight, the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of acute pancreatitis in children are discussed. Acute pancreatitis should be considered during the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in children and requires prompt treatment because it may become life-threatening. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and course of acute pancreatitis in children are often different than in adults. Therefore, the specific features of acute pancreatitis in children must be considered. The etiology of acute pancreatitis in children is often drugs, infections, trauma, or anatomic abnormalities. Diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms (such as abdominal pain and vomiting), serum pancreatic enzyme levels, and imaging studies. Several scoring systems have been proposed for the assessment of severity, which is useful for selecting treatments and predicting prognosis. The basic pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis does not greatly differ between adults and children, and the treatments for adults and children are similar. In large part, our understanding of the pathology, optimal treatment, assessment of severity, and outcome of acute pancreatitis in children is taken from the adult literature. However, we often find that the common management of adult pancreatitis is difficult to apply to children. With advances in diagnostic techniques and treatment methods, severe acute pancreatitis in children is becoming better understood and more controllable. PMID:25400985

Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sai, Jin Kan; Shimizu, Toshiaki

2014-01-01

394

Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors by endoscopic ultrasonography  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic tumors are highly diverse, as they can be solid or cystic, and benign or malignant. Since their imaging features overlap considerably, it is often difficult to characterize these tumors. In addition, small pancreatic tumors, especially those less than 2 cm in diameter, are difficult to detect and diagnose. For characterizing pancreatic tumors and detecting small pancreatic tumors, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the most sensitive of the imaging procedures currently available. This technique also provides good results in terms of the preoperative staging of pancreatic tumors. EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has also proved to be a safe and useful method for tissue sampling of pancreatic tumors. Despite these advantages, however, it is still difficult to differentiate between benign and malignant, solid or cystic pancreatic tumors, malignant neoplasms, and chronic pancreatitis using EUS, even when EUS-FNA is performed. Recently, contrast-enhanced EUS with Doppler mode (CE-EUS) employing ultrasound contrast agents, which indicate vascularization in pancreatic lesions, has been found to be useful in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic tumors, especially small pancreatic tumors. However, Doppler ultrasonography with contrast-enhancement has several limitations, including blooming artifacts, poor spatial resolution, and low sensitivity to slow flow. Consequently, an echoendoscope was developed recently that has a broad-band transducer and an imaging mode that was designed specifically for contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CEH-EUS) with a second-generation ultrasound contrast agent. The CEH-EUS technique is expected to improve the differential diagnosis of pancreatic disease in the future. This review describes the EUS appearances of common solid and cystic pancreatic masses, the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNA, and the relative efficacies and advantages of CE-EUS and CEH-EUS along with their relative advantages and their complementary roles in clinical practice. PMID:21160578

Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kitano, Masayuki; Kamata, Ken; El-Masry, Muhammad; Kudo, Masatoshi

2010-01-01

395

Extraintestinal manifestations of autoimmune pancreatitis.  

PubMed

The term autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was first used in Japan in 1995 to describe a newly recognized form of chronic pancreatitis, after the description of Yoshida and colleagues. But Sarles in 1961, first described a form of idiopathic chronic inflammatory sclerosis of the pancreas, suspected to be due to an autoimmune process. AIP has become a widely accepted term because clinical, serologic, histologic, and immunohistochemical findings suggest an autoimmune mechanism. Most affected patients have hypergammaglobulinemia and increased serum levels of IgG, particularly IgG4. Recently published International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria for Autoimmune Pancreatitis include Guidelines of the International Association of Pancreatology, classifying AIP into types 1 and 2, using five cardinal features of AIP, namely imaging of pancreatic parenchyma and duct, serology, other organ involvement, pancreatic histology, and an optional criterion of response to steroid therapy. Extrapancreatic presentations can include sclerosing cholangitis, retroperitoneal fibrosis, sclerosing sialadenitis (Küttner tumor), lymphadenopathy, nephritis, and interstitial pneumonia. Increased IgG4+ plasma cell infiltrate has been reported in sclerosing lesions from other organ sites, including inflammatory pseudotumors of the liver, breast, mediastinum, orbit, and aorta, and it has been observed with hypophysitis and IgG4-associated prostatitis. Abundant IgG4+ plasma cells were also confirmed in Riedel thyroiditis, sclerosing mesenteritis, and inflammatory pseudotumor of the orbit and stomach. Extrapancreatic lesions could be synchronously or metachronously diagnosed with AIP, sharing the same pathological conditions, showing also a favorable result to corticosteroid therapy and distinct differentiation between IgG4-related diseases from the inherent lesions of the corresponding organs. PMID:22722443

Milosavljevic, Tomica; Kostic-Milosavljevic, Mirjana; Jovanovic, Ivan; Krstic, Miodrag

2012-01-01

396

Pancreas; pancreatitis--Polish accomplishments.  

PubMed

Polish accomplishments in clinical and experimental pancreatology concern acute (AP) and chronic (CP) pancreatitis. Special notice was drawn in Polish studies on hemostasis disorders in acute experimental pancreatitis (AEP), and resulting clinical implications (possibility of thrombotic-embolic complications leading to hemorrhagic defects associated with coagulation factors consumption). Studies on lysosomal hydrolases role in AEP pathogenesis were discussed. In those studies notice was drawn to initiating role of zymogen activation by lysosomal hydrolases, especially beta-glucuronidase, with smaller activity of acid phosphatase and cathepsin in this process. It was stated, that also lysosomal enzymes are released from macrophages obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in AEP. It was revealed that prostacyclin (PGI(2)) shows stabilizing effect on lysosomes in liver and kidneys in AEP. Platelets activating factor antagonist inhibits pulmonary lysosomal hydrolases activity in such conditions. Polish studies concerning reactive forms of oxygen role in AEP pathogenesis are one of the first in Europe. Oxidative-antioxidative balance was disturbed in acute pancreatitis course and associated multiorgan changes both under experimental conditions and in humans. Oxidative stress as an early prognostic symptom in AP in humans was also emphasized, showing correlation of oxidative stress indicators with phospholipase A serum activity and polymorphonuclear elastase in plasma of patients with different degree of this disease. In a range of clinical studies special attention should be given to studies concerning lipid disorders as an AP etiological factor in humans. Clear decrease in lipoprotein lipase activity in AP in humans was determined. Polish studies concerning importance of sphincterectomy in acute gallstone derivative pancreatitis (AGP) were presented. Polish researchers accomplishments in chronic alcoholic pancreatitis (CAP) etiopathogenesis were discussed. PMID:15075470

Dzieniszewski, J; Gabryelewicz, A

2003-12-01

397

Genome profiling of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.  

PubMed

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive human cancers. It displays many different chromosomal abnormalities and mutations. By using 244 K high-resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) we studied the genome alterations of 39 fine-needle aspirations from pancreatic adenocarcinoma and eight human adenocarcinoma pancreatic cell lines. Using both visual inspection and GISTIC analysis, recurrent losses were observed on 1p, 3p, 4p, 6, 8p, 9, 10, 11q, 15q, 17, 18, 19p, 20p, 21, and 22 and comprised several known or suspected tumor suppressor genes such as ARHGEF10, ARID1A, CDKN2A/B, FHIT, PTEN, RB1, RUNX1-3, SMAD4, STK11/LKB1, TP53, and TUSC3. Heterozygous deletion of the 1p35-p36 chromosomal region was identified in one-third of the tumors and three of the cell lines. This region, commonly deleted in human cancers, contains several tumor suppressor genes including ARID1A and RUNX3. We identified frequent genetic gains on chromosome arms 1q, 3q, 5p, 6p, 7q, 8q, 12q, 15q, 18q, 19q, and 20q. Amplifications were observed in 16 tumors. AKT2, CCND3, CDK4, FOXA2, GATA6, MDM2, MYC, and SMURF1 genes were gained or amplified. The most obvious amplification was located at 18q11.2 and targeted the GATA6 gene, which plays a predominant role in the initial specification of the pancreas and in pancreatic cell type differentiation. In conclusion, we have identified novel biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:21412932

Birnbaum, David J; Adélaïde, José; Mamessier, Emilie; Finetti, Pascal; Lagarde, Arnaud; Monges, Geneviève; Viret, Frédéric; Gonçalvès, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Iovanna, Juan; Giovannini, Marc; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

2011-06-01

398

Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage

2015-01-29

399

Prognostic analyses on anatomical and morphological classification of feline lymphoma.  

PubMed

The present study was carried out to analyze the prognosis of 163 cats with lymphoma classified anatomically and cytomorphologically. Anatomically, alimentary lymphoma was the most common form and showed significantly shorter survival than mediastinal and nasal lymphomas in cats. Cytomorphologically, there was no predominant subtype in feline lymphomas. Immunoblastic type (18%), centroblastic type (16%), globule leukocyte type (15%), lymphocytic type (12%), lymphoblastic type (12%), pleomorphic medium and large cell type (10%) and anaplastic large cell type (7%) were relatively common subtypes. Most of the cats with globule leukocyte lymphoma had the alimentary form. Comparing median survival time among classifications, cats with globule leukocyte lymphoma showed significantly shorter survival than those with high-grade and other low-grade lymphomas. Furthermore, cats with high-grade lymphomas showed significantly shorter survival than cats with other low-grade lymphomas. The present study indicated the clinical significance of anatomical and cytomorphological evaluation in feline lymphomas. PMID:24521793

Sato, Hirofumi; Fujino, Yasuhito; Chino, Junko; Takahashi, Masashi; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

2014-06-01

400

Dasatinib and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride or Gemcitabine Hydrochloride Alone in Treating Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acinar Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Duct Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer

2013-11-06

401

What Are the Key Statistics about Pancreatic Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... factors for pancreatic cancer? What are the key statistics about pancreatic cancer? The American Cancer Society’s most ... risk factors (listed in the next section ). For statistics related to survival, see the section “ Pancreatic cancer ...

402

Pancreatic Cysts Identification Using Unstructured Information Management Architecture  

E-print Network

, Indianapolis, IN USA. Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers, mostlyPancreatic Cysts Identification Using Unstructured Information Management Architecture Saeed diagnosed at late stages. Patients with pancreatic cysts are at higher risk

Zhou, Yaoqi

403

RESEARCH ARTICLE Detection of pancreatic cancer using antibody  

E-print Network

RESEARCH ARTICLE Detection of pancreatic cancer using antibody microarray-based serum protein profiling proteome analysis / Oncopro- teomics / Pancreatic cancer / Recombinant antibody microarrayFv antibody microarray in an attempt to classify sera derived from pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients versus

Peterson, Carsten

404

Individualized management of follicular lymphoma.  

PubMed

Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the most common indolent non-hodgkin lymphoma. Most patients with FL are diagnosed with advanced disease and are considered incurable. The classical prognostic index in FL is the FL international prognostic index (FLIPI). The management of FL is mainly determined by histologic grading, clinical stage, and tumor burden. For patients with stage I and II disease, an involved-site radiation therapy (ISRT) is recommended and may be potentially curative approach with 60% to 80% of 10-year overall survival (OS) rates, while patients with stage III and IV should be treated with systemic therapy. The watchful waiting is still an option for patients without symptoms or/and low tumor burden. Induction of immuno-chemotherapy combined with consolidation of rituximab maintenance (MR) is standard care for patients with symptomatic disease or with high tumor burden when treatment indicated. The major indication for systemic therapy is including candidate for clinical trials, threatened end organ function, cytopenia secondary to lymphoma bulky disease and steady progress etc. at present time. Routine baseline and regular hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) testing is strongly recommended for all patients before the initiation of immuno-chemotherapy in order to minimize the risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivation which has been observed approximately 20% to 50% of patients with positive HBsAg and 3% to 45% of patients with positive HBcAb. Prophylactic antiviral treatment in patients who are HBsAg-positive or HBcAb-positive is indicated before immuno-chemotherapy. The management for elderly patients should be carefully selected to avoid overtreatment and severe toxicities. Individualized dose adjustment for chemotherapy and an adequate supportive treatment are essential for this special population. Novel agents such as lenalidomide, ibrutinib and idelalisib are promising. In conclusion, individualized management of FL remains challenging and role of new targeted agents need to be defined. PMID:25841714

Bai, Bing; Huang, Hui-Qiang

2015-03-01

405

Alisertib and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

2015-04-09

406

Response criteria for malignant lymphoma.  

PubMed

In the last 35 years, many attempts have been made to define criteria for the assessment of treatment response in malignant lymphoma. These systems, with respect to both morphological and molecular imaging, aim to standardize scan results, in order to simplify the interpretation of findings, facilitate multicentric research trials, and compare published data. Unfortunately, there is no consensus among the main international hematological associations on which criteria are the most appropriate. This detailed and comprehensive description of all classifications intends to focus attention on this topic. PMID:25603273

Maffione, Anna M; Paolini, Rossella; Rodella, Elisabetta; Ambrosio, Cristina; Rampin, Lucia; Lisato, Laura C; Ballotta, Maria; Pavanato, Giovanni; Rubello, Domenico

2015-04-01

407

Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (p<0.001, analysis of variance linear contrast; n=8 for each group). Pathological events relating to these components were observed, including presence of inflammatory cells, deposited collagen, and phenotype conversion of PSCs. We demonstrate that label-free nonlinear optical microscopy is an efficient tool for dissecting PSCs and other pancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

2013-05-01

408

Current status of endotherapy for chronic pancreatitis.  

PubMed

Chronic pancreatitis is associated with varied morphological complications, including intraductal stones, main pancreatic ductal strictures, distal biliary strictures and pseudocysts. Endoscopic therapy provides a less invasive alternative to surgery. In addition, extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy improves the success rate of endoscopic clearance of intraductal stones. However, recent data from randomised trials have shown better long-term outcomes with surgical drainage for obstructive pancreatic ductal disease. In patients with distal biliary strictures, stent insertion leads to good immediate drainage, but after stent removal, recurrent narrowing is common. Endoscopic drainage of pancreatic pseudocysts has excellent outcome and should be accompanied by pancreatic ductal stenting when a ductal communication is evident. In those who remain symptomatic, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided coeliac plexus block may provide effective but short-term pain relief. In this review, we present the current evidence for the role of endotherapy in the management of patients with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25630314

Kwek, B E; Ang, T L; Maydeo, A

2014-12-01

409

Transcatheter Embolization of Pseudoaneurysms Complicating Pancreatitis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic role of angiography in patients with pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis. Methods: Thirteen symptomatic pseudoaneurysms were treated in nine patients with pancreatitis. Eight patients had chronic pancreatitis and pseudocyst and one had acute pancreatitis. Clinical presentation included gastrointestinal bleeding in seven patients and epigastric pain without bleeding in two. All patients underwent transcatheter embolization. Results: Transcatheter embolization resulted in symptomatic resolution in all patients. Rebleeding occurred in two patients, 18 and 28 days after embolization respectively, and was successfully treated by repeated emnbolization. One patient with severe pancreatitis died from sepsis 28 days after embolization. Follow-up was then available for eight patients with no relapse of bleeding after a mean follow-up of 32 months (range 9-48 months). Conclusion: Transcatheter embolization is safe and effective in the management of pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis.

Golzarian, Jafar; Nicaise, Nicole [Department of Radiology, Brussels University, Hopital Erasme, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Deviere, Jacques [Department of Gastroenterology, Brussels University, Hopital Erasme, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium); Ghysels, Marc; Wery, Didier; Dussaussois, Luc; Gansbeke, Daniel van; Struyven, Julien [Department of Radiology, Brussels University, Hopital Erasme, 808 Route de Lennik, B-1070 Brussels (Belgium)

1997-11-15

410

Potential targets for pancreatic cancer immunotherapeutics  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with an overall 5-year survival of less than 5%. As there is ample evidence that pancreatic adenocarcinomas elicit antitumor immune responses, identification of pancreatic cancer-associated antigens has spurred the development of vaccination-based strategies for treatment. While promising results have been observed in animal tumor models, most clinical studies have found only limited success. As most trials were performed in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, the contribution of immune suppressor mechanisms should be taken into account. In this article, we detail recent work in tumor antigen vaccination and the recently identified mechanisms of immune suppression in pancreatic cancer. We offer our perspective on how to increase the clinical efficacy of vaccines for pancreatic cancer. PMID:21463193

Dodson, Lindzy F; Hawkins, William G; Goedegebuure, Peter

2011-01-01

411

Pancreatic cancer: Pathogenesis, prevention and treatment  

SciTech Connect

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States with a very low survival rate of 5 years. To better design new preventive and/or therapeutic strategies for the fight against pancreatic cancer, the knowledge of the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer at the molecular level is very important. It has been known that the development and the progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways among which the EGFR, Akt, and NF-{kappa}B pathways appear to be most relevant. Therefore, the strategies targeting EGFR, Akt, NF-{kappa}B, and their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. In this brief review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

Sarkar, Fazlul H. [Department of Pathology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 740 Hudson Webber Cancer Research Center, 110 E Warren, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)], E-mail: fsarkar@med.wayne.edu; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Li, Yiwei [Department of Pathology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 740 Hudson Webber Cancer Research Center, 110 E Warren, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

2007-11-01

412

Calcifying obstructive pancreatitis: a study of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm associated with pancreatic calcification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & Aims: We have observed intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) associated with pancreatic calcification. The aim of this study is to describe the profile of IPMN associated with calcification and gain insights into the pathogenesis of calcification in IPMN. Methods: We identified 10 patients with IPMN with pancreatic calcification, of whom 7 underwent pancreatic resection. We reviewed demographic data,

Mauricio Zapiach; Dhiraj Yadav; Thomas C Smyrk; Joel G Fletcher; Randall K Pearson; Jonathan E Clain; Michael B Farnell; Suresh T Chari

2004-01-01

413

[Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of bone].  

PubMed

Primary lymphoma of bone is a rare condition that has been described as a malignant neoplasm formed of lymphoid and myelopoetic tissues. Morphologic substrate is formed of lymphoid cells of different evolutional stages. Primary lymphoma of bone occurs predominantly in males; a male to female ratio is 1.8:1. It may occur at any age. The sites commonly affected are the long bones. In Lithuania 400 new cases of lymphoma are diagnosed every year. About 75% of them are non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Many histological types and subtypes of lymphoma exist. This variation leads to difficulties when reviewing the literature and comparing prognoses, treatment and oncologic outcomes. Treatment options for primary bone lymphoma historically have included local therapy with radiation or surgery with or without systemic therapy. The aim of surgery is prophylactic fixation of impending fractures or treatment of pathological fractures. We present a clinical case report of 40-year-old male who developed primary lymphoma of bone with pathological fracture of femur. The systemic chemotherapy was applied during the time of treatment. The choice of surgical treatment was intramedullary nailing without using of methylmethacrylate, because regeneration of bone was visible on roentgenograms. After twelve-month follow-up the patient is full weight bearing without external support. PMID:15111754

Toliusis, Vytautas; Pamerneckas, Algimantas; Petrulis, Algimantas; Tamulaitis, Gintaras; Pilipavicius, Giedrius; Pijadin, Andrejus

2004-01-01

414

HIV-Resistant Gene Modified Stem Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Lymphoma With HIV Infection  

ClinicalTrials.gov

HIV Infection; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

2015-01-16

415

Pancreatic polypeptide cell hyperplasia of the pancreas.  

PubMed

A case of pancreatic polypeptide cell hyperplasia in a 76-year-old man who presented with subacute bowel pseudo-obstruction is reported. A computed tomography scan incidentally showed a pancreatic head lesion that was resected by pancreaticoduodenectomy. Histological examination showed expansion of the endocrine pancreas with increased numbers of pancreatic polypeptide cells in irregularly enlarged islets, ragged endocrine cell clusters, ductulo-insular complexes and microadenomas. The clinicopathological features of this rare and poorly understood condition are discussed. PMID:17021132

Albazaz, R; Da Costa, P E; Verbeke, C S

2006-10-01

416

Robotic-assisted major pancreatic resection.  

PubMed

Robotic-assisted major pancreatic resections allow recreation of time-tested open surgical procedures on a minimally invasive platform. Early outcomes from robotic-assisted major pancreatic resections are comparable with those of laparoscopic and open approaches. Robotic assistance has the potential to bring the well-recognized advantages of minimally invasive surgery to major pancreatic resections. Technological innovations and increased surgeon familiarity with this approach will improve, likely leading to greater adoption and acceptance. PMID:21954697

Zeh, H J; Bartlett, David L; Moser, A James

2011-01-01

417

Acute idiopathic pancreatitis: clinical and diagnostic contribution.  

PubMed

Acute idiopathic pancreatitis is a term used when no underlying cause can be identified on routine investigations. However more specialized investigations, such as endoscopic, endoscopic retrocolangio pancreopathy (CPRE), may detect aetiological factors, particularly biliary sludge and pancreatic duct abnormalities. The authors, reviewing the current literature, report their caseload of idiopathic pancreatitis. They conclude that CPRE is indicated if ultrasonography shows a calibre of the common duct at the superior limits of normal values and in each idiopathic recurrent AP. PMID:9444796

Forte, A; Montesano, G; Gallinaro, L; Bertagni, A; Turano, R; Hueck, S; Illuminati, G

1997-01-01

418

Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Etoposide, Dexamethasone, and Filgrastim For Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

2015-03-03

419

Localised Extranodal Lymphoma of the Head and Neck: The Sheffield Lymphoma Group Experience (1971–2000)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: Over the 30-year period from 1971–2000, 3750 cases of lymphoma were referred to the Sheffield Lymphoma Group for investigation and treatment. Of these, 580 were extranodal presentations and, of these, 190 (33%) were localised to the head and neck region. The aim of this lymphoma database review was to evaluate the patient characteristics and survival rates for these patients.Materials

S. Hart; J. M. Horsman; C. R. Radstone; H. Hancock; J. R. Goepel; B. W. Hancock

2004-01-01

420

Blood Sample Markers of Reproductive Hormones in Assessing Ovarian Reserve in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lymphomas  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin

2014-12-03

421

Elevated DNA damage response in pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and intractable human malignant tumors and a leading cause of cancer-related death across the world, with incidence equaling mortality. Because of the extremely high malignance, this disease is usually diagnosed at its advanced stage and recurs even after surgical excision. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is generally thought to arise from pathological changes of pancreatic duct, and the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma accounts for more than 90 % of malignant neoplasms of the pancreas. To date, scientists have revealed several risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including smoking, family history, and aging. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Meanwhile, more mutations of DNA damage response factors have been identified in familial pancreatic cancers, implying a potential link between DNA damage and pancreatic cancer. DNA damage is a recurring phenomenon in our bodies which could be induced by exogenous agents and endogenous metabolism. Accumulated DNA lesions cause genomic instability which eventually results in tumorigenesis. In this study, we showed obvious DNA damages existed in human pancreatic cancer, which activated DNA damage response and the DNA repair pathway including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, DNA-PK, CHK1, and CHK2. The persistent DNA damage in pancreatic tissue may be the source for its tumorigenesis. PMID:25002126

Osterman, Michael; Kathawa, Deion; Liu, Diangang; Guo, Huan; Zhang, Chao; Li, Mo; Yu, Xiaochun; Li, Fei

2014-12-01

422

Mimicking pancreatic malignancy: a systemic sarcoidosis.  

PubMed

Systemic sarcoidosis that initially presents as a pancreatic mass has rarely been reported. A 47-year-old man presented with idiopathic epigastric abdominal pain. Abdominal CT showed multiple enlarged lymph nodes in the retroperitoneal area and a suspected tumor mass in the pancreatic head region. The preliminary diagnosis was celiac metastasis of a pancreatic malignancy. The definitive diagnosis was systemic sarcoidosis, which was supported by granulomas on histology, clinical radiographic findings, and clinical response to steroids. A review of published reports on sarcoidosis presenting initially as a pancreatic or celiac mass from the Chinese biomedical database (1978-2010) is included. PMID:24658558

Zhang, Li-Na; Xue, Qing-Liang; Wang, Jian-Xin

2014-01-01

423

Exocrine Pancreatic Carcinogenesis and Autotaxin Expression  

PubMed Central

Exocrine pancreatic cancer is an aggressive disease with an exceptionally high mortality rate. Genetic analysis suggests a causative role for environmental factors, but consistent epidemiological support is scarce and no biomarkers for monitoring the effects of chemical pancreatic carcinogens are available. With the objective to identify common traits for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors we studied the National Toxicology Program (NTP) bioassay database. We found that male rats were affected more often than female rats and identified eight chemicals that induced exocrine pancreatic tumors in males only. For a hypothesis generating process we used a text mining tool to analyse published literature for suggested mode of actions (MOA). The resulting MOA analysis suggested inflammatory responses as common feature. In cell studies we found that all the chemicals increased protein levels of the inflammatory protein autotaxin (ATX) in Panc-1, MIA PaCa-2 or Capan-2 cells. Induction of MMP-9 and increased invasive migration were also frequent effects, consistent with ATX activation. Testosterone has previously been implicated in pancreatic carcinogenesis and we found that it increased ATX levels. Our data show that ATX is a target for chemicals inducing pancreatic tumors in rats. Several lines of evidence implicate ATX and its product lysophosphatidic acid in human pancreatic cancer. Mechanisms of action may include stimulated invasive growth and metastasis. ATX may interact with hormones or onco- or suppressor-genes often deregulated in exocrine pancreatic cancer. Our data suggest that ATX is a target for chemicals promoting pancreatic tumor development. PMID:22952646

Kadekar, Sandeep; Silins, Ilona; Korhonen, Anna; Dreij, Kristian; Al-Anati, Lauy; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla

2012-01-01

424

Drug induced acute pancreatitis: incidence and severity.  

PubMed Central

To determine the incidence and severity of drug induced acute pancreatitis, data from 45 German centres of gastroenterology were evaluated. Among 1613 patients treated for acute pancreatitis in 1993, drug induced acute pancreatitis was diagnosed in 22 patients (incidence 1.4%). Drugs held responsible were azathioprine, mesalazine/sulfasalazine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI), oestrogens, frusemide, hydrochlorothiazide, and rifampicin. Pancreatic necrosis not exceeding 33% of the organ was found on ultrasonography or computed tomography, or both, in three patients (14%). Pancreatic pseudocysts did not occur. A decrease of arterial PO2 reflecting respiratory insufficiency, and an increase of serum creatinine, reflecting renal insufficiency as complications of acute pancreatitis were seen in two (9%) and four (18%) patients, respectively. Artificial ventilation was not needed, and dialysis was necessary in only one (5%) case. Two patients (9%) died of AIDS and tuberculosis, respectively; pancreatitis did not seem to have contributed materially to their death. In conclusion, drugs rarely cause acute pancreatitis, and drug induced acute pancreatitis usually runs a benign course. PMID:7489946

Lankisch, P G; Dröge, M; Gottesleben, F

1995-01-01

425

Pancreatic resection: effects on glucose metabolism.  

PubMed

Pancreatic resection results in hormonal abnormalities that are dependent on the extent and location (proximal versus distal) of the resected portion of the gland. The form of glucose intolerance which results from pancreatic resection is termed pancreatogenic diabetes. It is associated with features distinct from both type I (insulin-dependent) and type II (insulin-independent, or adult-onset) diabetes. Hepatic insulin resistance with persistent endogenous glucose production and enhanced peripheral insulin sensitivity result in a brittle form of diabetes which can be difficult to manage. In addition to insulin deficiency, the endocrine abnormalities that accompany pancreatic resection can include glucagon deficiency or pancreatic polypeptide (PP) deficiency if the resection is distal or proximal, respectively. Glucagon deficiency can contribute to iatrogenic hypoglycemia, and PP deficiency can contribute to persistent hyperglycemia due to impaired hepatic insulin action. Pancreatic resections that spare the duodenum, such as distal pancreatectomy, duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (Beger procedure), or extended lateral pancreaticojejunostomy with excavation of the pancreatic head (Frey procedure), are associated with a lower incidence of new or worsened diabetes than the standard or pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple procedure) or total pancreatectomy. Operative considerations for the treatment of pancreatic disease should include strategies to minimize the hormonal impairment of pancreatic resection. PMID:11344398

Slezak, L A; Andersen, D K

2001-04-01

426

[Acute pancreatitis: an overview of the management].  

PubMed

Over the past decades, the incidence and the number of hospital admissions for acute pancreatitis have increased in the Western countries. The two most common etiological factors of acute pancreatitis are gallstones (including small gallstones or microlithiasis) and alcohol abuse. Acute pancreatitis is associated with a significant mortality (4-10%) and 25% in case of pancreatic necrosis, especially. Edematous pancreatitis is benign and oral feeding can be restarted once abdominal pain is decreasing and inflammatory markers are improving. Enteral tube feeding should be the primary therapy in patients with predicted severe acute pancreatitis who require nutritional support. Enteral nutrition in acute pancreatitis can be administered via either the nasojejunal or nasogastric route. In case of necrosis, preventive antibiotics are not recommended. The single indication is infected necrosis confirmed by fine needle aspiration. The incidence trends of acute pancreatitis possibly reflect a change in the prevalence of main etiological factors (e.g. gallstones and alcohol consumption) and cofactors such as tobacco, obesity and genetic susceptibility. Priority is to search for associated causes, especially in cases with atypical symptoms. In case of first acute pancreatitis in patients older than 50 years, the presence of a tumor (benign or malignant) has to be specifically ruled out, using CT-scan, MRI and endoscopic ultrasound. PMID:24837648

Rebours, V

2014-10-01

427

Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy. PMID:25426078

Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A.; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T.; Jeon, Christie Y.; Pandol, Stephen J.

2014-01-01

428

Reconstruction after pancreatic trauma by pancreaticogastrostomy  

PubMed Central

Introduction Pancreatic lesions are very infrequent after closed abdominal trauma (5% of cases) with a complication rate that affects 30–40% of patients, and a mortality rate that can reach 39%. In our experience, closed abdominal traumatisms occurring at typical popular horse-riding festivals in our region constitute a high risk of pancreatic trauma. The purpose of the present paper is to raise awareness about our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic lesions secondary to closed abdominal traumatism. Presentation of case We present the clinical cases of two young patients who, after suffering blunt abdominal trauma secondary to the impact of a horse during the celebration of typical horse-riding festival, were diagnosed with pancreatic trauma type III. The treatment was surgical in both cases and consisted in performing a pancreaticogastric anastomosis with preservation of the distal pancreas and spleen. The postoperative period was uneventful and, at present, both patients are asymptomatic. Discussion Signs and symptoms caused by pancreatic lesion are unspecific and difficult to objectify. With some limitations CT is the imaging test of choice for diagnosis and staging in the acute phase. The Wirsung section is indication for surgical treatment. The most extended surgical procedure in these cases is the resection of pancreatic body, tail, and spleen. Conclusion The identification of a pancreatic injury after closed abdominal trauma requires a high suspicion based on the injury mechanism. A safer option may be the distal pancreatic preservation with pancreaticogastric anastomosis in grade III lesions with healthy pancreatic tissue. PMID:25744560

Martín, Gonzalo Martín; Morillas, Patricia Jiménez; Pino, José C. Rodríguez; Canis, José M. Morón; Argenté, Francesc X. González

2015-01-01

429

Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?  

PubMed Central

As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

Tenner, Scott

2014-01-01

430

Prognostic intraoperative factors in severe acute pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Acute pancreatitis is a serious disease. Triggered by the local inflammation of the pancreas, it can cause inflammation in various organs and systems in the body. It is important to identify severe forms of acute pancreatitis with an increased morbidity and mortality rate. Lately, internationally, numerous clinical and paraclinical factors predicting the severity of acute pancreatitis have been proposed. The purpose of the study is to identify the prognostic intraoperative factors of severity. The prospective study was conducted over a period of four years, between 2007 and 2010 and included 238 patients treated in a surgical clinic in Bucharest. 103 patients experienced a severe form of acute pancreatitis, which means 67.95% of all operations practiced. We monitored intraoperative factors, in particular: the presence and/ or the extent of pancreatic necrosis, common bile duct lithiasis and intraperitoneal fluid, parameters proposed to become statistically prognostic factors in the development and long-term morbidity of acute pancreatitis. The presence and/ or extension of necrosis was identified in the histopathology only in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. 71.43% of the patients with common bile duct lithiasis and 73.91% of the patients with inflammatory intraperitoneal fluid had severe acute pancreatitis. Most patients who developed postoperative complications (86.49%) or who required a surgical intervention (85.71%), presented a severe form of the disease. Conclusions: pancreatic necrosis, common bile duct lithiasis and intraperitoneal fluid may contribute to a more precise prediction of severity, as confirmed by international literature.

Popa, CC

2014-01-01

431

[Four cases of malignant primary breast lymphoma].  

PubMed

Primary malignant lymphoma of the breast (PBL) is comparatively rare in Japan.Herein, the authors present report 4 cases of PBL. All patients had the primary finding of a palpable left breast mass.Malignant lymphoma was strongly suspected by core needle biopsy, and final diagnosis was made on surgical specimens. All cases were diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and were treated with targeted chemotherapy with R-CHOP. Only 1 of the 4 patients needed multidisciplinary therapy due to advanced age.Whenever PBL is suspected, targeted therapy should be considered. PMID:25731383

Ishihara, Sae; Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Asano, Yuka; Morisaki, Tamami; Noda, Satoru; Kawajiri, Hidemi; Takashima, Tsutomu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Hirakawa, Kosei

2014-11-01

432

Cytotoxic T lymphocytes for leukemia and lymphoma.  

PubMed

This chapter focuses on the recent advances in adoptive T-cell immunotherapies, not only for patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but also in the autologous setting using T cells early in the disease process for the treatment of the highest-risk patients with leukemias and lymphomas. The particular emphasis is to highlight the role of T-cell therapies for hematologic malignancies using a non-gene-transfer approach to direct specificity, including the clinical use of T-cell therapies for EBV-associated lymphomas and strategies for targeting nonviral lymphoma- and leukemia-associated antigens. PMID:25696912

Bollard, Catherine M; Barrett, A John

2014-12-01

433

[Primary thyroid extranodal marginal zone lymphoma].  

PubMed

The paper gives the data available in the literature on the clinical and morphological features of thyroid lymphomas and on their diagnostic principles. The authors' observation details the histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of primary thyroid extranodal marginal zone lymphoma. The specific feature of the observation is total thyroid tissue substitution for tumor cells so the characteristic sign of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis were undetectable, but found only immunohistochemically from the remaining thyroid tissue follicle-like structures, which bears out the relationship between the development of lymphoma and autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:25306626

Selivanova, L S; Abramov, D S; Birg, T M; Tertychny?, A S

2014-01-01

434

Pediatric lymphomas and histiocytic disorders of childhood.  

PubMed

Although there have been dramatic improvements in the treatment of children with non-hodgkin lymphoma, hodgkin lymphoma and histiocytic disorders over the past 3 decades, many still relapse or are refractory to primary therapy. In addition, late effects such as 2nd malignancies, cardiomyopathy and infertility remain a major concern. Thus, this review focuses on the current state of the science and, in particular, novel treatment strategies that are aimed at improving outcomes for all pediatric patients with lymphoma and histiocytic disorders while reducing treatment related morbidity. PMID:25435117

Allen, Carl E; Kelly, Kara M; Bollard, Catherine M

2015-02-01

435

[Primary lymphoma of the thyroid gland].  

PubMed

Malignant primary lymphoma of the thyroid gland is a rare disease generally occurring women in the 6(th) or 7(th) decade of life. The principal clinical sign is giant goiter rapidly leading to sings of compression, raising the question of differential diagnosis with anaplastic cancer. The radiological findings in our patient were suggestive of malignancy due to the locoregional invasion. Immunohistochemistry study of the surgical specimen was required to reach the definitive diagnosis of thyroid gland primary lymphoma. Diagnosis of malignant primary lymphoma of the thyroid gland made at the stage of extensive locoregional extension compromises prognosis. Our patient died after one session of chemotherapy. PMID:12193880

Ibnou Soufyane, N; Chadli, A; El Ghomari, H; Essodegui, F; Marouan, F; El Farouqi, A; Ababou, M R; Kafih, M

2002-06-01

436

Oxaliplatin, Ifosfamide and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

2014-02-21

437

Current management of pancreatic carcinoma.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: The author seeks to provide an update on the current management of pancreatic carcinoma, including diagnosis and staging, surgical resection and adjuvant therapy for curative intent, and palliation. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: During the 1960s and 1970s, the operative mortality and long-term survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic carcinoma was so poor that some authors advocated abandoning the procedure. Several recent series have reported a marked improvement in perioperative results with 5-year survival in excess of 20%. Significant advances also have been made in areas of preoperative evaluation and palliation for advanced disease. CONCLUSION: Although carcinoma of the pancreas remains a disease with a poor prognosis, advances in the last decade have led to improvements in the overall management of this disease. Resection for curative intent currently should be accomplished with minimal perioperative mortality. Surgical palliation also may provide the optimal management of selected patients. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 7. PMID:7531966

Lillemoe, K D

1995-01-01

438

Pain Management in Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

A majority of pancreatic cancer patients present with pain at the time of diagnosis. Pain management can be challenging in light of the aggressive nature of this cancer. Apart from conventional pharmacotherapy, timely treatment with neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) has been shown to be of benefit. NCPB has demonstrated efficacious pain control in high quality studies with analgesic effects lasting one to two months. NCPB has also shown to decrease the requirements of narcotics, and thus decrease opioid related side effects. Another option for the control of moderate to severe pain is intrathecal therapy (IT). Delivery of analgesic medications intrathecally allows for lower dosages of medications and thus reduced toxicity. Both of the above mentioned interventional procedures have been shown to have low complication rates, and be safe and effective. Ultimately, comprehensive pancreatic cancer pain management necessitates understanding of pain mechanisms and delivery of sequential validated therapeutic interventions within a multidisciplinary patient care model. PMID:24212605

Hameed, Mariam; Hameed, Haroon; Erdek, Michael

2011-01-01

439

Pancreatic disorders in the newborn.  

PubMed

Except for the hyperinsulinism associated with the infant of a diabetic mother (accounting for about 5 percent of NICU admissions annually), pancreatic disorders of the newborn are rare. Congenital anomalies (such as annular pancreas) and endocrine disorders (such as hyperinsulinism of nesidioblastosis or hyperglycemia of neonatal diabetes mellitus) present many challenges to the personnel caring for these infants and their families. The potential mortality and morbidity of these disorders make it imperative for nurses and nurse practitioners working with infants to recognize and understand pancreatic dysfunction so that appropriate and timely intervention can prevent complications of brain injury and developmental delay. The home care needs of these infants and the extensive teaching needs of their parents require skilled nursing care to ensure a safe discharge. PMID:11949098

McKenna, L L

2000-06-01

440

Update on pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are relatively rare tumors comprising 1-2% of all pancreas neoplasms. In the last 10 years our understanding of this disease has increased dramatically allowing for advancements in the treatment of pNETs. Surgical excision remains the primary therapy for localized tumors and only potential for cure. New surgical techniques using laparoscopic approaches to complex pancreatic resections are a major advancement in surgical therapy and increasingly possible. With early detection being less common, most patients present with metastatic disease. Management of these patients requires multidisciplinary care combining the best of surgery, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. In addition to surgical advances, recently, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy and targeted molecular therapy. PMID:25493258

McKenna, Logan R.

2014-01-01