Science.gov

Sample records for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

  1. Medical treatment for gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, Rossana; Morgese, Francesca; Torniai, Mariangela; Savini, Agnese; Partelli, Stefano; Rinaldi, Silvia; Caramanti, Miriam; Ferrini, Consuelo; Falconi, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) represents a various family of rare tumours. Surgery is the first choice in GEP-NENs patients with localized disease whilst in the metastatic setting many other treatment options are available. Somatostatin analogues are indicated for symptoms control in functioning tumours. Furthermore they may be effective to inhibit tumour progression. GEP-NENs pathogenesis has been extensively studied in the last years therefore several driver mutations pathway genes have been identified as crucial factors in their tumourigenesis. GEP-NENs can over-express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic-fibroblastic growth factor, transforming growth factor (TGF-α and -β), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their receptors PDGF receptor, IGF-1 receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, VEGF receptor, and c-kit (stem cell factor receptor) that can be considered as potential targets. The availability of new targeted agents, such as everolimus and sunitinib that are effective in advanced and metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, has provided new treatment opportunities. Many trials combing new drugs are ongoing. PMID:27096034

  2. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. What do we know of their history?].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Starting with Paul Langerhans, who first described pancreatic islets in 1869, this article reviews the various protagonists who, in the last century and a half, have contributed to the discovery of the main hormones originating in the pancreas, the analytical methods for their measurement, the imaging techniques for identifying tumoural location, and the various pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:26684677

  3. Pathogenic PALB2 mutation in metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumour: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHAN, DAVID; CLARKE, STEPHEN; GILL, ANTHONY J.; CHANTRILL, LORRAINE; SAMRA, JAS; LI, BOB T.; BARNES, TRISTAN; NAHAR, KAZI; PAVLAKIS, NICK

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNET) comprise ~3% of primary pancreatic neoplasms and they are more heterogeneous in their histological character and outcome. This is the case report of a 73-year-old female patient with synchronously diagnosed pancreatic adenocarcinoma and PNET, which is likely associated with a pathogenic partner and localizer of breast cancer 2, early onset (PALB2) mutation. The potential pathogenic significance of PALB2 and its association with various malignancies were investigated and the potential role of PALB2 in conferring sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents, such as mitomycin C and cisplatin, was discussed. This case report highlights the significance of ongoing research into the molecular pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, which may help guide the selection of optimal treatments for this disease, as well as the need for ongoing study of PALB2 as a possible predictive marker of response to DNA-damaging agents. PMID:26171187

  4. [Drug therapy for neuroendocrine tumours].

    PubMed

    Tóth, Miklós

    2013-09-29

    The author aims to review the established medical treatment options of neuroendocrine tumours, which have expanded greatly in recent years and present the most important aspects to be considered in planning patients' management. Medical treatment is usually considered in advanced stages of these tumours, as well as in cases of hormone overproduction. Somatostatin analogues have been known to be effective in alleviating hormone excess syndromes, especially carcinoid syndrome for the past 25 years. There is a convincing evidence that the somatostatin analogue octreotide is useful as an antitumor agent, at least in well-differentiated small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours and probably also in those of pancreatic origin. Interferons may be also used and the indications for their use may be almost the same. Optimal patient selection is mandatory for the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Streptozotocin- and, recently, temozolomide-based chemotherapies should be considered in progressive phases of well differentiated (G1/G2) pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. A cisplatin-etoposide combination is the first choice for the treatment of G3 neuroendocrine carcinomas of any origin. Recently, the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus and the combined tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib were registered for the treatment of G1/G2 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. The most recent drug treatment recommendations and therapeutic algorithms to improve systemic therapy in patients with neuroendocrine tumours are summarized and novel drug candidates with particular potential for future management of these tumours are outlined. PMID:24058101

  5. Multivisceral resection of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs) are rare and surgical resection offers the only possibility of cure for localised disease. The role of surgery in the setting of locally advanced and metastatic disease is more controversial. Emerging data suggests that synchronous surgical resection of pancreas and liver may be associated with increased survival. We report two cases of synchronous, one stage multivisceral resections for pNET and associated reconstruction. We highlight the technical issues involved in such extensive resections and demonstrate that one stage multivisceral operations can be achieved safely. PMID:21859472

  6. Learning experiences with sunitinib continuous daily dosing in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, E.; Faivre, S.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular strategies to improve outcomes for patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (nets) have focused on targeting vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and mtor (the mammalian target of rapamycin). This approach has led to the regulatory approval of two molecularly targeted agents for advanced pancreatic nets: sunitinib, a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, and everolimus, an mtor inhibitor. Initial experience with sunitinib in advanced pancreatic net was gained from the phase iii registration trial, which used a continuous daily dosing (cdd) schedule instead of daily drug administration for 4 consecutive weeks every 6 weeks (schedule 4/2), the approved schedule for advanced renal cell carcinoma (rcc) and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (gist). Clinical experience gained with schedule 4/2 in rcc and gist shows that, using a therapy management approach, patients can start and be maintained on the recommended dose and schedule, thus optimizing treatment outcomes. Here, we discuss challenges that can potentially be faced by physicians who use sunitinib on the cdd schedule, and we use clinical data and real-life clinical experience to present therapy management approaches that support cdd in advanced pancreatic net. PMID:25489258

  7. High intensity focused ultrasound ablation of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Orgera, Gianluigi; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Bonomo, Guido; Della Vigna, Paolo; Fazio, Nicola; Orsi, Franco

    2011-04-01

    We describe the use of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for ablation of two pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs; insulinomas) in two inoperable young female patients. Both suffered from episodes of severe nightly hypoglycemia that was not efficiently controlled by medical treatment. After HIFU ablation, local disease control and symptom relief were achieved without postinterventional complications. The patients remained free of symptoms during 9-month follow-up. The lesions appeared to be decreased in volume, and there was decreased enhancing pattern in the multidetector computed tomography control (MDCT). HIFU is likely to be a valid alternative for symptoms control in patients with pancreatic NETs. However, currently the procedure should be reserved for inoperable patients for whom symptoms cannot be controlled by medical therapy. PMID:20521049

  8. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Orgera, Gianluigi; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Bonomo, Guido; Della Vigna, Paolo; Fazio, Nicola; Orsi, Franco

    2011-04-15

    We describe the use of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for ablation of two pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs; insulinomas) in two inoperable young female patients. Both suffered from episodes of severe nightly hypoglycemia that was not efficiently controlled by medical treatment. After HIFU ablation, local disease control and symptom relief were achieved without postinterventional complications. The patients remained free of symptoms during 9-month follow-up. The lesions appeared to be decreased in volume, and there was decreased enhancing pattern in the multidetector computed tomography control (MDCT). HIFU is likely to be a valid alternative for symptoms control in patients with pancreatic NETs. However, currently the procedure should be reserved for inoperable patients for whom symptoms cannot be controlled by medical therapy.

  9. Challenges and controversies in management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours in patients with MEN1.

    PubMed

    Yates, Christopher J; Newey, Paul J; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2015-11-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), an autosomal dominant disorder, is characterised by the occurrence of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (P-NETs) in association with parathyroid and pituitary tumours. P-NETs, which include gastrinomas, insulinomas, and non-functioning tumours, occur in more than 80% of MEN1 patients and account for 50% of disease-specific deaths. However, there is no consensus about the optimal methods for detecting and treating P-NETs in MEN1 patients, and extrapolations from approaches used in patients with non-familial (sporadic) P-NETs require caution because of differences, such as the younger age of onset, multi-focality of P-NETs, and concomitant presence of other tumours in MEN1 patients. Thus, the early detection of P-NETs by circulating biomarkers and imaging modalities, and their appropriate treatments by surgical approaches and/or radionuclide therapy, chemotherapy, and biotherapy pose challenges and controversies. These challenges and controversies will be reviewed and possible approaches proposed. PMID:26165399

  10. Anti-tumour effects of lanreotide for pancreatic and intestinal neuroendocrine tumours: the CLARINET open-label extension study

    PubMed Central

    Caplin, Martyn E; Pavel, Marianne; Ćwikła, Jarosław B; Phan, Alexandria T; Raderer, Markus; Sedláčková, Eva; Cadiot, Guillaume; Wolin, Edward M; Capdevila, Jaume; Wall, Lucy; Rindi, Guido; Langley, Alison; Martinez, Séverine; Gomez-Panzani, Edda; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In the CLARINET study, lanreotide Autogel (depot in USA) significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic pancreatic/intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). We report long-term safety and additional efficacy data from the open-label extension (OLE). Patients with metastatic grade 1/2 (Ki-67 ≤10%) non-functioning NET and documented baseline tumour-progression status received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (n=101) or placebo (n=103) for 96 weeks or until death/progressive disease (PD) in CLARINET study. Patients with stable disease (SD) at core study end (lanreotide/placebo) or PD (placebo only) continued or switched to lanreotide in the OLE. In total, 88 patients (previously: lanreotide, n=41; placebo, n=47) participated: 38% had pancreatic, 39% midgut and 23% other/unknown primary tumours. Patients continuing lanreotide reported fewer adverse events (AEs) (all and treatment-related) during OLE than core study. Placebo-to-lanreotide switch patients reported similar AE rates in OLE and core studies, except more diarrhoea was considered treatment-related in OLE (overall diarrhoea unchanged). Median lanreotide PFS (core study randomisation to PD in core/OLE; n=101) was 32.8 months (95% CI: 30.9, 68.0). A sensitivity analysis, addressing potential selection bias by assuming that patients with SD on lanreotide in the core study and not entering the OLE (n=13) had PD 24 weeks after last core assessment, found median PFS remaining consistent: 30.8 months (95% CI: 30.0, 31.3). Median time to further PD after placebo-to-lanreotide switch (n=32) was 14.0 months (10.1; not reached). This OLE study suggests long-term treatment with lanreotide Autogel 120 mg maintained favourable safety/tolerability. CLARINET OLE data also provide new evidence of lanreotide anti-tumour benefits in indolent and progressive pancreatic/intestinal NETs. PMID:26743120

  11. Anti-tumour effects of lanreotide for pancreatic and intestinal neuroendocrine tumours: the CLARINET open-label extension study.

    PubMed

    Caplin, Martyn E; Pavel, Marianne; Ćwikła, Jarosław B; Phan, Alexandria T; Raderer, Markus; Sedláčková, Eva; Cadiot, Guillaume; Wolin, Edward M; Capdevila, Jaume; Wall, Lucy; Rindi, Guido; Langley, Alison; Martinez, Séverine; Gomez-Panzani, Edda; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    In the CLARINET study, lanreotide Autogel (depot in USA) significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic pancreatic/intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). We report long-term safety and additional efficacy data from the open-label extension (OLE). Patients with metastatic grade 1/2 (Ki-67 ≤ 10%) non-functioning NET and documented baseline tumour-progression status received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (n = 101) or placebo (n = 103) for 96 weeks or until death/progressive disease (PD) in CLARINET study. Patients with stable disease (SD) at core study end (lanreotide/placebo) or PD (placebo only) continued or switched to lanreotide in the OLE. In total, 88 patients (previously: lanreotide, n = 41; placebo, n = 47) participated: 38% had pancreatic, 39% midgut and 23% other/unknown primary tumours. Patients continuing lanreotide reported fewer adverse events (AEs) (all and treatment-related) during OLE than core study. Placebo-to-lanreotide switch patients reported similar AE rates in OLE and core studies, except more diarrhoea was considered treatment-related in OLE (overall diarrhoea unchanged). Median lanreotide PFS (core study randomisation to PD in core/OLE; n=101) was 32.8 months (95% CI: 30.9, 68.0). A sensitivity analysis, addressing potential selection bias by assuming that patients with SD on lanreotide in the core study and not entering the OLE (n=13) had PD 24 weeks after last core assessment, found median PFS remaining consistent: 30.8 months (95% CI: 30.0, 31.3). Median time to further PD after placebo-to-lanreotide switch (n=32) was 14.0 months (10.1; not reached). This OLE study suggests long-term treatment with lanreotide Autogel 120 mg maintained favourable safety/tolerability. CLARINET OLE data also provide new evidence of lanreotide anti-tumour benefits in indolent and progressive pancreatic/intestinal NETs. PMID:26743120

  12. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A.; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W.; Strowski, Mathias Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highly Ca2+ permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca2+ response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca2+-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation. PMID:27450545

  13. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W; Strowski, Mathias Z

    2016-08-01

    Highly Ca(2+) permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca(2+) response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation. PMID:27450545

  14. Filamin-A is required to mediate SST2 effects in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Eleonora; Cambiaghi, Valeria; Zerbi, Alessandro; Carnaghi, Carlo; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Peverelli, Erika; Spada, Anna; Mantovani, Giovanna; Lania, Andrea G

    2016-03-01

    Somatostatin receptor type 2 (SST2) is the main pharmacological target of somatostatin (SS) analogues widely used in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (P-NETs), this treatment being ineffective in a subset of patients. Since it has been demonstrated that Filamin A (FLNA) is involved in mediating GPCR expression, membrane anchoring and signalling, we investigated the role of this cytoskeleton protein in SST2 expression and signalling, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and cell migration in human P-NETs and in QGP1 cell line. We demonstrated that FLNA silencing was not able to affect SST2 expression in P-NET cells in basal conditions. Conversely, a significant reduction in SST2 expression (-43 ± 21%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells) was observed in FLNA silenced QGP1 cells after long term SST2 activation with BIM23120. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of BIM23120 on cyclin D1 expression (-46 ± 18%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells), P-ERK1/2 levels (-42 ± 14%; P < 0.05 vs untreated cells), cAMP accumulation (-24 ± 3%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells), VEGF expression (-31 ± 5%, P < 0.01 vs untreated cells) and in vitro release (-40 ± 24%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells) was completely lost after FLNA silencing. Interestingly, BIM23120 promoted cell adhesion (+86 ± 45%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells) and inhibited cell migration (-24 ± 2%, P < 0.00001 vs untreated cells) in P-NETs cells and these effects were abolished in FLNA silenced cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that FLNA plays a crucial role in SST2 expression and signalling, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and cell migration in P-NETs and in QGP1 cell line, suggesting a possible role of FLNA in determining the different responsiveness to SS analogues observed in P-NET patients. PMID:26733502

  15. Current Status of Interventional Radiology in the Management of Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours (GEP-NETs)

    SciTech Connect

    Orgera, Gianluigi; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Cappucci, Matteo; Gourtsoyianni, Sofia; Tipaldi, Marcello Andrea; Hatzidakis, Adam; Rebonato, Alberto; Rossi, Michele

    2015-02-15

    Within the group of Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NETs), several heterogeneous malignancies are included with a variety of clinical manifestations and imaging characteristics. Often these cases are inoperable and minimal invasive treatment offered by image-guided procedures appears to be the only option. Interventional radiology offers a valid solution in the management of primary and metastatic GEP-NETs. The purpose of this review article is to describe the current status of the role of Interventional Radiology in the management of GEP-NETs.

  16. Screening for malnutrition in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Sheharyar A; Burch, Nicola; Druce, Maralyn; Hattersley, John G; Khan, Saboor; Gopalakrishnan, Kishore; Darby, Catherine; Wong, John L H; Davies, Louise; Fletcher, Simon; Shatwell, William; Sothi, Sharmila; Randeva, Harpal S; Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Weickert, Martin O

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether screening for malnutrition using the validated malnutrition universal screening tool (MUST) identifies specific characteristics of patients at risk, in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting University Hospitals Coventry & Warwickshire NHS Trust; European Neuroendocrine Tumour Society Centre of Excellence. Participants Patients with confirmed GEP-NET (n=161) of varying primary tumour sites, functioning status, grading, staging and treatment modalities. Main outcome measure To identify disease and treatment-related characteristics of patients with GEP-NET who score using MUST, and should be directed to detailed nutritional assessment. Results MUST score was positive (≥1) in 14% of outpatients with GEP-NET. MUST-positive patients had lower faecal elastase concentrations compared to MUST-negative patients (244±37 vs 383±20 µg/g stool; p=0.018), and were more likely to be on treatment with long-acting somatostatin analogues (65 vs 38%, p=0.021). MUST-positive patients were also more likely to have rectal or unknown primary NET, whereas, frequencies of other GEP-NET including pancreatic NET were comparable between MUST-positive and MUST-negative patients. Conclusions Given the frequency of patients identified at malnutrition risk using MUST in our relatively large and diverse GEP-NET cohort and the clinical implications of detecting malnutrition early, we recommend routine use of malnutrition screening in all patients with GEP-NET, and particularly in patients who are treated with long-acting somatostatin analogues. PMID:27147385

  17. Prolonged life-threatening hypoglycaemia following dose escalation of octreotide LAR in a patient with malignant polysecreting pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Jessie; Dowling, Anthony; Hofman, Michael S; MacIsaac, Richard J; Sachithanandan, Nirupa

    2015-01-01

    Summary This paper details the case of a 77-year-old male with refractory hypoglycaemia due to inoperable metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (pNET) co-secreting insulin and gastrin. Multiple medical therapies were trialled with limited success, and we describe the complications experienced by our patient. Somatostatin analogues can ameliorate hypoglycaemia and may have tumour-stabilising effects; however, in our case resulted in paradoxical worsening of hypoglycaemia. This rendered our patient hospital dependent for glycaemic support including continuous dextrose infusion. Although this is a reported adverse effect with initiation of therapy, we describe successful initiation of short-acting octreotide as an inpatient followed by commencement of long-acting octreotide. Hypoglycaemic collapse occurred only after dose titration of long-acting octreotide. We outline the pitfalls of somatostatin analogue therapy and the mechanisms that may contribute to worsening hypoglycaemia. This rare side effect cannot be reliably predicted, necessitating close supervision and glucose monitoring during therapy. Our patient achieved disease stabilisation and gradual resolution of hypoglycaemia with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), an emerging therapeutic option for metastatic neuroendocrine tumours with high efficacy and low toxicity. We present a brief but comprehensive discussion of currently available and novel therapies for insulin secreting pNETs. Learning points Hypoglycaemia due to malignant insulin secreting pNET is frequently severe and may be life-threatening despite supportive therapies.Octreotide can ameliorate hypoglycaemia, and may have anti-proliferative and tumour-stabilising effects in malignant pNETs that are surgically unresectable.Paradoxical worsening of hypoglycaemia may occur with octreotide initiation and dose titration, necessitating close supervision and glucose monitoring.PRRT is emerging as a therapeutic option with high efficacy and

  18. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Beiderwellen, K; Sabet, A; Lauenstein, T C; Lahner, H; Poeppel, T D

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. PMID:27003413

  19. A short history of neuroendocrine tumours and their peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    de Herder, Wouter W; Rehfeld, Jens F; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas started in 1870, when Rudolf Heidenhain discovered the neuroendocrine cells, which can lead to the development of these tumours. Siegfried Oberndorfer was the first to introduce the term carcinoid in 1907. The pancreatic islet cells were first described in 1869 by Paul Langerhans. In 1924, Seale Harris was the first to describe endogenous hyperinsulinism/insulinoma. In 1942 William Becker and colleagues were the first to describe the glucagonoma syndrome. The first description of gastrinoma by Robert Zollinger and Edwin Ellison dates from 1955. The first description of the VIPoma syndrome by John Verner and Ashton Morrison dates from 1958. In 1977, the groups of Lars-Inge Larsson and Jens Rehfeld, and of Om Ganda reported the first cases of somatostatinoma. But only in 2013, Jens Rehfeld and colleagues described the CCK-oma syndrome. The most recently updated WHO classification for gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours dates from 2010. PMID:26971840

  20. Consensus on biomarkers for neuroendocrine tumour disease

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, Kjell; Modlin, Irvin M; De Herder, Wouter; Pavel, Marianne; Klimstra, David; Frilling, Andrea; Metz, David C; Heaney, Anthony; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Strosberg, Jonathan; Meyer, Timothy; Moss, Steven F; Washington, Kay; Wolin, Edward; Liu, Eric; Goldenring, James

    2016-01-01

    Management of neuroendocrine neoplasia represents a clinical challenge because of its late presentation, lack of treatment options, and limitations in present imaging modalities and biomarkers to guide management. Monoanalyte biomarkers have poor sensitivity, specificity, and predictive ability. A National Cancer Institute summit, held in 2007, on neuroendocrine tumours noted biomarker limitations to be a crucial unmet need in the management of neuroendocrine tumours. A multinational consensus meeting of multidisciplinary experts in neuroendocrine tumours assessed the use of current biomarkers and defined the perquisites for novel biomarkers via the Delphi method. Consensus (at >75%) was achieved for 88 (82%) of 107 assessment questions. The panel concluded that circulating multianalyte biomarkers provide the highest sensitivity and specificity necessary for minimum disease detection and that this type of biomarker had sufficient information to predict treatment effectiveness and prognosis. The panel also concluded that no monoanalyte biomarker of neuroendocrine tumours has yet fulfilled these criteria and there is insufficient information to support the clinical use of miRNA or circulating tumour cells as useful prognostic markers for this disease. The panel considered that trials measuring multianalytes (eg, neuroendocrine gene transcripts) should also identify how such information can optimise the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:26370353

  1. Update on pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Logan R.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are relatively rare tumors comprising 1-2% of all pancreas neoplasms. In the last 10 years our understanding of this disease has increased dramatically allowing for advancements in the treatment of pNETs. Surgical excision remains the primary therapy for localized tumors and only potential for cure. New surgical techniques using laparoscopic approaches to complex pancreatic resections are a major advancement in surgical therapy and increasingly possible. With early detection being less common, most patients present with metastatic disease. Management of these patients requires multidisciplinary care combining the best of surgery, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. In addition to surgical advances, recently, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy and targeted molecular therapy. PMID:25493258

  2. Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Contessa, Joseph N.; Griffith, Kent A.; Wolff, Elizabeth; Ensminger, William; Zalupski, Mark; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNTs) are rare malignant neoplasms considered to be resistant to radiotherapy (RT), although data on efficacy are scarce. We reviewed our institutional experience to further delineate the role of RT for patients with PNTs. Methods and Materials: Between 1986 and 2006, 36 patients with PNTs were treated with RT to 49 sites. Of these 36 patients, 23 had radiographic follow-up data, which were used to determine the tumor response rate and freedom from local progression. Long-term toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results: The overall response rate to RT was 39% (13% complete response, 26% partial response, 56% stable disease, and 4% progressive disease). A significant difference in the freedom from local progression between the groups receiving either greater than or less than the median 2 Gy/fraction biologically equivalent dose of 49.6 Gy was found, with all radiographic progression occurring in patients who had received <=32 Gy. The actuarial 3-year local freedom from progression rate was 49%. Palliation was achieved in 90% of patients, with either improvement or resolution of symptoms after RT. Of 35 patients, 33 had metastatic disease at their referral for RT, and the median overall survival for this patient population was 2 years. Three long-term Grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Conclusion: RT is an effective modality for achieving local control in patients with PNTs. RT produces high rates of symptomatic palliation and freedom from local progression. Prospective trials of radiotherapy for PNTs are warranted.

  3. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Brabander, Tessa; Teunissen, Jaap J M; Van Eijck, Casper H J; Franssen, Gaston J H; Feelders, Richard A; de Herder, Wouter W; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the number of neuroendocrine tumours that are detected is increasing. A relative new and promising therapy for patients with metastasised or inoperable disease is peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). This therapy involves an infusion of somatostatin analogues linked to radionuclides like Yttrium-90 or Lutetium-177. Objective response rates are reported in 15-35%. Response rates may vary between type of tumour and radionuclide. Besides the objective response rate, overall survival and progression free survival increase significantly. Also, the quality of life improves as well. Serious side-affects are rare. PRRT is usually well tolerated, also in patients with extensive metastasised disease. Recent studies combined PRRT with other types of therapies. Unfortunately no randomised trials comparing these strategies are available. In the future, more research is needed to evaluate the best therapy combinations or sequence of therapies. PMID:26971847

  4. Familial syndromes associated with neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Komarowska, Hanna; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours may be associated with familial syndromes. At least eight inherited syndromes predisposing to endocrine neoplasia have been identified. Two of these are considered to be major factors predisposing to benign and malignant endocrine tumours, designated multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and type 2 (MEN1 and MEN2). Five other autosomal dominant diseases show more heterogeneous clinical patterns, such as the Carney complex, hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome, Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and tuberous sclerosis. The molecular and cellular interactions underlying the development of most endocrine cells and related organs represent one of the more complex pathways not yet to be deciphered. Almost all endocrine cells are derived from the endoderm and neuroectoderm. It is suggested that within the first few weeks of human development there are complex interactions between, firstly, the major genes involved in the initiation of progenitor-cell differentiation, secondly, factors secreted by the surrounding mesenchyme, and thirdly, a series of genes controlling cell differentiation, proliferation and migration. Together these represent a formula for the harmonious development of endocrine glands and tissue. PMID:26557756

  5. Surgical management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Wataru; Tezuka, Koji; Hirai, Ichiro

    2011-10-01

    This study outlines the surgical management and clinicopathological findings of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (P-NETs). There are various surgical options, such as enucleation of the tumor, spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy, distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, pancreatoduodenectomy, and duodenum-preserving pancreas head resection. Lymph node dissection is performed for malignant cases. New guidelines and classifications have been proposed and are now being used in clinical practice. However, there are still no clear indications for organ-preserving pancreatic resection or lymph node dissection. Hepatectomy is the first choice for liver metastases of well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma without extrahepatic metastases. On the other hand, cisplatin-based combination therapy is performed as first-line chemotherapy for metastatic poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. Other treatment options are radiofrequency ablation, transarterial chemoembolization/embolization, and liver transplantation. Systematic chemotherapy and biotherapy, such as that with somatostatin analogue and interferon-α, are used for recurrence after surgery. The precise surgical techniques for enucleation of the tumor and spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy are described. PMID:21922354

  6. Primary Malignant Neuroendocrine Tumour of Pleura: First Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anirban; Pratap, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic tumours of pleura are the most common malignant tumours causing malignant pleural effusion. Lungs are the most common primary sites. Primary pleural tumours are rarely seen and diffuse malignant mesothelioma is the most common malignant tumour of pleura. Primary malignant neuroendocrine tumour of pleura is not reported in the literature. Here, we report a rare case of primary malignant neuroendocrine tumour of pleura in a fifty-two-year-old, nonsmoker female who presented with right-sided pleural effusion and ipsilateral, dull aching chest pain. Clinical presentations of inflammatory lesions like tuberculous pleuritis and benign and malignant neoplasms of pleura are indistinguishable; hence, fluid cytology, pleural biopsy, and immunohistochemistry are necessary for exact tissue diagnosis of the tumours, which is mandatory for correct treatment and prognostic assessment. PMID:27034865

  7. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: biology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Cynthia; Chai, Wanxing; Yu, Victoria E.; Yu, Run

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs), a group of endocrine tumors arising in the pancreas, are among the most common neuroendocrine tumors. The genetic causes of familial and sporadic PNETs are somewhat understood, but their molecular pathogenesis remains unknown. Most PNETs are indolent but have malignant potential. The biological behavior of an individual PNET is unpredictable; higher tumor grade, lymph node and liver metastasis, and larger tumor size generally indicate a less favorable prognosis. Endocrine testing, imaging, and histological evidence are necessary to accurately diagnose PNETs. A 4-pronged aggressive treatment approach consisting of surgery, locoregional therapy, systemic therapy, and complication control has become popular in academic centers around the world. The optimal application of the multiple systemic therapeutic modalities is under development; efficacy, safety, availability, and cost should be considered when treating a specific patient. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of specific types of PNETs and familial PNET syndromes, including the novel Mahvash disease, are summarized. PMID:23237225

  8. Everolimus and Octreotide Acetate With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  9. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: Challenges in an underestimated disease.

    PubMed

    Viúdez, A; De Jesus-Acosta, A; Carvalho, F L; Vera, R; Martín-Algarra, S; Ramírez, N

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PanNETs) are considered a relatively unusual oncologic entity. Due to its relative good prognosis, surgery remains the goal standard therapy not only in localized disease but also in the setting of locally or metastatic disease. Most of the patients are diagnosed in metastatic scenario, where multidisciplinary approach based on surgery, chemotherapies, liver-directed and/or molecular targeted therapies are commonly used. Owing to a deeper molecular knowledge of this disease, these targeted therapies are nowadays widely implemented, being the likely discovery of predictive biomarkers that would allow its use in other settings. This review is focused on describing the different classifications, etiology, prognostic biomarkers and multidisciplinary approaches that are typically used in PanNET. PMID:27021395

  10. [Multifocal Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Tumours: Genesis, Diagnostics and Treatment].

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, A; Beutel, B; Rinke, A; Rexin, P; Fink, L; Koczulla, R; Bartsch, D K

    2016-02-01

    Multifocal neuroendocrine lung tumour is a rare diagnosis. Multiple lung foci of different sizes are usually apparent on chest CT scans. It is assumed that multifocal neuroendocrine lung tumours originally develop from diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH). This results in cell aggregations formed by proliferation of neuroendocrine cells that are already physiologically present in the bronchial system. If these cell proliferations break through the bronchial basement membrane, they are considered to constitute tumourlets if they measure ≤ 5 mm and carcinoid tumours if they are larger than 5 mm. The speed of proliferation of the cell hyperplasias appears to vary. Many of the patients are completely asymptomatic, the multifocal neuroendocrine lung tumours being diagnosed by chance. However, other patients complain of breathlessness, reduced physical capacity and cough. There may also be reduction of lung function. In these cases, chest HRCT often reveals peribronchial fibrosis or bronchiectasis in addition to the lung foci. Bronchoscopy is usually not helpful. Surgical lung biopsy is considered to be the diagnostic gold standard. Histological examination typically shows a mixture of cell hyperplasias, tumourlets and carcinoid tumours. There is no consensus on the treatment of multifocal neuroendocrine tumours. Taking the clinical situation and the chest HRCT findings as our starting point, we developed a stepwise approach that is guided by the success of the individual therapeutic procedures. The most favourable prognosis is found in affected people without clinical symptoms whose lung foci all measure less than 5 mm. In these cases the 5-year survival rate is over 90 %. PMID:26894394

  11. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Go ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  12. Therapy for metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Massironi, Sara; Conte, Dario; Peracchi, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are frequently malignant (50-80%, except for insulinoma) and may show an aggressive course with metastases to the liver as well as more distant sites. These heterogeneous neoplasms include functioning tumors, which secrete a variety of peptide hormones, and non-functioning tumors (up to 90% of pNETs), which often show metastases at the time of diagnosis. Methods A PubMed search was performed for English-language publications from 1995 through December 2012. Reference lists from studies selected were manually searched to identify further relevant reports. Manuscripts comparing different therapeutic options and advances for metastatic pNETs were selected. Results The therapeutic options for metastatic pNETs are expanding and include surgery, which remains the only curative approach, liver-directed therapies, and medical therapy. In selected cases also liver transplantation (OLT) may be considered. The option of OLT for metastatic disease is unique to neuroendocrine tumors. Recently, novel promising targeted therapies have been proposed for progressive well-differentiated pNETs. Conclusions The best therapeutic approach for pNETs is still matter of debating. However, since pNETs often show a more indolent behavior compared to other malignancies, the preservation of the quality of life of the patient and the personalization of the therapy according to tumor’s and patient’s features are mandatory. PMID:25332984

  13. TNM Staging of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wei-guo; Wang, Li; Ke, Neng-wen; Liu, Xu-bao; Tian, Bo-le

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and compare the surgical outcome of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) using the 2 tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) systems by both the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Staging Manual (seventh edition) and the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS). Moreover, we sought to validate the prognostic value of the new AJCC criterion. Data of 145 consecutive patients who were all surgically treated and histologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2002 to June 2013 in our single institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates for AJCC classifications of stages I, II, III, and IV were 79.5%, 63.1%, 15.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). As for the ENETS system, the OS rates at 5 years for stages I, II, III, and IV were 75.5%, 72.7%, 29.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). Both criteria present no statistically notable difference between stage I and stage II (P > 0.05) but between stage I and stages III and IV (P < 0.05), as well as those between stage II and stages III and IV (P < 0.05). Difference between stage III and IV by ENETS was significant (P = 0.031), whereas that by the AJCC was not (P = 0.144). What's more, the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) was statistically significant in both uni- and multivariate analyses by Cox regression (P < 0.005 and P = 0.025, respectively). Our study indicated that the ENETS TNM staging system might be superior to the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) for the clinical practice of p-NETs. Together with tumor grade and radical resection, the new AJCC system was also validated to be an independent predictor for p-NETs. PMID:25816036

  14. Neuroendocrine breast tumours: breast cancer or neuroendocrine cancer presenting in the breast?

    PubMed

    Adams, R W; Dyson, P; Barthelmes, L

    2014-04-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) of the breast are rare. Diagnosis depends on close scrutiny of core- or excisional-biopsy specimens for characteristic growth patterns (papillary, nesting or mixed), which should trigger immunohistochemical staining for neuroendocrine markers (in particular chromogranin and synaptophysin). The diagnosis is confirmed if a) >50% of the tissue specimen demonstrate neuroendocrine markers and b) in-situ ductal carcinoma is identified and/or imaging modalities exclude extra-mammary sites. Our literature search including the non-English literature identified 66 articles with data on 123 cases, including our own. Oestrogen receptors are not diagnostic for NET's of the breast as they are found in tumours of non-mammary origin, too. Half of reported cases of neuroendocrine tumours have axillary lymph node involvement. Breast-conserving surgery (wide local excision ± axillary clearance) is commonly performed for suitable tumours. Chemotherapy regimens utilised are commonly either platinum- (as for small-cell cancers) or anthracycline-based (as for primary breast cancers). Best management remains unknown. PMID:24342375

  15. Role of Staging in Patients with Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumours.

    PubMed

    Clift, Ashley Kieran; Faiz, Omar; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Bockisch, Andreas; Liedke, Marc Olaf; Schloericke, Erik; Wasan, Harpreet; Martin, John; Ziprin, Paul; Moorthy, Krishna; Frilling, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel neuroendocrine tumours are the commonest malignancy arising in the small intestine and have substantially increased in incidence in recent decades. Patients with small bowel neuroendocrine tumours commonly develop lymph node and/or distant metastases. Here, we examine the role of staging in 84 surgically treated patients with small bowel neuroendocrine tumours, comparing diagnostic information yielded from morphological, functional and endoscopic modalities. Furthermore, we correlate pre-operative staging with intra-operative findings in a sub-cohort of 20 patients. The vast majority of patients had been histologically confirmed to have low-grade (Ki-67 <2%) disease; however, lymph node and distant metastases were observed in 74 (88.1%) and 51 (60.7%) of patients at presentation, respectively. Liver metastases were evident in 48 (57.1%) patients, with solely peritoneal and bone metastases observed in 2 (2.4%) and 1 (1.2%) patients, respectively. Forty patients (47.6%) received multimodal treatment. In our sub-cohort analysis, pre-operative imaging understaged disease in 14/20 (70%) when compared with intra-operative findings. In patients with multifocal primary tumours and miliary liver metastases, no imaging modality was able to detect entire disease spread. Overall, presently available imaging modalities heavily underestimate disease stage, with meticulous intra-operative abdominal examination being superior to any imaging technology. Multimodal treatment has an important role in prolonging survival. PMID:26394880

  16. [Medical treatment of digestive neuroendocrine tumours].

    PubMed

    Panzuto, F; Nasoni, S; Delle Fave, G

    2001-09-01

    Surgery is the only therapy able to cure patients with digestive neuroendocrine tumor. However, due to the presence of diffuse metastases, radical surgery is often not feasible. In these cases, medical treatment plays a critical role, because of its ability to control symptoms in functioning tumors and to inhibit tumor growth. Different therapeutic approaches, such as chemotherapy, hepatic artery chemoembolization and targeted radio-nuclide therapy can be used alone or combined to the biologic treatment with somatostatin analogues and interferon. However, an accurate staging by imaging procedures plus a histological, immunohistochemical and biomolecular examination must be performed before planning an optimal medical treatment. PMID:11753237

  17. Treatment of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours with etoposide and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Mitry, E; Baudin, E; Ducreux, M; Sabourin, J-C; Rufié, P; Aparicio, T; Lasser, P; Elias, D; Duvillard, P; Schlumberger, M; Rougier, P

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate by a retrospective analysis of 53 patients the efficacy of chemotherapy combining etoposide and cisplatin in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumours. The regimen was a combination of etoposide 100 mg m–2 day–1 for 3 days and cisplatin 100 mg m–2 on day 1, given by 2-h intravenous infusion, administered every 21 days. Twelve patients had a well-differentiated and 41 a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumour. Toxicity of treatment was assessed in 50 patients and efficacy in 52 patients. Among the 11 patients with a well-differentiated tumour evaluable for tumoural response, only one (9.4%) had a partial response for 8.5 months. Forty-one patients with a poorly differentiated tumour showed an objective response rate of 41.5% (four complete and 13 partial responses); the median duration of response was 9.2 months, the median overall survival 15 months and the median progression-free survival 8.9 months. Haematological grade 3–4 toxicity was observed in 60% of the cases with one treatment-related death, digestive grade 3–4 toxicity in 40% and grade 3 alopecia was constant. No severe renal, hearing and neurological toxicities were observed (grade 1 in 6%, 14%, 72% respectively and no grade >1). We confirm that poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours are chemosensitive to the etoposide plus cisplatin combination. However, the prognosis remains poor with a 2-year survival lower than 20% confirming that new therapeutic strategies have to be developed. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10604732

  18. [Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors and helpfulness of targeted therapies].

    PubMed

    Vaysse, Thibaut; Coriat, Romain; Perkins, Géraldine; Dhooge, Marion; Brezault, Catherine; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2013-06-01

    The neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are rare tumors, but their incidence is constantly rising. Even if the management of these tumors has to be surgical as soon as possible, the disease is most often metastatic at the stage of the diagnostic. The prognostic and the therapeutic options differ from pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Available treatments have evolved over the last years with recent publications of studies that bring to light the benefits of targeted therapies in this pathology. This has resulted in modifications of both practices and either French and international guidelines. Therefore, we focus on the management of the grade 1 and grade 2 well-differentiated neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors as classified in new WHO classification of neuroendocrine neoplasms published in 2010. PMID:23009947

  19. Genomic landscape of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gebauer, Niklas; Schmidt-Werthern, Christian; Bernard, Veronica; Feller, Alfred C; Keck, Tobias; Begum, Nehara; Rades, Dirk; Lehnert, Hendrik; Brabant, Georg; Thorns, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prognostic role of genomic stability and copy number alterations (CNAs) pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs). METHODS: A high-resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization approach was utilized in order to investigate and quantify chromosomal aberrations in a panel of 37 primary PanNET and 11 metastatic samples. DNA samples were extracted from formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumor specimen. Genomic findings were correlated with histopathological and immunohistochemical data. Moreover, the dataset was subjected to employing an unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis approach utilizing Euclidean distance and average linkage and associations between genomically defined tumor groups and recurrent CNAs or clinicopathological features of the study group were assessed. RESULTS: Numerous chromosomal aberrations were recurrently detected in both, primary tumor samples and metastases. Copy number gains were most frequently observed at 06p22.2-p22.1 (27.1%), 17p13.1 (20.8%), 07p21.3-p21.2 (18.8%), 09q34.11 (18.8%). Genomic losses were significantly less frequent and the only recurrent aberration affected 08q24.3 (6.3%). Moreover, we detected a high degree of genomic heterogeneity between primary tumors and metastatic lesions. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of loci affected by CNAs in more than 3 primary tumor samples revealed two genetically distinct tumor groups as well as two chromosomal clusters of genomic imbalances indicating a small subset of tumors with common molecular features (13.5%). Aberrations affecting 6p22.2-22.1, 8q24.3, 9q34.11 and 17p13.1 (P = 0.011; 0.003; 0.003; 0.001), were significantly associated with a poorer survival prognosis. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that several frequent CNAs in numerous candidate regions are involved in the pathogenesis and metastatic progression of PanNET. PMID:25516664

  20. Irreversible electroporation for the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Papamichail, Michail; Ali, Amir; Pizanias, Michail; Peddu, Praveen; Karani, John

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Resection or enucleation is currently the treatment of choice for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Irreversible electroporation is a novel ablative method that is used for locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but little data exists for its use for pancreatic NETs. We report an early experience of IRE for early pancreatic NETs. Methods Between April 2014 and March 2015, 3 patients with small (<2 cm) pancreatic NETs were treated with percutaneous IRE. Results There were no adverse effects during the procedure. Mean hospital stay was 2.6 days. All patients remained disease free on 12-19 months follow up. One patient developed recurrent pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation. Conclusions IRE for small tumors of the pancreas is practical and may offer advantages over other thermal ablative techniques, since it preserves vital structures such as blood vessels, bile and pancreatic ducts. Further data regarding the long term disease free interval is required to establish efficacy. PMID:27621748

  1. IGF-1 drives chromogranin A secretion via activation of Arf1 in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Münzberg, Christin; Höhn, Katharina; Krndija, Denis; Maaß, Ulrike; Bartsch, Detlef K; Slater, Emily P; Oswald, Franz; Walther, Paul; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Hypersecretion is the major symptom of functional neuroendocrine tumours. The mechanisms that contribute to this excessive secretion of hormones are still elusive. A key event in secretion is the exit of secretory products from the Golgi apparatus. ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are known to control vesicle budding and trafficking, and have a leading function in the regulation of formation of secretory granula at the Golgi. Here, we show that Arf1 is the predominant Arf protein family member expressed in the neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines BON and QGP-1. In BON cells Arf1 colocalizes with Golgi markers as well as chromogranin A, and shows significant basal activity. The inhibition of Arf1 activity or expression significantly impaired secretion of chromogranin A. Furthermore, we show that the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a major regulator of growth and secretion in BON cells, induces Arf1 activity. We found that activation of Arf1 upon IGF-1 receptor stimulation is mediated by MEK/ERK signalling pathway in BON and QGP-1 cells. Moreover, the activity of Arf1 in BON cells is mediated by autocrinely secreted IGF-1, and concomitantly, autocrine IGF1 secretion is maintained by Arf1 activity. In summary, our data indicate an important regulatory role for Arf1 at the Golgi in hypersecretion in neuroendocrine cancer cells. PMID:25754106

  2. Lutetium-labelled peptides for therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Kam, B L R; Teunissen, J J M; Krenning, E P; de Herder, W W; Khan, S; van Vliet, E I; Kwekkeboom, D J

    2012-02-01

    Treatment with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues is a promising new tool in the management of patients with inoperable or metastasized neuroendocrine tumours. Symptomatic improvement may occur with (177)Lu-labelled somatostatin analogues that have been used for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). The results obtained with (177)Lu-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotate (DOTATATE) are very encouraging in terms of tumour regression. Dosimetry studies with (177)Lu-DOTATATE as well as the limited side effects with additional cycles of (177)Lu-DOTATATE suggest that more cycles of (177)Lu-DOTATATE can be safely given. Also, if kidney-protective agents are used, the side effects of this therapy are few and mild and less than those from the use of (90)Y-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotide (DOTATOC). Besides objective tumour responses, the median progression-free survival is more than 40 months. The patients' self-assessed quality of life increases significantly after treatment with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. Lastly, compared to historical controls, there is a benefit in overall survival of several years from the time of diagnosis in patients treated with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. These findings compare favourably with the limited number of alternative therapeutic approaches. If more widespread use of PRRT can be guaranteed, such therapy may well become the therapy of first choice in patients with metastasized or inoperable neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:22388631

  3. Intraoperative detection of somatostatin-receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumours using indium-111-labelled DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide.

    PubMed Central

    Wangberg, B.; Forssell-Aronsson, E.; Tisell, L. E.; Nilsson, O.; Fjalling, M.; Ahlman, H.

    1996-01-01

    After injection of 111In-labelled DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide, intraoperative tumour localisation was performed using a scintillation detector in 23 patients with neuroendocrine tumours. Count rates from suspect tumour lesions and adjacent normal tissue were expressed as a ratio before (Rin situ) and after (Rex vivo) excision. 111In activity concentration ratios of tumour tissue to blood (T/B) were determined in a gamma counter. In patients with midgut carcinoids, (all scintigraphy positive), false Rin situ recordings were found in 4/29 macroscopically identified tumours. T/B ratios were all high (27-650). In patients with medullary thyroid carcinomas (eight out of ten scintigraphy positive), misleading Rin situ results were found in 4/37 macroscopically identified tumours. T/B ratios were lower (3-39) than those seen in midgut carcinoids. Two out of four patients with endocrine pancreatic tumours had positive scintigraphy, reliable intraoperative measurements and very high T/B ratios (910-1500). One patient with a gastric carcinoid had correct measurements in situ and ex vivo with high T/B ratios (71-210). In situ measurements added little information to preoperative scintigraphy and surgical findings using the present detection system. Rex vivo measurements were more reliable. The very high T/B ratios seen in midgut carcinoids and some endocrine pancreatic tumours would be favourable for future radiation therapy via somatostatin receptors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8611378

  4. Practical management and treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yasuharu

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are uncommon disease, about which little is known. Pancreatic NETs are usually slow growing and their malignant potential are often underestimated. The management of this disease poses a challenge because of the heterogeneous clinical presentation and varying degrees of aggressiveness. Recently, several guidelines for the management of pancreatic NETs have been established and help to devise clinical strategy. In the treatment algorithms, however, a lot of uncertain points are included. Practical treatment decisions of pancreatic NETs are still sometimes made in a patient- and/or physicians-oriented manner. The tumor grading system proposed by the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS) gives important prognostic information, however, the implication of grading regarding medical treatment strategies to choose has not yet been clarified. Moreover, the place of surgical treatment is unclear in the overall management course of advanced pancreatic NETs. In some cases, practical management and treatment have to be individualized depending on predominant symptoms, tumor spread, and general health of the patients. Current issues and a few points to make a strategy in the management of pancreatic NETs would be reviewed. PMID:25493259

  5. Validation of the EORTC QLQ-GINET21 questionnaire for assessing quality of life of patients with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Yadegarfar, G; Friend, L; Jones, L; Plum, L M; Ardill, J; Taal, B; Larsson, G; Jeziorski, K; Kwekkeboom, D; Ramage, J K

    2013-01-01

    Background: Quality of life is an important end point in clinical trials, yet there are few quality of life questionnaires for neuroendocrine tumours. Methods: This international multicentre validation study assesses the QLQ-GINET21 Quality of Life Questionnaire in 253 patients with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours. All patients were requested to complete two quality of life questionnaires – the EORTC Core Quality of Life questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and the QLQ-GINET21 – at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months post-baseline; the psychometric properties of the questionnaire were then analysed. Results: Analysis of QLQ-GINET21 scales confirmed appropriate aggregation of the items, except for treatment-related symptoms, where weight gain showed low correlation with other questions in the scale; weight gain was therefore analysed as a single item. Internal consistency of scales using Cronbach's α coefficient was >0.7 for all parts of the QLQ-GINET21 at 6 months. Intraclass correlation was >0.85 for all scales. Discriminant validity was confirmed, with values <0.70 for all scales compared with each other. Scores changed in accordance with alterations in performance status and in response to expected clinical changes after therapies. Mean scores were similar for pancreatic and other tumours. Conclusion: The QLQ-GINET21 is a valid and responsive tool for assessing quality of life in the gut, pancreas and liver neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:23322194

  6. Predictive factors of response to mTOR inhibitors in neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Fanciulli, Giuseppe; Malandrino, Pasqualino; Ramundo, Valeria; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-03-01

    Medical treatment of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) has drawn a lot of attention due to the recent demonstration of efficacy of several drugs on progression-free survival, including somatostatin analogs, small tyrosine kinase inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors (or rapalogs). The latter are approved as therapeutic agents in advanced pancreatic NETs and have been demonstrated to be effective in different types of NETs, with variable efficacy due to the development of resistance to treatment. Early detection of patients that may benefit from rapalogs treatment is of paramount importance in order to select the better treatment and avoid ineffective and expensive treatments. Predictive markers for therapeutic response are under intensive investigation, aiming at a tailored patient management and more appropriate resource utilization. This review summarizes the available data on the tissue, circulating and imaging markers that are potentially predictive of rapalog efficacy in NETs. PMID:26666705

  7. Pazopanib and depot octreotide in advanced, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours: a multicentre, single-group, phase 2 study

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Alexandria T; Halperin, Daniel M; Chan, Jennifer A; Fogelman, David R; Hess, Kenneth R; Malinowski, Paige; Regan, Eileen; Ng, Chaan S; Yao, James C; Kulke, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Treatment options for advanced, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) remain scarce. Pazopanib is an orally bioavailable, small molecule, multitargeted kinase inhibitor that inhibits VEGF receptors 1, 2, and 3. We did a study of the efficacy of pazopanib with depot octreotide in patients with advanced NETs. Methods We did a parallel cohort study of patients with metastatic or locally advanced grade 1–2 carcinoid tumours or pancreatic NETs, by use of a single-group, two-stage design. Patients received pazopanib 800 mg orally once per day and octreotide at their preprotocol dosage. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving an objective response, as assessed by investigators, by intention-to-treat analysis. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT00454363, and was completed in March, 2014. Findings Between April 12, 2007, and July 2, 2009, we enrolled 52 patients, including 32 individuals with pancreatic NETs and 20 individuals with carcinoid tumours. Seven (21.9%, 95% CI 11.0–38.8) of 32 patients with pancreatic NETs achieved an objective response. We detected no responses in the first stage of the cohort with carcinoid tumours, and we terminated accrual at 20 patients. Toxic effects included one patient with grade 4 hypertriglyceridaemia and one with grade 4 thrombosis, with the most common grade three events being aminotransferase increases and neutropenia, each of which happened in 3 patients. In all 52 patients, the most frequently observed toxic effects were fatigue (39 [75%]), nausea (33 [63%]), diarrhoea (33 [63%]), and hypertension (28 [54%]). Interpretation Treatment with pazopanib is associated with tumour response for patients with pancreatic NETs, but not for carcinoid tumours; a randomised controlled phase 3 study to assess pazopanib in advanced pancreatic NETs is warranted. Funding US National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. PMID:25956795

  8. [Pancreatic tumour in a child].

    PubMed

    Schouenborg Schultz, Thea; Thyssen Vestergaard, Esben

    2014-07-28

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom in children and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) has a prevalence of 8.4% in childhood. In 90-95% of RAPs no organic disease is identified. Thus, it is important that the few of somatic origin are diagnosed. We describe a case concerning a 12-year-old girl, diagnosed with a solid pseudopapillary tumour of the pancreas. The symptoms were RAP and postprandial vomiting. The purpose of this article is to increase the knowledge of "alarm findings" indicating an organic disease in children with RAP. PMID:25292323

  9. Meso-pancreatectomy for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Ferrarese, Alessia; Borello, Alessandro; Gentile, Valentina; Bindi, Marco; Ferrara, Yuri; Solej, Mario; Martino, Valter; Nano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a meso-pancreatectomy performed on a pancreatic glucagonoma in a 58 years-old woman. MP is a conservative surgical treatment consisting in a resection of the body of the pancreas with the aim of reducing postoperative hormone insufficiency. This approach is curative in benign or low-malignant neoplasm of the central part of the pancreas. PMID:24859404

  10. Pancreatic metastasis resulting from thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    DU, YANG; WANG, YING; TANG, JIE; GE, JUN; QIN, QING; JIANG, LI; LIU, XIAOKE; ZHU, XIANGLAN; WANG, YONGSHENG

    2016-01-01

    Thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) is a rare type of cancer. Unlike other thymic epithelial tumors and carcinoids originating in other locations, thymic NEC possesses a more aggressive biological behavior, including invasion to proximal structures, local recurrence and distant hematogenous metastasis. Distant metastasis is often observed in the bones, lungs, spleen, liver and adrenal glands. However, pancreatic metastasis resulting from thymic NEC is extremely uncommon, and only a few cases of patients with this disease have been reported. The current study presents the case of a patient with pancreatic metastasis resulting from thymic NEC. The patient was admitted to hospital with an anterior mediastinal neoplasm, which was identified using chest enhanced computed tomography. The patient underwent a monobloc excision of the tumor with resection of involved structures. Subsequently, a pathological diagnosis of atypical thymic carcinoid was provided, according to the morphological characteristics observed and the expression of neuroendocrine markers, as identified by immunohistochemistry. Following surgery, the patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, ~2 years after surgery, metastasis at the pancreatic head was identified. The patient underwent a total pancreatectomy and splenectomy, and did not receive any post-operative therapies; however, the patient succumbed to the disease 9 months following surgery. Overall, the results from the present study demonstrate the clinical features of thymic NEC, which may aid with the diagnosis of this rare disease in other patients. PMID:26998098

  11. Pancreatic body adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine tumor characteristics: A case report

    PubMed Central

    TAJIMA, HIDEHIRO; KITAGAWA, HIROHISA; SHOJI, MASATOSHI; WATANABE, TOSHIFUMI; NAKANUMA, SHINICHI; OKAMOTO, KOICHI; SAKAI, SEISHO; KINOSHITA, JUN; MAKINO, ISAMU; FURUKAWA, HIROYUKI; NAKAMURA, KEISHI; HAYASHI, HIRONORI; OYAMA, KATSUNOBU; INOKUCHI, MASAFUMI; NAKAGAWARA, HISATOSHI; MIYASHITA, TOMOHARU; ITOH, HIROSHI; TAKAMURA, HIROYUKI; NINOMIYA, ITASU; FUSHIDA, SACHIO; FUJIMURA, TAKASHI; OHTA, TETSUO; SATOH, HIROHIDE; IKEDA, HIROKO; HARADA, KENICHI; NAKANUMA, YASUNI

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old female with pancreatic body cancer underwent a distal pancreatectomy. The tumor was a moderately- to poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Tumor growth filled the dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD) and infiltrated the surrounding area. Six months later, metastases to the left diaphragm and MPD of the remnant pancreatic head were detected. Chemoradiotherapy was administered, but the patient succumbed 22 months after surgery. An autopsy demonstrated that a moderately- to poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma had arisen from the pancreatic head and infiltrated the duodenum and bile duct. Huge liver metastases and multiple peritoneal disseminations were also present. Microscopically, a portion of the tumor had a pseudo-rosette appearance in the adenocarcinoma component, while another section showed characteristics of a neuroendocrine tumor (NET) immunohistochemically. The original surgically-resected tumor also showed NET characteristics immunohistochemically. It is therefore necessary to search for NET components in pancreatic cancer with atypical growth and metastases, even when adenocarcinoma has been diagnosed histologically. PMID:24944667

  12. Localization of neuroendocrine tumours with [111In] DTPA-octreotide scintigraphy (Octreoscan): a comparative study with CT and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Shi, W; Johnston, C F; Buchanan, K D; Ferguson, W R; Laird, J D; Crothers, J G; McIlrath, E M

    1998-04-01

    A wide variety of neuroendocrine tumours express somatostatin receptors, and can be visualized by radiolabelled somatostatin analogue scintigraphy. To investigate the value of [111In]-octreotide scintigraphy (Octreoscan), 48 patients (37 with proven carcinoid, pancreatic endocrine and medullary carcinoma of thyroid tumours, 11 with neuroendocrine syndromes multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN-I) and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) were examined with 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide. Scintigrams were obtained at 24 and 48 h, and the results were compared with CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Thirty-five of 48 patients had positive [111In]-octreotide scintigraphy (23/25 (92%) carcinoids, 8/9 (89%) PETs, 4/11 (36%) MEN-I & ZES). Of the 42 lesions located by conventional imaging techniques, 37 (88%) were also identified by Octreoscan. Unexpected lesions (40 sites), not detected by CT or MR imaging were found in 24/48 (50%) patients. [111In]-octreotide scintigraphy has a higher sensitivity for tumour detection, and is superior to MR imaging and CT scanning in the identification of previously unsuspected extraliver and lymph node metastases. It may also be helpful for the localization of clinically suspected tumours in patients with MEN-I and ZES. PMID:9666953

  13. Recent developments in imaging of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kartalis, Nikolaos; Mucelli, Raffaella Maria Pozzi; Sundin, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are very rare, accounting for 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. They are classified into functioning and non-functioning and their behavior varies widely from benign to highly malignant. For their investigation, a variety of anatomical and functional imaging methods are available. Anatomical methods include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography. Functional methods include scintigraphy and positron emission tomography (PET). A combination of anatomical and morphological methods results in the so-called hybrid imaging, such as PET/CT. We herein discuss the currently available imaging modalities for the investigation of PNETs and, more specifically, their applications in tumor detection and staging as well as in choice of therapy, imaging follow up and prediction of response, with emphasis on the recent developments. PMID:25830417

  14. Update on surgical treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    D’Haese, Jan G; Tosolini, Chiara; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Kong, Bo; Esposito, Irene; Michalski, Christoph W; Kleeff, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) are rare and account for only 2%-4% of all pancreatic neoplasms. All PNENs are potential (neurendocrine tumors PNETs) or overt (neuroendocrine carcinomas PNECs) malignant, but a subset of PNETs is low-risk. Even in case of low-risk PNETs surgical resection is frequently required to treat hormone-related symptoms and to obtain an appropriate pathological diagnosis. Low-risk PNETs in the body and the tail are ideal for minimally-invasive approaches which should be tailored to the individual patient. Generally, surgeons must aim for parenchyma sparing in these cases. In high-risk and malignant PNENs, indications for tumor resection are much wider than for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, in many cases due to the relatively benign tumor biology. Thus, patients with locally advanced and metastatic PNETs may benefit from extensive resection. In experienced hands, even multi-organ resections are accomplished with acceptable perioperative morbidity and mortality rates and are associated with excellent long term survival. However, poorly differentiated neoplasms with high proliferation rates are associated with a dismal prognosis and may frequently only be treated with chemotherapy. The evidence on surgical treatment of PNENs stems from reviews of mostly single-center series and some analyses of nation-wide tumor registries. No randomized trial has been performed to compare surgical and non-surgical therapies in potentially resectable PNEN. Though such a trial would principally be desirable, ethical considerations and the heterogeneity of PNENs preclude realization of such a study. In the current review, we summarize recent advances in the surgical treatment of PNENs. PMID:25320524

  15. Radionuclide therapy in neuroendocrine tumours: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gulenchyn, K Y; Yao, X; Asa, S L; Singh, S; Law, C

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the effects of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals in patients with different types of advanced neuroendocrine tumour (NETs). A literature search was carried out in MEDLINE and EMBASE from January 1998 to November 2010. The Cochrane Library (to Issue 10, 2010) and the Standards and Guidelines Evidence Inventory of Cancer Guidelines, including over 1100 English-language cancer guidelines from January 2003 to June 2010, were also checked. No existing systematic reviews or clinical practice guidelines based on a systematic review or randomised controlled trials focusing on this topic were found. Twenty-four fully published articles were abstracted and summarised: 16 articles focused on five peptide receptor radionuclide therapy ((111)In-DTPAOC, (90)Y-DOTALAN, (90)Y-DOTATOC, (90)Y-DOTATATE, and (177)Lu-DOTATATE) and eight focused on (131)I-MIBG treatment. Limited evidence from a historical comparison of studies in one centre supported that (177)Lu-DOTATATE might be associated with greater clinical outcomes compared with (90)Y-DOTATOC or (111)In-DTPAOC. The severe toxicities for (177)Lu-DOTATATE included hepatic insufficiency in 0.6%, myelodysplastic syndrome in 0.8% and renal insufficiency in 0.4% of patients in this study. Insufficient evidence suggested efficacy of (131)I-MIBG in adult NET patients, but the overall tumour response rate from (131)I-MIBG was 27-75% for malignant neuroblastoma, paraganglioma or pheochromocytoma. Haematological toxicities were the main severe side-effects after (131)I-MIBG and 4% of patients developed secondary malignancies in one study. To date, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy seems to be an acceptable option and is relatively safe in adult advanced NET patients with receptor uptake positive on scintigraphy, but patients' renal function must be monitored. (131)I-MIBG may be effective for malignant neuroblastoma, paraganglioma or pheochromocytoma, but its side-effects need to be

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of a rare sinonasal neuroendocrine tumour: adding to the evidence.

    PubMed

    Gudlavalleti, Aashrai; Dean, Ryan; Liu, Yuxin; Dhamoon, Amit S

    2016-01-01

    Sinonasal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare, aggressive neoplasms with a high recurrence potential. There are no robust protocols for the management of these tumours. An 81-year-old man presented with an incidental sinonasal mass visualised on CT scan of head. Over the next few weeks he developed new onset, progressively worsening headache, right eye ptosis and restricted extraocular movements. Imaging confirmed a rapidly enlarging tumour involving the right nasal cavity and the orbit. Biopsy showed a large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the right ethmoidal sinus. The patient was treated with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy and radiation. Repeat imaging showed decrease in tumour volume. The patient continues to do well and follows up regularly with our oncology service. Current protocols comprising chemotherapy after radiation are based on limited studies. A regimen involving concurrent chemoradiation also appears to aid in tumour volume reduction. Additional studies are required to formulate robust clinical protocols for management of sinonasal NETs. PMID:27624450

  17. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor accompanied with multiple liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Takaori, Kyoichi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (P-NET) is rare and slow-growing. Current classifications predict its prognosis and postoperative recurrence. Curative resection is ideal, although often difficult, because over 80% of patients have unresectable multiple liver metastases and extrahepatic metastasis. Aggressive surgery for liver metastases is important to improve survival. Aggressive or cytoreductive surgery for liver metastases is indicated to reduce hormone levels and improve symptoms and prognosis. Liver transplantation was originally conceived as an ideal therapy for unresectable liver metastases. Unfortunately, there is no clear consensus on the role and timing of surgery for primary tumor and liver metastases. Surgeons still face questions in deciding the best surgical scenario in patients with P-NET with unresectable liver metastases. PMID:25232452

  18. Clinicopathological features of small nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Furukori, Mariko; Imai, Koji; Karasaki, Hidenori; Watanabe, Kenji; Oikawa, Kensuke; Miyokawa, Naoyuki; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Furukawa, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To present our experiences in studying the clinicopathological features of small nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NF-pNETs). METHODS: The subjects included 9 patients with NF-pNETs who underwent pancreatectomy between April 1996 and September 2012. The surgical procedure, histopathological findings, and prognosis were assessed. RESULTS: All tumors were incidentally detected by computed tomography. The median diameter was 10 mm (5-32 mm). One patient was diagnosed with von Hippel-Lindau disease, and the others were sporadic cases. For the histopathological findings, 7 patients were G1; 1 patient was G2; and 1 patient, whose tumor was 22 mm, had neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC). One patient who had a tumor that was 32 mm had direct invasion to a regional lymph node and 1 patient with NEC, had regional lymph node metastases. Six of the 7 patients with sporadic NF-pNETs, excluding the patient with NEC, had tumors that were smaller than 10 mm. Tumors smaller than 10 mm showed no malignancy and lacked lymph node metastasis. CONCLUSION: Sporadic NF-pNETs smaller than 10 mm tend to have less malignant potential. These findings suggest that lymphadenectomy may be omitted for small NF-pNETs after further investigation. PMID:25548493

  19. AACE/ACE Disease State Clinical Review: Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Incidentalomas

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Miguel F.; Åkerström, Göran; Angelos, Peter; Grant, Clive S.; Hoff, Ana O.; Pantoja, Juan Pablo; Pérez-Johnston, Rocio; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Wong, Richard J.; Randolph, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Summary Incidental detection of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) has substantially increased over the last decade due to widespread use of advanced imaging studies. Reliable initial imaging-based characterization is crucial for the differential diagnosis from other exocrine neoplasms and to determine the appropriate management plan. Measurements of chromogranin A, pancreatic polypeptide, and calcitonin are recommended for the biochemical evaluation. A thorough medical history needs to be performed to rule out multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 1. The European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS)/Tumor Node Metastasis (TNM) staging system together with a grading based on the Ki-67 proliferation index and mitotic counts has proven to give more appropriate prognostic information than the World Health Organization (WHO)/American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM staging but may still fail to safely differentiate benign from malignant lesions. Poorly differentiated PNETs generally present with metastases and are rarely amenable for resection. Well- or intermediately differentiated tumors ≥2 cm with imaging evidence of malignancy or with a Ki-67 >2% should be resected. It has been suggested that non-MEN related, nonfunctioning, and asymptomatic PNETs <2 cm with a Ki-67 index ≤2% carry a low risk of metastasis and may be observed in the absence of clinical or radiologic criteria of malignancy or progression, especially in older patients. However, because metastases may occur with long delay with smaller PNETS, physicians should consider patient age, lesion location, and the risks of operation, and patients not undergoing surgery need to be closely followed closely. PMID:25962093

  20. Large cell neuroendocrine – Adenocarcinona mixed tumour of colon: Collision tumour with peculiar behaviour. What do we know about these tumours?

    PubMed Central

    Minaya-Bravo, Ana María; Garcia Mahillo, Julio Cesar; Mendoza Moreno, Fernando; Noguelares Fraguas, Fernando; Granell, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mixed glandular-endocrine carcinomas are rare tumours of gastrointestinal tract (MANEC). They are more frequent in stomach and hardly one hundred cases have been described in colon. According to Lewis, they are classified into collision (side by side pattern), composite (intermingled) or amphicrine (neuroendocrine and glandular features inside a same cell). Collision tumours are related to biclonal theory: two simultaneous cancerogenic events. Conversely, multidirectional differentiation from a stem cell is accepted as origin of composite tumours. The aim of this paper is to analyse the behaviour of these tumours, with an especial concern about how these tumours metastasise, and the different theories about carcinogenesis. Presentation of case We report a rare case of collision adenocarcinoma-large cell neuroendocrine tumour of colon that after a three-year period of follow-up has presented a retroperitoneal recurrence that features adenocarcinoma and large cell neuroendocrine components. Discussion After an exhaustive review of the English literature, we found that only two cases of collision tumour of colon with metastases showing glandular and endocrine components have been described up to date, so we report the third case, and the first happening in transverse colon. Conclusion We conclude that not all collision tumours follow the biclonal theory and more studies are needed to clarify the origin of these neoplasms, and consequently, to reach an adequate treatment. PMID:26635955

  1. Malignant Glomus Tumour (Glomangiosarcoma) with Additional Neuroendocrine Differentiation in a Horse.

    PubMed

    Peters, M; Grafen, J; Kuhnen, C; Wohlsein, P

    2016-05-01

    A 13-year-old Icelandic crossbred horse was presented with headshaking and progressive impairment of chewing. A slowly growing mass was identified in the anterior maxilla. This was associated with lysis of the alveolar bone and the roots of the incisors and there were nodular proliferations affecting the nasal septum and conchae. There was no response to chemotherapy and so the horse was humanely destroyed. Based on morphological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural findings the mass was classified as a malignant glomus tumour with multifocal vascular spaces and additional neuroendocrine differentiation. An oronasal glomus tumour with neuroendocrine differentiation has not been described previously in an animal. PMID:27102445

  2. Somatostatin Analogues according to Ki67 index in neuroendocrine tumours: an observational retrospective-prospective analysis from real life

    PubMed Central

    Faggiano, Antongiulio; Carratù, Anna Chiara; Guadagno, Elia; Tafuto, Salvatore; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Mocerino, Carmela; Palmieri, Giovannella; Damiano, Vincenzo; Siciliano, Roberta; Leo, Silvana; Mauro, Annamaria; Tozzi, Lucia Franca; Battista, Claudia; De Rosa, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) have shown limited and variable antiproliferative effects in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Whether tumour control by SSAs depends on grading based on the 2010 WHO NET classification is still unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of long-acting SSAs in NETs according to Ki67 index. An observational Italian multicentre study was designed to collect data in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NETs under SSA treatment. Both retrospective and prospective data were included and they were analysed in line with Ki67 index, immunohistochemically evaluated in tumour samples and graded according to WHO classification (G1 = Ki67 index 0-2%, G2 = Ki67 index 3-20%, G3 = Ki67 index > 20%). Among 601 patients with NET, 140 with a histologically confirmed gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NET or NET with unknown primary were treated with lanreotide autogel or octreotide LAR. An objective tumour response was observed in 11%, stability in 58% and progression in 31%. Objective response and tumour stability were not significantly different between G1 and G2 NETs. Progression free survival was longer but not significantly different in G1 than G2 NETs (median: 89 vs 43 months, p = 0.15). The median PFS was significantly longer in NETs showing Ki67 < 5% than in those showing Ki67 ≥5% (89 vs 35 months, p = 0.005). SSA therapy shows significant antiproliferative effects in well differentiated low/intermediate-proliferating NETs, not only G1 but also in G2 type. A Ki67 index of 5% seems to work better than 3% to select the best candidates for SSA therapy. PMID:26701729

  3. Somatostatin analogues according to Ki67 index in neuroendocrine tumours: an observational retrospective-prospective analysis from real life.

    PubMed

    Faggiano, Antongiulio; Carratù, Anna Chiara; Guadagno, Elia; Tafuto, Salvatore; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Mocerino, Carmela; Palmieri, Giovannella; Damiano, Vincenzo; Siciliano, Roberta; Leo, Silvana; Mauro, Annamaria; Tozzi, Lucia Franca; Battista, Claudia; De Rosa, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-02-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) have shown limited and variable antiproliferative effects in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Whether tumour control by SSAs depends on grading based on the 2010 WHO NET classification is still unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of long-acting SSAs in NETs according to Ki67 index. An observational Italian multicentre study was designed to collect data in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NETs under SSA treatment. Both retrospective and prospective data were included and they were analysed in line with Ki67 index, immunohistochemically evaluated in tumour samples and graded according to WHO classification (G1 = Ki67 index 0-2%, G2 = Ki67 index 3-20%, G3 = Ki67 index > 20%). Among 601 patients with NET, 140 with a histologically confirmed gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NET or NET with unknown primary were treated with lanreotide autogel or octreotide LAR. An objective tumour response was observed in 11%, stability in 58% and progression in 31%. Objective response and tumour stability were not significantly different between G1 and G2 NETs. Progression free survival was longer but not significantly different in G1 than G2 NETs (median: 89 vs 43 months, p = 0.15). The median PFS was significantly longer in NETs showing Ki67 < 5% than in those showing Ki67 ≥ 5% (89 vs 35 months, p = 0.005). SSA therapy shows significant antiproliferative effects in well differentiated low/intermediate-proliferating NETs, not only G1 but also in G2 type. A Ki67 index of 5% seems to work better than 3% to select the best candidates for SSA therapy. PMID:26701729

  4. Surgical Treatment and Clinical Outcome of Nonfunctional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Su, An-ping; Yue, Peng-ju; Tian, Bo-le

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Our primary aim of the present study was to analyze the clinical characteristics and surgical outcome of nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (non-F-P-NETs), with an emphasis on evaluating the prognostic value of the newly updated 2010 grading classification of the World Health Organization (WHO). Data of 55 consecutive patients who were surgically treated and pathologically diagnosed as non-F-P-NETs in our single institution from January 2000 to December 2013 were retrospectively collected. This entirety comprised of 55 patients (31 males and 24 females), with a mean age of 51.24 ± 12.95 years. Manifestations of non-F-P-NETs were nonspecific. Distal pancreatectomy, pancreaticoduodenectomy, and local resection of pancreatic tumor were the most frequent surgical procedures, while pancreatic fistula was the most common but acceptable complication (30.3%). The overall 5-year survival rate of this entire cohort was 41.0%, with a median survival time of 60.4 months. Patients who underwent R0 resections obtained a better survival than those who did not (P < 0.005). As for the prognostic analysis, tumor size and lymph invasion were only statistically significant in univariate analysis (P = 0.046 and P < 0.05, respectively), whereas the newly updated 2010 grading classification of WHO (G1 and G2 vs G3), distant metastasis, and surgical margin were all meaningful in both univariate and multivariate analysis (P = 0.045, 0.001, and 0.042, respectively). Non-F-P-NETs are a kind of rare neoplasm, with mostly indolent malignancy. Patients with non-F-P-NETs could benefit from the radical resections. The new WHO criteria, distant metastasis and surgical margin, might be independent predictors for the prognosis of non-F-P-NETs. PMID:25396335

  5. Management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in patients with MEN 1

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Samira M.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are frequent and can be non-functional (NF) in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). Their identification is of clinical importance because malignant PNETs are reported to be the most common cause of death in patients with MEN1. Once the diagnosis of MEN1 is established in an individual based on clinical manifestations and/or genetic testing results, an active surveillance program is instituted for early detection and treatment of MEN1-associated disease. Ultrasonography, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), CT, MRI, selective arterial angiography and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy are all used for localization of tumors. Managing PNETs can be challenging and includes diagnosis, surveillance, adequate staging, and interdisciplinary, multimodal treatments to optimize patient outcome. Treatment includes surgical resection for loco-regional disease, as well as liver directed and targeted chemotherapies for advanced progressive disease. To date, the recommendation for surgical resection in NF-PNETs is based on tumor size, as a higher rate of metastases was found in patients with larger tumors. This review summarizes key concepts in managing PNETs in patients with MEN1. PMID:25713781

  6. Biotherapy of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors using somatostatin analogs.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Hisato; Hijioka, Masayuki; Lee, Lingaku; Ito, Tetsuhide

    2015-08-01

    Basically, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) should be treated surgically; however, in unresectable cases, a treatment that aims to improve the prognosis by inhibiting the growth of the tumor and control the clinical symptoms becomes necessary. In the case of functional tumors, the quality of life of patients is decreased by not only the symptoms with tumor invasion and/or metastasis but also by the symptoms of hormone excess. The efficacy of somatostatin analogs against the latter has been previously reported, and their sustained release formulations have been developed. Somatostatin analogs are recommended to treat the endocrine symptoms of functional PNET; however, in case they can cause hypoglycemia in patients with insulinoma. On the other hand, results from the PROMID study demonstrated a tumor-stabilizing effect when octreotide LAR (long acting repeatable) was used to treat patients with advanced midgut NET; however, there has been no consensus regarding its antitumor effect for PNET. Additionally, a recent result from the CLARINET study suggests that lanreotide autogel has an antitumor effect against nonfunctional NET including PNET. Further clinical study results are awaited. PMID:25689143

  7. [Efficacy of somatostatin analogues in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumours based on the results of recent clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Igaz, Péter

    2014-11-30

    Due to their inhibitory effects on hormone secretion, somatostatin analogues are of pivotal importance in the symptomatic treatment of hormone-secreting neuroendocrine tumours. Although several earlier clinical observations supported the view that these biological agents are capable of inhibiting the growth of neuroendocrine tumours, the PROMID study published in 2009 was the first to confirm the inhibitory effect of octreotide on tumour growth and demonstrated the prolongation of progression free survival. These findings have been confirmed and extended by the most recent CLARINET trial with lanreotide published in 2014. Somatostatin analogues are capable of inhibiting tumour growth and stabilizing disease irrespective of the hormonal activity of the tumour and, therefore, their applicability is expected to be extended to the treatment of hormonally inactive neuroendocrine tumours, as well. PMID:25417137

  8. Canine pancreatic islet cell tumours secreting insulin-like growth factor type 2: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Finotello, R; Ressel, L; Arvigo, M; Baroni, G; Marchetti, V; Romanelli, G; Burrow, R; Mignacca, D; Blackwood, L

    2016-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor type II (IGF-II) is the main cause of non-islet cell tumour hypoglycaemia (NICTH) and insulin is thought to be the only factor causing hypoglycaemia in insulinomas. However, two case reports of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNETs) producing IGF-II have been previously published: a human and a canine patient. In this study, we investigated clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features, and biological behaviour of canine pancreatic IGF-II-omas, a subgroup of PNETs that has not been previously characterized. Case records of 58 dogs with confirmed PNETs and hypoglycaemia were reviewed: six patients were affected by IGF-II-omas. Surgery was performed in all cases and two dogs had metastases. Four patients remained alive and in remission at 370, 440, 560 and 890 days post-diagnosis; two died of non-tumour-related causes. IGF-II-omas can be differentiated from insulinomas through hypoinsulinaemia, IGF-II positive and insulin negative immunostaining. The prevalence of this neoplasia is low, accounting for just 6% of PNETs. PMID:24428588

  9. Preoperative glucose abnormalities in patients with pancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Durlik, Marek; Kałuża, Bernadetta; Milczarczyk, Alicja; Franek, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic cancer is a neoplasm characterised by poor prognosis. The only effective, possible treatment is radical surgery, but most patients do not qualify for surgery because of delayed diagnosis. Aim To determine if assessment of endocrine pancreatic function could serve as a means of screening for pancreatic cancer. Material and methods This prospective study was conducted on a group of 50 patients diagnosed with pancreatic tumour, who were qualified for surgery. Results From 1.07.2010 to 4.07.2011 a further 50 patients were added to the study group. They had been admitted to the hospital with pancreatic tumours. During the preoperative period, nine of these people had been treated for diabetes, 14 were newly diagnosed with diabetes and 15 had been diagnosed with impaired glucose tolerance, but only 12 had a normal glucose profile. Afterwards, patients underwent the surgical treatment. Histopathological examination revealed that out of the 50 operated patients, 36 suffered from malignant disease, and of these only four had no impaired glucose tolerance before treatment. Conclusions In most cases, patients with pancreatic tumours have impaired glucose tolerance. Screening patients over 50 years of age could speed up diagnosis and surgical treatment. PMID:25061491

  10. MGMT expression predicts response to temozolomide in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Cros, J; Hentic, O; Rebours, V; Zappa, M; Gille, N; Theou-Anton, N; Vernerey, D; Maire, F; Lévy, P; Bedossa, P; Paradis, V; Hammel, P; Ruszniewski, P; Couvelard, A

    2016-08-01

    Temozolomide (TEM) showed encouraging results in well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (WDPNETs). Low O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression and MGMT promoter methylation within tumors correlate with a better outcome under TEM-based chemotherapy in glioblastoma. We aimed to assess whether MGMT expression and MGMT promoter methylation could help predict the efficacy of TEM-based chemotherapy in patients with WDPNET. Consecutive patients with progressive WDPNET and/or liver involvement over 50% who received TEM between 2006 and 2012 were retrospectively studied. Tumor response was assessed according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 guidelines. Nuclear expression of MGMT was assessed by immunochemistry (H-score, 0-300) and MGMT promoter methylation by pyrosequencing. Forty-three patients (21 men, 58years (27-84)) with grade 1 WDPNET (n=6) or 2 (n=36) were analyzed. Objective response, stable disease, and progression rates were seen in 17 patients (39.5%), 18 patients (41.9%), and 8 patients (18.6%), respectively. Low MGMT expression (≤50) was associated with radiological objective response (P=0.04) and better progression-free survival (PFS) (HR=0.35 (0.15-0.81), P=0.01). Disease control rate at 18months of treatment remained satisfying with an MGMT score up to 100 (74%) but dropped with a higher expression. High MGMT promoter methylation was associated with a low MGMT expression and longer PFS (HR=0.37 (0.29-1.08), P=0.05). Low MGMT score (≤50) appears to predict an objective tumor response, whereas an intermediate MGMT score (50-100) seems to be associated with prolonged stable disease. PMID:27353036

  11. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  12. Pathology and Surgical Treatment of High-Grade Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: an Evolving Landscape.

    PubMed

    Haugvik, Sven-Petter; Kaemmerer, Daniel; Gaujoux, Sebastien; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Verbeke, Caroline Sophie; Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) are rare, accounting for less than 5 % of all pancreatic tumors. High-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (hgPNECs) represent about 5 % of all PNENs. They show highly aggressive behavior with dismal prognosis. Throughout the last two decades, there has been a notable progress in basic and clinical research of PNENs and a therapeutic trend towards both more aggressive and minimally invasive surgery. Despite these advances, hgPNECs as a distinct clinical entity remains largely unexplored among surgeons. This review of current development in pathology reporting and surgical treatment of hgPNECs aims at increasing the awareness of an evolving field in pancreatic surgery. PMID:26984415

  13. Histidine decarboxylase and urinary methylimidazoleacetic acid in gastric neuroendocrine cells and tumours

    PubMed Central

    Tsolakis, Apostolos V; Grimelius, Lars; Granerus, Göran; Stridsberg, Mats; Falkmer, Sture E; Janson, Eva T

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study histidine decarboxylase (HDC) expression in normal and neoplastic gastric neuroendocrine cells in relationship to the main histamine metabolite. METHODS: Control tissues from fundus (n = 3) and corpus (n = 3) mucosa of six patients undergoing operations for gastric adenocarcinoma, biopsy and/or gastric surgical specimens from 64 patients with primary gastric neuroendocrine tumours (GNETs), as well as metastases from 22 of these patients, were investigated using conventional immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence with commercial antibodies vs vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT-2), HDC and ghrelin. The urinary excretion of the main histamine metabolite methylimidazoleacetic acid (U-MeImAA) was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography in 27 of the 64 patients. RESULTS: In the gastric mucosa of the control tissues, co-localization studies identified neuroendocrine cells that showed immunoreactivity only to VMAT-2 and others with reactivity only to HDC. A third cell population co-expressed both antigens. There was no co-expression of HDC and ghrelin. Similar results were obtained in the foci of neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia associated with chronic atrophic gastritis type A and also in the tumours. The relative incidence of the three aforementioned markers varied in the tumours that were examined using conventional immunohistochemistry. All of these GNETs revealed both VMAT-2 and HDC immunoreactivity, and their metastases showed an immunohistochemical pattern and frequency similar to that of their primary tumours. In four patients, increased U-MeImAA excretion was detected, but only two of the patients exhibited related endocrine symptoms. CONCLUSION: Human enterochromaffin-like cells appear to partially co-express VMAT-2 and HDC. Co-expression of VMAT-2 and HDC might be required for increased histamine production in patients with GNETs. PMID:26715806

  14. Contemporary methods of therapy and follow-up of neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Jakub; Kamiński, Grzegorz; Ruchała, Marek

    2012-01-01

    The growing interest in neuroendocrine tumours is due to the dynamic growth of detection of this type of cancer. Neuroendocrine tumours (neuroendocrine neoplasms – NENs / neuroendocrine tumours – NETs) derive from glands, groups of endocrine cells and diffuse neuroendocrine system cells. Mainly they derive from the gastrointestinal tract (gastroenteropancreatic-neuroendocrine tumours – GEP-NETs). Currently the modified WHO classification from 2010 is widely used. An important element in the choice of treatment is histological maturity based on mitotic activity and on assessment of proliferation activity (Ki-67). The treatment of choice is surgery. In most cases, complete surgical removal is impossible because of the advanced staging at the time of diagnosis. In well-differentiated neoplasms where the expression of somatostatin receptors is expected, patients are qualified for somatostatin analogues therapy. Poorly differentiated lesions are qualified for chemotherapy. In the guidelines of ENETS (European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society) from 2007 the rules concerning monitoring depending on the WHO classification were specified. PMID:23788913

  15. Neuroendocrine tumours of the head and neck: anatomical, functional and molecular imaging and contemporary management

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Navaraj; Prestwich, Robin; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Patel, Chirag

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the head and neck are rare neoplasms and can be of epithelial or non-epithelial differentiation. Although the natural history of NETs is variable, it is crucial to establish an early diagnosis of these tumours as they can be potentially curable. Conventional anatomical imaging and functional imaging using radionuclide scintigraphy and positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be complementary for the diagnosis, staging and monitoring of treatment response. This article describes and illustrates the imaging features of head and neck NETs, discusses the potential future role of novel positron-emitting tracers that are emerging into clinical practice and reviews contemporary management of these tumours. Familiarity with the choice of imaging techniques and the variety of imaging patterns and treatment options should help guide radiologists in the management of this rare but important subgroup of head and neck neoplasms. PMID:24240099

  16. Feline cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma (Merkel cell tumour): clinical and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Bagnasco, Giorgio; Properzi, Roberto; Porto, Roberto; Nardini, Vincenzo; Poli, Alessandro; Abramo, Francesca

    2003-04-01

    A case of a feline Merkel cell tumour is described. An 8-year-old, female cat developed a round, alopecic, reddish mass on the nose. Wide excisional surgery was performed with cartilage resection. Histologically the mass was composed of solid islands of mostly basophilic densely packed cells with a scant cytoplasm, which was suggestive of a neuroendocrine origin. Results of immunohistochemical studies using antibodies against neurone-specific enolase, chromogranin, synaptophysin and pan-cytokeratin allowed classification of the lesion as a Merkel cell tumour. Ultrastructurally, dense core granules were identified in the cytoplasm. In a 2-year follow-up no relapses or metastases were observed. The clinical course recorded is in contrast with the malignant nature of a Merkel cell tumour recently described in a cat and of the human Merkel cell tumour, but is similar to the course of the canine Merkel cell tumour which is often benign. Early diagnosis along with the use of wide surgical excision might be considered an important factor in preventing relapse of this tumour. PMID:12662269

  17. A malignant cause of hypoglycaemia: a metastatic insulin-secreting pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Mark Anthony; Pagsisihan, Daveric; Berberabe, A'Ericson; Palugod-Lopez, Elaine Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Most cases of insulinomas are benign. We report a case of a malignant form of insulinoma. A 46-year-old man presented with behavioural changes associated with hypoglycaemia. Diagnostic work up revealed high serum insulin, high C-peptide and low glucose levels, compatible with endogenous hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia. CT imaging of the abdomen revealed a pancreatic head mass and multiple liver masses. Biopsy of the pancreatic mass revealed a grade three pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. Histological analysis of a liver mass showed that it was identical to the pancreatic mass, confirming its metastatic nature. The patient underwent distal pancreatectomy with en bloc splenectomy. There was persistence of hypoglycaemic symptoms after removal of the pancreatic mass, suggesting that the liver metastases were also functioning. Symptoms were controlled by diazoxide and octreotide long-acting release. The patient is already 1 year postsurgery with no recurrence of severe hypoglycaemia, and he has good functional capacity and has returned to his office job. PMID:26994053

  18. Malignant Neuroendocrine Tumour (Carcinoid) of the Spleen in an African Pygmy Hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Lowden, L R; Davies, J L

    2016-07-01

    A malignant neuroendocrine tumour (carcinoid) of the spleen was diagnosed on post-mortem examination of a 3-year-old, male African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris). The animal presented with a history of inappetence, weight loss, lethargy, a wide-based gait and a palpable abdominal mass. The gross pathological, histopathological, histochemical and immunohistochemical findings are described. Primary splenic carcinoids are reported rarely in the human medical literature and this is believed to be the first report in a non-human animal. PMID:27212029

  19. Imaging secondary neuroendocrine tumours of the liver: comparison of I123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and In111-labelled octreotide (Octreoscan).

    PubMed

    Ramage, J K; Williams, R; Buxton-Thomas, M

    1996-07-01

    Functional imaging of neuroendocrine tumours with Octreoscan and I123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is important for assessment prior to various therapies and assessing response. The two imaging methods have not been directly compared in hepatic neuroendocrine tumours. Patients (n = 18) were studied with both imaging techniques. The sensitivity of Octreoscan was 94%, and that of MIBG 39%. No previously occult primary sites were detected. Concurrent octreotide therapy did not reduce the sensitivity of Octreoscan. Widespread bone metastases were seen in two post-liver-transplant patients using Octreoscan. Octreoscan is a sensitive means of detecting hepatic neuroendocrine tumours, and the more specific technique. MIBG has poor sensitivity, reducing its clinical utility. Therapy with I131-MIBG is likely to be applicable to relatively few patients. PMID:8759495

  20. Bowel parasitosis and neuroendocrine tumours of the appendix. A report from the Italian TREP project.

    PubMed

    Virgone, C; Cecchetto, G; Besutti, V; Ferrari, A; Buffa, P; Alaggio, R; Alessandrini, L; Dall'Igna, P

    2015-05-01

    Five children with a neuroendocrine tumour (NET) of the appendix associated with a parasitic bowel infection are described, and the possibility of inflammation-triggered carcinogenesis is discussed. Schistosoma haematobium is linked primarily to bladder cancer but it has been reported in association with several other histotypes, including NETs of the gastrointestinal tract. Conversely, Enterobius vermicularis has not yet been claimed to participate in the onset of pre-cancerous conditions or tumours. The rare occurrence of contemporary appendiceal NETs and parasitic infection, raises the intriguing hypothesis of an inflammation-related carcinogenesis, although a cause-effect relationship cannot be established. Larger international series of childhood appendiceal NETs, which also include countries with higher prevalence of parasitic bowel infections, are needed to further clarify this possible cause-effect relationship. PMID:25216117

  1. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Model for Biodistribution of Radiolabeled Peptides in Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Gospavic, Radovan; Knoll, Peter; Mirzaei, Siroos; Popov, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The objectives of this work was to assess the benefits of the application of Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models in patients with different neuroendocrine tumours (NET) who were treated with Lu-177 DOTATATE. The model utilises clinical data on biodistribution of radiolabeled peptides (RLPs) obtained by whole body scintigraphy (WBS) of the patients. Methods: The blood flow restricted (perfusion rate limited) type of the PBPK model for biodistribution of radiolabeled peptides (RLPs) in individual human organs is based on the multi-compartment approach, which takes into account the main physiological processes in the organism: absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME). The approach calibrates the PBPK model for each patient in order to increase the accuracy of the dose estimation. Datasets obtained using WBS in four patients have been used to obtain the unknown model parameters. The scintigraphic data were acquired using a double head gamma camera in patients with different neuroendocrine tumours who were treated with Lu-177 DOTATATE. The activity administered to each patient was 7400 MBq. Results: Satisfactory agreement of the model predictions with the data obtained from the WBS for each patient has been achieved. Conclusion: The study indicates that the PBPK model can be used for more accurate calculation of biodistribution and absorbed doses in patients. This approach is the first attempt of utilizing scintigraphic data in PBPK models, which was obtained during Lu-177 peptide therapy of patients with NET. PMID:27408897

  2. Pancreatic mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasm with clear cells leading to diagnosis of von Hippel Lindau disease.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Aanchal; Sharma, Mehar C; Yadav, Rajni; Panwar, Rajesh; Mathur, Sandeep R; Iyer, Venkateswaran K; Sahni, Peush

    2016-08-01

    Mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasms are extremely rare tumors that are usually seen in female patients and are often associated with von Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease. We describe the case of a 38-year-old male who presented with complaints of anorexia, weight loss, and abdominal pain. CT abdomen showed a mass in the head of the pancreas, multiple small nodules in the body of pancreas, and bilateral adrenal masses. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) from the mass showed features of a neuroendocrine tumor, with many of the cells demonstrating abundant clear cytoplasm. Histopathological examination of the pancreaticoduodenectomy specimen showed a mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasm with two components viz. serous cystadenoma and neuroendocrine tumor (NET) World Health Organization (WHO) grade 2. In addition, he was diagnosed to have bilateral pheochromocytomas and a paraganglioma. The synchronicity of these tumors suggested the possibility of VHL disease. Thus, identification of a NET with clear cells or of a mixed serous neuroendocrine neoplasm should raise suspicion of VHL disease. In a mixed tumor, FNAC may identify only one of the two components. Thorough processing of all pancreatic serous tumors for pathological examination is recommended, as NET may occur as a small nodule within the serous cystadenoma. PMID:27161305

  3. Antiproliferative effects of lanreotide autogel in patients with progressive, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours: a Spanish, multicentre, open-label, single arm phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) are indicated to relieve carcinoid syndrome but seem to have antiproliferative effects on neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). This is the first prospective study investigating tumour stabilisation with the long-acting SSA lanreotide Autogel in patients with progressive NETs. Methods This was a multicentre, open-label, phase II trial conducted in 17 Spanish specialist centres. Patients with well-differentiated NETs and radiologically confirmed progression within the previous 6 months received lanreotide Autogel, 120 mg every 28 days over ≤92 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were response rate, tumour biomarkers, symptom control, quality of life (QoL), and safety. Radiographic imaging was assessed by a blinded central radiologist. Results Of 30 patients included in the efficacy and safety analyses, 40% had midgut tumours and 27% pancreatic tumours; 63% of tumours were functioning. Median PFS time was 12.9 (95% CI: 7.9, 16.5) months, and most patients achieved disease stabilisation (89%) or partial response (4%). No deterioration in QoL was observed. Nineteen patients (63%) experienced treatment-related adverse events, most frequently diarrhoea and asthenia; only one treatment-related adverse event (aerophagia) was severe. Conclusion Lanreotide Autogel provided effective tumour stabilisation and PFS >12 months in patients with progressive NETs ineligible for surgery or chemotherapy, with a safety profile consistent with the pharmacology of the class. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00326469; EU Clinical Trial Register EudraCT no 2004-002871-18. PMID:24053191

  4. [Von Hippel-Lindau disease type 2-related pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and adrenal myelolipoma].

    PubMed

    Dolzhansky, O V; Morozova, M M; Korostelev, S A; Kanivets, I V; Chardarov, N K; Shatveryan, G A; Pal'tseva, E M; Fedorov, D N

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a case of von Hippel--Lindau-related pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and adrenal myelolipoma in a 44-year-old woman. The pancreatic tumor and a left retroperitoneal mass were removed in the women in July 2014 and May 2015. Histological examination of the pancreatic tumor revealed that the latter consisted of clear cells forming tubular and tubercular structures showing the expression of chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and cytokeratins 18 and 19 and a negative response to CD10 and RCC. The adrenal medullary mass presented as clear-cell alveolar structures with inclusions of adipose tissue mixed with erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cells. The clear-cell component of the adrenal gland expressed neuroendocrine markers with a negative response to cytokeratins, CD10, and RCC. Molecular genetic examination yielded a signal corresponding to two copies of the VHL gene. No deletions or amplifications of the gene were detected. Cases of von Hippel--Lindau disease concurrent with adrenal pheochromocytoma and myelolipoma and simultaneous pancreatic involvement were not found in the literature. PMID:26978235

  5. Metronomic temozolomide as second line treatment for metastatic poorly differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    De Divitiis, C; von Arx, C; Grimaldi, A M; Cicala, D; Tatangelo, F; Arcella, A; Romano, G M; Simeone, E; Iaffaioli, R V; Ascierto, P A; Tafuto, S

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine Neoplasms (NEN) are a group of heterogeneous malignancies derived from neuroendocrine cell compartment, with different roles in both endocrine and nervous system. Most NETs have gastroentero-pancreatic (GEP) origin, arising in the foregut, midgut, or hindgut. The 2010 WHO classification divides GEP-NETs into two main subgroups, neuroendocrine tumors (NET) and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC), according with Ki-67 levels. NET are tumors with low (<20 %) Ki-67 value, and NECs, including small cell lung carcinomas and Merkel Cell carcinomas, are all NETs with high Ki-67 levels (>20 %-G3). Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC) are usually treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimens. Here we present a case of a patient with pancreatic NEC progressing after cisplatin and etoposide, treated with temozolomide as palliative, second line treatment. According with the poor Performance Status (PS = 2) and to reduce the toxicity of the treatment was chosen an intermittent dosing regimen of metronomic temozolomide (75 mg/m(2)/day-one-week-on/on-week-off). MGMT resulted methylated. On July 2014 the patient started the treatment. On August 2014 the patient obtained a significant clinical benefit (PS = 0) and the total body CT scan performed on October 2014 showed a RECIST partial response on all the sites of disease. No drug-related side effects were reported by the patient. After 18 months of therapy the treatment continues without significant toxicity, and with further remission of the metastases. Treatment with metronomic "one-week-on/on-week-off" Temozolomide can be considered a good treatment option in patients with poor performance status, affected by pNEC with MGMT methylation. PMID:27142424

  6. Von Hippel Lindau disease with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Kepicoglu, Hasan; Rusen, Elif; Kabasakal, Levent; Gundogdu, Sadi; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2013-01-01

    We present a 39-year-old woman who was previously diagnosed with Von Hippel Lindau Disease (VHLD). She had surgery and radiotherapy for cranial hemangioblastoma (HA) 11 years ago and had unilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma in another hospital 6 month prior to her admission to our center. Moon face, buffalo hump, central obesity, progressive weight gain and menstrual irregularities persisted after adrenalectomy. Her laboratory results were consistent with ectopic Cushing's syndrome (ECS). A pancreatic solid mass with a nodule on the left lung were revealed upon computed tomography. In addition, Gallium-68 Somatostatin Receptor PET confirmed the pancreatic involvement and demonstrated additional lesions on the left lung and in the aortocaval lymphatic system on the right side, suggesting metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET). Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with [177Lutetium-DOTA0,Tyr3] octreotate was performed on the patient, with no side effects observed. She was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the first cycle. PMID:23524618

  7. Comparative Analysis of Clinical, Hormonal and Morphological Studies in Patients with Neuroendocrine ACTH-Producing Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Kolesnikova, G. S.; Lapshina, A. M.; Voronkova, I. A.; Marova, E. I.; Arapova, S. D.; Goncharov, N. P.; Dedov, I. I.

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights the problem of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) with clinical symptoms of hypercorticism caused by hypersecretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) by tumour cells. In most cases (85%), the tumours were localized in the pituitary gland (Cushing's disease); 15% of the patients had an extrapituitary tumour that manifest as an ectopic ACTH secretion (EAS). Comparative analysis of clinical, hormonal, histological, and immunohistochemical characteristics of pituitary and extrapituitary ACTH-secreting NET was performed. It included 46 patients with CD and 38 ones exhibiting ectopic ACTH secretion (EAS). Results of the study suggest differences between CD and EAS in terms of the severity of clinical manifestations and duration of the disease. Hormonal studies showed that EAS unlike CD was associated with high plasma ACTH and cortisol levels, late-evening salivary cortisol and daily urinary free cortisol, the absence of a 60% or greater reduction of cortisol in the HDDST test, and the presence of a low (less than 2) ACTH gradient in response to desmopressin administration with catheterization of cavernous sinuses. The study of morphofunctional characteristics of the removed NET demonstrated the ability of both pituitary and extrapituitary NETs to express ACTH as well as GH, PRL, LH, and FSH. The angiogenic markers (CD31 and VEGF) were detected with equal frequency regardless of the NET localization. The histological structure of all corticotropinomas suggested their benign origin, but extrapituitary NETs were represented by different morphological types with varying malignancy, invasiveness, and metastatic properties. A higher cell proliferation potential (Ki-67) was documented for NET in patients presenting with an ectopic ACTH secretion compared to those having corticotropinomas. PMID:23509456

  8. MicroRNAs associated with small bowel neuroendocrine tumours and their metastases.

    PubMed

    Miller, Helen C; Frampton, Adam E; Malczewska, Anna; Ottaviani, Silvia; Stronach, Euan A; Flora, Rashpal; Kaemmerer, Daniel; Schwach, Gert; Pfragner, Roswitha; Faiz, Omar; Kos-Kudła, Beata; Hanna, George B; Stebbing, Justin; Castellano, Leandro; Frilling, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Novel molecular analytes are needed in small bowel neuroendocrine tumours (SBNETs) to better determine disease aggressiveness and predict treatment response. In this study, we aimed to profile the global miRNome of SBNETs, and identify microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in tumour progression for use as potential biomarkers. Two independent miRNA profiling experiments were performed (n=90), including primary SBNETs (n=28), adjacent normal small bowel (NSB; n=14), matched lymph node (LN) metastases (n=24), normal LNs (n=7), normal liver (n=2) and liver metastases (n=15). We then evaluated potentially targeted genes by performing integrated computational analyses. We discovered 39 miRNAs significantly deregulated in SBNETs compared with adjacent NSB. The most upregulated (miR-204-5p, miR-7-5p and miR-375) were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Two miRNAs (miR-1 and miR-143-3p) were significantly downregulated in LN and liver metastases compared with primary tumours. Furthermore, we identified upregulated gene targets for miR-1 and miR-143-3p in an existing SBNET dataset, which could contribute to disease progression, and show that these miRNAs directly regulate FOSB and NUAK2 oncogenes. Our study represents the largest global miRNA profiling of SBNETs using matched primary tumour and metastatic samples. We revealed novel miRNAs deregulated during SBNET disease progression, and important miRNA-mRNA interactions. These miRNAs have the potential to act as biomarkers for patient stratification and may also be able to guide treatment decisions. Further experiments to define molecular mechanisms and validate these miRNAs in larger tissue cohorts and in biofluids are now warranted. PMID:27353039

  9. Hypercalcemia from metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor secreting 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Viola; de las Morenas, Antonio; Janicek, Milos

    2014-01-01

    Malignant hypercalcemia occurs in about 20-30% of patients with cancer, both solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. The secretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTH-rP) is the most common cause and has been shown to be the etiology of hypercalcemia associated with neuroendocrine tumors. Here we report the case of a patient with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor who developed hypercalcemia more than 4 years after the initial diagnosis as a result of secretion of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, a mechanism only commonly seen in lymphomas. The successful control of the patient’s disease with capecitabine and temozolomide led to the alleviation of this paraneoplastic syndrome. PMID:25083313

  10. Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Ethanol Ablation for Small Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Oh, Dongwook; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation is gaining popularity for the treatment of focal pancreatic lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, feasibility, and treatment response after EUS-guided ethanol injection for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs). Methods This was a retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database including 11 consecutive patients with p-NETs who underwent EUS-guided ethanol injection. Results EUS-guided ethanol injection was successfully performed in 11 patients with 14 tumors. The final diagnosis was based on histology and clinical signs as follows: 10 non-functioning neuroendocrine tumors and four insulinomas. During follow-up (median, 370 days; range, 152 to 730 days), 10 patients underwent clinical follow-up after treatment, and one patient was excluded because of loss to follow-up. A single treatment session with an injection of 0.5 to 3.8 mL of ethanol resulted in complete responses (CRs) at the 3-month radiologic imaging for seven of 13 tumors (response rate, 53.8%). Multiple treatment sessions performed in three tumors with residual viable enhancing tissue increased the number of tumors with CRs to eight of 13 (response rate, 61.5%). Mild pancreatitis occurred in three of 11 patients. Conclusions EUS-guided ethanol injection appears to be a safe, feasible, and potentially effective method for treating small p-NETs in patients who are poor surgical candidates. PMID:25844345

  11. Methods to assess the biodistribution of radiolabelled somatostatin analogues and treatment response of neuroendocrine tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanasegaran, Gopinath

    Introduction: During the past decade, proof of the principle that somatostatin receptors can be successfully used for in vivo targeting of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) has been provided. These tumours are imaged with 111Indium-pentetreotide and treated with 90Yttrium labeled somatostatin analogues. The aim of this study was to assess (a) the biodistribution and residency of 90Y labelled agents using the brehmsstrahlung imaging technique (b) the tumour response to various treatment modalities using a simplified scintigraphic method [Functional SPECT tumour volume (STV)]. Material and methods: 1) 19 patients with NETs were imaged with 111In-pentetreotide and 14 of them underwent treatment with 90Y-lanreotide. The rest underwent treatment with 90Y-SMT. All the patients were imaged 24 hours post-therapy. Brehmsstrahlung images obtained post therapies were used to assess the 90Y-lanreotide biodistribution in 14 patients and the 5 patients treated with 90Y-SMT, comparing them with 111In-pentetreotide. 2) In 42 patients with NETs a retrospective analysis was performed of the 111In-pentetreotide imaging and CT scan in patients treated with different therapies. A simplified scintigraphic method using 111In-pentetreotide SPECT liver imaging was used to monitor changes in tumour response and to determine how this correlates with CT scan and clinical response. Results: 1) 90Y-lanreotide and 90Y-SMT (with amino acids) have much lower uptake in the kidney (p 0.000 and 0.041 respectively) than 111In-pentetreotide. G Gnanasegaran MD 2 2) 22/42 patients had a good clinical response. A mean fall in total functional STV of 37% was seen in patients with symptomatic relief and a mean increase of 72 % was seen in patients with no symptomatic relief STV predicted the clinical outcome in 34 patients (81%) and CT predicted the outcome in 21 (50%) patients. Conclusion: There was a difference in biodistribution between 111In-pentetreotide and 90Y-lanreotide/ 90Y-SMT, especially in the

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Ethanol Ablation Therapy for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Mizukawa, Sho; Yabe, Syuntaro; Seki, Hiroyuki; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Recently, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) has been reported. However, the efficacy and safety of the technique remain unclear. We have launched a prospective pilot study of EUS-guided ethanol ablation for p-NETs. The major eligibility criteria are the presence of a pathologically diagnosed grade (G) 1 or G2 p-NET, a tumor size of 2cm, and being a poor candidate for surgery. A total of 5 patients will be treated. The primary endpoint will be the complete ablation rate at 1 month after treatment. PMID:27549680

  13. New Genetics and Genomic Data on Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Implications for Diagnosis, Treatment, and Targeted Therapies.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Anja M; Marinoni, Ilaria; Blank, Annika; Perren, Aurel

    2016-09-01

    The recent findings on the roles of death-associated protein 6/α-thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked (DAXX/ATRX) in the development of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) have led to major advances in the molecular understanding of these rare tumors and open up completely new therapeutic windows. This overview aims at giving a simplified view on these findings and their possible therapeutic implications. The importance of epigenetic changes in PanNET is also underlined by recent findings of a cross-species study on microRNA (miRNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) profiles in PanNETs. PMID:27456058

  14. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with ectopic adrenocorticotropin production: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Forum B; Khagi, Simon; Daly, Kevin P; Lechan, Ronald M; Ummaritchot, Vorawan; Saif, Muhammad W

    2013-09-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) entail a vast array of tumors, which can vary from benign neoplastic growths to rapidly aggressive malignancies. Such is the case with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing p-NETs. These tumors have been found to be quite aggressive and a challenge to treat, especially due to the occurrence of metastatic disease even after resection of the primary tumor. We discuss the case of a 44-year-old female who initially presented with vague, non-specific symptoms, in which a malignant p-NET was found to be the cause of her clinical presentation. Although resection of the pancreatic mass was performed, the patient presented again with metastatic disease to the liver. PMID:24023341

  15. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Neuroendocrine Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-15

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor

  16. Serotonin-producing pancreatic endocrine tumour. Histological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study of a case.

    PubMed

    Kanavaros, P; Hoang, C; Le Bodic, M F; Polivka, M; Hautefeuille, P

    1990-07-01

    Serotonin-producing pancreatic endocrine tumours are rare neoplasms which in most cases exhibit malignant biological behaviour. These tumours, in the majority of the well-documented cases, are composed of argyrophil- and argentaffin-positive cells which contain large pleomorphic neurosecretory granules. In contrast, argyrophilic non-argentaffin pancreatic endocrine tumours with tumour cells containing round neurosecretory granules are exceptional. In this study we describe such a tumour not associated with clinical evidence of carcinoid syndrome in a 60-year-old woman. Histological examination revealed tumour extension in pancreatic lymphatic vessels and veins but no evidence of locoregional or distant metastases. Ten months after surgery the patient showed no recurrence of the disease. Immunohistochemistry revealed cytoplasmic serotonin production in the tumour cells which were negative for anti-gastrin, insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and ACTH. This study emphasizes the usefulness of combined ultrastructural and immunohistochemical investigations in order to identify and characterize the rare pancreatic endocrine tumours with serotonin production. PMID:1966880

  17. Correlation of monoclonal and polyclonal somatostatin receptor 5 antibodies in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kaemmerer, Daniel; Lupp, Amelie; Peter, Luisa; Fischer, Elke; Schulz, Stefan; Klöppel, Günter; Hommann, Merten

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the frequency of somatostatin-receptor 5 (SSTR 5) in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors by using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Material and Method: we analyzed 66 proven pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors immunohistochemically with monoclonal (clone UMB-4) and polyclonal SSTR 5-antibodies. Immunoreactive score (IRS) and DAKO-score Her2/neu were evaluated. Results: Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated for the IRS a significant higher staining of all specimen using the monoclonal antibodies ( IRS SSTR5 poly vs IRS SSTR 5 mono; 20.0% vs 30.3% p < 0.001) by a correlation of 0.21; p = 0.04. For the HER2 score there was also a significant higher staining in the monoclonal group (Her2 SSTR 5 poly vs Her2 SSTR 5 mono; 21.5% vs 28.8% p < 0.001) by a correlation of 0.20; p = 0.08. Conclusion: Both antibodies are useful in staining of SSTR, although UMB-4 demonstrated a 10% higher SSTR 5 staining. Due to the previous underestimated expression rate of SSTR 5, current standards in diagnostics and therapy should be reconsidered. The increasing usage of long-acting pansomatostatin receptor analogues will rise the adverse effects connected to SSTR5 binding. PMID:23236542

  18. Broncho-biliary fistula secondary to biliary obstruction and lung abscess in a patient with pancreatic neuro-endocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Panda, Dipanjan; Aggarwal, Mayank; Yadav, Vikas; Kumar, Sachin; Mukund, Amar; Baghmar, Saphalta

    2016-06-01

    We present a case report of broncho-biliary fistula that developed due to the blockage of biliary stent placed during the management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET); diagnosed on high clinical suspicion, percutaneous cholangiogram and contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT); and successfully treated with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). PMID:26994644

  19. Malignant neuroendocrine tumour of the gallbladder with elevated carcinoembryonic antigen: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Furrukh, Muhammad; Qureshi, Asim; Saparamadu, Anna; Kumar, Shiyam

    2013-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman presented to a tertiary care centre with signs and symptoms of acute cholecystitis, cholelithiasis and diagnoses of a high-grade neuroendocrine tumour of the gallbladder primarily with peritoneal and liver metastases. She had a liver abscess secondary to Salmonella and Enterococcus fecalis that was drained and treated with appropriate antibiotics. Interestingly, the serum chromogranin A levels were within normal limits, but carcinoembryonic antigen was elevated, which helped evaluate responses and pick progression. She was treated with 10 cycles of palliative chemotherapy when malignancy associated complications started to recur, that is, cholangitis, worsening pain, cachexia, intestinal obstruction, etc leading to chemotherapy delays. Her disease progressed during these times with rapid deterioration of performance status. She died of septic complications postlaparotomy for intestinal obstruction. Her progression-free survival remained for 8 months with subjective and objective improvements, and her overall survival remained at 13 months. We describe the course of her illness and give a brief review of the literature. PMID:23661652

  20. Quality of life, resource utilisation and health economics assessment in advanced neuroendocrine tumours: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chau, I; Casciano, R; Willet, J; Wang, X; Yao, J C

    2013-11-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are often diagnosed at an advanced stage when the prognosis is poor for patients, who often experience diminished quality of life (QoL). As new treatments for NET become available, it is important to characterise the associated outcomes, costs and QoL. A comprehensive search was performed to systematically review available data in advanced NET regarding cost of illness/resource utilisation, economic studies/health technology assessment and QoL. Four rounds of sequential review narrowed the search results to 22 relevant studies. Most focused on surgical procedures and diagnostic tools and contained limited information on the costs and consequences of medical therapies. Multiple tools are used to assess health-related QoL in NET, but few analyses have been conducted to assess the comparative impact of available treatment alternatives on QoL. Limitations include English language and the focus on advanced NET; ongoing terminology and classification changes prevented pooled statistical analyses. This systematic review suggests a lack of comparative economic and outcomes data associated with NET treatments. Further research on disease costs, resource utilisation and QoL for patients with advanced NET is warranted. PMID:23895457

  1. Quality of life, resource utilisation and health economics assessment in advanced neuroendocrine tumours: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Chau, I; Casciano, R; Willet, J; Wang, X; Yao, JC

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are often diagnosed at an advanced stage when the prognosis is poor for patients, who often experience diminished quality of life (QoL). As new treatments for NET become available, it is important to characterise the associated outcomes, costs and QoL. A comprehensive search was performed to systematically review available data in advanced NET regarding cost of illness/resource utilisation, economic studies/health technology assessment and QoL. Four rounds of sequential review narrowed the search results to 22 relevant studies. Most focused on surgical procedures and diagnostic tools and contained limited information on the costs and consequences of medical therapies. Multiple tools are used to assess health-related QoL in NET, but few analyses have been conducted to assess the comparative impact of available treatment alternatives on QoL. Limitations include English language and the focus on advanced NET; ongoing terminology and classification changes prevented pooled statistical analyses. This systematic review suggests a lack of comparative economic and outcomes data associated with NET treatments. Further research on disease costs, resource utilisation and QoL for patients with advanced NET is warranted. PMID:23895457

  2. Primary neuroendocrine tumour of the right ventricle presenting with heart failure and cyanosis.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Syed Yaseen; Henry, David; Furukawa, Satoshi; Haber, Howard

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman presented to the emergency department owing to exertional dyspnoea and bilateral leg oedema for 3 weeks. Her vital signs included the following: heart rate of 95 bpm, respiratory rate of 24 breaths/min, oxygen saturation of 73% on room air and a blood pressure of 184/108 mm Hg. Physical examination revealed tachypnoea with clear lungs to auscultation, elevated jugular veins, cyanosis and bilateral pitting oedema. A chest X-ray demonstrated cardiomegaly without obvious pulmonary oedema. A CT of the chest was negative for pulmonary embolus; however, the scan did reveal a large right ventricular (RV) mass. An echocardiogram with bubble study confirmed a patent foramen ovale with significant right-to-left shunting and a large RV mass that significantly obstructed the pulmonary outflow tract. A cardiac biopsy revealed a low-grade neuroendocrine tumour. The patient underwent successful debridement and adjuvant chemotherapy. She improved greatly and was asymptomatic at a 9-month follow-up visit. PMID:26969366

  3. Consensus Recommendations for the Diagnosis and Management of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Guidelines from a Canadian National Expert Group.

    PubMed

    Singh, Simron; Dey, Chris; Kennecke, Hagen; Kocha, Walter; Maroun, Jean; Metrakos, Peter; Mukhtar, Tariq; Pasieka, Janice; Rayson, Daniel; Rowsell, Corwyn; Sideris, Lucas; Wong, Ralph; Law, Calvin

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are rare heterogeneous tumors that have been steadily increasing in both incidence and prevalence during the past few decades. Pancreatic NETs are categorized as functional (F) or nonfunctional (NF) based on their ability to secrete hormones that elicit clinically relevant symptoms. Specialized diagnostic tests are required for diagnosis. Treatment options are diverse and include surgical resection, intraarterial hepatic therapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Systemic therapy options include targeted agents as well as chemotherapy when indicated. Diagnosis and management should occur through a collaborative team of health care practitioners well-experienced in managing pNETs. Recent advances in pNET treatment options have led to the development of the Canadian consensus document described in this report. The discussion includes the epidemiology, classification, pathology, clinical presentation and prognosis, imaging and laboratory testing, medical and surgical management, and recommended treatment algorithms for pancreatic neuroendocrine cancers. PMID:25366583

  4. Genetic polymorphisms of interleukin 1β gene and sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Karakaxas, Dimitrios; Sioziou, Anna; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Coker, Ahmet; Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Liakakos, Theodoros; Dervenis, Christos; Gazouli, Maria

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association between the interleukin 1β (IL-1β) polymorphisms and the pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET) development. METHODS: A case-control study was conducted analyzing IL-1β polymorphisms using germline DNA collected in a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer (51 pNET cases, 85 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cases, 19 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and 98 healthy controls). RESULTS: The distribution of genotypes for the -511 C/T polymorphism in the pNET patient groups showed significant difference compared to the control group. It is known that the carriers of the IL-1β -511T allele have increased concentrations of IL-1β. The -511 CT and TT high-expression genotypes were over-represented in pNET patients. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study suggested a possible role of IL-1β -511 C/T genotypes in the pathogenesis of pNETs since the presence of the IL-1β -511 CT and TT genotypes and the T allele was associated with an increased risk of pNET only. PMID:27326321

  5. Capsaicin induces cytotoxicity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cells via mitochondrial action.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, M; Sassek, M; Abdelmessih, S; Mergler, S; Grötzinger, C; Metzke, D; Wojciechowicz, T; Nowak, K W; Strowski, M Z

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin (CAP), the pungent ingredient of chili peppers, inhibits growth of various solid cancers via TRPV1 as well as TRPV1-independent mechanisms. Recently, we showed that TRPV1 regulates intracellular calcium level and chromogranin A secretion in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) cells. In the present study, we characterize the role of the TRPV1 agonist - CAP - in controlling proliferation and apoptosis of pancreatic BON and QGP-1 NET cells. We demonstrate that CAP reduces viability and proliferation, and stimulates apoptotic death of NET cells. CAP causes mitochondrial membrane potential loss, inhibits ATP synthesis and reduces mitochondrial Bcl-2 protein production. In addition, CAP increases cytochrome c and cleaved caspase 3 levels in cytoplasm. CAP reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) acts synergistically with CAP to reduce ROS generation, without affecting CAP-induced toxicity. TRPV1 protein reduction by 75% reduction fails to attenuate CAP-induced cytotoxicity. In summary, these results suggest that CAP induces cytotoxicity by disturbing mitochondrial potential, and inhibits ATP synthesis in NET cells. Stimulation of ROS generation by CAP appears to be a secondary effect, not related to CAP-induced cytotoxicity. These results justify further evaluation of CAP in modulating pancreatic NETs in vivo. PMID:24075930

  6. Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Patterns of Failure and Disease-Related Outcomes With or Without Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zagar, Timothy M.; White, Rebekah R.; Willett, Christopher G.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Papavassiliou, Paulie; Papalezova, Katia T.; Guy, Cynthia D.; Broadwater, Gloria; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare and have better disease-related outcomes compared with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although many patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Little is known regarding the use of radiotherapy in the prevention of local recurrence after resection. To better define the role of radiotherapy, we performed an analysis of resected patients at our institution. Methods: Between 1994 and 2009, 33 patients with NET of the pancreatic head and neck underwent treatment with curative intent at Duke University Medical Center. Sixteen patients were treated with surgical resection alone while an additional 17 underwent resection with adjuvant or neoadjuvant radiation therapy, usually with concurrent fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CMT). Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy and median follow-up 28 months. Results: Thirteen patients (39%) experienced treatment failure. Eleven of the initial failures were distant, one was local only and one was local and distant. Two-year overall survival was 77% for all patients. Two-year local control for all patients was 87%: 85% for the CMT group and 90% for the surgery alone group (p = 0.38). Two-year distant metastasis-free survival was 56% for all patients: 46% and 69% for the CMT and surgery patients, respectively (p = 0.10). Conclusions: The primary mode of failure is distant which often results in mortality, with local failure occurring much less commonly. The role of radiotherapy in the adjuvant management of NET remains unclear.

  7. Risk Factors for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (PNETs): A Clinic-Based Case-Control study

    PubMed Central

    Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R.; Bamlet, William R.; McWilliams, Robert R; Hobday, Timothy J.; Burch, Patrick A.; Rabe, Kari G.; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are uncommon, and little is known about their risk factors and association with other cancers. We evaluated whether risk factors known to be associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma are also associated with PNETs: smoking, alcohol use, family history of PNET and other cancers, and personal history of diabetes as potential risk factors. Methods Patients with PNETs seen at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 2000 and 2011 were compared to controls seen for a general medical evaluation. Patients and controls completed the same questionnaires. After excluding insulinoma and high-grade PNETs, 355 cases were evaluated, and 309 were matched to 602 controls (2:1) on age, sex, and region of residence. Results Personal smoking history was not associated with PNETs. Alcohol use was less common among cases (54% vs. 67%, p<0.001). Cases were more likely to report a family member with sarcoma (p=0.02), PNET (p=0.02), gall bladder cancer (p=0.02), ovarian cancer (p=0.04) and gastric cancer (p=0.01). There was no association with other cancers in family members. Diabetes was more commonly reported by cases than controls (19% vs. 11%, p<0.001). Conclusions With the exception of diabetes, risk factors that are associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma are not risk factors for PNETs. PMID:25291526

  8. Sequential treatment in disseminated well- and intermediate-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: Common sense or low rationale?

    PubMed

    Grande, Enrique

    2016-04-10

    Fortunately, the landscape of the systemic treatment for grade 1 and 2 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors has changed in the last decade with at least four different alternatives approved in the field. Chemotherapy, somatostatin analogues, sunitinib and everolimus remind valid options according to the most referenced international guidelines. However, and although this is something done in the routine practice, there is a lack of evidence for the use of any of these strategies after failure to the others. Moreover, further sequential alternatives in third or fourth line have never been tested prospectively. The need for a better understanding of the rationale to sequence different systemic options is even greater in non-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors since available therapies are scarce. Sequential strategies in other solid tumors have led to a clear improvement in overall survival. This is also believed to occur in neuroendocrine tumors but no clear data on it has been delivered yet. We postulate that the different mode of action of the systemic options available for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors may avoid the complete resistance of one option after the other and that sequential use of these agents will be translated into a longer overall survival of patients. Prospective and randomized trials that seek for the activity of drugs after failure to another systemic alternatives are highly needed in this field of neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:27081637

  9. Sequential treatment in disseminated well- and intermediate-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: Common sense or low rationale?

    PubMed Central

    Grande, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Fortunately, the landscape of the systemic treatment for grade 1 and 2 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors has changed in the last decade with at least four different alternatives approved in the field. Chemotherapy, somatostatin analogues, sunitinib and everolimus remind valid options according to the most referenced international guidelines. However, and although this is something done in the routine practice, there is a lack of evidence for the use of any of these strategies after failure to the others. Moreover, further sequential alternatives in third or fourth line have never been tested prospectively. The need for a better understanding of the rationale to sequence different systemic options is even greater in non-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors since available therapies are scarce. Sequential strategies in other solid tumors have led to a clear improvement in overall survival. This is also believed to occur in neuroendocrine tumors but no clear data on it has been delivered yet. We postulate that the different mode of action of the systemic options available for the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors may avoid the complete resistance of one option after the other and that sequential use of these agents will be translated into a longer overall survival of patients. Prospective and randomized trials that seek for the activity of drugs after failure to another systemic alternatives are highly needed in this field of neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:27081637

  10. Future Directions in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal and Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Asmis, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the landscape of the diagnosis and treatment of patients with well-differentiated gastrointestinal/pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (previously referred to as carcinoid tumors) has changed dramatically. We will need to work with all of the stakeholders including clinicians, patients, regulatory agencies, and industry to best navigate future treatment and research. Future protocols will require us to define clinically relevant end points. In designing future clinical trials, we will need to determine which patients will be included in these studies. Future research will need to address the best way to image and follow patient's disease both in the clinic and on research studies. Timely access to new therapies will be the utmost importance to both current and future patients. We must work together to establish relevant clinical questions and to pursue collaborative research that promotes the health of our patients. PMID:27295530

  11. Diagnostic imaging of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNEN): tumor detection, staging, prognosis, and response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Baur, Alexander D J; Pavel, Marianne; Prasad, Vikas; Denecke, Timm

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNEN) are rare malignancies arising from neuroendocrine cells of the pancreas. Functional tumors can present with specific clinical syndromes due to hormonal secretion. These tumors can present as incidental findings on imaging performed for unrelated purposes or they are diagnosed when workup is initiated in patients with specific syndromes or metastases. This article presents an overview of available imaging techniques focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Recommendations regarding examination protocols are given. Typical imaging features of pNEN and metastases are described. Their potential value for the evaluation of prognosis as well as tumor response under treatment is discussed. PMID:25855665

  12. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-19

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  13. An Integrated Framework for Automatic Ki-67 Scoring in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fuyong; Su, Hai; Yang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    The Ki-67 labeling index is a valid and important biomarker to gauge neuroendocrine tumor cell progression. Automatic Ki-67 assessment is very challenging due to complex variations of cell characteristics. In this paper, we propose an integrated learning-based framework for accurate Ki-67 scoring in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. The main contributions of our method are: a novel and robust cell detection algorithm is designed to localize both tumor and non-tumor cells; a repulsive deformable model is applied to correct touching cell segmentation; a two stage learning-based scheme combining cellular features and regional structure information is proposed to differentiate tumor from non-tumor cells (such as lymphocytes); an integrated automatic framework is developed to accurately assess the Ki-67 labeling index. The proposed method has been extensively evaluated on 101 tissue microarray (TMA) whole discs, and the cell detection performance is comparable to manual annotations. The automatic Ki-67 score is very accurate compared with pathologists’ estimation. PMID:24505696

  14. Case Report of Cirrhosis following Yttrium-90 Radioembolization for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Loree, Jonathan M.; Hiruki, Tadaaki; Kennecke, Hagen F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Management options for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) metastatic to the liver include surgical, ablative, cytotoxic, and radioisotope approaches. One potential local treatment option includes selective internal radiotherapy utilizing yttrium-90 (90Y) microspheres. 90Y has also been used in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and tumors metastatic to the liver. It appears to be well tolerated; however, there is no randomized controlled trial reporting long-term toxicities. Previous retrospective reports have described biliary damage as a potential complication of therapy with 90Y and chemoembolization; however, the long-term sequelae of 90Y treatment are poorly understood. Case Presentation We present the case of a 65-year-old Caucasian woman who suffered biliary damage following 90Y administration for metastatic pNETs and subsequently developed cirrhosis. Given the timeline of her various treatments and the lack of any other identifiable etiology for her cirrhosis, we believe this to be a potential long-term complication of 90Y therapy. Conclusion This case provides pathologic confirmation of cirrhosis as a potential long-term sequela of 90Y treatment. This long-term risk needs to be considered when sequencing therapy for patients with neuroendocrine tumors who have a good prognosis. There are now several other systemic and ablative treatment options available to these patients, and long-term complications must be considered during treatment. PMID:26933423

  15. Therapy of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs): recent insights and advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) [carcinoids, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs)] are becoming an increasing clinical problem because not only are they increasing in frequency, but they can frequently present with advanced disease that requires diagnostic and treatment approaches different from those used in the neoplasms that most physicians are used to seeing and treating. In the past few years there have been numerous advances in all aspects of NETs including: an understanding of their unique pathogenesis; specific classification systems developed which have prognostic value; novel methods of tumor localization developed; and novel treatment approaches described. In patients with advanced metastatic disease these include the use of newer chemotherapeutic approaches, an increased understanding of the role of surgery and cytoreductive methods, the development of methods for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents, and the development of targeted medical therapies (everolimus, sunitinib) based on an increased understanding of the disease biology. Although pNETs and gastrointestinal NETs share many features, recent studies show they differ in pathogenesis and in many aspects of diagnosis and treatment, including their responsiveness to different therapies. Because of limited space, this review will be limited to the advances made in the management and treatment of patients with advanced metastatic pNETs over the past 5 years. PMID:22886480

  16. A thymic neuroendocrine tumour in a young female: a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Farah, G; Stokes, V J; Wang, L M; Grossman, A B

    2016-01-01

    Summary We present a case of a young female patient with a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion from a thymic neuroendocrine tumour. A 34-year-old female presented with a constellation of symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome, including facial swelling, muscle weakness and cognitive impairment. We use the terms ‘relapsing and remitting’ in this case report, given the unpredictable time course of symptoms, which led to a delay of 2 years before the correct diagnosis of hypercortisolaemia. Diagnostic workup confirmed ectopic ACTH secretion, and a thymic mass was seen on mediastinal imaging. The patient subsequently underwent thymectomy with complete resolution of her symptoms. Several case series have documented the association of Cushing’s syndrome with thymic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), although to our knowledge there are a few published cases of patients with relapsing and remitting symptoms. This case is also notable for the absence of features of the MEN-1 syndrome, along with the female gender of our patient and her history of non-smoking. Learning points Ectopic corticotrophin (ACTH) secretion should always be considered in the diagnostic workup of young patients with Cushing’s syndrome There is a small but growing body of literature describing the correlation between ectopic ACTH secretion and thymic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) The possibility of a MEN-1 syndrome should be considered in all patients with thymic NETs, and we note the observational association with male gender and cigarette smoking in this cohort An exception to these associations is the finding of relatively high incidence of thymic NETs among female non-smoking MEN-1 patients in the Japanese compared with Western populations The relapsing and remitting course of our patient’s symptoms is noteworthy, given the paucity of this finding among other published cases PMID:27252866

  17. Identification of tumorigenic cells and therapeutic targets in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Krampitz, Geoffrey Wayne; George, Benson M; Willingham, Stephen B; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Weiskopf, Kipp; Jahchan, Nadine; Newman, Aaron M; Sahoo, Debashis; Zemek, Allison J; Yanovsky, Rebecca L; Nguyen, Julia K; Schnorr, Peter J; Mazur, Pawel K; Sage, Julien; Longacre, Teri A; Visser, Brendan C; Poultsides, George A; Norton, Jeffrey A; Weissman, Irving L

    2016-04-19

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) are a type of pancreatic cancer with limited therapeutic options. Consequently, most patients with advanced disease die from tumor progression. Current evidence indicates that a subset of cancer cells is responsible for tumor development, metastasis, and recurrence, and targeting these tumor-initiating cells is necessary to eradicate tumors. However, tumor-initiating cells and the biological processes that promote pathogenesis remain largely uncharacterized in PanNETs. Here we profile primary and metastatic tumors from an index patient and demonstrate that MET proto-oncogene activation is important for tumor growth in PanNET xenograft models. We identify a highly tumorigenic cell population within several independent surgically acquired PanNETs characterized by increased cell-surface protein CD90 expression and aldehyde dehydrogenase A1 (ALDHA1) activity, and provide in vitro and in vivo evidence for their stem-like properties. We performed proteomic profiling of 332 antigens in two cell lines and four primary tumors, and showed that CD47, a cell-surface protein that acts as a "don't eat me" signal co-opted by cancers to evade innate immune surveillance, is ubiquitously expressed. Moreover, CD47 coexpresses with MET and is enriched in CD90(hi)cells. Furthermore, blocking CD47 signaling promotes engulfment of tumor cells by macrophages in vitro and inhibits xenograft tumor growth, prevents metastases, and prolongs survival in vivo. PMID:27035983

  18. PHLDA3 is a novel tumor suppressor of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Rieko; Saito, Kozue; Chen, Yu; Kawase, Tatsuya; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Saigawa, Raira; Minegishi, Maiko; Aita, Yukie; Yanai, Goichi; Shimizu, Hiroko; Yachida, Shinichi; Sakata, Naoaki; Doi, Ryuichiro; Kosuge, Tomoo; Shimada, Kazuaki; Tycko, Benjamin; Tsukada, Toshihiko; Kanai, Yae; Sumi, Shoichiro; Namiki, Hideo; Taya, Yoichi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2014-06-10

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the development of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) have not been well defined. We report here that the genomic region of the PHLDA3 gene undergoes loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at a remarkably high frequency in human PanNETs, and this genetic change is correlated with disease progression and poor prognosis. We also show that the PHLDA3 locus undergoes methylation in addition to LOH, suggesting that a two-hit inactivation of the PHLDA3 gene is required for PanNET development. We demonstrate that PHLDA3 represses Akt activity and Akt-regulated biological processes in pancreatic endocrine tissues, and that PHLDA3-deficient mice develop islet hyperplasia. In addition, we show that the tumor-suppressing pathway mediated by MEN1, a well-known tumor suppressor of PanNETs, is dependent on the pathway mediated by PHLDA3, and inactivation of PHLDA3 and MEN1 cooperatively contribute to PanNET development. Collectively, these results indicate the existence of a novel PHLDA3-mediated pathway of tumor suppression that is important in the development of PanNETs. PMID:24912192

  19. Gene Expression Analysis of the 26S Proteasome Subunit PSMB4 Reveals Significant Upregulation, Different Expression and Association with Proliferation in Human Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Mairinger, Fabian Dominik; Walter, Robert Fred Henry; Theegarten, Dirk; Hager, Thomas; Vollbrecht, Claudia; Christoph, Daniel Christian; Worm, Karl; Ting, Saskia; Werner, Robert; Stamatis, Georgios; Mairinger, Thomas; Baba, Hideo; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Schmid, Kurt Werner; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proteasomal subunit PSMB4 was suggested to be a survival gene in an animal model of hepatocellular carcinoma and in glioblastoma cell lines. In pulmonary adenocarcinoma, a high expression of these genes was found to be associated with poor differentiation and survival. This study investigates the gene expression levels of 26S proteasome subunits in human pulmonary neuroendocrine tumours including typical (TC) and atypical (AC) carcinoid tumours as well as small cell (SCLC) and large cell (LCNEC) neuroendocrine carcinomas. Material and methods: Gene expression levels of proteasomal subunits (PSMA1, PSMA5, PSMB4, PSMB5 and PSMD1) were investigated in 80 neuroendocrine pulmonary tumours (each 20 TC, AC, LCNLC and SCLC) and compared to controls. mRNA levels were determined by using TaqMan assays. Immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays (TMA) was performed to determine the expression of ki67, cleaved caspase 3 and PSMB4. Results: All proteasomal subunit gene expressions were significantly upregulated in TC, AC, SCLC and LCNEC compared to controls. PSMB4 mRNA is differently expressed between all neuroendocrine tumour subtypes demonstrating the highest expression and greatest range in LCNEC (p=0.043), and is significantly associated with proliferative activity (p=0.039). Conclusion: In line with other 26S proteasomal subunits PSMB4 is significantly increased, but differently expressed between pulmonary neuroendocrine tumours and is associated with the proliferative activity. Unlike in pulmonary adenocarcinomas, no association with biological behaviour was observed, suggesting that increased proteasomal subunit gene expression is a common and probably early event in the tumorigenesis of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumours regardless of their differentiation. PMID:25157275

  20. Well-Differentiated Grade 2, Type 3 Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumour with Bilateral Metastatic Ovarian Involvement: Report of an Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Manneh, Ray; Castellano, Daniel; Caso, Oscar; Loinaz, Carmelo; Jiménez, Jesús; Estenoz, Juana; Calatayud, Maria; Sepúlveda, Juan M.; García-Carbonero, Rocio

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of metastatic gastric neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) is challenging. In oligometastatic cases, surgical resection is recommended whenever possible. Somatostatin analogues have been used to decrease gastrin levels, and available evidence suggests that these drugs can also reduce recurrences. Here we present a highly unusual case involving a patient with a well-differentiated grade 2, type 3 gastric NET with exclusive metastatic bilateral ovarian involvement. To our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature, as the cause of ovarian involvement is usually due to local invasion rather than metastasis. We believe this case is of interest not only due to the unusual presentation, but also because it makes us consider adjuvant treatment with somatostatin analogues in patients with low-grade tumours and a positive postoperative octreoscan. PMID:27239181

  1. Metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor to the central nervous system in a patient with von Hippel-Lindau disease: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Crilly, Shane M; Sweeney, Kieron J; Farrell, Michael; Rawluk, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is frequently encountered in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) and uncommonly metastasizes to the central nervous system. Here, we present the case of a VHL patient with symptomatic pancreatic NET metastases to both the cervical spinal cord and a preexisting brainstem hemangioblastoma (e.g., tumor- to-tumor metastasis). PMID:25232806

  2. Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Paraganglioma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  3. Appropriateness of systemic treatments in unresectable metastatic well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, Jonathan R; Fisher, George A; Benson, Al B; Anthony, Lowell B; Arslan, Bulent; Gibbs, John F; Greeno, Edward; Iyer, Renuka V; Kim, Michelle K; Maples, William J; Philip, Philip A; Wolin, Edward M; Cherepanov, Dasha; Broder, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate systemic treatment choices in unresectable metastatic well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) and provide consensus treatment recommendations. METHODS: Systemic treatment options for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors have expanded in recent years to include somatostatin analogs, angiogenesis inhibitors, inhibitors of mammalian target of rapamycin and cytotoxic agents. At this time, there is little data to guide treatment selection and sequence. We therefore assembled a panel of expert physicians to evaluate systemic treatment choices and provide consensus treatment recommendations. Treatment appropriateness ratings were collected using the RAND/UCLA modified Delphi process. After studying the literature, a multidisciplinary panel of 10 physicians assessed the appropriateness of various medical treatment scenarios on a 1-9 scale. Ratings were done both before and after an extended discussion of the evidence. Quantitative measurements of agreement were made and consensus statements developed from the second round ratings. RESULTS: Specialties represented were medical and surgical oncology, interventional radiology, and gastroenterology. Panelists had practiced for a mean of 15.5 years (range: 6-33). Among 202 rated scenarios, disagreement decreased from 13.2% (26 scenarios) before the face-to-face discussion of evidence to 1% (2) after. In the final ratings, 46.5% (94 scenarios) were rated inappropriate, 21.8% (44) were uncertain, and 30.7% (62) were appropriate. Consensus statements from the scenarios included: (1) it is appropriate to use somatostatin analogs as first line therapy in patients with hormonally functional tumors and may be appropriate in patients who are asymptomatic; (2) it is appropriate to use everolimus, sunitinib, or cytotoxic chemotherapy therapy as first line therapy in patients with symptomatic or progressive tumors; and (3) beyond first line, these same agents can be used. In patients with uncontrolled

  4. Pasireotide and octreotide antiproliferative effects and sst2 trafficking in human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cultures.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Amira; Blanchard, Marie-Pierre; Albertelli, Manuela; Barbieri, Federica; Brue, Thierry; Niccoli, Patricia; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Monges, Genevieve; Garcia, Stephane; Ferone, Diego; Florio, Tullio; Enjalbert, Alain; Moutardier, Vincent; Schonbrunn, Agnes; Gerard, Corinne; Barlier, Anne; Saveanu, Alexandru

    2014-10-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) raise difficult therapeutic problems despite the emergence of targeted therapies. Somatostatin analogs (SSA) remain pivotal therapeutic drugs. However, the tachyphylaxis and the limited antitumoral effects observed with the classical somatostatin 2 (sst2) agonists (octreotide and lanreotide) led to the development of new SSA, such as the pan sst receptor agonist pasireotide. Our aim was to compare the effects of pasireotide and octreotide on cell survival, chromogranin A (CgA) secretion, and sst2 phosphorylation/trafficking in pancreatic NET (pNET) primary cells from 15 tumors. We established and characterized the primary cultures of human pancreatic tumors (pNETs) as powerful preclinical models for understanding the biological effects of SSA. At clinically relevant concentrations (1-10 nM), pasireotide was at least as efficient as octreotide in inhibiting CgA secretion and cell viability through caspase-dependent apoptosis during short treatments, irrespective of the expression levels of the different sst receptors or the WHO grade of the parental tumor. Interestingly, unlike octreotide, which induces a rapid and persistent partial internalization of sst2 associated with its phosphorylation on Ser341/343, pasireotide did not phosphorylate sst2 and induced a rapid and transient internalization of the receptor followed by a persistent recycling at the cell surface. These results provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of striking differences in the dynamics of sst2 trafficking in pNET cells treated with the two SSAs, but with similar efficiency in the control of CgA secretion and cell viability. PMID:25012983

  5. [Treatment Strategy for Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (P-NETs) at Kurume University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Hisaka, Toru; Okuda, Kouji; Akagi, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (P-NETs) are relatively rare. Approximately 50-90% of non-functioning P-NETs are malignant, and the only curative treatment is surgical resection. Liver and lymph node metastases often occur. In Japan, the mTOR inhibitor everolimus is now covered by the national health insurance for treatment of P-NETs, including advanced and unresectable tumors. We present a case of P-NETs with liver metastases seen at our hospital and discuss our treatment strategy for this disease. Patients with tumors≤1 cm receive follow-up observation. For G1 and G2 (other than G3) tumors, if their size is >1 cm when first discovered, resection of the primary lesion along with lymph node dissection (as for pancreatic cancer) is performed. In G1 and G2 tumors with synchronous distant metastases, the primary lesion is first resected, and depending on the pathological findings, chemotherapy (LAR plus everolimus) may be administered. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, the response is assessed, and if further resection is possible, resection is performed. When there are synchronous liver metastases, if partial resection and local treatment (such as RFA) are possible, the primary lesion and synchronous lesions are resected. If a major hepatic resection procedure such as a segmentectomy or lobectomy is possible, the primary lesion is resected, followed by chemotherapy. After 4 courses of chemotherapy, the response is assessed, and if further resection is possible, hepatic resection is performed. G3 tumors are usually highly malignant, advanced, and often associated with metastases at the time of diagnosis. Chemotherapy may be an option for treating patients with G3 tumors. PMID:26809536

  6. Analysis of potential response predictors to capecitabine/temozolomide in metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Cives, M; Ghayouri, M; Morse, B; Brelsford, M; Black, M; Rizzo, A; Meeker, A; Strosberg, J

    2016-09-01

    The capecitabine and temozolomide (CAPTEM) regimen is active in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs), with response rates ranging from 30 to 70%. Small retrospective studies suggest that O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) deficiency predicts response to temozolomide. High tumor proliferative activity is also commonly perceived as a significant predictor of response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. It is unclear whether chromosomal instability (CIN), which correlates with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), is a predictive factor. In this study, we evaluated 143 patients with advanced pNET who underwent treatment with CAPTEM for radiographic and biochemical response. MGMT expression (n=52), grade (n=128) and ALT activation (n=46) were investigated as potential predictive biomarkers. Treatment with CAPTEM was associated with an overall response rate (ORR) of 54% by RECIST 1.1. Response to CAPTEM was not influenced by MGMT expression, proliferative activity or ALT pathway activation. Based on these results, no biomarker-driven selection criteria for use of the CAPTEM regimen can be recommended at this time. PMID:27552969

  7. Polymorphic genetic control of tumor invasion in a mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chun, Matthew G H; Mao, Jian-Hua; Chiu, Christopher W; Balmain, Allan; Hanahan, Douglas

    2010-10-01

    Cancer is a disease subject to both genetic and environmental influences. In this study, we used the RIP1-Tag2 (RT2) mouse model of islet cell carcinogenesis to identify a genetic locus that influences tumor progression to an invasive growth state. RT2 mice inbred into the C57BL/6 (B6) background develop both noninvasive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) and invasive carcinomas with varying degrees of aggressiveness. In contrast, RT2 mice inbred into the C3HeB/Fe (C3H) background are comparatively resistant to the development of invasive tumors, as are RT2 C3HB6(F1) hybrid mice. Using linkage analysis, we identified a 13-Mb locus on mouse chromosome 17 with significant linkage to the development of highly invasive PNETs. A gene residing in this locus, the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk), was expressed at significantly lower levels in PNETs from invasion-resistant C3H mice compared with invasion-susceptible B6 mice, and pharmacological inhibition of Alk led to reduced tumor invasiveness in RT2 B6 mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate that tumor invasion is subject to polymorphic genetic control and identify Alk as a genetic modifier of invasive tumor growth. PMID:20855625

  8. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with transformation to insulinoma: an unusual presentation of a rare disease

    PubMed Central

    Grozinsky-Glasberg, Simona; Salmon, Asher; Gross, David J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Approximately 35% of the pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are functional, the most common of which is an insulinoma. Rarely can initially nonfunctioning tumor undergo biological transformation to a hormone-secreting tumor with subsequent changes in the clinical picture. We present here three unique patients with long-standing pNETs who developed life-threatening hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia along with tumor progression. In two of the patients, everolimus (Afinitor) was administered in an attempt to control both tumor growth and hypoglycemia. In two cases everolimus therapy resulted in the abolishment of hypoglycemia and induced significant tumor regression; however these beneficial responses were transient. These cases highlight the exceptional ability of pNETs to change biological behavior in parallel with disease progression. Our experience concurs with recently published studies demonstrating the utility of everolimus for the control of both hypoglycemia and tumor progression. Learning points Nonfunctional pNET can gain new features such as insulin secretion with related morbidity.Gain of function in a previously nonfunctional pNET signifies tumor progression and is usually associated with poor prognosis.Everolimus proved to be a viable treatment for hypoglycemia in insulinoma patients and was also proven highly effective in the patients presented here.As disease progresses, the effect of everolimus on hypoglycemia wanes. We report for the first time the development of hypoglycemia during everolimus treatment. PMID:26113980

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound guided radiofrequency ablation, for pancreatic cystic neoplasms and neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Madhava; Habib, Nagy; Senturk, Hakan; Lakhtakia, Sundeep; Reddy, Nageshwar; Cicinnati, Vito R; Kaba, Iyad; Beckebaum, Susanne; Drymousis, Panagiotis; Kahaleh, Michel; Brugge, William

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To outline the feasibility, safety, adverse events and early results of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in pancreatic neoplasms using a novel probe. METHODS: This is a multi-center, pilot safety feasibility study. The intervention described was radiofrequency ablation (RF) which was applied with an innovative monopolar RF probe (1.2 mm Habib EUS-RFA catheter) placed through a 19 or 22 gauge fine needle aspiration (FNA) needle once FNA was performed in patients with a tumor in the head of the pancreas. The Habib™ EUS-RFA is a 1 Fr wire (0.33 mm, 0.013”) with a working length of 190 cm, which can be inserted through the biopsy channel of an echoendoscope. RF power is applied to the electrode at the end of the wire to coagulate tissue in the liver and pancreas. RESULTS: Eight patients [median age of 65 (range 27-82) years; 7 female and 1 male] were recruited in a prospective multicenter trial. Six had a pancreatic cystic neoplasm (four a mucinous cyst, one had intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and one a microcystic adenoma) and two had a neuroendocrine tumors (NET) in the head of pancreas. The mean size of the cystic neoplasm and NET were 36.5 mm (SD ± 17.9 mm) and 27.5 mm (SD ± 17.7 mm) respectively. The EUS-RFA was successfully completed in all cases. Among the 6 patients with a cystic neoplasm, post procedure imaging in 3-6 mo showed complete resolution of the cysts in 2 cases, whilst in three more there was a 48.4% reduction [mean pre RF 38.8 mm (SD ± 21.7 mm) vs mean post RF 20 mm (SD ± 17.1 mm)] in size. In regards to the NET patients, there was a change in vascularity and central necrosis after EUS-RFA. No major complications were observed within 48 h of the procedure. Two patients had mild abdominal pain that resolved within 3 d. CONCLUSION: EUS-RFA of pancreatic neoplasms with a novel monopolar RF probe was well tolerated in all cases. Our preliminary data suggest that the procedure is straightforward and safe. The

  10. A case of primary pancreatic non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma mimicking autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Anderloni, Andrea; Genco, Chiara; Ballarè, Marco; Carmagnola, Stefania; Battista, Serena; Repici, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Non Hodgkin lymphoma frequently involves the gastrointestinal tract, in particular the stomach and the small bowel. Rarely, it can also be a cause of pancreatic masses. Clinical presentation is often non-specific and may overlap with other pancreatic conditions such as carcinoma, neuroendocrine tumours and autoimmune pancreatitis. We report a case of primary pancreatic lymphoma in a young woman with jaundice, fever and abdominal pain mimicking autoimmune pancreatitis. Clinical evaluation included the abdominal Computed Tomography scan, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that revealed a large duodenal mass. Endoscopic biopsies were performed and eventually histological examination was coherent with a diagnosis of primary pancreatic lymphoma. PMID:26114186

  11. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy for Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumour Liver Metastases: A New and Effective Modality for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rajekar, Harshal; Bogammana, Kashan; Stubbs, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Nonresectable neuroendocrine tumour (NET) liver metastases respond poorly to most widely available and used therapies. Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is becoming recognized as a new modality for selectively treating non-resectable liver tumours. This paper presents an experience of 14 patients with non-resectable NET liver metastases treated with SIRT. Methods. Between September 1997 and October 2009 14 patients with extensive NET liver metastases were treated with 2.0 to 3.0 GBq of 90Yttrium microspheres. Repeat SIRT was undertaken in three patients after 16, 27, and 48 months, respectively. Responses were assessed clinically, biochemically, and with serial CT scans. Survival was measured from initial SIRT. Results. Some response was seen in all 14 patients. Carcinoid syndrome improved or resolved in 10/10 instances. 24-hour urinary 5-HIAA or serum chromogranin A levels fell dramatically in 5/7 patients following SIRT. Serial CT scans revealed partial response or stable disease in all 14 patients. Repeat treatment in three patients experiencing progression was associated with a further response. Median survival after SIRT is 25 months with 6 patients being alive (and 3 patients still asymptomatic), at 19, 22, 23, 23, 58, and 60 months. Conclusions. SIRT is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for non-resectable NET liver metastases capable of both alleviating the carcinoid syndrome and achieving significant tumour regression. Repeat treatment is an option and liver resection after downstaging may also become possible. PMID:22164335

  12. p53 status determines the role of autophagy in pancreatic tumour development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeldt, Mathias T.; O'Prey, Jim; Morton, Jennifer P.; Nixon, Colin; Mackay, Gillian; Mrowinska, Agata; Au, Amy; Rai, Taranjit Singh; Zheng, Liang; Ridgway, Rachel; Adams, Peter D.; Anderson, Kurt I.; Gottlieb, Eyal; Sansom, Owen J.; Ryan, Kevin M.

    2013-12-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as autophagy) is a process in which organelles termed autophagosomes deliver cytoplasmic constituents to lysosomes for degradation. Autophagy has a major role in cellular homeostasis and has been implicated in various forms of human disease. The role of autophagy in cancer seems to be complex, with reports indicating both pro-tumorigenic and tumour-suppressive roles. Here we show, in a humanized genetically-modified mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), that autophagy's role in tumour development is intrinsically connected to the status of the tumour suppressor p53. Mice with pancreases containing an activated oncogenic allele of Kras (also called Ki-Ras)--the most common mutational event in PDAC--develop a small number of pre-cancerous lesions that stochastically develop into PDAC over time. However, mice also lacking the essential autophagy genes Atg5 or Atg7 accumulate low-grade, pre-malignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia lesions, but progression to high-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias and PDAC is blocked. In marked contrast, in mice containing oncogenic Kras and lacking p53, loss of autophagy no longer blocks tumour progression, but actually accelerates tumour onset, with metabolic analysis revealing enhanced glucose uptake and enrichment of anabolic pathways, which can fuel tumour growth. These findings provide considerable insight into the role of autophagy in cancer and have important implications for autophagy inhibition in cancer therapy. In this regard, we also show that treatment of mice with the autophagy inhibitor hydroxychloroquine, which is currently being used in several clinical trials, significantly accelerates tumour formation in mice containing oncogenic Kras but lacking p53.

  13. Transformation of the tumour microenvironment by a CD40 agonist antibody correlates with improved responses to PD-L1 blockade in a mouse orthotopic pancreatic tumour model

    PubMed Central

    Mullins, Stefanie; Sulikowski, Michal G.; Martin, Philip; Brown, Lee; Lewis, Arthur; Davies, Gareth; Morrow, Michelle; Wilkinson, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of recently developed chemotherapy regimens, survival times for pancreatic cancer patients remain poor. These patients also respond poorly to immune checkpoint blockade therapies (anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-L1, anti-PD-1), which suggests the presence of additional immunosuppressive mechanisms in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment (TME). CD40 agonist antibodies (αCD40) promote antigen presenting cell (APC) maturation and enhance macrophage tumouricidal activity, and may therefore alter the pancreatic TME to increase sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade. Here, we test whether αCD40 transforms the TME in a mouse syngeneic orthotopic model of pancreatic cancer, to increase sensitivity to PD-L1 blockade. We found that whilst mice bearing orthotopic Pan02 tumours responded poorly to PD-L1 blockade, αCD40 improved overall survival. αCD40 transformed the TME, upregulating Th1 chemokines, increasing cytotoxic T cell infiltration and promoting formation of an immune cell-rich capsule separating the tumour from the normal pancreas. Furthermore, αCD40 drove systemic APC maturation, memory T cell expansion, and upregulated tumour and systemic PD-L1 expression. Combining αCD40 with PD-L1 blockade enhanced anti-tumour immunity and improved overall survival versus either monotherapy. These data provide further support for the potential of combining αCD40 with immune checkpoint blockade to promote anti-tumour immunity in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26918344

  14. NOTE: Image analysis can be used to detect spatial changes in the histopathology of pancreatic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, A. J.; Bennett, M. K.; Murray, A.

    2003-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is frequently associated with intense growth of fibrous tissue at the periphery of tumours, but the histopathological quantification of this stromal reaction has not yet been used as a prognostic factor because of the difficulty of obtaining quantitative measures using manual methods. Manual histological grading is a poor indicator of outcome in this type of cancer and there is a clinical need to establish a more sensitive indicator. Recent pancreatic tumour biology research has focused upon the stromal reaction and there is an indication that its histopathological quantification may lead to a new prognostic indicator. Histological samples from 21 cases of pancreatic carcinoma were stained using the sirius red, light-green method. Multiple images from the centre and periphery of each tumour were automatically segmented using colour cluster analysis to subdivide each image into representative colours. These were classified manually as stroma, cell cytoplasm or lumen in order to measure the area of each component in each image. Measured areas were analysed to determine whether the technique could detect spatial differences in the area of each tissue component over all samples, and within individual samples. Over all 21 cases, the area of stromal tissue at the periphery of the tumours exceeded that at the centre by an average of 10.0 percentage points (P < 0.001). Within individual tumours, the algorithm was able to detect significantly more stroma (P < 0.05) at the periphery than the centre in 11 cases, whilst none of the remaining cases had significantly more stromal tissue at the centre than the periphery. The results demonstrate that semi-automated analysis can be used to detect spatial differences in the area of fibrous tissue in routinely stained sections of pancreatic cancer.

  15. Functional malignant cell heterogeneity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors revealed by targeting of PDGF-DD

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Eliane; Gladh, Hanna; Braun, Sebastian; Bocci, Matteo; Cordero, Eugenia; Björkström, Niklas K.; Miyazaki, Hideki; Michael, Iacovos P.; Eriksson, Ulf; Folestad, Erika; Pietras, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most human cancers and has profound implications for cancer therapy. As a result, there is an emergent need to explore previously unmapped mechanisms regulating distinct subpopulations of tumor cells and to understand their contribution to tumor progression and treatment response. Aberrant platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) signaling in cancer has motivated the development of several antagonists currently in clinical use, including imatinib, sunitinib, and sorafenib. The discovery of a novel ligand for PDGFRβ, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-DD, opened the possibility of a previously unidentified signaling pathway involved in tumor development. However, the precise function of PDGF-DD in tumor growth and invasion remains elusive. Here, making use of a newly generated Pdgfd knockout mouse, we reveal a functionally important malignant cell heterogeneity modulated by PDGF-DD signaling in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET). Our analyses demonstrate that tumor growth was delayed in the absence of signaling by PDGF-DD. Surprisingly, ablation of PDGF-DD did not affect the vasculature or stroma of PanNET; instead, we found that PDGF-DD stimulated bulk tumor cell proliferation by induction of paracrine mitogenic signaling between heterogeneous malignant cell clones, some of which expressed PDGFRβ. The presence of a subclonal population of tumor cells characterized by PDGFRβ expression was further validated in a cohort of human PanNET. In conclusion, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized heterogeneity in PanNET characterized by signaling through the PDGF-DD/PDGFRβ axis. PMID:26831065

  16. Heterogeneity for IGF-II production maintained by public goods dynamics in neuroendocrine pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Archetti, Marco; Ferraro, Daniela A.; Christofori, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The extensive intratumor heterogeneity revealed by sequencing cancer genomes is an essential determinant of tumor progression, diagnosis, and treatment. What maintains heterogeneity remains an open question because competition within a tumor leads to a strong selection for the fittest subclone. Cancer cells also cooperate by sharing molecules with paracrine effects, such as growth factors, and heterogeneity can be maintained if subclones depend on each other for survival. Without strict interdependence between subclones, however, nonproducer cells can free-ride on the growth factors produced by neighboring producer cells, a collective action problem known in game theory as the “tragedy of the commons,” which has been observed in microbial cell populations. Here, we report that similar dynamics occur in cancer cell populations. Neuroendocrine pancreatic cancer (insulinoma) cells that do not produce insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) grow slowly in pure cultures but have a proliferation advantage in mixed cultures, where they can use the IGF-II provided by producer cells. We show that, as predicted by evolutionary game theory, producer cells do not go extinct because IGF-II acts as a nonlinear public good, creating negative frequency-dependent selection that leads to a stable coexistence of the two cell types. Intratumor cell heterogeneity can therefore be maintained even without strict interdependence between cell subclones. Reducing the amount of growth factors available within a tumor may lead to a reduction in growth followed by a new equilibrium, which may explain relapse in therapies that target growth factors. PMID:25624490

  17. Impact and Clinical Predictors of Lymph Node Metastases in Nonfunctional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Jin, Jia-Bin; Zhan, Qian; Deng, Xia-Xing; Shen, Bai-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background: The optimal surgical management of nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NF-PNETs) is still controversial. Here, we evaluated the impact of lymph node status on postoperative recurrence in patients with NF-PNET and the potential of preoperative variables for predicting lymph node metastasis (LNM). Methods: In this mono-institutional retrospective cohort study conducted in 100 consecutive patients who underwent NF-PNET resection between January 2004 and December 2014, we evaluated risk factors for survival using the Kaplan–Meier method and the Cox regression model. Predictors of LNM were evaluated using the logistic regression model, and the power of predictive models was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Results: Five-year disease-free survival of resected NF-PNET was 64.1%. LNM was independently associated with postoperative recurrence (hazard ratio = 3.995, P = 0.003). Multivariate analysis revealed tumor grade as an independent factor associated with LNM (G2 vs. G1: odds ratio [OR] =6.287, P = 0.008; G3 vs. G1: OR = 12.407, P = 0.001). When tumor grade was excluded, radiological tumor diameter >2.5 cm (OR = 5.430, P = 0.013) and presence of symptoms (OR = 3.366, P = 0.039) were significantly associated with LNM. Compared to neoplasms with radiological diameter >2.5 cm (32.1%), tumors ≤2.5 cm had an obviously lower risk of LNM (7.7%), indicating the reliability of this parameter in predicting LNM (area under the curve, 0.693). Incidentally discovered NF-PNETs ≤2.5 cm were associated with a low-risk of LNM and excellent survival. Conclusions: LNM is significantly associated with postoperative recurrence. Radiological tumor diameter is a reliable predictor of LNM in NF-PNETs. Our results indicate that lymphadenectomy in small (≤2.5 cm) NF-PNETs is not routinely necessary. PMID:26668149

  18. Everolimus in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: latest findings and interpretations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Eric; Marincola, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with various clinical presentations. More than half of patients present with so-called nonfunctioning tumors with no hormone-related symptoms, whereas other tumors produce symptoms like gastric problems, ulcers, hypoglycemia, skin rash and diarrhea related to hormone production. The traditional treatment for pNETs over the last three decades has been cytotoxic agents, mainly streptozotocin plus 5-fluorouracil or doxorubicin. Most recently two new compounds have been registered worldwide for the treatment of pNETs, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor everolimus and the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib. This paper concentrates on the use of mTOR inhibitors and the mechanisms of action. The mTOR pathway is altered in a number of pNETs. Everolimus (RAD001) is an orally active rapamycin analog and mTOR inhibitor. It blocks activity of the mTOR pathway by binding with high affinity to the cytoplasmic protein FKBP-12. The efficacy of everolimus in pNETs has been demonstrated in two multicenter studies (RADIANT 1 and 3). The RADIANT 3 study was a randomized controlled study in pNETs of everolimus 10 mg/day versus placebo, showing an increased progression-free survival (11.7 months versus 4.6 months) and hazard ratio of 0.35 (p < 0.001). Current studies indicate that there is strong evidence to support the antitumor effect of rapalogs in pNETs. However, significant tumor reduction is very rarely obtained, usually in less than 10% of treated patients. Therefore, these drugs may be more effective in combination with other anticancer agents, including chemotherapy, targeted therapies as well as peptide receptor radiotherapy. PMID:24003341

  19. Clinical implications of genomic alterations in the tumour and circulation of pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Sausen, Mark; Phallen, Jillian; Adleff, Vilmos; Jones, Siân; Leary, Rebecca J; Barrett, Michael T; Anagnostou, Valsamo; Parpart-Li, Sonya; Murphy, Derek; Kay Li, Qing; Hruban, Carolyn A; Scharpf, Rob; White, James R; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Allen, Peter J; Eshleman, James R; Thompson, Craig B; Klimstra, David S; Linehan, David C; Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H; Diaz, Luis A; Von Hoff, Daniel D; Johansen, Julia S; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Velculescu, Victor E

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has the worst mortality of any solid cancer. In this study, to evaluate the clinical implications of genomic alterations in this tumour type, we perform whole-exome analyses of 24 tumours, targeted genomic analyses of 77 tumours, and use non-invasive approaches to examine tumour-specific mutations in the circulation of these patients. These analyses reveal somatic mutations in chromatin-regulating genes MLL, MLL2, MLL3 and ARID1A in 20% of patients that are associated with improved survival. We observe alterations in genes with potential therapeutic utility in over a third of cases. Liquid biopsy analyses demonstrate that 43% of patients with localized disease have detectable circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) at diagnosis. Detection of ctDNA after resection predicts clinical relapse and poor outcome, with recurrence by ctDNA detected 6.5 months earlier than with CT imaging. These observations provide genetic predictors of outcome in pancreatic cancer and have implications for new avenues of therapeutic intervention. PMID:26154128

  20. Clinical implications of genomic alterations in the tumour and circulation of pancreatic cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Sausen, Mark; Phallen, Jillian; Adleff, Vilmos; Jones, Siân; Leary, Rebecca J.; Barrett, Michael T.; Anagnostou, Valsamo; Parpart-Li, Sonya; Murphy, Derek; Li, Qing Kay; Hruban, Carolyn A.; Scharpf, Rob; White, James R.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Allen, Peter J.; Eshleman, James R.; Thompson, Craig B.; Klimstra, David S.; Linehan, David C.; Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.; Diaz, Luis A.; Von Hoff, Daniel D.; Johansen, Julia S.; Drebin, Jeffrey A.; Velculescu, Victor E.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma has the worst mortality of any solid cancer. In this study, to evaluate the clinical implications of genomic alterations in this tumour type, we perform whole-exome analyses of 24 tumours, targeted genomic analyses of 77 tumours, and use non-invasive approaches to examine tumour-specific mutations in the circulation of these patients. These analyses reveal somatic mutations in chromatin-regulating genes MLL, MLL2, MLL3 and ARID1A in 20% of patients that are associated with improved survival. We observe alterations in genes with potential therapeutic utility in over a third of cases. Liquid biopsy analyses demonstrate that 43% of patients with localized disease have detectable circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) at diagnosis. Detection of ctDNA after resection predicts clinical relapse and poor outcome, with recurrence by ctDNA detected 6.5 months earlier than with CT imaging. These observations provide genetic predictors of outcome in pancreatic cancer and have implications for new avenues of therapeutic intervention. PMID:26154128

  1. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  2. Early Response to Everolimus Therapy Detected on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in a Patient With Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Elgin; Soydal, Cigdem; Ucak Semirgin, Sibel; Yapici, Oktay; Atmaca, Aysegul; Demirag, Guzin

    2016-07-01

    Everolimus is a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor that has been recently approved for the treatment of patients with advanced progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. Here, we present a case in which an early therapy response to everolimus was effectively demonstrated by Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT. PMID:27163457

  3. Immunohistochemical analysis of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Vivian; Dueber, Julie; Wright, Jesse P; Cates, Justin; Revetta, Frank; Parikh, Alexander A; Merchant, Nipun B; Shi, Chanjuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). METHODS Tissue microarrays containing 88 PanNENs were immunohistochemically labeled with antibodies to β-catenin, E-cadherin, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), chromogranin and synaptophysin. One case had only metastatic tumors resected, whereas others (n = 87) received pancreatectomy with or without partial hepatectomy. Pathology slides, demographic, clinicopathologic, and follow up data were reviewed. Patients’ demographics, clinicopathologic features, and immunohistochemical results from 87 primary tumors were compared between patients with low stage (stage I/II) and high stage (stage III/IV) tumors. In addition, correlation of immunohistochemical results from primary tumors with disease-specific survival (DSS) was evaluated. RESULTS Strong membranous β-catenin staining in the primary tumor was observed in all 13 stage III/IV PanNENs as compared to 47% (35/74) of stage I/II tumors (P < 0.01). However, the strong membranous β-catenin staining was unassociated with tumor grade or DSS. Decreased membranous β-catenin staining was associated with decreased membranous E-cadherin labeling. Nuclear β-catenin staining was seen in 15% (2/13) of stage III/IV PanNENs as compared to 0% (0/74) of stage I/II tumors (P = 0.02). The case with metastasectomy only also showed nuclear β-catenin staining. Two of the three cases with nuclear β-catenin staining were familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients. Lack of APC expression was seen in 70% (57/81) of the cases, including the 3 cases with nuclear β-catenin staining. Expression of E-cadherin and APC in primary tumor was not correlated with tumor grade, tumor stage, or disease specific survival. CONCLUSION The Wnt/β-catenin pathway was altered in some PanNENs, but did not Impact DSS. PanNENs in FAP patients demonstrated nuclear β-catenin accumulation and loss of APC. PMID:27574554

  4. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors With Involved Surgical Margins: Prognostic Factors and the Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Willett, Christopher G.; Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos; Ryan, David P.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S.; Deshpande, Vikram; Niemierko, Andrzej; Allen, Jill N.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Wadlow, Raymond C.; Zhu, Andrew X.; Warshaw, Andrew L.; Hong, Theodore S.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) are rare neoplasms associated with poor outcomes without resection, and involved surgical margins are associated with a worse prognosis. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in these patients has not been characterized. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated 46 consecutive patients with positive or close (<1 mm) margins after pNET resection, treated from 1983 to 2010, 16 of whom received adjuvant RT. Median RT dose was 50.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions; half the patients received concurrent chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil or capecitabine. No patients received adjuvant chemotherapy. Cox multivariate analysis (MVA) was used to analyze factors associated with overall survival (OS). Results: Median age at diagnosis was 56 years, and 52% of patients were female. Median tumor size was 38 mm, 57% of patients were node-positive, and 11% had a resected solitary liver metastasis. Patients who received RT were more likely to have larger tumors (median, 54 mm vs. 30 mm, respectively, p = 0.002) and node positivity (81% vs. 33%, respectively, p = 0.002) than those not receiving RT. Median follow-up was 39 months. Actuarial 5-year OS was 62% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41%-77%). In the group that did not receive RT, 3 patients (10%) experienced local recurrence (LR) and 5 patients (18%) developed new distant metastases, while in the RT group, 1 patient (6%) experienced LR and 5 patients (38%) developed distant metastases. Of all recurrences, 29% were LR. On MVA, male gender (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 3.81; 95% CI, 1.21-11.92; p = 0.02) and increasing tumor size (AHR = 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04; p = 0.007) were associated with decreased OS. Conclusions: Long-term survival is common among patients with involved-margin pNET. Despite significantly worse pathologic features among patients receiving adjuvant RT, rates of LR between groups were similar, suggesting that RT might aid local control, and merits further

  5. Applications of a novel tumor-grading-metastasis staging system for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Tan, Chun-Lu; Zhang, Yi; Ke, Neng-Wen; Zeng, Lin; Li, Ang; Zhang, Hao; Xiong, Jun-Jie; Guo, Zi-Heng; Tian, Bo-Le; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ability to stratify patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into prognostic groups has been hindered by the absence of a commonly accepted staging system. Both the 7th tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging guidelines by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the 2010 grading classifications by the World Health Organization (WHO) were validated to be unsatisfactory. We aim to evaluate the feasibility of combining the latest AJCC and WHO criteria to devise a novel tumor-grading-metastasis (TGM) staging system. We also sought to examine the stage-specific survival rates and the prognostic value of this new TGM system for p-NETs. Data of 120 patients with surgical resection and histopathological diagnosis of p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Based on the AJCC and WHO criteria, we replaced the stage N0 and N1 with stage Ga (NET G1 and NET G2) and Gb (NET G3 and MANEC) respectively, without changes of the definition of T or M stage. The present novel TGM staging system was grouped as follows: stage I was defined as T1–2, Ga, M0; stage II as T3, Ga, M0 or as T1–3, Gb, M0; stage III as T4, Ga–b, M0 and stage IV as any T, M1. The new TGM staging system successfully distributed 55, 42, 12, and 11 eligible patients in stage I to IV, respectively. Differences of survival compared stage I with III and IV for patients with p-NETs were both statistically significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001). Patients in stage I showed better a survival than those in stage II, whereas difference between stages III and IV was not notable (P = 0.001, P = 0.286, respectively). In multivariate models, when the TGM staging system was evaluated in place of the individual T, G, and M variables, this new criteria were proven to be an independent predictor of survival for surgically resected p-NETs (P < 0.05). Stratifying patients well

  6. Autophagy mediates survival of pancreatic tumour-initiating cells in a hypoxic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Vanessa; Liu, Li; Apel, Anja; Rettig, Theresa; Gladkich, Jury; Labsch, Sabrina; Kallifatidis, Georgios; Kaczorowski, Adam; Groth, Ariane; Gross, Wolfgang; Gebhard, Martha M; Schemmer, Peter; Werner, Jens; Salnikov, Alexei V; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Büchler, Markus W; Herr, Ingrid

    2012-07-01

    Involvement of dysregulated autophagy in cancer growth and progression has been shown in different tumour entities, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). PDA is an extremely aggressive tumour characterized by a small population of highly therapy-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) capable of self-renewal and migration. We examined whether autophagy might be involved in the survival of CSCs despite nutrition and oxygen deprivation typical for the hypoxic tumour microenvironment of PDA. Immunohistochemistry revealed that markers for hypoxia, CSCs and autophagy are co-expressed in patient-derived tissue of PDA. Hypoxia starvation (H/S) enhanced clonogenic survival and migration of established pancreatic cancer cells with stem-like properties (CSC(high)), while pancreatic tumour cells with fewer stem cell markers (CSC(low)) did not survive these conditions. Electron microscopy revealed more advanced autophagic vesicles in CSC(high) cells, which exhibited higher expression of autophagy-related genes under normoxic conditions and relative to CSC(low) cells, as found by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. LC3 was already fully converted to the active LC3-II form in both cell lines, as evaluated by western blot and detection of accumulated GFP-LC3 protein by fluorescence microscopy. H/S increased formation of autophagic and acid vesicles, as well as expression of autophagy-related genes, to a higher extent in CSC(high) cells. Modulation of autophagy by inhibitors and activators resensitized CSC(high) to apoptosis and diminished clonogenicity, spheroid formation, expression of CSC-related genes, migratory activity and tumourigenicity in mice. Our data suggest that enhanced autophagy levels may enable survival of CSC(high) cells under H/S. Interference with autophagy-activating or -inhibiting drugs disturbs the fine-tuned physiological balance of enhanced autophagy in CSC and switches survival signalling to suicide. PMID:22262369

  7. Pancreatic polypeptide: a review of its involvement in neuro-endocrine reflexes, islet-acinar interactions and ethanol-evoked physiopatologic pancreatic gland changes.

    PubMed

    Tiscornia, Osvaldo Manuel; Negri, Gustavo Alberto; Otero, Graciela; López Mingorance, Fabiana Norma; Waisman, Hipólito; Tiscornia-Wasserman, Patricia Graciela

    2015-06-01

    release mechanism of this regulatory peptide secreted by PP cells located in the periphery of Langerhans islets and scattered in the ductal epithelium, two neuroendocrine reflexes (NER) are involved. The "short" NER is evoked from the duodenum by an unknown component of bile-pancreatic secretion. The "long" NER is triggered by a vagovagal reflex. PP induces a depression of the intrapancreatic cholinergic tone. On the one hand suppressing, hormonally, nervous impulses discharge from the vagal nuclear complex in the brainstem. On the other, interfering paracrinically on the cholinergic transmission by acting, presynaptically, on post-ganglionic cholinergic neurons. The resulting PP-evoked fall of the intrapancreatic cholinergic tone depresses the hormone induced (secretin, CCK) pancreons secretory response. PP, with other agents, contributes to the "fail-safe" system or pancreon's brake that PMID:26353468

  8. Successful case of pancreaticoduodenectomy with resection of the hepatic arteries preserving a single aberrant hepatic artery for a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ichida, Akihiko; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Akahane, Masaaki; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Kaneko, Junichi; Aoki, Taku; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-03-01

    A 65-year-old male with a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor presenting with a duodenal ulcer was referred to our department. The tumor involved the common hepatic artery, gastroduodenal artery, left hepatic artery and the right posterior hepatic artery, but not the right anterior hepatic artery originating from the superior mesenteric artery. The hepatic arteries, except the aberrant right anterior hepatic artery, were embolized using coils 18 days before the surgery. The patient underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy with resection of the tumor-encased hepatic arteries, while preserving the aberrant artery. The patient was discharged uneventfully on postoperative day 13 with no ischemic complications. A histopathological examination revealed a grade 2 pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor according to the classification of the World Health Organization, and the surgical margin was negative. The patient developed hepatic metastases 16 months after surgery; hence, hepatic resection was performed. The present surgical strategy is applicable in patients with relatively low-grade pancreatic malignancies involving major hepatic arteries. PMID:24477525

  9. [177Lu-DOTA]0-D-Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide (177Lu-DOTATOC) For Peptide Receptor Radiotherapy in Patients with Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumours: A Phase-II Study

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Richard P.; Kluge, Andreas W.; Kulkarni, Harshad; Schorr-Neufing, Ulrike; Niepsch, Karin; Bitterlich, Norman; van Echteld, Cees J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To characterise efficacy and safety of 177Lu-DOTATOC as agent for peptide receptor radiotherapy (PRRT) of advanced neuroendocrine tumours (NET). Patients and methods: Fifty-six subjects with metastasized and progressive NET (50% gastroenteral, 26.8% pancreatic, 23.2% other primary sites) treated consecutively with 177Lu-DOTATOC were analysed retrospectively. Subjects were administered 177Lu-DOTATOC (mean 2.1 cycles; range 1-4) as 7.0GBq (median) doses at three-monthly intervals. Efficacy was analysed using CT and/or MRI according to RECIST 1.1 criteria and results were stratified for the number of administered cycles and the primary tumour origin. Results: In the total NET population (A), median progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 17.4 and 34.2 months, respectively, assessed in a follow-up time (mean ± SD) of 16.1 ± 12.4 months. In patients receiving more than one cycle, mean follow-up time was 22.4 ± 11.0 months for all NETs (B) and PFS was 32.0 months for all NETs (B), 34.5 months for GEP-NET (C), and 11.9 months for other NETs (D). Objective response rates (Complete/Partial Responses) were 33.9%, 40.6%, 54.2%, and 0% for A, B, C, and D groups, respectively, while disease control rates in the same were 66.1%, 93.8%, 100%, and 75%. Complete responses (16.1%, 18.8% and 25.0% for groups A, B and C) were high, 78% of which were maintained throughout the follow up. There were no serious adverse events. One case of self-limiting grade 3 myelotoxicity was reported. Although 20% of patients had mild renal insufficiency at baseline, there was no evidence of exacerbated or de novo renal toxicity after treatment. Conclusion: 177Lu-DOTATOC is a novel agent for PRRT with major potential to induce objective tumour responses and sustained disease control in progressive neuroendocrine tumours, even when administered in moderate activities. The observed safety profile suggests a particularly favourable therapeutic index, including in patients with

  10. Unusual suspects: pulmonary opportunistic infections masquerading as tumor metastasis in a patient with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer.

    PubMed

    Chowdry, Rajasree P; Bhimani, Chandar; Delgado, Maria A; Lee, Daniel J; Dayamani, Priya; Sica, Gabriel L; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2012-11-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) are a rare group of neoplasms but with increasing incidence. The atypical complications that arise in the setting of functional endocrine tumors are underreported and therefore have not received sufficient attention and the necessary mention in the oncology literature. The clinical implications of these complications pose management challenges starting with the difficulty in establishing diagnosis, accurate staging and optimal treatment of the primary process. We present the case of a middle-aged woman diagnosed with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing carcinoma arising from the pancreas whose case was complicated by excessive uncontrolled hypercortisolism and reactivation of pulmonary opportunistic infections that confounded her management. We believe that this case illustration will be of value to practicing oncologists and other groups of physicians who are called upon to participate in the multidisciplinary treatment of these relatively rare but highly challenging cases. PMID:23118805

  11. Unusual suspects: pulmonary opportunistic infections masquerading as tumor metastasis in a patient with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chowdry, Rajasree P.; Bhimani, Chandar; Delgado, Maria A.; Lee, Daniel J.; Dayamani, Priya; Sica, Gabriel L.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) are a rare group of neoplasms but with increasing incidence. The atypical complications that arise in the setting of functional endocrine tumors are underreported and therefore have not received sufficient attention and the necessary mention in the oncology literature. The clinical implications of these complications pose management challenges starting with the difficulty in establishing diagnosis, accurate staging and optimal treatment of the primary process. We present the case of a middle-aged woman diagnosed with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing carcinoma arising from the pancreas whose case was complicated by excessive uncontrolled hypercortisolism and reactivation of pulmonary opportunistic infections that confounded her management. We believe that this case illustration will be of value to practicing oncologists and other groups of physicians who are called upon to participate in the multidisciplinary treatment of these relatively rare but highly challenging cases. PMID:23118805

  12. Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the endometrium and the importance of pathologic diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Estruch, Adriana; Minig, Lucas; Illueca, Carmen; Romero, Ignacio; Guinot, Jose Luis; Poveda, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the endometrium is a very rare entity. They are very aggressive tumours, with a poor prognosis. They represent a clinical challenge because of a lack of a standardised treatment. We see here a case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of a lobular breast carcinoma, diagnosed in 2002. After presenting with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding in October 2014, she underwent a hysteroscopy-guided biopsy which revealed a metastasis of breast carcinoma. A hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy was performed because of uncontrolled uterine bleeding. The pathologic diagnosis was small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium. A surgical complete cytoreduction was achieved after the case being presented in a multidisciplinary tumour board. Pathologic results revealed metastasis from peritoneal implants of SCC on the endometrium, and metastasis in pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes from serous carcinoma of the endometrium. A total of four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy based on cisplatin (80mg/m² day one) and etoposide (100mg/m² day one, two, three) every 21 days was given. The patient experienced persistent disease and died 17 months after the diagnosis. SCC of the endometrium is a very rare and aggressive disease that requires an individualised multidisciplinary management. PMID:27610194

  13. Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the endometrium and the importance of pathologic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Estruch, Adriana; Minig, Lucas; Illueca, Carmen; Romero, Ignacio; Guinot, Jose Luis; Poveda, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the endometrium is a very rare entity. They are very aggressive tumours, with a poor prognosis. They represent a clinical challenge because of a lack of a standardised treatment. We see here a case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of a lobular breast carcinoma, diagnosed in 2002. After presenting with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding in October 2014, she underwent a hysteroscopy-guided biopsy which revealed a metastasis of breast carcinoma. A hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy was performed because of uncontrolled uterine bleeding. The pathologic diagnosis was small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium. A surgical complete cytoreduction was achieved after the case being presented in a multidisciplinary tumour board. Pathologic results revealed metastasis from peritoneal implants of SCC on the endometrium, and metastasis in pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes from serous carcinoma of the endometrium. A total of four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy based on cisplatin (80mg/m² day one) and etoposide (100mg/m² day one, two, three) every 21 days was given. The patient experienced persistent disease and died 17 months after the diagnosis. SCC of the endometrium is a very rare and aggressive disease that requires an individualised multidisciplinary management. PMID:27610194

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fiducial placement allows localization of small neuroendocrine tumors during parenchymal-sparing pancreatic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Law, Joanna K.; Singh, Vikesh K.; Khashab, Mouen A.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Canto, Marcia Irene; Shin, Eun Ji; Saxena, Payal; Weiss, Matthew J.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Parenchymal-sparing pancreatic surgery is ideal for lesions such as small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET). However, precise localization of these small tumors at surgery can be difficult. The placement of fiducials under endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guidance (EUS-F) has been used to direct stereotactic radiation therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This report describes two cases in which placement of fiducials was used to guide surgical resection. This study aimed to assess the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of using EUS-F for intraoperative localization of small PanNETs. Methods A retrospective study analyzed two consecutive patients with small PanNETs who underwent EUS-F followed by enucleation in a tertiary-care referral hospital. The following features were examined: technical success and complication rates of EUS-F, visibility of the fiducial at the time of surgery, and fiducial migration. Results In the study, EUS-F was performed for two female patients with a 7-mm and a 9-mm PanNET respectively in the uncinate process and neck of the pancreas. In both patients, EUS-F was feasible with two Visicoil fiducials (Core Oncology, Santa Barbara, CA, USA) placed either within or adjacent to the tumors using a 22-gauge Cook Echotip needle. At surgery, the fiducials were clearly visible on intraoperative ultrasound, and both the tumor and the fiducials were successfully enucleated in both cases. No complications were associated with EUS-F, and no evidence of pancreatitis was shown either clinically or on surgical pathology. This investigation had the limitations of a small single-center study. Conclusions For patients undergoing enucleation, EUS-F is technically feasible and safe and aids intraoperative localization of small PanNETs. PMID:23636530

  15. Long-term disease control of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with lanreotide autogel(®): a case report.

    PubMed

    Lybaert, Willem; Van Hul, Erik; Woestenborghs, Heidi

    2014-09-01

    The CLARINET study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00353496) showed that somatostatin analogs are able to stabilize tumor growth in patients with intestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Here, we present a case of NET originating from the pancreatic tail that was treated with lanreotide Autogel(®). A 60-year-old patient underwent resection of a pancreatic NET with splenectomy and distal pancreatectomy. Four months after surgery, there was an increase in chromogranin A levels, along with a hypercaptating lesion of approximately 3.5 cm at the residual part of the pancreatic corpus. Treatment with 30 mg monthly-administered octreotide long-acting release (LAR) was initiated. After 3 months of treatment, a control CT scan revealed diffuse metastases in the liver, although the patient presented no symptoms and liver tests were normal. Due to difficulties with the administration of octreotide LAR, treatment was switched to lanreotide Autogel(®) 120 mg, administered as monthly deep-subcutaneous injections. Progression-free survival, as shown by 3-monthly CT scans, was obtained for 2 years without the need to increase the lanreotide Autogel(®) dose, and the patient reported no side effects. After these 2 years, deterioration of the patient's clinical status and weight loss were observed, along with increased size of the liver lesions and appearance of peritoneal metastases. Chemotherapy treatment with cisplatinum-etoposide was initiated, while the lanreotide Autogel(®) injections were continued. After three chemotherapy cycles, a rapid decline in the patient's quality of life was noted, and she requested discontinuation of the chemotherapy and lanreotide injections. One month later, the patient died due to clinical progressive disease. PMID:25408662

  16. Long-Term Disease Control of a Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor with Lanreotide Autogel®: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lybaert, Willem; Van Hul, Erik; Woestenborghs, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The CLARINET study (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00353496) showed that somatostatin analogs are able to stabilize tumor growth in patients with intestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Here, we present a case of NET originating from the pancreatic tail that was treated with lanreotide Autogel®. A 60-year-old patient underwent resection of a pancreatic NET with splenectomy and distal pancreatectomy. Four months after surgery, there was an increase in chromogranin A levels, along with a hypercaptating lesion of approximately 3.5 cm at the residual part of the pancreatic corpus. Treatment with 30 mg monthly-administered octreotide long-acting release (LAR) was initiated. After 3 months of treatment, a control CT scan revealed diffuse metastases in the liver, although the patient presented no symptoms and liver tests were normal. Due to difficulties with the administration of octreotide LAR, treatment was switched to lanreotide Autogel® 120 mg, administered as monthly deep-subcutaneous injections. Progression-free survival, as shown by 3-monthly CT scans, was obtained for 2 years without the need to increase the lanreotide Autogel® dose, and the patient reported no side effects. After these 2 years, deterioration of the patient's clinical status and weight loss were observed, along with increased size of the liver lesions and appearance of peritoneal metastases. Chemotherapy treatment with cisplatinum-etoposide was initiated, while the lanreotide Autogel® injections were continued. After three chemotherapy cycles, a rapid decline in the patient's quality of life was noted, and she requested discontinuation of the chemotherapy and lanreotide injections. One month later, the patient died due to clinical progressive disease. PMID:25408662

  17. Calculation of the Ki67 index in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a comparative analysis of four counting methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Michelle D; Bagci, Pelin; Ohike, Nobuyuki; Saka, Burcu; Seven, Ipek Erbarut; Dursun, Nevra; Balci, Serdar; Gucer, Hasan; Jang, Kee-Taek; Tajiri, Takuma; Basturk, Olca; Kong, So Yeon; Goodman, Michael; Akkas, Gizem; Adsay, Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Ki67 index is now an essential part of classification of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, its adaptation into daily practice has been fraught with challenges related to counting methodology. In this study, three reviewers used four counting methodologies to calculate Ki67 index in 68 well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: (1) ‘eye-ball’ estimation, which has been advocated as reliable and is widely used; (2) automated counting by image analyzer; (3) manual eye-counting (eye under a microscope without a grid); and (4) manual count of camera-captured/printed image. Pearson’s correlation (R) was used to measure pair-wise correlation among three reviewers using all four methodologies. Average level of agreement was calculated using mean of R values. The results showed that: (1) ‘eye-balling’ was least expensive and fastest (average time <1 min) but had poor reliability and reproducibility. (2) Automated count was the most expensive and least practical with major impact on turnaround time (limited by machine and personnel accessibility), and, more importantly, had inaccuracies in overcounting unwanted material. (3) Manual eye count had no additional cost, averaged 6 min, but proved impractical and poorly reproducible. (4) Camera-captured/printed image was most reliable, had highest reproducibility, but took longer than ‘eye-balling’. In conclusion, based on its comparatively low cost/benefit ratio and reproducibility, camera-captured/printed image appears to be the most practical for calculating Ki67 index. Although automated counting is generally advertised as the gold standard for index calculation, in this study it was not as accurate or cost-effective as camera-captured/printed image and was highly operator-dependent. ‘Eye-balling’ produces highly inaccurate and unreliable results, and is not recommended for routine use. PMID:25412850

  18. Resolution of Hyperreninemia, Secondary Hyperaldosteronism, and Hypokalemia With 177Lu-DOTATATE Induction and Maintenance Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy in a Patient With Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; Riauka, Terence A; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2015-11-01

    A 54-year-old woman presented with a history of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and recurrent episodes of severe hypokalemia requiring hospitalization. Imaging revealed a pancreatic mass with liver metastases, histologically confirmed to be a neuroendocrine tumor. Elevated active renin and aldosterone levels were identified, and the patient was treated with 4 induction cycles of Lu-DOTATATE, which resolved the diarrhea, nausea, and hypokalemia, and normalized the renin and aldosterone levels. After 3 additional maintenance Lu-DOTATATE treatments, the pancreatic tumor had decreased in size, was deemed operable, and was resected. She remains on maintenance Lu-DOTATATE therapy with progression-free survival of 45 months thus far. PMID:26359564

  19. Surgical treatment and clinical outcome of nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a 14-year experience from one single center.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Su, An-Ping; Yue, Peng-Ju; Tian, Bo-le

    2014-11-01

    Our primary aim of the present study was to analyze the clinical characteristics and surgical outcome of nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (non-F-P-NETs), with an emphasis on evaluating the prognostic value of the newly updated 2010 grading classification of the World Health Organization (WHO).Data of 55 consecutive patients who were surgically treated and pathologically diagnosed as non-F-P-NETs in our single institution from January 2000 to December 2013 were retrospectively collected.This entirety comprised of 55 patients (31 males and 24 females), with a mean age of 51.24 ± 12.95 years. Manifestations of non-F-P-NETs were nonspecific. Distal pancreatectomy, pancreaticoduodenectomy, and local resection of pancreatic tumor were the most frequent surgical procedures, while pancreatic fistula was the most common but acceptable complication (30.3%). The overall 5-year survival rate of this entire cohort was 41.0%, with a median survival time of 60.4 months. Patients who underwent R0 resections obtained a better survival than those who did not (P < 0.005). As for the prognostic analysis, tumor size and lymph invasion were only statistically significant in univariate analysis (P = 0.046 and P < 0.05, respectively), whereas the newly updated 2010 grading classification of WHO (G1 and G2 vs G3), distant metastasis, and surgical margin were all meaningful in both univariate and multivariate analysis (P = 0.045, 0.001, and 0.042, respectively).Non-F-P-NETs are a kind of rare neoplasm, with mostly indolent malignancy. Patients with non-F-P-NETs could benefit from the radical resections. The new WHO criteria, distant metastasis and surgical margin, might be independent predictors for the prognosis of non-F-P-NETs. PMID:25396335

  20. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  1. A G-quadruplex-binding compound showing anti-tumour activity in an in vivo model for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohnmacht, Stephan A; Marchetti, Chiara; Gunaratnam, Mekala; Besser, Rachael J; Haider, Shozeb M; Di Vita, Gloria; Lowe, Helen L; Mellinas-Gomez, Maria; Diocou, Seckou; Robson, Mathew; Šponer, Jiri; Islam, Barira; Barbara Pedley, R; Hartley, John A; Neidle, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We report here that a tetra-substituted naphthalene-diimide derivative (MM41) has significant in vivo anti-tumour activity against the MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer xenograft model. IV administration with a twice-weekly 15 mg/kg dose produces ca 80% tumour growth decrease in a group of tumour-bearing animals. Two animals survived tumour-free after 279 days. High levels of MM41 are rapidly transported into cell nuclei and were found to accumulate in the tumour. MM41 is a quadruplex-interactive compound which binds strongly to the quadruplexes encoded in the promoter sequences of the BCL-2 and k-RAS genes, both of which are dis-regulated in many human pancreatic cancers. Levels of BCL-2 were reduced by ca 40% in tumours from MM41-treated animals relative to controls, consistent with BCL-2 being a target for MM41. Molecular modelling suggests that MM41 binds to a BCL-2 quadruplex in a manner resembling that previously observed in co-crystal structures with human telomeric quadruplexes. This supports the concept that MM41 (and by implication other quadruplex-targeting small molecules) can bind to quadruplex-forming promoter regions in a number of genes and down-regulate their transcription. We suggest that quadruplexes within those master genes that are up-regulated drivers for particular cancers, may be selective targets for compounds such as MM41. PMID:26077929

  2. A G-quadruplex-binding compound showing anti-tumour activity in an in vivo model for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohnmacht, Stephan A; Marchetti, Chiara; Gunaratnam, Mekala; Besser, Rachael J; Haider, Shozeb M; Di Vita, Gloria; Lowe, Helen L; Mellinas-Gomez, Maria; Diocou, Seckou; Robson, Mathew; Šponer, Jiri; Islam, Barira; Pedley, R Barbara; Hartley, John A; Neidle, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We report here that a tetra-substituted naphthalene-diimide derivative (MM41) has significant in vivo anti-tumour activity against the MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer xenograft model. IV administration with a twice-weekly 15 mg/kg dose produces ca 80% tumour growth decrease in a group of tumour-bearing animals. Two animals survived tumour-free after 279 days. High levels of MM41 are rapidly transported into cell nuclei and were found to accumulate in the tumour. MM41 is a quadruplex-interactive compound which binds strongly to the quadruplexes encoded in the promoter sequences of the BCL-2 and k-RAS genes, both of which are dis-regulated in many human pancreatic cancers. Levels of BCL-2 were reduced by ca 40% in tumours from MM41-treated animals relative to controls, consistent with BCL-2 being a target for MM41. Molecular modelling suggests that MM41 binds to a BCL-2 quadruplex in a manner resembling that previously observed in co-crystal structures with human telomeric quadruplexes. This supports the concept that MM41 (and by implication other quadruplex-targeting small molecules) can bind to quadruplex-forming promoter regions in a number of genes and down-regulate their transcription. We suggest that quadruplexes within those master genes that are up-regulated drivers for particular cancers, may be selective targets for compounds such as MM41. PMID:26077929

  3. A Cross-Species Analysis in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Reveals Molecular Subtypes with Distinctive Clinical, Metastatic, Developmental, and Metabolic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wullschleger, Stephan; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Grötzinger, Carsten; Barbi, Stefano; Bersani, Samantha; Körner, Jan; Wafy, Ismael; Mafficini, Andrea; Lawlor, Rita T.; Simbolo, Michele; Asara, John M.; Bläker, Hendrik; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Scarpa, Aldo; Hanahan, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to assess the representative and instructive value of an engineered mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) for its cognate human cancer, we profiled and compared mRNA and miRNA transcriptomes of tumors from both. Mouse PanNET tumors could be classified into two distinctive subtypes, well-differentiated islet/insulinoma tumors (IT) and poorly differentiated tumors associated with liver metastases, dubbed metastasis-like primary (MLP). Human PanNETs were independently classified into these same two subtypes, along with a third, specific gene mutation–enriched subtype. The MLP subtypes in human and mouse were similar to liver metastases in terms of miRNA and mRNA transcriptome profiles and signature genes. The human/mouse MLP subtypes also similarly expressed genes known to regulate early pancreas development, whereas the IT subtypes expressed genes characteristic of mature islet cells, suggesting different tumorigenesis pathways. In addition, these subtypes exhibit distinct metabolic profiles marked by differential pyruvate metabolism, substantiating the significance of their separate identities. SIGNIFICANCE This study involves a comprehensive cross-species integrated analysis of multi-omics profiles and histology to stratify PanNETs into subtypes with distinctive characteristics. We provide support for the RIP1-TAG2 mouse model as representative of its cognate human cancer with prospects to better understand PanNET heterogeneity and consider future applications of personalized cancer therapy. PMID:26446169

  4. Deficiency for the Cysteine Protease Cathepsin L Impairs Myc-Induced Tumorigenesis in a Mouse Model of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brindle, Nicola R.; Joyce, Johanna A.; Rostker, Fanya; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.; Swigart-Brown, Lamorna; Evan, Gerard; Hanahan, Douglas; Shchors, Ksenya

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the recent implication of cysteine protease cathepsin L as a potential target for anti-cancer drug development, we used a conditional MycERTAM;Bcl-xL model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumorigenesis (PNET) to assess the role of cathepsin L in Myc-induced tumor progression. By employing a cysteine cathepsin activity probe in vivo and in vitro, we first established that cathepsin activity increases during the initial stages of MycERTAM;Bcl-xL tumor development. Among the cathepsin family members investigated, only cathepsin L was predominately produced by beta-tumor cells in neoplastic pancreata and, consistent with this, cathepsin L mRNA expression was rapidly upregulated following Myc activation in the beta cell compartment. By contrast, cathepsins B, S and C were highly enriched in tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. Genetic deletion of cathepsin L had no discernible effect on the initiation of neoplastic growth or concordant angiogenesis. However, the tumors that developed in the cathepsin L-deficient background were markedly reduced in size relative to their typical wild-type counterparts, indicative of a role for cathepsin L in enabling expansive tumor growth. Thus, genetic blockade of cathepsin L activity is inferred to retard Myc-driven tumor growth, encouraging the potential utility of pharmacological inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins in treating late stage tumors. PMID:25927437

  5. Glucagonoma Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor Treated With 177Lu DOTATATE Induction and Maintenance Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; Riauka, Terence A; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2015-11-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with a history of 2 prior resections of a recurrent pancreatic glucagonoma in the past 4 years. Workup revealed new liver and abdominal nodal metastases with a rising serum glucagon level. He was started on peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with Lu DOTATATE, and his disease stabilized, while his glucagon levels decreased and also stabilized. After 4 induction and 2 maintenance cycles, he remains progression free for 23 months. PMID:26204206

  6. Nuclear medicine imaging of gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The key role of cellular differentiation and tumor grade: from theory to clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Edmond; Hubele, Fabrice; Marzano, Ettore; Goichot, Bernard; Pessaux, Patrick; Kurtz, Jean-Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear medicine imaging is a powerful diagnostic tool for the management of patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, mainly developed considering some cellular characteristics that are specific to the neuroendocrine phenotype. Hence, overexpression of specific trans membrane receptors as well as the cellular ability to take up, accumulate, and decarboxylate amine precursors have been considered for diagnostic radiotracer development. Moreover, the glycolytic metabolism, which is not a specific energetic pathway of neuroendocrine tumors, has been proposed for radionuclide imaging of neuroendocrine tumors. The results of scintigraphic examinations reflect the pathologic features and tumor metabolic properties, allowing the in vivo characterization of the disease. In this article, the influence of both cellular differentiation and tumor grade in the scintigraphic pattern is reviewed according to the literature data. The relationship between nuclear imaging results and prognosis is also discussed. Despite the existence of a relationship between the results of scintigraphic imaging and cellular differentiation, tumor grade and patient outcome, the mechanism explaining the variability of the results needs further investigation. PMID:22743056

  7. [Laboratory and instrumental diagnostics of pancreatic diseases].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The review focuses on the potential of modern laboratory and instrumental diagnostics ofpancreatic diseases including various forms of chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, cysts and pseudocysts, calcificators and concrements, abscesses, neuroendocrine tumours, etc. Diagnostic criteria for exocrine pancreatic disorders, such as hyper- and hyposecretory (hyper- and hypoenzymatic) forms of chronic pancreatitis are described along with direct and indirect, invasive and non-invasive, probe-based and probe-free methods for their study. Special attention is given to instrumental visualization of structural and morphological changes in the pancreas under different pathological conditions. The description of methods for the study of pancreatic endocrine functions and diagnostics of pancreatic diseases is preceded by a brief anatomo-physiologic essay. PMID:22420188

  8. Impact of polyunsaturated fatty acids on hepato-pancreatic prostaglandin and leukotriene concentration in ductal pancreatic cancer -- is there a correlation to tumour growth and liver metastasis?

    PubMed

    Heukamp, I; Kilian, M; Gregor, J I; Kiewert, C; Schimke, I; Kristiansen, G; Walz, M K; Jacobi, C A; Wenger, F A

    2006-04-01

    Type and composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are suspected to play an important role in carcinogenesis. Thus we investigated the effects of n-3, n-6 and n-9 PUFAs on tumour growth, liver metastasis and concentration of prostaglandins (PG) and leukotrienes (LT) in experimental ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Ninety male hamsters were randomised into six groups (Gr.) (n=15). While Gr. 1-3 were healthy control groups, Gr. 4-6 weekly received subcutaneous injections of 10mg N-nitrosobis-2-oxypropylamine (BOP)/kg body weight for 12 weeks in order to induce ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Between week 1 and 16 all animals were fed with a standard diet with a raw fat content of 2.9%. In week 17 Gr. 1-6 were allocated to three types of diets: Gr. 1: standard high fat (=SHF diet, rich in n-6 PUFAs)/Gr. 2: FISH-OIL (rich in n-3 PUFAs)/Gr. 3: SMOF (=mixture of n-3, n-6 and n-9 PUFAs)/Gr. 4: BOP+SHF/Gr. 5: BOP+SMOF/Gr. 6: BOP+FISH-OIL. After 32 weeks all animals were sacrificed and pancreas as well as liver were analysed histologically. Furthermore pancreatic and hepatic concentrations of prostaglandins (PGF1alpha, PGE(2)) and LT were measured. FISH-OIL decreased number of macroscopically visible pancreatic tumours (Gr. 4-6: 54.5% vs. 45.5% vs. 9.1%, P<0.05) as well as incidence of liver metastasis (Gr. 4-6: 90.9% vs. 72.7% vs. 36.4%, P<0.05). Furthermore concentration of PGF(1)(alpha), PGE(2) and LT were significantly increased in pancreatic carcinoma compared to tumour-free tissue. Moreover levels of PGF(1)(alpha) and PGE(2) were higher in liver metastasis than in extrametastatic hepatic tissue. However, in Gr. 6 (FISH-OIL) intrametastatic concentration of LT was significantly lower than in non-metastatic hepatic tissue as well as in Gr. 4 and Gr. 5. FISH-OIL decreased number of visible pancreatic tumours and incidence of histological proven liver metastasis. This effect might be caused by a decrease of intrametastatic concentration of LT compared to

  9. Gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: Is now time for a new approach?

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, Rossana; Torniai, Mariangela; Savini, Agnese; Rinaldi, Silvia; Cascinu, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Gastro-entero-pancreatic tumors (GEP-NETs) are rare neoplasms often characterized by an overexpression of somatostatin receptors. Thus, radiolabeled somatostatin analogues have showed an increasing relevance both in diagnosis and treatment, especially in low- and intermediate-differentiated GEP-NETs. These evidences have led to a growing development of new functional imaging techniques as 68Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) proved useful in the management of these neoplasms. However these tumors have a heterogeneous behavior also modifying their aggressiveness through time. Therefore sometimes 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT appears to be more appropriate to obtain a better assessment of the disease. According to these considerations, the combination of different functional imaging techniques should be considered in the management of GEP-NETs patients allowing clinicians to choose the tailored therapeutic approach among available options. PMID:27081635

  10. Role of hepatic intra-arterial therapies in metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (NET): guidelines from the NET-Liver-Metastases Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Andrew; Bester, Lourens; Salem, Riad; Sharma, Ricky A; Parks, Rowan W; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Liver metastasis from a neuroendocrine tumour (NET) represents a significant clinical entity. A multidisciplinary group of experts was convened to develop state-of-the-art recommendations for its management. Methods Peer-reviewed published reports on intra-arterial therapies for NET hepatic metastases were reviewed and the findings presented to a jury of peers. The therapies reviewed included transarterial embolization (TAE), transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radioembolization (RE). Two systems were used to evaluate the level of evidence in each publication: (i) the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) system, and (ii) the GRADE system. Results Eighteen publications were reviewed. These comprised 11 reports on TAE or TACE and seven on RE. Four questions posed to the panel were answered and recommendations offered. Conclusions Studies of moderate quality support the use of TAE, TACE and RE in hepatic metastases of NETs. The quality and strength of the reports available do not allow any modality to be determined as superior in terms of imaging response, symptomatic response or impact on survival. Radioembolization may have advantages over TAE and TACE because it causes fewer side-effects and requires fewer treatments. Based on current European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS) Consensus Guidelines, RE can be substituted for TAE or TACE in patients with either liver-only disease or those with limited extrahepatic metastases. PMID:25186181

  11. Reduced Expression of the Polymeric Immunoglobulin Receptor in Pancreatic and Periampullary Adenocarcinoma Signifies Tumour Progression and Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Fristedt, Richard; Elebro, Jacob; Gaber, Alexander; Jonsson, Liv; Heby, Margareta; Yudina, Yulyana; Nodin, Björn; Uhlén, Mathias; Eberhard, Jakob; Jirström, Karin

    2014-01-01

    The polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) is a key component of the mucosal immune system that mediates epithelial transcytosis of immunoglobulins. High pIgR expression has been reported to correlate with a less aggressive tumour phenotype and an improved prognosis in several human cancer types. Here, we examined the expression and prognostic significance of pIgR in pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma. The study cohort encompasses a consecutive series of 175 patients surgically treated with pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma in Malmö and Lund University Hospitals, Sweden, between 2001–2011. Tissue microarrays were constructed from primary tumours (n = 175) and paired lymph node metastases (n = 105). A multiplied score was calculated from the fraction and intensity of pIgR staining. Classification and regression tree analysis was used to select the prognostic cut-off. Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for death and recurrence within 5 years were calculated. pIgR expression could be evaluated in 172/175 (98.3%) primary tumours and in 96/105 (91.4%) lymph node metastases. pIgR expression was significantly down-regulated in lymph node metastases as compared with primary tumours (p = 0.018). Low pIgR expression was significantly associated with poor differentiation grade (p<0.001), perineural growth (p = 0.027), lymphatic invasion (p = 0.016), vascular invasion (p = 0.033) and infiltration of the peripancreatic fat (p = 0.039). In the entire cohort, low pIgR expression was significantly associated with an impaired 5-year survival (HR = 2.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.71–5.25) and early recurrence (HR = 2.89, 95% CI 1.67–4.98). This association remained significant for survival after adjustment for conventional clinicopathological factors, tumour origin and adjuvant treatment (HR = 1.98, 95% CI 1.10–3.57). These results demonstrate, for the first time, that high

  12. Biokinetics and dosimetry with 177Lu-DOTA-TATE in athymic mice with induced pancreatic malignant tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Cortés, J.; de Murphy, C. Arteaga; Ferro-Flores, Ge; Pedraza-López, M.; Murphy-Stack, E.

    Malignant pancreatic tumours induced in athymic mice are a good model for peptide receptor targeted radiotherapy. The objective of this research was to determine biokinetic parameters in mice, in order to estimate the induced pancreatic tumour absorbed doses and to evaluate an `in house' 177Lu-DOTA-TATE radiopharmaceutical as part of preclinical studies for targeted therapy in humans. AR42J murine pancreas cancer cells expressing somatostatin receptors, were implanted in athymic mice (nD22) to obtain biokinetic and dosimetric data of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE. The mean tumour uptake 2 h post injection was 14.76±1.9% I.A./g; kidney and pancreas uptake, at the same time, were 7.27±1.1% I.A./g (1.71±0.90%/organ) and 4.20±0.98% I.A./g (0.42±0.03%/organ), respectively. The mean absorbed dose to tumour, kidney and pancreas was 0.58±0.02 Gy/MBq; 0.23±0.01 Gy/MBq and 0.14±0.01 Gy/MBq, respectively. These studies justify further dosimetric estimations to ensure that 177Lu-DOTA-TATE will act as expected in humans.

  13. The tumour-suppressor p53 is not required for pancreatic β cell death during diabetes and upon irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Shin Yuen; Lee, Ming Kei; Sabapathy, Kanaga

    2008-01-01

    Immune-independent diabetes often occurs via pancreatic β cell dysfunction. However, the role of the tumour suppressor p53 that regulates cellular life and death in multiple tissues, in pancreatic cell death and diabetes has not been clarified. We have therefore utilized an established mouse model for diabetes in which the MHC class I antigen is overexpressed in pancreatic β cells under the rat insulin promoter, to investigate the role of p53. We show that pancreatic β cell death, as determined by TUNEL staining, is elevated in transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice. However, there was no increase in immuno-reactivity towards anti-p53 antibodies in the pancreas of transgenic mice over the course of diabetes formation and β cell death, suggesting that p53 may not be involved in these processes. Interestingly, p53 expression was also not induced in pancreas upon γ-irradiation, which resulted in a massive increase in the number of TUNEL-positive cells, suggesting that the p53 pathway may not be causally involved in pancreatic cell death. To further confirm these findings, we generated MHC class I transgenic mice lacking p53 expression. Absence of p53 did not result in any significant changes in pancreatic morphology or affect cell death levels. Importantly, p53 absence did not rescue the diabetic phenotype of the transgenic mice. The results therefore demonstrate that p53 may not be causally involved in pancreatic β cell death, and suggests that the classical cell death pathway dependent on p53 may not be operating in pancreatic β cells. PMID:18006584

  14. In vivo molecular imaging of somatostatin receptors in pancreatic islet cells and neuroendocrine tumors by miniaturized confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fottner, C; Mettler, E; Goetz, M; Schirrmacher, E; Anlauf, M; Strand, D; Schirrmacher, R; Klöppel, G; Delaney, P; Schreckenberger, M; Galle, P R; Neurath, M F; Kiesslich, R; Weber, M M

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate real time in vivo molecular imaging of somatostatin receptors (sstrs) using a handheld miniaturized confocal laser scan microscope (CLM) in conjunction with fluorescein-labeled octreotate (OcF) in healthy mice and murine models of neuroendocrine tumors. For CLM a small rigid probe (diameter 7 mm) with an integrated single line laser (488 nm) was used (optical slice thickness 7 mum; lateral resolution 0.7 mum). OcF was synthesized via Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis and purified by HPLC showing high-affinity binding to the sstr2 (IC(50) 6.2 nmol). For in vitro evaluation, rat and human pancreatic cancer cells were used and characterized with respect to its sstr subtype expression and functional properties. For in vivo confocal imaging, healthy mouse pancreatic islet and renal tubular cells as well as immunoincompetent nude mice harboring sstr-expressing tumors were evaluated. Incubation of sstr-positive cells with OcF showed a specific time- and dose-dependent staining of sstr-positive cells. CLM showed rapid internalization and homogenous cytoplasmatic distribution. After systemic application to mice (n = 8), specific time-dependent internalization and cytoplasmatic distribution into pancreatic islet cells and tubular cells of the renal cortex was recorded. After injection in tumor-harboring nude mice (n = 8), sstr-positive cells selectively displayed a cell surface and cytoplasmatic staining. CLM-targeted biopsies detected sstr-positive tumor cells with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 100% as correlated with ex vivo immunohistochemistry. CLM with OcF permits real-time molecular, functional, and morphological imaging of sstr-expressing cell structures, allowing the specific visualization of pancreatic islet cells and neuroendocrine tumors in vivo. PMID:20233796

  15. Conditional deletion of p53 and Rb in the renin-expressing compartment of the pancreas leads to a highly penetrant metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Sexton, Sandra; LeVea, Charles M.; Caraker, Susan M.; Hajduczok, George; Gross, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to model human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) in animals have been moderately successful, with minimal evidence for glucagonomas or metastatic spread. The renin gene while classically associated with expression in the kidney is also expressed in many other extra-renal tissues including the pancreas. To induce tumorigenesis within renin specific tissues, floxed alleles of p53 and Rb were selectively abrogated using Cre-recombinase driven by the renin promoter. The primary neoplasm generated is a highly metastatic islet cell carcinoma of the pancreas. Lineage tracing identifies descendants of renin-expressing cells as pancreatic alpha cells despite a lack of active renin expression in the mature pancreas. Both primary and metastatic tumors express high levels of glucagon, furthermore an increased level of glucagon is found in the serum identifying the pancreatic cancer as a functional glucagonoma. This new model is highly penetrant and exhibits robust frequency of metastases to lymph nodes and liver, mimicking human disease and provides a useful platform for better understanding pancreatic endocrine differentiation and development, as well as islet cell carcinogenesis. The use of fluorescent reporters for lineage tracing of the cells contributing to disease initiation and progression provides a unique opportunity to dissect the timeline of disease, examining mechanisms of the metastatic process, as well as recovering primary and metastatic cells for identifying co-operating mutations that are necessary for progression of disease. PMID:24292676

  16. Chemotherapy for neuroendocrine tumors: the Beatson Oncology Centre experience.

    PubMed

    Hatton, M Q; Reed, N S

    1997-01-01

    The role of chemotherapy in malignant neuroendocrine tumours is difficult to assess because of their rarity and variation in biological behaviour. We present a retrospective review of chemotherapy given to 18 patients with metastatic and one with locally advanced neuroendocrine tumours. There were eight poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours, six thyroid medullary carcinomas, two phaeochromocytomas, two pancreatic islet cell tumours and one undifferentiated neuroblastoma. Four patients were given 3-weekly dacarbazine, vincristine and cyclophosphamide (DOC) chemotherapy. In eight patients, this regimen was modified by substituting the dacarbazine and cisplatin and etoposide (OPEC). A further six patients were treated with dacarbazine reintroduced into the 3-weekly regimen (DOPEC). The remaining patient received cisplatin and etoposide. There were two complete responses (both with OPEC) and eight partial responses (two with DOC, three with OPEC and three with DOPEC). Five patients had stable disease and four progressed. Four received further chemotherapy on relapse, producing one complete and one partial response. The median response duration to initial chemotherapy was 10 months (range 3-34). The median survival was 12 months (range 1-42). The main toxicity was haematological, with grade 3-4 neutropenia in 12 patients; eight suffered episodes of sepsis. One death was treatment related. Other toxicity was mild although three patients discontinued vincristine with grade 2 neurotoxicity. The response rate and side effects of these three regimens appear comparable. We conclude that, although these patient numbers are small, combination chemotherapy produces an encouraging response rate (53%; 95% CI 30-75) in malignant neuroendocrine tumours, with acceptable toxicity. PMID:9448967

  17. Considerations concerning a tailored, individualized therapeutic management of patients with (neuro)endocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas.

    PubMed

    de Herder, W W; Krenning, E P; Van Eijck, C H J; Lamberts, S W J

    2004-03-01

    Endocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas may present at different disease stages with either hormonal or hormone-related symptoms/syndromes, or without hormonal symptoms. They may occur either sporadically or as part of hereditary syndromes. In the therapeutic approach to a patient with these tumours, excessive hormonal secretion and/or its effects should always be controlled first. Tumour-related deficiencies or disorders should also be corrected. Subsequently, control should be aimed at the tumour growth. Surgery is generally considered as first-line therapy for patients with localized disease, as it can be curative. However, in patients with metastatic disease the role of first-line surgery is not clearly established and other therapies should be considered, such as non-surgical cytoreductive therapies, biotherapy (with somatostatin analogues or interferon-alpha), embolization and chemoembolization of liver metastases, chemotherapy (with single or multiple dose regimens) and peptide receptor-targeted radiotherapy. The delicate balance of the use of the different therapeutical options in patients with endocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas emphasizes the importance of team approach and team expertise. PMID:15027883

  18. Differences and Similarities in the Clinicopathological Features of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in China and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li-Ming; Tang, Laura; Qiao, Xin-Wei; Wolin, Edward; Nissen, Nicholas N.; Dhall, Deepti; Chen, Jie; Shen, Lin; Chi, Yihebali; Yuan, Yao-Zong; Ben, Qi-Wen; Lv, Bin; Zhou, Ya-Ru; Bai, Chun-Mei; Chen, Jie; Song, Yu-Li; Song, Tian-Tian; Lu, Chong-Mei; Yu, Run; Chen, Yuan-Jia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The presentation, pathology, and prognosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) in Asian patients have not been studied in large cohorts. We hypothesized that the clinicopathological features of PNETs of Chinese patients might be different from those of US patients. The objectives of this study were to address whether PNETs in Chinese patients exhibit unique clinicopathological features and natural history, and can be graded and staged using the WHO/ENETS criteria. This is a retrospective review of medical records of patients with PNETs in multiple academic medical centers in China (7) and the United States (2). Tumor grading and staging were based on WHO/ENETS criteria. The clinicopathological features of PNETs of Chinese and US patients were compared. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to find associations between survival and patient demographics, tumor grade and stage, and other clinicopathological characteristics. A total of 977 (527 Chinese and 450 US) patients with PNETs were studied. In general, Chinese patients were younger than US patients (median age 46 vs 56 years). In Chinese patients, insulinomas were the most common (52.2%), followed by nonfunctional tumors (39.7%), whereas the order was reversed in US patients. Tumor grade distribution was similar in the 2 countries (G1: 57.5% vs 55.0%; G2: 38.5% vs 41.3%; and G3: 4.0% vs 3.7%). However, age, primary tumor size, primary tumor location, grade, and stage of subtypes of PNETs were significantly different between the 2 countries. The Chinese nonfunctional tumors were significantly larger than US ones (median size 4 vs 3 cm) and more frequently located in the head/neck region (54.9% vs 34.8%). The Chinese and US insulinomas were similar in size (median 1.5 cm) but the Chinese insulinomas relatively more frequently located in the head/neck region (48.3% vs 26.1%). Higher grade, advanced stage, metastasis, and larger primary tumor size were significantly associated with

  19. Diagnostic Utility of PET CT in Thymic Tumours with Emphasis on 68Ga-DOTATATE PET CT in Thymic Neuroendocrine Tumour - Experience at a Tertiary Level Hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Shanthly, Nylla; Oommen, Regi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction:18 Fluorine-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emis–sion tomography/computed tomography (18F- FDG-PET/CT) is of importance in assessing high-risk thymoma and thymic carcinomas. Detection of advanced thymoma versus thymic carcinoma by routine cross sectional anatomical imaging such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) often poses a diagnostic dilemma. In this case series we observed the utility of FDG uptake to predict advanced thymoma and distinguish thymoma from thymic cancer. Materials and Methods: We reviewed 18F- FDG-PET/CT scans of 12 patients (8 males, 4 females); age 24-60yrs with thymic epithelial malignancy from January 2011 to May 2013. FDG activity in lesions was quantified using maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) and correlated with Masaoka staging and WHO classification. All patients fasted 4 hr prior to 18F-FDG PET/CT. Images from vertex to mid-thigh were acquired 60min post injection of 3.7 -4.7 MBq/kg (Mega Becquerel)/kilogram of18F-FDG and SUV max of each tumour was measured. One patient underwent DOTATATE scan, received 138MBq of 68Gallium (68Ga)-DOTATATE injection IV and imaging was done after 60 min. Results: Higher FDG uptake of SUVmax 7.35 was seen in type B3 thymoma. FDG uptake was higher in thymic carcinoma (20.45 in primary and 17.46 in the node) or neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) than in patients with thymomas (ranged 7.35 - 3.02). No significant association was observed between higher focal FDG uptake and advanced-stage disease in thymoma. In NED 68Ga - DOTATATE imaging identified more lesions than in FDG. Conclusion: PET CT is a valuable diagnostic tool in evaluation of thymic tumours, to assess in initial workup, for treatment response and for prognostication. 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is beneficial in assessing neuroendocrine thymic tumours. Focal FDG uptake cannot predict advanced thymoma but is helpful in distinguishing thymoma from thymic carcinoma, or the more aggressive thymoma B3. PMID

  20. Establishing a clinic-based pancreatic cancer and periampullary tumour research registry in Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Smith, A.L.; Bascuñana, C.; Hall, A.; Salman, A.; Andrei, A.Z.; Volenik, A.; Rothenmund, H.; Ferland, D.; Lamoussenery, D.; Kamath, A.S.; Amre, R.; Caglar, D.; Gao, Z.H.; Haegert, D.G.; Kanber, Y.; Michel, R.P.; Omeroglu–Altinel, G.; Asselah, J.; Bouganim, N.; Kavan, P.; Arena, G.; Barkun, J.; Chaudhury, P.; Gallinger, S.; Foulkes, W.D.; Omeroglu, A.; Metrakos, P.; Zogopoulos, G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Enrolling patients in studies of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (pdac) is challenging because of the high fatality of the disease. We hypothesized that a prospective clinic-based study with rapid ascertainment would result in high participation rates. Using that strategy, we established the Quebec Pancreas Cancer Study (qpcs) to investigate the genetics and causes of pdac and other periampullary tumours (pats) that are also rare and underrepresented in research studies. Methods Patients diagnosed with pdac or pat were introduced to the study at their initial clinical encounter, with a strategy to enrol participants within 2 weeks of diagnosis. Patient self-referrals and referrals of unaffected individuals with an increased risk of pdac were also accepted. Family histories, epidemiologic and clinical data, and biospecimens were collected. Additional relatives were enrolled in families at increased genetic risk. Results The first 346 completed referrals led to 306 probands being enrolled, including 190 probands affected with pdac, who represent the population focus of the qpcs. Participation rates were 88.4% for all referrals and 89.2% for pdac referrals. Family history, epidemiologic and clinical data, and biospecimens were ascertained from 91.9%, 54.6%, and 97.5% respectively of patients with pdac. Although demographics and trends in risk factors in our patients were consistent with published statistics for patients with pdac, the qpcs is enriched for families with French-Canadian ancestry (37.4%), a population with recurrent germ-line mutations in hereditary diseases. Conclusions Using rapid ascertainment, a pdac and pat research registry with high participation rates can be established. The qpcs is a valuable research resource and its enrichment with patients of French-Canadian ancestry provides a unique opportunity for studies of heredity in these diseases. PMID:25908910

  1. Survival Analyses for Patients With Surgically Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors by World Health Organization 2010 Grading Classifications and American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 Staging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Ke, Neng-wen; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Tan, Chun-lu; Zhang, Hao; Mai, Gang; Tian, Bo-le; Liu, Xu-bao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In 2010, World Health Organization (WHO) reclassified pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into 4 main groups: neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1), neuroendocrine tumor G2 (NET G2), neuroendocrine carcinoma G3 (NEC G3), mixed adeno and neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Clinical value of these newly updated WHO grading criteria has not been rigorously validated. The authors aimed to evaluate the clinical consistency of the new 2010 grading classifications by WHO and the 2010 tumor-node metastasis staging systems by American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) on survivals for patients with surgically resected p-NETs. Moreover, the authors would validate the prognostic value of both criteria for p-NETs. The authors retrospectively collected the clinicopathologic data of 120 eligible patients who were all surgically treated and histopathologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our single institution. The new WHO criteria were assigned to 4 stratified groups with a respective distribution of 62, 35, 17, and 6 patients. Patients with NET G1 or NET G2 obtained a statistically better survival compared with those with NEC G3 or MANEC (P < 0.001). Survivals of NET G1 was also better than those of NET G2 (P = 0.023), whereas difference of survivals between NEC G3 and MANEC present no obvious significance (P = 0.071). The AJCC 2010 staging systems were respectively defined in 61, 36, 12, and 11 patients for each stage. Differences of survivals of stage I with stage III and IV were significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001); whereas comparisons of stage I with stage II and stage III with IV were not statistically significant (P = 0.129, P = 0.286; respectively). Together with radical resection, these 2 systems were both significant in univariate and multivariate analysis (P < 0.05). The newly updated WHO 2010 grading classifications and the AJCC 2010 staging systems could

  2. Survival Analyses for Patients With Surgically Resected Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors by World Health Organization 2010 Grading Classifications and American Joint Committee on Cancer 2010 Staging Systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Ke, Neng-wen; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Tan, Chun-lu; Zhang, Hao; Mai, Gang; Tian, Bo-le; Liu, Xu-bao

    2015-12-01

    In 2010, World Health Organization (WHO) reclassified pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into 4 main groups: neuroendocrine tumor G1 (NET G1), neuroendocrine tumor G2 (NET G2), neuroendocrine carcinoma G3 (NEC G3), mixed adeno and neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Clinical value of these newly updated WHO grading criteria has not been rigorously validated. The authors aimed to evaluate the clinical consistency of the new 2010 grading classifications by WHO and the 2010 tumor-node metastasis staging systems by American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) on survivals for patients with surgically resected p-NETs. Moreover, the authors would validate the prognostic value of both criteria for p-NETs.The authors retrospectively collected the clinicopathologic data of 120 eligible patients who were all surgically treated and histopathologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our single institution. The new WHO criteria were assigned to 4 stratified groups with a respective distribution of 62, 35, 17, and 6 patients. Patients with NET G1 or NET G2 obtained a statistically better survival compared with those with NEC G3 or MANEC (P < 0.001). Survivals of NET G1 was also better than those of NET G2 (P = 0.023), whereas difference of survivals between NEC G3 and MANEC present no obvious significance (P = 0.071). The AJCC 2010 staging systems were respectively defined in 61, 36, 12, and 11 patients for each stage. Differences of survivals of stage I with stage III and IV were significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001); whereas comparisons of stage I with stage II and stage III with IV were not statistically significant (P = 0.129, P = 0.286; respectively). Together with radical resection, these 2 systems were both significant in univariate and multivariate analysis (P < 0.05).The newly updated WHO 2010 grading classifications and the AJCC 2010 staging systems could consistently reflect the clinical outcome

  3. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with 90Y-DOTATATE/90Y-DOTATOC in patients with progressive metastatic neuroendocrine tumours: assessment of response, survival and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vinjamuri, S; Gilbert, T M; Banks, M; McKane, G; Maltby, P; Poston, G; Weissman, H; Palmer, D H; Vora, J; Pritchard, D M; Cuthbertson, D J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is an established treatment for patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), although which factors are associated with an improved overall survival (OS) remains unclear. The primary aim of this study is to determine to what extent a radiological response to 90Y-DOTATOC/90Y-DOTATATE PRRT is associated with an improved OS. The association of biochemical and clinical response to OS were assessed as secondary outcome measures. Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted on 57 patients: radiological response was classified using RECIST criteria, biochemical response was classified using WHO criteria and clinical response was assessed subjectively. Responses were recorded as positive response (PR), stable disease (SD) or progressive disease (PD), and survival analysed. Results: Radiological response was achieved in 71.5% (24.5% PR, 47% SD) and was associated with a greater OS (51 and 56 months, respectively), compared with PD (18 months). A biochemical or clinical response post PRRT were not associated with a statistically significant improvement in OS. However, when combined with radiological response a survival benefit was observed according to the number of outcomes (radiological, biochemical, clinical), in which a response was observed. Mild haematological toxicity was common, renal toxicity was rare. Conclusion: In patients with progressive metastatic NETs receiving 90Y-DOTATOC/90Y-DOTATATE PRRT, a radiological response with either a PR or a SD post therapy confers a significant OS benefit. PMID:23492685

  4. Grading of EUS-FNA cytologic specimens from patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: it is time move to tissue core biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Vinayek, Rakesh; Capurso, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (p-NENs) are rare and characterized by an indolent course, with a much better prognosis than non-neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas. In the non-functional class of p-NENS, surgery remains the only curative treatment for early localized disease, but there are few therapeutic options for advanced disease. The prognosis of non-functional p-NENs is determined by many clinical criteria. In 2010, however, the World Health Organization (WHO) introduced a grading system in which determination of the Ki-67 proliferative index has become essential with key role in determining therapeutic decision in both advanced and early diseases. Conventionally, Ki-67 has been assessed on surgical specimens. In last decade, however, the availability of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has provided the opportunity to sample pancreatic lesions and to assess the value of this parameter pre-operatively. The few studies reporting the use of EUS-FNA cytological specimens for Ki-67 measurement showed promising results. As shown by Weynand and colleagues FNA-cytology may underestimate the staging and caution in using this method to classify tumors as low-grade (G1) should be adopted. Thus, Ki-67 expression on cytological specimens remains unsatisfactory and the need for tissue biopsy specimens has been strongly advocated. Based on a recent study that has reported a high concordance of EUS-guided core biopsy for histologic examination and surgical specimens, especially when a cut-off of 5% is used to differentiate G1 and G2 tumors, EUS tissue acquisition by core biopsy is ready for prime time and should be adopted as a standard of practice. PMID:25493252

  5. TERT promoter mutations in pancreatic endocrine tumours are rare and mainly found in tumours from patients with hereditary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, João; Nabais, Joana; Pinheiro, Jorge; Batista, Rui; Oliveira, Rui Caetano; Gonçalves, António Pedro; Pestana, Ana; Reis, Marta; Mesquita, Bárbara; Pinto, Vasco; Lyra, Joana; Cipriano, Maria Augusta; Ferreira, Miguel Godinho; Lopes, José Manuel; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is its unlimited replicative potential that needs a compensatory mechanism for the consequential telomere erosion. Telomerase promoter (TERTp) mutations were recently reported as a novel mechanism for telomerase re-activation/expression in order to maintain telomere length. Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) were so far recognized to rely mainly on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism. It was our objective to study if TERTp mutations were present in pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) and could represent an alternative mechanism to ALT. TERTp mutations were detected in 7% of the cases studied and were mainly associated to patients harbouring hereditary syndromes. In vitro, using PET-derived cell lines and by luciferase reporter assay, these mutations confer a 2 to 4-fold increase in telomerase transcription activity. These novel alterations are able to recruit ETS transcription factor members, in particular GABP-α and ETV1, to the newly generated binding sites. We report for the first time TERTp mutations in PETs and PET-derived cell lines. Additionally, our data indicate that these mutations serve as an alternative mechanism and in an exclusive manner to ALT, in particular in patients with hereditary syndromes. PMID:27411289

  6. TERT promoter mutations in pancreatic endocrine tumours are rare and mainly found in tumours from patients with hereditary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Vinagre, João; Nabais, Joana; Pinheiro, Jorge; Batista, Rui; Oliveira, Rui Caetano; Gonçalves, António Pedro; Pestana, Ana; Reis, Marta; Mesquita, Bárbara; Pinto, Vasco; Lyra, Joana; Cipriano, Maria Augusta; Ferreira, Miguel Godinho; Lopes, José Manuel; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is its unlimited replicative potential that needs a compensatory mechanism for the consequential telomere erosion. Telomerase promoter (TERTp) mutations were recently reported as a novel mechanism for telomerase re-activation/expression in order to maintain telomere length. Pancreatic endocrine tumors (PETs) were so far recognized to rely mainly on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanism. It was our objective to study if TERTp mutations were present in pancreatic endocrine tumors (PET) and could represent an alternative mechanism to ALT. TERTp mutations were detected in 7% of the cases studied and were mainly associated to patients harbouring hereditary syndromes. In vitro, using PET-derived cell lines and by luciferase reporter assay, these mutations confer a 2 to 4-fold increase in telomerase transcription activity. These novel alterations are able to recruit ETS transcription factor members, in particular GABP-α and ETV1, to the newly generated binding sites. We report for the first time TERTp mutations in PETs and PET-derived cell lines. Additionally, our data indicate that these mutations serve as an alternative mechanism and in an exclusive manner to ALT, in particular in patients with hereditary syndromes. PMID:27411289

  7. Ectopic insulin secreting neuroendocrine tumor of kidney with recurrent hypoglycemia: a diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypoglycemia secondary to ectopic insulin secretion of non-pancreatic tumors is rare. Case presentation We describe a middle aged woman with recurrent hypoglycemia. On evaluation, she was detected to have hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia and right sided renal mass lesion. 68Ga-Dotanoc and 99mTc-HYNICTOC scans confirmed the intrarenal mass to be of neuroendocrine origin. Right nephrectomy was done and it turned out to be an insulin secreting neuroendocrine tumour. Neuroendocrine nature of this tumour was further confirmed by ultra-structural examination. Her hypoglycemia did not recur after resection of this tumour. Conclusion Few cases of ectopic insulin secretion have been reported though some are not proven convincingly. This case addresses all the issues raised in previous case reports and proves by clinical, laboratory, functional imaging and immunohistochemical analysis that ectopic origin of insulin by non-pancreatic tumors does occur. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of ectopic insulinoma arising from the kidney. PMID:24741994

  8. Pancreatic Aetiology for Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zaborowski, Alexandra; Walsh, Siun M.; Ravi, Narayanasamy; Reynolds, John V.

    2016-01-01

    We present herein what we believe is the first reported case of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding in pregnancy due to a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour causing left sided portal hypertension. A 37-year-old 27-week pregnant female presented with massive haematemesis and melaena requiring transfusion of 10 units of red cell concentrate. Gastric varices were evident at endoscopy. An MRI revealed a large mass infiltrating the pancreatic tail and spleen with massive upper abdominal varix formation secondary to splenic vein invasion. A caesarean section was performed, followed by a radical en bloc partial pancreatectomy and splenectomy with resection of the fundus of the stomach and ligation of gastric and splenic varices. Her postoperative course was uncomplicated. Histology revealed a well differentiated grade 2 neuroendocrine tumour with final staging of T4N0. This case highlights an infrequently encountered cause of massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnosis and management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, due to their rarity and variable clinical presentation, can be challenging particularly in the setting of pregnancy where the wellbeing of a second patient must also be considered. A multidisciplinary approach with input from obstetricians and general surgeons is required when deciding optimum management, while also taking into account the patient's preferences. PMID:27034880

  9. Pancreatic Aetiology for Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Zaborowski, Alexandra; Walsh, Siun M; Ravi, Narayanasamy; Reynolds, John V

    2016-01-01

    We present herein what we believe is the first reported case of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding in pregnancy due to a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour causing left sided portal hypertension. A 37-year-old 27-week pregnant female presented with massive haematemesis and melaena requiring transfusion of 10 units of red cell concentrate. Gastric varices were evident at endoscopy. An MRI revealed a large mass infiltrating the pancreatic tail and spleen with massive upper abdominal varix formation secondary to splenic vein invasion. A caesarean section was performed, followed by a radical en bloc partial pancreatectomy and splenectomy with resection of the fundus of the stomach and ligation of gastric and splenic varices. Her postoperative course was uncomplicated. Histology revealed a well differentiated grade 2 neuroendocrine tumour with final staging of T4N0. This case highlights an infrequently encountered cause of massive gastrointestinal bleeding. Diagnosis and management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, due to their rarity and variable clinical presentation, can be challenging particularly in the setting of pregnancy where the wellbeing of a second patient must also be considered. A multidisciplinary approach with input from obstetricians and general surgeons is required when deciding optimum management, while also taking into account the patient's preferences. PMID:27034880

  10. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  11. TNM staging of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: an observational analysis and comparison by both AJCC and ENETS systems from 1 single institution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wei-guo; Wang, Li; Ke, Neng-wen; Liu, Xu-bao; Tian, Bo-le

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and compare the surgical outcome of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) using the 2 tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) systems by both the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Staging Manual (seventh edition) and the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS). Moreover, we sought to validate the prognostic value of the new AJCC criterion. Data of 145 consecutive patients who were all surgically treated and histologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2002 to June 2013 in our single institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates for AJCC classifications of stages I, II, III, and IV were 79.5%, 63.1%, 15.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). As for the ENETS system, the OS rates at 5 years for stages I, II, III, and IV were 75.5%, 72.7%, 29.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). Both criteria present no statistically notable difference between stage I and stage II (P > 0.05) but between stage I and stages III and IV (P < 0.05), as well as those between stage II and stages III and IV (P < 0.05). Difference between stage III and IV by ENETS was significant (P = 0.031), whereas that by the AJCC was not (P = 0.144). What's more, the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) was statistically significant in both uni- and multivariate analyses by Cox regression (P < 0.005 and P = 0.025, respectively). Our study indicated that the ENETS TNM staging system might be superior to the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) for the clinical practice of p-NETs. Together with tumor grade and radical resection, the new AJCC system was also validated to be an independent predictor for p-NETs. PMID:25816036

  12. Ki-67 cytological index can distinguish well-differentiated from poorly differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a comparative cytohistological study of 53 cases.

    PubMed

    Carlinfante, Gabriele; Baccarini, Paola; Berretti, Debora; Cassetti, Tiziana; Cavina, Maurizio; Conigliaro, Rita; De Pellegrin, Alessandro; Di Tommaso, Luca; Fabbri, Carlo; Fornelli, Adele; Frasoldati, Andrea; Gardini, Giorgio; Losi, Luisa; Maccio, Livia; Manta, Raffaele; Pagano, Nico; Sassatelli, Romano; Serra, Silvia; Camellini, Lorenzo

    2014-07-01

    The Ki-67 labeling index has been found to bear prognostic significance in gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), and it was recently incorporated in NET histological grading. Nevertheless, a reliable preoperative determination of NET grading could be useful in clinical practice. The aim of this study is to compare the results of Ki-67 labeling index, as measured on cytological samples and on surgical specimens of patients with pancreatic NETs (P-NETs). We also investigated whether concordance might be improved, using a 5 % (instead of 2 %) cutoff value for defining G2 tumors. We retrospectively identified 48 consecutive patients with 53 P-NETs, from our five institutions, and we measured Ki-67 labeling index on their cytological samples and surgical specimens. The traditional 2 % and the alternative 5 % cutoff values were used to classify G2 tumors. The concordance rate between cytological and histological grading was 46/53 (86.8 %; weighted κ statistic 0.77; 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) 0.60-0.94). No cases of cytological G1-G2 NETs were upgraded to G3 neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) at histological grading. Cytology was found to be highly specific in the diagnosis of both G2 (94.1 %; 95 % CI 80.3-99.3) and G3 tumors (100.0 %; 95 % CI 92.8-100), but the sensitivity was poor for G2 NETs (66.7 %; 95 % CI 38.4-88.2) and high for the prediction of G3 NECs (100 %; 95 % CI 39.8-100.0). When the 5 % cutoff value was adopted, concordance rate was 49/53 (92.4 %; weighted κ 0.82; 95 % CI 0.64-1.00). In conclusion, Ki-67 cytological expression can distinguish well-differentiated (both G1 and G2) from poorly differentiated P-NETs, and it may be useful for their preoperative classification. PMID:24807732

  13. Oral bacteria in pancreatic cancer: mutagenesis of the p53 tumour suppressor gene

    PubMed Central

    Öğrendik, Mesut

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoma of exocrine pancreas is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, worldwide. The prevalence of this disease is very high in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Orodigestive cancers are frequently seen in patients with periodontitis. These findings suggest that this type of cancer may have some bacterial origins. This study hypothesizes that the peptidyl arginine deaminase (PAD) enzymes found in oral bacteria may be responsible for the p53 point mutations that occur in patients with pancreatic cancer. Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola possess the PAD enzyme, and p53 arginine mutations have been detected in patients with pancreatic cancer. Moreover, the Pro allele p53Arg72-Pro is a risk factor for the development of this cancer. Anti-P. gingivalis antibody titers have been found to be higher in patients with pancreatic cancer as compared to healthy controls. The hypothesis in question can be tested if the DNA of P. gingivalis or the antibodies against P. gingivalis can be detected in patients with the p53 arginine mutation.If this hypothesis is true, it could reveal the real cause of pancreatic cancer, which is a fatal disease. Further studies are necessary in order to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:26617937

  14. Hormonally defined pancreatic and duodenal neuroendocrine tumors differ in their transcription factor signatures: expression of ISL1, PDX1, NGN3, and CDX2.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Gratiana; Konukiewitz, Björn; Schmitt, Anja; Perren, Aurel; Klöppel, Günter

    2011-08-01

    We recently identified the transcription factor (TF) islet 1 gene product (ISL1) as a marker for well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (P-NETs). In order to better understand the expression of the four TFs, ISL1, pancreatico-duodenal homeobox 1 gene product (PDX1), neurogenin 3 gene product (NGN3), and CDX-2 homeobox gene product (CDX2), that mainly govern the development and differentiation of the pancreas and duodenum, we studied their expression in hormonally defined P-NETs and duodenal (D-) NETs. Thirty-six P-NETs and 14 D-NETs were immunostained with antibodies against the four pancreatic hormones, gastrin, serotonin, calcitonin, ISL1, PDX1, NGN3, and CDX2. The TF expression pattern of each case was correlated with the tumor's hormonal profile. Insulin-positive NETs expressed only ISL1 (10/10) and PDX1 (9/10). Glucagon-positive tumors expressed ISL1 (7/7) and were almost negative for the other TFs. Gastrin-positive NETs, whether of duodenal or pancreatic origin, frequently expressed PDX1 (17/18), ISL1 (14/18), and NGN3 (14/18). CDX2 was mainly found in the gastrin-positive P-NETs (5/8) and rarely in the D-NETs (1/10). Somatostatin-positive NETs, whether duodenal or pancreatic in origin, expressed ISL1 (9/9), PDX1 (3/9), and NGN3 (3/9). The remaining tumors showed labeling for ISL1 in addition to NGN3. There was no association between a particular TF pattern and NET features such as grade, size, location, presence of metastases, and functional activity. We conclude from our data that there is a correlation between TF expression patterns and certain hormonally defined P-NET and D-NET types, suggesting that most of the tumor types originate from embryologically determined precursor cells. The observed TF signatures do not allow us to distinguish P-NETs from D-NETs. PMID:21739268

  15. RABL6A promotes G1-S phase progression and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cell proliferation in an Rb1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Jussara; Muniz, Viviane P.; Falls, Kelly; Reed, Sara M.; Taghiyev, Agshin F.; Quelle, Frederick W.; Gourronc, Francoise; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Major, Heather J.; Askeland, Ryan; Sherman, Scott K.; O'Dorisio, Thomas M.; Bellizzi, Andrew M.; Howe, James R.; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms of neuroendocrine tumor (NET) proliferation are poorly understood and therapies that effectively control NET progression and metastatic disease are limited. We found amplification of a putative oncogene, RABL6A, in primary human pancreatic NETs(PNETs) that correlated with high level RABL6A protein expression. Consistent with those results, stable silencing of RABL6A in cultured BON-1 PNET cells revealed that it is essential for their proliferation and survival. Cells lacking RABL6A predominantly arrested in G1 phase with a moderate mitotic block. Pathway analysis of microarray data suggested activation of the p53 and retinoblastoma (Rb1) tumor suppressor pathways in the arrested cells. Loss of p53 had no effect on the RABL6A knockdown phenotype, indicating RABL6A functions independent of p53 in this setting. By comparison, Rb1 inactivation partially restored G1 to S phase progression in RABL6A knockdown cells although it was insufficient to override the mitotic arrest and cell death caused by RABL6A loss. Thus, RABL6A promotes G1 progression in PNET cells by inactivating Rb1, an established suppressor of PNET proliferation and development. This work identifies RABL6A as a novel negative regulator of Rb1 that is essential for PNET proliferation and survival. We suggest RABL6A is a new potential biomarker and target for anticancer therapy in PNET patients. PMID:25273089

  16. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  17. PTCH 1 staining of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET) samples from patients with and without multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN-1) syndrome reveals a potential therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Buddha; Hua, Xianxin; Runske, Melissa; Bennett, Bonita; LiVolsi, Virginia; Roses, Robert; Fraker, Douglas A; Metz, David C

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare, indolent tumors that may occur sporadically or develop in association with well-recognized hereditary syndromes, particularly multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1). We previously demonstrated that the hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway was aberrantly up-regulated in a mouse model that phenocopies the human MEN-1 syndrome, Men1l/l;RipCre, and that inhibition of this pathway suppresses MEN-1 tumor cell proliferation. We hypothesized that the HH signaling pathway is similarly upregulated in human PNETs. We performed immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for PTCH1 in human fresh and archival PNET specimens to examine whether human sporadic and MEN-1-associated PNETs revealed similar abnormalities as in our mouse model and correlated the results with clinical and demographic factors of the study cohort. PTCH1 staining was positive in 12 of 22 PNET patients (55%). Four of 5 MEN-1 patients stained for PTCH1 (p = 0.32 as compared with sporadic disease patients). Nine of 16 patients with metastatic disease stained for PTCH1 as compared with zero of 3 with localized disease only (p = 0.21). No demographic or clinical features appeared to be predictive of PTCH 1 positivity and PTCH 1 positivity per se was not predictive of clinical outcome. PTCH1, a marker of HH pathway up regulation, is detectable in both primary and metastatic tumors in more than 50% of PNET patients. Although no clinical or demographic factors predict PTCH1 positivity and PTCH1 positivity does not predict clinical outcome, the frequency of expression alone indicates that perturbation of this pathway with agents such as Vismodegib, an inhibitor of Smoothened (SMO), should be examined in future clinical trials. PMID:25482929

  18. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses

    PubMed Central

    Voss, M; Hammel, P; Molas, G; Palazzo, L; Dancour, A; O'Toole, D; Terris, B; Degott, C; Bernades, P; Ruszniewski, P

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To assess the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNAB) in patients with solid pancreatic masses.
METHODS—Ninety nine consecutive patients with pancreatic masses were studied. Histological findings obtained by EUS-FNAB were compared with the final diagnosis assessed by surgery, biopsy of other tumour site or at postmortem examination, or by using a combination of clinical course, imaging features, and tumour markers.
RESULTS—EUS-FNAB was feasible in 90 patients (adenocarcinomas, n = 59; neuroendocrine tumours, n = 15; various neoplasms, n = 6; pancreatitis, n = 10), and analysable material was obtained in 73. Tumour size (⩾ or < 25 mm in diameter) did not influence the ability to obtain informative biopsy samples. Diagnostic accuracy was 74.4% (adenocarcinomas, 81.4%; neuroendocrine tumours, 46.7%; other lesions, 75%; p<0.02). Overall, the diagnostic yield in all 99 patients was 68%. Successful biopsies were performed in six patients with portal hypertension. Minor complications (moderate bleeding or pain) occurred in 5% of cases.
CONCLUSIONS—EUS-FNAB is a useful and safe method for the investigation of pancreatic masses, with a high feasibility rate even when lesions are small. Overall diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNAB seems to depend on the tumour type.


Keywords: pancreas; tumour; endoscopic ultrasound; fine needle aspiration biopsy PMID:10644320

  19. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... open. Balloon dilatation. Some endoscopes have a small balloon that the doctor uses to dilate, or stretch, a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  20. Pancreatic panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahawish, Karim; Iyasere, Isoken T

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old Caucasian man presenting with polyarthritis, weight loss and multiple tender cutaneous nodules. Abnormal liver function tests prompted imaging of the liver which demonstrated liver metastases. Biopsy of the liver lesions confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:25150233

  1. [Neuroendocrine system of the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract: origin and development].

    PubMed

    Díaz Pérez, José Angel

    2009-04-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP NETs) originate from the neuroendocrine cells through the gastrointestinal tract and endocrine pancreas. The embryologic development of the pancreas is a complex process that begins with the "stem cell" that come from the endodermus. These cells go through two phases: in the first transition the "stem cell" differentiates in exocrine and endocrine cells. This process is regulated by transcription factors such as Pdx1 ("insulin promoter factor 1"), Hlxb6 and SOX9. In the second transition the neuroendocrine cell differentiates in the 5 cell types (alpha, beta, delta, PP y epsilon.). This process is regulated through the balance between factors favoring differentiation (mainly neurogenin 3) and inhibitor factors which depend on Notch signals. The existence of a third transition in postnatal pancreas is hypothesized. The "stem cell" from pancreatic ducts would become adult beta cells, through autoduplication and neogenesis. In the small gut of the adult the stem cell are placed in the intestinal crypts and develop to villi in secretor lines (enterocytes, globet and Paneths cells) or neuroendocrine cells from which at least 10 cell types depend. This process is regulated by transcription factors: Math1, neurogenina 3 and NeuroD. PMID:19627763

  2. Applications of a novel tumor-grading-metastasis staging system for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: An analysis of surgical patients from a Chinese institution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Tan, Chun-Lu; Zhang, Yi; Ke, Neng-Wen; Zeng, Lin; Li, Ang; Zhang, Hao; Xiong, Jun-Jie; Guo, Zi-Heng; Tian, Bo-Le; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2016-07-01

    The ability to stratify patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) into prognostic groups has been hindered by the absence of a commonly accepted staging system. Both the 7th tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging guidelines by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and the 2010 grading classifications by the World Health Organization (WHO) were validated to be unsatisfactory.We aim to evaluate the feasibility of combining the latest AJCC and WHO criteria to devise a novel tumor-grading-metastasis (TGM) staging system. We also sought to examine the stage-specific survival rates and the prognostic value of this new TGM system for p-NETs.Data of 120 patients with surgical resection and histopathological diagnosis of p-NETs from January 2004 to February 2014 in our institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Based on the AJCC and WHO criteria, we replaced the stage N0 and N1 with stage Ga (NET G1 and NET G2) and Gb (NET G3 and MANEC) respectively, without changes of the definition of T or M stage. The present novel TGM staging system was grouped as follows: stage I was defined as T1-2, Ga, M0; stage II as T3, Ga, M0 or as T1-3, Gb, M0; stage III as T4, Ga-b, M0 and stage IV as any T, M1.The new TGM staging system successfully distributed 55, 42, 12, and 11 eligible patients in stage I to IV, respectively. Differences of survival compared stage I with III and IV for patients with p-NETs were both statistically significant (P < 0.001), as well as those of stage II with III and IV (P < 0.001). Patients in stage I showed better a survival than those in stage II, whereas difference between stages III and IV was not notable (P = 0.001, P = 0.286, respectively). In multivariate models, when the TGM staging system was evaluated in place of the individual T, G, and M variables, this new criteria were proven to be an independent predictor of survival for surgically resected p-NETs (P < 0.05).Stratifying patients well, the current

  3. Calcium-dependent photodynamic action of di- and tetrasulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine on normal and tumour-derived rat pancreatic exocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    al-Laith, M.; Matthews, E. K.

    1994-01-01

    Important differences exist in the responses to photodynamic agents of normal and tumour-derived pancreatic acinar cells. In the present study amylase release has been used to assess the mechanisms by which the photodynamic drugs tetra- and disulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine (A1PcS4, A1PcS2) act on pancreatic cells via energy and calcium-dependent activation and transduction pathways. The photodynamic release of amylase was found to be energy dependent and inhibited by the chelation of free cytoplasmic calcium but not by the removal of extracellular calcium. In contrast to their effects on normal acinar cells, the photodynamic action of A1PcS4 and A1PcS2 was to inhibit amylase secretion from pancreatoma AR4-2J cells. Removal of extracellular calcium reversed this inhibitory effect on AR4-2J cells and produced a significant increase in amylase release, but chelation of free cytoplasmic calcium did not affect the inhibitory photodynamic action of the phthalocyanines on amylase release from the tumour cells. Overall, these results demonstrate further important distinctions between the photodynamic action of sulphonated aluminium phthalocyanines on normal versus tumour exocrine cells of the pancreas and indicate that calcium plays an important role in photodynamic drug action, since these agents affected intracellular calcium mobilisation at some distal point in the membrane signal transduction pathway for regulated secretion. Furthermore, the photodynamic inhibition of constitutive secretion in tumour cells may involve a calcium-dependent membrane target site or modulation of membrane calcium channels by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:7524603

  4. Mixed acinar-neuroendocrine-ductal carcinoma of the pancreas: a tale of three lineages.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark J; Kwong, Christina A; Atieh, Mohammed; Pappas, Sam G

    2016-01-01

    Most pancreatic cancers arise from a single cell type, although mixed pancreatic carcinomas represent a rare exception. The rarity of these aggressive malignancies and the limitations of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) pose significant barriers to diagnosis and appropriate management. We report a case of a 54-year-old man presenting with abdominal pain, jaundice and a hypodense lesion within the uncinate process on CT. FNA suggested poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, which was subsequently resected via pancreaticoduodenectomy. Pathological analysis yielded diagnosis of invasive mixed acinar-neuroendocrine-ductal pancreatic carcinoma. Given the rare and deadly nature of these tumours, clinicians must be aware of their pathophysiology and do practice with a high degree of clinical suspicion, when appropriate. Surgical resection and thorough pathological analysis with immunohistochemical staining and electron microscopy remain the standards of care for mixed pancreatic tumours without gross evidence of metastasis. Diligent characterisation of the presentation and histological findings associated with these neoplasms should continue in order to promote optimal diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27257019

  5. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  6. Expression of major histocompatibility antigens in human chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jalleh, R P; Gilbertson, J A; Williamson, R C; Slater, S D; Foster, C S

    1993-10-01

    T-lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine pancreas and liver in patients with chronic pancreatitis has suggested that cell mediated immune mechanisms may play a part in the pathogenesis of this disease. As expression of major histocompatibility (MHC) antigens is a prerequisite for organ specific autoimmunity, the expression of HLA class I (beta 2-microglobulin) and class II (HLA-DR) determinants have been analysed, together with the presence of T-lymphocytes, in 93 patients (64 men and 29 women, mean age 40.6 years) having an operation for chronic pancreatitis. Ethanol (63 patients), recurrent acute pancreatitis (12), congenital lesions (2), and unknown (16) were suggested to be the causes of the disease. Immunohistochemical staining of formalin fixed and paraffin wax embedded tissue sections used conventional immunohistochemical techniques with specific anti-serum samples. No MHC expression was identified in 10 histologically normal pancreatic control specimens or in four cases of chronic pancreatitis secondary to obstruction by neuroendocrine tumours within the head of the pancreas. beta 2-microglobulin expression by pancreatic exocrine epithelial cells was seen in 76 chronic pancreatitis specimens (82%) while HLA-DR was present in 61 (66%). Simultaneous expression of both class I and II determinants was seen in 53 (57%) of cases. MHC determinant expression was not found in 10 cases (11%) of chronic pancreatitis. In the positive specimens, expression was confined to ductal and ductular (interlobular and intralobular) epithelium with no staining of acinar cells. Staining was not related to the suspected cause of the disease or age. T-lymphocytes were more prominent in chronic pancreatitis mean (SEM) (131 (15) cells per high powered field) than controls (5 (1), p < 0.01). Aberrant MHC expression by exocrine pancreatic epithelial cells occurring in the presence of an appreciable T-cell infiltration confirmed that the appropriate cellular conditions were present for

  7. Stages of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound. Tissue may also be removed during a laparoscopy (a surgical incision made in the wall of ... The instrument may be used during surgery or laparoscopy or inserted through the skin. This procedure is ...

  8. High VEGF serum values are associated with locoregional spread of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs).

    PubMed

    Cigrovski Berković, Maja; Čačev, Tamara; Catela Ivković, Tina; Marout, Jasminka; Ulamec, Monika; Zjačić-Rotkvić, Vanja; Kapitanović, Sanja

    2016-04-15

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are highly vascularized neoplasms, capable of synthethisizing VEGF-A, a key mediator of angiogenesis. In pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) VEGF expression is higher in benign and low-grade tumors and associated with good prognosis (neuroendocrine paradox) while the VEGF role in gastrointestinal NETs (GI-NETs) is still unclear. In this study, we examined the VEGF-1154A/G polymorphism in 145 GEP-NET patients and 150 controls. Next, we measured VEGF serum levels and VEGF tumor protein expression, comparing it with Ki67 and tumor grade. Patients' VEGF serum levels were compared with VEGF -1145A/G genotypes and metastatic status as well as with chromogranin A (CgA) and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) in case of GI-NET patients. In this study GEP-NET patients had elevated VEGF serum values when compared to healthy controls (p = 0.0013). VEGF-1145G allele correlated with higher VEGF serum levels (p = 0.002). Patients with metastatic tumors had higher VEGF serum values when compared to patients without metastases (p = 0.033), and highest levels were observed in case of lymph node metastases (p = 0.008). VEGF-1145G allele was more frequent in non-functional GI-NET patients than in healthy controls (p = 0.041). CgA was superior to VEGF in tumor detection, while VEGF was superior to 5-HIAA. A correlation was observed between VEGF immunohistochemical staining and Ki-67 (p = 0.028). Tumours with weaker VEGF protein expression were more aggressive than tumours with stronger VEGF expression, confirming a "neuroendocrine paradox" in GI-NETs. Our results suggest the role of VEGF in GI-NETs locoregional spread. PMID:26805636

  9. Breast Carcinoma With Unrecognized Neuroendocrine Differentiation Metastasizing to the Pancreas: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Lene; Mortensen, Michael Bau; Detlefsen, Sönke

    2016-08-01

    The current World Health Organization classification recognizes 3 subtypes of breast carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. Their reported prevalence is highly variable, ranging from <1% to up to 20% of all breast carcinomas. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who underwent lumpectomy with a postoperative diagnosis of invasive ductal breast carcinoma. Six weeks after lumpectomy, pancreatic biopsies showed tumor cells with neuroendocrine features. The first immunohistochemical panel showed positivity for synaptophysin and cytokeratins, raising suspicion of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. However, a second panel revealed positivity for estrogen receptors and GATA3. On review of the lumpectomy specimen, a significant neuroendocrine component was found, leading to the final diagnosis of breast carcinoma with neuroendocrine features metastasizing to the pancreas. Neuroendocrine markers are not routinely analyzed in breast tumors. Hence, metastases from breast carcinomas with unrecognized neuroendocrine features may lead to false diagnoses of primary neuroendocrine tumors at different metastatic sites, such as the pancreas. PMID:26912472

  10. Evaluation and management of pancreatic lesions in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease.

    PubMed

    Keutgen, Xavier M; Hammel, Pascal; Choyke, Peter L; Libutti, Steven K; Jonasch, Eric; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-09-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a heritable cancer-predisposition syndrome with multiorgan involvement. Pancreatic lesions are detected in approximately two-thirds of patients with VHL disease at some point during their lifetime. In these patients, cystic pancreatic lesions are almost exclusively benign and, unless symptomatic, do not require surgical or endoscopic intervention; however, solid pancreatic lesions can often be recognized through imaging screens, and are commonly found to be nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs) with malignant potential. The natural history of these VHL-associated pNETs is variable, and lacks clinical or imaging features that predict disease progression or metastatic potential, and generally needs to be managed more conservatively than their sporadic counterparts. Treatment options for such lesions, which range from active surveillance to surgical intervention, can nevertheless be associated with considerable morbidity and even mortality. Of note, although several guidelines have been established for the management of tumours associated with VHL syndrome, none of these have specifically focused on pancreatic lesions. Thus, we aim to characterize the types of pancreatic lesions associated with VHL disease and their natural history, to identify particular lesions that necessitate treatment, and to define what forms of treatment should be undertaken. PMID:27030075

  11. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  12. Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Giulio; Cavazza, Alberto; Spagnolo, Paolo; Sverzellati, Nicola; Longo, Lucia; Jukna, Agita; Montanari, Gloria; Carbonelli, Cristiano; Vincenzi, Giada; Bogina, Giuseppe; Franco, Renato; Tiseo, Marcello; Cottin, Vincent; Colby, Thomas V

    2016-06-01

    The term diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) may be used to describe a clinico-pathological syndrome, as well as an incidental finding on histological examination, although there are obvious differences between these two scenarios. According to the World Health Organization, the definition of DIPNECH is purely histological. However, DIPNECH encompasses symptomatic patients with airway disease, as well as asymptomatic patients with neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia associated with multiple tumourlets/carcinoid tumours. DIPNECH is also considered a pre-neoplastic lesion in the spectrum of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumours, because it is commonly found in patients with peripheral carcinoid tumours.In this review, we summarise clinical, physiological, radiological and histological features of DIPNECH and critically discuss recently proposed diagnostic criteria. In addition, we propose that the term "DIPNECH syndrome" be used to indicate a sufficiently distinct patient subgroup characterised by respiratory symptoms, airflow obstruction, mosaic attenuation with air trapping on chest imaging and constrictive obliterative bronchiolitis, often with nodular proliferation of neuroendocrine cells with/without tumourlets/carcinoid tumours on histology. Surgical lung biopsy is the diagnostic gold standard. However, in the appropriate clinical and radiological setting, transbronchial lung biopsy may also allow a confident diagnosis of DIPNECH syndrome. PMID:27076588

  13. Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detection of primary site in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making: experience from a tertiary care centre in India

    PubMed Central

    Pankaj, Promila; Verma, Ritu; Jain, Anjali; Belho, Ethel S.; Mahajan, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare, heterogeneous group of tumours which usually originate from small, occult primary sites and are characterized by over-expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using Ga-68-labeled-somatostatin-analogues have shown superiority over other modalities for imaging of NETs. The objective of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detecting the primary site in patients with metastatic NETs of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making in such patients. Methods Between December 2011 and September 2014, a total of 263 patients underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT study in our department for various indications. Out of them, 68 patients (45 males, 23 females; mean age, 54.9±10.7 years; range, 31–78 years) with histopathologically proven metastatic NETs and unknown primary site (CUP-NET) on conventional imaging, who underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan as part of their clinical work-up were included for analyses. Histopathology (wherever available) and/or follow-up imaging were taken as reference standard. Quantitative estimation of SSTR expression in the form of maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of detected primary and metastatic sites was calculated. Follow-up data of individual patients was collected through careful survey of hospital medical records and telephonic interviews. Results Maximum patients presented to our department with hepatic metastasis (50 out of 68 patients) and grade I NETs (>50%). Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan identified primary sites in 40 out of these 68 patients i.e., in approximately 59% patients. Identified primary sites were: small intestine [19], rectum [8], pancreas [7], stomach [4], lung [1] and one each in rare sites in kidney and prostate. In one patient, 2 primary sites were identified (one each in stomach and duodenum). Mean SUVmax of the detected primary sites was

  14. Neuroendocrine differentiation in cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Savargaonkar, P R; Hale, R J; Mutton, A; Manning, V; Buckley, C H

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To examine neuroendocrine differentiation, as shown by chromogranin A (CGA) expression, in cervical carcinomas. METHODS: Sixty seven cervical carcinomas were studied and were classified as adenocarcinomas, adenosquamous carcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas based on the assessment of haematoxylin and eosin staining and stains for mucin. Where features of glandular differentiation were identified, sections were also stained for evidence of intestinal type mucin. CGA immunostaining was done and the results were graded on a three point scale: 0, + (1-5% of cells positive) and ++ (> 5% of cells positive). These findings were then analysed with respect to lymph node status, tumour differentiation and clinical outcome. RESULTS: There were 32 adenocarcinomas, 18 adenosquamous carcinomas and 17 squamous cell carcinomas. Positive staining was seen in 14 (20.9%) cases, of which four were strongly positive. All but one case were either adenocarcinomas or adenosquamous carcinomas. There was a trend for CGA positivity to be related to intestinal differentiation but this failed to reach statistical significance. No correlation could be demonstrated between CGA staining and lymph node status, tumour differentiation and clinical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Neuroendocrine differentiation is common in cervical carcinomas where there is evidence of glandular differentiation. Whilst the numbers in this study are relatively small, the presence of neuroendocrine cells in otherwise typical carcinomas does not seem to have any association with clinical behaviour. Images PMID:8655680

  15. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  16. Metastatic Insulinoma Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor Treated With 177Lu-DOTATATE Induction and Maintenance Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy: A Suggested Protocol.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2016-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented with frequent episodes of hypoglycemia. Imaging revealed a 6-cm pancreatic mass with several liver lesions. The pancreatic mass was resected and confirmed to be a well-differentiated insulinoma. Surgery improved but did not resolve her hypoglycemic episodes, and she was referred for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with 177Lu-DOTATATE to treat her residual disease. A modified protocol with a continuous IV dextrose infusion was used, and the treatments were well tolerated. After 4 induction and 2 maintenance treatments, her hypoglycemic symptoms resolved completely and her disease stabilized. She has been progression free for 24 months. PMID:26562579

  17. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Ru-Wen; Tsoi, Daphne T.

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy is a common cause of disseminated intravascular coagulation and usually presents as a chronic disorder in solid organ tumours. We present a rare case of recurrent acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in neuroendocrine carcinoma after manipulation, firstly, by core biopsy and, later, by cytotoxic therapy causing a release of procoagulants and cytokines from lysed tumour cells. This is reminiscent of tumour lysis syndrome where massive quantities of intracellular electrolytes and nucleic acid are released, causing acute metabolic imbalance and renal failure. This case highlights the potential complication of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation after trauma to malignant cells. PMID:23139666

  18. Mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas with neuroendocrine predominance.

    PubMed

    Ogbonna, Onyekachi Henry; Garcon, Marie Carmel; Syrigos, Kostas N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic tumors are rare and could arise from either the exocrine (ductal and acinar cells) or the endocrine (neuroendocrine cells) components of the pancreas. In some instances, the occurrence of pancreatic tumors comprising both acinar cells and neuroendocrine cells, with neuroendocrine cells making up more than 30% of the tumor, has been identified. This unique entity has been referred to as mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Only about 20 such cases have been reported in the literature. Case Report. We report an interesting case of MANEC with neuroendocrine cell predominance in a woman presenting with epigastric pain secondary to a pancreatic mass with acinar and endocrine differentiation. She underwent surgical resection of the tumor and was offered adjuvant treatment chemotherapy with carboplatin, etoposide, and radiotherapy for positive tumor resection margins. Conclusions. Given the paucity of the cases of MANEC, continuous reporting of these cases when identified should be encouraged to aid oncologists in understanding the disease and help establish standardized management. PMID:24348574

  19. Mixed Acinar-Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Pancreas with Neuroendocrine Predominance

    PubMed Central

    Ogbonna, Onyekachi Henry; Syrigos, Kostas N.; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic tumors are rare and could arise from either the exocrine (ductal and acinar cells) or the endocrine (neuroendocrine cells) components of the pancreas. In some instances, the occurrence of pancreatic tumors comprising both acinar cells and neuroendocrine cells, with neuroendocrine cells making up more than 30% of the tumor, has been identified. This unique entity has been referred to as mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Only about 20 such cases have been reported in the literature. Case Report. We report an interesting case of MANEC with neuroendocrine cell predominance in a woman presenting with epigastric pain secondary to a pancreatic mass with acinar and endocrine differentiation. She underwent surgical resection of the tumor and was offered adjuvant treatment chemotherapy with carboplatin, etoposide, and radiotherapy for positive tumor resection margins. Conclusions. Given the paucity of the cases of MANEC, continuous reporting of these cases when identified should be encouraged to aid oncologists in understanding the disease and help establish standardized management. PMID:24348574

  20. Neuroendocrine Adenoma of the Middle Ear: A Rare Histopathological Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    McGinness, Sam; Coleman, Hedley; Varikatt, Winny; da Cruz, Melville

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours occur throughout the body but are rare in the head and neck region and particularly rare in the middle ear. Clinical findings are often nonspecific and therefore pose a diagnostic challenge. Furthermore, the nomenclature of neuroendocrine tumours of the middle ear is historically controversial. Herein a case is presented of a middle ear adenoma in a 33-year-old patient who presented with otalgia, hearing loss, and facial nerve palsy. A brief discussion is included regarding the histopathological features of middle ear adenomas and seeks to clarify the correct nomenclature for these tumours. PMID:27429819

  1. Clinical utility of indigenously formulated single-vial lyophilized HYNIC-TOC kit in evaluating Gastro-entero Pancreatic neuro endocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Shinto, Ajit S; Kamaleshwaran, K; Vyshak, K; Sudhakar, Natarajan; Banerjee, Sharmila; Korde, Aruna; Samuel, Grace; Mallia, Madhav

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and utility of 99mTc HYNIC-TOC planar scintigraphy and SPECT/CT in the diagnosis, staging and management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GPNETs). Methods: 22 patients (median age, 46 years) with histologically proven gastro- entero- pancreatic NETs underwent 99mTc HYNIC-TOC whole body scintigraphy and regional SPECT/CT as indicated. Scanning was performed after injection of 370-550 MBq (10-15 mCi) of 99mTc HYNIC-TOC intravenously. Images were evaluated by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians both qualitatively as well as semi quantitatively (tumor to background and tumor to normal liver ratios on SPECT -CT images). Results of SPECT/CT were compared with the results of conventional imaging. Histopathology results and follow-up somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with 99mTc HYNIC TOC or conventional imaging with biochemical markers were considered to be the reference standards. Results: 99mTc HYNIC TOC showed sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and 85.7%, respectively, for primary tumor and 100% and 86% for metastases. It was better than conventional imaging modalities for the detection of both primary tumor (P<0.001) and metastases (P<0.0001). It changed the management strategy in 6 patients (31.8%) and supported management decisions in 8 patients (36.3%). Conclusion: 99mTc HYNIC TOC SPECT/CT appears to be a highly sensitive and specific modality for the detection and staging of GPNETs. It is better than conventional imaging for the evaluation of GPNETs and can have a significant impact on patient management and planning further therapeutic options. PMID:27408857

  2. Comparison between 68Ga-bombesin (68Ga-BZH3) and the cRGD tetramer 68Ga-RGD4 studies in an experimental nude rat model with a neuroendocrine pancreatic tumor cell line

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Receptor scintigraphy gains more interest for diagnosis and treatment of tumors, in particular for neuroendocrine tumors (NET). We used a pan-Bombesin analog, the peptide DOTA-PEG2-[D-tyr6, β-Ala11, Thi13, Nle14] BN(6-14) amide (BZH3). BZH3 binds to at least three receptor subtypes: the BB1 (Neuromedin B), BB2 (Gastrin-releasing peptide, GRP), and BB3. Imaging of ανβ3 integrin expression playing an important role in angiogenesis and metastasis was accomplished with a 68Ga-RGD tetramer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinetics and to compare both tracers in an experimental NET cell line. Methods This study comprised nine nude rats inoculated with the pancreatic tumor cell line AR42J. Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans using 68Ga-BZH3 and 68Ga-RGD tetramer were performed (68Ga-RGD tetramer: n = 4, 68Ga-BZH3: n = 5). Standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated, and a two-tissue compartmental learning-machine model (calculation of K1 - k4 vessel density (VB) and receptor binding potential (RBP)) as well as a non-compartmental model based on the fractal dimension was used for quantitative analysis of both tracers. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the kinetic data. Results The PET kinetic parameters showed significant differences when individual parameters were compared between groups. Significant differences were found in FD, VB, K1, and RBP (p = 0.0275, 0.05, 0.05, and 0.0275 respectively). The 56- to 60-min SUV for 68Ga-BZH3, with a range of 0.86 to 1.29 (median, 1.19) was higher than the corresponding value for the 68Ga-RGD tetramer, with a range of 0.78 to 1.31 (median, 0.99). Furthermore, FD, VB, K1, and RBP for 68Ga-BZH3 were generally higher than the corresponding values for the 68Ga-RGD tetramer, whereas k3 was slightly higher for 68Ga-RGD tetramer. Conclusions As a parameter that reflects receptor binding, the increase of K1 for 68Ga-BZH3 indicated higher expression of bombesin receptors than that of

  3. A case of metachronous double primary neuroendocrine cancer in pancreas/ileum and uterine cervix

    PubMed Central

    Buccoliero, Anna Maria; Novelli, Luca; Sansovini, Maddalena; Severi, Stefano; Pieralli, Annalisa; Livi, Lorenzo; Fambrini, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of a 50-year-old female patient developing two primary cancers with neuroendocrine features. Initially the patient underwent surgery for an entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. During the subsequent follow-up she experienced some episodes of vaginal bleeding with negative PET scanning with the tracer fluorine-18 (F-18) fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). A Papanicolaou (pap) smear and an endometrial biopsy revealed a primary neuroendocrine cancer of the uterine cervix. The present case underlines the importance of clinical follow-up after a diagnosis of intestinal neuroendocrine tumor, investigating any new symptom. Female patients, after the diagnosis of entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma, must be recommended to continue screening pap test examinations for the likelihood of classical squamous and glandular cervical cancers and also for neuroendocrine cervical cancer. PMID:23009225

  4. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kleeff, Jorg; Korc, Murray; Apte, Minoti; La Vecchia, Carlo; Johnson, Colin D; Biankin, Andrew V; Neale, Rachel E; Tempero, Margaret; Tuveson, David A; Hruban, Ralph H; Neoptolemos, John P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a major cause of cancer-associated mortality, with a dismal overall prognosis that has remained virtually unchanged for many decades. Currently, prevention or early diagnosis at a curable stage is exceedingly difficult; patients rarely exhibit symptoms and tumours do not display sensitive and specific markers to aid detection. Pancreatic cancers also have few prevalent genetic mutations; the most commonly mutated genes are KRAS, CDKN2A (encoding p16), TP53 and SMAD4 - none of which are currently druggable. Indeed, therapeutic options are limited and progress in drug development is impeded because most pancreatic cancers are complex at the genomic, epigenetic and metabolic levels, with multiple activated pathways and crosstalk evident. Furthermore, the multilayered interplay between neoplastic and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment challenges medical treatment. Fewer than 20% of patients have surgically resectable disease; however, neoadjuvant therapies might shift tumours towards resectability. Although newer drug combinations and multimodal regimens in this setting, as well as the adjuvant setting, appreciably extend survival, ∼80% of patients will relapse after surgery and ultimately die of their disease. Thus, consideration of quality of life and overall survival is important. In this Primer, we summarize the current understanding of the salient pathophysiological, molecular, translational and clinical aspects of this disease. In addition, we present an outline of potential future directions for pancreatic cancer research and patient management. PMID:27158978

  5. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor - Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor - Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 04/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on how many people survive this type of ...

  6. Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis-as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery. PMID:24132440

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  8. Presence of sst5TMD4, a truncated splice variant of the somatostatin receptor subtype 5, is associated to features of increased aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Villa-Osaba, Alicia; Adrados, Magdalena; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Martín-Pérez, Elena; Culler, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are rare and heterogeneous tumors, and their biological behavior is not well known. We studied the presence and potential functional roles of somatostatin receptors (sst1-5), focusing particularly on the truncated variants (sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5) and on their relationships with the angiogenic system (Ang/Tie-2 and VEGF) in human GEP-NETs. Experimental Design We evaluated 42 tumor tissue samples (26 primary/16 metastatic) from 26 patients with GEP-NETs, and 30 non-tumoral tissues (26 from adjacent non-tumor regions and 4 from normal controls) from a single center. Expression of sst1-5, sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5, Ang1-2, Tie-2 and VEGF was analyzed using real-time qPCR, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Expression levels were associated with tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes. Functional role of sst5TMD4 was analyzed in GEP-NET cell lines. Results sst1 exhibited the highest expression in GEP-NET, whilst sst2 was the most frequently observed sst-subtype (90.2%). Expression levels of sst1, sst2, sst3, sst5TMD4, and sst5TMD5 were significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to their adjacent non-tumoral tissue. Lymph-node metastases expressed higher levels of sst5TMD4 than in its corresponding primary tumor tissue. sst5TMD4 was also significantly higher in intestinal tumor tissues from patients with residual disease of intestinal origin compared to those with non-residual disease. Functional assays demonstrated that the presence of sst5TMD4 was associated to enhanced malignant features in GEP-NET cells. Angiogenic markers correlated positively with sst5TMD4, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical/fluorescence studies. Conclusions sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in GEP-NETs and is associated to enhanced aggressiveness, suggesting its potential value as biomarker and target in GEP-NETs. PMID:26673010

  9. Prognostic significance of Ki-67 antigen and p53 protein expression in pancreatic duct carcinoma: a study of the monoclonal antibodies MIB-1 and DO-7 in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumour material.

    PubMed Central

    Linder, S.; Parrado, C.; Falkmer, U. G.; Blåsjö, M.; Sundelin, P.; von Rosen, A.

    1997-01-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material from 57 patients in whom curative resection of pancreatic carcinoma had been attempted was analysed by an immunohistochemical procedure to estimate proliferation and p53 protein expression. Using the monoclonal antibody (MAb) MIB-1, which recognizes a Ki-67 epitope, the proliferating cell index (PCI, percentage of immunoreactive tumour nuclei) and proliferating cell area (PCA, percentage of immunoreactive tumour nuclear area) were calculated using an interactive image analysis system and were compared with semiquantitative scoring of stainability. MAb DO-7, which recognizes both wild- and mutant-type p53 protein, was used to assess p53 expression in the same material. MIB-1 stainings were of high quality in 53 tumours. The median PCI was 29.7% (range 0.5-82.1%) and the median PCA was 10.6% (range 0.0-36.5%). There was a close correlation between PCI and PCA (P < 0.0001). PCI and PCA values were in conformity with the semiquantitative scoring (P < 0.0001). The p53 immunohistochemical stainings were successful in 48 tumours and the protein was expressed in 22 (46%). High PCI values (> 45%, n = 14) correlated with shorter survival time (P < 0.01). PCA (P < 0.05) and the expression of p53 protein (P < 0.001) were independent prognostic variables. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9218733

  10. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mammary gland in a dog.

    PubMed

    Nakahira, R; Michishita, M; Yoshimura, H; Hatakeyama, H; Takahashi, K

    2015-01-01

    A 10-year-old female border collie was presented with a mass (2 cm diameter) in the fifth mammary gland. The mass was located in the subcutis and the cut surface was grey-white in colour. Microscopically, the mass was composed of tumour cells arranged in nests of various sizes separated by delicate fibrovascular stroma. The tumour cells had small, round hypochromatic nuclei and abundant cytoplasm. Metastases were observed in the inguinal lymph node. Immunohistochemically, most tumour cells expressed cytokeratin (CK) 20, chromogranin A, neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin and oestrogen receptor-β, but not low molecular weight CK (CAM5.2), p63 and insulin. Ultrastructurally, the tumour cells contained a large number of electron-dense granules corresponding to neuroendocrine granules. Based on these findings, this case was diagnosed as a neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mammary gland. PMID:25670668

  11. Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Cervix: A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    V, Pavithra; Shalini, C.N. Sai; Priya, Shanmuga; Rani, Usha; Rajendiran, S; Joseph, Leena Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the cervix is a rare and a very aggressive tumour. Once being considered to be a rare type of squamous cell carcinoma, evidence has proven that most of the tumours express one or more markers of neuroendocrine differentiation. The behaviour of this rare malignancy is different from that of squamous cell carcinomas, with a high propensity for nodal and distant metastases. Hence, there is a need to highlight this histopathological entity. PMID:24701511

  12. Octreoscan SPET evaluation in the diagnosis of pancreas neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Briganti, V; Matteini, M; Ferri, P; Vaggelli, L; Castagnoli, A; Pieroni, C

    2001-12-01

    The study describes the results of Octreoscan SPET (OCTSPET) qualitative and semi-quantitative evaluation in 38 patients with suspected pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. SPET studies were acquired at 4 and 24 hours after the injection of 111-220 MBq of 111-In-pentetreotide (Octreoscan). Qualitative and semi-quantitative evaluations were performed. The semi-quantitative approach was based on the time course of Tumor/Non Tumor ratios (TNTinc) from 4 and 24 hours. The OCTSPET results were true positive in 18 of 19 patients (10 gastrinoma, 5 insulinoma, 1 neuroendocrine tumor, 1 glucagonoma and 1 carcinoid) and false negative in one insulinoma. Besides, 20 of 38 patients (52%) had clinical plans modified after OCTSPET; OCTSPET was the only positive diagnostic test in 14 of 19 patients (73%) and guided the surgery decision in 14 of 25 patients (56%). In conclusion, these data indicate that Octreoscan represents an excellent tool for the diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:11789028

  13. [Tumours and liver transplants].

    PubMed

    Mejzlík, Vladimír; Husová, Libuše; Kuman, Milan; Štěpánková, Soňa; Ondrášek, Jiří; Němec, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation as a curative treatment method can be used for selected primary liver tumours, in particular for hepatocellular carcinoma and rather rare semi-malignant tumours such as epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, further for infiltration of liver by metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (provided that metastases are only located in the liver and the primary tumour was removed) and for benign tumours (hemangiomas and adenomas) with oppression symptoms and size progression. Cholangiocarcinoma is not indicated for liver transplantation at the CKTCH Brno. In recent years liver transplants for hepatocellular carcinoma have increased and hepatocellular carcinoma has also been more frequently found ex post, in the explanted livers. Liver transplantation is indicated in selected patients with a good chance of long-term survival after liver transplantation (a generally accepted limit is 5 year survival of 50 % after transplantation). By 20 March 2015 there were liver transplants carried out on 38 patients - in 25 of them was hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosed before transplantation and in 13 it was found in the liver explants. 5 year survival following transplantation is reached by 53 % of this cohort. 32 % patients suffered from chronic hepatitis C. The longest surviving (32 years) patient at CKTCH Brno had liver transplanted for a big fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma, which points to the prognostic significance of tumour histology: the criterion only considered in some indication schemes for practical reasons. Benign liver tumours (adenomatosis, cystadenoma, hemangioma with oppression symptoms) are rather rare indications and the transplantation results are favourable. 4 patients underwent transplantation for infiltration of liver by carcinoid, tumour recurrence occurred in one. PMID:26375706

  14. Primary resection versus neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by resection for locally resectable or potentially resectable pancreatic carcinoma without distant metastasis. A multi-centre prospectively randomised phase II-study of the Interdisciplinary Working Group Gastrointestinal Tumours (AIO, ARO, and CAO)

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Thomas B; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G; Meyer, Thomas; Golcher, Henriette; Sauer, Rolf; Hohenberger, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Background The disappointing results of surgical therapy alone of ductal pancreatic cancer can only be improved using multimodal approaches. In contrast to adjuvant therapy, neoadjuvant chemoradiation is able to facilitate resectability with free margins and to lower lymphatic spread. Another advantage is better tolerability which consecutively allows applying multimodal treatment in a higher number of patients. Furthermore, the synopsis of the overall survival results of neoadjuvant trials suggests a higher rate compared to adjuvant trials. Methods/Design As there are no prospectively randomised studies for neoadjuvant therapy, the Interdisciplinary Study Group of Gastrointestinal Tumours of the German Cancer Aid has started such a trial. The study investigates the effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally resectable or probably resectable cancer of the pancreatic head without distant metastasis on median overall survival time compared to primary surgery. Adjuvant chemotherapy is integrated into both arms. Discussion The protocol of the study is presented in condensed form after an introducing survey on adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:17338829

  15. Medical Treatment of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rinke, Anja; Michl, Patrick; Gress, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of the clinically and prognostically heterogeneous neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) should be based on a multidisciplinary approach, including surgical, interventional, medical and nuclear medicine-based therapeutic options. Medical therapies include somatostatin analogues, interferon-α, mTOR inhibitors, multikinase inhibitors and systemic chemotherapy. For the selection of the appropriate medical treatment the hormonal activity, primary tumor localization, tumor grading and growth behaviour as well as the extent of the disease must be considered. Somatostatin analogues are mainly indicated in hormonally active tumors for symptomatic relief, but antiproliferative effects have also been demonstrated, especially in well-differentiated intestinal NET. The efficacy of everolimus and sunitinib in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) has been demonstrated in large placebo-controlled clinical trials. pNETs are also chemosensitive. Streptozocin-based chemotherapeutic regimens are regarded as current standard of care. Temozolomide in combination with capecitabine is an alternative that has shown promising results that need to be confirmed in larger trials. Currently, no comparative studies and no molecular markers are established that predict the response to medical treatment. Therefore the choice of treatment for each pNET patient is based on individual parameters taking into account the patient’s preference, expected side effects and established response criteria such as proliferation rate and tumor load. Platin-based chemotherapy is still the standard treatment for poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. Clearly, there is an unmet need for new systemic treatment options in patients with extrapancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:24213230

  16. Multimodal management of neuroendocrine liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Frilling, Andrea; Sotiropoulos, Georgios C; Li, Jun; Kornasiewicz, Oskar; Plöckinger, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    Background: The incidence of neuroendocrine tumours (NET) has increased over the past three decades. Hepatic metastases which occur in up to 75% of NET patients significantly worsen their prognosis. New imaging techniques with increasing sensitivity enabling tumour detection at an early stage have been developed. The treatment encompasses a panel of surgical and non-surgical modalities. Methods: This article reviews the published literature related to management of hepatic neuroendocrine metastases. Results: Abdominal computer tomography, magnetic resonance tomography and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy are widely accepted imaging modalities. Hepatic resection is the only potentially curative treatment. Liver transplantation is justified in highly selected patients. Liver-directed interventional techniques and locally ablative measures offer effective palliation. Promising novel therapeutic options offering targeted approaches are under evaluation. Conclusions: The treatment of neuroendocrine liver metastases still needs to be standardized. Management in centres of expertise should be strongly encouraged in order to enable a multidisciplinary approach and personalized treatment. Development of molecular prognostic factors to select treatment according to patient risk should be attempted. PMID:20662787

  17. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, C; Hofmann, B T; Wolters-Eisfeld, G; Bockhorn, M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that the current standard therapeutic options for pancreatic cancer are not adequate and still do not meet the criteria to cure patients suffering from this lethal disease. Although research over the past decade has shown very interesting and promising new therapeutic options for these patients, only minor clinical success was achieved. Therefore, there is still an urgent need for new approaches that deal with early detection and new therapeutic options in pancreatic cancer. To provide optimal care for patients with pancreatic cancer, we need to understand better its complex molecular biology and thus to identify new target molecules that promote the proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer cells. In spite of significant progress in curing cancers with chemotherapy, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most resistant solid tumour cancers and many studies suggest that drug-resistant cancer cells are the most aggressive with the highest relapse and metastatic rates. In this context, activated Notch signalling is strongly linked with chemoresistance and therefore reflects a rational new target to circumvent resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Here, we have focused our discussion on the latest research, current therapy options and recently identified target molecules such as Notch-2 and the heparin-binding growth factor midkine, which exhibit a wide range of cancer-relevant functions and therefore provide attractive new therapeutic target molecules, in terms of pancreatic cancer and other cancers also. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24024905

  18. Novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shing-Chun; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has become the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the last two decades. Only 3%-15% of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had 5 year survival rate. Drug resistance, high metastasis, poor prognosis and tumour relapse contributed to the malignancies and difficulties in treating pancreatic cancer. The current standard chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is gemcitabine, however its efficacy is far from satisfactory, one of the reasons is due to the complex tumour microenvironment which decreases effective drug delivery to target cancer cell. Studies of the molecular pathology of pancreatic cancer have revealed that activation of KRAS, overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2, inactivation of p16INK4A and loss of p53 activities occurred in pancreatic cancer. Co-administration of gemcitabine and targeting the molecular pathological events happened in pancreatic cancer has brought an enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of gemcitabine. Therefore, studies looking for novel targets in hindering pancreatic tumour growth are emerging rapidly. In order to give a better understanding of the current findings and to seek the direction in future pancreatic cancer research; in this review we will focus on targets suppressing tumour metastatsis and progression, KRAS activated downstream effectors, the relationship of Notch signaling and Nodal/Activin signaling with pancreatic cancer cells, the current findings of non-coding RNAs in inhibiting pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, brief discussion in transcription remodeling by epigenetic modifiers (e.g., HDAC, BMI1, EZH2) and the plausible therapeutic applications of cancer stem cell and hyaluronan in tumour environment. PMID:25152585

  19. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  20. Future Directions in the Biology of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Daniel M; Dasari, Arvind; Yao, James C

    2016-07-01

    The neuroendocrine field is experiencing an ever-accelerating expansion of data about the makeup of these tumors whose biology has long been opaque. Genome sequencing and epigenetic data regarding copy number variations, methylation events, and expression profiling are increasingly available for small bowel and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, in addition to building larger and more robust genetic and epigenetic datasets, the remaining challenge is moving beyond the data toward meaningful information, knowledge, and wisdom. Herein, we will offer perspectives on the existing data and thoughts on future directions. PMID:27295529

  1. Treatment Options for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound. Tissue may also be removed during a laparoscopy (a surgical incision made in the wall of ... The instrument may be used during surgery or laparoscopy or inserted through the skin. This procedure is ...

  2. [Neuroendocrine tumors: Peptide receptors radionuclide therapy (PRRT)].

    PubMed

    Papamichail, Dimitris G; Exadaktylou, Paraskevi E; Chatzipavlidou, Vasiliki D

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (neuroendocrine tumors-NET) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with a common embryological origin and diverse biological behavior, derived from cells of the neuroendocrine system, the system APUD (amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation). They are characterized by overexpression of all five somatostatin receptors (SSTR1-SSTR5), particularly type 2 (SST2). Surgical resection of the tumor is the treatment option, with a possibility of complete remission in patients with limited disease. Somatostatin analogs (octreotide and lanreotide) are the treatment of choice in patients with residual disease, particularly when it comes to NET non-pancreatic origin. Systemic chemotherapy is administered primarily to patients with poorly differentiated carcinomas. PRRT treatment is recommended in case of non-responsiveness of the disease. The ideal candidates for PRRT are patients with unresectable disease of high and intermediate differentiation. Somatostatine analogs radiolabelled with Indium-111 ((111)In), Yttrium-90 ((90)Y), Lutetium-177 ((177)Lu) and Bismuth-213 ((213)Bi), are selectively concentrated in the tumor cells, causing maximum tissue damage to tumors and with fewer effects on healthy tissue and the immune system. In the current review, it was demonstrated that patients with unresectable grade 1 or 2 disease showed increased PFS (progression free survival) and OS (overall survival), while quality of life was improved after PRRT treatment as compared to somatostatin analogs, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. PMID:27035909

  3. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  4. Genetic associations with neuroendocrine tumor risk: results from a genome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    Du, Yeting; Ter-Minassian, Monica; Brais, Lauren; Brooks, Nichole; Waldron, Amanda; Chan, Jennifer A; Lin, Xihong; Kraft, Peter; Christiani, David C; Kulke, Matthew H

    2016-08-01

    The etiology of neuroendocrine tumors remains poorly defined. Although neuroendocrine tumors are in some cases associated with inherited genetic syndromes, such syndromes are rare. The majority of neuroendocrine tumors are thought to be sporadic. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify potential genetic risk factors for sporadic neuroendocrine tumors. Using germline DNA from blood specimens, we genotyped 909,622 SNPs using the Affymetrix 6.0 GeneChip, in a cohort comprising 832 neuroendocrine tumor cases from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital and 4542 controls from the Harvard School of Public Health. An additional 241 controls from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute were used for quality control. We assessed risk associations in the overall cohort, and in neuroendocrine tumor subgroups. We identified no potential risk associations in the cohort overall. In the small intestine neuroendocrine tumor subgroup, comprising 293 cases, we identified risk associations with three SNPs on chromosome 12, all in strong LD. The three SNPs are located upstream of ELK3, a transcription factor implicated in angiogenesis. We did not identify clear risk associations in the bronchial or pancreatic neuroendocrine subgroups. This large-scale study provides initial evidence that presumed sporadic small intestine neuroendocrine tumors may have a genetic etiology. Our results provide a basis for further exploring the role of genes implicated in this analysis, and for replication studies to confirm the observed associations. Additional studies to evaluate potential genetic risk factors for sporadic pancreatic and bronchial neuroendocrine tumors are warranted. PMID:27492634

  5. Chronic Pancreatitis and Neoplasia: Correlation or Coincidence

    PubMed Central

    Bean, A. G.; Bowles, M.; Williamson, R. C. N.

    1997-01-01

    Any link between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could reflect the malignant potential of a chronic inflammatory process. Four patients with ductal adenocarcinomas had a long history of pancreatic pain (median duration 5 years) and showed clearcut evidence of chronic pancreatitis “downstream” of the tumour. Four were alcoholics and two heavy smokers. These four cases arose within a surgical series of approximately 250 patients with chronic pancreatitis, giving an incidence of 1.6 per cent. The incidence and anatomical distribution of carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could possibly be consistent with a casual relationship. PMID:9184877

  6. Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis—as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery. PMID:24132440

  7. Biochemical diagnosis of neuroendocrine GEP tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, K.

    1997-01-01

    Neuroendocrine gut and pancreatic tumors are known to contain and secret different peptide hormones and amines. During the last two decades, many radioimmunoassays and Elizas have been developed to analyze these substances in blood and urine, which has enabled clinicians to improve the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with various neuroendocrine tumors. Due to cost constraints in medical care, it is important to try to define the most useful biochemical markers from the clinical point of view. The glycoprotein chromogranin A has been shown to be a useful marker for diagnosing various neuroendocrine tumors, both by histopathology and circulating tumor markers. In patients with demonstrable endocrine tumors, about 90 percent of the patients present high circulating levels of chromogranin A. A hundred-fold increase of plasma chromogranin is seen in patients with midgut carcinoid tumors and liver metastases. The plasma levels of chromogranin A reflect the tumor mass and can be used for monitoring the patient during treatment and follow-up, although the day-to-day variation might be 30-40 percent. High circulating levels of the chromogranin A might be an indicator of bad prognosis in patients with malignant carcinoid tumors. Besides analyzing plasma chromogranin A, specific analyses such as urinary 5-HIAA in midgut carcinoid patients, serum gastrin in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and insulin/proinsulin in patients with hypoglycemia should be performed. In patients with small tumor masses or intermittent symptoms, provocative tests such as a meal stimulation test, secretin test or pentagastrin stimulation of tachykinin release can supplement the basal measurements of peptides and amines. To fully evaluate the growth potential in neuroendocrine tumors, traditional biochemical markers should be supplemented with indicators of growth proliferation (Ki-67, PCNA) and immunohistochemical staining for the adhesion molecule CD44 and the PDGF-alpha receptor

  8. Neuroendocrine hormone amylin in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Xi; Pan, Yan-Hong; Huang, Yan-Mei; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-05-10

    The neuroendocrine hormone amylin, also known as islet amyloid polypeptide, is co-localized, co-packaged and co-secreted with insulin from adult pancreatic islet β cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Specifically, amylin reduces secretion of nutrient-stimulated glucagon, regulates blood pressure with an effect on renin-angiotensin system, and delays gastric emptying. The physiological actions of human amylin attribute to the conformational α-helix monomers whereas the misfolding instable oligomers may be detrimental to the islet β cells and further transform to β-sheet fibrils as amyloid deposits. No direct evidence proves that the amylin fibrils in amyloid deposits cause diabetes. Here we also have performed a systematic review of human amylin gene changes and reported the S20G mutation is minor in the development of diabetes. In addition to the metabolic effects, human amylin may modulate autoimmunity and innate inflammation through regulatory T cells to impact on both human type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27162583

  9. Neuroendocrine hormone amylin in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Xi; Pan, Yan-Hong; Huang, Yan-Mei; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-01-01

    The neuroendocrine hormone amylin, also known as islet amyloid polypeptide, is co-localized, co-packaged and co-secreted with insulin from adult pancreatic islet β cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Specifically, amylin reduces secretion of nutrient-stimulated glucagon, regulates blood pressure with an effect on renin-angiotensin system, and delays gastric emptying. The physiological actions of human amylin attribute to the conformational α-helix monomers whereas the misfolding instable oligomers may be detrimental to the islet β cells and further transform to β-sheet fibrils as amyloid deposits. No direct evidence proves that the amylin fibrils in amyloid deposits cause diabetes. Here we also have performed a systematic review of human amylin gene changes and reported the S20G mutation is minor in the development of diabetes. In addition to the metabolic effects, human amylin may modulate autoimmunity and innate inflammation through regulatory T cells to impact on both human type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27162583

  10. Overview of Exocrine Pancreatic Pathobiology

    PubMed Central

    Pandiri, Arun R

    2014-01-01

    Exocrine pancreas is a source of several enzymes that are essential for the digestive process. The exocrine pancreatic secretion is tightly regulated by the neuroendocrine system. The endocrine pancreas is tightly integrated anatomically and physiologically with the exocrine pancreas and modulates its function. Compound-induced pancreatitis is not a common event in toxicology or drug development but it becomes a significant liability when encountered. Understanding the species-specific differences in physiology is essential to understand the underlying pathobiology of pancreatic disease in animal models and its relevance to human disease. This review will mainly focus on understanding the morphology and physiology of the pancreas, unique islet-exocrine interactions, and pancreatitis. PMID:24190915

  11. Endoscopic mucosal resection of early stage colon neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Yasushi; Uedo, Noriya; Ishihara, Ryu; Tomita, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Early stage colorectal neuroendocrine carcinoma is rare. A small colon tumour was found in a 56-year-old man during diagnostic colonoscopy performed after a positive faecal occult blood test, and he was referred for treatment. A slightly reddish superficial elevated lesion with a shallow depression 10 mm in size was found in the transverse colon. Magnifying narrow-band imaging revealed disrupted irregular microvessels and the absence of a surface pattern in the depressed area. En bloc endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) of the tumour was undertaken. The tumour was positive for chromogranin A and synaptophysin, and had a mitotic rate of >20/10 high-power fields and a Ki-67 proliferative index of >50%; it was diagnosed as a neuroendocrine carcinoma. The tumour minimally invaded the submucosa (300 μm) without lymphovascular involvement. The patient was followed up carefully, and at 1 year after EMR, no recurrence was found using colonoscopy and CT scans. PMID:25737221

  12. Neuroendocrine mechanisms in athletes.

    PubMed

    Misra, Madhusmita

    2014-01-01

    Athletic activity may be associated with alterations in various neuroendocrine axes depending on the state of energy availability. In addition, genetic factors and an underlying predilection for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may predispose some athletes to develop functional hypothalamic amenorrhea earlier than other athletes. In conditions of low energy availability associated with athletic activity, changes that occur in various neuroendocrine axes are primarily adaptive, and aim to either conserve energy for the most essential functions, or allow the body to draw on its reserves to meet energy needs. These hormonal changes, however, then lead to changes in body composition and bone metabolism. Impaired bone accrual in younger athletes and low bone density in older athletes constitutes the major pathologic consequence of neuroendocrine changes associated with low energy availability. The female athlete triad of low energy availability, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone density is prevalent in certain kinds of sports and activities, particularly endurance sports, gymnastics, and ballet. It is essential to screen for this condition in athletes at every preparticipation physical and during office visits, and to put in place an effective treatment team to manage the triad early, in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25248600

  13. Neuroendocrine Role for VGF

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jo E.; Brameld, John M.; Jethwa, Preeti H.

    2015-01-01

    The vgf gene (non-acronymic) is highly conserved and was identified on the basis of its rapid induction in vitro by nerve growth factor, although can also be induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial-derived growth factor. The VGF gene gives rise to a 68 kDa precursor polypeptide, which is induced robustly, relatively selectively and is synthesized exclusively in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells. Post-translational processing by neuroendocrine specific prohormone convertases in these cells results in the production of a number of smaller peptides. The VGF gene and peptides are widely expressed throughout the brain, particularly in the hypothalamus and hippocampus, in peripheral tissues including the pituitary gland, the adrenal glands, and the pancreas, and in the gastrointestinal tract in both the myenteric plexus and in endocrine cells. VGF peptides have been associated with a number of neuroendocrine roles, and in this review, we aim to describe these roles to highlight the importance of VGF as therapeutic target for a number of disorders, particularly those associated with energy metabolism, pain, reproduction, and cognition. PMID:25699015

  14. Classifying pancreatic cancer using gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Ayars, Michael; Goggins, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Despite some advances in our understanding of the molecular characteristics of pancreatic cancer, much more progress is needed. In a new study, RNA profiling of pancreatic cancers was used to identify gene signatures of tumour cells and stromal cells to help predict patient outcomes. PMID:26484444

  15. Clinicopathologic significance of immunostaining of α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked protein and death domain-associated protein in neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi-Fan; Kasajima, Atsuko; Yazdani, Samaneh; Chan, Monica S M; Wang, Lin; He, Yang-Yang; Gao, Hong-Wen; Sasano, Hironobu

    2013-10-01

    α-Thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked protein (ATRX) and death domain-associated protein (DAXX) genes are tumor suppressors whose mutations have been identified in sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors as well as in patients with MEN1. However, it is unknown whether ATRX and DAXX alterations are specific for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. In addition, the association of ATRX/DAXX protein loss with tumor cell proliferation has not been examined. We, therefore, immunostained ATRX and DAXX in 10 gastric, 15 duodenal, 20 rectal, 70 pancreatic, and 22 pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors with 15 nonneoplastic pancreases and 27 pancreatic adenocarcinomas to elucidate the site-specific roles of ATRX/DAXX abnormalities. At least 1 loss of ATRX and DAXX immunoreactivity was detected in all neuroendocrine tumor cases but not in any of nonneoplastic pancreatic tissues or pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The loss of DAXX protein was correlated with the Ki-67 index (ATRX, P = .904; DAXX, P = .044). The status of DAXX immunoreactivity correlated positively with World Health Organization histologic grade (P = .026). These results suggest that the status of ATRX or DAXX protein loss in neuroendocrine tumor differed among the organs in which these tumors arose, and these proteins may play site-specific roles in the development of these tumors. PMID:23954140

  16. Pancreatic GIST with pancreas divisum: A new entity

    PubMed Central

    Soufi, Mehdi; Bouziane, Mohammed; Massrouri, Rahal; Chad, Bouziane

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are uncommon intra-abdominal tumours. These tumours tend to arise with a higher frequency in the stomach and the small bowel. In fewer than 5% of cases, they originate primarily from extra-gastrointestinal tumours (EGISTs). Gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the pancreas is very rare. Only few cases have been published. We report the first case of stromal tumour of the pancreas with concomitant pancreas divisum. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 39-year-old male who presented with constipation and abdominal pain. A computerized tomography demonstrated a 9 cm pancreatic mass, without liver lesions. A Whipple procedure with segmental colectomy was performed with success. After 24 months follow up, the patient is doing well and disease-free. DISCUSSION Mesenchymal tumours of the pancreas are extremely rare, accounting for less than 1% of all pancreatic tumours. The endoscopic ultrasound is helpful for diagnosis. Surgical resection with negative pathologic margins remains the treatment of choice. CONCLUSION in our knowledge, this is the first case of pancreatic GIST with pancreas divisum. Although pancreatic GISTs are uncommon tumours, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions. Even though the tumour can be evaluated as high risk, treatment must be aggressive in order to improve survival rate. PMID:23123418

  17. Pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers.

    PubMed

    Buck, Andreas K; Herrmann, Ken; Eckel, Florian; Beer, Ambros J

    2011-01-01

    Morphology-based imaging modalities have replaced classical conventional nuclear medicine modalities for detection of liver or pancreatic lesions. With positron emission tomography and the glucose analog F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), a sensitive and specific modality for the detection of hepatic metastases and extrahepatic tumor deposits from hepatocellular or pancreatic cancer is available. F-18 FDG PET can increase the accuracy of staging primary tumors of the liver or the pancreas, and can be used for response monitoring. Radiopharmaceuticals such as Ga-68 DOTATOC and F-18 DOPA allow the specific detection of neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors and their metastatic deposits. Hybrid scanners such as PET-CT integrate morphologic and metabolic information, and allow to increase the sensitivity and specificity of noninvasive imaging in many tumor entities. The development of specific radiopharmaceuticals and technical innovations such as SPECT-CT has increased the reliability of conventional scintigraphic imaging. This chapter focuses on the use of PET-CT in hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancers. PMID:21331938

  18. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  19. [Management of metabolic disorders induced by everolimus in patients with differentiated neuroendocrine tumors: expert proposals].

    PubMed

    Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Vergès, Bruno; Coriat, Romain; N'guyen, Thierry; François, Eric; Hammel, Pascal; Niccoli, Patricia; Hentic, Olivia

    2014-02-01

    Medical management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors has recently been improved by new molecules of which the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. If digestive neuroendocrine tumors are rare, the incidence is in constant increase and the prevalence in digestive cancers put them right behind colorectal cancers. Everolimus has demonstrated efficacy in unresectable and progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, by doubling the median progression free survival (11 versus 4.6 months), with a median time of exposure to everolimus of nine months. Everolimus is generally maintained until progression or intolerance and some patients are treated during several years. Potential metabolic disorders induced by everolimus (dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia) in patients with life expectancy of several years, justify monitoring of these parameters and accurate treatment management algorithm. These will avoid worsening patient's prognostic, but also prematurely discontinue potentially effective treatment or contraindicate other therapeutic weapons, in a pathology in which there are multiple therapeutic options in metastatic phase. We propose a standard practice in terms of initial assessment, monitoring, care threshold, and therapeutic objectives to manage metabolic disorders, fitted to our patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:24557872

  20. [Grading of neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W; Schnabel, P A; Komminoth, P

    2016-07-01

    The current WHO classification of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) differentiates between typical carcinoids (low grade NET), atypical carcinoids (intermediate grade NET) and small cell and large cell carcinomas (high grade NET) according to the prognosis. Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas are graded in an identical way. Together with the TNM system this enables a preoperative estimation of the prognosis in biopsies and fine needle aspirates. Well-differentiated tumors are graded into G1 tumors by the number of mitoses, <2 per 10 high-power fields (HPF) and the Ki-67 (index <3 %) and G2 tumors (2-20 mitoses/10 HPF, Ki-67 3-20 %). Discrepancies between the number of mitoses and the Ki-67 index are not uncommon and in these cases the higher value of the two should be applied. The more differentiated tumors of the G3 type have to be differentiated from undifferentiated carcinomas of the small cell type and large cell type with a much poorer prognosis. Prognosis relevant grading of thyroid cancers is achieved by special subtyping so that the G1-G3 system is not applicable. The rare cancers of the parathyroid gland and of the pituitary gland are not graded. Adrenal tumors also have no grading system. The prognosis is dependent on the Ki-67 index and with some reservations on the established scoring systems. PMID:27379621

  1. Endocannabinoid Regulation of Neuroendocrine Systems.

    PubMed

    Tasker, Jeffrey G; Chen, Chun; Fisher, Marc O; Fu, Xin; Rainville, Jennifer R; Weiss, Grant L

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a part of the brain that is critical for sustaining life through its homeostatic control and integrative regulation of the autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine systems. Neuroendocrine function in mammals is mediated mainly through the control of pituitary hormone secretion by diverse neuroendocrine cell groups in the hypothalamus. Cannabinoid receptors are expressed throughout the hypothalamus, and endocannabinoids have been found to exert pronounced regulatory effects on neuroendocrine function via modulation of the outputs of several neuroendocrine systems. Here, we review the physiological regulation of neuroendocrine function by endocannabinoids, focusing on the role of endocannabinoids in the neuroendocrine regulation of the stress response, food intake, fluid homeostasis, and reproductive function. Cannabis sativa (marijuana) has a long history of recreational and/or medicinal use dating back to ancient times. It was used as an analgesic, anesthetic, and antianxiety herb as early as 2600 B.C. The hedonic, anxiolytic, and mood-elevating properties of cannabis have also been cited in ancient records from different cultures. However, it was not until 1964 that the psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, was isolated and its chemical structure determined (Gaoni & Mechoulam, 1964). PMID:26638767

  2. Multidisciplinary management of nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Folkert, Ian W; Hernandez, Paul; Roses, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are a rare and diverse group of tumors; nonfunctional (NF) PNETs account for the majority of cases. Most patients with NF-PNETs have metastatic disease at the time of presentation. A variety of treatment modalities exist, including medical, liver directed, and surgical treatments. Aggressive surgical management is associated with prolonged survival, however available data are limited by selection bias and the frequent combination of PNETs with carcinoid tumors. Although few patients with metastatic disease will be cured, application of currently available therapies in a multidisciplinary setting can lead to excellent outcomes with prolonged patient survival. PMID:27003988

  3. Current Concepts in Neuroendocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  4. Mimics of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kaza, Ravi K.; Azar, Shadi F.; Ruma, Julie A.; Francis, Isaac R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Several uncommon primary pancreatic tumors, inflammatory conditions, metastasis to the pancreas and peripancreatic masses can mimic the appearance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Differentiation between these lesions and PDA can be challenging, due to the overlap in imaging features; however, familiarity with their typical imaging features and clinical presentation may be helpful in their differentiation, as in some cases, invasive diagnostic tests or unnecessary surgery can be avoided. The different pathologies that can mimic PDA include inflammatory conditions such as the various forms of pancreatitis (chronic-focal mass-forming, autoimmune and groove pancreatitis), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, solid pseudopapillary tumors, metastasis (solid non-lymphomatous and hematologic), congenital variants (annular pancreas), as well as peripancreatic lesions (accessory spleen, adrenal masses, duodenal masses, lymph nodes and vascular lesions), and certain rare pancreatic tumors (e.g., acinar cell tumors, solid serous tumors, hamartoma and solitary fibrous tumors). The clinical presentation and imaging features of the most commonly encountered mimics of PDA are discussed in this presentation with representative illustrations. PMID:24060833

  5. Neuroendocrine Responses to Hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Tesfaye, Nolawit; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    The counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia is a complex and well-coordinated process. As blood glucose concentration declines, peripheral and central glucose sensors relay this information to central integrative centers to coordinate neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses and avert the progression of hypoglycemia. Diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, can perturb these counterregulatory responses. Moreover, defective counterregulation in the setting of diabetes can progress to hypoglycemia unawareness. While the mechanisms that underlie the development of hypoglycemia unawareness are not completely known, possible causes include altered sensing of hypoglycemia by the brain and/or impaired coordination of responses to hypoglycemia. Further study is needed to better understand the intricacies of the counterregulatory response and the mechanisms contributing to the development of hypoglycemia unawareness. PMID:21039590

  6. Neuroendocrine targets of endocrine disruptors

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Andrea C.

    2010-01-01

    The central neuroendocrine systems are responsible for the control of homeostatic processes in the body, including reproduction, growth, metabolism and energy balance, and stress responsiveness. These processes are initiated by signals in the central nervous system, specifically the hypothalamus, and are conveyed first by neural and then by endocrine effectors. The neuroendocrine systems, as the links between the brain and peripheral endocrine systems, play critical roles in the ability of an organism to respond to its environment under normal circumstances. When neuroendocrine homeostasis is disrupted by environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals, a variety of perturbations can ensue, particularly when endocrine disruption occurs during critical developmental time periods. This article will discuss the evidence for environmental endocrine disruption of neuroendocrine systems, and the sequelae on endocrine and reproductive functions. PMID:20363718

  7. Carcinoid tumour of the common bile duct--a novel complication of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, I W; Leach, I H; Smith, P G; Toghill, P J; Doran, J

    1990-01-01

    A 30 year old man with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome presented with obstructive jaundice caused by a carcinoid tumour of the mid- and upper common bile duct. This association is probably causally related in view of the propensity for patients with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome to develop neuroendocrine tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2379881

  8. Gastric hyperplastic polyps coexisting with early gastric cancers, adenoma and neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, K; Lewandowska, M; Białek, A; Ławniczak, M; Urasińska, E

    2016-03-01

    Gastric hyperplastic polyps (GHP) constitute up to 93% of all benign epithelial polyps of the stomach. The average probability of malignant transformation in GHP is 0.6-22% in large series. The aim of the study was to present the coexistence of GHP with early gastric cancer (EGC), gastric adenoma (GA), neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (NH) and well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour (NET G1). Three cases were studied to reveal clinical data and morphological changes and to assess the relationship between GHP and accompanying gastric neoplastic lesions. PMID:27179272

  9. Focal autoimmune pancreatitis and chronic sclerosing sialadenitis mimicking pancreatic cancer and neck metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Zhou, Qiang; Brigstock, David R; Yan, Su; Xiu, Ming; Piao, Rong-Li; Gao, Yan-Hang; Gao, Run-Ping

    2014-12-14

    Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) or chronic sclerosing sialadenitis (Küttner's tumour) is an uncommon disorder that has recently been confirmed as an IgG4-related disease. Here, we describe a rare case of a 53-year-old male patient who primarily presented with pancreatic body mass, left neck mass and several lumps in his lower lip mimicking pancreatic cancer (PC) and neck metastasis. The patient underwent pancreatic body mass and labial gland lumps resection as well as an ultrasound-guided biopsy of the left neck mass. He was diagnosed with IgG4-related focal type of AIP (f-AIP) and Küttner's tumour by immunohistochemistry. The patient responded well to corticosteroid therapy and remains healthy with no signs of recurrence at one year follow-up. The differentiation of f-AIP from PC is very important to avoid unnecessary pancreatic resection. PMID:25516685

  10. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  11. Neuroendocrine control of satiation.

    PubMed

    Asarian, Lori; Bächler, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Eating is a simple behavior with complex functions. The unconscious neuroendocrine process that stops eating and brings a meal to its end is called satiation. Energy homeostasis is mediated accomplished through the control of meal size via satiation. It involves neural integrations of phasic negative-feedback signals related to ingested food and tonic signals, such as those related to adipose tissue mass. Energy homeostasis is accomplished through adjustments in meal size brought about by changes in these satiation signals. The best understood meal-derived satiation signals arise from gastrointestinal nutrient sensing. Gastrointestinal hormones secreted during the meal, including cholecystokinin, glucagon-like peptide 1, and PYY, mediate most of these. Other physiological signals arise from activation of metabolic-sensing neurons, mainly in the hypothalamus and caudal brainstem. We review both classes of satiation signal and their integration in the brain, including their processing by melanocortin, neuropeptide Y/agouti-related peptide, serotonin, noradrenaline, and oxytocin neurons. Our review is not comprehensive; rather, we discuss only what we consider the best-understood mechanisms of satiation, with a special focus on normally operating physiological mechanisms. PMID:25390024

  12. [Management of neuroendocrine prostate carcinoma: Literature review].

    PubMed

    Yossi, S; Brahmi, T; Enachescu, C; Selmaji, I; Lapierre, A; Samlali, H; Chapet, O

    2016-06-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate carcinoma is a rare entity causing both diagnostic and therapeutic issues. There are basically four histological forms (adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine differentiation, carcinoid tumors, small cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas), which can be pure or mixed associated with prostatic carcinoma. There is no consensus on the management or the prognosis of these various tumor subtypes. We conducted a literature review aiming to determine the potential therapeutic implications. PMID:27340027

  13. Histopathology of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Nishi, Takayuki; Tanaka, Akira; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) arise from neuroendocrine cells distributed mainly in the mucosa and submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of NENs of the digestive system was changed, categorizing these tumors as grade 1 neuroendocrine tumor (NET), grade-2NET, neuroendocrine carcinoma (large- or small-cell type), or mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Such a classification is based on the Ki-67 index and mitotic count in histological material. For the accurate pathological diagnosis and grading of NENs, it is important to clearly recognize the characteristic histological features of GI-NENs and to understand the correct method of counting Ki-67 and mitoses. In this review, we focus on the histopathological features of GI-NENs, particularly regarding biopsy and cytological diagnoses, neuroendocrine markers, genetic and molecular features, and the evaluation of the Ki-67 index and mitotic count. In addition, we will address the histological features of GI-NEN in specific organs. PMID:23346552

  14. Histopathology of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Nishi, Takayuki; Tanaka, Akira; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) arise from neuroendocrine cells distributed mainly in the mucosa and submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of NENs of the digestive system was changed, categorizing these tumors as grade 1 neuroendocrine tumor (NET), grade-2NET, neuroendocrine carcinoma (large- or small-cell type), or mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Such a classification is based on the Ki-67 index and mitotic count in histological material. For the accurate pathological diagnosis and grading of NENs, it is important to clearly recognize the characteristic histological features of GI-NENs and to understand the correct method of counting Ki-67 and mitoses. In this review, we focus on the histopathological features of GI-NENs, particularly regarding biopsy and cytological diagnoses, neuroendocrine markers, genetic and molecular features, and the evaluation of the Ki-67 index and mitotic count. In addition, we will address the histological features of GI-NEN in specific organs. PMID:23346552

  15. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

  16. An Ectopic ACTH Secreting Metastatic Parotid Tumour.

    PubMed

    Dacruz, Thomas; Kalhan, Atul; Rashid, Majid; Obuobie, Kofi

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year old woman presented with features of Cushing's syndrome (CS) secondary to an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secreting metastatic parotid tumour 3 years after excision of the original tumour. She subsequently developed fatal intestinal perforation and unfortunately died despite best possible medical measures. Ectopic ACTH secretion accounts for 5-10% of all patients presenting with ACTH dependent hypercortisolism; small cell carcinoma of lung (SCLC) and neuroendocrine tumours (NET) account for the majority of such cases. Although there are 4 previous case reports of ectopic ACTH secreting salivary tumours in literature, to our knowledge this is the first published case report in which the CS developed after 3 years of what was deemed as a successful surgical excision of primary salivary tumour. Our patient initially had nonspecific symptoms which may have contributed to a delay in diagnosis. Perforation of sigmoid colon is a recognised though underdiagnosed complication associated with steroid therapy and hypercortisolism. This case demonstrates the challenges faced in diagnosis as well as management of patients with CS apart from the practical difficulties faced while trying to identify source of ectopic ACTH. PMID:26904316

  17. An Ectopic ACTH Secreting Metastatic Parotid Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Dacruz, Thomas; Kalhan, Atul; Rashid, Majid; Obuobie, Kofi

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year old woman presented with features of Cushing's syndrome (CS) secondary to an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secreting metastatic parotid tumour 3 years after excision of the original tumour. She subsequently developed fatal intestinal perforation and unfortunately died despite best possible medical measures. Ectopic ACTH secretion accounts for 5–10% of all patients presenting with ACTH dependent hypercortisolism; small cell carcinoma of lung (SCLC) and neuroendocrine tumours (NET) account for the majority of such cases. Although there are 4 previous case reports of ectopic ACTH secreting salivary tumours in literature, to our knowledge this is the first published case report in which the CS developed after 3 years of what was deemed as a successful surgical excision of primary salivary tumour. Our patient initially had nonspecific symptoms which may have contributed to a delay in diagnosis. Perforation of sigmoid colon is a recognised though underdiagnosed complication associated with steroid therapy and hypercortisolism. This case demonstrates the challenges faced in diagnosis as well as management of patients with CS apart from the practical difficulties faced while trying to identify source of ectopic ACTH. PMID:26904316

  18. Digestive neuroendocrine neoplasms: A 2016 overview.

    PubMed

    Merola, Elettra; Rinzivillo, Maria; Cicchese, Noemi; Capurso, Gabriele; Panzuto, Francesco; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2016-08-01

    Digestive neuroendocrine neoplasms (DNENs) have an incidence of 2.39 per 100,000 inhabitants per year, and a prevalence of 35 cases per 100,000; the gap between these rates is to be referred to the relatively long survival that characterizes the majority of these tumors, which can be thus considered as chronic oncological diseases. Up to 80% of patients are stage IV since the first diagnosis, presenting a 5-yr overall survival rate of 35%-55% and a twice higher mortality than limited disease. DNENs express somatostatin receptors in more than 80% of cases, detected through immunohistochemistry or functional imaging tests (FITs). This feature identifies patients who may benefit from "cold" somatostatin analogs (SSAs) or peptide receptors radionuclide therapy, although SSAs are sometimes used also with a negative uptake at FITs. The therapeutic options have been recently increased after the identification of molecular pathways involved in DNENs pathogenesis, and the subsequent use of targeted therapies (i.e., Everolimus and Sunitinib) for these neoplasms. This review offers an overview about pancreatic and small bowel NENs, critically underlining the issues that still need to be clarified and the future perspectives to be investigated. PMID:27212431

  19. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... It may also contain tissue from the pancreas, pancreatic enzymes, and blood. ... located behind the stomach. It produces chemicals (called enzymes) ... Pancreatic pseudocysts most often develop after an episode of ...

  20. Pancreatic abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Most people with pancreatic abscesses have had pancreatitis. However, the complication often takes 7 or more days to develop. Signs of an abscess can be seen on: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of the abdomen Ultrasound of the abdomen

  1. Pancreatitis - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100149.htm Pancreatitis - series To use the sharing features on this ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pancreatitis A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  2. Neuroendocrine effects of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Russel J.

    1991-09-01

    The light/dark cycle to which animals, and possibly humans, are exposed has a major impact on their physiology. The mechanisms whereby specific tissues respond to the light/dark cycle involve the pineal hormone melatonin. The pineal gland, an end organ of the visual system in mammals, produces the hormone melatonin only at night, at which time it is released into the blood. The duration of elevated nightly melatonin provides every tissue with information about the time of day and time of year (in animals that are kept under naturally changing photoperiods). Besides its release in a circadian mode, melatonin is also discharged in a pulsatile manner; the physiological significance, if any, of pulsatile melatonin release remains unknown. The exposure of animals including man to light at night rapidly depresses pineal melatonin synthesis and, therefore, blood melatonin levels drop precipitously. The brightness of light at night required to depress melatonin production is highly species specific. In general, the pineal gland of nocturnally active mammals, which possess rod-dominated retinas, is more sensitive to inhibition by light than is the pineal gland of diurnally active animals (with cone-dominated retinas). Because of the ability of the light/dark cycle to determine melatonin production, the photoperiod is capable of influencing the function of a variety of endocrine and non-endocrine organs. Indeed, melatonin is a ubiquitously acting pineal hormone with its effects on the neuroendocrine system having been most thoroughly investigated. Thus, in nonhuman photoperiodic mammals melatonin regulates seasonal reproduction; in humans also, the indole has been implicated in the control of reproductive physiology.

  3. Comparison of metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms to the breast and primary invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sambit K; Kim, Stacey A; DeLair, Deborah F; Bose, Shikha; Laury, Anna R; Chopra, Shefali; Mertens, Richard B; Dhall, Deepti

    2016-08-01

    Metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms to the breast may show considerable morphologic overlap with primary mammary carcinomas, particularly those showing evidence of neuroendocrine differentiation, and may be misdiagnosed as such. Accurate distinction between these two entities is crucial for determination of appropriate clinical management. The histologic and immunohistochemical features of metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms to the breast were studied and compared with the features of primary invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation, which served as controls. Of the metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms, 15 were well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors with carcinoid tumor-type morphology and 7 were poorly differentiated/high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas with small-cell or large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma morphology. The majority of the metastatic neoplasms originated in the lung and gastrointestinal tract. There were histologic similarities between metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms and invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation, both of which exhibited neuroendocrine histologic features (nested and trabecular architecture, minimal tubular differentiation, and characteristic nuclear features). Only one case of the invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation was modified Bloom-Richardson grade 1 (largely due to minimal tubular differentiation on most such tumors), and the invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation were often associated with in situ carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry was helpful in distinguishing metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms from invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation. Whereas the majority of invasive mammary carcinomas with neuroendocrine differentiation were positive for estrogen receptor and GATA3, metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasms were typically negative for estrogen receptor and GATA3, and metastatic well

  4. Expression of CD133 in neuroendocrine neoplasms of the digestive tract: a detailed immunohistochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Mia-Jan, Khalilullah; Munkhdelger, Jijgee; Lee, Mi-Ra; Ji, Sun-Young; Kang, Tae Young; Choi, EunHee; Cho, Mee-Yon

    2013-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are potentially malignant with variable biologic behavior that originates from neuroendocrine cells of digestive tract. Recently, the existence of cancer stem cells (CSC) was demonstrated in tumors of gastrointestinal tract. CD133 is a transmembrane glycoprotein that serves as a CSC marker in various malignancies. However, the expression of CD133 in neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of digestive tract has not been studied. We evaluated tissue expression of CD133 by immunohistochemistry in 90 NENs of digestive tract with their matched non-neoplastic mucosa including stomach (n=15), small intestine (n=7), appendix (n=3), colon (n=8), rectum (n=41), pancreas (n=2), gallbladder (n=4) and liver (n=10). Tumors were divided according to 2010 WHO classification. CD133 was expressed in 30.3% (17/56) of well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (NET), 26.1% (6/23) of poorly-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC) and 63.6% (7/11) of mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANECs). MANEC refers to existence of both adenocarcinoma and NEC together, each one comprising at least 30% of the tumor. CD133 was expressed in cytoplasm, luminal-side of cell membrane, or both and the staining pattern correlated with tumor growth pattern. CD133 expression was not significantly correlated with tumor grade, site, expression of neuroendocrine markers (chromogranin-A and synaptophysin) and patients' survival. Thus, CD133 expression may lack prognostic significance in GEP-NETs. Importantly, CD133 was not detectable in non-neoplastic neuroendocrine cells of digestive system including pancreatic islets. In conclusion, CD133 is expressed in poorly-differentiated NECs and well-differentiated NETs of the digestive tract. PMID:23615455

  5. Duodenal Leiomyosarcoma Mimicking a Pancreatic Pseudocyst

    PubMed Central

    Sperti, C.; Pasquali, C.; Di Prima, F.; Baffa, R.

    1994-01-01

    A case of duodenal leiomyosarcoma presenting as a cystic mass is reported. Amylase, tumour markers levels in the cyst fluid and radiological findings suggested an inflammatory pancreatic pseudocyst. Exploratory laparotomy and frozen section examination showed a smooth muscle tumour of the duodenum. Pancreatoduodenectomy with pylorus-preser vation was performed and the patient remained symptom-free at 8 months follow-up. PMID:7993864

  6. Expanding Therapy for Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Results from two phase III studies suggest that everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, and (177)Lutetium-DOTATATE, a radiopharmaceutical, may be effective new options for patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Both therapies were well tolerated and significantly prolonged progression-free survival. PMID:26826165

  7. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Wood, Laura D; Itoi, Takao; Takaori, Kyoichi

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease, for which mortality closely parallels incidence. Most patients with pancreatic cancer remain asymptomatic until the disease reaches an advanced stage. There is no standard programme for screening patients at high risk of pancreatic cancer (eg, those with a family history of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis). Most pancreatic cancers arise from microscopic non-invasive epithelial proliferations within the pancreatic ducts, referred to as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias. There are four major driver genes for pancreatic cancer: KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4. KRAS mutation and alterations in CDKN2A are early events in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Endoscopic ultrasonography and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration offer high diagnostic ability for pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection is regarded as the only potentially curative treatment, and adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine or S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, is given after surgery. FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, folinic acid [leucovorin], irinotecan, and oxaliplatin) and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) are the treatments of choice for patients who are not surgical candidates but have good performance status. PMID:26830752

  8. Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of pancreatic cancer, and it is now clear that pancreatic cancer is a disease of inherited (germ-line) and somatic gene mutations. The genes mutated in pancreatic cancer include KRAS2, p16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, and these are accompanied by a substantial compendium of genomic and transcriptomic alterations that facilitate cell cycle deregulation, cell survival, invasion, and metastases. Pancreatic cancers do not arise de novo, and three distinct precursor lesions have been identified. Experimental models of pancreatic cancer have been developed in genetically engineered mice, which recapitulate the multistep progression of the cognate human disease. Although the putative cell of origin for pancreatic cancer remains elusive, minor populations of cells with stem-like properties have been identified that appear responsible for tumor initiation, metastases, and resistance of pancreatic cancer to conventional therapies. PMID:18039136

  9. Ectopic Corticotropin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Pancreas Treated With 177Lu DOTATATE Induction and Maintenance Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; McCann, Karey; Riauka, Terence A; McEwan, Alexander J B

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman diagnosed with ectopic Cushing syndrome was found to have a 111In-octreotide-avid corticotropin-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with liver metastases. She was treated with 4 induction and 4 maintenance cycles of 177Lu-DOTATATE, which normalized her serum corticotropin levels and dramatically reduced the size of the pancreatic primary and liver metastases. PMID:26359569

  10. Incidental Finding of a Neuroendocrine Tumor Arising from Meckel Diverticulum During Hernia Repair - A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Bacalbasa, Nicolae; Costin, Radu; Orban, Carmen; Iliescu, Laura; Hurjui, Ioan; Hurjui, Marcela; Niculescu, Nicoleta; Cristea, Mirela; Balescu, Irina

    2016-04-01

    Meckel diverticulum is the most common abnormality of the gastrointestinal tract arising from an incomplete obliteration of the vitelline duct during the intrauterine life. Although tumor development in Meckel diverticulum is not a common situation, it can occur due to the persistence of cellular islets with gastric, pancreatic or intestinal origin. The presence of a neuroendocrine tumor arising from Meckel diverticulum is even scarcer. We present the case of a 59-year-old patient in whom a Meckel diverticulum was found during surgery for inguinal hernia; the histopathological and immunohistochemical studies revealed the presence of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor with low mitotic index. PMID:27069171

  11. Pancreatic insulinomas: Laparoscopic management

    PubMed Central

    Antonakis, Pantelis T; Ashrafian, Hutan; Martinez-Isla, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Insulinomas are rare pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors that are most commonly benign, solitary, and intrapancreatic. Uncontrolled insulin overproduction from the tumor produces neurological and adrenergic symptoms of hypoglycemia. Biochemical diagnosis is confirmed by the presence of Whipple’s triad, along with corroborating measurements of blood glucose, insulin, proinsulin, C-peptide, β-hydroxybutyrate, and negative tests for hypoglycemic agents during a supervised fasting period. This is accompanied by accurate preoperative localization using both invasive and non-invasive imaging modalities. Following this, careful preoperative planning is required, with the ensuing procedure being preferably carried out laparoscopically. An integral part of the laparoscopic approach is the application of laparoscopic intraoperative ultrasound, which is indispensable for accurate intraoperative localization of the lesion in the pancreatic region. The extent of laparoscopic resection is dependent on preoperative and intraoperative findings, but most commonly involves tumor enucleation or distal pancreatectomy. When performed in an experienced surgical unit, laparoscopic resection is associated with minimal mortality and excellent long-term cure rates. Furthermore, this approach confers equivalent safety and efficacy rates to open resection, while improving cosmesis and reducing hospital stay. As such, laparoscopic resection should be considered in all cases of benign insulinoma where adequate surgical expertise is available. PMID:26566426

  12. Safety and Tolerability of Everolimus as Second-line Treatment in Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma / Neuroendocrine Carcinoma G3 (WHO 2010) and Neuroendocrine Tumor G3 - an Investigator Initiated Phase II Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-18

    Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma,; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 3; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 1 [Well-differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma] That Switched to G3; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 2 [Moderately Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma] That Switched to G3; Neuroendocrine Tumor, Grade 3 and Disease Progression as Measured by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST 1.1.)

  13. Pancreatoduodenectomy for circumportal pancreas accompanying the retroportal pancreatic duct: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shonaka, Tatsuya; Inagaki, Mitsuhiro; Akabane, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Naoyuki; Shomura, Hiroki; Kudo, Takeaki; Orimo, Tatsuya; Oikawa, Futoshi; Aiyama, Takeshi; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Oikawa, Kensuke; Nakano, Shiro

    2012-10-01

    Circumportal pancreas (CP) is an extremely rare pancreatic fusion anomaly which is usually asymptomatic. This report presents the case of a patient with a tumor in the head of a CP and the retroportal accessory pancreatic duct in the pancreatic tissue behind the portal vein. A 53-year-old male was diagnosed with a nonfunctioning neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas and resection of the tumor was scheduled. The patient was revealed to have CP on preoperative computed tomography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, which showed the pancreatic tissue encircling the portal vein and the retroportal accessory pancreatic duct. The patient safely underwent pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy reconstructed with pancreaticogastrostomy. PMID:26181071

  14. Mucinous cyst exhibiting severe dysplasia in gastric heterotopic pancreas associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Antony; Storey, David; Lee, Cheok Soon; Murali, Rajmohan

    2007-11-21

    Heterotopic pancreatic tissue within the stomach is rare and dysplasia within heterotopic pancreatic tissue is very rare. We present the first report of a patient with concurrent occurrence of heterotopic pancreas in the stomach with a gastrointestinal stromal tumour. PMID:17963310

  15. Karyotypic abnormalities in tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Bardi, G.; Johansson, B.; Pandis, N.; Mandahl, N.; Bak-Jensen, E.; Andrén-Sandberg, A.; Mitelman, F.; Heim, S.

    1993-01-01

    Short-term cultures from 20 pancreatic tumours, three endocrine and 17 exocrine, were cytogenetically analysed. All three endocrine tumours had a normal chromosome complement. Clonal chromosome aberrations were detected in 13 of the 17 exocrine tumours: simple karyotypic changes were found in five carcinomas and numerous numerical and/or structural changes in eight. When the present findings and those previously reported by our group were viewed in conjunction, the most common numerical imbalances among the 22 karyotypically abnormal pancreatic carcinomas thus available for evaluation turned out to be, in order of falling frequency, -18, -Y, +20, +7, +11 and -12. Imbalances brought about by structural changes most frequently affected chromosomes 1 (losses in 1p but especially gains of 1q), 8 (in particular 8q gains but also 8p losses), and 17 (mostly 17q gain but also loss of 17p). Chromosomal bands 1p32, 1q10, 6q21, 7p22, 8p21, 8q11, 14p11, 15q10-11, and 17q11 were the most common breakpoint sites affected by the structural rearrangements. Abnormal karyotypes were detected more frequently in poorly differentiated and anaplastic carcinomas than in moderately and well differentiated tumours. Images Figure 1 PMID:8494707

  16. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  17. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the cervix presenting as intractable hyponatremic seizures due to paraneoplastic SIADH—a rare case report and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kuriakose, Santhosh; Umadevi, N; Mathew, Sheela; Supriya, NK; Aravindan, KP; Smitha, DS; Amritha Malini, G

    2014-01-01

    Herein is presented an interesting case of small-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the cervix which initially manifests as seizures due to hyponatremia caused by paraneoplastic syndrome of inappropriate anti diuretic hormone (SIADH). Awareness of a paraneoplastic syndrome at presentation can lead to early diagnosis and early initiation of treatment. The management is also unique in that it combines treating the paraneoplastic aspects as well as targeting the tumour itself. Multimodality treatment gives the best outcome in this aggressive tumour. PMID:25114722

  18. Indications for staging laparoscopy in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Antonella; Cameron, Iain C.; Gomez, Dhanwant

    2015-01-01

    Background To identify indications for staging laparoscopy (SL) in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer, and suggest a pre-operative algorithm for staging these patients. Methods Relevant articles were reviewed from the published literature using the Medline database. The search was performed using the keywords ‘pancreatic cancer’, ‘resectability’, ‘staging’, ‘laparoscopy’, and ‘Whipple's procedure’. Results Twenty four studies were identified which fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of the published data, the most reliable surrogate markers for selecting patients for SL to predict unresectability in patients with CT defined resectable pancreatic cancer were CA 19.9 and tumour size. Although there are studies suggesting a role for tumour location, CEA levels, and clinical findings such as weight loss and jaundice, there is currently not enough evidence for these variables to predict resectability. Based on the current data, patients with a CT suggestive of resectable disease and (1) CA 19.9 ≥150 U/mL; or (2) tumour size >3 cm should be considered for SL. Conclusion The role of laparoscopy in the staging of pancreatic cancer patients remains controversial. Potential predictors of unresectability to select patients for SL include CA 19.9 levels and tumour size. PMID:26776846

  19. Notch Signaling in Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Judy S.; Singleton, Ciera S.; Miele, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoids and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors that arise from the neuroendocrine cells of the GI tract, endocrine pancreas, and the respiratory system. NETs remain significantly understudied with respect to molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, particularly the role of cell fate signaling systems such as Notch. The abundance of literature on the Notch pathway is a testament to its complexity in different cellular environments. Notch receptors can function as oncogenes in some contexts and tumor suppressors in others. The genetic heterogeneity of NETs suggests that to fully understand the roles and the potential therapeutic implications of Notch signaling in NETs, a comprehensive analysis of Notch expression patterns and potential roles across all NET subtypes is required. PMID:27148486

  20. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) made in the past year. Recent findings Tropical pancreatitis associates with SPINK1 and/or CFTR gene mutations in approximately 50% of patients, similar to the frequency in idiopathic CP. Corticosteroids increase secretin-stimulated pancreatic bicarbonate concentrations in AIP by restoring mislocalized CFTR protein to the apical ductal membrane. Most patients with asymptomatic hyperenzymemia have pancreatic lesions of unclear significance or no pancreatic lesions. Common pitfalls in the use of diagnostic tests for EPI confound interpretation of findings in IBS and severe renal insufficiency. Further study is needed to improve the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) to diagnose CP. Celiac plexus block provides short term pain relief in a subset of patients. Summary Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the genetic associations of tropical pancreatitis, a reversible mislocalization of ductal CFTR in AIP, the association of asymptomatic pancreatic hyperenzymemia with pancreatic disorders, limitations of diagnostic tests for EPI, diagnosis of CP by EUS and endoscopic pancreatic function testing and treatment of pain. PMID:21844753

  1. Mucins in pancreatic cancer and its microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhwinder; Kumar, Sushil; Momi, Navneet; Sasson, Aaron R.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a lethal malignancy with poor prognosis owing to therapeutic resistance, frequent recurrence and the absence of treatment strategies that specifically target the tumour and its supporting stroma. Deregulated cell-surface proteins drive neoplastic transformations and are envisioned to mediate crosstalk between the tumour and its microenvironment. Emerging studies have elaborated on the role of mucins in diverse biological functions, including enhanced tumorigenicity, invasiveness, metastasis and drug resistance through their characteristic O-linked and N-linked oligosaccharides (glycans), extended structures and unique domains. Multiple mucin domains differentially interact and regulate different components of the tumour microenvironment. This Review discusses: the expression pattern of various mucins in the pancreas under healthy, inflammatory, and cancerous conditions; the context-dependent attributes of mucins that differ under healthy and pathological conditions; the contribution of the tumour microenvironment in pancreatic cancer development and/or progression; diagnostic and/or prognostic efficacy of mucins; and mucin-based therapeutic strategies. Overall, this information should help to delineate the intricacies of pancreatic cancer by exploring the family of mucins, which, through various mechanisms in both tumour cells and the microenvironment, worsen disease outcome. PMID:23856888

  2. Molecular Imaging of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquillo, Jorge A.; Chen, Clara C.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are a heterogeneous group of tumors that arise from neuroendocrine cells. These tumors may arise from various organs, including lung, thymus, thyroid, stomach, duodenum, small bowel, large bowel, appendix, pancreas, adrenal, and skin. Most are well differentiated and have the ability to produce biogenic amines and various hormones. NET usually occur sporadically but they also be associated with various familial syndromes. For the vast majority of NET, surgical resection is the treatment of choice whenever feasible. Localization of NET prior to surgery and for staging and follow-up relies on both anatomic and functional imaging modalities. In fact, the unique secretory characteristics of these tumors lend themselves to imaging by molecular imaging modalities, which can target specific metabolic pathways or receptors. Neuroendocrine cells have a variety of such target receptors and pathways for which radiopharmaceuticals have been developed, including [123I/131I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), [ 111In]pentetreotide, [68Ga] somatostatin analogs, [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), [11C/18F] dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), [11C] 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) 99mTc pentavalent dimercaptosuccinic acid ([99mTc] (V) DMSA, and [18F] fluorodopamine (FDA). Here, we review the molecular imaging approaches for NET using various radiopharmaceuticals. PMID:21167384

  3. Endoscopic imaging in the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pellicano, Rinaldo; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Altruda, Fiorella; Bruno, Mauro; Saracco, Giorgio M; De Angelis, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors deriving from the gastrointestinal (GI) neuroendocrine system. Since these neoplasms are usually very small, located deeply within the retroperitoneum or into an extramucosal site of the GI tract and, lastly, because they may be multi-sited, radiological imaging modalities, in combination with endoscopy, are the diagnostic workhorses in patients with GEP-NETs. Endoscopic approach is useful for detection, bioptic diagnosis and curative resection of small GEP-NETs of stomach, duodenum, jejuno-ileum, and colon-rectum. Moreover, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), associated with high frequency miniprobes, is a valuable procedure in regional staging of lesions of the GI wall and can provide information which has a remarkable impact on therapeutic choices. EUS is still the sole technique, in a substantial number of cases, providing a definitive diagnosis of pancreatic insulinoma and it detects and follows small lesions of the pancreas in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome. EUS should be performed in those cases in which morphological or molecular imaging modalities need to be supported because of negative or dubious results. In this review we describe the applications of endoscopic procedures in the management of GEP-NETs. PMID:27600643

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors / Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ultrasound. Tissue may also be removed during a laparoscopy (a surgical incision made in the wall of ... The instrument may be used during surgery or laparoscopy or inserted through the skin. This procedure is ...

  5. Pancreatic Schwannoma - A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    R, Sathyalakshmi; K, Chandramouleeswari; Devi, Nalli R. Sumitra

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic schwannomas are rare neoplasms. Only 47 cases have been reported in literature as of date. Age group that is commonly involved varies between the range of 20-87 years, with an almost equal sex ratio. Tumour size ranges from 1-20 cm. Locations where schwannomas can be encountered in the pancreas are in the vast majority, the head and body, the incidence being: head-40 %, junction of head and body-6 %, body-21 %, body and tail-15 %, tail-4 % and uncinate process-13 %, 60 % of the tumours are cystic, the rest being solid tumours. We hereby report a case where in total gastrectomy with distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was done for carcinoma stomach involving the stomach bed and pancreatic schwannoma was an incidental finding in this case. PMID:25177575

  6. Diffuse Idiopathic Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Cell Hyperplasia and Neuroendocrine Hyperplasia of Infancy.

    PubMed

    Carr, Laurie L; Kern, Jeffrey A; Deutsch, Gail H

    2016-09-01

    Although incidental reactive pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (PNECH) is seen on biopsy specimens in adults with chronic lung disease, disorders characterized by marked PNECH are rare. Primary hyperplasia of neuroendocrine cells in the lung and obstructive lung disease related to remodeling or physiologic constriction of small airways define diffuse idiopathic neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) in the adult and neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy (NEHI) in children. DIPENCH and NEHI share a similar physiology, typical imaging appearance, and increased neuroendocrine cells on biopsy. However, there are important differences related to the underlying disease mechanisms leading to disparate outcomes. PMID:27514602

  7. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  8. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  9. Pancreatic Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Poras; Bhadana, Utsav; Arora, Mohinder P

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis of the pancreas is extremely rare and in most of the cases mimics pancreatic carcinoma. There are a number of case reports on pancreatic tuberculosis with various different presentations, but only a few case series have been published, and most of our knowledge about this disease comes from individual case reports. Patients of pancreatic tuberculosis may remain asymptomatic initially and manifest as an abscess or a mass involving local lymph nodes and usually present with non-specific features. Pancreatic tuberculosis may present with a wide range of imaging findings. It is difficult to diagnose tuberculosis of pancreas on imaging studies as they may present with masses, cystic lesions or abscesses and mass lesions in most of the cases mimic pancreatic carcinoma. As it is a rare entity, it cannot be recommended but suggested that pancreatic tuberculosis should be considered in cases with a large space occupying lesions associated with necrotic peripancreatic lymph nodes and constitutional symptoms. Ultrasonography/computed tomography/endosonography-guided biopsy is the recommended diagnostic technique. Most patients achieve complete cure with standard antituberculous therapy. The aims of this study are to review clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, and management of pancreatic tuberculosis and to present our experience of 5 cases of pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:26884661

  10. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality. PMID:20016434

  11. Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Peter; Chang, David K; Nones, Katia; Johns, Amber L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Miller, David K; Christ, Angelika N; Bruxner, Tim J C; Quinn, Michael C; Nourse, Craig; Murtaugh, L Charles; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Fink, Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Chin, Venessa; Anderson, Matthew J; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wilson, Peter J; Cloonan, Nicole; Kassahn, Karin S; Taylor, Darrin; Quek, Kelly; Robertson, Alan; Pantano, Lorena; Mincarelli, Laura; Sanchez, Luis N; Evers, Lisa; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Humphris, Jeremy; Chou, Angela; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Rooman, Ilse; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Moran-Jones, Kim; Jamieson, Nigel B; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Grützmann, Robert; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Corbo, Vincenzo; Bassi, Claudio; Rusev, Borislav; Capelli, Paola; Salvia, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Petersen, Gloria M; Munzy, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Karim, Saadia A; Eshleman, James R; Hruban, Ralph H; Pilarsky, Christian; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo; Hofmann, Oliver; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Gill, Anthony J; Gibbs, Richard A; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2016-03-01

    Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development. PMID:26909576

  12. Irradiation Decreases the Neuroendocrine Biomarker Pro-Opiomelanocortin in Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Suzanne L.; Bryant, Jennifer L.; Babur, Muhammad; Riddell, Philip W.; Behrouzi, Roya; Williams, Kaye J.; White, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an extremely aggressive disease, commonly displaying therapy-resistant relapse. We have previously identified neuroendocrine and epithelial phenotypes in SCLC tumours and the neuroendocrine marker, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), correlated with worse overall survival in patients. However, the effect of treatment on these phenotypes is not understood. The current study aimed to determine the effect of repeated irradiation treatment on SCLC cell phenotype, focussing on the neuroendocrine marker, POMC. Results Human SCLC cells (DMS 79) were established as subcutaneous xenograft tumours in CBA nude mice and then exposed to repeated 2Gy irradiation. In untreated animals, POMC in the blood closely mirrored tumour growth; an ideal characteristic for a circulating biomarker. Following repeated localised irradiation in vivo, circulating POMC decreased (p< 0.01), in parallel with a decrease in tumour size, but remained low even when the tumours re-established. The excised tumours displayed reduced and distinctly heterogeneous expression of POMC compared to untreated tumours. There was no difference in the epithelial marker, cytokeratin. However, there were significantly more N-cadherin positive cells in the irradiated tumours. To investigate the tumour response to irradiation, DMS79 cells were repeatedly irradiated in vitro and the surviving cells selected. POMC expression was reduced, while mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, β1-integrin, fibroblast-specific protein 1, β-catenin and Zeb1 expression were amplified in the more irradiation-primed cells. There were no consistent changes in epithelial marker expression. Cell morphology changed dramatically with repeatedly irradiated cells displaying a more elongated shape, suggesting a switch to a more mesenchymal phenotype. Conclusions In summary, POMC biomarker expression and secretion were reduced in SCLC tumours which regrew after irradiation and in repeatedly irradiation (irradiation

  13. Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the sinonasal region.

    PubMed

    Bell, Diana; Hanna, Ehab Y; Weber, Randal S; DeMonte, Franco; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Lewis, James S; Cardesa, Antonio; Slootweg, Pieter J; Stenman, Göran; Gnepp, Douglas R; Devaney, Kenneth O; Rodrigo, Juan P; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Wenig, Bruce M; Westra, William H; Bishop, Justin A; Hellquist, Henrik; Hunt, Jennifer L; Kusafuka, Kimihide; Perez-Ordoñez, Bayardo; Williams, Michelle D; Takes, Robert P; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-04-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the sinonasal region, which are relatively uncommon but clinically very important, are reviewed here in the light of current knowledge. Using a definition for neuroendocrine based on phenotypic, histologic, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic features rather than histogenetic criteria, sinonasal neuroendocrine carcinomas are examined with a particular emphasis on the small-cell and large-cell subtypes. This is followed by revisiting olfactory neuroblastoma because it is also a tumor that shows a neuroendocrine phenotype. Kadish clinical and Hyams histologic grading systems as prognosticators of olfactory neuroblastoma are also considered in detail. Finally, controversies regarding sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma as a neuroendocrine tumor are discussed and a possible relationship with high-grade olfactory neuroblastoma is explored. Genetic events and current management of these tumors are also outlined. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E2259-E2266, 2016. PMID:26041714

  14. Extensive multiarterial resection attending total duodenopancreatectomy and adrenalectomy for MEN-1-associated neuroendocrine carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Egorov, Vyacheslav Ivanovich; Kharazov, Alexander Felixovich; Pavlovskaya, Alla Ivanovna; Petrov, Roman Valeryevich; Starostina, Natalia Sergeevna; Kondratiev, Eugeny Valerievich; Filippova, Ekaterina Mikhailovna

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNTs) are relatively uncommon although these neoplasms have been noted to grow in occurrence in recent decades. Surgical removal of locally advanced PNTs involving major vessels and adjacent organs is warranted by reason of an appreciably more favorable prognosis as compared to exocrine pancreas cancer. We are reporting a case of successful multi-organ resection combined with a wide excision of the superior mesenteric, common, proper, left and right hepatic arteries (in the presence of the hepatomesenteric trunk variant of aberrant arterial anatomy) for multifocal PNTs in the setting of multiple neuroendocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome. The procedure resulted in pain abolition, a significant improvement in the patient’s life quality and allowed her to return to work. Follow-up computed tomography at 15 mo post-surgery showed no evidence of disease recurrence. PMID:23443490

  15. A rare case of three different tumors in the same pancreatic specimen: a case report and brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Paiella, Salvatore; Luchini, Claudio; Amodio, Antonio; Rusev, Borislav; Bassi, Claudio; Manfredi, Riccardo; Frulloni, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumors (SPT) of the pancreas are rare neoplasms mainly affecting young women. Pancreatic serous cystadenomas (SCAs) and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) account for about 2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. The combination of these three lesions, to our knowledge, has never been described in literature. Here we report a case of combined SPT, SCA and PanNET affecting a 33-year-old woman. PMID:27284489

  16. Immunocytochemical analysis of the tissue location of cytokines (IL-2 and IL-12) in neuroendocrine lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, Aldona; Przewoźna, Mariola; Zabel, Maciej; Pankowski, Juliusz; Surdyk-Zasada, Joanna

    2003-01-01

    The study aimed at immunocytochemical evaluation of the cellular expression of two cytokines, IL-2 and IL-12 in lung carcinoids (n = 10), following the earlier demonstration of two markers of endocrine tumours (chromogranin A and NSE--neuron-specific enolase). In the immunocytochemical studies the classical avidin-biotinylated peroxidase (ABC) technique was used. Results of the tests were semiquantitatively appraised employing the IRS scale. In 9/10 cases intense reaction (score: 6-12 points) was noted for both lung neuroendocrine markers. In all cases of carcinoma co-expression of IL-2 and IL-12 was demonstrated in cells of the tumours. The cytokines showed a cytoplasmic localisation of mean (score: 3-4 points) or high (score: 6-12 points) intensity of reaction. Our studies point to a possible role of the two cytokines in the proliferation of lung neuroendocrine carcinomas but more detailed analysis is required on a broader material. PMID:14507073

  17. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  18. Prognostic and predictive markers in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Le, Nha; Sund, Malin; Vinci, Alessio

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is characterized by a poor prognosis and a low median survival, despite improvements observed for many other solid tumours. Intensive research efforts have been undertaken during the last decades to discover new prognostic and treatment predictive biomarkers for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The mainstay of medical treatment for the disease has been the well-tolerated nucleoside analogue, gemcitabine. The only targeted agent currently used in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients is the epithelial growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib in combination with gemcitabine. Recently, treatment regimens such as a combination of fluorouracil-leucovorin-irinotecan-oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) and the combination of nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine have been introduced for metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Although these treatment regimens significantly improve survival of patients, there are no good predictive biomarkers available that can be used to identify who would benefit most from them. Therefore, the search for predictive biomarkers that would facilitate personalization of chemotherapy is highly relevant. PMID:26769569

  19. Electrochemotherapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma treatment: pre-clinical and clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Leongito, Maddalena; Granata, Vincenza; Barbieri, Antonio; del Vecchio, Vitale; Falco, Michela; Nasto, Aurelio; Albino, Vittorio; Piccirillo, Mauro; Palaia, Raffaele; Amore, Alfonso; Giacomo, Raimondo di; Lastoria, Secondo; Setola, Sergio Venanzio; Fusco, Roberta; Petrillo, Antonella; Izzo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Background Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is currently one of the deadliest cancers with high mortality rate. This disease leads to an aggressive local invasion and early metastases, and is poorly responsive to treatment with chemotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy. Radical resection is still the only curative treatment for pancreatic cancer, but it is generally accepted that a multimodality strategy is necessary for its management. Therefore, new alternative therapies have been considered for local treatment. Conclusions Chemotherapeutic resistance in pancreatic cancer is associated to a low penetration of drugs into tumour cells due to the presence of fibrotic stroma surrounding cells. In order to increase the uptake of chemotherapeutic drugs into tumour cells, electrochemotherapy can be used for treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma leading to an increased tumour response rate. This review will summarize the published papers reported in literature on the efficacy and safety of electrochemotherapy in pre-clinical and clinical studies on pancreatic cancer. PMID:27069445

  20. Targeted radionuclide therapies for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Da Silva, R; Gravekamp, C; Libutti, S K; Abraham, T; Dadachova, E

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic malignancies, the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths, have an aggressive behavior with poor prognosis, resulting in a 5-year survival rate of only 4%. It is typically a silent malignancy until patients develop metastatic disease. Targeted radionuclide therapies of cancer such as radiolabeled peptides, which bind to the receptors overexpressed by cancer cells and radiolabeled antibodies to tumor-specific antigens provide a viable alternative to chemotherapy and external beam radiation of metastatic cancers. Multiple clinical trials of targeted radionuclide therapy of pancreatic cancer have been performed in the last decade and demonstrated safety and potential efficacy of radionuclide therapy for treatment of this formidable disease. Although a lot of progress has been made in treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with radiolabeled (90)Y and (177)Lu somatostatin peptide analogs, pancreatic adenocarcinomas remain a major challenge. Novel approaches such as peptides and antibodies radiolabeled with alpha emitters, pre-targeting, bispecific antibodies and biological therapy based on the radioactive tumorlytic bacteria might offer a potential breakthrough in treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PMID:26227823

  1. Targeted radionuclide therapies for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, M.; Da Silva, R.; Gravekamp, C.; Libutti, S. K.; Abraham, T.; Dadachova, E.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic malignancies, the 4th leading cause of cancer deaths, have an aggressive behavior with poor prognosis, resulting in a five-year survival rate of only 4%. It is typically a silent malignancy until patients develop metastatic disease. Targeted radionuclide therapies of cancer such as radiolabeled peptides which bind to the receptors overexpressed by cancer cells and radiolabeled antibodies to tumor-specific antigens provide a viable alternative to chemotherapy and external beam radiation of metastatic cancers. Multiple clinical trials of targeted radionuclide therapy of pancreatic cancer have been performed in the last decade and demonstrated safety and potential efficacy of radionuclide therapy for treatment of this formidable disease. While a lot progress has been made in treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with radiolabeled with 90Y and 177Lu somatostatin peptide analogues, pancreatic adenocarcinomas remain a major challenge. Novel approaches such as peptides and antibodies radiolabeled with alpha emitters, pre-targeting, bispecific antibodies and biological therapy based on the radioactive tumorlytic bacteria might offer a potential breakthrough in treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. PMID:26227823

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in the detection of pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Recently, with the rapid scanning time and improved image quality, outstanding advances in magnetic resonance (MR) methods have resulted in an increase in the use of MRI for patients with a variety of pancreatic neoplasms. MR multi-imaging protocol, which includes MR cross-sectional imaging, MR cholangiopancreatography and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography, integrates the advantages of various special imaging techniques. The non-invasive all-in-one MR multi-imaging techniques may provide the comprehensive information needed for the preoperative diagnosis and evaluation of pancreatic neoplasms. Pancreatic neoplasms include primary tumors and pancreatic metastases. Primary tumors of the pancreas may be mainly classified as ductal adenocarcinomas, cystic tumors and islet cell tumors (ICT). Pancreatic adenocarcinomas can be diagnosed in a MRI study depending on direct evidence or both direct and indirect evidence. The combined MRI features of a focal pancreatic mass, pancreatic duct dilatation and parenchymal atrophy are highly suggestive of a ductal adenocarcinoma. Most cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are either microcystic adenomas or mucinous cystic neoplasms. Intraductal papillary mucinous tumors are the uncommon low-grade malignancy of the pancreatic duct. ICT are rare neoplasms arising from neuroendocrine cells in the pancreas or the periampullary region. ICT are classified as functioning and non-functioning. The most frequent tumors to metastasize to the pancreas are cancers of the breast, lung, kidney and melanoma. The majority of metastases present as large solitary masses with well-defined margins. PMID:17650223

  3. Uncommon presentations of common pancreatic neoplasms: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; De Robertis, Riccardo; Capelli, Paola; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Crosara, Stefano; Gobbo, Stefano; Butturini, Giovanni; Salvia, Roberto; Barbi, Emilio; Girelli, Roberto; Bassi, Claudio; Pederzoli, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatic neoplasms are a wide group of solid and cystic lesions with different and often characteristic imaging features, clinical presentations, and management. Among solid tumors, ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common: it arises from exocrine pancreas, comprises about 90% of all pancreatic neoplasms, and generally has a bad prognosis; its therapeutic management must be multidisciplinary, involving surgeons, oncologists, gastroenterologists, radiologists, and radiotherapists. The second most common solid pancreatic neoplasms are neuroendocrine tumors: they can be divided into functioning or non-functioning and present different degrees of malignancy. Cystic pancreatic neoplasms comprise serous neoplasms, which are almost always benign, mucinous cystic neoplasms and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, which can vary from benign to frankly malignant lesions, and solid pseudopapillary tumors. Other pancreatic neoplasms, such as lymphoma, metastases, or pancreatoblastoma, are rarely seen in clinical practice and have different and sometimes controversial managements. Rare clinical presentations and imaging appearance of the most common pancreatic neoplasms, both solid and cystic, are more frequently seen and clinically relevant than rare pancreatic tumors; their pathologic and radiologic appearances must be known to improve their management. The purpose of this paper is to present some rare or uncommon clinical and radiological presentations of common pancreatic neoplasms providing examples of multi-modality imaging approach with pathologic correlations, thus describing the histopathological bases that can explain the peculiar imaging features, in order to avoid relevant misdiagnosis and to improve lesion management. PMID:25772002

  4. Neuroendocrine Regulation of Maternal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The expression of maternal behavior in mammals is regulated by the developmental and experiential events over a female’s lifetime. In this review the relationships between the endocrine and neural systems that play key roles in these developmental and experiential that affect both the establishment and maintenance of maternal care are presented. The involvement of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and lactogens are discussed in the context of ligand, receptor, and gene activity in rodents and to a lesser extent in higher mammals. The roles of neuroendocrine factors, including oxytocin, vasopressin, classical neurotransmitters, and other neural gene products that regulate aspects of maternal care are set forth, and the interactions of hormones with central nervous system mediators of maternal behavior are discussed. The impact of prior developmental factors, including epigenetic events, and maternal experience on subsequent maternal care are assessed over the course of the female’s lifespan. It is proposed that common neuroendocrine mechanisms underlie the regulation of maternal care in mammals. PMID:25500107

  5. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... include: Abdominal CT scan Abdominal MRI Abdominal ultrasound

  6. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... body Blockage of the tubes (ducts) that drain enzymes from the pancreas Cystic fibrosis High levels of a fat, called ... Limiting caffeine The health care provider may prescribe pancreatic enzymes. You must take these medicines with every meal. ...

  7. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure children receive vaccines to protect them against mumps and other childhood illnesses. Treat medical problems that ... Heart failure - overview Hemolytic-uremic syndrome Kawasaki disease Mumps Mycoplasma pneumonia Reye syndrome Patient Instructions Pancreatitis - discharge ...

  8. Pancreatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and in front of your spine. It produces juices that help break down food and hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Problems with the pancreas can lead to many health problems. These include Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the ...

  9. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for ... therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  10. Brain and spinal tumour.

    PubMed

    Goh, C H; Lu, Y Y; Lau, B L; Oy, J; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2014-12-01

    This study reviewed the epidemiology of brain and spinal tumours in Sarawak from January 2009 till December 2012. The crude incidence of brain tumour in Sarawak was 4.6 per 100,000 population/year with cumulative rate 0.5%. Meningioma was the most common brain tumour (32.3%) and followed by astrocytoma (19.4%). Only brain metastases showed a rising trend and cases were doubled in 4 years. This accounted for 15.4% and lung carcinoma was the commonest primary. Others tumour load were consistent. Primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and astrocytoma were common in paediatrics (60%). We encountered more primary spinal tumour rather than spinal metastases. Intradural schwannoma was the commonest and frequently located at thoracic level. The current healthcare system in Sarawak enables a more consolidate data collection to reflect accurate brain tumours incidence. This advantage allows subsequent future survival outcome research and benchmarking for healthcare resource planning. PMID:25934956

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  12. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  13. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  14. Reversal of Severe and Refractory Humoral Hypercalcemia With 177Lu-Octreotate Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy for Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Iliuta, Ioan-Andrei; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Couture, Félix; Douville, Pierre; Mac-Way, Fabrice

    2015-09-01

    A 48-year-old Caucasian male patient with newly diagnosed neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas with multiple liver metastases developed severe and refractory hypercalcemia. Complementary investigations were compatible with humoral hypercalcemia with high parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) levels. Hypercalcemia was refractory to medical treatments for more than 2 years. Serum calcium returned to normal values only after 4 cycles of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with Lu-octreotate, with concomitant reduction of PTHrP level and tumor regression. The use of radionuclide therapy could be an option for the management of severe humoral hypercalcemia in patients with inoperable metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. PMID:26053724

  15. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma Is a Rare but Important Tumour Found in the Oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Kadhim, Mohammad Murad Kasim; Jespersen, Marie Louise; Pilegaard, Hans Kristian; Nordsmark, Marianne; Villadsen, Gerda Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is a rare tumour of the gastrointestinal tract that consists of a dual adenocarcinomatous and neuroendocrine differentiation, each component representing at least 30% of the tumour. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with two-month history of postprandial pain and vomiting. Gastric endoscopy revealed a polypoid mass in the lower part of the oesophagus. In contrast to the majority of these tumours, this biopsy was immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A, and synaptophysin and Ki-67 index was 50% and the tumour was diagnosed as poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the oesophagus. The patient underwent surgery and lower oesophagus resection was performed. Based on the histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the tumour in the oesophagogastrectomy specimen, a mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) was diagnosed. The objective of this case report is to advocate for the focus on the MANEC diagnosis as such patients need to be referred to a centre of excellence with expertise in NET tumours, to have the correct diagnostic work-up, treatment, and secondary diagnostic procedures performed at progression, as this will have paramount influence of the choice of treatment. PMID:26955490

  16. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma Is a Rare but Important Tumour Found in the Oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Kadhim, Mohammad Murad Kasim; Jespersen, Marie Louise; Pilegaard, Hans Kristian; Nordsmark, Marianne; Villadsen, Gerda Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is a rare tumour of the gastrointestinal tract that consists of a dual adenocarcinomatous and neuroendocrine differentiation, each component representing at least 30% of the tumour. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with two-month history of postprandial pain and vomiting. Gastric endoscopy revealed a polypoid mass in the lower part of the oesophagus. In contrast to the majority of these tumours, this biopsy was immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A, and synaptophysin and Ki-67 index was 50% and the tumour was diagnosed as poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the oesophagus. The patient underwent surgery and lower oesophagus resection was performed. Based on the histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the tumour in the oesophagogastrectomy specimen, a mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) was diagnosed. The objective of this case report is to advocate for the focus on the MANEC diagnosis as such patients need to be referred to a centre of excellence with expertise in NET tumours, to have the correct diagnostic work-up, treatment, and secondary diagnostic procedures performed at progression, as this will have paramount influence of the choice of treatment. PMID:26955490

  17. Tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour's survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  18. Interventional gastroenterology: esophageal and pancreatic cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeffrey H

    2005-12-01

    The development and refinement of endoscopic procedures have greatly improved the diagnosis and management of esophageal and pancreatic cancers. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a highly accurate technique for TNM staging in esophageal cancer, and allows a tissue diagnosis of lymph nodes via fine-needle aspiration with low risk of complications. Endoscopic mucosal resection is a treatment option in patients with early esophageal cancer who are poor surgical candidates. Similarly, EUS fine-needle aspiration is helpful in establishing a diagnosis in cystic lesions, exocrine tumors, neuroendocrine tumors, and other lesions in the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography provides diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for various pancreaticobiliary problems. A number of promising EUS-guided therapies for pancreatic cancers are under investigation. PMID:16360009

  19. Some aspects of neuroendocrine pathology.

    PubMed Central

    Polak, J M; Bloom, S R

    1987-01-01

    The advent of modern microscopical investigative methods for the determination of neuroendocrine differentiation has increasingly given credence to the original concept of a "diffuse endocrine system". These methods include a variety of silver impregnation techniques, technologically advanced light and electron microscopical immunocytochemistry, and, lately, the ability to localise specific binding sites by in vitro autoradiography and mRNA species by in situ hybridisation. Further insight has been gained into the possible role of regulatory peptides contained in the so called "diffuse endocrine system" and into the nature of disease processes by investigating the role of the system in benign and malignant disease. Images Fig 13 Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 Fig 9 Fig 10 Fig 11 Fig 12 Fig 14 Fig 15 PMID:3312297

  20. Neuroendocrine Cancer of Rectum Metastasizing to Ovary.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sapna Vinit; Kumaran, Aswathy; Bharatnur, Sunanda; Vasudeva, Akhila; Udupa, Kartik; Venkateshiah, Dinesh Bangalore; Bhat, Shaila T

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) are rare malignancies that originate from the hormone-producing cells of the body's neuroendocrine system. Rectal high grade NEC (HG-NEC) constituting less than 1% of colorectal cancers can cause large ovarian metastasis that may be the initial presenting complaint. Ovarian Krukenberg tumor from a primary rectal HG-NEC is a very unusual and exceedingly uncommon differential diagnosis for secondary ovarian malignancy. This case report describes one such extremely rare case of a woman who had presented to the gynecology department with features suggestive of ovarian malignancy and was ultimately diagnosed to have Krukenberg tumor originating from neuroendocrine cancer of rectum. We felt this is a good opportunity to spread more light on neuroendocrine neoplasms that are very rare in gynecological practice. PMID:27293931

  1. Neuroendocrine Cancer of Rectum Metastasizing to Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Sapna Vinit; Kumaran, Aswathy; Bharatnur, Sunanda; Vasudeva, Akhila; Udupa, Kartik; Venkateshiah, Dinesh Bangalore; Bhat, Shaila T.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) are rare malignancies that originate from the hormone-producing cells of the body's neuroendocrine system. Rectal high grade NEC (HG-NEC) constituting less than 1% of colorectal cancers can cause large ovarian metastasis that may be the initial presenting complaint. Ovarian Krukenberg tumor from a primary rectal HG-NEC is a very unusual and exceedingly uncommon differential diagnosis for secondary ovarian malignancy. This case report describes one such extremely rare case of a woman who had presented to the gynecology department with features suggestive of ovarian malignancy and was ultimately diagnosed to have Krukenberg tumor originating from neuroendocrine cancer of rectum. We felt this is a good opportunity to spread more light on neuroendocrine neoplasms that are very rare in gynecological practice. PMID:27293931

  2. Pancreatic polypeptide-rich islets in the posterior portion of the pancreatic head--a tumor mimic in somatostatin receptor scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Albers, Max Benjamin; Maurer, Elisabeth; Klöppel, Günter; Bartsch, Detlef Klaus

    2014-05-01

    A 74-year-old man with recurrent duodenal ulcers underwent somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in suspicion of gastrinoma. A 2-cm area of focal uptake was visualized within the pancreatic head. Serum chromogranin A levels were elevated, but serum gastrin levels and the secretin test were normal. Computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasonography were not conclusive. After partial duodenopancreatectomy, pathological examination failed to reveal any neuroendocrine tumor. Instead, the dorsal portion of the pancreatic head was found to be densely populated by pancreatic polypeptide cell-rich islets. This area correlated with the site of tracer uptake seen on SRS. Thus, pancreatic polypeptide cell-rich islets in elderly patients should be kept in mind when interpreting SRS results to avoid unnecessary major pancreatic resections. PMID:24713672

  3. Development of the Neuroendocrine Hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Burbridge, Sarah; Stewart, Iain; Placzek, Marysia

    2016-01-01

    The neuroendocrine hypothalamus is composed of the tuberal and anterodorsal hypothalamus, together with the median eminence/neurohypophysis. It centrally governs wide-ranging physiological processes, including homeostasis of energy balance, circadian rhythms and stress responses, as well as growth and reproductive behaviours. Homeostasis is maintained by integrating sensory inputs and effecting responses via autonomic, endocrine and behavioural outputs, over diverse time-scales and throughout the lifecourse of an individual. Here, we summarize studies that begin to reveal how different territories and cell types within the neuroendocrine hypothalamus are assembled in an integrated manner to enable function, thus supporting the organism's ability to survive and thrive. We discuss how signaling pathways and transcription factors dictate the appearance and regionalization of the hypothalamic primordium, the maintenance of progenitor cells, and their specification and differentiation into neurons. We comment on recent studies that harness such programmes for the directed differentiation of human ES/iPS cells. We summarize how developmental plasticity is maintained even into adulthood and how integration between the hypothalamus and peripheral body is established in the median eminence and neurohypophysis. Analysis of model organisms, including mouse, chick and zebrafish, provides a picture of how complex, yet elegantly coordinated, developmental programmes build glial and neuronal cells around the third ventricle of the brain. Such conserved processes enable the hypothalamus to mediate its function as a central integrating and response-control mediator for the homeostatic processes that are critical to life. Early indications suggest that deregulation of these events may underlie multifaceted pathological conditions and dysfunctional physiology in humans, such as obesity. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:623-643, 2016. PMID:27065164

  4. Impact by pancreatic stellate cells on epithelial-mesenchymal transition and pancreatic cancer cell invasion: Adding a third dimension in vitro.

    PubMed

    Karnevi, Emelie; Rosendahl, Ann H; Hilmersson, Katarzyna Said; Saleem, Moin A; Andersson, Roland

    2016-08-15

    Pancreatic cancer is associated with a highly abundant stroma and low-grade inflammation. In the local tumour microenvironment, elevated glucose levels, the presence of tumour-associated stellate cells and macrophages are hypothesised to promote the tumour progression and invasion. The present study investigated the influence by the microenvironment on pancreatic cancer cell invasion in vitro. After co-culture with tumour-associated pancreatic stellate cells (TPSCs), pancreatic cancer cells displayed up to 8-fold reduction in levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers E-cadherin and ZO-1, while β-catenin and vimentin levels were increased. A 3D organotypic model showed that TPSCs stimulated pancreatic cancer cell invasion, both as single cell (PANC-1) and cohort (MIAPaCa-2) invasion. The combined presence of TPSCs and M2-like macrophages induced invasion of the non-invasive BxPC-3 cells. High glucose conditions further enhanced changes in EMT markers as well as the cancer cell invasion. In summary, co-culture with TPSCs induced molecular changes associated with EMT in pancreatic cancer cells, regardless of differentiation status, and the organotypic model demonstrated the influence of microenvironmental factors, such as glucose, stellate cells and macrophages, on pancreatic cancer cell invasion. PMID:27443257

  5. Tumours of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Stünzi, H.; Head, K. W.; Nielsen, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lung tumours are not common in domestic animals; there has not been the increase in epidermoid carcinomas and anaplastic small-cell carcinomas that has occurred in man this century. Adenocarcinoma is the most common type in animals. The biological behaviour of each type of tumour in animals seems to be much the same as in man. The tumours are described histologically, the main categories being: epidermoid carcinoma, anaplastic carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma, carcinoid tumours, bronchial gland tumours, benign tumours, and sarcomas. ImagesFig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:4371738

  6. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  7. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26199449

  8. Hypothalamic and pancreatic lesions with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Shuangshoti, S; Samranvej, P

    1975-01-01

    A case is reported of a neoplasm of mixed mesenchymal and neuroepithelial origin consisting of plasmacytoma, lymphoma, ganglioneuroma, and astrocytoma in the same mass. The tumour arose in the hypothalamus of a 43 year old diabetic woman who also had alpha cell hyperplasia and beta cell hypoplasia of the islets of Langerhans. It is suggested that both hypothalamic and pancreatic lesions produced diabetes mellitus in this patient. Images PMID:1104774

  9. Proposal for a Standardized Pathology Report of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Prognostic Significance of Pathological Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Mee-Yon; Jin, So Young; Kim, Hyunki; Jung, Eun Sun; Kim, Mi-Jung; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Kim, Woo Ho; Kim, Joon Mee; Kang, Yun Kyung; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kang, Dae Young; Kim, Youn Wha; Choi, Eun Hee

    2013-01-01

    Background There is confusion in the diagnosis and biological behaviors of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs), because of independently proposed nomenclatures and classifications. A standardized form of pathology report is required for the proper management of patients. Methods We discussed the proper pathological evaluation of GEP-NET at the consensus conference of the subcommittee meeting for the Gastrointestinal Pathology Study Group of the Korean Society of Pathologists. We then verified the prognostic significance of pathological parameters from our previous nationwide collection of pathological data from 28 hospitals in Korea to determine the essential data set for a pathology report. Results Histological classification, grading (mitosis and/or Ki-67 labeling index), T staging (extent, size), lymph node metastasis, and lymphovascular and perineural invasion were significant prognostic factors and essential for the pathology report of GEP-NET, while immunostaining such as synaptophysin and chromogranin may be optional. Furthermore, the staging system, either that of the 2010 American Joint Cancer Committee (AJCC) or the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS), should be specified, especially for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. Conclusions A standardized pathology report is crucial for the proper management and prediction of prognosis of patients with GEP-NET. PMID:23837015

  10. Accessory spleen mimicking pancreatic tumour: evaluation by 99mTc-labelled colloid SPECT/CT study. Report of two cases and a review of nuclear medicine methods utility.

    PubMed

    Pachowicz, M; Mocarska, A; Starosławska, E; Pietrzyk, Ł; Chrapko, B

    2015-01-01

    The accessory spleen is a common congenital anomaly, typically asymptomatic and harmless to the patient. However, in some clinical cases, this anomaly beco-mes significant as it can be mistaken for a tumour or lymph node and be missed during a therapeutic splenectomy. There are nuclear medicine modalities which can be applied in the identification and localisation of an accessory spleen. They include scintigraphy with radiolabelled colloids or heat damaged red blood cells, which are trapped in the splenic tissue. Modern techniques, including hybrid imaging, enable simultaneous structure and tracer distribution evaluations. Additionally, radiation-guided surgery can be used in cases where the accessory spleen, which is usually small (not exceeding 1 cm) and difficult to find among other tissues, has to be removed. In the study, we would like to present 2 cases of patients in which the malignancy had to be excluded for the reason that the multiple accessory spleens were very closely related to the pancreas. There was a lack of certainty in the multi-phase computed tomography (CT) evaluation; however, this situation was clearly resolved by using the 99mTc-stannous colloid single photon emission computed tomography/ CT study. We would also like to briefly analyse the clinical applications of nuclear medicine in case of an accessory spleen. PMID:26620518

  11. Tumour ablation: technical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Gerd; Bale, Reto

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Image-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive, relatively low-risk procedure for tumour treatment. Local recurrence and survival rates depend on the rate of complete ablation of the entire tumour including a sufficient margin of surrounding healthy tissue. Currently a variety of different RFA devices are available. The interventionalist must be able to predict the configuration and extent of the resulting ablation necrosis. Accurate planning and execution of RFA according to the size and geometry of the tumour is essential. In order to minimize complications, individualized treatment strategies may be necessary for tumours close to vital structures. This review examines the state-of-the art of different device technologies, approaches, and treatment strategies for percutaneous RFA of liver tumours. PMID:19965296

  12. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  13. Transgenerational neuroendocrine disruption of reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Deena M.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is associated with dysfunctions of metabolism, energy balance, thyroid function and reproduction, and an increased risk of endocrine cancers. These multifactorial disorders can be ‘programmed’ through molecular epigenetic changes induced by exposure to EDCs early in life, the expression of which may not manifest until adulthood. In some cases, EDCs have detrimental effects on subsequent generations, which indicates that traits for disease predisposition may be passed to future generations by nongenomic inheritance. This Review discusses current understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms that underlie sexual differentiation of reproductive neuroendocrine systems in mammals and summarizes the literature on transgenerational epigenetic effects of representative EDCs: vinclozolin, diethylstilbesterol, bisphenol A and polychlorinated biphenyls. The article differentiates between context-dependent epigenetic transgenerational changes—namely, those that require environmental exposure, either via the EDC itself or through behavioral or physiological differences in parents—and germline-dependent epigenetic mechanisms. These processes, albeit discrete, are not mutually exclusive and can involve similar molecular mechanisms including DNA methylation and histone modifications and may predispose exposed individuals to transgenerational disruption of reproductive processes. New insights stress the crucial need to develop a clear understanding of how EDCs may program the epigenome of exposed individuals and their descendants. PMID:21263448

  14. Primary Neuroendocrine Tumor in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Ryota; Kuroshima, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of brain metastases for neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is reportedly 1.5~5%, and the origin is usually pulmonary. A 77-year-old man presented to our hospital with headache and disturbance of specific skilled motor activities. Computed tomography (CT) showed a massive neoplastic lesion originating in the left temporal and parietal lobes that caused a mass edematous effect. Grossly, total resection of the tumor was achieved. Histological examination revealed much nuclear atypia and mitotic figures. Staining for CD56, chromogranin A, and synaptophysin was positive, indicating NET. The MIB-1 index was 37%. Histopathologically, the tumor was diagnosed as NET. After surgery, gastroscopy and colonoscopy were performed, but the origin was not seen. After discharge, CT and FDG-PET (fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography) were performed every 3 months. Two years later we have not determined the origin of the tumor. It is possible that the brain is the primary site of this NET. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of this phenomenon. PMID:25506006

  15. Neuroendocrine Regulation of Hydromineral Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mecawi, Andre de Souza; Ruginsk, Silvia Graciela; Elias, Lucila Leico Kagohara; Varanda, Wamberto Antonio; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose

    2015-07-01

    Since the crucial evolutionary change from an aqueous to a terrestrial environment, all living organisms address the primordial task of equilibrating the ingestion/production of water and electrolytes (primarily sodium) with their excretion. In mammals, the final route for the excretion of these elements is mainly through the kidneys, which can eliminate concentrated or diluted urine according to the requirements. Despite their primary role in homeostasis, the kidneys are not able to recover water and solutes lost through other systems. Therefore, the selective stimulation or inhibition of motivational and locomotor behavior becomes essential to initiate the search and acquisition of water and/or sodium from the environment. Indeed, imbalances affecting the osmolality and volume of body fluids are dramatic challenges to the maintenance of hydromineral homeostasis. In addition to behavioral changes, which are integrated in the central nervous system, most of the systemic responses recruited to restore hydroelectrolytic balance are accomplished by coordinated actions of the cardiovascular, autonomic and endocrine systems, which determine the appropriate renal responses. The activation of sequential and redundant mechanisms (involving local and systemic factors) produces accurate and self-limited effector responses. From a physiological point of view, understanding the mechanisms underlying water and sodium balance is intriguing and of great interest for the biomedical sciences. Therefore, the present review will address the biophysical, evolutionary and historical perspectives concerning the integrative neuroendocrine control of hydromineral balance, focusing on the major neural and endocrine systems implicated in the control of water and sodium balance. PMID:26140725

  16. The Thymus–Neuroendocrine Axis

    PubMed Central

    Reggiani, Paula C.; Morel, Gustavo R.; Cónsole, Gloria M.; Barbeito, Claudio G.; Rodriguez, Silvia S.; Brown, Oscar A.; Bellini, Maria Jose; Pléau, Jean-Marie; Dardenne, Mireille; Goya, Rodolfo G.

    2009-01-01

    Thymulin is a thymic hormone exclusively produced by the thymic epithelial cells. It consists of a nonapeptide component coupled to the ion zinc, which confers biological activity to the molecule. After its discovery in the early 1970s, thymulin was characterized as a thymic hormone involved in several aspects of intrathymic and extrathymic T cell differentiation. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that thymulin production and secretion is strongly influenced by the neuroendocrine system. Conversely, a growing core of information, to be reviewed here, points to thymulin as a hypophysotropic peptide. In recent years, interest has arisen in the potential use of thymulin as a therapeutic agent. Thymulin was shown to possess anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties in the brain. Furthermore, an adenoviral vector harboring a synthetic gene for thymulin, stereotaxically injected in the rat brain, achieved a much longer expression than the adenovirally mediated expression in the brain of other genes, thus suggesting that an anti-inflammatory activity of thymulin prevents the immune system from destroying virus-transduced brain cells. Other studies suggest that thymulin gene therapy may also be a suitable therapeutic strategy to prevent some of the endocrine and metabolic alterations that typically appear in thymus-deficient animal models. The present article briefly reviews the literature on the physiology, molecular biology, and therapeutic potential of thymulin. PMID:19236333

  17. Duodenal Neuroendocrine Tumors: Location Matters!

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Mohd Raashid; Osman, Houssam; Cheek, Susannah; Hunter, Shanee; Jeyarajah, Dhiresh Rohan

    2016-05-01

    Duodenal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare. Historically, when feasible a less aggressive surgical approach is considered. The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with prognosis and the necessity for more aggressive surgical procedures. All patients who underwent surgery for duodenal NETs between September 2005 and June 2014 were identified retrospectively. Data collected included clinical presentation, operative findings, and histopathological data. Eighteen patients underwent surgical management for duodenal NETs. Two patients underwent transduodenal excision (11%), two patients had partial duodenal resection (11%), two patients had antrectomy including 1st part of duodenum (D1) resection (33%), and eight underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy [PD (44%)]. On analysis, 2nd part of duodenum (D2) location was the most common site of duodenal NETs (n = 9, 50%). The odds of having a PD were 10 times higher when the lesion was in D2 location. The odds of having a positive lymph node are nine times higher when the lesion is in D2 region. The odds of having a positive lymph node are three times higher when lesion is greater than T1. D2 location of NETs is associated with higher odds of lymph node positivity and need for more extensive procedures like PD. PMID:27215716

  18. Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Female Reproductive Tract: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Yi Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the female reproductive tract are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that display various histologic findings and biologic behaviors. In this review, the classification and clinicopathologic characteristics of neuroendocrine tumors of the female reproductive tract are described. Differential diagnoses are discussed, especially for non-neuroendocrine tumors showing high-grade nuclei with neuroendocrine differentiation. This review also discusses recent advances in our pathogenetic understanding of these disorders. PMID:26459408

  19. Immune-Neuroendocrine Interactions and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Luis J.; Navarro, Carmen; Medina, Gabriela; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Blanco, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between immune-neuroendocrine system is firmly established. The messengers of this connection are hormones, neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and cytokines. The immune-neuroendocrine system have the capacity to synthesize and release these molecules, which, in turn, can stimulate or suppress the activity of immune or neuroendocrine cells by binding to receptors. In fact, hormones, neuropeptides and neurotransmitters participate in innate and adaptive immune response.Autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) are characterized by aberrant production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are a potent activator of the HPA axis. In consequence, high levels of pro-inflammatory hormones such as estrogens and prolactin, and low levels of glucocorticoids, an anti-inflammatory hormone, have been described in the active phase of ARD. In addition, high levels of pro-inflammatory hormones and cytokines have also been frequently detected in organ involvement of patients with ARD, suggesting an abnormal local neuroendocrine immune interaction. There is evidence that hormonal changes may appear before the symptomatic phase of the disease. Therefore, it is possible that a pro-inflammatory hormone favors the rupture of tolerance, which is a key feature of autoimmune diseases. The interactions between the immune-neuroendocrine system have a major impact on our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, diagnosis and therapy of ARD. PMID:17162354

  20. A bipartite graph of Neuroendocrine System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhong-Wei; Zou, Sheng-Rong; Peng, Yu-Jing; Zhou, Ta; Gu, Chang-Gui; He, Da-Ren

    2008-03-01

    We present an empirical investigation on the neuroendocrine system and suggest describe it by a bipartite graph. In the net the cells can be regarded as collaboration acts and the mediators can be regarded as collaboration actors. The act degree stands for the number of the cells that secrete a single mediator. Among them bFGF (the basic fibroblast growth factor) has the largest node act degree. It is the most important mitogenic cytokine, followed by TGF-beta, IL-6, IL1-beta, VEGF, IGF-1and so on. They are critical in neuroendocrine system to maintain bodily healthiness, emotional stabilization and endocrine harmony. The act degree distribution shows a shifted power law (SPL) function forms [1]. The average act degree of neuroendocrine network is h=3.01, It means that each mediator is secreted by three cells on average. The similarity, which stands for the average probability of secreting the same mediators by all neuroendocrine cells, is observed as s=0.14. Our results may be used in the research of the medical treatment of neuroendocrine diseases. [1] Assortativity and act degree distribution of some collaboration networks, Hui Chang, Bei-Bei Su, Yue-Ping Zhou, Daren He, Physica A, 383 (2007) 687-702

  1. A Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour of the Head of Pancreas: A Rare Case Report Diagnosed by Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Archana Hemant; Chhadi, Shyam Atmaram; Kumbhalkar, Dinkar T; Raut, Waman K

    2016-01-01

    Solid Pseudopapillary Tumour (SPPT) is a distinctive tumour of low malignant potential with a striking and unexplained predilection for adolescent girls and young women. Hence it is important to distinguish this rare tumour from other pancreatic tumours with similar cytomorphologic features because an accurate preoperative diagnosis is highly desirable since these patients can have long survival with adequate surgery. We report a case of the rare SPPT of the pancreas in a young girl who presented with nonspecific pain in the abdomen. Radiological investigations revealed a solid cystic mass in relation to the uncinate process of pancreas and third part of duodenum. The mass was diagnosed to be a solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas on ultrasound guided FNAC. Surgical removal of the pancreatic tumour and detailed histologic study confirmed the cytologic diagnosis. We present this case because, to date, there are few case reports on the cytological diagnosis of this tumour, about 60 cases, diagnosed by Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) are reported in the literature. With widespread availability of high-quality imaging systems and a better understanding of its pathology, the number of cases reported in the literature has been steadily increasing in recent years. In our case, the cytological diagnosis was done even before the detailed imaging findings were available, the cytological features of this tumour are highly characteristic and it is possible to differentiate it from other pancreatic tumours with relative ease. PMID:27504299

  2. MicroRNAs in pancreatic cancer metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pankaj K.; Brand, Randall E.; Mehla, Kamiya

    2014-01-01

    Advances in understanding the biology of tumour progression and metastasis have clearly highlighted the importance of aberrant tumour metabolism, which supports not only the energy requirements but also the enormous biosynthetic needs of tumour cells. Such metabolic alterations modulate glucose, amino acid and fatty-acid-dependent metabolite bio-synthesis and energy production. Although much progress has been made in understanding the somatic mutations and expression genomics behind these alterations, the regulation of these processes by microRNAs (miRNAs) is only beginning to be appreciated. This Review focuses on the miRNAs that are potential regulators of the expression of genes whose protein products either directly regulate metabolic machinery or serve as master regulators, indirectly modulating the expression of metabolic enzymes. We focus particularly on miRNAs in pancreatic cancer. PMID:22508159

  3. Structural pathology underlying neuroendocrine dysfunction in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Morris B.; Wang, Lei; Wachi, Carly; Daudi, Sheeraz; Csernansky, John; Marlow-O'Connor, Megan; Keedy, Sarah; Torres, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Polydipsic hyponatremic schizophrenic (PHS) patients exhibit altered neuroendocrine activity that has been linked to their life-threatening water imbalance, as well as to impaired function and reduced volume of the anterior hippocampus. Polydipsic patients without hyponatremia (polydipsic normonatremic schizophrenics: PNS) exhibit similar, albeit less marked, changes in neuroendocrine activity and anterior hippocampal function, but not reduced anterior hippocampal volume. Indeed, reduced anterior hippocampal volume is seen in patients with normal water balance (nonpolydipsic normonatremic schizophrenics: NNS) whose neuroendocrine activity and anterior hippocampal function differ markedly from those with polydipsia. In an effort to reconcile these findings we measured hippocampal, amygdala and 3rd ventricle shapes in 26 schizophrenic patients (10 PNS, 7 PHS, 9 NNS) and 12 healthy controls matched for age and gender. Bilateral inward deformations were localized to the anterior lateral hippocampal surface (part of a neurocircuit which modulates neuroendocrine responses to psychological stimuli) in PHS and to a lesser extent in PNS, while deformations in NNS were restricted to the medial surface. Proportional deformations of the right medial amygdala, a key segment of this neurocircuit, were seen in both polydipsic groups, and correlated with the volume of the 3rd ventricle, which lies adjacent to the neuroendocrine nuclei. Finally, these structural findings were most marked in those with impaired hippocampal-mediated stress responses. These results reconcile previously conflicting data, and support the view that anterior lateral hippocampal pathology disrupts neuroendocrine function in polydipsic patients with and without hyponatremia. The relationship of these findings to the underlying mental illness remains to be established. PMID:21093493

  4. Neuroendocrine Disruption: More than Hormones are Upset

    PubMed Central

    Waye, Andrew; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2011-01-01

    Only a small proportion of the published research on endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) directly examined effects on neuroendocrine processes. There is an expanding body of evidence that anthropogenic chemicals exert effects on neuroendocrine systems and that these changes might impact peripheral organ systems and physiological processes. Neuroendocrine disruption extends the concept of endocrine disruption to include the full breadth of integrative physiology (i.e., more than hormones are upset). Pollutants may also disrupt numerous other neurochemical pathways to affect an animal's capacity to reproduce, develop and grow, or deal with stress and other challenges. Several examples are presented in this review, from both vertebrates and invertebrates, illustrating that diverse environmental pollutants including pharmaceuticals, organochlorine pesticides, and industrial contaminants have the potential to disrupt neuroendocrine control mechanisms. While most investigations on EDC are carried out with vertebrate models, an attempt is also made to highlight the importance of research on invertebrate neuroendocrine disruption. The neurophysiology of many invertebrates is well described and many of their neurotransmitters are similar or identical to those in vertebrates; therefore, lessons learned from one group of organisms may help us understand potential adverse effects in others. This review argues for the adoption of systems biology and integrative physiology to address the effects of EDC. Effects of pulp and paper mill effluents on fish reproduction are a good example of where relatively narrow hypothesis testing strategies (e.g., whether or not pollutants are sex steroid mimics) have only partially solved a major problem in environmental biology. It is clear that a global, integrative physiological approach, including improved understanding of neuroendocrine control mechanisms, is warranted to fully understand the impacts of pulp and paper mill effluents

  5. Neuroendocrine tumors: common presentations of uncommon diseases.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, K S; Debas, H T

    1995-12-01

    In recent decades, isolation of the peptides secreted by gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors has greatly advanced our understanding of the pathophysiology of the syndromes resulting from over-production of these biologically active compounds. Early detection of these lesions permits localization and surgical extirpation prior to the development of mestastatic disease. In 1995, early detection of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors hinges on an appropriate index of suspicion on the part of the primary care physician. The prompt recognition of the typical clinical constellations of symptoms associated with these tumors is essential to their timely diagnosis and management. PMID:8789136

  6. Desmoplasia in Pancreatic Cancer. Can We Fight It?

    PubMed Central

    Merika, E. E.; Syrigos, K. N.; Saif, M. W.

    2012-01-01

    The hallmark of pancreatic tumours, the desmoplastic reaction, provides a unique microenvironment that affects pancreatic tumour behaviour, its ability to grow and metastasize as well as resist the effects of chemotherapy. Complex molecular interactions and pathways give rise to the desmoplastic reaction. Breakdown or penetration of the desmoplastic reaction may hold the key to overcoming the limits of delivery of efficacious chemotherapy or the development of new targeted treatments. Herein we discuss such new developments to fight the desmoplastic reaction, including inhibitors of the epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, the hedgehog pathway, as well as new molecular targets like CD40 agonist and its effects on T cells, extracellular matrix modifying enzymes such as LOXL2 inhibitor and novel tumour penetrating peptides for delivery of drugs. PMID:23125850

  7. [Liver trasplantation for the treatment of non-resectable metastases of neuroendocrine tumors: first report in Argentina].

    PubMed

    Quiñonez, Emilio; Capitanich, Pablo; Anders, Margarita; Fernández, José Luis; Serafini, Víctor; Viola, Luis; Mastai, Ricardo; McCormack, Lucas

    2011-09-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are uncommon cancers characterized by a slow grow rate. Unresectable liver metastases are the main cause of death in patients with these tumors. This is the first Argentine report of a liver transplantation as an indication for the treatment of unresectable liver metastases from a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. We present a 48-year-old woman with diagnosis of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with multiple bilobar unresectable liver metastases. A splenopancreatectomy was performed after a complete staging revealed absence of extrahepatic disease. Six months later, a follow-up performed with thoracoabdominal CT scan and octreo-scan was consistent with no tumor recurrence or extrahepatic disease. As the huge hepatomegaly caused a notorius deterioration in the patient's quality of life, we decided to include her in the waiting list for liver transplantation. Priority points were requested to the MELD (model for end stage liver disease) Exceptions Experts Committee with a positive response. Twelve months after the primary surgery, with a MELD score of 23 points, a deceased donor liver transplantation was performed without evidence at that moment of residual disease. Eighteen months after liver transplantation, the patient required the surgical repair of a stenosis in the biliary anastomosis. At the surgery peritoneal tumor recurrence was diagnosed. Now, 24 months after liver transplantation the patient has an excellent quality of life and a well functioning graft. We report this case of a liver transplantation as an indication for the treatment of liver metastases from a neuroendocrine tumor and we review the literature on this controversial issue. PMID:22233004

  8. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Heikki; Hohenberger, Peter; Corless, Christopher L

    2013-09-14

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms that arise in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. They can occur at any age, the median age being 60-65 years, and typically cause bleeding, anaemia, and pain. GISTs have variable malignant potential, ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. Most tumours stain positively for the mast/stem cell growth factor receptor KIT and anoctamin 1 and harbour a kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or PDGFRA. Tumours without such mutations could have alterations in genes of the succinate dehydrogenase complex or in BRAF, or rarely RAS family genes. About 60% of patients are cured by surgery. Adjuvant treatment with imatinib is recommended for patients with a substantial risk of recurrence, if the tumour has an imatinib-sensitive mutation. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors substantially improve survival in advanced disease, but secondary drug resistance is common. PMID:23623056

  9. Transport processes in tumours.

    PubMed

    Quastel, J H

    1965-12-01

    The characteristic features of transport systems controlling influx into tumour cells of nutrients and other chemicals are briefly described. Two notable features of transport of amino acids into tumour cells have been observed: extensive accumulation against a concentration gradient and equal accumulations, whether conditions are aerobic or anaerobic, provided glucose is present. This combination of features has not been observed in the majority of normal mammalian tissues so far examined. Important for considerations of chemotherapy is the ability of tumour transport carriers to transfer substances related in structure to amino acids and other nutrients. Amino acid analogues, for example, can either block transport of natural amino acids or can be transported into the cell where they may interfere with various aspects of amino acid metabolism. The study of transport carriers is essential for an understanding of tumour-host relationships and for considerations of chemotherapy. PMID:5842595

  10. Breast tumour angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Stephen B; Generali, Daniele G; Harris, Adrian L

    2007-01-01

    The central importance of tumour neovascularization has been emphasized by clinical trials using antiangiogenic therapy in breast cancer. This review gives a background to breast tumour neovascularization in in situ and invasive breast cancer, outlines the mechanisms by which this is achieved and discusses the influence of the microenvironment, focusing on hypoxia. The regulation of angiogenesis and the antivascular agents that are used in an antiangiogenic dosing schedule, both novel and conventional, are also summarized. PMID:18190723

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  12. Aurora B kinase inhibitor AZD1152: determinants of action and ability to enhance chemotherapeutics effectiveness in pancreatic and colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Azzariti, A; Bocci, G; Porcelli, L; Fioravanti, A; Sini, P; Simone, G M; Quatrale, A E; Chiarappa, P; Mangia, A; Sebastian, S; Del Bufalo, D; Del Tacca, M; Paradiso, A

    2011-01-01

    Background: AZD1152, the prodrug for AZD1152-hydroxyquinazoline pyrazol anilide (HQPA), is a selective inhibitor of Aurora B kinase activity. Preclinical evaluation of AZD1152 has been reported in several human cancer models. The potentiality of this compound in combination therapy warrants further investigation in solid tumours. Experimental design: This study explored the effects of AZD1152-HQPA in colon and pancreatic tumour cells. The antitumour properties of AZD1152, either as single agent or in combination with chemotherapeutics, were evaluated in each study model. The efficacy and the toxicity of AZD1152 alone and in combination with gemcitabine were validated in pancreatic tumour xenograft model. Results: AZD1152-HQPA treatment resulted in a dramatic increase of chromosome number, modification of cell cycle and induction of apoptosis. The most effective combination was that with chemotherapeutics given soon after AZD1152 in both tumour cell types. The effectiveness of the sequential schedule of AZD1152 with gemcitabine was confirmed in nude mice bearing MiaPaCa-2 tumours, showing inhibition of tumour volumes and delaying of tumour growth after the interruption of the treatments. Conclusion: Here we show that AZD1152-HQPA enhances oxaliplatin and gemcitabine effectiveness in colon and pancreatic cancer, respectively. First, we provide advances into administration schedules and dosing regimens for the combination treatment in in vivo pancreatic tumour. PMID:21304529

  13. Testicular germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; McGlynn, Katherine A; Okamoto, Keisei; Jewett, Michael A S; Bokemeyer, Carsten

    2016-04-23

    Testicular germ cell tumours are at the crossroads of developmental and neoplastic processes. Their cause has not been fully elucidated but differences in incidences suggest that a combination of genetic and environment factors are involved, with environmental factors predominating early in life. Substantial progress has been made in understanding genetic susceptibility in the past 5 years on the basis of the results of large genome-wide association studies. Testicular germ cell tumours are highly sensitive to radiotherapy and chemotherapy and hence have among the best outcomes of all tumours. Because the tumours occur mainly in young men, preservation of reproductive function, quality of life after treatment, and late effects are crucial concerns. In this Seminar, we provide an overview of advances in the understanding of the epidemiology, genetics, and biology of testicular germ cell tumours. We also summarise the consensus on how to treat testicular germ cell tumours and focus on a few controversies and improvements in the understanding of late effects of treatment and quality of life for survivors. PMID:26651223

  14. Neuroendocrine Neoplasms of the Sinonasal Tract: Neuroendocrine Carcinomas and Olfactory Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ketan; Perez-Ordóñez, Bayardo

    2016-03-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) can occur in organs or tissues that do not contain neuroendocrine cells normally and do not necessarily imply embryologic derivation from the neuroectoderm; but rather reflect a shared phenotype characterized by the expression of multiple genes encoding both endocrine and neuronal features. NENs are rare in the sinonasal tract and are subdivided into epithelial and neural subtypes based on the presence of keratins or neurofilaments, respectively. Although relatively rare, neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) and olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) are the most common neuroendocrine neoplasms of the sinonasal tract. The focus of this review is to highlight recent developments in the pathology of sinonasal NECs and ONB in light of the upcoming update of the World Health Organization (WHO) 2005 classification of tumors of the head and neck. PMID:26830400

  15. Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangyu; Sun, Tao; Kong, Fanyang; Du, Yiqi; Li, Zhaoshen

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most lethal diseases with an incidence rate almost equal to the rate of mortality. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology that affects the pancreas. Epidemiological studies have identified CP to be a major risk factor for PC. Summary A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking CP and PC has identified several common pathways that provide targets for future interventions. This article reviews those components in the CP-PC connection, including the role of macrophages, the maintenance of genome stability, cytokines, and other nodal factors such as nuclear factor kappa B, COX-2 and reactive oxygen species. Key Message The molecular mechanisms that underlie CP and PC provide novel targets for future therapies for PC. Practical Implications The stromal-desmoplastic reaction plays an important role in initiating and sustaining chronic inflammation and tumor progression. Recently, two targeted anti-tumor agents, erlotinib and nab-paclitaxel, have shown promising therapeutic efficacy. Notably, both these agents target components (EGFR and SPARC) within the inflammatory stroma surrounding malignant cells, underscoring the importance of inflammation in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Identifying the common pathways linking CP and PC may help uncover additional novel targets for future therapies. PMID:26674754

  16. Bilateral symmetrical adrenal hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT due to Cushing syndrome in well differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aktas, G E; Soyluoglu Demir, S; Sarikaya, A

    2016-01-01

    The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan has been suggested for whole-body imaging to identify ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone secreting tumours, but there are some challenges involved. The case of a patient is presented, who was admitted with the pre-diagnosis of ectopic ACTH syndrome. On the CT, a nodular lesion was detected in the medial segment of the right lung. The FDG uptake of the lesion seemed to be increased visually, but was not pathological quantitatively (SUVmax: 1.8) on the PET/CT. There was also diffuse increased uptake (SUVmax: 14.2) in the enlarged adrenal glands. The lesion was reported as a possible malignant lesion with low FDG affinity, such as a low grade neuroendocrine tumour, while the diffuse enlarged adrenal glands with high uptake were interpreted as diffusely hyperplasic, due to Cushing's syndrome. The patient was treated with a surgical wedge resection. The histopathological diagnosis confirmed that the tumour was a grade 1 well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:26522002

  17. Prospective Study of Bevacizumab Plus Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jennifer A.; Stuart, Keith; Earle, Craig C.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Bhargava, Pankaj; Miksad, Rebecca; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence; Enzinger, Peter C.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Zheng, Hui; Fuchs, Charles S.; Kulke, Matthew H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Both tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor and bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody targeting VEGF, have antitumor activity in neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Temozolomide, an oral analog of dacarbazine, also has activity against NETs when administered alone or in combination with other agents. We performed a phase II study to evaluate the efficacy of temozolomide in combination with bevacizumab in patients with locally advanced or metastatic NETs. Patients and Methods Thirty-four patients (56% with carcinoid, 44% with pancreatic NETs) were treated with temozolomide 150 mg/m2 orally per day on days 1 through 7 and days 15 through 21, together with bevacizumab at a dose of 5 mg/kg per day intravenously on days 1 and 15 of each 28-day cycle. All patients received prophylaxis against Pneumocystis carinii and varicella zoster. Patients were followed for toxicity, biochemical and radiologic response, and survival. Results The combination of temozolomide and bevacizumab was associated with anticipated grade 3 to 4 toxicities, including lymphopenia (53%) and thrombocytopenia (18%). Although the overall radiographic response rate was 15% (five of 34), response rates differed between patients with pancreatic NETs (33%; five of 15) and those with carcinoid tumors (zero of 19). The median progression-free survival was 11.0 months (14.3 months for pancreatic NETs v 7.3 months for carcinoid tumors). The median overall survival was 33.3 months (41.7 months for pancreatic NETs v 18.8 months for carcinoid tumors). Conclusion Temozolomide and bevacizumab can be safely administered together in patients with advanced NETs, and the combination regimen appears promising for patients with pancreatic NETs. Studies evaluating the relative contributions of these two agents to the observed antitumor activity are warranted. PMID:22778320

  18. Chromogranin A as Serum Marker for Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Single Center Experience and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Nölting, Svenja; Kuttner, Axel; Lauseker, Michael; Vogeser, Michael; Haug, Alexander; Herrmann, Karin A.; Hoffmann, Johannes N.; Spitzweg, Christine; Göke, Burkhard; Auernhammer, Christoph J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical sensitivities of the tumor markers chromogranin A (CgA), urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) in neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of the GastroEnteroPancreatic-(GEP-) system depending on tumor primary location and metastatic spread. In a retrospective single-center series, sensitivities were evaluated in serum samples from 110 patients with midgut (n = 62) and pancreatic (n = 48) NETs. CgA levels were analyzed by a commercially-available immunoradiometric assay (CIS-bio) during routine follow-up in the years 2000–2009. CgA showed a higher sensitivity for midgut (68%) than pancreatic (54%) NETs. A higher CgA sensitivity and significantly higher median CgA values were found in patients with liver metastases than in those without, and in patients with hepatic and additionally extra-hepatic metastases than in those with hepatic and nodal metastases alone, respectively. We found an overall sensitivity for elevated 5HIAA excretion of 69% for midgut NETs and a significant correlation between median CgA and 5-HIAA values. The sensitivity of AP and the correlations of AP/CgA-data-pairs were low in both midgut and pancreatic NETs, although highest for metastatic pancreatic NETs. The sensitivity of CgA measurement depends on the NET primary location and spread of disease. 5-HIAA and CgA showed comparable sensitivity in midgut NETs, while AP does not seem to be useful as a tumor marker in GEP-NETs. PMID:24213232

  19. Development of neuroendocrine tumors in the gastrointestinal tract of transgenic mice. Heterogeneity of hormone expression.

    PubMed Central

    Rindi, G.; Grant, S. G.; Yiangou, Y.; Ghatei, M. A.; Bloom, S. R.; Bautch, V. L.; Solcia, E.; Polak, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Expression of hormones in endocrine tumors and derived cell lines of transgenic mice carrying insulin-promoted oncogenes has been investigated by histochemical, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and radioimmunologic means. Tumors of the pancreas, small intestine, mesentery, and liver were examined. Insulin-immunoreactive cells were prevalent in pancreatic tumors, with a significant subpopulation of pancreatic polypeptide-immunoreactive elements. Conventional ultrastructural and immunogold analysis identified insulin-storing beta granules in pancreatic tumor cells. In contrast, the largest immunoreactive subpopulation of intestinal tumors expressed secretin (53% of total cells), followed by proglucagon-related peptides (15%), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (7%), gastrin (7%), pancreatic polypeptide (2%), neurotensin (2%), and somatostatin (1%). No detectable immunoreactivity for either insulin or serotonin was observed. Electron microscopy and immunogold labeling showed that intestinal tumor cells contained secretin-storing S-type granules. Lymph node and liver tumors contained secretin-immunoreactive cells with ultrastructural features similar to those of intestinal tumors. In addition, high levels of circulating insulinlike and secretinlike immunoreactants were detectable. Analogous hormone profiles were identified in tumor cell lines and culture media. Large T-antigen immunoreactivity was detected in all the nuclei of neoplastic cells, as well as in insulin-immunoreactive elements of non-neoplastic islets and pancreatic ducts and in some secretin-immunoreactive cells of small intestinal mucosa. These data indicate that neuroendocrine tumors arise both in beta cell and S-cell subpopulations of transgenic mice. Images Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:2162628

  20. Skin manifestations of endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Jonathan S; Braverman, Irwin M

    2016-06-01

    The skin signs of benign and malignant endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors are manifold and early identification of these dermatologic features is crucial in initiating timely diagnosis and management. This article reviews the salient cutaneous features of these tumors that arise in the classic endocrine glands, lung and gastrointestinal tract either as individual neoplasms or as part of a syndrome. PMID:27178685

  1. Neuroendocrine Disorders in Pediatric Craniopharyngioma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Daubenbüchel, Anna M. M.; Müller, Hermann L.

    2015-01-01

    Childhood-onset craniopharyngiomas are partly cystic embryonic malformations of the sellar/parasellar region. The therapy of choice in patients with favorable tumor localization is complete resection with a specific focus on maintaining optical and hypothalamic neuroendocrine functions. In patients with unfavorable tumor localization (i.e., hypothalamic involvement), a limited hypothalamus-sparing surgical strategy followed by local irradiation is recommended. Involvement and/or surgical lesions of posterior hypothalamic areas cause major neuroendocrine sequelae. The overall survival rates are high (92%) but neuroendocrine disorders such as obesity and metabolic syndrome due to involvement and/or treatment-related hypothalamic lesions have major negative impact on survival and quality of life. Recurrences and progressions are frequent post-surgical events. Because irradiation is efficient in preventing tumor progression, appropriate timing of post-surgical irradiation is currently under investigation in a randomized multinational trial (KRANIOPHARYNGEOM 2007). Childhood-onset craniopharyngioma should be recognized as a chronic disease requiring treatment and constant monitoring of the clinical and quality of life consequences, frequently impaired due to neuroendocrine disorders, by experienced multidisciplinary teams in order to provide optimal care of surviving patients. PMID:26239246

  2. Neuroendocrine host factors and inflammatory disease susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Ligier, S; Sternberg, E M

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial, resulting from a combination of genetically predetermined host characteristics and environmental exposures. As the term autoimmune implies, immune dysfunction and dysregulated self-tolerance are key elements in the pathophysiology of all these diseases. The neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous systems are increasingly recognized as modulators of the immune response at the levels of both early inflammation and specific immunity. As such, alterations in their response represent a potential mechanism by which pathologic autoimmunity may develop. Animal models of autoimmune diseases show pre-existing changes in neuroendocrine responses to a variety of stimuli, and both animal and human studies have shown altered stress responses in the setting of active immune activation. The potential role of the neuroendocrine system in linking environmental exposures and autoimmune diseases is 2-fold. First, it may represent a direct target for toxic compounds. Second, its inadequate function may result in the inappropriate response of the immune system to an environmental agent with immunogenic properties. This article reviews the relationship between autoimmune diseases and the neuroendocrine system and discusses the difficulties and pitfalls of investigating a physiologic response that is sensitive to such a multiplicity of environmental exposures. PMID:10502534

  3. NEUROENDOCRINE AND REPRODUCTIVE EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neuroendocrine and Reproductive Effects of Pesticides

    1Stoker, TE, Goldman 2, JM and Cooper 2, RL.

    1Gamete and Early Embryogenesis Biology Branch and 2 Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laborat...

  4. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guannan; Cao, Zhe; Yang, Gang; Wu, Wenming; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication of pancreatic cancer, most often accompanying rare acinar cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with pancreatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Patient information: A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital for weight loss. A physical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on his lower extremities. The blood test showed abnormal increases in amylase, lipase, and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 levels. A computed tomography scan detected a hypodense 2 × 1.5 cm solid mass with an unclear margin in the head of the pancreas. The biopsy of subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities was conducted and revealed lobular panniculitis. Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic panniculitis were strongly suspected. After the administration of octreotide acetate and the Whipple procedure, the serous amylase and lipase levels returned to normal, and the pancreatic panniculitis had almost resolved by 4 weeks later. Conclusion: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare complication of pancreatic cancer. However, in the presence of a pancreatic mass, as in this case, clinicians should be aware that panniculitis may be the sentinel of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27495045

  5. Surgical implications of tumour immunology.

    PubMed Central

    Somers, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of immune infiltration of tumour deposits and the existence of effective in vitro anti-tumour immune responses would suggest the possibility of therapeutic manipulation against tumour cells. However, clinical immunotherapy has shown little promise as a cancer treatment. Numerous explanations for this inefficacy have been proposed, one of which involves the elaboration of immunosuppressive moieties from tumour cells. The results of studies presented below show that serum from patients with gastrointestinal and other tumours have immunosuppressive influences on normal lymphocytes. The degree of this in vitro inhibition is related to tumour 'bulk' and may reflect a systemic immunosuppressive influence of the tumour. Isolation and culture of lymphocytes from gastrointestinal tumour deposits demonstrated that these immune cells are functionally inert, suggesting the existence of an immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment. The isolation and partial purification of an immunosuppressive moiety from conditioned culture medium of a variety of human tumour cell lines further supports the hypothesis of tumour-mediated immunosuppression. A number of protein tumour cell products have been described with potent immunosuppressive properties. These include transforming growth factor-beta, interleukin-10, and the retroviral envelope protein p15E. The surgical implications of the proposed tumour-host immune relationship includes the hypothesis that clinically apparent disease may not be amenable to immune attack owing to tumour-mediated immune suppression. The use of immunostimulatory strategies as adjuvant perioperative therapy would seem a more effective environment for the activation of antitumour immune responses in the surgical patient. PMID:8678441

  6. Tumours of the thymus

    PubMed Central

    Sellors, T. Holmes; Thackray, A. C.; Thomson, A. D.

    1967-01-01

    Eighty-eight cases of thymoma are discussed with the object of trying to co-ordinate the histological and clinical features. The pathological specimens were in all cases obtained at operation. The pathology classification introduced by Thomson and Thackray in 1957 has been found to correspond adequately with the clinical pattern. The most common groups of tumours are basically epithelial and can be separated into five or six subdivisions, each of which has a separate pattern of behaviour. Lymphoid and teratomatous tumours also occur, but there were only two examples in this series. Clinically, separation of patients who suffered from myasthenia (38) and those who did not (50) affords the first main grouping. The majority of patients who had myasthenia gravis had tumours classified as epidermoid (19) and lymphoepithelial (14), the former with a more malignant appearance and behaviour than the latter. Removal of the tumour with or without radiation gave considerable and sometimes complete relief from myasthenic symptoms. Non-myasthenic thymoma (50) was usually discovered as a result of pressure signs or in the course of routine radiography. Spindle or oval celled tumours followed a benign pattern whereas undifferentiated thymoma was in every sense malignant, as also were teratomatous growths. Granulomatous or Hodgkin-like thymomas were of special interest and had an unpredictable course, some patients surviving many years after what was regarded as inadequate treatment. The place of radiotherapy as a pre- or post-operative agent complementary to surgery is discussed. Images PMID:6033387

  7. Tumours of the ovary

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Svend W.; Misdorp, W.; McEntee, Kenneth

    1976-01-01

    Ovarian tumours are common in animals, the majority occurring in bitches and cows. The two most important germ cell tumours were dysgerminoma and teratoma; these morphologically resemble their counterparts in women, with the exception that teratomas in animals tend less to malignancy. The granulosa cell tumour is the most frequent sex cord-stromal tumour in all six species and it may contain luteinized areas or show differentiation towards a Sertoli cell pattern. The canine papillary adenoma and papillary adenocarcinoma, which are as common as granulosa tumours, have several features in common with their counterparts in women: they are of similar histological appearance, are frequently bilateral, and the adenocarcinomas have a great propensity for peritoneal implantation metastasis. Ovarian cysts are frequent in the bitch, sow, and cow and may originate from five different anatomical structures in the ovary. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 and 3Fig. 20-22Fig. 8-10Fig. 15 and 16Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 17-19Fig. 4 and 5Fig. 6 and 7Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13 and 14 PMID:1086151

  8. 75Se-selenomethionine scanning in the diagnosis of tumours of the pancreas and adjacent viscera: The use of the test and its impact on survival

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Denis M.; Brown, Pamela; Melmed, R. N.; Agnew, J. E.; Bouchier, I. A. D.

    1972-01-01

    The results of pancreatic scanning with 75Se-selenomethionine in 393 carefully documented patients over a two-year period are presented. On follow up 50 patients had operatively proven malignant tumours in the gland and a further 22 had similar tumours in adjacent organs, clinically mimicking carcinoma of the pancreas and in many cases causing scan abnormalities. Five patients had pancreatic adenomata. Remote tumours rarely affected the scan. Examination of the role of scanning in patients with neoplastic disease revealed that the test was effective in screening and in detection; false negative diagnoses were rare. By contrast, survival following diagnosis was extremely poor with only 8% of pancreatic tumours resectable and 50% metastasized at the time of surgery. Causes of pancreatic dysfunction, other than pancreatitis or carcinoma, which were associated with abnormalities on the scan are described and general aspects of reporting on the scan are discussed. The patterns seen in abnormal scans, while non-specific with regard to aetiology, were anatomically meaningful and useful adjuncts to the diagnosis of pancreatic disease. A normal scan excluded pancreatic cancer with a probability greater than 95%. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:5045709

  9. Oxygen carrying microbubbles for enhanced sonodynamic therapy of hypoxic tumours.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Conor; Owen, Joshua; Stride, Eleanor; Fowley, Colin; Nesbitt, Heather; Cochrane, David; Coussios, Constantin C; Borden, M; Nomikou, Nikolitsa; McHale, Anthony P; Callan, John F

    2015-04-10

    Tumour hypoxia represents a major challenge in the effective treatment of solid cancerous tumours using conventional approaches. As oxygen is a key substrate for Photo-/Sono-dynamic Therapy (PDT/SDT), hypoxia is also problematic for the treatment of solid tumours using these techniques. The ability to deliver oxygen to the vicinity of the tumour increases its local partial pressure improving the possibility of ROS generation in PDT/SDT. In this manuscript, we investigate the use of oxygen-loaded, lipid-stabilised microbubbles (MBs), decorated with a Rose Bengal sensitiser, for SDT-based treatment of a pancreatic cancer model (BxPc-3) in vitro and in vivo. We directly compare the effectiveness of the oxygen-loaded MBs with sulphur hexafluoride (SF6)-loaded MBs and reveal a significant improvement in therapeutic efficacy. The combination of oxygen-carrying, ultrasound-responsive MBs, with an ultrasound-responsive therapeutic sensitiser, offers the possibility of delivering and activating the MB-sensitiser conjugate at the tumour site in a non-invasive manner, providing enhanced sonodynamic activation at that site. PMID:25660073

  10. Radiotherapy for ocular tumours.

    PubMed

    Stannard, C; Sauerwein, W; Maree, G; Lecuona, K

    2013-02-01

    Ocular tumours present a therapeutic challenge because of the sensitive tissues involved and the necessity to destroy the tumour while minimising visual loss. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of several modalites used apart from surgery, laser, cryotherapy, and chemotherapy. Both external beam RT (EBRT) and brachytherapy are used. Tumours of the bulbar conjunctiva, squamous carcinoma and malignant melanoma, can be treated with a radioactive plaque: strontium-90, ruthenium-106 (Ru-106), or iodine-125 (I-125), after excision. If the tumour involves the fornix or tarsal conjunctiva, proton therapy can treat the conjunctiva and spare most of the eye. Alternatively, an I-125 interstitial implant can be used with shielding of the cornea and lens. Conjunctival mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma can be treated with an anterior electron field with lens shielding and 25-30 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions. Discrete retinoblastoma (RB), too large for cryotherapy or thermolaser, or recurrent after these modalities, can be treated with plaque therapy, I-125, or Ru-106. For large RB, multiple tumours, or vitreous seeds the whole eye can be treated with an I-125 applicator, sparing the bony orbit, or with EBRT, under anaesthetic, using X-rays or proton therapy with vacuum contact lenses to fix the eyes in the required position. Post-enucleated orbits at risk for recurrent RB can be treated with an I-125 implant with shielding to reduce the dose to the bony orbit. Uveal malignant melanomas can be treated with plaque or proton therapy with excellent local control. Preservation of vision will depend on the initial size and location of the tumour. PMID:23174750

  11. Radiotherapy for ocular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Stannard, C; Sauerwein, W; Maree, G; Lecuona, K

    2013-01-01

    Ocular tumours present a therapeutic challenge because of the sensitive tissues involved and the necessity to destroy the tumour while minimising visual loss. Radiotherapy (RT) is one of several modalites used apart from surgery, laser, cryotherapy, and chemotherapy. Both external beam RT (EBRT) and brachytherapy are used. Tumours of the bulbar conjunctiva, squamous carcinoma and malignant melanoma, can be treated with a radioactive plaque: strontium-90, ruthenium-106 (Ru-106), or iodine-125 (I-125), after excision. If the tumour involves the fornix or tarsal conjunctiva, proton therapy can treat the conjunctiva and spare most of the eye. Alternatively, an I-125 interstitial implant can be used with shielding of the cornea and lens. Conjunctival mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma can be treated with an anterior electron field with lens shielding and 25–30 Gray (Gy) in 2 Gy fractions. Discrete retinoblastoma (RB), too large for cryotherapy or thermolaser, or recurrent after these modalities, can be treated with plaque therapy, I-125, or Ru-106. For large RB, multiple tumours, or vitreous seeds the whole eye can be treated with an I-125 applicator, sparing the bony orbit, or with EBRT, under anaesthetic, using X-rays or proton therapy with vacuum contact lenses to fix the eyes in the required position. Post-enucleated orbits at risk for recurrent RB can be treated with an I-125 implant with shielding to reduce the dose to the bony orbit. Uveal malignant melanomas can be treated with plaque or proton therapy with excellent local control. Preservation of vision will depend on the initial size and location of the tumour. PMID:23174750

  12. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours.

    PubMed

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonize a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT), which spreads among dogs, and devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), among Tasmanian devils. CTVT are generally not fatal as a tumour-specific host immune response controls or clears the tumours after transmission and a period of growth. In contrast, the growth of DFTD tumours is not controlled by the Tasmanian devil's immune system and the disease causes close to 100% mortality, severely impacting the devil population. To avoid the immune response of the host both DFTD and CTVT use a variety of immune escape strategies that have similarities to many single organism tumours, including MHC loss and the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines. However, both tumours appear to have a complex interaction with the immune system of their respective host, which has evolved over the relatively long life of these tumours. The Tasmanian devil is struggling to survive with the burden of this disease and it is only with an understanding of how DFTD passes between individuals that a vaccine might be developed. Further, an understanding of how these tumours achieve natural transmissibility should provide insights into general mechanisms of immune escape that emerge during tumour evolution. PMID:25187312

  13. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonize a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT), which spreads among dogs, and devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), among Tasmanian devils. CTVT are generally not fatal as a tumour-specific host immune response controls or clears the tumours after transmission and a period of growth. In contrast, the growth of DFTD tumours is not controlled by the Tasmanian devil's immune system and the disease causes close to 100% mortality, severely impacting the devil population. To avoid the immune response of the host both DFTD and CTVT use a variety of immune escape strategies that have similarities to many single organism tumours, including MHC loss and the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines. However, both tumours appear to have a complex interaction with the immune system of their respective host, which has evolved over the relatively long life of these tumours. The Tasmanian devil is struggling to survive with the burden of this disease and it is only with an understanding of how DFTD passes between individuals that a vaccine might be developed. Further, an understanding of how these tumours achieve natural transmissibility should provide insights into general mechanisms of immune escape that emerge during tumour evolution. PMID:25187312

  14. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome. PMID:23716380

  15. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. PMID:26526433

  16. Image-based detection and targeting of therapy resistance in pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fox, Raymond G; Lytle, Nikki K; Jaquish, Dawn V; Park, Frederick D; Ito, Takahiro; Bajaj, Jeevisha; Koechlein, Claire S; Zimdahl, Bryan; Yano, Masato; Kopp, Janel L; Kritzik, Marcie; Sicklick, Jason K; Sander, Maike; Grandgenett, Paul M; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Shibata, Shinsuke; Pizzo, Donald; Valasek, Mark A; Sasik, Roman; Scadeng, Miriam; Okano, Hideyuki; Kim, Youngsoo; MacLeod, A Robert; Lowy, Andrew M; Reya, Tannishtha

    2016-06-16

    Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia is a pre-malignant lesion that can progress to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, a highly lethal malignancy marked by its late stage at clinical presentation and profound drug resistance. The genomic alterations that commonly occur in pancreatic cancer include activation of KRAS2 and inactivation of p53 and SMAD4 (refs 2-4). So far, however, it has been challenging to target these pathways therapeutically; thus the search for other key mediators of pancreatic cancer growth remains an important endeavour. Here we show that the stem cell determinant Musashi (Msi) is a critical element of pancreatic cancer progression both in genetic models and in patient-derived xenografts. Specifically, we developed Msi reporter mice that allowed image-based tracking of stem cell signals within cancers, revealing that Msi expression rises as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia progresses to adenocarcinoma, and that Msi-expressing cells are key drivers of pancreatic cancer: they preferentially harbour the capacity to propagate adenocarcinoma, are enriched in circulating tumour cells, and are markedly drug resistant. This population could be effectively targeted by deletion of either Msi1 or Msi2, which led to a striking defect in the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to adenocarcinoma and an improvement in overall survival. Msi inhibition also blocked the growth of primary patient-derived tumours, suggesting that this signal is required for human disease. To define the translational potential of this work we developed antisense oligonucleotides against Msi; these showed reliable tumour penetration, uptake and target inhibition, and effectively blocked pancreatic cancer growth. Collectively, these studies highlight Msi reporters as a unique tool to identify therapy resistance, and define Msi signalling as a central regulator of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27281208

  17. [Update of pathological diagnosis of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor].

    PubMed

    Xiaodong, Teng; Ming, Zhao; Maode, Lai

    2016-05-25

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors are common in pathological practice and its pathological classification and histological grading are not exactly the same as that of those in the digestive tract and pancreas. In 2015 edition of World Health Organization classification, pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors are classified as carcinoid tumors (including typical carcinoid and atypical carcinoid), small cell lung carcinoma, large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, and precursor lesion diffuse idiopathic neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia; each category has distinctive morphological and immunohistochemical features. The morphologic features including growth patterns and cytological appearances are keys for the diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumor, and immunohistochemical findings are also critical for its diagnosis. Furthermore, the diagnostic criteria vary for different types of specimen. In this article, we present a concise review and summary of the update of clinicopathological characterizations of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor, with an emphasis on its diagnostic criteria and differential diagnosis. PMID:27045239

  18. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Sala; Nikolopoulos, Ioannis; Kerwat, Rajab

    2016-01-01

    Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions. PMID:27274876

  19. Pancreatic cancer and its stroma: A conspiracy theory

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhihong; Pothula, Srinivasa P; Wilson, Jeremy S; Apte, Minoti V

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterised by a prominent desmoplastic/stromal reaction that has received little attention until recent times. Given that treatments focusing on pancreatic cancer cells alone have failed to significantly improve patient outcome over many decades, research efforts have now moved to understanding the pathophysiology of the stromal reaction and its role in cancer progression. In this regard, our Group was the first to identify the cells (pancreatic stellate cells, PSCs) that produced the collagenous stroma of pancreatic cancer and to demonstrate that these cells interacted closely with cancer cells to facilitate local tumour growth and distant metastasis. Evidence is accumulating to indicate that stromal PSCs may also mediate angiogenesis, immune evasion and the well known resistance of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This review will summarise current knowledge regarding the critical role of pancreatic stellate cells and the stroma in pancreatic cancer biology and the therapeutic approaches being developed to target the stroma in a bid to improve the outcome of this devastating disease. PMID:25170206

  20. Pancreatic cancer and its stroma: a conspiracy theory.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihong; Pothula, Srinivasa P; Wilson, Jeremy S; Apte, Minoti V

    2014-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is characterised by a prominent desmoplastic/stromal reaction that has received little attention until recent times. Given that treatments focusing on pancreatic cancer cells alone have failed to significantly improve patient outcome over many decades, research efforts have now moved to understanding the pathophysiology of the stromal reaction and its role in cancer progression. In this regard, our Group was the first to identify the cells (pancreatic stellate cells, PSCs) that produced the collagenous stroma of pancreatic cancer and to demonstrate that these cells interacted closely with cancer cells to facilitate local tumour growth and distant metastasis. Evidence is accumulating to indicate that stromal PSCs may also mediate angiogenesis, immune evasion and the well known resistance of pancreatic cancer to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This review will summarise current knowledge regarding the critical role of pancreatic stellate cells and the stroma in pancreatic cancer biology and the therapeutic approaches being developed to target the stroma in a bid to improve the outcome of this devastating disease. PMID:25170206

  1. Network of immune-neuroendocrine interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Besedovsky, H; Sorkin, E

    1977-01-01

    In order to bring the self-regulated immune system into conformity with other body systems its functioning within the context of an immune-neuroendocrine network is proposed. This hypothesis is based on the existence of afferent--efferent pathways between immune and neuroendocrine structures. Major endocrine responses occur as a consequence of antigenic stimulation and changes in the electrical activity of the hypothalamus also take place; both of these alterations are temporally related to the immune response itself. This endocrine response has meaningful implications for immunoregulation and for immunospecificity. During ontogeny, there is also evidence for the operations of a complex network between the endocrine and immune system, a bidirectional interrelationship that may well affect each developmental stage of both functions. As sequels the functioning of the immune system and the outcome of this interrelation could be decisive in lymphoid cell homeostasis, self-tolerance, and could also have significant implications for pathology. PMID:849642

  2. Neuroendocrine Causes of Amenorrhea—An Update

    PubMed Central

    Fourman, Lindsay T.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Secondary amenorrhea—the absence of menses for three consecutive cycles—affects approximately 3–4% of reproductive age women, and infertility—the failure to conceive after 12 months of regular intercourse—affects approximately 6–10%. Neuroendocrine causes of amenorrhea and infertility, including functional hypothalamic amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia, constitute a majority of these cases. Objective: In this review, we discuss the physiologic, pathologic, and iatrogenic causes of amenorrhea and infertility arising from perturbations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, including potential genetic causes. We focus extensively on the hormonal mechanisms involved in disrupting the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Conclusions: A thorough understanding of the neuroendocrine causes of amenorrhea and infertility is critical for properly assessing patients presenting with these complaints. Prompt evaluation and treatment are essential to prevent loss of bone mass due to hypoestrogenemia and/or to achieve the time-sensitive treatment goal of conception. PMID:25581597

  3. Canine neuroendocrine carcinoma. A tumor resembling histiocytoma.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, B J; Hill, J; Weiss, L M

    1985-12-01

    The clinical and light- and electron microscopic features of 20 cases of canine neuroendocrine carcinoma, initially classified as atypical histiocytomas, are reported. The locally expansile well-circumscribed dermal tumor nodules were composed of solid masses of cells with high mitotic index and multinucleation, arranged in a trabecular pattern with prominent fibrovascular connective tissue stroma rich in reticulin fibers that outlined compact cell nests. Ultrastructural studies revealed evenly dispersed chromatin, focally indented nuclei and abundant cytoplasm with perinuclear filaments, membrane-bound dense core granules, and prominent interdigitating plasma membrane projections with primitive intercellular junctions. Clinical and pathological comparisons between canine neuroendocrine carcinoma, canine histiocytomas, and human Merkel cell neoplasms are discussed. PMID:4091229

  4. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Marc; Teulé, Alexandre; Salazar, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are relatively rare and complex neoplasms that present many clinical challenges. Most GEP-NETs are sporadic, but they can be multiple and a component of a familial syndrome. Assessment of the location and extent of GEP-NETs is crucial for management and a number of novel imaging modalities are under evaluation with the principal goal of increasing sensitivity for the detection of micro-metastases while retaining specificity. The appropriate diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine tumors often involves collaboration between specialists in multiple disciplines, using specific biochemical, radiologic, and surgical methods. Management strategies include surgery, radiological intervention, cytotoxic chemotherapies, somatostatin analogs and novel biological agents such as sunitinib and everolimus. Other biological agents, new chemoteraphy regimens and somatostatin-tagged radionuclide therapies are also under investigation. In spite of this, comparison between therapeutic modalities is currently difficult. Further studies are warranted to individualize and optimize the diagnosis and treatment of these tumors. PMID:24714698

  5. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  6. Ampullary neuroendocrine tumor diagnosed by endoscopic papillectomy in previously confirmed ampullary adenoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoung Ho; Lee, Tae Hoon; Jang, Si-Hyong; Choi, Chi Young; Lee, Won Myung; Min, Ji Hey; Cho, Hyun Deuk; Park, Sang-Heum

    2016-04-01

    Ampullary adenoma is a common indication for endoscopic papillectomy. Ampullary neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is a rare disease for which complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice. However, because of the morbidity and mortality associated with surgical resection, endoscopic papillectomy is increasingly used in selected cases of low grade, with no metastasis and no invasion of the pancreatic or bile duct. Also, confirmed and complete endoscopic resection of ampullary NET accompanied by adenoma has not been reported to date. We report herein a rare case of an ampullary NET accompanied with adenoma, which was successfully and completely resected via endoscopic papillectomy. Prior to papillectomy, this case was diagnosed as an ampullary adenoma. PMID:27053861

  7. Questions and answers: what can be said by diagnostic imaging in neuroendocrine tumors?

    PubMed

    Cuccurullo, V; Faggiano, A; Scialpi, M; Cascini, G L; Piunno, A; Catalano, O; Colao, A; Mansi, L

    2012-12-01

    The neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the gastro-entero-pancreatic area (GEP) represent a heterogeneous group of malignancies from the histologic, clinico-laboratoristic (functioning and non-functioning variants), and therapeutic point of view. It is an issue becoming more frequent for the diagnostic imager, being radiologist as well as nuclear physician. Imaging (together with biopsy) plays a key role in the diagnostic assessment and staging (including grading and prognostic definition), in evaluating response to treatment, and in follow-up of GEP-NET. Multislice computed tomography (MSCT), octreoscan and PET-CT are the most widely diffuse and accurate imaging modalities employed in this setting. Other methods, such as Magnetic Resonance and Endoscopic Ultrasound, may also play a significant role. PMID:23235192

  8. p27 Loss Is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Sung; Lee, Hye Seung; Nam, Kyung Han; Choi, Jiwoon; Kim, Woo Ho

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) represent a heterogeneous disease group originating from the neuroendocrine cells. Identification of prognostic markers, related to neuroendocrine tissue-selective tumorigenesis, is necessary to find therapeutic targets. Materials and Methods A total of 327 patients with GEP-NETs were included in this study; there were 49 gastric, 29 duodenal, 49 pancreatic, 12 hepatobiliary, 33 appendiceal, 5 proximal colon, and 150 distal colon cases. We performed immunostaining with the tissue microarray method for menin, p27, and p18. Results We observed negative staining for menin, p27, and p18 in 34%, 21%, and 56% of GEP-NETs, respectively. The loss of p27, but not menin, was positively correlated with the grade of Ki-67. Menin–/p27–, menin–/p27+, menin+/p27–, and menin+/p27+ phenotype groups included 13%, 22%, 8%, and 57% of patients, respectively. A dichotomized comparison showed that menin– or p27– tumors were significantly associated with foregut and midgut localizations, high World Health Organization (WHO) grade, lymph node metastasis, and more advanced stage as compared to menin+/p27+ patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis for the overall survival showed that p27 loss was significantly associated with decreased survival. Multivariate analysis showed that p27 loss is an independent factor for poor overall survival. Conclusion Our results revealed that the loss of p27 is associated with poor prognosis and the menin-p27 pathway is important in the tumorigenesis of GEP-NETs. PMID:25036575

  9. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the prostate gland

    PubMed Central

    Hoof, Pamela; Tsai-Nguyen, Ginger; Paulson, Scott; Syed, Almas

    2016-01-01

    Small cell prostate carcinoma (SCPC) has a clinical course and prognosis that is markedly different from that of common adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The patient in this case presented with fever of unknown origin, dyspnea, and near spinal cord compression. He was subsequently found to have widely metastatic high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma of prostatic origin. This case emphasizes that despite the commonality of prostate cancer, there are rare presentations of this common disease. PMID:26722176

  10. Neuroendocrine regulation of appetitive ingestive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Keen-Rhinehart, Erin; Ondek, Katelynn; Schneider, Jill E.

    2013-01-01

    Food availability in nature is often irregular, and famine is commonplace. Increased motivation to engage in ingestive behaviors increases the chance of survival, providing additional potential opportunities for reproduction. Because of the advantages conferred by entraining ingestive behavior to environmental conditions, neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating the motivation to acquire and ingest food have evolved to be responsive to exogenous (i.e., food stored for future consumption) and endogenous (i.e., body fat stores) fuel availability. Motivated behaviors like eating occur in two phases. The appetitive phase brings animals into contact with food (e.g., foraging, food hoarding), and the more reflexive consummatory phase results in ingestion (e.g., chewing, swallowing). Quantifiable appetitive behaviors are part of the natural ingestive behavioral repertoire of species such as hamsters and humans. This review summarizes current knowledge about neuroendocrine regulators of ingestive behavior, with an emphasis appetitive behavior. We will discuss hormonal regulators of appetitive ingestive behaviors, including the orexigenic hormone ghrelin, which potently stimulates foraging and food hoarding in Siberian hamsters. This section includes a discussion of the hormone leptin, its relation to endogenous fat stores, and its role in food deprivation-induced increases in appetitive ingestive behaviors. Next, we discuss how hormonal regulators interact with neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of ingestive behaviors, such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), to regulate ingestive behavior. Finally, we discuss the potential impact that perinatal nutrient availability can have on the neuroendocrine regulation of ingestive behavior. Understanding the hormonal mechanisms that connect metabolic fuel availability to central appetite regulatory circuits should provide a better understanding of the

  11. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.R.; Millar, A.M.; Taylor, T.V.

    1982-05-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with /sup 86/RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory.

  12. Primary Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Ureter: A Short Review.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Andres M; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre

    2016-07-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors represent 0.05% of urinary tract malignancies, and most originate in the bladder. Their pathogenesis is debated, since ureters are thought to lack neuroendocrine cells. Morphologically, most ureteral neuroendocrine tumors demonstrate the typical small cell neuroendocrine appearance, are immunohistochemically positive for synaptophysin/chromogranin A/CD56, and show electron-dense granules by electron microscopy. Clinical presentation is similar to that of other more common ureteral neoplasms. Prognosis is usually dismal, but a multimodal treatment approach including platinum-based adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy seems to be beneficial. PMID:27362572

  13. Microsatellite unstable gastrointestinal neuroendocrine carcinomas: a new clinicopathologic entity.

    PubMed

    Sahnane, Nora; Furlan, Daniela; Monti, Matilde; Romualdi, Chiara; Vanoli, Alessandro; Vicari, Emanuela; Solcia, Enrico; Capella, Carlo; Sessa, Fausto; La Rosa, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) and mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas (MANECs) are heterogeneous neoplasms characterized by poor outcome. Microsatellite instability (MSI) has recently been found in colorectal NECs showing a better prognosis than expected. However, the frequency of MSI in a large series of GEP-NEC/MANECs is still unknown. In this work, we investigated the incidence of MSI in GEP-NEC/MANECs and characterized their clinicopathologic and molecular features. MSI analysis and immunohistochemistry for mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2) were performed in 89 GEP-NEC/MANECs (six esophageal, 77 gastrointestinal, three pancreatic, and three of the gallbladder). Methylation of 34 genes was studied by methylation-specific multiplex ligation probe amplification. Mutation analysis of BRAF and KRAS was assessed by PCR-pyrosequencing analysis. MSI was observed in 11 NEC/MANECs (12.4%): seven intestinal and four gastric. All but two MSI-cases showed MLH1 methylation and loss of MLH1 protein. The remaining two MSI-cancers showed lack of MSH2 or PMS2 immunohistochemical expression. MSI-NEC/MANECs showed higher methylation levels than microsatellite stable NEC/MANECs (40.6% vs 20.2% methylated genes respectively, P<0.001). BRAF mutation was detected in six out of 88 cases (7%) and KRAS mutation was identified in 15 cases (17%). BRAF mutation was associated with MSI (P<0.0008), while KRAS status did not correlate with any clinicopathologic or molecular feature. Vascular invasion (P=0.0003) and MSI (P=0.0084) were identified as the only independent prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. We conclude that MSI identifies a subset of gastric and intestinal NEC/MANECs with distinct biology and better prognosis. MSI-NEC/MANECs resemble MSI-gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas for frequency, molecular profile and pathogenetic mechanisms. PMID:25465415

  14. Management of early gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Scherübl, Hans; Jensen, Robert T; Cadiot, Guillaume; Stölzel, Ulrich; Klöppel, Günter

    2011-01-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) of the stomach, duodenum, appendix or rectum that are small (≤ 1 cm) and well differentiated can be considered “early” tumors, since they generally have a (very) good prognosis. In the new WHO classification of 2010, these neoplasms are called neuroendocrine tumors/ carcinoids (NETs), grade (G) 1 or 2, and distinguished from poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs), G3. NETs are increasing, with a rise in the age-adjusted incidence in the U.S.A. by about 700 % in the last 35 years. Improved early detection seems to be the main reason for these epidemiological changes. Both the better general availability of endoscopy, and imaging techniques, have led to a shift in the discovery of smaller-sized (≤ 10-20 mm) intestinal NETs/carcinoids and earlier tumor stages at diagnosis. Endoscopic screening is therefore effective in the early diagnosis, not only of colorectal adenocarcinomas, but also of NETs/carcinoids. Endoscopic removal, followed up with endoscopic surveillance is the treatment of choice in NETs/carcinoids of the stomach, duodenum and rectum that are ≤ 10 mm in size, have a low proliferative activity (G1), do not infiltrate the muscular layer and show no angioinvasion. In all the other intestinal NENs, optimal treatment generally needs surgery and/or medical therapy depending on type, biology and stage of the tumor, as well as the individual situation of the patient. PMID:21860682

  15. GEP- NETS UPDATE: Genetics of neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Crona, Joakim; Skogseid, Britt

    2016-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, arising from neuroendocrine cells that are dispersed throughout the body. Around 20% of NETs occur in the context of a genetic syndrome. Today there are at least ten recognized NET syndromes. This includes the classical syndromes: multiple endocrine neoplasias types 1 and 2, and von Hippel-Lindau and neurofibromatosis type 1. Additional susceptibility genes associated with a smaller fraction of NETs have also been identified. Recognizing genetic susceptibility has proved essential both to provide genetic counseling and to give the best preventive care. In this review we will also discuss the knowledge of somatic genetic alterations in NETs. At least 24 genes have been implicated as drivers of neuroendocrine tumorigenesis, and the overall rates of genomic instability are relatively low. Genetic intra-tumoral, as well as inter-tumoral heterogeneity in the same patient, have also been identified. Together these data point towards the common pathways in NET evolution, separating early from late disease drivers. Although knowledge of specific mutations in NETs has limited impact on actual patient management, we predict that in the near future genomic profiling of tumors will be included in the clinical arsenal for diagnostics, prognostics and therapeutic decisions. PMID:27165966

  16. Stress induced neuroendocrine-immune plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liezmann, Christiane; Stock, Daniel; Peters, Eva M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Research over the past decade has revealed close interaction between the nervous and immune systems in regulation of peripheral inflammation linking psychosocial stress with chronic somatic disease and aging. Moreover emerging data suggests that chronic inflammations lead to a pro-inflammatory status underlying premature aging called inflammaging. In this context, the spleen can be seen as a switch board monitoring peripherally derived neuroendocrine-immune mediators in the blood and keeping up a close communication with the central stress response via its mainly sympathetic innervation. The effect aims at balanced and well-timed stress axis activation and immune adaptation in acute peripheral inflammatory events. Constant adjustment to the needs generated by environmental and endogenous challenges is provided by neuroendocrine-immune plasticity. However, maladaptive plasticity induced e.g., by chronic stress-axis activation and excessive non-neuronal derived neuroendocrine mediators may be at the heart of the observed stress sensitivity promote inflammaging under chronic inflammatory conditions. We here review the role of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and neurotrophins as stress mediators modulating the immune response in the spleen and their potential role in inflammaging. PMID:23467333

  17. A Rare Case of Mixed Neuroendocrine Tumor and Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Xenaki, Sofia; Lasithiotakis, Konstantinos; Andreou, Alexandros; Aggelaki, Sofia; Tzardi, Maria; Daskalaki, Anna; Chalkiadakis, George; Chrysos, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) of pancreas is a rare tumor with aggressive progression and poor prognosis. Its coexistence with adenocarcinoma poses significant clinical problems and has not been addressed in the literature. Methods. We describe a case of a 51-year-old male who underwent pancreatoduodenectomy due to pancreatic head tumor 1.5 × 1 × 1.4 cm. Histological examination of the specimen revealed a mixed neoplasm: (1) a well differentiated adenocarcinoma, neoplastic blasts of which are extended focally to the submucosa without invading the muscular layer, and (2) a low differentiated NEC consisting of solid clusters and pagetoid formations. All 18 lymph nodes of the specimen were free of neoplastic disease and the surgical margins of the specimen were tumor-free. No adjuvant treatment was administered and two months after the operation the patient developed liver metastasis. FNA cytology of the hepatic lesions revealed low grade carcinoma with neuroendocrine characteristics. Five lines of chemotherapy were administered: VP + CDDP, paclitaxel + ifosfamide + Mesna + CDDP, Folfox + Avastin, Folfiri + Avastin, and CAV. During his treatment he revealed PD and succumbed to his disease 13 months after the operation. Conclusion. Coexistence of NEC with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is a very rare entity presenting significant challenges regarding its adjuvant treatment and the treatment of distant relapse. PMID:27610261

  18. Differential Contribution to Neuroendocrine Tumorigenesis of Parallel Egfr Signaling in Cancer Cells and Pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Nolan-Stevaux, Olivier; Truitt, Morgan C.; Pahler, Jessica C.; Olson, Peter; Guinto, Cristina; Lee, David C.; Hanahan, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Factors associated with tumor sensitivity to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors in the context of wild-type EGFR remain elusive. This study investigates the mechanistic basis of responsiveness to EGFR inhibitors in the RIP1-Tag2 (RT2) mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumorigenesis (PNET). Upon treatment of RT2 mice with EGFR inhibitors, PNET tumors harboring wild-type, nonamplified alleles of Egfr grow at a markedly reduced rate and display a significant increase in tumor cell apoptosis, as well as reduced neovascularization. The authors identify Tgf-α and Hb-egf as key limiting mediators of separable pathological functions of Egfr in neuroendocrine tumor progression: Tgf-α mutant tumors present with an elevated apoptotic index, whereas Hb-egf mutant lesions exhibit decreased angiogenic switching and neovascularization. This study not only associates Tgf-α and Hb-egf expression with wild-type Egfr oncogenicity but also ascribes the proangiogenic activity of Egfr in this tumor model to a novel mesenchymal Hb-egf/Egfr signaling axis, whereby endothelial and pericyte-derived Hb-egf activates Egfr specifically in tumor-associated perivascular cells, leading to increased pericyte coverage of the tumor endothelium and enhanced angiogenesis. PMID:20975924

  19. A Rare Case of Mixed Neuroendocrine Tumor and Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Lasithiotakis, Konstantinos; Andreou, Alexandros; Aggelaki, Sofia; Tzardi, Maria; Chalkiadakis, George; Chrysos, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) of pancreas is a rare tumor with aggressive progression and poor prognosis. Its coexistence with adenocarcinoma poses significant clinical problems and has not been addressed in the literature. Methods. We describe a case of a 51-year-old male who underwent pancreatoduodenectomy due to pancreatic head tumor 1.5 × 1 × 1.4 cm. Histological examination of the specimen revealed a mixed neoplasm: (1) a well differentiated adenocarcinoma, neoplastic blasts of which are extended focally to the submucosa without invading the muscular layer, and (2) a low differentiated NEC consisting of solid clusters and pagetoid formations. All 18 lymph nodes of the specimen were free of neoplastic disease and the surgical margins of the specimen were tumor-free. No adjuvant treatment was administered and two months after the operation the patient developed liver metastasis. FNA cytology of the hepatic lesions revealed low grade carcinoma with neuroendocrine characteristics. Five lines of chemotherapy were administered: VP + CDDP, paclitaxel + ifosfamide + Mesna + CDDP, Folfox + Avastin, Folfiri + Avastin, and CAV. During his treatment he revealed PD and succumbed to his disease 13 months after the operation. Conclusion. Coexistence of NEC with adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is a very rare entity presenting significant challenges regarding its adjuvant treatment and the treatment of distant relapse. PMID:27610261

  20. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  1. Current and future systemic treatment options in metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Cagatay

    2014-01-01

    Although pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer death, only modest improvement has been observed in the past two decades, single agent gemcitabine has been the only standard treatment in patients with advanced disease. Recently newer agents such as nab-paclitaxel, nimotuzumab and regimens such as FOLFIRINOX have been shown to have promising activity being superior to gemcitabine as a single agent. With better understanding of tumour biology coupled with the improvements in targeted and immunotherapies, there is increasing expectation for better response rates and extended survival in pancreatic cancer. PMID:25083302

  2. Overexpression of cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 is an early event in the progression of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Irene; Kleeff, Jörg; Abiatari, Ivane; Shi, Xined; Giese, Nathalia; Bergmann, Frank; Roth, Wilfried; Friess, Helmut; Schirmacher, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Aim To determine the role of two antiapoptotic proteins of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein family, cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (cIAP1) and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 (cIAP2), in human pancreatic carcinogenesis. Methods mRNA levels were measured in pancreatic tissues and pancreatic cancer cell lines by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Protein expression was assessed in pancreatic cancer cell lines by immunoblotting and in pancreatic tissues by immunohistochemistry, and correlated with pathological and survival data. Results cIAP1 expression was constantly high in non‐neoplastic pancreatic tissues, in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions, as well as in a subset of primary and metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC), and a preferential cytoplasmatic localisation was observed in the tumour tissues. cIAP1 expression was rare in a cohort of cystic tumours. cIAP2 mRNA levels were significantly higher (2.4 fold) in PDAC than in normal tissues. cIAP2 protein was overexpressed in PDAC, and was detectable in low‐ and high‐grade PanIN lesions. Moreover, cIAP2 was often expressed in pancreatic cystic tumours. cIAP1 and cIAP2 mRNA and protein were detected in all the examined cell lines. Survival analysis revealed a shorter survival in patients with cIAP1/cIAP2‐positive tumours. Conclusions cIAP1 might contribute to the regulation of the apoptotic process in the normal and in the neoplastic pancreas, depending on its subcellular localisation. Overexpression of cIAP2 is a common and early event in the progression of pancreatic cancer, and could therefore potentially influence the important pathophysiological aspects of PDAC, such as anoikis or chemoresistance. PMID:16775116

  3. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Islet cell tumors; Islet of Langerhans tumor; Neuroendocrine tumors ... In the healthy pancreas, cells called islet cells produce hormones that regulate a several bodily functions. These include blood sugar level and the production of ...

  4. Inactivation of TGFβ receptor II signalling in pancreatic epithelial cells promotes acinar cell proliferation, acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and fibrosis during pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Saponara, Enrica; Reding, Theresia; Bombardo, Marta; Seleznik, Gitta M; Malagola, Ermanno; Zabel, Anja; Faso, Carmen; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2016-02-01

    Determining signalling pathways that regulate pancreatic regeneration following pancreatitis is critical for implementing therapeutic interventions. In this study we elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pancreatic epithelial cells during tissue regeneration. To this end, we conditionally inactivated TGFβ receptor II (TGFβ-RII) using a Cre-LoxP system under the control of pancreas transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) promoter, specific for the pancreatic epithelium, and evaluated the molecular and cellular changes in a mouse model of cerulein-induced pancreatitis. We show that TGFβ-RII signalling does not mediate the initial acinar cell damage observed at the onset of pancreatitis. However, TGFβ-RII signalling not only restricts acinar cell replication during the regenerative phase of the disease but also limits ADM formation in vivo and in vitro in a cell-autonomous manner. Analyses of molecular mechanisms underlying the observed phenotype revealed that TGFβ-RII signalling stimulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and intersects with the EGFR signalling axis. Finally, TGFβ-RII ablation in epithelial cells resulted in increased infiltration of inflammatory cells in the early phases of pancreatitis and increased activation of pancreatic stellate cells in the later stages of pancreatitis, thus highlighting a TGFβ-based crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating the development of pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis. Collectively, our data not only contribute to clarifying the cellular processes governing pancreatic tissue regeneration, but also emphasize the conserved role of TGFβ as a tumour suppressor, both in the regenerative process following pancreatitis and in the initial phases of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26510396

  5. Integrated preclinical and clinical development of mTOR inhibitors in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Laguna, I; Tan, A C; Uson, M; Angenendt, M; Ma, W W; Villaroel, M C; Zhao, M; Rajeshkumar, N V; Jimeno, A; Donehower, R; Iacobuzio-Donahue, C; Barrett, M; Rudek, M A; Rubio-Viqueira, B; Laheru, D; Hidalgo, M

    2010-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this work was to determine the efficacy of inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in pancreatic cancer preclinical models and translate preclinical observations to the clinic. Methods: Temsirolimus (20 mg Kg−1 daily) was administered to freshly generated pancreatic cancer xenografts. Tumour growth inhibition was determined after 28 days. Xenografts were characterised at baseline by gene expression and comparative genomic hybridisation. Patients with advanced, gemcitabine-resistant pancreatic cancer were treated with sirolimus (5 mg daily). The primary end point was 6-month survival rate (6mSR). Correlative studies included immunohistochemistry assessment of pathway expression in baseline tumours, drug pharmacokinetics (PKs), response assessment by FDG-PET and pharmacodynamic effects in peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results: In all, 4 of 17 xenografts (23%) responded to treatment. Sensitive tumours were characterised by gene copy number variations and overexpression of genes leading to activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Activation of p70S6K correlated with drug activity in the preclinical studies. Sirolimus was well tolerated in the clinic, showed predictable PKs, exerted pathway inhibition in post-treatment PBMCs and resulted in a 6mSR of 26%. No correlation, however, was found between activated p70S6K in tumour tissues and anti-tumour effects. Conclusion: Sirolimus activity in pancreatic cancer was marginal and not predicted by the selected biomarker. PMID:20664591

  6. Cryosurgery for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kecheng; Yang, Daming

    2013-01-01

    The procedure of pancreatic cryosurgery is performed with intraoperative or percutaneous approaches. Based on current data and our initial experience, cryoablation appears to be a feasible, potentially safe and promising option in patients with locally advanced and unresectable pancreatic cancer. It is suggested that there are almost no known contraindications to the use of cryosurgery for pancreatic cancer. For most patients with pancreatic cancer, cryosurgery can substitute conventional surgery. PMID:25083453

  7. Fatty tumours of the uterus.

    PubMed Central

    Pounder, D J

    1982-01-01

    Uterine fatty tumours (UFT) are uncommon and have received little attention in the English literature. They have aroused interest as a consequence of occasional diagnostic confusion with sarcomas and the continuing unresolved dispute as to their histogenesis. Three cases of UFT are described and the pathological features of note discussed. The viewpoint that these tumours are hamartomas/choristomas is rejected. UFT most probably represent tumour metaplasia within a leiomyoma. There is no uniform accepted nomenclature for such tumours and it is suggested that they be designated "uterine fatty tumours" and subdivided into "lipoma" and "mixed lipoma/leiomyoma" (synonym lipoleiomyoma). Images PMID:7174848

  8. Multi-detector row CT of pancreatic islet cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Horton, Karen M; Hruban, Ralph H; Yeo, Charles; Fishman, Elliot K

    2006-01-01

    Pancreatic islet cell tumors (ICTs) are neuroendocrine neoplasms that produce and secrete hormones to a variable degree. These neoplasms can present a diagnostic challenge, both clinically and radiologically. ICTs can be classified as either syndromic or nonsyndromic on the basis of their clinical manifestations. Multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of both syndromic and nonsyndromic ICTs. In general, syndromic ICTs are less than 3 cm in size. They are typically hyperenhancing and are usually best seen on CT scans obtained during the arterial phase. Nonsyndromic ICTs tend to be larger than syndromic ICTs at presentation and are more likely to be cystic or necrotic. It is important for the radiologist to be familiar with appropriate CT protocol for the evaluation of patients with suspected pancreatic ICT and to understand the variable CT appearances of these neoplasms. PMID:16549609

  9. Glomus tumour of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Troller, Rebekka; Soll, Christopher; Breitenstein, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Glomus tumours are benign tumours typically arising from the glomus bodies and primarily found under the fingernails or toenails. These rare neoplasms account for <2% of all soft tissue tumours and are generally not found in the gastrointestinal tract. We report a case of a 40-year-old man presenting with recurrent epigastric pain and pyrosis. Endoscopy revealed a solitary tumour in the antrum of the stomach. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy was suspicious for a gastrointestinal stroma tumour. After CT indicated the resectability of the tumour, showing neither lymphatic nor distant metastases, a laparoscopic-assisted gastric wedge resection was performed. Surprisingly, histology revealed a glomus tumour of the stomach. PMID:27343282

  10. Serum CA 242 in pancreatic cancer. Comparison with CA 19-9 and CEA.

    PubMed

    Pezzilli, R; Billi, P; Plate, L; Laudadio, M A; Sprovieri, G

    1995-01-01

    Serum CA 242, CA 19-9 and CEA concentrations were determined in 94 subjects divided into 5 groups: Group 1 consisted of 22 healthy subjects; Group 2 consisted of 40 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma; according to Cubilla and Fitzgerald's classification, 11 tumours were Stage I, 4 were Stage II, and 25 were Stage III. Group 3 consisted of 10 chronic pancreatitis patients, group 4 of 10 acute pancreatitis patients, group 5 of 12 patients with nonpancreatic digestive carcinomas. Ten of these 12 patients had distant metastases. The sensitivity of CA 19-9 in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was higher than that of CEA and CA 242 (p < 0.05 and p < 0.005, respectively). In Stage I cancer patients the sensitivity of the markers studied was less than 50% (45% for CA 19-9, 18% for CEA, and 9% for CA 242) whereas most of the 25 patients with metastatic tumours of the pancreas had elevated serum levels of all 3 markers. The various combinations of the three markers did not significantly improve the sensitivity in diagnosing pancreatic cancer. No relationship was found between the localization of the tumour and the serum levels of the 3 markers studied. Similarly, no differences were found between patients with cholestasis and those without. The specificity of the 3 markers, evaluated in patients with benign pancreatic diseases, was 100% for CA 242, 90% for CA 199 and 70% for CEA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8562994

  11. A Phase II Trial of a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Panobinostat in Patients With Low-Grade Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Sam J.; Mulkerin, Daniel L.; Rajguru, Saurabh; Carmichael, Lakeesha; Chen, Herb; Holen, Kyle D.; LoConte, Noelle K.

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors versus carcinoid tumors should be examined separately in clinical trials. Progression-free survival is more clinically relevant as the primary endpoint (rather than response rate) in phase II trials for low-grade neuroendocrine tumors. Background. The most common subtypes of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are pancreatic islet cell tumors and carcinoids, which represent only 2% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have already been shown to suppress tumor growth and induce apoptosis in various malignancies. In NET cells, HDAC inhibitors have resulted in increased Notch1 expression and subsequent inhibition of growth. We present here a phase II study of the novel HDAC inhibitor panobinostat in patients with low-grade NET. Methods. Adult patients with histologically confirmed, metastatic, low-grade NETs and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of ≤2 were treated with oral panobinostat 20 mg once daily three times per week. Treatment was continued until patients experienced unacceptable toxicities or disease progression. The study was stopped at planned interim analysis based on a Simon two-stage design. Results. Fifteen patients were accrued, and 13 were evaluable for response. No responses were seen, but the stable disease rate was 100%. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 9.9 months, and the median overall survival was 47.3 months. Fatigue (27%), thrombocytopenia (20%), diarrhea (13%), and nausea (13%) were the most common related grade 3 toxicities. There was one grade 4 thrombocytopenia (7%). These results did not meet the prespecified criteria to open the study to full accrual. Conclusion. The HDAC inhibitor panobinostat has a high stable disease rate and reasonable PFS in low-grade NET, but has a low response rate. PMID:27261467

  12. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Frank U.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of the body's immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli—like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells—and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. HP often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of HP patients to develop pancreatic cancer. PMID:24600409

  13. Metachronous pancreatic cancer originating from disseminated founder pancreatic intraductal neoplasias (PanINs).

    PubMed

    Imai, Koji; Karasaki, Hidenori; Ono, Yusuke; Sasajima, Junpei; Chiba, Shin-Ichi; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Muraki, Miho; Hanaoka, Hideki; Furukawa, Takahisa; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Kono, Toru; Nagashima, Kazuo; Mizukami, Yusuke

    2015-04-01

    Clonal populations originated from benign-looking 'founder cells' may spread widely within pancreas instead of being localized in situ before frank pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) can be detected. Metachronous PDA is not common event, and we here sought to define potent origin of multiple PDAs developed in a woman using advanced genetics technologies. Curative resection of pancreatic head tumour was performed; however, 'recurrent' lesions in the remnant pancreas were found 3.5 years later and total pancreatectomy was subsequently performed. The metachronous lesions were morphologically similar to the primary PDA. Using a next-generation sequencing and digital PCR, all three PDAs were shown to possess rare somatic mutations in KRAS (p.T58I & p.Q61H). Curiously, identical KRAS mutations were found in low-grade 'intraepithelial' lesions, which localized in normal area of the pancreas and one of them possessed p53 mutation, which was also found in the PDAs. The footprint of the tumour evolution marked by mutational profiling supports a human correlate to the mouse models of 'dissemination' occurring at the earliest stages of pancreatic neoplasia. PMID:27499895

  14. Metachronous pancreatic cancer originating from disseminated founder pancreatic intraductal neoplasias (PanINs)

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Koji; Karasaki, Hidenori; Ono, Yusuke; Sasajima, Junpei; Chiba, Shin‐ichi; Funakoshi, Hiroshi; Muraki, Miho; Hanaoka, Hideki; Furukawa, Takahisa; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Kono, Toru; Nagashima, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Clonal populations originated from benign‐looking ‘founder cells' may spread widely within pancreas instead of being localized in situ before frank pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) can be detected. Metachronous PDA is not common event, and we here sought to define potent origin of multiple PDAs developed in a woman using advanced genetics technologies. Curative resection of pancreatic head tumour was performed; however, ‘recurrent' lesions in the remnant pancreas were found 3.5 years later and total pancreatectomy was subsequently performed. The metachronous lesions were morphologically similar to the primary PDA. Using a next‐generation sequencing and digital PCR, all three PDAs were shown to possess rare somatic mutations in KRAS (p.T58I & p.Q61H). Curiously, identical KRAS mutations were found in low‐grade ‘intraepithelial' lesions, which localized in normal area of the pancreas and one of them possessed p53 mutation, which was also found in the PDAs. The footprint of the tumour evolution marked by mutational profiling supports a human correlate to the mouse models of ‘dissemination' occurring at the earliest stages of pancreatic neoplasia.

  15. Biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, G J; Gillespie, J; Guillou, P J

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of death from malignant disease in Western society. Apart from the fortunate few patients who present with a resectable small pancreatic adenocarcinoma, conventional treatment offers no hope of cure and has little palliative value. Over the past two decades major steps have been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic growth and neoplasia. This review sets out to explore these advances, firstly in the regulation of normal pancreatic growth, and secondly the mechanism which may be involved in malignant change of the exocrine pancreas. From an understanding of this new biology, new treatment strategies may be possible for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:1855689

  16. Borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Tropé, Claes Göran; Kaern, Janne; Davidson, Ben

    2012-06-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours account for 10-20% of all epithelial ovarian cancer. Historically, standard primary surgery has included borderline ovarian tumours, omentectomy, peritoneal washing and multiple biopsies. As one-third of borderline ovarian tumours are diagnosed in women under the age of 40 years, fertility-sparing treatment has been more frequently used in the past 10 years. Fertility drugs are well tolerated in women with infertility after fertility-sparing surgery. Careful selection of candidates is necessary. Laparoscopic techniques can be used, but should be reserved for oncologic surgeons. This conservative treatment increases the rate of recurrence, albeit with no effect on survival. The pregnancy rate is nearly 50%, and most are achieved spontaneously. These women should be closely followed up. The question is whether this is acceptable from a gynaecologic oncologic point of view. For this reason, we will discuss recently published studies and gynaecologic oncologic concerns about the mode of fertility-sparing surgery and its consequences. PMID:22321906

  17. Tumours of the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Svend W.; Mackey, L. J.; Misdorp, W.

    1976-01-01

    The most frequent renal tumours of animals are renal cell carcinoma and nephroblastoma. Renal cell carcinomas are seen mainly in dogs and cattle and nephroblastoma is encountered in pigs, puppies, and calves. Renal cell carcinomas are usually papillary in the dog. They show a marked propensity for vascular invasion, penetration of the posterior vena cava, and subsequent pulmonary metastasis. Nephroblastoma, which is morphologically identical to Wilms' tumour of children, is almost always a benign tumour in animals. It is one of the most frequent neoplasms of pigs, possibly owing to the fact that most pigs are slaughtered (and examined) when a few months old. Lymphosarcoma involving the kidney is particularly frequent in the cat, but is also seen in other species as part of a generalized disease. ImagesFig. 5,6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 1,2Fig. 3,4Fig. 16,17,18,19Fig. 9,10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14,15 PMID:1086154

  18. Diffuse Neuroendocrine Cell Hyperplasia: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cansız Ersöz, Cevriye; Cangır, Ayten Kayı; Dizbay Sak, Serpil

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) is a rare pulmonary disorder characterised by a proliferation of neuroendocrine cells within the lung. It is believed that a minority of the patients with DIPNECH can develop carcinoid tumors. Here, we report two new cases of DIPNECH with coexisting carcinoid tumors. PMID:27293939

  19. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  20. Biophysical models of tumour growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracqui, P.

    2009-05-01

    Tumour growth is a multifactorial process, which has stimulated in recent decades the development of numerous models trying to figure out the mechanisms controlling solid tumours morphogenesis. While the earliest models were focusing on cell proliferation kinetics, modulated by the availability of supplied nutrients, new modelling approaches emphasize the crucial role of several biophysical processes, including local matrix remodelling, active cell migration and traction, and reshaping of host tissue vasculature. After a brief presentation of this experimental background, this review will outline a number of representative models describing, at different scales, the growth of avascular and vascularized tumours. Special attention will be paid to the formulation of tumour-host tissue interactions that selectively drive changes in tumour size and morphology, and which are notably mediated by the mechanical status and elasticity of the tumour microenvironment. Emergence of invasive behaviour through growth instabilities at the tumour-host interface will be presented considering both reaction-diffusion and mechano-cellular models. In the latter part of the review, patient-oriented implications of tumour growth modelling are outlined in the context of brain tumours. Some conceptual views of the adaptive strategies and selective barriers that govern tumour evolution are presented in conclusion as potential guidelines for the development of future models.

  1. Programming of neuroendocrine self in the thymus and its defect in the development of neuroendocrine autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Geenen, Vincent; Bodart, Gwennaëlle; Henry, Séverine; Michaux, Hélène; Dardenne, Olivier; Charlet-Renard, Chantal; Martens, Henri; Hober, Didier

    2013-01-01

    For centuries after its first description by Galen, the thymus was considered as only a vestigial endocrine organ until the discovery in 1961 by Jacques FAP Miller of its essential role in the development of T (thymo-dependent) lymphocytes. A unique thymus first appeared in cartilaginous fishes some 500 million years ago, at the same time or shortly after the emergence of the adaptive (acquired) immune system. The thymus may be compared to a small brain or a computer highly specialized in the orchestration of central immunological self-tolerance. This was a necessity for the survival of species, given the potent evolutionary pressure imposed by the high risk of autotoxicity inherent in the stochastic generation of the diversity of immune cell receptors that characterize the adaptive immune response. A new paradigm of “neuroendocrine self-peptides” has been proposed, together with the definition of “neuroendocrine self.” Neuroendocrine self-peptides are secreted by thymic epithelial cells (TECs) not according to the classic model of neuroendocrine signaling, but are processed for presentation by, or in association with, the thymic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene/protein controls the transcription of neuroendocrine genes in TECs. The presentation of self-peptides in the thymus is responsible for the clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells, which emerge during the random recombination of gene segments that encode variable parts of the T cell receptor for the antigen (TCR). At the same time, self-antigen presentation in the thymus generates regulatory T (Treg) cells that can inhibit, in the periphery, those self-reactive T cells that escaped negative selection in the thymus. Several arguments indicate that the origin of autoimmunity directed against neuroendocrine glands results primarily from a defect in the intrathymic programming of self-tolerance to neuroendocrine functions. This defect may be genetic

  2. Neuroendocrine differentiation: The mysterious fellow of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kleist, Britta; Poetsch, Micaela

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine differentiation in sporadic colorectal cancer has been recognized since decades, but its clinical impact is still controversially discussed. Detailed parameter analyses hint at the possibility that probably not neuroendocrine differentiation itself, but its association with poor grade of tumor differentiation, lymph node metastases, distant metastases and other unfavorable features contribute to worse clinical outcome. However, other studies deny a relationship between neuroendocrine differentiation and prognosis of colorectal cancer. This review elucidates, whether new insights into the origin of neuroendocrine differentiation in the intestinal epithelium, its regulation by mTOR pathway components and its possible link to the intestinal stem cell compartment could determine a role of neuroendocrine cells as prognostic marker and putative therapeutic target in sporadic colorectal cancer. PMID:26556999

  3. Recurrent gastric neuroendocrine tumors treated with total gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Myounghwa; Kim, Jung-Wook; Jang, Jae-Young; Chang, Young Woon; Park, Sun Hee; Kim, Yong Ho; Kim, Youn Wha

    2015-01-01

    Gastric neuroendocrine tumors are rare; however, the incidence has recently increased due to the increasing use of upper endoscopy. Neuroendocrine tumors arise from the excess proliferation of enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells. The proliferative changes of enterochromaffin cells evolve through a hyperplasia-dysplasia-neoplasia sequence that is believed to underlie the pathogenesis of gastric neuroendocrine tumors. Endoscopic resection is recommended as the initial treatment if the tumor is not in an advanced stage. However, there is no definite guideline for the treatment of recurrent gastric neuroendocrine tumors following endoscopic resection. Here, we report a rare case of gastric neuroendocrine tumors in a 56-year-old male who experienced two recurrences within 11 years after endoscopic resection. The patient finally underwent a total gastrectomy. The pathological features of the resected stomach exhibited the full hyperplasia-dysplasia-neoplasia sequence of the ECL cells in a single specimen. PMID:26675502

  4. Molecular aspects of prostate cancer with neuroendocrine differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Connie S.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine differentiation (NED), which is not uncommon in prostate cancer, is increases in prostate cancer after androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and generally appears in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Neuroendocrine cells, which are found in normal prostate tissue, are a small subset of cells and have unique function in regulating the growth of prostate cells. Prostate cancer with NED includes different types of tumor, including focal NED, pure neuroendocrine tumor or mixed neuroendocrine-adenocarcinoma. Although more and more studies are carried out on NED in prostate cancer, the molecular components that are involved in NED are still poorly elucidated. We review neuroendocrine cells in normal prostate tissue, NED in prostate cancer, terminology of NED and biomarkers used for detecting NED in routine pathological practice. Some recently reported molecular components which drive NED in prostate cancer are listed in the review. PMID:27041934

  5. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the larynx with metastasis to the eyelid.

    PubMed

    Assi, Hussein A; Patel, Raina; Mehdi, Syed

    2015-10-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are a rare type of neoplasms that comprise only 0.5% of all malignancies.¹ They usually arise from the gastrointestinal tract and the lung.¹,² Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the head and neck is a relatively rare malignancy described in the literature. The larynx is the most commonly affected region of the head and neck.³,⁴ Nevertheless, small-cell carcinoma comprises only 0.5% of all laryngeal cancers.⁵ Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the larynx carries variable prognosis depending on the histological subtype.⁶ Typical carcinoid rarely metastasizes, but atypical carcinoid and small-cell carcinoma have high rates of metastasis, usually in the lung and liver.² Cutaneous metastasis from neuroendocrine carcinoma is an extremely rare entity, with only few cases reported in the English literature.⁷,⁸ We report the case of an elderly man with recurrent laryngeal neuroendocrine carcinoma with metastasis to the eyelid. PMID:26862914

  6. Maspin as a Tumour Suppressor in Salivary Gland Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Nipun; Sheirawan, Mohammad Kinan; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran; Alenzi, Faris; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Nasser; Baroudi, Kusai; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2014-01-01

    Maspin is a protein that belongs to serin protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. The purpose of this study was to review the literature concerning the expression of maspin in salivary gland tumours. A literature search was done using MEDLINE, accessed via the National Library of Medicine PubMed interface. Statistical analysis was not done because only seven studies were available in literature, the collected data were different and the results could not be compared. Expression of maspin was down regulated in more aggressive salivary gland tumours. Maspin may function as a tumour suppressor in salivary gland tumours. PMID:25654053

  7. Tumour imaging by the detection of fibrin clots in tumour stroma using an anti-fibrin Fab fragment

    PubMed Central

    Obonai, Toshifumi; Fuchigami, Hirobumi; Furuya, Fumiaki; Kozuka, Naoyuki; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of early and aggressive types of cancer is important for providing effective cancer therapy. Cancer-induced fibrin clots exist only within lesions. Previously, we developed a monoclonal antibody (clone 102-10) that recognizes insoluble fibrin but not fibrinogen or soluble fibrin and confirmed that fibrin clots form continuously in various cancers. Here, we describe the development of a Fab fragment probe of clone 102-10 for tumour imaging. The distribution of 102-10 Fab was investigated in genetically engineered mice bearing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and its effect on blood coagulation was examined. Immunohistochemical and ex vivo imaging revealed that 102-10 Fab was distributed selectively in fibrin clots in PDAC tumours 3 h after injection and that it disappeared from the body after 24 h. 102-10 Fab had no influence on blood coagulation or fibrinolysis. Tumour imaging using anti-fibrin Fab may provide a safe and effective method for the diagnosis of invasive cancers by detecting fibrin clots in tumour stroma. PMID:27009516

  8. Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors: Searching the optimal treatment strategy--A literature review.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Rossana; Rinaldi, Silvia; Torniai, Mariangela; Morgese, Francesca; Partelli, Stefano; Caramanti, Miriam; Onofri, Azzurra; Polenta, Vanessa; Pagliaretta, Silvia; Falconi, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastro-entero-pancreatic system (GEP-NETs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with different malignant potential and behavior. Many treatment options are available. Surgery should be considered for localized tumors and in some selected cases of metastatic disease. Somatostatin analogs, useful for symptoms control in functioning tumors, are also effective to inhibit tumor progression in specific settings. The multi-TKI sunitinib and of the mTOR-inhibitor everolimus are efficacy for metastatic pancreatic NET (P-NET) treatment. Chemotherapy is generally used in symptomatic and progressive NETs. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) should be recommended after failure of medical therapy. For tumors confined to the liver ablative techniques should be considered. Nevertheless a shared therapeutic sequence for GEP-NET treatment still does not exist. In this review, we analyzed available data trying to identify the better treatment strategy and to suggest potential therapeutic algorithms distinguishing P-NETs from gastrointestinal NETs (GI-NETs). PMID:26643525

  9. Pancreatic metastases from ovarian carcinoma--diagnosis by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Hadzri, M Hasmoni; Rosemi, Salleh

    2012-04-01

    Pancreatic metastases are very uncommon and originate most commonly from lung, colon, breast and kidney cancer. Ovarian adenocarcinoma has been reported as a primary site of pancreatic metastasis, but its diagnosis has rarely being reported by endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). We report a case of multiple metastases to the pancreas from ovarian carcinoma occurring four years after original resection of the primary tumour. Our patient presented with severe epigastric pain which was initially treated as acute pancreatitis. Further imaging modalities showed multiple large pseudocystic lesions in the pancreatic head and body. Subsequent EUS-FNA confirmed that the lesions were metastatic disease from an advanced ovarian carcinoma. She underwent palliative chemotherapy and the pancreatic lesion showed receding size. PMID:22822646

  10. Pancreatic cancer: Are "liquid biopsies" ready for prime-time?

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alexandra R; Valle, Juan W; McNamara, Mairead G

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease that carries a poor prognosis. Accurate tissue diagnosis is required. Tumours contain a high content of stromal tissue and therefore biopsies may be inconclusive. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have been investigated as a potential "liquid biopsy" in several malignancies and have proven to be of prognostic value in breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. They have been detected in patients with localised and metastatic pancreatic cancer with sensitivities ranging from 38%-100% using a variety of platforms. Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has also been detected in pancreas cancer with a sensitivity ranging from 26%-100% in studies across different platforms and using different genetic markers. However, there is no clear consensus on which platform is the most effective for detection, nor which genetic markers are the most useful to use. Potential roles of liquid biopsies include diagnosis, screening, guiding therapies and prognosis. The presence of CTCs or ctDNA has been shown to be of prognostic value both at diagnosis and after treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, more prospective studies are required before this promising technology is ready for adoption into routine clinical practice. PMID:27621566

  11. Pancreatic cancer: Are "liquid biopsies" ready for prime-time?

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Alexandra R; Valle, Juan W; McNamara, Mairead G

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease that carries a poor prognosis. Accurate tissue diagnosis is required. Tumours contain a high content of stromal tissue and therefore biopsies may be inconclusive. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have been investigated as a potential “liquid biopsy” in several malignancies and have proven to be of prognostic value in breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. They have been detected in patients with localised and metastatic pancreatic cancer with sensitivities ranging from 38%-100% using a variety of platforms. Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has also been detected in pancreas cancer with a sensitivity ranging from 26%-100% in studies across different platforms and using different genetic markers. However, there is no clear consensus on which platform is the most effective for detection, nor which genetic markers are the most useful to use. Potential roles of liquid biopsies include diagnosis, screening, guiding therapies and prognosis. The presence of CTCs or ctDNA has been shown to be of prognostic value both at diagnosis and after treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, more prospective studies are required before this promising technology is ready for adoption into routine clinical practice. PMID:27621566

  12. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  13. Transformation of nonfunctioning pancreatic tumor into malignant insulinoma after 3 years: an uncommon clinical course of insulinoma.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Muyesser Sayki; Ozbek, Mustafa; Karakose, Melia; Tutal, Esra; Ucan, Bekir; Yilmazer, Demet; Dilli, Alper; Gultekin, Salih Sinan; Cakal, Erman; Delibasi, Tuncay

    2015-06-01

    A 62-year-old man admitted to our outpatient clinic with two months of recurrent life threatening hypoglycemia episodes. He was diagnosed as malignant insulinoma with multiple metastases of liver and peripancreatic lymph nodes. Liver biopsy specimen was demonstrated grade 2 neuroendocrine tumor compatible with clinical and radiological results. He was followed under the treatment of continuous intravenous glucose infusion during the diagnostic procedures. He had a pancreatic lesion history measured 20 x 12 mm in diameter via the abdominal tomography examination approximately two years before the diagnosis. Unusual course of this case suggests the transformation of nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor into functional insulin secreting tumor with metastases. The patient was found inoperable and started on chemotherapy. PMID:26154097

  14. CAM 17.1--a new diagnostic marker in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gansauge, F.; Gansauge, S.; Parker, N.; Beger, M. I.; Poch, B.; Link, K. H.; Safi, F.; Beger, H. G.

    1996-01-01

    CAM 17.1-Ab is a recently described monoclonal antibody that detects a mucus glycoprotein with high specificity for intestinal mucus, particularly in the colon, small intestine, biliary tract and pancreas. We investigated the expression and release of CAM 17.1 in pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and tissue specimens of normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. CAM 17.1 was weakly expressed on normal ductal cells and chronic pancreatitis, whereas it was overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Serum analysis using a new enzyme-linked antibody sandwich assay (CAM 17.1/WGA) of patients with chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer or other gastrointestinal cancer and of healthy blood donors revealed a high sensitivity (67%) and excellent specificity (90%) of CAM 17.1/WGA assay in pancreatic cancer. In comparison with the tumour marker CA19-9, the sensitivity of the CAM 17.1/WGA assay was similar to the sensitivity of CA 19-9 (67% and 76%, P = 0.22), whereas the specificity of CAM 17.1/WGA assay was higher than in CA 19-9 (90% compared with 78% in chronic pancreatitis, P > 0.05). Images Figure 2 PMID:8980403

  15. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer ... in pancreatic cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized ...

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  18. Lungs and subcutaneous metastases from a solitary fibrous tumour of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Tesfom, Meron F.; Caldwell, Carole; Hanasoge, Raveesh; Bramhall, Simon R.

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour is an uncommon mesenchymal neoplasm previously thought to only originate from the pleura; it is seen only rarely in an extra-pleural location. We report the first case of pancreatic solitary fibrous tumour in an 87-year-old woman that has metastasized to the lungs and subcutaneous tissue. We have identified a solitary mass excised from the groin region, which is positive for CD34 and vimentic marker with high proliferative rate, nuclear atypia and cellular necrosis. Imaging studies confirmed a slow-growing solitary mass in the uncinate lobe of the pancreas with evidence of lung metastasis. PMID:26612261

  19. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Sears, R. Bryan; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivatable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with photo-initiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivatable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release whilst reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities. PMID:26780659

  20. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Bryan Sears, R.; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with a photoinitiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near-infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release while reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  1. Knowledge discovery for pancreatic cancer using inductive logic programming.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yushan; Shimada, Kazuaki; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Maeshiro, Kensei; Ching, Wai-Ki; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Furuta, Koh

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease and predicting the status of the patients becomes an important and urgent issue. The authors explore the applicability of inductive logic programming (ILP) method in the disease and show that the accumulated clinical laboratory data can be used to predict disease characteristics, and this will contribute to the selection of therapeutic modalities of pancreatic cancer. The availability of a large amount of clinical laboratory data provides clues to aid in the knowledge discovery of diseases. In predicting the differentiation of tumour and the status of lymph node metastasis in pancreatic cancer, using the ILP model, three rules are developed that are consistent with descriptions in the literature. The rules that are identified are useful to detect the differentiation of tumour and the status of lymph node metastasis in pancreatic cancer and therefore contributed significantly to the decision of therapeutic strategies. In addition, the proposed method is compared with the other typical classification techniques and the results further confirm the superiority and merit of the proposed method. PMID:25075529

  2. Neuroendocrine effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Maureen E; Kasturi, Badrinarayanan S; Barber, Matthew; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; MohanKumar, Puliyur S; MohanKumar, Sheba M J

    2003-01-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a degradation product of sulfonyl-based fluorochemicals that are used extensively in industrial and household applications. Humans and wildlife are exposed to this class of compounds from several sources. Toxicity tests in rodents have raised concerns about potential developmental, reproductive, and systemic effects of PFOS. However, the effect of PFOS on the neuroendocrine system has not been investigated thus far. In this study, adult female rats were injected intraperitoneally with 0, 1, or 10 mg PFOS/kg body weight (BW) for 2 weeks. Food and water intake, BW, and estrous cycles were monitored daily. At the end of treatment, PFOS levels in tissues were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) interfaced with electrospray mass spectrometry. Changes in brain monoamines were measured by HPLC with electrochemical detection, and serum corticosterone and leptin were monitored using radioimmunoassay. Treatment with PFOS produced a dose-dependent accumulation of this chemical in various body tissues, including the brain. PFOS exposure decreased food intake and BW in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with PFOS affected estrous cyclicity and increased serum corticosterone levels while decreasing serum leptin concentrations. PFOS treatment also increased norepinephrine concentrations in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. These results indicate that exposure to PFOS can affect the neuroendocrine system in rats. PMID:12948888

  3. Surgical Treatment of Neuroendocrine Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ser Yee; Cheow, Peng Chung; Teo, Jin Yao; Ooi, London L. P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Management of Neuroendocrine liver metastases (NELM) is challenging. The presence of NELM worsens survival outcome and almost 10% of all liver metastases are neuroendocrine in origin. There is no firm consensus on the optimal treatment strategy for NELM. A systematic search of the PubMed database was performed from 1995–2010, to collate the current evidence and formulate a sound management algorithm. There are 22 case series with a total of 793 patients who had undergone surgery for NELM. The overall survival ranges from 46–86% at 5 years, 35–79% at 10 years, and the median survival ranges from 52–123 months. After successful cytoreductive surgery, the mean duration of symptom reduction is between 16–26 months, and the 5-year recurrence/progression rate ranges from 59–76%. Five studies evaluated the efficacy of a combination cytoreductive strategy reporting survival rate of ranging from 83% at 3 years to 50% at 10 years. To date, there is no level 1 evidence comparing surgery versus other liver-directed treatment options for NELM. An aggressive surgical approach, including combination with additional liver-directed procedures is recommended as it leads to long-term survival, significant long-term palliation, and a good quality of life. A multidisciplinary approach should be established as the platform for decision making. PMID:22319650

  4. Neuroendocrine control of ionic balance in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Kumai, Yusuke; Perry, Steve F

    2016-08-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an emerging model for integrative physiological research. In this mini-review, we discuss recent advances in the neuroendocrine control of ionic balance in this species, and identify current knowledge gaps and issues that would benefit from further investigation. Zebrafish inhabit a hypo-ionic environment and therefore are challenged by a continual loss of ions to the water. To maintain ionic homeostasis, they must actively take up ions from the water and reduce passive ion loss. The adult gill or the skin of larvae are the primary sites of ionic regulation. Current models for the uptake of major ions in zebrafish incorporate at least three types of ion transporting cells (also called ionocytes); H(+)-ATPase-rich cells for Na(+) uptake, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-rich cells for Ca(2+) uptake, and Na(+)/Cl(-)-cotransporter expressing cells for both Na(+) and Cl(-) uptake. The precise molecular mechanisms regulating the paracellular loss of ions remain largely unknown. However, epithelial tight junction proteins, including claudins, are thought to play a critical role in reducing ion losses to the surrounding water. Using the zebrafish model, several key neuroendocrine factors were identified as regulators of epithelial ion movement, including the catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline), cortisol, the renin-angiotensin system, parathyroid hormone and prolactin. Increasing evidence also suggests that gasotransmitters, such as H2S, are involved in regulating ion uptake. PMID:27179885

  5. Gestational dexamethasone alters fetal neuroendocrine axis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, R G

    2016-09-01

    This study tested whether the maternal transport of dexamethasone (DEXA) may affect the development of the neuroendocrine system. DEXA (0.2mg/kg b.w., subcutaneous injection) was administered to pregnant rats from gestation day (GD) 1-20. In the DEXA-treated group, a decrease in maternal serum thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), and increase in thyrotropin (TSH) levels (hypothyroid status) were observed at GDs 15 & 20 with respect to control group. The reverse pattern (hyperthyroid status) was observed in their fetuses at embryonic days (EDs) 15 & 20. Although the maternal body weight was diminished, the weight of the thyroid gland was increased at studied GDs as compared to the control group. The fetal growth retardation, hyperleptinemia, hyperinsulinism, and cytokines distortions (transforming growth factor-beta; TGF-β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha; TNF-α, and interferon-γ; IFN-γ) were noticed at examined EDs if compared to the control group. Alternatively, the maternofetal thyroid dysfunctions due to the maternal DEXA administration attenuated the levels of fetal cerebral norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E), and elevated the levels of dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) at considered days. These alterations were age-dependent and might damage the nerve transmission. Finally, maternal DEXA might act as neuroendocrine disruptor causing dyshormonogenesis and fetal cerebral dysfunction. PMID:27220267

  6. Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors with nuclear inclusion.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Saori; Tsuta, Koji; Sekine, Shigeki; Yoshida, Akihiko; Sasaki, Naoshi; Shibuki, Yasuo; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Asamura, Hisao; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-09-01

    Nuclear inclusion or pseudoinclusion is a peculiar cytological feature, and its recognition in appropriate clinicopathological settings can aid in the diagnosis of several disease entities. To the best of our knowledge, only 1 case of pulmonary neuroendocrine tumor (NET) with nuclear pseudoinclusion has been reported. A review of 227 patients who had undergone surgical resection for pulmonary NETs revealed 2 tumors with different mechanisms of nuclear inclusion. To explore the cause of nuclear inclusion, NET with nuclear inclusion was characterized immunohistochemically and ultrastructurally. Nuclear inclusions were observed in 2 of the 227 (0.9%) patients with pulmonary NETs. The first patient was a 46-year-old woman with small cell carcinoma. Tumor cells with nuclear inclusions were distributed focally. Ultrastructural analysis showed that these inclusions were pseudoinclusions. The second patient was a 62-year-old man with large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Nuclear inclusions were observed in the focal area of the tumor. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the intra-nuclear materials consisted of biotin and aberrant cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. Mutational analysis revealed a CTNNB1 gene mutation. Although very rare, diagnostic errors may be observed in cases of pulmonary NETs with nuclear inclusions. The mechanisms of nuclear inclusion differed, with one due to herniation of the cytoplasm into the nucleus (pseudoinclusion) and the other due to accumulation of biotin resulting from a CTNNB1 gene mutation. PMID:23896262

  7. Neuroendocrine effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate in rats.

    PubMed

    Austin, Maureen E; Kasturi, Badrinarayanan S; Barber, Matthew; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; MohanKumar, Puliyur S; MohanKumar, Sheba M J

    2003-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a degradation product of sulfonyl-based fluorochemicals that are used extensively in industrial and household applications. Humans and wildlife are exposed to this class of compounds from several sources. Toxicity tests in rodents have raised concerns about potential developmental, reproductive, and systemic effects of PFOS. However, the effect of PFOS on the neuroendocrine system has not been investigated thus far. In this study, adult female rats were injected intraperitoneally with 0, 1, or 10 mg PFOS/kg body weight (BW) for 2 weeks. Food and water intake, BW, and estrous cycles were monitored daily. At the end of treatment, PFOS levels in tissues were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) interfaced with electrospray mass spectrometry. Changes in brain monoamines were measured by HPLC with electrochemical detection, and serum corticosterone and leptin were monitored using radioimmunoassay. Treatment with PFOS produced a dose-dependent accumulation of this chemical in various body tissues, including the brain. PFOS exposure decreased food intake and BW in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with PFOS affected estrous cyclicity and increased serum corticosterone levels while decreasing serum leptin concentrations. PFOS treatment also increased norepinephrine concentrations in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. These results indicate that exposure to PFOS can affect the neuroendocrine system in rats. PMID:12948888

  8. Advances in the Diagnosis of Neuroendocrine Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Singh, Aviral; Baum, Richard P

    2016-09-01

    Somatostatin receptor PET/CT using (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs, is a mainstay for the evaluation of the somatostatin receptor status in neuroendocrine neoplasms. In addition, the assessment of glucose metabolism by (18)F-FDG PET/CT at diagnosis can overcome probable shortcomings of histopathologic grading. This offers a systematic theranostic approach for the management of neuroendocrine neoplasms, that is, patient selection for the appropriate treatment-surgery, somatostatin analogs, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, targeted therapies like everolimus and sunitinib, or chemotherapy-and also for therapy response monitoring. Novel targets, for example, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in higher-grade tumors and glucagon like peptide-1 receptor in insulinomas, appear promising for imaging. Scandium-44 and Copper-64, especially on account of their longer half-life (for pretherapeutic dosimetry) and cyclotron production (which favors mass production), might be the potential alternatives to (68)Ga for PET/CT imaging. The future of molecular imaging lies in Radiomics, that is, qualitative and quantitative characterization of tumor phenotypes in correlation with tumor genomics and proteomics, for a personalized cancer management. PMID:27553465

  9. AAVP displaying octreotide for ligand-directed therapeutic transgene delivery in neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tracey L.; Yuan, Ziqiang; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Sanchez Claros, Carmen; Adem, Asha; Cui, Min-Hui; Branch, Craig A.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Libutti, Steven K.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inoperable or unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have limited treatment options. These rare human tumors often express somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) and thus are clinically responsive to certain relatively stable somatostatin analogs, such as octreotide. Unfortunately, however, this tumor response is generally short-lived. Here we designed a hybrid adeno-associated virus and phage (AAVP) vector displaying biologically active octreotide on the viral surface for ligand-directed delivery, cell internalization, and transduction of an apoptosis-promoting tumor necrosis factor (TNF) transgene specifically to NETs. These functional attributes of AAVP-TNF particles displaying the octreotide peptide motif (termed Oct-AAVP-TNF) were confirmed in vitro, in SSTR type 2-expressing NET cells, and in vivo using cohorts of pancreatic NET-bearing Men1 tumor-suppressor gene KO mice, a transgenic model of functioning (i.e., insulin-secreting) tumors that genetically and clinically recapitulates the human disease. Finally, preclinical imaging and therapeutic experiments with pancreatic NET-bearing mice demonstrated that Oct-AAVP-TNF lowered tumor metabolism and insulin secretion, reduced tumor size, and improved mouse survival. Taken together, these proof-of-concept results establish Oct-AAVP-TNF as a strong therapeutic candidate for patients with NETs of the pancreas. More broadly, the demonstration that a known, short, biologically active motif can direct tumor targeting and receptor-mediated internalization of AAVP particles may streamline the potential utility of myriad other short peptide motifs and provide a blueprint for therapeutic applications in a variety of cancers and perhaps many nonmalignant diseases as well. PMID:26884209

  10. AAVP displaying octreotide for ligand-directed therapeutic transgene delivery in neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tracey L; Yuan, Ziqiang; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Sanchez Claros, Carmen; Adem, Asha; Cui, Min-Hui; Branch, Craig A; Gelovani, Juri G; Libutti, Steven K; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-03-01

    Patients with inoperable or unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) have limited treatment options. These rare human tumors often express somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) and thus are clinically responsive to certain relatively stable somatostatin analogs, such as octreotide. Unfortunately, however, this tumor response is generally short-lived. Here we designed a hybrid adeno-associated virus and phage (AAVP) vector displaying biologically active octreotide on the viral surface for ligand-directed delivery, cell internalization, and transduction of an apoptosis-promoting tumor necrosis factor (TNF) transgene specifically to NETs. These functional attributes of AAVP-TNF particles displaying the octreotide peptide motif (termed Oct-AAVP-TNF) were confirmed in vitro, in SSTR type 2-expressing NET cells, and in vivo using cohorts of pancreatic NET-bearing Men1 tumor-suppressor gene KO mice, a transgenic model of functioning (i.e., insulin-secreting) tumors that genetically and clinically recapitulates the human disease. Finally, preclinical imaging and therapeutic experiments with pancreatic NET-bearing mice demonstrated that Oct-AAVP-TNF lowered tumor metabolism and insulin secretion, reduced tumor size, and improved mouse survival. Taken together, these proof-of-concept results establish Oct-AAVP-TNF as a strong therapeutic candidate for patients with NETs of the pancreas. More broadly, the demonstration that a known, short, biologically active motif can direct tumor targeting and receptor-mediated internalization of AAVP particles may streamline the potential utility of myriad other short peptide motifs and provide a blueprint for therapeutic applications in a variety of cancers and perhaps many nonmalignant diseases as well. PMID:26884209

  11. Functional annotation of rare gene aberration drivers of pancreatic cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    As we enter the era of precision medicine, characterization of cancer genomes will directly influence therapeutic decisions in the clinic. Here we describe a platform enabling functionalization of rare gene mutations through their high-throughput construction, molecular barcoding and delivery to cancer models for in vivo tumour driver screens. We apply these technologies to identify oncogenic drivers of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC).

  12. Nuclear medicine in the detection, staging and treatment of gastrointestinal carcinoid tumours.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Kjell; Eriksson, Barbro

    2005-06-01

    Carcinoid tumours belong to the family of neuroendocrine tumours with a capacity to take up and concentrate amines and precursors as well as peptides, and can thereby be detected by nuclear medicine techniques. These rare tumours are difficult to diagnose at earlier stages because of small size and multiplicity. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are mostly of benefit for detection of larger primary tumours (1-3 cm) and liver and lymph-node metastases. A majority of carcinoid tumours express somatostatin receptors, particularly receptor type 2, and thus somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) can be used for detection and staging of carcinoid tumours. The detection rate of carcinoid tumours has been reported to be somewhere between 80 and 100% in different studies. The scintigraphy gives a good staging of the disease and detection of unexpected tumour sites, which were not determined by conventional imaging. This method also indicates content of somatostatin receptors, which might indicate efficacy of treatment with octreotide or other somatostatin analogues. Another new non-invasive technique for detection of carcinoid tumours is positron emission tomography (PET). The biological substance for study can be labelled for radioactive imaging with radionuclears, such as (11)C, (15)O and (18)F, with emission of positrons. More than 95% of patients studied displayed high tracer uptake from PET with (11)C-5HTP (5-hydroxytryptophan), which is significantly higher compared to both computer tomography and somatostatin receptor scintigraphy. MIBG has been used for decades to visualize carcinoid tumours, because MIBG is concentrated in the endocrine cells. It was initially developed to detect phaeochromocytomas of the adrenal with reported high sensitivity (87%) and specificity as high as 99%. The method can be used when other methods fail to localize carcinoid tumours and particularly when treatment with (131)I-MIBG is being considered. Tumour

  13. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Goess, Ruediger; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Friess, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an often-underestimated complication following pancreatic surgery. After recent advances in managing acute postoperative complications the focus of current research is now shifting onto the long-term complications following pancreatectomy. Weight loss and steatorrhea as typical symptoms have high influence on the quality of life in the postoperative period. Malnutrition-related symptoms occur late and are often misinterpreted. Enzyme replacement therapy is more or less the only possible treatment option, even though not many controlled trials have been performed in this field. In this review we summarized the pathophysiology, diagnosis, risk factors and treatment options of exocrine insufficiency and focus mainly on patients with pancreaticoduodenectomy (classical Whipple), pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (ppWhipple) or distal pancreatectomy. Incidence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after surgery depends mainly on the initial diagnosis, the preoperative exocrine function and is associated with the extent of parenchyma resection. Diagnosing exocrine failure after surgery can be difficult and specific function tests are commonly not routinely performed. Starting and monitoring of enzyme replacement treatment is more based on clinical symptoms, than on objective markers. To improve the performance status of postsurgical patients it is important to consider pancreatic exocrine function as one aspect of quality of life. Further clinical trials should be initiated to gain more specific knowledge about the influence of the different pancreatic resections on pancreatic exocrine function to initialize proper treatment even before major clinical symptoms occur. PMID:27058237

  14. Targeting of cancer stem cell marker EpCAM by bispecific antibody EpCAMxCD3 inhibits pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salnikov, Alexei V; Groth, Ariane; Apel, Anja; Kallifatidis, Georgios; Beckermann, Benjamin M; Khamidjanov, Akmal; Ryschich, Eduard; Büchler, Markus W; Herr, Ingrid; Moldenhauer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic cancer have a poor survival rate, and new therapeutic strategies are needed. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), suggested as a marker for cancer stem cells, is over-expressed on most pancreatic tumour cells but not on normal cells and may be an ideal therapeutic target. We evaluated the anti-tumour efficiency of bispecific EpCAMxCD3 antibody linking tumour cells and T lymphocytes. In NOD SCID mice, EpCAMxCD3 had a long serum half-life (t1/2∼ 7 days). EpCAMxCD3 significantly retarded growth of BxPC-3 pancreatic carcinoma xenografts. For mimicking a pancreatic cancer microenvironment in vitro, we used a three-dimensional tumour reconstruct system, in which lymphocytes were co-cultured with tumour cells and fibroblasts in a collagen matrix. In this in vivo–like system, EpCAMxCD3 potently stimulated production of the effector cytokines IFN-γ and TNF-α by extracorporally pre-activated lymphocytes. Moreover, compared with a bivalent anti-CD3 antibody, EpCAMxCD3 more efficiently activated the production of TNF-α and IFN-γ by non-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Most excitingly, we demonstrate for the first time that EpCAMxCD3 induces prolonged contacts between lymphocytes and tumour cells, which may be the main reason for the observed anti-tumour effects. As an important prerequisite for future use in patients, EpCAMxCD3 did not alter lymphocyte migration as measured by time-lapse video microscopy. Our data may open a way to improve the immune response and treatment outcome in patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:20196789

  15. Pancreatic Metastasis from Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Chihiro; Naoe, Hideaki; Hashigo, Shunpei; Tsutsumi, Hideharu; Ishii, Shotaro; Konoe, Takeyasu; Watanabe, Takehisa; Shono, Takashi; Sakurai, Kouichi; Takaishi, Kiyomi; Ikuta, Yoshiaki; Chikamoto, Akira; Tanaka, Motohiko; Iyama, Ken-ichi; Baba, Hideo; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Sasaki, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic cancers of the pancreas are rare, accounting for approximately 2–4% of all pancreatic malignancies. Renal cell carcinoma is the most common solid tumor that metastasizes to the pancreas. Here, we present a case of uterine cervical carcinoma metastasizing to the pancreas and review the literature regarding this rare event. A 44-year-old woman with a uterine cervical tumor had undergone radical hysterectomy and had been diagnosed pathologically with stage Ib mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma in 2004. She underwent concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy postoperatively. Pulmonary metastases subsequently appeared in 2008 and 2011, and she underwent complete resection of the lung tumors by video-assisted thoracic surgery. Although she was followed up without any treatment and with no other recurrences, positron emission tomography revealed an area of abnormal uptake within the pancreatic body in 2012. Enhanced computed tomography demonstrated a 20-mm lesion in the pancreatic body and upstream pancreatic duct dilatation. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration was performed and pathological examination suggested neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC). On the basis of these results and the patient's oncological background, lesions in the pancreatic body were diagnosed as secondary metastasis from the cervical carcinoma that had been treated 8 years earlier. No other distant metastases were visualized, and the patient subsequently underwent middle pancreatectomy. Pathological examination showed NEC consistent with pancreatic metastasis from the uterine cervical carcinoma. The patient has survived 7 months since the middle pancreatectomy without any signs of local recurrence or other metastatic lesions. PMID:23741220

  16. Neuroendocrine and immune system responses with spaceflights.

    PubMed

    Tipton, C M; Greenleaf, J E; Jackson, C G

    1996-08-01

    Despite the fact that the first human was in space during 1961 and individuals have existed in a microgravity environment for more than a year, there are limited spaceflight data available on the responses of the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Because of mutual interactions between these respective integrative systems, it is inappropriate to assume that the responses of one have no impact on functions of the other. Blood and plasma volume consistently decrease with spaceflight; hence, blood endocrine and immune constituents will be modified by both gravitational and measurement influences. The majority of the in-flight data relates to endocrine responses that influence fluids and electrolytes during the first month in space. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), aldosterone, and anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) appear to be elevated with little change in the atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP). Flight results longer than 60 d show increased ADH variability with elevations in angiotensin and cortisol. Although post-flight results are influenced by reentry and recovery events, ACTH and ADH appear to be consistently elevated with variable results being reported for the other hormones. Limited in-flight data on insulin and growth hormone levels suggest they are not elevated to counteract the loss in muscle mass. Post-flight results from short- and long-term flights indicate that thyroxine and insulin are increased while growth hormone exhibits minimal change. In-flight parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are variable for several weeks after which they remain elevated. Post-flight PTH was increased on missions that lasted either 7 or 237 d, whereas calcitonin concentrations were increased after 1 wk but decreased after longer flights. Leukocytes are elevated in flights of various durations because of an increase in neutrophils. The majority of post-flights data indicates immunoglobulin concentrations are not significantly changed from pre-flight measurements. However, the numbers of T

  17. One very rare and one new tracheal tumour found by electron microscopy: glomus tumour and acinic cell tumour resembling carcinoid tumours by light microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Heard, B E; Dewar, A; Firmin, R K; Lennox, S C

    1982-01-01

    Tracheal tumours were removed surgically from two patients and diagnosed as carcinoid tumours by routine light microscopy. At a later date, electron microscopy was performed on stored tumour tissue and no neurosecretory granules were found in either case. One showed features of a glomus tumour and the other of an acinic cell tumour. Only two glomus tumours appear to have been reported previously in the trachea, and no acinic cell tumours. Electron microscopy is thus sometimes of great assistance in diagnosing accurately unusual tumours of the lower respiratory tract. Images PMID:6281934

  18. Metabolic reprogramming of the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yazhi; Zhao, Shimin; Zhou, Binhua P; Mi, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Tumour cells, stromal cells and the stroma comprise the tumour microenvironment. The metabolism of both tumour cells and several types of tumour stromal cells, such as cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumour-associated macrophages, is reprogrammed. Current studies have found that stromal cells promote tumour progression and metastasis, through not only the paracrine secretion of cytokines or chemokines, but also intermediate metabolites. Here, we summarize the latest insights into the mechanism of metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumour-associated macrophages, and their potential roles in tumour progression and metastasis. PMID:26255648

  19. Recurrent hyperphosphatemic tumoural calcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Sonal; Agarwal, Asha; Nigam, Anand; Rao, Yashwant Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Tumoural calcinosis (TC) is a benign gradually developing disorder that can occur in a variety of clinical settings, characterised by subcutaneous deposition of calcium phosphate with or without giant cell reaction. We describe a case of 11-year-old girl presenting with recurrent hard swellings in the vicinity of shoulder and hip joints associated with elevated serum phosphate and normal serum calcium levels. TC has been mainly reported from Africa, with very few cases reported from India. After the diagnosis of hyperphosphatemic TC was established, the patient was treated with oral sevelamer and is under constant follow-up to detect recurrence, if any. The present case highlights the fact that although an uncommon lesion, TC must be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous hard lump in the vicinity of a joint. PMID:23010461

  20. Use of molecular targeted agents for the diagnosis, staging and therapy of neuroendocrine malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Imaging of neuroendocrine tumours (NET) poses significant challenges because of the heterogeneous biology of the tumours that are represented by this class of neoplasia. NET can range from benign lesions to highly aggressive cancers. Structural imaging techniques have suboptimal sensitivity in most published series and diagnosis is often delayed until metastatic disease is present. Current guidelines emphasise the importance of functional imaging for evaluating the extent of NET. The mainstay of this type of imaging has been somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with [111In]diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-octreotide (Octreoscan™). Routine use of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and particularly of hybrid SPECT/computed tomography (CT) has significantly improved localisation of tumour sites and evaluation of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) expression, which is important for predicting the likelihood of response to somatostatin analogues (SSA). Positron emission tomography (PET) can also now be used for evaluating SSTR expression. There are a number of peptides that have been evaluated but [68Ga]tetraazocyclodecanetetraacetic acid (DOTA)-octreotate (GaTate) PET/CT, which has been shown to be significantly more sensitive for detecting small lesions than Octreoscan™, is now probably the preferred agent because high uptake in known sites of disease provides a diagnostic pair for assessing suitability of patients for [177Lu]DOTA-octreotate (LuTate) peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). A range of other radiolabelled SSA has also been used for PRRT. Lesions without SSTR expression require alternative imaging and therapeutic strategies. Although fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in low-grade NET is not generally increased relative to normal tissues, the loss of differentiation that often accompanies loss of SSTR expression may be associated with a significant increase in glycolytic metabolism and an accompanying improvement in the

  1. Diagnosis of functioning pancreaticoduodenal neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Masayuki; Nakamoto, Yuji; Uose, Suguru; Komoto, Izumi; Awane, Masaaki; Taki, Yoshiro

    2015-08-01

    Functioning pancreaticoduodenal neuroendocrine tumors (PD-NETs) are popular in a textbook, but they are still unfamiliar to a general clinician, and delay of diagnosis or misdiagnosis has been reported even today. It is a consensus that sporadic functioning PD-NET is cured only by surgical resection. So, early detection and early resection is the gold standard for the treatment of functioning PD-NET. Functioning PD-NETs in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) are often multiple. You should check about MEN 1 whenever you encountered multiple PD-NET. They are diagnosed in younger age than sporadic cases. In most cases they are accompanied with numerous microscopic or macroscopic nonfunctioning P-NETs, which are potentially metastatic and the most common cause of death in MEN 1 patients. PMID:25624017

  2. Endoscopic Ultrasound in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is an advanced endoscopic technique currently used in the staging and diagnosis of many gastrointestinal neoplasms. The proximity of the echoendoscope to the gastrointestinal tract lends itself to a detailed view of the luminal pathology and the pancreas. This unique ability enables endoscopists to use EUS in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). Diagnostic EUS allows previously unidentified NETs to be localized. EUS also determines tumor management by staging the GEP-NETS, enabling the clinicians to choose the appropriate endoscopic or surgical management. The ability to obtain a tissue diagnosis with EUS guidance enables disease confirmation. Finally, recent developments suggest that EUS may be used to deliver therapeutic agents for the treatment of NETs. This review will highlight the advances in our knowledge of EUS in the clinical management of these tumors. PMID:23170141

  3. Octreotide and Lanreotide in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Pokuri, Venkata K; Fong, Mei Ka; Iyer, Renuka

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are heterogeneous, rare malignancies that arise most commonly in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. They often secrete vasoactive substances resulting in carcinoid syndrome and the tumor cells exclusively express somatostatin receptors. Octreotide and lanreotide are the two synthetic somatostatin analogs used for the control of carcinoid symptoms and tumor progression in advanced inoperable disease. Recent pivotal trials (PROMID and CLARINET studies) established their antitumor activity. We discuss the available data to support their use as symptom controlling and antiproliferative agents. This article also reviews the guidelines (National Comprehensive Cancer Network and North American Neuro Endocrine Tumor Society), cost-analysis (suggesting the cost-effectiveness of lanreotide autogel compared to higher doses of octreotide long acting release formulation in refractory patients), and future directions of somatostatin analogs in the management of patients refractory to conventional doses of octreotide and lanreotide. PMID:26743514

  4. A case of rectal neuroendocrine tumor presenting as polyp

    PubMed Central

    RAKICI, Halil; AKDOGAN, Remzi Adnan; YURDAKUL, Cüneyt; CANTURK, Neşe

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is detected in the examination of polypectomy material, presenting as rectal polyp. Since this is a rare case, we aimed to summarize the approach to rectal NET’s. PMID:25625492

  5. Management of gastric and duodenal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Mizuno, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Manabu; Terai, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs) are rare neoplasms, like all NETs. However, the incidence of GI-NETS has been increasing in recent years. Gastric NETs (G-NETs) and duodenal NETs (D-NETs) are the common types of upper GI-NETs based on tumor location. G-NETs are classified into three distinct subgroups: type I, II, and III. Type I G-NETs, which are the most common subtype (70%-80% of all G-NETs), are associated with chronic atrophic gastritis, including autoimmune gastritis and Helicobacter pylori associated atrophic gastritis. Type II G-NETs (5%-6%) are associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1-ZES). Both type I and II G-NETs are related to hypergastrinemia, are small in size, occur in multiple numbers, and are generally benign. In contrast, type III G-NETs (10%-15%) are not associated with hypergastrinemia, are large-sized single tumors, and are usually malignant. Therefore, surgical resection and chemotherapy are generally necessary for type III G-NETs, while endoscopic resection and follow-up, which are acceptable for the treatment of most type I and II G-NETs, are only acceptable for small and well differentiated type III G-NETs. D-NETs include gastrinomas (50%-60%), somatostatin-producing tumors (15%), nonfunctional serotonin-containing tumors (20%), poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (< 3%), and gangliocytic paragangliomas (< 2%). Most D-NETs are located in the first or second part of the duodenum, with 20% occurring in the periampullary region. Therapy for D-NETs is based on tumor size, location, histological grade, stage, and tumor type. While endoscopic resection may be considered for small nonfunctional D-NETs (G1) located in the higher papilla region, surgical resection is necessary for most other D-NETs. However, there is no consensus regarding the ideal treatment of D-NETs. PMID:27570419

  6. Prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Evans, Neil P; Bellingham, Michelle; Robinson, Jane E

    2016-07-01

    It is now well recognized that the gestational environment can have long-lasting effects not only on the life span and health span of an individual but also, through potential epigenetic changes, on future generations. This article reviews the "prenatal programming" of the neuroendocrine systems that regulate reproduction, with a specific focus on the lessons learned using ovine models. The review examines the critical roles played by steroids in normal reproductive development before considering the effects of prenatal exposure to exogenous steroid hormones including androgens and estrogens, the effects of maternal nutrition and stress during gestation, and the effects of exogenous chemicals such as alcohol and environment chemicals. In so doing, it becomes evident that, to maximize fitness, the regulation of reproduction has evolved to be responsive to many different internal and external cues and that the GnRH neurosecretory system expresses a degree of plasticity throughout life. During fetal life, however, the system is particularly sensitive to change and at this time, the GnRH neurosecretory system can be "shaped" both to achieve normal sexually differentiated function but also in ways that may adversely affect or even prevent "normal function". The exact mechanisms through which these programmed changes are brought about remain largely uncharacterized but are likely to differ depending on the factor, the timing of exposure to that factor, and the species. It would appear, however, that some afferent systems to the GnRH neurons such as kisspeptin, may be critical in this regard as it would appear to be sensitive to a wide variety of factors that can program reproductive function. Finally, it has been noted that the prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function can be associated with epigenetic changes, which would suggest that in addition to direct effects on the exposed offspring, prenatal programming could have transgenerational effects on

  7. Photoreception for circadian, neuroendocrine, and neurobehavioral regulation.

    PubMed

    Hanifin, John P; Brainard, George C

    2007-03-01

    In the art and science of lighting, four traditional objectives have been to provide light that: 1) is optimum for visual performance; 2) is visually comfortable; 3) permits aesthetic appreciation of the space; and 4) conserves energy. Over the past 25 years, it has been demonstrated that there are nonvisual, systemic effects of light in healthy humans. Furthermore, light has been used to successfully treat patients with selected affective and sleep disorders as well as healthy individuals who have circadian disruption due to shift work, transcontinental jet travel, or space flight. Recently, there has been an upheaval in the understanding of photoreceptive input to the circadian system of humans and other mammals. Analytical action spectra in rodents, primates, and humans have identified 446-484 nm (predominantly the blue part of the spectrum) as the most potent wavelength region for neuroendocrine, circadian, and neurobehavioral responses. Those studies suggested that a novel photosensory system, distinct from the visual rods and cones, is primarily responsible for this regulation. Studies have now shown that this new photosensory system is based on a small population of widely dispersed retinal ganglion cells that are intrinsically responsive to light, and project to the suprachiasmatic nuclei and other nonvisual centers in the brain. These light-sensitive retinal ganglion cells contain melanopsin, a vitamin A photopigment that mediates the cellular phototransduction cascade. Although light detection for circadian and neuroendocrine phototransduction seems to be mediated principally by a novel photosensory system in the eye, the classic rod and cone photoreceptors appear to play a role as well. These findings are important in understanding how humans adapt to lighting conditions in modern society and will provide the basis for major changes in future architectural lighting strategies. PMID:17435349

  8. Management of gastric and duodenal neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Mizuno, Ken-Ichi; Takeuchi, Manabu; Terai, Shuji

    2016-08-14

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs) are rare neoplasms, like all NETs. However, the incidence of GI-NETS has been increasing in recent years. Gastric NETs (G-NETs) and duodenal NETs (D-NETs) are the common types of upper GI-NETs based on tumor location. G-NETs are classified into three distinct subgroups: type I, II, and III. Type I G-NETs, which are the most common subtype (70%-80% of all G-NETs), are associated with chronic atrophic gastritis, including autoimmune gastritis and Helicobacter pylori associated atrophic gastritis. Type II G-NETs (5%-6%) are associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1-ZES). Both type I and II G-NETs are related to hypergastrinemia, are small in size, occur in multiple numbers, and are generally benign. In contrast, type III G-NETs (10%-15%) are not associated with hypergastrinemia, are large-sized single tumors, and are usually malignant. Therefore, surgical resection and chemotherapy are generally necessary for type III G-NETs, while endoscopic resection and follow-up, which are acceptable for the treatment of most type I and II G-NETs, are only acceptable for small and well differentiated type III G-NETs. D-NETs include gastrinomas (50%-60%), somatostatin-producing tumors (15%), nonfunctional serotonin-containing tumors (20%), poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (< 3%), and gangliocytic paragangliomas (< 2%). Most D-NETs are located in the first or second part of the duodenum, with 20% occurring in the periampullary region. Therapy for D-NETs is based on tumor size, location, histological grade, stage, and tumor type. While endoscopic resection may be considered for small nonfunctional D-NETs (G1) located in the higher papilla region, surgical resection is necessary for most other D-NETs. However, there is no consensus regarding the ideal treatment of D-NETs. PMID:27570419

  9. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour masquerading as a cyst in the lesser sac

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Ahmed Mahmoud; Ayyash, Emad Helmi; Alzafiri, Raed; Francis, Issam; Asfar, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are solid tumours of the gastrointestinal tract, mostly found in the stomach and intestine. They rarely present as cystic lesions. A 74-year-old woman referred to the hepatopancreaticobiliary unit, with 3 months history of upper abdominal discomfort. Abdominal ultrasound scan showed a large cystic lesion in the epigastric region suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. The CT-scan showed a 6.6×6×6.3 cm size cyst related to the pancreas and extending to the hepatogastric omentum. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) scan was suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. Aspirated Cyst fluid via EUS showed benign cytology with normal amylase, lipase and tumour markers (CEA, CA-19.9 and CA-125). She was referred as a case of pancreatic pseudocyst. After surgical excision, the histopathology confirmed the presence GIST in the wall of the cystic lesion. The possibility of GIST should be kept in mind in the presence of unusual features of a cyst on abdominal imaging. PMID:27469382

  10. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour masquerading as a cyst in the lesser sac.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Ahmed Mahmoud; Ayyash, Emad Helmi; Alzafiri, Raed; Francis, Issam; Asfar, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are solid tumours of the gastrointestinal tract, mostly found in the stomach and intestine. They rarely present as cystic lesions. A 74-year-old woman referred to the hepatopancreaticobiliary unit, with 3 months history of upper abdominal discomfort. Abdominal ultrasound scan showed a large cystic lesion in the epigastric region suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. The CT-scan showed a 6.6×6×6.3 cm size cyst related to the pancreas and extending to the hepatogastric omentum. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) scan was suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. Aspirated Cyst fluid via EUS showed benign cytology with normal amylase, lipase and tumour markers (CEA, CA-19.9 and CA-125). She was referred as a case of pancreatic pseudocyst. After surgical excision, the histopathology confirmed the presence GIST in the wall of the cystic lesion. The possibility of GIST should be kept in mind in the presence of unusual features of a cyst on abdominal imaging. PMID:27469382

  11. High grade neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary bladder treated by radical cystectomy: a series of small cell, mixed neuroendocrine and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sounak; Thompson, R Houston; Boorjian, Stephen A; Thapa, Prabin; Hernandez, Loren P Herrera; Jimenez, Rafael E; Costello, Brian A; Frank, Igor; Cheville, John C

    2015-10-01

    High grade neuroendocrine carcinomas (HGNEC) treated by cystectomy often carry an original diagnosis of typical urothelial carcinoma (UC). The correct diagnosis of HGNEC is critical in influencing the decision for early chemotherapy, potentially followed by cystectomy. The objective of this study was to characterise the features of HGNEC treated by radical cystectomy. The study consisted of 79 patients with HGNEC including small cell (68 patients), large cell neuroendocrine (LCNEC) (5 patients) and mixed neuroendocrine (mixed-NEC) carcinoma (6 patients) matched with 122 patients with UC, treated at our institution between 1987 and 2014. Morphometric analysis for cell and nuclear size as well as immunophenotyping for neuroendocrine markers and cell-cycle regulators were applied to tissue microarrays. Small cell, LCNEC and mixed-NEC are a morphological spectrum of high grade neuroendocrine carcinoma with overlapping histological features, identical immunophenotype, Ki-67 proliferative rate and patient outcomes. Finally, the nuclear size criteria is misleading as HGNEC, particularly cases of LCNEC and mixed-NEC, may have enlarged nuclei compared to small cell carcinomas and are more prone to be misdiagnosed as UC, thereby preventing appropriate management. PMID:26308137

  12. Simultaneous Occurrence of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma and Brunner's Gland Adenoma in a Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Gombač, M; Dolenšek, T; Jaušovec, D; Kvapil, P; Švara, T; Pogačnik, M

    2015-11-01

    We describe a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma and Brunner's gland adenoma in an 18-year-old male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) from the Ljubljana Zoo. The tiger was humanely destroyed due to weakness and progressive weight loss. Necropsy examination revealed a large, grey, predominantly necrotic mass replacing the major part of the pancreatic body. Microscopically, the mass was unencapsulated, poorly demarcated, highly cellular and composed of highly pleomorphic, cuboidal to tall columnar cells with basal, round or oval, moderately anisokaryotic nuclei with prominent nucleoli and moderate to large amounts of eosinophilic cytoplasm. The tumour was diagnosed as pancreatic tubular adenocarcinoma with infiltration into the duodenum and mesentery. There were tumour emboli in mesenteric blood vessels and hepatic metastases. The non-affected part of the pancreas exhibited severe chronic pancreatitis. In addition, one firm white neoplastic nodule was observed in the duodenal wall. The nodule was set in the tunica muscularis and was unencapsulated, well demarcated and highly cellular, and consisted of a closely packed layer of normal Brunner's glands and a centrally positioned group of irregularly branched tubules with small amounts of debris in the lumen. The neoplastic nodule was diagnosed as Brunner's gland adenoma. The present case is, to the best of our knowledge, the first report of concurrent pancreatic adenocarcinoma and Brunner's gland adenoma, most probably induced by chronic pancreatitis, either in man or animals. PMID:26422412

  13. Fast-growing large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Lukina, Olga; Gorbunkov, Stanislav; Dvorakovskaja, Ivetta; Varlamov, Vladimir; Akopov, Andrey

    2011-05-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas combine a heterogeneous group of tumors occurring in lungs on a rare occasion, and in some cases, they appear to have extraordinary quick growth and extrapulmonary localization. In this case we present a 42-year-old patient who underwent a right upper lobectomy for emphysema, and 6 months later, the tumor developed again into a giant neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mediastinum. PMID:21524479

  14. Pancreatic Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Joji Kurian; Kim, Min-Sik; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Raju, Rajesh; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Khan, Aafaque Ahmad; Sakamuri, Sruthi; Tankala, Shantal Gupta; Singal, Mukul; Nair, Bipin; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava; Maitra, Anirban; Gowda, Harsha; Hruban, Ralph H; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. The etiology of pancreatic cancer is heterogeneous with a wide range of alterations that have already been reported at the level of the genome, transcriptome, and proteome. The past decade has witnessed a large number of experimental studies using high-throughput technology platforms to identify genes whose expression at the transcript or protein levels is altered in pancreatic cancer. Based on expression studies, a number of molecules have also been proposed as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of this deadly cancer. Currently, there are no repositories which provide an integrative view of multiple Omics data sets from published research on pancreatic cancer. Here, we describe the development of a web-based resource, Pancreatic Cancer Database (http://www.pancreaticcancerdatabase.org), as a unified platform for pancreatic cancer research. PCD contains manually curated information pertaining to quantitative alterations in miRNA, mRNA, and proteins obtained from small-scale as well as high-throughput studies of pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We believe that PCD will serve as an integrative platform for scientific community involved in pancreatic cancer research. PMID:24839966

  15. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  16. Tumours of bones and joints

    PubMed Central

    Misdorp, W.; Van Der Heul, R. O.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of bones and joints are not infrequent in dogs but are rare in other domestic animals. In the dog, most bone tumours are malignant; osteosarcomas are by far the most frequently encountered tumours, especially in giant breeds and boxers. The following main categories of bone tumour are described: bone-forming, cartilage-forming, giant cell, marrow, vascular, miscellaneous, metastatic, unclassified, and tumour-like lesions. The tumours of joints and related structures are classified as synovial sarcomas, fibroxanthomas, and malignant giant cell tumour of soft tissues. ImagesFig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 40Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:1086157

  17. GEMMs as preclinical models for testing pancreatic cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, Aarthi; Morton, Jennifer P; Jodrell, Duncan I; Sansom, Owen J

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the most common form of pancreatic tumour, with a very limited survival rate and currently no available disease-modifying treatments. Despite recent advances in the production of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), the development of new therapies for pancreatic cancer is still hampered by a lack of reliable and predictive preclinical animal models for this disease. Preclinical models are vitally important for assessing therapies in the first stages of the drug development pipeline, prior to their transition to the clinical arena. GEMMs carry mutations in genes that are associated with specific human diseases and they can thus accurately mimic the genetic, phenotypic and physiological aspects of human pathologies. Here, we discuss different GEMMs of human pancreatic cancer, with a focus on the Lox-Stop-Lox (LSL)-Kras(G12D); LSL-Trp53(R172H); Pdx1-cre (KPC) model, one of the most widely used preclinical models for this disease. We describe its application in preclinical research, highlighting its advantages and disadvantages, its potential for predicting clinical outcomes in humans and the factors that can affect such outcomes, and, finally, future developments that could advance the discovery of new therapies for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26438692

  18. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes

    PubMed Central

    Biankin, Andrew V.; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Johns, Amber L.; Miller, David K.; Wilson, Peter J.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K.; Cowley, Mark J.; Gardiner, Brooke B.; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Gill, Anthony J.; Pinho, Andreia V.; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J. Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R. Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L.; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D.; Colvin, Emily K.; Nagrial, Adnan M.; Humphrey, Emily S.; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T.; Chantrill, Lorraine A.; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Kench, James G.; Lovell, Jessica A.; Daly, Roger J.; Merrett, Neil D.; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q.; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M.; Fisher, William E.; Brunicardi, F. Charles; Hodges, Sally E.; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R.; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J.; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E.; Yung, Christina K.; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Morgan, Richard A.; Lawlor, Rita T.; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A.; Mann, Karen M.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Adams, David J.; Largaespada, David A.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Rust, Alistair G.; Stein, Lincoln D.; Tuveson, David A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Wheeler, David A.; Pearson, John V.; McPherson, John D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Grimmond, Sean M.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:23103869