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Sample records for pancreatitis autoinmune pseudotumor

  1. [Autoimmune pancreatitis: inflammatory pseudotumor, multifocal fibrosclerosis, portal hypertension, and long-term outcome].

    PubMed

    Beristain, J L; Sabater, L; Calatayud, A; Calvete, J; Rausell, M; Lledó, S; Tosca, J; Sastre, J; Aparisi, L

    2008-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently characterized disease that still constitutes a diagnostic challenge, especially regarding differential diagnosis from neoplasia. Long-term outcome is poorly known. We herein report a case of a patient with autoimmune pancreatitis and 14 years of follow-up, and show its clinical, biochemical, and morphological characteristics. A 54-year-old female presented with obstructive jaundice and abdominal tenderness, as well as a mass at the pancreatic head on a CT scan, suggestive of pancreatic neoplasia. Surgery showed an increase of the whole pancreas, malignancy was intraoperatively ruled out, and a cholecystectomy and choledochoduodenostomy were carried out. The diagnosis was chronic pancreatitis. Over the following years different autoimmune complications developed, including asthma, salivary gland swelling, and sclerosing cholangitis, as well as recurrent episodes of jaundice, and exocrine and endocrine pancreatic failure. The development of these complications combined with the demonstration of high serum levels of IgG4 and carbonic anhydrase II led to a re-evaluation of the initial histology of the pancreas, leading to a final diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis: IgG4+ lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates, fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. New complications developed during the last few years: retroperitoneal fibrosis with portal hypertension, esophageal varices, and splenomegaly. PMID:19119794

  2. Pseudotumor cerebri

    MedlinePlus

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension; Benign intracranial hypertension ... Ferri FF. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension. In: Ferri FF. Ferri's Clinical Advisor 2015 . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:640-641. Pless ML. Pseudotumor cerebri. In: Kliegman ...

  3. Pseudotumor Cerebri

    MedlinePlus

    ... the skull caused by the buildup or poor absorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The disorder is most common in women between the ages of 20 and 50. Symptoms of pseudotumor cerebri, which include headache, nausea, vomiting, and pulsating sounds within the head, closely mimic symptoms of large ...

  4. Paratesticular Fibrous Pseudotumors

    PubMed Central

    Turkan, Sadi; Kalkan, Mehmet; Ekmekcioglu, Ozan; Haltas, Hacer; Sahin, Coskun

    2016-01-01

    Paratesticular fibrous pseudotumors (PFPs) are rare pathologies with quite wide and variable topographic-morphological features. It is difficult to distinguish PFPs from malignant masses. Treatment can be done by resection of the mass. We reported a young patient’s findings about this rare pathology. PMID:27441080

  5. Pseudotumoral Eosinophilic Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Saadi, Ahmed; Bouzouita, Abderrazak; Ayed, Haroun; Kerkeni, Walid; Cherif, Mohamed; Ben Slama, Riadh M.; Derouiche, Amine; Chebil, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic cystitis is a rare inflammatory disease of the bladder which origin and pathogenesis are unknown. Since the first description in 1960, hundreds of cases have been reported, 20 Pseudotumor forms. We report a case of cystitis eosinophils in tumor-form, a patient of 72 years without urological or allergic history. The patient was treated with endoscopic resection alone. The outcome was favorable with disappearance symptoms and no recurrence at 1, 3 and 6 months controls. We carry a literature review of cystitis eosinophils on the different clinical manifestations, the means diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. PMID:26793503

  6. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) En Español Read in Chinese What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder that ...

  7. Inflammatory pseudotumor of spleen

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Parvin; Noorollahi, Hasan; Hani, Mohsen; Bagheri, Marzie

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is an uncommon tumor and its occurrence in spleen is rare. This tumor is composed of proliferation of spindle cells of unknown origin and etiology that mimic other tumors at clinical and histological evaluation. The most surmising etiology is Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and the most suspected origin is myofibroblasts, hence its synonym is “inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor.” The clinical appearance of tumor is related to its location but the most ones are abdominal pain, fever and weight loss. Surgical removal for this lesion is treatment of choice and there is few reported case with recurrence and metastasis. Herein we report a 63-year-old female patient with and abdominal discomfort that primary paraclinical investigations had been showed splenic mass and therefore surgical treatment was performed for her. Microscopic examination suggest some different diagnosis such as IPT, thus immunohistochemical staining was perform to confirm the diagnosis and rule out the others. PMID:24592376

  8. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Höer, J; Steinau, G; Füzesi, L; Gunawan, B; Schumpelick, V

    1999-07-01

    A 5-year-old-boy presented with a right pleural effusion and fever. A tumorous mass was located between the right lung and the liver. The boy underwent a right thoracotomy with excision of the tumor and the adherent parts of the right hemidiaphragm. Histology and immunohistochemistry showed an inflammatory pseudotumor of the diaphragm. This is the first reported case of an inflammatory pseudotumor in this location. A brief review of the heterogeneous theories about the pathogenesis and the different therapeutic regimens for this rare neoplastic entity are discussed. PMID:10415294

  9. [Pseudotumors caused by hip prostheses].

    PubMed

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Lohman, Martina; Alberty, Anne

    2015-01-01

    More than 100000 hip replacements have been performed in Finland. In the hip replacement operations performed due to osteoarthritis, the artificial joint surfaces are made of metal, plastic or ceramics. Pseudotumors associated with metal-on-metal (MoM) sliding surfaces have received worldwide attention. Soft issue lesions, not always symptomatic, may develop around the joint replacements. These may even require joint revision surgery. PMID:26237883

  10. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  11. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Elsa; Pereira, José; Corbusier, Florence; Demeter, Pieter; Bali, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of an inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder in a 31 year-old woman. She presented at the emergency room with low abdominal pain and urinary symptoms. Abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were performed and revealed asymmetric thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Cystoscopy with urinary cytology revealed a benign nature of the process. The patient underwent partial cystectomy and the pathologic examination of the specimen revealed an inflammatory pseudotumor. We reviewed the clinical, imaging and pathological features of the inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder and discussed its differential diagnosis. PMID:25926919

  12. Hemophilic pseudotumor of the first lumbar vertebra.

    PubMed

    Nachimuthu, Gurusamy; Arockiaraj, Justin; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Sundararaj, Gabriel David

    2014-11-01

    Hemophilic pseudotumor involving the spine is extremely uncommon and presents a challenging problem. Preoperative planning, angiography, intra and perioperative monitoring with factor VIII cover and postoperative care for hemophilic pseudotumor is vital. Recognition of the artery of Adamkiewicz in the thoracolumbar junction helps to avoid intraoperative neurological injury. We report the case of a 26-year-old male patient with hemophilia A, who presented with a massive pseudotumor involving the first lumbar vertebra and the left iliopsoas. Preoperative angiography revealed the artery of Adamkiewicz arising from the left first lumbar segmental artery. Excision of pseudotumor was successfully carried out with additional spinal stabilization. At 2 years followup, there was no recurrence and the patient was well stabilized with a satisfactory functional status. Surgical excision gives satisfactory outcome in such cases. PMID:25404776

  13. Hemophilic pseudotumor of the first lumbar vertebra

    PubMed Central

    Nachimuthu, Gurusamy; Arockiaraj, Justin; Krishnan, Venkatesh; Sundararaj, Gabriel David

    2014-01-01

    Hemophilic pseudotumor involving the spine is extremely uncommon and presents a challenging problem. Preoperative planning, angiography, intra and perioperative monitoring with factor VIII cover and postoperative care for hemophilic pseudotumor is vital. Recognition of the artery of Adamkiewicz in the thoracolumbar junction helps to avoid intraoperative neurological injury. We report the case of a 26-year-old male patient with hemophilia A, who presented with a massive pseudotumor involving the first lumbar vertebra and the left iliopsoas. Preoperative angiography revealed the artery of Adamkiewicz arising from the left first lumbar segmental artery. Excision of pseudotumor was successfully carried out with additional spinal stabilization. At 2 years followup, there was no recurrence and the patient was well stabilized with a satisfactory functional status. Surgical excision gives satisfactory outcome in such cases. PMID:25404776

  14. A Presentation of Lyme Disease: Pseudotumor Cerebri.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Burcu; İncecik, Faruk; Hergüner, Özlem M; Alabaz, Derya; Beşen, Şeyda

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is caused by a tick-transmitted spirochete, B. burgdorferi. It can present with both central and peripheral nervous system manifestations, including aseptic meningitis, meningoencephalitis, Bell's palsy and other cranial neuropathies, radiculoneuritis, and myelitis. However, pseudotumor cerebri associated with Lyme disease is rare. Here, we report a eight-year-old girl with the unusual manifestation of pseudotumor cerebri associated Lyme disease. PMID:27411423

  15. Pseudotumor cerebri secondary to subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ayçiçek, Ali; Işcan, Akin; Ceçe, Hasan

    2009-05-01

    Unusual presentations are not rare in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. Five patients initially diagnosed with pseudotumor cerebri were ultimately determined to have pseudotumor cerebri secondary to subacute sclerosing panencephalitis. The present study retrospectively reviewed 56 cases history, neurologic symptoms, and clinical and laboratory data, as well as the outcomes. On admission, five patients (group 1) presenting with pseudotumor cerebri exhibited bilateral papilledema, and in each of them cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed small lateral ventricles, effacement of the subarachnoid space, and no mass lesion. On admission, 51 patients (group 2) had no pseudotumor cerebri findings. The year of original measles infection, the interval between measles and onset of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, and initial neurologic symptoms were similar, but length of symptoms before diagnosis of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis was shorter in group 1, and the clinical stage of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis on admission was more advanced in group 2. Cerebrospinal fluid mean open pressure was 378 +/- 22 H(2)O in group 1 and 146 +/- 28 H(2)O in group 2; cerebrospinal fluid antibody was 2038 +/- 768 U/L in group 1 and was 664 +/- 214 U/L in group 2. Only three of the five patients with pseudotumor cerebri had typical periodic discharges on electroencephalographic examination. These findings suggest that subacute sclerosing panencephalitis can cause pseudotumor cerebri. PMID:19380074

  16. Another Look at Pseudotumor Cerebri

    PubMed Central

    Odelowo, Ezekiel O. O.; Barber, Jesse B.

    1977-01-01

    Thirteen black patients with diagnoses of pseudotumor cerebri (benign intracranial hypertension) were treated in Howard University (Freedmen's Hospital) between 1962 and 1974. These patients presented features similar to others reported with this syndrome as regards age, sex, habitus, menstrual irregularities, treatment, and prognosis. There was no suggestion of higher incidence of the syndrome in blacks. This paper emphasizes the unknown etiology. Only a complete patient work-up, including hemoglobin genotype, endocrine study, pulmonary function tests, blood and cerebrospinal fluid gases and, where applicable, brain Po2, Pco2 and pH can serve as a reasonable prelude to an experimental model for studying the pathophysiology of this poorly understood syndrome and a more rational basis for therapy. A review of the literature dealing with suspected etiology, diagnosis, and therapy is also presented. PMID:875079

  17. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... open. Balloon dilatation. Some endoscopes have a small balloon that the doctor uses to dilate, or stretch, a narrowed pancreatic or bile duct. A temporary stent may be placed for a few months to ...

  18. Pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the abdomen. In 1 out of 4 childhood cases, a cause is never found. What are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Inflammation of the pancreas is often associated with pain in the upper abdomen and/or the back which may develop slowly, ...

  19. Acute orbital pseudotumors: classification and CT features

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, R.A.; Rootman, J.; Robertson, W.D.; Lapointe, J.S.; Harrison, P.B.

    1981-11-01

    Acute orbital pseudotumors are inflammatory lesions of unknown etiology that may affect part or, less often, all of the tissue within the orbit. A retrospective computed tomographic (CT) study of 16 patients demonstrated that these lesions occur in one of five specific anatomic patterns: anterior, posterior, diffuse, lacrimal, or myositic. The most common location was lacrimal followed by anterior psuedotumors. Posterior, diffuse, and myositic pseudotumors were equally frequent. Localization on the basis of clinical features correlated with the CT localization. Illustrative cases of each of the five types are included. The role of CT in evaluating the therapeutic response is discussed.

  20. [A new case of pseudotumoral renal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Sarf, I; Dahami, Z; Dakir, M; Aboutaeib, R; el Moussaoui, A; Joual, A; El Mrini, M; Meziane, F; Benjelloun, S

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of urogenital tuberculosis is still frequent and constitutes a current public health problem in Morocco, a country in which tuberculosis is endemic. The clinical presentation of this form of the disease may be misleading. The pseudotumoral type of renal tuberculosis is extremely uncommon, and in this study this disease has been described in a young patient. The radiological findings suggested the possibility of this lesion being renal cancer. The preliminary diagnosis was corrected and a definitive diagnosis of pseudotumor was made following pathological examination of the surgically-removed kidney. PMID:11233318

  1. [Pseudotumor aspect of ovarian vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Randoux, B; Goudot, D; Clément, O; Deux, J F; Lecuru, F; Taurelle, R; Frija, G

    1997-11-01

    Ovarian vein thrombosis is an unusual puerperal illness (1 in 600 deliveries) which usually recovers spontaneously or under treatment. We report a rare follow-up observation of a puerperal ovarian vein thrombophlebitis, first diagnosed by computed tomography, which evolved to a 6 x 10 cm pseudotumoral cavernoma mass after 18 months. PMID:9499957

  2. Hip Arthroplasty Pseudotumors: Pathogenesis, Imaging, and Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L; Morrison, James J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotumors are a complication of hip arthroplasty. The goal of this article is to review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, and the role of diagnostic imaging in clinical decision making for treatment, and surveillance of pseudotumors. We will discuss the multimodal imaging appearances, differential diagnosis, associated complications, treatment, and prognosis of pseudotumors, as an aid to the assessment of orthopedic prostheses at the hip. PMID:27195183

  3. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Barrios-Sánchez, Gracia M; Dean-Ferrer, Alicia; Alamillos-Granados, Francisco J; Ruiz-Masera, Juan José; Zafra-Camacho, Francisco M; García de Marcos, José A; Calderón-Bohórquez, José M

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor is a term that refers to a reactive pseudoneoplastic disorder that can appear in different locations of the human body. The lung is the most frequently affected organ. The etiology is still unknown. It affects individuals of both sexes and of a wide range of ages. The diagnosis is still difficult and it is based on the histological examination of the lesions composed of four cell-types: histiocytes, myofibroblasts, plasma cells and lymphocytes. With regard to the treatment regimes there is no agreement. Treatment ranges from surgical excision to radiotherapy, chemotherapy or steroids. The purpose of this article is to report one case of inflammatory pseudotumor located in the parotid gland and to make a special point of the difficulty in arriving at a correct diagnosis in order to achieve the most adequate treatment. PMID:16056193

  4. Inflammatory Pseudotumors After Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tufan, Asli; Bahat, Gulistan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumors (IPT) are rare tumors that occur in various organs and tissues. The clinical picture varies from the more frequent benign lesions to rare malignant tumors with distant metastases. IPTs associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is rarely reported. In this article, we review the reports of IPT after HSCT. We also review the possible factors involved in the pathogenesis. IPT may be rare but they are a potentially serious complication of HSCT. A knowledge of these entities and insistence on a definitive biopsy of mass lesions in the post-HSCT period can avoid unnecessary treatment such as radical surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. PMID:26487930

  5. Computed tomography of cardiac pseudotumors and neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Anavekar, Nandan S; Bonnichsen, Crystal R; Foley, Thomas A; Morris, Michael F; Martinez, Matthew W; Williamson, Eric E; Glockner, James F; Miller, Dylan V; Breen, Jerome F; Araoz, Philip A

    2010-07-01

    Important features of cardiac masses can be clearly delineated on cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging. This modality is useful in identifying the presence of a mass, its relationship with cardiac and extracardiac structures, and the features that distinguish one type of mass from another. A multimodality approach to the evaluation of cardiac tumors is advocated, with the use of echocardiography, CT imaging and magnetic resonance imaging as appropriately indicated. In this article, various cardiac masses are described, including pseudotumors and true cardiac neoplasms, and the CT imaging findings that may be useful in distinguishing these rare entities are presented. PMID:20705174

  6. Inflammatory pseudotumor of kidney masquerading as renal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Babu, Prakash; Kalpana Kumari, M K; Nagaraj, H K; Mysorekar, Vijaya V

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor also known as inflammatory fibroblastic tumor is a rare benign tumor, which commonly affects the lung. It is very rarely seen in the genitourinary tract. As the preoperative diagnosis, clinically and radiologically is inconclusive, it is imperative to surgically remove and confirm it on histopathologic examination. We report a case of inflammatory pseudotumor in a 51-year-old male who presented with flank pain and was treated with nephrectomy. PMID:26458713

  7. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver. Ultrasound and CT features.

    PubMed

    Lim, J H; Lee, J H

    1995-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver is characterized by a well-circumscribed, encapsulated inflammatory mass consisting of inflammatory cell infiltration and fibrosis. We report the radiological findings of inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver in two patients with recurrent pyogenic cholangitis, showing a poorly defined, heterogeneous, hypovascular mass, mimicking a tumor. Radiological findings are not characteristic and definitive diagnosis requires needle biopsy or surgery. PMID:7895198

  8. Surgical management of hemophilic pseudotumor complicated by destructive osteoarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Jiliang; Weng, Xisheng; Zhang, Baozhong; Peng, Hui-ming; Bian, Yan-yan; Zhou, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilic pseudotumor gradually erodes bone and induces fracture or deformity, causing joint dysfunction or destructive osteoarthropathy. Reports about surgery for hemophilic pseudotumor complicated by destructive osteoarthropathy are scarce. The object of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of surgical management for patients of pseudotumor complicated by destructive osteoarthropathy. We retrospectively reviewed records from July 1996 to July 2013, and found eight patients with pseudotumor complicated by destructive osteoarthropathy. We recorded their demographic data, time of surgery, amount of blood loss and transfusion, bone union, and complications. Seven patients were diagnosed with hemophilia A and one with hemophilia B. The mean age at surgery was 31.9 ± 8.3 years. Two of the eight underwent excision of the pseudotumor and metallic fixation, one had amputation, and five underwent autogenous or exogenous bone grafting and fixation with an absorbable screw. The median operating time was 170 min (135–315 min). The median amount of intraoperative blood loss was 1350 ml (100–4000 ml). The amount of red blood cells, plasma, and whole blood transfusion after surgery were 0–24 units, 0–2000 ml, and 0–4600 ml, respectively. After a median follow-up of 75 months, the numbers of pseudotumor recurrence, fracture nonunion, coagulation factor inhibitor formation, and wound complications were one, one, two, and four, respectively. Surgery is an effective treatment for hemophilic pseudotumor complicated by destructive osteoarthropathy. However, the incidences of wound infection, coagulation factor inhibitor formation, hemophilic pseudotumor recurrence, and fracture nonunion are high. PMID:25629563

  9. Microscopic Posterior Transdural Resection of Cervical Retro-Odontoid Pseudotumors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Yasushi; Manabe, Hideki; Sumida, Tadayoshi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hamasaki, Takahiko

    2015-12-01

    Retro-odontoid pseudotumors are noninflammatory masses formed posterior to the odontoid process. Because of their anatomy, the optimal surgical approach for resecting pseudotumors is controversial. Conventionally, 3 approaches are used: the anterior transoral approach, the lateral approach, and the posterior extradural approach; however, each approach has its limitations. The posterior extradural approach is the most common; however, it remains challenging due to severe epidural veins. Although regression of pseudotumors after fusion surgery has been reported, direct decompression and a pathologic diagnosis are ideal when the pseudotumor is large. We therefore developed a new microscopic surgical technique; transdural resection. After C1 laminectomy, the dorsal and ventral dura was incised while preserving the arachnoid. Removal of the pseudotumor was performed and both of the dura were repaired. The patient's clinical symptoms subsequently improved and the pathologic findings showed degenerative fibrocartilaginous tissue. In addition, no neurological deterioration, central spinal fluid leakage, or arachnoiditis was observed. Currently, the usefulness of the transdural approach has been reported for cervical and thoracic disk herniation. According to our results, the transdural approach is recommended for resection of retro-odontoid pseudotumors because it enables direct decompression of the spinal cord and a pathologic diagnosis. PMID:26544168

  10. Microscopic Posterior Transdural Resection of Cervical Retro-Odontoid Pseudotumors

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, Hideki; Sumida, Tadayoshi; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Hamasaki, Takahiko

    2015-01-01

    Retro-odontoid pseudotumors are noninflammatory masses formed posterior to the odontoid process. Because of their anatomy, the optimal surgical approach for resecting pseudotumors is controversial. Conventionally, 3 approaches are used: the anterior transoral approach, the lateral approach, and the posterior extradural approach; however, each approach has its limitations. The posterior extradural approach is the most common; however, it remains challenging due to severe epidural veins. Although regression of pseudotumors after fusion surgery has been reported, direct decompression and a pathologic diagnosis are ideal when the pseudotumor is large. We therefore developed a new microscopic surgical technique; transdural resection. After C1 laminectomy, the dorsal and ventral dura was incised while preserving the arachnoid. Removal of the pseudotumor was performed and both of the dura were repaired. The patient’s clinical symptoms subsequently improved and the pathologic findings showed degenerative fibrocartilaginous tissue. In addition, no neurological deterioration, central spinal fluid leakage, or arachnoiditis was observed. Currently, the usefulness of the transdural approach has been reported for cervical and thoracic disk herniation. According to our results, the transdural approach is recommended for resection of retro-odontoid pseudotumors because it enables direct decompression of the spinal cord and a pathologic diagnosis. PMID:26544168

  11. An update on the management of pseudotumor cerebri.

    PubMed

    Galgano, Michael A; Deshaies, Eric M

    2013-03-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri, or benign intracranial hypertension, is characterized by intracranial hypertension of unknown etiology typically in obese women <45 years of age, and can be disabling secondary to headaches and visual disturbances. Medical management includes pharmaceuticals that reduce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production and lumbar punctures that reduce the CSF volume, both aimed at reducing intracranial pressure. When medical management fails, surgical CSF diverting procedures are indicated. Recently it has been demonstrated that dural sinus stenosis or thrombosis can be responsible for this disease and treated with endovascular venous stent placement. The intent of this educational manuscript is to review the clinical presentation of pseudotumor cerebri patients and discuss the medical, surgical, and endovascular treatment options for this disease. After reading this paper, the reader should be able to: (1) understand the pathophysiological basis of pseudotumor cerebri, (2) describe its presenting signs and symptoms, and (3) discuss the medical, surgical, and endovascular treatment options. PMID:23265564

  12. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  13. A Pelvic Pseudotumor in a Nonhemophilic Patient: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gouse, Mohamad; Livingston, Abel; Barnabas, Dan; Cherian, Vinoo Mathew

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilic pseudotumor is a rare complication of hemophilia, occurring in 1 to 2 percent of individuals with severe factor VIII or factor IX deficiency. A 35-year-old male presented with a swelling in the right lower abdomen for 3 months. There was no history of trauma. Examination revealed a swelling over the right iliac fossa. Right hip showed 30° flexion deformity. Blood investigations like complete blood count, APTT, PT, bleeding and clotting time, and fibrinogen were all normal. Plain radiograph and MRI showed a lytic lesion in the right iliac wing. Excision biopsy of the swelling showed organized hematoma with a fibrous capsule suggestive of a pseudotumor. Further haematological workup like factors VIII and IX was normal. At 2 years follow-up, there was no recurrence. We report this case of pseudotumour in patient without any bleeding disorder. Such case has not been reported in literature to the best of our knowledge. PMID:26000180

  14. [Retro-odontoid pseudotumor in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis].

    PubMed

    Castro-Castro, Julián; Castro-Bouzas, Daniel; Pinzón-Millán, Alfonso; Pastor-Zapata, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Retro-odontoid pseudotumors are lesions caused by inflammatory granulation or reactive soft tissue hypertrophy from chronic atlantoaxial subluxation. However, one-third of the cases reported in the medical literature did not show atlantoaxial instability clearly. The authors present the case of a 76-year-old man previously diagnosed with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis who presented with severe progressive myelopathy. A magnetic resonance imaging of his cervical spine revealed a retro-odontoid predural mass, which caused a severe compression of the cervical spinal cord. The patient underwent a posterior laminectomy of the atlas and an occipitocervical fusion. After surgery, the pseudotumor was considerably smaller and the neurological symptoms improved. PMID:23465746

  15. Orbital inflammatory pseudotumor associated with multifocal systemic neoplastic immunoincompetence.

    PubMed

    Wesley, R E; Cooper, J; Litchford, D W

    1988-04-01

    A 52-year-old man developed proptosis from an orbital mass which was documented histopathologically to be an inflammatory orbital pseudotumor. When the lesion failed to resolve after six months of adrenocorticosteroid treatment, a second biopsy showed an inflammatory mass with nests of eosinophilic granuloma. The patient soon developed a lymphoma of the soft palate and a glioblastoma multiforme which led to the patient's rapid demise. Eosinophilic granuloma is known to represent the more benign end of the spectrum of histiocytic disorders in which a proliferation of Langerhans' cells and an abnormality of T-suppressor cells occur. Our case represents the first report of multifocal tumor immunoincompetence occurring with eosinophilic granuloma in an orbital inflammatory pseudotumor. PMID:2837126

  16. Pseudotumoral form of soft-tissue tuberculosis of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Benzarti, Sofien; Msek, Hichem; Boussen, Monia; Khorbi, Adel

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in developing countries. Hand and wrist is a rare localization for extra-pulmonary tuberculosis, a pseudotumoral form of soft tissue tuberculosis of the wrist is exceptional. We report the case of a 45-year-old male presenting with a painful swelling of the dorsal aspect of the right wrist evolving for six months. Clinical study was evoking a ganglion cyst of the wrist. Intraoperatively a pseudotumoral mass with rice bodies was found, suggesting tuberculous tenosynovitis. The histopathological study revealed caseating giant cell granulomas with epithelioid cells. Cultures on Löwenstein-Jensen medium detected Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Synovectomy with removal of all the rice bodies followed by anti-tuberculous chemotherapy provided uneventful recovery. PMID:26927998

  17. Pancreatitis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  18. Unusual sclerosing orbital pseudotumor infiltrating orbits and maxillofacial regions.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Huseyin; Aralaşmak, Ayşe; Yılmaz, Temel Fatih; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor (IOP) is a benign inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. Bilateral massive orbital involvement and extraorbital extension of the IOP is very rare. We present an unusual case of IOP with bilateral massive orbital infiltration extending into maxillofacial regions and discuss its distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that help to exclude other entities during differential diagnoses. PMID:24991481

  19. Unusual Sclerosing Orbital Pseudotumor Infiltrating Orbits and Maxillofacial Regions

    PubMed Central

    Toprak, Huseyin; Aralaşmak, Ayşe; Yılmaz, Temel Fatih; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic orbital pseudotumor (IOP) is a benign inflammatory condition of the orbit without identifiable local or systemic causes. Bilateral massive orbital involvement and extraorbital extension of the IOP is very rare. We present an unusual case of IOP with bilateral massive orbital infiltration extending into maxillofacial regions and discuss its distinctive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features that help to exclude other entities during differential diagnoses. PMID:24991481

  20. Pseudotumor Caused by Titanium Particles From a Total Hip Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Masaaki; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Higashi, Hidetaka; Kubosawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman underwent metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis of the right hip at another institution. During surgery, the greater trochanter was broken and internal fixation was performed with a trochanteric cable grip reattachment. Although postoperative recovery was uneventful, approximately 6 years later, the patient had severe right hip pain with apparent swelling, and she was referred to the authors' institution. Plain radiographs showed evidence of severe osteolysis in the proximal femur and cable breakage; however, preoperative aspiration culture findings were negative for bacterial growth. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a well-circumscribed mass, presumed to be a pseudotumor. Serum cobalt and chromium levels were within normal limits, and the serum titanium level was high. During surgery, the mass was excised and removal of the cable system revealed a sharp deficit in the bare femoral stem. Gross surgical findings showed no obvious evidence of infection and no corrosion at the head-neck junction; therefore, all components were retained besides the cable system, which resulted in clinical recovery. All of the cultures from specimens were negative for bacterial growth, and histologic findings were compatible with a pseudotumor, such as histiocytes containing metal particles, abundant plasma cells, and CD8-positive cells. Quantitative analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry showed that the main source of metal debris in the pseudotumor was the femoral stem, which was made of titanium alloy, not the broken cable, which was made of cobalt-chromium alloy. The findings suggest that titanium particles can form symptomatic solid pseudotumors. PMID:26709566

  1. Inflammatory pseudotumor: A gallium-avid mobile mesenteric mass

    SciTech Connect

    Auringer, S.T.; Scott, M.D.; Sumner, T.E. )

    1991-08-01

    An 8-yr-old boy with a 1-mo history of culture-negative fever and anemia underwent gallium, ultrasound, and computed tomography studies as part of the evaluation of a fever of unknown origin. These studies revealed a mobile gallium-avid solid abdominal mass subsequently proven to be an inflammatory pseudotumor of the mesentery, a rare benign mass. This report documents the gallium-avid nature of this rare lesion and discusses associated characteristic clinical, pathologic, and radiographic features.

  2. Pseudotumor in the temporomandibular joint: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Hiroyuki; Kayamori, Kou; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Wake, Sou; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neoplastic disease in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare condition and is difficult to differentiate from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) based on symptoms and simple X-ray examinations. Potential differential diagnoses include synovial chondromatosis and pseudotumor, both of which are also relatively rare in the TMJ. Presentation of case We report a case of pseudotumor of the TMJ that was difficult to differentiate from synovial chondromatosis in a 71-year-old woman with a chief complaint of pain in the left TMJ. MRI of the right TMJ initially led to diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis. Extirpation of the lesion was performed under general anesthesia. Histopathological findings of the resected specimen revealed inflammatory granulation tissue without cellular atypism. Discussion The pathological findings for the resected specimen were compatible with pseudotumor of the TMJ. These findings were not supportive of synovial chondromatosis or other tumor diseases. Conclusion This case illustrates the importance of careful examination of a mass lesion in the TMJ for differentiation from other TMJ-related diseases. PMID:26298241

  3. The Efficacy of Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Orbital Pseudotumor

    SciTech Connect

    Matthiesen, Chance; Bogardus, Carl; Thompson, J. Spencer; Farris, Bradley; Hildebrand, Lloyd; Wilkes, Byron; Syzek, Elizabeth; Algan, Ozer; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Herman, Terence

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To review institutional outcomes for patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for orbital pseudotumor. Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution retrospective review of 20 orbits in 16 patients diagnosed with orbital pseudotumor that received EBRT at the University of Oklahoma, Department of Radiation Oncology. Treated patients had a median follow-up of 16.5 months. Results: Fifteen patients (93.7%) were initially treated with corticosteroids. Eight had recurrence after steroid cessation, six were unable to taper corticosteroids completely or partially, and one experienced progression of symptoms despite corticosteroid therapy. Fourteen patients (87.5%) initially responded to radiotherapy indicated by clinical improvement of preradiation symptoms and/or tapering of corticosteroid dose. Mean EBRT dose was 20 Gy (range, 14-30 Gy). Thirteen patients (81.2%) continued to improve after radiation therapy. Patient outcomes were complete cessation of corticosteroid therapy in nine patients (56.3%) and reduced corticosteroid dose in four patients (25%). Radiotherapy did not achieve long-term control for three patients (18.7%), who still required preradiation corticosteroid dosages. Three patients received retreatment(s) of four orbits, of which two patients achieved long-term symptom control without corticosteroid dependence. One patient received retreatment to an orbit three times, achieving long-term control without corticosteroid dependence. No significant late effects have been observed in retreated patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for acute symptomatic improvement and long-term control of orbital pseudotumor. Orbital retreatment can be of clinical benefit, without apparent increase in morbidity, when initial irradiation fails to achieve complete response.

  4. [IgG4-related kidney disease: a long-term follow up case of pseudotumor of the renal pelvis].

    PubMed

    Tsuzaka, Yasuo; Ookubo, Kazuki; Sugiyama, Kazutaka; Morimoto, Hirohiko; Amano, Hiroyuki; Oota, Nobutaka; Kuriki, Ken; Homma, Yukio

    2014-04-01

    A 69-year-old man had undergone left ureteronephrectomy because of a left renal pelvic tumor, however the pathological diagnosis was inflammatory pseudotumor. About 1 year later, computed tomography showed a mass at the right kidney near the hilar. Ureterorenoscopy and urine cytology were performed, and their results showed no evidence of malignancy. He had been followed closely without therapy. The mass increased in size during follow-up, and we reviewed the surgical specimen of the left ureteronephrectomy. Immunohistochemical studies revealed diffuse infiltration by IgG4 positive plasma cell. His serum IgG4 was high. We diagnosed him as IgG4-related kidney disease. In response to treatment with corticosteroid, the size of the tumor and serum IgG4 levels decreased. Most reported cases of IgG4-related disease involving kidney have a history of prior pancreatic involvement. We report a rare long term follow-up case of IgG4-related kidney disease without pancreatic involvement. PMID:24908817

  5. Prevalence of Pseudotumor in Patients After Metal-On-Metal Hip Arthroplasty Evaluated with Metal Ion Analysis and MARS-MRI.

    PubMed

    Sutphen, Sean A; MacLaughlin, Lewis H; Madsen, Adam A; Russell, Jackie H; McShane, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the prevalence of pseudotumors in patients with well-functioning and painful metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty, to characterize the pseudotumor with the use of MARS-MRI, and to assess the relationship between pseudotumors and metal ions. We retrospectively reviewed 102 single surgeon patients. The results showed that 68.6% developed pseudotumor with 60.9% of the asymptomatic group developing pseudotumor. The symptomatic group had a higher proportion of patients with elevated serum cobalt levels (P=0.035). There was no difference found with elevated metal ions and prevalence of pseudotumor, but elevated cobalt levels were associated with larger pseudotumor size (P=0.001). The available evidence indicated that most patients that develop pseudotumors are asymptomatic, and that elevated serum cobalt levels may be associated with symptoms and pseudotumor size. PMID:26253484

  6. Fibrous Pseudotumor of the Penis - An Unusual Finding During Repair of Fractured Penis.

    PubMed

    Nalavenkata, Sunny; Winter, Matthew; Pickett, Justine; Dias, Maxwell; Chalasani, Venu

    2014-01-01

    Fibrous pseudotumors of the testis and penis are a rare phenomenon, forming a spectrum of heterogeneous lesions. To the best of our knowledge, there has been only 1 previous report arising from the penis. We present a case of fibrous pseudotumor of the penis, incidentally found during the surgical repair of a fractured penis. These benign lesions have been described in the literature and are most commonly referred to as pseudotumors. They should be distinguished from potentially malignant lesions, including fibrosarcomas, squamous cell carcinoma, and polypoid urothelial carcinoma. Being aware of this pathology is important to prevent unnecessary radical surgery. PMID:26955535

  7. Acute pseudotumoral hemicerebellitis in a child: a rare and distinct entity?

    PubMed

    Alberini, Elena; Vellante, Valerio; Zennaro, Floriana; Calligaris, Lorenzo; Barbi, Egidio; Carrozzi, Marco; Devescovi, Raffaella

    2015-03-01

    A pseudotumoral presentation of acute hemicerebellitis is rare in pediatric age. The authors report a new single case study of a 7-year-old child with pseudotumoral unilateral cerebellitis mimicking an intracranial tumor, which clinically presented itself with signs of intracranial hypertension and mild contralateral hemiparesis, completely recovered after anti-inflammatory therapy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was essential for the differential diagnosis between inflammatory and neoplastic processes. The literature highlighting specific clues about pseudotumoral hemicerebellitis as a distinct clinical and radiological entity is reviewed. PMID:25143480

  8. IgA Nephropathy in a Patient Presenting with Pseudotumor Cerebri

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Umair Syed; Bacaj, Patrick; Iqbal, Hafiz Imran; Onder, Songul

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common glomerulonephritis worldwide and typically has minimal signs for chronicity in histopathology at the time of initial presentation. Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is characterized by increased intracranial pressure in the absence of any intracranial lesions, inflammation, or obstruction. PTC has been reported in renal transplant and dialysis patients, but we are unaware of any reports of pseudotumor cerebri in patients with IgA nephropathy. We report a case of a young female who presented with signs and symptoms of pseudotumor cerebri and was subsequently diagnosed with IgA nephropathy and end-stage renal disease. To our knowledge this is the first report of IgA nephropathy presenting as end-stage renal disease in a patient who presented with pseudotumor cerebri. PMID:26989531

  9. IgA Nephropathy in a Patient Presenting with Pseudotumor Cerebri.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Umair Syed; Bacaj, Patrick; Iqbal, Hafiz Imran; Onder, Songul

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common glomerulonephritis worldwide and typically has minimal signs for chronicity in histopathology at the time of initial presentation. Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is characterized by increased intracranial pressure in the absence of any intracranial lesions, inflammation, or obstruction. PTC has been reported in renal transplant and dialysis patients, but we are unaware of any reports of pseudotumor cerebri in patients with IgA nephropathy. We report a case of a young female who presented with signs and symptoms of pseudotumor cerebri and was subsequently diagnosed with IgA nephropathy and end-stage renal disease. To our knowledge this is the first report of IgA nephropathy presenting as end-stage renal disease in a patient who presented with pseudotumor cerebri. PMID:26989531

  10. Glucocorticosteroid-sensitive inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder in an adolescent: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder is a rare inflammatory bladder disease. The etiology and pathophysiology of this condition are still unclear. Few case reports have described inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder in adults or children. Although benign, this disease is occasionally clinically aggressive and locally invasive, thus open surgical removal or complete transurethral resection is recommended. Case presentation We present the case of a biopsy-proven inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder in a previously healthy 16-year-old male adolescent with 2-month history of frequent micturition and dysuria with no significant apparent causative factors. The tumor regressed after a 6-week course of glucocorticosteroids. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, our case is a rare case of inflammatory eosinophilic pseudotumor of the bladder treated with complete conservative management. Due to its glucocorticosteroid-sensitive nature, we postulate that this disease belongs to a subgroup of eosinophilic disorders. PMID:20062774

  11. [Inflammatory pseudo-tumor of the bladder expelled through the urethral meatus in a girl].

    PubMed

    Sarr, A; Thiam, I; Gueye, D; Sow, Y; Fall, B; Thiam, A; Sine, B; Ba, M; Diagne, B A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory pseudo-tumors of the bladder are rare benign tumors that mostly arise in the differential diagnosis of sarcomas in children. The authors report an unusual case of pedunculated inflammatory pseudo-tumor of the bladder that externalized by the urethral meatus in a 13-year-old girl. The treatment consisted of a ligation-resection of the pedicle, followed by resection of the tumor. After regular follow-up for 18 months there was no tumor recurrence. PMID:26552617

  12. Fibrosing pseudotumor of the sella and parasellar area producing hypopituitarism and multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Olmos, P R; Falko, J M; Rea, G L; Boesel, C P; Chakeres, D W; McGhee, D B

    1993-06-01

    We present an unusual patient with a medical history of a fibrosing pseudotumor of the left orbit that had been stable for 8 years who presented with acute anterior hypophyseal failure. During the next 10-month period, sequential magnetic resonance scans showed a rapid growth of a plaque-like sellar and parasellar mass extending into the right cavernous sinus, right Meckel's cave, along the dural surfaces of the clivus, dens, and body of the second cervical vertebra. A transsphenoidal biopsy revealed sphenoid and intrasellar pseudotumor that invaded the adenohypophysis and had microscopic features identical to those of the previously excised orbital pseudotumor. Rapid growth of the pseudotumor continued despite a course of radiotherapy. Palsies of cranial nerves V and VI and of the sensory root of the cranial nerve VII developed on the right side. Steroid therapy was associated with improvement of the cranial nerve palsies. This is the first report of the sellar fibrosing pseudotumor producing not only anterior hypophyseal failure, but also cranial nerve dysfunction secondary to plaque-like extension into the cavernous sinus, Meckel's cave, and cranial base dura. This intracranial plaque-like extension of a fibrous pseudotumor corresponds to a hypertrophic intracranial pachymeningitis, which is a rare, previously described phenomenon associated to the syndrome of multifocal fibrosclerosis. PMID:8327075

  13. Odontoid pseudotumor and serial postfusion radiographic evaluation in a patient with a C1-2 mass.

    PubMed

    Yanni, Daniel S; Halim, Alexander Y; Alexandru, Daniela

    2015-06-01

    Odontoid pseudotumor is a mass occurring around the odontoid process in the cervical spine and can cause significant neurological symptoms at the craniocervical junction due to compression of the spinal cord and cervicomedullary junction at this level. A literature review was performed to provide input on options for treatment and prognosis for this lesion. The literature search found 12 papers in which pseudotumor was treated with posterior decompression and fixation. Posterior decompression and fixation with serial imaging to monitor the size of the pseudotumor postsurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for odontoid pseudotumors. PMID:25768667

  14. Infective endocarditis caused by Listeria monocytogenes forming a pseudotumor.

    PubMed

    Uehara Yonekawa, Akiko; Iwasaka, Sho; Nakamura, Hisataka; Fukata, Mitsuhiro; Kadowaki, Masako; Uchida, Yujiro; Odashiro, Keita; Shimoda, Shinji; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Akashi, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman with breast cancer and metastasis under chemotherapy suffered from fever, pleural effusion and pericardial effusion. Despite the administration of treatment with cefozopran and prednisolone, the patient's fever relapsed. An electrocardiogram identified a new complete atrioventricular block and an echocardiogram revealed vegetation with an unusual pseudotumoral mass in the right atrium. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient was eventually diagnosed with right-sided infective endocarditis, which improved following the six-week administration of ampicillin and gentamicin. Homemade yoghurt was suspected to be the cause of infection in this case. Listeria endocarditis is rare; however, physicians should pay more attention to preventing this fatal disease in immunocompromised patients. PMID:24785898

  15. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  16. Inflammatory pseudotumor (plasma cell granuloma) of the heart. Report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rose, A G; McCormick, S; Cooper, K; Titus, J L

    1996-06-01

    We report pathologic findings in two patients with inflammatory pseudotumor of the heart. The first patient was a 15-year-old-boy who died suddenly and unexpectedly of myocardial ischemia caused by an angiocentric inflammatory pseudotumor affecting all of the major coronary arteries and some of their branches. Inflammatory pseudotumor was also centered around some intrasplenic arteries. The second patient was a 5-month-old girl who had subtotal resection of a mass in the right atrial free wall. Her inflammatory pseudotumor was confined to the myocardium and showed no angiocentricity. The patient is doing well 22 months after surgery. Inflammatory pseudotumor is a benign inflammatory response evoked by an unknown agent(s). In both patients, the inflammatory cells comprised a mixture of B and T lymphocytes. Among B cells, a mixture of kappa and lambda plasma cells was evident. A moderate number of tissue macrophages was also observed. The process is usually self-limited but may cause death if vital structures are involved. PMID:8651856

  17. [Pseudotumor cerebri secondary to consumption of minocycline in a pediatric patient].

    PubMed

    González Gili, Lucas O; Buffone, Ignacio R; Carrara, Laura E; Coto, María B; Fortunatti, Eliana A; Dejtera, Mabel; García Elliot, María F; Giacone, Alejandra; Luncio, Anabella C; Masnicoff, Sebastián D; Oviedo Crosta, María B; Parroua, Marianela; Romano, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri is a syndrome characterized by an elevated intracranial pressure greater than 20 cmH2O with ventricles and cerebrospinal fluid of normal characteristics. Consumption of minocycline have been described among the causes associated with this syndrome. We present a 13-year old female patient with a history of acne treated with minocycline who began with severe headache, diplopia and blurred vision. The diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri was made, indicating the immediate antibiotic suspension and the beginning of the treatment with acetazolamide. Although the pathogenesis of pseudotumor cerebri is not fully known, an association with minocycline has been observed. This antibiotic is often used by health professionals for the management of acne, so it is important to consider its complications before being prescribed. PMID:27079408

  18. Pseudotumoral and Multiple Retinal Pigment Epithelium Proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease.

    PubMed

    Yepez, Juan B; Murati, Felipe; Petitto, Michele; Arevalo, J Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of pseudotumoral retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease, in a 50-year-old female who presented with a juxtapapillary and peripheral subretinal hyperpigmented lesions in the left eye and "sunset glow fundus," hyperpigmented striae, and multiple atrophic chorioretinal spots in the periphery. The darkly pigmented exuberant larger subretinal mass extended to the periphery with associated subretinal fibrosis. This patient demonstrated the entire clinical presentation of VKH disease, which tends to course with a chronic, bilateral, granulomatous panuveitis and exudative retinal detachment associated with poliosis, vitiligo, alopecia, and central nervous system and auditory signs. Our case is unique for the presence of exuberant, pseudotumoral RPE proliferation at the juxtapapillary region and peripheral area. Although this complication has rarely been reported, a high index of suspicion is warranted for early diagnosis and avoids unnecessary treatments of a pseudotumor. PMID:26509089

  19. Pseudotumoral and Multiple Retinal Pigment Epithelium Proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yepez, Juan B.; Murati, Felipe; Petitto, Michele; Arevalo, J. Fernando

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of pseudotumoral retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) proliferation in Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease, in a 50-year-old female who presented with a juxtapapillary and peripheral subretinal hyperpigmented lesions in the left eye and “sunset glow fundus,” hyperpigmented striae, and multiple atrophic chorioretinal spots in the periphery. The darkly pigmented exuberant larger subretinal mass extended to the periphery with associated subretinal fibrosis. This patient demonstrated the entire clinical presentation of VKH disease, which tends to course with a chronic, bilateral, granulomatous panuveitis and exudative retinal detachment associated with poliosis, vitiligo, alopecia, and central nervous system and auditory signs. Our case is unique for the presence of exuberant, pseudotumoral RPE proliferation at the juxtapapillary region and peripheral area. Although this complication has rarely been reported, a high index of suspicion is warranted for early diagnosis and avoids unnecessary treatments of a pseudotumor. PMID:26509089

  20. Presumed Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome After Withdrawal of Inhaled Glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Joon; Allen, Julian L; Liu, Grant T; McCormack, Shana E

    2016-06-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS) is characterized by increased intracranial pressure with normal brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid constituents. PTCS after withdrawal of systemic corticosteroids also has been described in children. In contrast, to our knowledge, PTCS after withdrawal of inhaled glucocorticoids has not previously been described. Here we report the case of an 8-year and 6-month-old girl who developed signs and symptoms consistent with PTCS after withdrawal of inhaled glucocorticoids. The patient had excellent adherence to inhaled glucocorticoid therapy for ∼1 year before presentation, after which the therapy was stopped for concern related to poor growth. The withdrawal of inhaled glucocorticoids was associated with the development of severe headaches and diplopia, and further clinical examination led to the patient's diagnosis of likely PTCS. Although its occurrence is likely rare, clinicians caring for the many children receiving inhaled glucocorticoid therapy should be aware of the potential for PTCS after abrupt withdrawal of such treatment, and consider ophthalmology evaluation if patients report suggestive symptoms, such as headaches or vision changes in this context. PMID:27244842

  1. Cryptococcosis, silicosis, and tuberculous pseudotumor in the same pulmonary lobe*

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Geruza Alves; Brandão, Daniel Ferracioli; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; de Sá, João Batista Carlos; Baddini-Martinez, José

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis and cryptococcosis are infectious diseases that can result in the formation of single or multiple nodules in immunocompetent patients. Exposure to silica is known to raise the risk of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We report the case of an elderly man with no history of opportunistic infections and no clinical evidence of immunodeficiency but with a six-month history of dry cough and nocturnal wheezing. A chest X-ray revealed a mass measuring 5.0 × 3.5 cm in the right upper lobe. The diagnostic approach of the mass revealed tuberculosis. The histopathological analysis of the surrounding parenchyma reveled silicosis and cryptococcosis. Cryptococcosis was also found in masses identified in the mediastinal lymph nodes. The surgical approach was indicated because of the degree of pleuropulmonary involvement, the inconclusive results obtained with the invasive and noninvasive methods applied, and the possibility of malignancy. This case illustrates the difficulty inherent to the assessment of infectious or inflammatory pulmonary pseudotumors, the differential diagnosis of which occasionally requires a radical surgical approach. Despite the presence of respiratory symptoms for six months, the first chest X-ray was performed only at the end of that period. We discuss the possible pathogenic mechanisms that might have led to the combination of three types of granulomatous lesions in the same lobe, and we emphasize the need for greater awareness of atypical presentations of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:24310636

  2. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Spleen Masquerading as Splenic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mohammad; Pujani, Mukta; Jairajpuri, Zeeba Shamim; Rana, Safia; Goel, Amit; Jetley, Sujata

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumors (IPTs) of the spleen are extremely rare, benign tumors of unknown etiology, and are most frequently detected incidentally. We report a case of IPT of the spleen in a 19-year-old male, who presented to the Hamdard Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, New Delhi, with a history of pain and heaviness in the left hypochondrium. On clinical examination, splenomegaly was detected. Ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen revealed an enlarged spleen with a mass lesion completely occupying the lower pole of the spleen. Therefore, a diagnosis of splenomegaly with a malignant splenic lesion was suggested. Open splenectomy was performed. On gross examination, a well-circumscribed nodular growth measuring 9 × 8 × 5 cm in diameter was seen on the lower pole of the spleen, which on cut section appeared tan white with foci of yellowish discoloration. Microscopic examination of the nodular growth revealed spindle cells in a hyalinized stroma with inflammatory infiltration of predominantly plasma cells and lymphocytes. On immunohistochemistry, the spindle cells were positive for smooth muscle actin. A diagnosis of IPT of the spleen was rendered following histopathology testing. Splenectomy is both diagnostic and curative for this rare entity, and prognosis is usually favorable following the procedure. PMID:27168929

  3. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Spleen Masquerading as Splenic Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohammad; Pujani, Mukta; Jairajpuri, Zeeba Shamim; Rana, Safia; Goel, Amit; Jetley, Sujata

    2016-03-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumors (IPTs) of the spleen are extremely rare, benign tumors of unknown etiology, and are most frequently detected incidentally. We report a case of IPT of the spleen in a 19-year-old male, who presented to the Hamdard Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, New Delhi, with a history of pain and heaviness in the left hypochondrium. On clinical examination, splenomegaly was detected. Ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen revealed an enlarged spleen with a mass lesion completely occupying the lower pole of the spleen. Therefore, a diagnosis of splenomegaly with a malignant splenic lesion was suggested. Open splenectomy was performed. On gross examination, a well-circumscribed nodular growth measuring 9 × 8 × 5 cm in diameter was seen on the lower pole of the spleen, which on cut section appeared tan white with foci of yellowish discoloration. Microscopic examination of the nodular growth revealed spindle cells in a hyalinized stroma with inflammatory infiltration of predominantly plasma cells and lymphocytes. On immunohistochemistry, the spindle cells were positive for smooth muscle actin. A diagnosis of IPT of the spleen was rendered following histopathology testing. Splenectomy is both diagnostic and curative for this rare entity, and prognosis is usually favorable following the procedure. PMID:27168929

  4. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the hip: a complication of arthroplasty to be recognized by the radiologist*

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Raquel de Melo Santos Vilas; Madeira, Ivana Andrade; Lopes, Alexia Abuhid; Paiva, Edson Barreto; Rodrigues, André Soares

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue complications following hip arthroplasty may occur either in cases of total hip arthroplasty or in hip resurfacing, a technique that has become popular in cases involving young patients. Both orthopedic and radiological literatures are now calling attention to these symptomatic periprosthetic soft tissue masses called inflammatory pseudotumors or aseptic lymphocytic vasculites-associated lesions. Pseudotumors are associated with pain, instability, neuropathy, and premature loosening of prosthetic components, frequently requiring early and difficult reoperation. Magnetic resonance imaging plays a relevant role in the evaluation of soft tissue changes in the painful hip after arthroplasty, ranging from early periprosthetic fluid collections to necrosis and more extensive tissue damage. PMID:26543283

  5. A pediatric patient with recurrent pseudotumor cerebri and vitamin B12 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yetgin, Sevgi; Derman, Orhan; Dogan, Muhsin

    2006-01-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri is a syndrome of increased intracranial pressure, normal cerebrospinal fluid values, and a normal cerebral ventricles on brain imaging studies. A patient with a diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri was admitted to the authors' hospital twice within a 2.5-year interval and treated with vitamin B12 (vit-B12). At the second admission she also presented with a cerebral venous thrombosis that might have been explained by vit-B12 deficiency, homocysteinemia, and an increased level of lipoprotein-a. PMID:16326411

  6. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    PubMed

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  7. Good sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound for detecting pseudotumors in 83 failed metal-on-metal hip replacements

    PubMed Central

    Lainiala, Olli; Elo, Petra; Reito, Aleksi; Pajamäki, Jorma; Puolakka, Timo; Eskelinen, Antti

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Ultrasound is used for imaging of pseudotumors associated with metal-on-metal (MoM) hips. Ultrasound has been compared with magnetic resonance imaging, but to date there have been no studies comparing ultrasound findings and revision findings. Methods We evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of preoperative ultrasound for detecting pseudotumors in 82 patients with MoM hip replacement (82 hips). Ultrasound examinations were performed by 1 of 3 musculoskeletal radiologists, and pseudotumors seen by ultrasound were retrospectively classified as fluid-filled, mixed-type, or solid. Findings at revision surgery were retrieved from surgical notes and graded according to the same system as used for ultrasound findings. Results Ultrasound had a sensitivity of 83% (95% CI: 63–93) and a specificity of 92% (CI: 82–96) for detecting trochanteric region pseudotumors, and a sensitivity of 79% (CI: 62–89) and a specificity of 94% (CI: 83–98) for detecting iliopsoas-region pseudotumors. Type misclassification of pseudotumors found at revision occurred in 8 of 23 hips in the trochanteric region and in 19 of 33 hips in the iliopsoas region. Interpretation Despite the discrepancy in type classification between ultrasound and revision findings, the presence of pseudotumors was predicted well with ultrasound in our cohort of failed MoM hip replacements. PMID:25582840

  8. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:24839445

  9. Pancreatic abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Most people with pancreatic abscesses have had pancreatitis. However, the complication often takes 7 or more days to develop. Signs of an abscess can be seen on: CT scan of the abdomen MRI of the abdomen Ultrasound of the abdomen

  10. Pancreatitis - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100149.htm Pancreatitis - series To use the sharing features on this ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pancreatitis A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  11. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    MedlinePlus

    ... It may also contain tissue from the pancreas, pancreatic enzymes, and blood. ... located behind the stomach. It produces chemicals (called enzymes) ... Pancreatic pseudocysts most often develop after an episode of ...

  12. Neuro-Behçet, pseudotumor cerebri and ocular signs: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Inês; Loureiro, Cláudia; Geraldo Couceiro, Ana; Reis Ferreira, Cidalina; Monteiro-Grillo, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The central nervous system involvement in Behçet’s disease occurs in 5–30% of cases. The diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri is even rarer (only 22 cases reported worldwide). Purpose: To emphasize the importance of differential diagnosis in a case of pseudotumor cerebri in the context of ocular inflammation. Methods: V.A.V.R., a 31 year old female, was diagnosed with pan-uveitis on the left eye associated with recurrent bipolar aphthosis. During the etiological investigation, there was an onset of a left hemiparesis and facial palsy. Results: The central nervous system (CNS) neuroradiological investigation revealed a space-occupying lesion within the right hemisphere with intense signal enhancement with gadolinium. It globally reached the nucleo-basal structures and induced deviation of the middle structures (including homolateral ventricle). Cytochemical analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was negative for atypical cells. The ophthalmological features regressed with the corticosteroid and immunosuppressive therapy instituted. The final diagnosis was of pseudotumor cerebri in the context of Behçet’s disease. Conclusion: In Behçet’s disease, a cerebral space-occupying lesion should lead to a diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri. The correct diagnosis will determine an appropriate therapy and may prevent an inappropriate neurosurgical approach. The cortico and immunotherapy allowed a substantial regression of the lesion.

  13. Calcifying Fibrous Pseudotumor of the Posterior Mediastinum With Encapsulation of the Thoracic Duct.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Sumudu N; Hagen, Jeffrey; Fedenko, Alexander; Lee, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    We report the first case of calcifying fibrous pseudotumor (CFPT) to arise in the posterior mediastinum with encapsulation of the thoracic duct. This exceedingly rare lesion was incidentally discovered in an asymptomatic young woman and treated with surgical resection, requiring ligation and excision of the thoracic duct. There has been no evidence of tumor recurrence or postoperative complication. PMID:27343527

  14. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Wood, Laura D; Itoi, Takao; Takaori, Kyoichi

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease, for which mortality closely parallels incidence. Most patients with pancreatic cancer remain asymptomatic until the disease reaches an advanced stage. There is no standard programme for screening patients at high risk of pancreatic cancer (eg, those with a family history of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis). Most pancreatic cancers arise from microscopic non-invasive epithelial proliferations within the pancreatic ducts, referred to as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias. There are four major driver genes for pancreatic cancer: KRAS, CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4. KRAS mutation and alterations in CDKN2A are early events in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Endoscopic ultrasonography and endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration offer high diagnostic ability for pancreatic cancer. Surgical resection is regarded as the only potentially curative treatment, and adjuvant chemotherapy with gemcitabine or S-1, an oral fluoropyrimidine derivative, is given after surgery. FOLFIRINOX (fluorouracil, folinic acid [leucovorin], irinotecan, and oxaliplatin) and gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) are the treatments of choice for patients who are not surgical candidates but have good performance status. PMID:26830752

  15. Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2009-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed an explosion in our understanding of pancreatic cancer, and it is now clear that pancreatic cancer is a disease of inherited (germ-line) and somatic gene mutations. The genes mutated in pancreatic cancer include KRAS2, p16/CDKN2A, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, and these are accompanied by a substantial compendium of genomic and transcriptomic alterations that facilitate cell cycle deregulation, cell survival, invasion, and metastases. Pancreatic cancers do not arise de novo, and three distinct precursor lesions have been identified. Experimental models of pancreatic cancer have been developed in genetically engineered mice, which recapitulate the multistep progression of the cognate human disease. Although the putative cell of origin for pancreatic cancer remains elusive, minor populations of cells with stem-like properties have been identified that appear responsible for tumor initiation, metastases, and resistance of pancreatic cancer to conventional therapies. PMID:18039136

  16. A rare case of pseudotumor formation associated with methyl methacrylate hypersensitivity in a patient following cemented total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kenan, Shachar; Kahn, Leonard; Haramati, Noga; Kenan, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Hypersensitivity to orthopedic implant materials has been well documented with potential catastrophic consequences if not addressed pre-operatively. The spectrum of reactions is wide, from mild non-specific pain with localized erythema to severe periprosthetic inflammatory destruction and pseudotumor formation. It is therefore essential to identify patients who have or are at risk for implant-associated hypersensitivity. Although metal sensitivity is commonly cited as the cause of these reactions, methyl methacrylate (MMA) has rarely been implicated. To the best of our knowledge, methyl methacrylate-associated pseudotumor formation has not yet been described. The following is a case report of a 68-year-old female who, after undergoing a routine cemented right total knee arthroplasty, developed a painless, enlarging mass during a 13-year period. This mass was found to be a pseudotumor in association with methyl methacrylate hypersensitivity. A review of pseudotumor pathogenesis, methyl methacrylate hypersensitivity, and preoperative preventative care is discussed. PMID:27022733

  17. Muscular pseudotumor of the breast following doxorubicin and radiation therapy for oat cell carcinoma of the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Wergowske, G.; Chang, J.C.; Marger, D.

    1982-12-01

    Two male patients developed muscular pseudotumor of the breast following combined treatment of radiation and chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, methotrexate and procarbazine for oat cell carcinoma of the lung. The pathologic findings of the biopsy specimens revealed muscle and capillary changes similar to previously reported myocardiotoxicity from doxorubicin and radiation therapy. Discussed is a possible additive or synergistic toxic effect of doxorubicin and radiation therapy in the development of muscular pseudotumor of the breast.

  18. Relationship between dacryoadenitis subtype of idiopathic orbital inflammatory pseudotumor and paranasal sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Ge, Xin; Ma, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the clinical features of the dacryoadenitis subtype of idiopathic orbital inflammatory pseudotumor and its relationship with paranasal sinusitis. METHODS A retrospective analysis of 46 patients who received surgical treatment at the Department of Ophthalmology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University for the dacryoadenitis subtype of idiopathic orbital inflammatory pseudotumor from October 2010 to December 2012. Each patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the orbits and the 4 paranasal sinuses. Disease status and the level of serum immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) was measured before and 6mo after surgery. RESULTS The initial clinical feature of the idiopathic dacryoadenitis type of orbital inflammatory pseudotumor was redness or swelling of the eyelids. Masses were palpated in the area of the lacrimal gland in some patients. Of the 46 patients, 16 also suffered from sinusitis (34.8%), with 14 cases of ethmoid sinusitis, 8 cases of maxillary sinusitis, 9 cases of sphenoid sinusitis, and 8 cases of frontal sinusitis. Of the 16 patients with sinusitis, 4 patients had a medical history of rhinitis (range: 10mo to 15y previously), 10 patients had occasional nasal congestion, and 2 patients had no nasal congestion. Thirteen of the 46 patients had elevated serum IgG4 levels. Nine of these 13 patients had MRI signs of sinusitis. All patients (n=46) received oral glucocorticoid treatment for approximately 3mo after surgery. No sign of recurrence was found in the orbital MRI 6mo after surgery. Of the 16 patients with sinusitis, 9 cases of elevated serum IgG4 levels improved after treatment with decreased serum IgG4 level and 7 cases of normal serum IgG4 levels remained unchanged. CONCLUSION Some patients with the dacryoadenitis subtype of idiopathic orbital inflammatory pseudotumor may also suffer from paranasal sinusitis. The incidence of paranasal sinusitis was much higher in patients with IgG4-elevated dacryoadenitis subtype orbital

  19. Chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Shounak; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pancreatitis describes a wide spectrum of fibro-inflammatory disorders of the exocrine pancreas that includes calcifying, obstructive, and steroid-responsive forms. Use of the term chronic pancreatitis without qualification generally refers to calcifying chronic pancreatitis. Epidemiology is poorly defined, but incidence worldwide seems to be on the rise. Smoking, drinking alcohol, and genetic predisposition are the major risk factors for chronic calcifying pancreatitis. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical features, diagnosis, and management of chronic calcifying pancreatitis, focusing on pain management, the role of endoscopic and surgical intervention, and the use of pancreatic enzyme-replacement therapy. Management of patients is often challenging and necessitates a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:26948434

  20. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) made in the past year. Recent findings Tropical pancreatitis associates with SPINK1 and/or CFTR gene mutations in approximately 50% of patients, similar to the frequency in idiopathic CP. Corticosteroids increase secretin-stimulated pancreatic bicarbonate concentrations in AIP by restoring mislocalized CFTR protein to the apical ductal membrane. Most patients with asymptomatic hyperenzymemia have pancreatic lesions of unclear significance or no pancreatic lesions. Common pitfalls in the use of diagnostic tests for EPI confound interpretation of findings in IBS and severe renal insufficiency. Further study is needed to improve the accuracy of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) to diagnose CP. Celiac plexus block provides short term pain relief in a subset of patients. Summary Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the genetic associations of tropical pancreatitis, a reversible mislocalization of ductal CFTR in AIP, the association of asymptomatic pancreatic hyperenzymemia with pancreatic disorders, limitations of diagnostic tests for EPI, diagnosis of CP by EUS and endoscopic pancreatic function testing and treatment of pain. PMID:21844753

  1. An Inflammatory Pseudotumor Arising from Pterygopalatine Fossa with Invasion to the Maxillary Sinus and Orbital Cavity.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Hidenori; Yazawa, Takuya; Matsumoto, Yuma; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Fujiwara, Masachika; Ohkura, Yasuo; Kohno, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    We report a patient who had an inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) that invaded to the maxillary sinus and orbital cavity, with the left pterygopalatine fossa as the principal site; this is a very rare case. The patient was an 83-year-old woman who suddenly became aware of impairment in the eyesight and visual field of the left eye. CT images showed a neoplastic lesion that invaded to the maxillary sinus and orbital cavity, with the left pterygopalatine fossa as the principal site, and also showed contrast effects. To obtain a definitive diagnosis from histopathological analysis, the lesion was biopsied, and she was diagnosed as the inflammatory pseudotumor with the immunohistochemical study and multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based clonality assays. The patient had a lymphoid-predominant lesion that responded to radiotherapy but corticosteroids were not effective. It is important to scrutinize the pathology to avoid unnecessary and mutilating surgery. PMID:26167321

  2. Epstein-Barr virus-associated inflammatory pseudotumor presenting as a colonic mass.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shunyou; Auer, Iwona; Duggal, Rajan; Pittaluga, Stefania; Raffeld, Mark; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2015-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) commonly involves spleen and liver and has only rarely been reported in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The spindle cells may express myofibroblastic or follicular dendritic cell markers. We report a challenging case of EBV-positive IPT arising in the ascending colon. The lesion was composed of spindle cells positive for smooth muscle actin but negative for all follicular dendritic cell markers tested and was associated with an exuberant lymphoid proliferation containing reactive follicles, abundant plasma cells, and small lymphocytes. We further discuss pitfalls for possible misdiagnosis as ALK-positive inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, IgG4-related disease, and peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Our case represents the first EBV-positive inflammatory pseudotumor of the GI tract in the Western literature. Awareness of this rare entity in GI tract is essential for correct diagnosis and appropriate patient management. PMID:26477709

  3. Performance evaluation of endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging system: in vitro and pseudotumor studies

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xin; Chen, Xueli; Kang, Fei; Lin, Yenan; Liu, Muhan; Hu, Hao; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Wang, Jing; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2014-01-01

    By integrating the clinically used endoscope with the emerging Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) technology, a new endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging (ECLI) system was developed. The aim is to demonstrate the potential of translating CLI to clinical studies of gastrointestinal (GI) tract diseases. We systematically evaluated the feasibility and performance of the developed ECLI system with a series of in vitro and pseudotumor experiments. The ECLI system is comprised of an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera coupled with a clinically used endoscope via an optical adapter. A 1951-USAF test board was used to measure the white-light lateral resolution, while a homemade test chart filled with 68Ga was employed to measure the CL lateral resolution. Both in vitro and pseudotumor experiments were conducted to obtain the sensitivity of the ECLI system. The results were validated with that of CLI using EMCCD only, and the relative attenuation ratio of the ECLI system was calculated. Results showed that The white-light lateral resolution of the ECLI system was 198 µm, and the luminescent lateral resolution was better than 1 mm. Sensitivity experiments showed a theoretical sensitivity of 0.186 KBq/μl (5.033×10−3 μCi/μl) and 1.218 KBq/μl (32.922×10−3 μCi/μl) for the in vitro and pseudotumor studies, respectively. The relative attenuation ratio of ECLI to CLI was about 96%. The luminescent lateral resolution of the ECLI system was comparable with that of positron emission tomography (PET). The pseudotumor study illustrated the feasibility and applicability of the ECLI system in living organisms, indicating the potential for translating the CLI technology to the clinic. PMID:25360380

  4. Performance evaluation of endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging system: in vitro and pseudotumor studies.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xin; Chen, Xueli; Kang, Fei; Lin, Yenan; Liu, Muhan; Hu, Hao; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Wang, Jing; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2014-10-01

    By integrating the clinically used endoscope with the emerging Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) technology, a new endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging (ECLI) system was developed. The aim is to demonstrate the potential of translating CLI to clinical studies of gastrointestinal (GI) tract diseases. We systematically evaluated the feasibility and performance of the developed ECLI system with a series of in vitro and pseudotumor experiments. The ECLI system is comprised of an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera coupled with a clinically used endoscope via an optical adapter. A 1951-USAF test board was used to measure the white-light lateral resolution, while a homemade test chart filled with (68)Ga was employed to measure the CL lateral resolution. Both in vitro and pseudotumor experiments were conducted to obtain the sensitivity of the ECLI system. The results were validated with that of CLI using EMCCD only, and the relative attenuation ratio of the ECLI system was calculated. Results showed that The white-light lateral resolution of the ECLI system was 198 µm, and the luminescent lateral resolution was better than 1 mm. Sensitivity experiments showed a theoretical sensitivity of [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]) and [Formula: see text] ([Formula: see text]) for the in vitro and pseudotumor studies, respectively. The relative attenuation ratio of ECLI to CLI was about 96%. The luminescent lateral resolution of the ECLI system was comparable with that of positron emission tomography (PET). The pseudotumor study illustrated the feasibility and applicability of the ECLI system in living organisms, indicating the potential for translating the CLI technology to the clinic. PMID:25360380

  5. Pseudotumor cerebri in a child treated with acitretin: A rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Somenath; Das, Kapildev; Roychoudhury, Soumyajit; Shrimal, Arpit

    2013-01-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is a rare neurological disorder characterized by increased intracranial pressure in absence of any intra-cranial space-occupying lesion. It is mostly due to impairment of drainage of CSF from arachnoid villi. Clinically pseudotumor cerebri presents with headache, diplopia, nausea, vomiting, papilloedema and if treatment is delayed, may lead to blindness. Females of childbearing age group, endocrinal abnormalities and ingestion of certain drugs have been reported to be associated with pseudotumor cerebri. However, it's occurrence in relation to acitretin ingestion has not been reported on pubmed database. Here we present a case where significant temporal association of acitretin intake with PTC was found in a child who was being treated with this medication for recalcitrant pustular psoriasis. The case is reported for its rarity in occurrence and associated significant morbidity including visual loss if not diagnosed and treated immediately. According to Naranjo ADR Causality scale of adverse drug reaction, the association of PTC due to acitretin in our case was probable. PMID:23543097

  6. A negative cranial computed tomographic scan is not adequate to support a diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri.

    PubMed

    Said, Rana R; Rosman, N Paul

    2004-08-01

    A 10-year-old boy with daily headache for 1 month and intermittent diplopia for 1 week was found to have a unilateral partial abducens palsy and bilateral papilledema; otherwise, his neurologic examination showed no abnormalities. A cranial computed tomographic (CT) scan was normal. Lumbar puncture disclosed a markedly elevated opening pressure of > 550 mm of cerebrospinal fluid with normal cerebrospinal fluid. Medical therapy with acetazolamide for presumed pseudotumor cerebri was begun. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, done several days later because of continuing symptoms, unexpectedly showed multiple hyperintensities of cerebral white matter on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Despite high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone for possible demyelinating disease, he failed to improve. A left temporal brain biopsy followed and disclosed an anaplastic oligodendroglioma. In a patient with features indicating pseudotumor cerebri, a negative cranial CT scan is not adequate to rule out underlying pathology; thus, MRI of the brain should probably always be performed. A revised definition of pseudotumor cerebri could better include "normal MRI of the brain" rather than "normal neuroimaging." PMID:15605471

  7. Tumors and pseudotumors at the temporomandibular joint region in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Bin; Chen, Min-Jie; Yang, Chi; Qiu, Yating; Zhou, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical manifestations and types of, and our surgical experience with, neoplasms in the region of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in pediatric patients. Materials and Methods: From September 1997 to December 2013, a total of 18 patients with neoplasms in the region of the TMJ were treated at our department. They all underwent open surgeries. The clinical manifestations and radiological aspects of all the patients were reviewed. The average follow-up period was 61.8 months with a range of 12-221 months. We reviewed the history, physical examination, images, and related radiological examinations. Results: Of the 18 patients, 14 had benign tumors or pseudotumors, and four had malignant tumors. The ratio of pseudotumor to benign tumor to malignant tumor was 2.5:1:1. Limitations of mouth opening were more likely to occur with malignant tumors, and facial deformity had a higher incidence in benign tumors. Local resection was the first choice for patients with benign tumors or pseudotumors. All patients with malignant tumors underwent whole-tumor resection along the boundary, including the joint capsule, disc, and part of the temporal bone and mandible. During the follow-up period, no tumor reformation or new deformity was detected. Conclusions: In the diagnosis of masses in the TMJ region, CT and MRI play an important role. Surgical removal of the mass with/without joint attachment was sufficient to treat benign and malignant tumors. PMID:26885147

  8. Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Geokas, Michael C.

    1972-01-01

    For many decades two types of acute pancreatitis have been recognized: the edematous or interstitial and the hemorrhagic or necrotic. In most cases acute pancreatitis is associated with alcoholism or biliary tract disease. Elevated serum or urinary α-amylase is the most important finding in diagnosis. The presence of methemalbumin in serum and in peritoneal or pleural fluid supports the diagnosis of the hemorrhagic form of the disease in patients with a history and enzyme studies suggestive of pancreatitis. There is no characteristic clinical picture in acute pancreatitis, and its complications are legion. Pancreatic pseudocyst is probably the most common and pancreatic abscess is the most serious complication. The pathogenetic principle is autodigestion, but the precise sequence of biochemical events is unclear, especially the mode of trypsinogen activation and the role of lysosomal hydrolases. A host of metabolic derangements have been identified in acute pancreatitis, involving lipid, glucose, calcium and magnesium metabolism and changes of the blood clotting mechanism, to name but a few. Medical treatment includes intestinal decompression, analgesics, correction of hypovolemia and other supportive and protective measures. Surgical exploration is advisable in selected cases, when the diagnosis is in doubt, and is considered imperative in the presence of certain complications, especially pancreatic abscess. PMID:4559467

  9. [Hereditary pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Dyrla, Przemysław; Nowak, Tomasz; Gil, Jerzy; Adamiec, Cezary; Bobula, Mariusz; Saracyn, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare, heterogeneous familial disease and should be suspected in any patient who has suffered at least two attacks of acute pancreatitis for which there is no underlying cause and unexplained chronic pancreatitis with a family history in a first- or second degree relative. with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Genetic factors have been implied in cases of familial chronic pancreatitis. The most common are mutations of the PRSS1 gene on the long arm of the chromosome 7, encoding for the cationic trypsinogen. The inheritance pattern is autosomal dominant with an incomplete penetrance (80%). The inflammation results in repeated DNA damage, error-prone repair mechanisms and the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations. Risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a major concern of many patients with hereditary chronic pancreatitis, but the individual risk is poorly defined. Better risk models of pancreatic cancer in individual patients based on etiology of pancreatitis, family history, genetics, smoking, alcohol, diabetes and the patient's age are needed. PMID:27000817

  10. Pancreatic Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Poras; Bhadana, Utsav; Arora, Mohinder P

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis of the pancreas is extremely rare and in most of the cases mimics pancreatic carcinoma. There are a number of case reports on pancreatic tuberculosis with various different presentations, but only a few case series have been published, and most of our knowledge about this disease comes from individual case reports. Patients of pancreatic tuberculosis may remain asymptomatic initially and manifest as an abscess or a mass involving local lymph nodes and usually present with non-specific features. Pancreatic tuberculosis may present with a wide range of imaging findings. It is difficult to diagnose tuberculosis of pancreas on imaging studies as they may present with masses, cystic lesions or abscesses and mass lesions in most of the cases mimic pancreatic carcinoma. As it is a rare entity, it cannot be recommended but suggested that pancreatic tuberculosis should be considered in cases with a large space occupying lesions associated with necrotic peripancreatic lymph nodes and constitutional symptoms. Ultrasonography/computed tomography/endosonography-guided biopsy is the recommended diagnostic technique. Most patients achieve complete cure with standard antituberculous therapy. The aims of this study are to review clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, and management of pancreatic tuberculosis and to present our experience of 5 cases of pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:26884661

  11. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Audrey; Herman, Joseph; Schulick, Rich; Hruban, Ralph H; Goggins, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer, and advances in patients’ management have also taken place. Evidence is beginning to show that screening first-degree relatives of individuals with several family members affected by pancreatic cancer can identify non-invasive precursors of this malignant disease. The incidence of and number of deaths caused by pancreatic tumours have been gradually rising, even as incidence and mortality of other common cancers have been declining. Despite developments in detection and management of pancreatic cancer, only about 4% of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Survival is better for those with malignant disease localised to the pancreas, because surgical resection at present offers the only chance of cure. Unfortunately, 80–85% of patients present with advanced unresectable disease. Furthermore, pancreatic cancer responds poorly to most chemotherapeutic agents. Hence, we need to understand the biological mechanisms that contribute to development and progression of pancreatic tumours. In this Seminar we will discuss the most common and deadly form of pancreatic cancer, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:21620466

  12. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality. PMID:20016434

  13. Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    DiMagno, Matthew J.; DiMagno, Eugene P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review We review important new clinical observations in chronic pancreatitis (CP) reported in 2011. Recent findings Smoking increases the risk of non-gallstone acute pancreatitis (AP) and the progression of AP to CP. Binge drinking during Oktoberfest did not associate with increased hospital admissions for AP. The unfolded protein response is an adaptive mechanism to maintain pancreatic health in response to noxious stimuli such as alcohol. Onset of diabetes mellitus in CP is likely due to progressive disease rather than individual variables. Insufficient pancreatic enzyme dosing is common for treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea; 90,000 USP U of lipase should be given with meals. Surgical drainage provides sustained, superior pain relief compared to endoscopic treatment in patients advanced CP with a dilated main duct +/− pancreatic stones. The central acting gabapentoid pregabalin affords a modest 12% pain reduction in patients with CP but ~30% of patients have significant side effects. Summary Patients with non-gallstone related AP or CP of any etiology should cease smoking. Results of this year’s investigations further elucidated the pancreatic pathobiology due to alcohol, onset of diabetes mellitus in CP, and the mechanisms and treatment of neuropathic pain in CP. PMID:22782018

  14. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure children receive vaccines to protect them against mumps and other childhood illnesses. Treat medical problems that ... Heart failure - overview Hemolytic-uremic syndrome Kawasaki disease Mumps Mycoplasma pneumonia Reye syndrome Patient Instructions Pancreatitis - discharge ...

  15. Acute pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... include: Abdominal CT scan Abdominal MRI Abdominal ultrasound

  16. Chronic pancreatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... body Blockage of the tubes (ducts) that drain enzymes from the pancreas Cystic fibrosis High levels of a fat, called ... Limiting caffeine The health care provider may prescribe pancreatic enzymes. You must take these medicines with every meal. ...

  17. Pancreatic Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... and in front of your spine. It produces juices that help break down food and hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Problems with the pancreas can lead to many health problems. These include Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the ...

  18. Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for ... therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Omiyale, Ayodeji Oluwarotimi

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare, distinct and increasingly recognized form of pancreatitis which has autoimmune features. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC) for AIP recently described two subtypes; type 1[lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP)] and type 2 [idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) or AIP with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL)]. Type 1 is the more common form of the disease worldwide and current understanding suggests that it is a pancreatic manifestation of immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In contrast, type 2 AIP is a pancreas-specific disease not associated with IgG4 and mostly without the overt extra-pancreatic organ involvement seen in type 1. The pathogenesis of AIP is not completely understood and its clinical presentation is non-specific. It shares overlapping features with more sinister pathologies such as cancer of the pancreas, which continues to pose a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The diagnostic criteria requires a variable combination of histopathological, imaging and serological features in the presence of typical extrapancreatic lesions and a predictable response to steroids. PMID:27294040

  1. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  2. High pseudotumor cerebri incidence in tretinoin and arsenic treated acute promyelocytic leukemia and the role of topiramate after acetazolamide failure

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Morgan B.; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.; Thompson, James E.; Wang, Eunice S.; Wetzler, Meir; Freyer, Craig W.

    2014-01-01

    Dual differentiation therapy with arsenic trioxide and tretinoin (all-trans-retinoic acid; ATRA) for the management of low and intermediate risk acute promyelocytic leukemia has recently been recommended by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Some less common toxicities of the combination may have yet to be fully realized. Of ten patients we have treated thus far, five (50%) have developed pseudotumor cerebri. In one patient, temporary discontinuation of ATRA and initiation of acetazolamide controlled symptoms. In four patients, topiramate was substituted for acetazolamide to relieve symptoms and allow ATRA dose re-escalation. We conclude that providers should monitor for pseudotumor cerebri and consider topiramate if acetazolamide fails. PMID:25180154

  3. Pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Güngör, C; Hofmann, B T; Wolters-Eisfeld, G; Bockhorn, M

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that the current standard therapeutic options for pancreatic cancer are not adequate and still do not meet the criteria to cure patients suffering from this lethal disease. Although research over the past decade has shown very interesting and promising new therapeutic options for these patients, only minor clinical success was achieved. Therefore, there is still an urgent need for new approaches that deal with early detection and new therapeutic options in pancreatic cancer. To provide optimal care for patients with pancreatic cancer, we need to understand better its complex molecular biology and thus to identify new target molecules that promote the proliferation and resistance to chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer cells. In spite of significant progress in curing cancers with chemotherapy, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most resistant solid tumour cancers and many studies suggest that drug-resistant cancer cells are the most aggressive with the highest relapse and metastatic rates. In this context, activated Notch signalling is strongly linked with chemoresistance and therefore reflects a rational new target to circumvent resistance to chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Here, we have focused our discussion on the latest research, current therapy options and recently identified target molecules such as Notch-2 and the heparin-binding growth factor midkine, which exhibit a wide range of cancer-relevant functions and therefore provide attractive new therapeutic target molecules, in terms of pancreatic cancer and other cancers also. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24024905

  4. [Primary "pseudotumor cerebri" syndrome or idiopathic intracranial hypertension: clinical features and treatment].

    PubMed

    Timmermans, G; Scholtes, F; Andris, C; Martin, D

    2015-10-01

    "Pseudotumor cerebri" generally refers to a syndrome associating signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension, increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure and normal CSF composition, without any identifiable intracranial abnormality, particularly by neuroimaging studies. Although the "idiopathic" variant of the syndrome is most common, there are secondary forms where a cause can be found. The term "benign intracranial hypertension" should be abandoned, since permanent visual impairment can complicate the condition. This disaster can be avoided by early recognition and medical or surgical treatment of the disease. This article discusses the terminology, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the syndrome. PMID:26727837

  5. Pseudotumor cerebri: What We Have Learned from the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial.

    PubMed

    Thakore, Rachel V; Johnson, Meredith A J; Krohel, Gregory B; Johnson, Lenworth N

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, also known as pseudotumor cerebri, is an unexplained increase in intracranial pressure associated with permanent severe visual loss in 25% of cases and debilitating headaches. The condition is often associated with obesity. The Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial, a large, randomized, collaborative clinical trial, evaluated the efficacy of acetazolamide with weight loss versus placebo with weight loss in participants. Herein, we describe the major components of the clinical trial and discuss its shortcomings. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-05.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27128512

  6. Reactive Nodular Fibrous Pseudotumor: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Salihi, Rawand; Moerman, Philippe; Timmerman, Dirk; Van Schoubroeck, Dominique; Op de beeck, Katya; Vergote, Ignace

    2014-01-01

    We will describe a case of a patient diagnosed with a rare identity of a benign lesion, “reactive nodular fibrous pseudotumor” (RNFP). It is a tumor which preoperatively can present as a malignant tumor and is only reported in 19 cases. According to the very limited amount of information on this tumor in the literature it is mostly seen after trauma or intraperitoneal inflammation. Our case is the second one of RNFP associated with endometriosis, which is a frequently seen intraperitoneal inflammation process in women. Knowledge that these large pseudotumoral lesions can occur is important to direct the management of these patients. PMID:24800089

  7. Pseudotumor presentation of renal tuberculosis mimicking renal cell carcinoma: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, Anubhav; Ranjan, Raju; Drall, Nityasha; Mishra, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis can involve any part of the body. Urogenital tuberculosis is a fairly common extra-pulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis and renal tuberculosis is the most common form of urogenital tuberculosis. Renal tuberculosis seldom presents as a mass, usually due to hydronephrosis of the involved kidney. However in extremely rare cases it may present as an inflammatory pseudotumor which may mimic renal cell carcinoma. We present a case of a 65- year- old male who was provisionally diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma based on clinical and radiological findings and managed accordingly but was finally diagnosed as renal tuberculosis based on histopathological examination of surgical specimen.

  8. Recurrent inflammatory pseudotumor of the jaw with perineural intracranial invasion demonstrating sustained response to Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Bryan A; Tinsley, Sarah; Schellenberger, Thomas; Bobustuc, George C

    2012-12-01

    Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment of inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of the head and neck; however, involvement of the skull base and mandible can be unresponsive to steroids and require surgical resection. IPT is known to usually contain a CD20+ lymphocyte subgroup. Rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody, has been successfully utilized in the treatment of other CD20+ diseases, including the similar idiopathic orbital inflammatory disease. This is the first report to describe successful treatment with Rituximab of a recurrent IPT of the mandible with trigeminal spread and leptomeningeal involvement with clinical and radiologic evidence demonstrating a sustained response to therapy. PMID:22161155

  9. Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Infraorbital Nerve: A Rare Diagnosis to Be Aware of.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Andrea; Bergonzani, Michela; Varazzani, Andrea; Sesenna, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a rare benign mass-forming disease that can arise anywhere throughout the body, mimicking a wide spectrum of other conditions. Its diagnosis can be challenging, especially when it involves uncommon sites. The authors report a patient of an atypical localization of IPT, occurred as an enlarging bulk in the infraorbital nerve channel in a patient who presented with facial numbness. Clinical and radiological aspects similar to schwannoma led to misdiagnosis and over-treatment. The differential diagnosis of an infraorbital mass should include IPT and the least invasive treatment should be preferred, as steroid therapy being the first-line treatment for IPT. PMID:27438435

  10. [Pseudotumoral-like recurrence of visceral leishmaniasis in a seven-year-old girl].

    PubMed

    Jeziorski, E; Blanchet, C; Ludwig, C; Lalande, M; Coste, V; Dereure, J; Rodière, M

    2009-10-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is endemic around Mediterranean and is considered by certain authors as an opportunist disease. We report on the case of a 7-year-old girl treated by anti-TNF for an idiopathic juvenile arthritis which has presented a visceral leishmaniasis. Four years later, she presented a pseudotumoral-like recurrence located in a nasal mucous membrane. Leishmania infantum is classically responsible for visceral leishmaniasis but pure mucocutaneous leishmaniasis has been described. It is, for our knowledge, the first observation of a recurrence of visceral leishmaniasis in a mucocutaneous location. Atypical leishmaniasis in the endemic zones can appear in immunodepressed patients and must be evoked when in doubt. PMID:19836676

  11. Cavitating lung lesion as a manifestation of inflammatory tumor (pseudotumor) of the lung: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Michaelides, Stylianos A.; Passalidou, Elisabeth; Bablekos, George D.; Aza, Evlambia; Goulas, George; Chorti, Maria; Nicolaou, Irene N.; Lioulias, Achilleas G.

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: Inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung Symptoms: Cough dry • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: — Objective: Rare disease Background: Inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung involves a benign, non-neoplastic lung lesion of unknown etiology. Case Report: We present a case of a 60-year-old female smoker who had been under intermittent immunosuppressive medication for discoid lupus, who was admitted to hospital with fever of 39.5°C of 10-day duration, not responding to an oral cephalosporin. Chest CT examination showed a cavitating opacity in the upper zone of the left lung. It was not feasible to establish a diagnosis based on clinical and laboratory testing nor based on CT scanning and bronchoscopy. Thus, the patient underwent left thoracotomy and sphenoid resection of the lesion, which was sent for biopsy. The histopathologic features aided by immunohistochemical staining proved the lesion to be an inflammatory pseudotumor of the lung. Conclusions: The case is reported because of the extremely rare radiologic presentation of the development of a lung pseudotumor emerging as a cavitated lesion, which relapsed during the follow-up period while the patient was still under immunosuppressive medication. PMID:24971159

  12. Paraneoplastic pemphigus and myasthenia gravis, associated with inflammatory pseudotumor-like follicular dendritic cell sarcoma: response to rituximab.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifang; Deng, Hui; Mao, Mei

    2016-08-01

    Paraneoplastic pemphigus (PNP) is an autoimmune blistering disease associated with neoplasms. The disease is most commonly of lymphoproliferative origin and presents high mortality. We describe a patient with PNP and myasthenia gravis associated with inflammatory pseudotumor-like follicular dendritic cell sarcoma, as well as the response to rituximab. PMID:27525088

  13. Computed Tomography of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic disease often is asymptomatic until tissue damage and complications occur or until malignancies have reached advanced stages and have metastasized. Contrast-enhanced multidetector computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing, staging, and treatment planning for pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This article introduces the functional anatomy of the pancreas and common bile duct and the epidemiology, pathobiology, and computed tomography imaging of pancreatitis, calculi, and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26199449

  14. Formation of a pseudotumor in total hip arthroplasty using a tribological metal–polyethylene pair☆

    PubMed Central

    Fagotti, Lorenzo; Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros; Miyahara, Helder Souza; de Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano; Bernabé, Antônio Carlos; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2015-01-01

    The aim here was to report a case of a young adult patient who evolved with tumor formation in the left thigh, 14 years after revision surgery on hip arthroplasty. Davies in 2005 made the first description of this disease in patients undergoing metal-on-metal hip arthroplasty. Over the last decade, however, pseudotumors around metal-on-polyethylene surfaces have become more prevalent. Our patient presented with increased volume of the left thigh 8 years after hip arthroplasty revision surgery. Two years before the arising of the tumor in the thigh, a nodule in the inguinal region was investigated to rule out a malignant neoplastic process, but the results were inconclusive. The main preoperative complaints were pain, functional limitation and marked reduction in the range of motion of the left hip. Plain radiographs showed loosening of acetabular and femoral, and a large mass between the muscle planes was revealed through magnetic resonance imaging of the left thigh. The surgical procedure consisted of resection of the lesion and removal of the components through lateral approach. In respect of total hip arthroplasty, pseudotumors are benign neoplasms in which the bearing surface consists of metal-on-metal, but they can also occur in different tribological pairs, as presented in this case. PMID:27218090

  15. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis presenting as an orbital inflammatory pseudotumor: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a systemic inflammatory disease that often presents with necrosis, granuloma formation and vasculitis of small- to medium-sized vessels. Affected patients usually present with disease of the upper respiratory tract, lungs and kidneys, but this disease has been reported to involve almost any organ. We report the case of a patient with ocular manifestations of granulomatosis with polyangiitis after the remission of renal and auditory manifestations. Case presentation An 81-year-old Japanese woman had a four-year history of biopsy-proven antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-related glomerulonephritis that had been treated with oral prednisolone and was in serological remission. She had also recovered from a one-year history of complete hearing loss immediately following the steroid treatment for glomerulonephritis. She gradually experienced right eye visual disturbance and exophthalmos over a two-month period. Radiographic and histopathological findings revealed an orbital inflammatory pseudotumor. The administration of prednisolone completely restored her right eye visual acuity and eye movement after two weeks. Considering this case retrospectively, our patient had an orbital inflammatory pseudotumor caused by granulomatosis with polyangiitis including a medical history of reversible hearing loss, although her glomerulonephritis had remitted with an undetectable level of specific antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody. Conclusions In this patient, hearing loss and visual loss occurred at different times during the course of treatment of granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Clinicians should consider a differential diagnosis of granulomatosis with polyangiitis in patients with treatable hearing and visual loss. PMID:23617946

  16. Pancreatic panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahawish, Karim; Iyasere, Isoken T

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old Caucasian man presenting with polyarthritis, weight loss and multiple tender cutaneous nodules. Abnormal liver function tests prompted imaging of the liver which demonstrated liver metastases. Biopsy of the liver lesions confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. PMID:25150233

  17. Pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kleeff, Jorg; Korc, Murray; Apte, Minoti; La Vecchia, Carlo; Johnson, Colin D; Biankin, Andrew V; Neale, Rachel E; Tempero, Margaret; Tuveson, David A; Hruban, Ralph H; Neoptolemos, John P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a major cause of cancer-associated mortality, with a dismal overall prognosis that has remained virtually unchanged for many decades. Currently, prevention or early diagnosis at a curable stage is exceedingly difficult; patients rarely exhibit symptoms and tumours do not display sensitive and specific markers to aid detection. Pancreatic cancers also have few prevalent genetic mutations; the most commonly mutated genes are KRAS, CDKN2A (encoding p16), TP53 and SMAD4 - none of which are currently druggable. Indeed, therapeutic options are limited and progress in drug development is impeded because most pancreatic cancers are complex at the genomic, epigenetic and metabolic levels, with multiple activated pathways and crosstalk evident. Furthermore, the multilayered interplay between neoplastic and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment challenges medical treatment. Fewer than 20% of patients have surgically resectable disease; however, neoadjuvant therapies might shift tumours towards resectability. Although newer drug combinations and multimodal regimens in this setting, as well as the adjuvant setting, appreciably extend survival, ∼80% of patients will relapse after surgery and ultimately die of their disease. Thus, consideration of quality of life and overall survival is important. In this Primer, we summarize the current understanding of the salient pathophysiological, molecular, translational and clinical aspects of this disease. In addition, we present an outline of potential future directions for pancreatic cancer research and patient management. PMID:27158978

  18. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    MedlinePlus

    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 720x576 ... Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer ...

  19. Delayed relapse in pseudotumor cerebri due to new stenosis after transverse sinus stenting.

    PubMed

    Winters, Hugh Stephen; Parker, Geoff; Halmagyi, Gabor Michael; Mehta, Ankur; Atkins, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A patient presented with recurrent severe pseudotumor cerebri (PTC). Transverse sinus stenting is a very effective treatment option, however stenosis and intracranial hypertension can recur. In our patient, stenting initially resulted in resolution of papilloedema. However, after 5 years, a new stenosis developed which required further stenting. This case highlights the fact that, in patients with PTC who undergo transverse sinus stenting, a small proportion require repeat treatment due to formation of a new stenosis, usually adjacent to the existing stent. Patients with severe disease, such as ours, may be at higher risk of recurrence. Regardless of the severity, all patients who undergo stenting should have regular ocular follow-up. PMID:26351311

  20. Lumboatrial shunt in a patient with Crouzon syndrome complicated by pseudotumor cerebri.

    PubMed

    Sankey, Eric W; Khattab, Mohamed H; Elder, Benjamin D; Goodwin, C Rory; Rekate, Harold L; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2015-09-01

    A 25-year-old man with Crouzon syndrome complicated by pseudotumor cerebri and multiple shunt failures presented with progressive back and neck pain, intermittent headaches, and associated vomiting secondary to shunt infection. Due to his previous history of repeated failure of both ventriculoperitoneal and lumboperitoneal (LP) shunting procedures, the decision was made to place a lumboatrial (LA) shunt via an approach through the internal jugular vein. The procedure was uncomplicated and the man's symptoms were relieved. Despite significant improvement, the LA shunt limited his exercise tolerance, and as an avid runner and weight lifter, he requested reconversion back to an LP shunt. At a follow-up of 20months, he continued to do well both clinically and radiographically. This case report summarizes the successful placement and use of an LA shunt for the treatment of intracranial hypertension in the setting of Crouzon syndrome. PMID:26021731

  1. Pseudotumor cerebri in a child receiving peritoneal dialysis: recovery of vision after lumbo-pleural shunt

    PubMed Central

    Alrifai, Muhammad Talal; Al Naji, Foad; Alamir, Abdulrahman; Russell, Neville

    2011-01-01

    A 9-year-old boy with end-stage renal disease who was receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) presented with acute visual loss and was found to have papilledema. Neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis were normal. The lumbar puncture opening pressure was 290 mm of water so the diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) was entertained. Medical treatment was not an option because of renal insufficiency; neither was lumbo-peritoneal shunting, because of the peritoneal dialysis. After a lumbo-pleural shunt was placed, there was marked improvement in symptoms. The lumbo-pleural shunt is a reasonable option for treatment for PTC in patients on CAPD who require a CSF divergence procedure. PMID:21911996

  2. A Supraglottic Pseudotumor in an Immunocompromised Patient with Nephrotic Syndrome, Herpes Zoster, and a Cytomegalovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Saito, Osamu; Muto, Shigeaki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Several viral infections may occasionally induce supraglottic mass lesions, resulting in an obstructive airway emergency. We herein report one such case in a 63-year-old male immunocompromised patient with nephrotic syndrome due to membranous nephropathy who also had ophthalmic herpes zoster with a laryngeal mass, which required urgent intubation and mechanical ventilation. The patient was initially treated with acyclovir; however, because a serological analysis revealed a concurrent cytomegalovirus infection, we discontinued the administration of acyclovir and gave priority to the simultaneous treatment of the cytomegalovirus and varicella-zoster virus infections with ganciclovir. The clinical course was favorable, and he was weaned from the ventilator 10 days later when a serial imaging analysis revealed no signs of the supraglottic mass, leading us to conclude that these two viral infections could have additively or synergistically contributed to the development of the local pseudotumor. The diagnostic and therapeutic concerns arising in the current case are also discussed. PMID:27547043

  3. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the colon causing intussusception: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Li, Le-Ping; Wang, Jing; Lun, Zeng-Jun; Li, Wei; Yang, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a rare space-occupying lesion of unknown etiology that can mimic malignancy on clinic-radiological and pathological examination. We describe a rare case of ileocecal intussusception from clinically suspected malignancy of the right colon where the patient underwent right hemicolectomy. Histopathology of the resected specimen confirmed IPT of the colon. This patient was observed to have abnormally elevated total leukocyte count and platelets before and after surgery. In an adult with intussusception associated with an abdominal mass, the possibility of IPT of the colon should be considered. Considering the abnormally high total leukocyte and platelet counts and colonic IPT, it is necessary to prevent postoperative adverse effects due to these changes. Although IPT of the colon is usually a benign process, controversy regarding its management still exists. We consider hemicolectomy as a safe treatment approach for colonic IPT and review the existing literature. PMID:25593502

  4. Orbital Pseudotumor: Uncommon Initial Presentation of IgG4-Related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Teresa; Azêdo Montes, Ricardo; Andrade, Beatriz; Lanzieri, Pedro; Mocarzel, Luis

    2015-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) encompasses a group of fibroinflammatory conditions recognized in recent times. The main clinical features include variable degrees of tissue fibrosis, tumorlike expansions, perivascular lymphocytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells, and elevated serum IgG4. A case has been reported of an elderly patient with an unexplained unilateral exophthalmia; biopsy was performed and revealed lymphocytic infiltration, suggesting IgG4-RD. High serum levels of IgG4, in association with a good response to steroid therapy and to the exclusion of other diagnoses, confirmed the hypothesis of orbital pseudotumor by IgG4-RD. PMID:25838962

  5. Calcifying fibrous pseudotumor of the adrenal gland: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Zhu, Pingyu; Duan, Xi; Yang, Xuesong; Lu, Dongliang

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying fibrous pseudotumor (CFP) is a rare benign soft tissue lesion. We herein present an extremely rare case of CFP of the adrenal gland. A 32-year-old male patient presented to our hospital with a tumor-like lesion in the area of the left adrenal gland detected by ultrasound during a routine check-up several days prior. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging examination revealed a solitary, well-circumscribed mass, in close proximity to the medial arterial branch of the left adrenal gland. Histological examination revealed that the tumor consisted of sheets of varying amount of inflammatory cell infiltration; interstitial fibrosis and psammomatous calcifications were also observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third case of CFP occurring in the adrenal gland in the published literature. We herein report the findings of this case and review the two previously reported cases of CFP of the adrenal gland with valuable information.

  6. Hypophosphatasia presenting with pyridoxine-responsive seizures, hypercalcemia, and pseudotumor cerebri: case report.

    PubMed

    Demirbilek, Hüseyin; Alanay, Yasemin; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Topçu, Meral; Mornet, Etienne; Gönç, Nazlı; Özön, Alev; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2012-03-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by defective bone mineralization caused by a deficiency in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity due to mutations in the tissue-nonspecific ALP (TNALP) gene. The clinical expression of the disease is variable. Six forms of HPP are identified according to age at presentation and clinical features. Patients with the infantile form are normal at birth. First symptoms appear within the first 6 months of life. Along with skeletal findings, HPP patients may present with hypercalcemia, seizures, pseudotumor cerebri, and pulmonary insufficiency. Seizures in HPP are refractory to conventional antiepileptic drugs, but are responsive to pyridoxine. Herein, we report a case of HPP who presented with pyridoxine-responsive seizures in the early neonatal period and was found to have hypercalcemia, skeletal demineralization and increased intracranial pressure. PMID:22394703

  7. Hypophosphatasia Presenting with Pyridoxine-Responsive Seizures, Hypercalcemia, and Pseudotumor Cerebri: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Alanay, Yasemin; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Topçu, Meral; Mornet, Etienne; Özön, Alev; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2012-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is an inborn error of metabolism characterized by defective bone mineralization caused by a deficiency in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity due to mutations in the tissue-nonspecific ALP (TNALP) gene. The clinical expression of the disease is variable. Six forms of HPP are identified according to age at presentation and clinical features. Patients with the infantile form are normal at birth. First symptoms appear within the first 6 months of life. Along with skeletal findings, HPP patients may present with hypercalcemia, seizures, pseudotumor cerebri, and pulmonary insufficiency. Seizures in HPP are refractory to conventional antiepileptic drugs, but are responsive to pyridoxine. Herein, we report a case of HPP who presented with pyridoxine-responsive seizures in the early neonatal period and was found to have hypercalcemia, skeletal demineralization and increased intracranial pressure. Key words: Hypophosphatasia, pyridoxine-responsive seizures, bisphosphonates, alkaline phosphatase, bone resorption, hypercalcemia Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22394703

  8. Highly Vascularized Primarily Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Omentum in an Adult Male: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chehade, Hiba Hassan El Hage; Zbibo, Riad Hassan; Hussein, Bassem Mahmoud Abou; Abtar, Houssam Khodor

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 38 Final Diagnosis: Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor Symptoms: Abdominal pain • anorexia • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Operation Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Inflammatory pseudotumors can affect any organ, whereas primary omental tumors are very rare. A few cases have been reported in the literature, all affecting adult patients. They are usually difficult to diagnose preoperatively and pathology remains the criterion standard for diagnosis. Surgical resection is considered the first-line treatment in limited disease, whereas recurrent or metastatic disease is treated by re-excision. There is no role for chemo- or radio-therapy in limited disease. Here, we present a rare case of omental myofibroblastic tumor in an adult male. Case Report: A 38-year-old healthy man presented to our clinic complaining of lower abdominal pain associated with anorexia and low-grade fever, and he also reported weight loss. His initial hemoglobin was 9.7 g/dl. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an enhancing solid mass in the lower abdomen, with close proximity to the appendix and the urinary bladder. The patient was treated successfully with laparotomy and excision of the tumor. Histopathology of the mass revealed spindle cells of vague fascicular pattern. Further immunohistochemical staining showed presence of reaction for CD68, CD34, and ALK. No omental infiltration was noted. No adjuvant treatment was applied and the patient was free of disease after 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: Omental pseudotumors are a rare pathology. They are usually slowly- growing, circumscribed tumors with a low malignant potential. They have a predilection for children. The overall mortality is reported to be 5–7% in cases with multiple recurrences. PMID:26867942

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  10. Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangyu; Sun, Tao; Kong, Fanyang; Du, Yiqi; Li, Zhaoshen

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer (PC) is one of the most lethal diseases with an incidence rate almost equal to the rate of mortality. Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a common chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology that affects the pancreas. Epidemiological studies have identified CP to be a major risk factor for PC. Summary A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking CP and PC has identified several common pathways that provide targets for future interventions. This article reviews those components in the CP-PC connection, including the role of macrophages, the maintenance of genome stability, cytokines, and other nodal factors such as nuclear factor kappa B, COX-2 and reactive oxygen species. Key Message The molecular mechanisms that underlie CP and PC provide novel targets for future therapies for PC. Practical Implications The stromal-desmoplastic reaction plays an important role in initiating and sustaining chronic inflammation and tumor progression. Recently, two targeted anti-tumor agents, erlotinib and nab-paclitaxel, have shown promising therapeutic efficacy. Notably, both these agents target components (EGFR and SPARC) within the inflammatory stroma surrounding malignant cells, underscoring the importance of inflammation in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Identifying the common pathways linking CP and PC may help uncover additional novel targets for future therapies. PMID:26674754

  11. Clinicoradiological appraisal of ‘paraduodenal pancreatitis’: Pancreatitis outside the pancreas!

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Ankur; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Patidar, Yashwant; Thapar, Shalini; Arora, Asit; Bhatia, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Paraduodenal pancreatitis (PP) is a unique form of focal chronic pancreatitis that selectively involves the duodenum and aberrant pancreatic tissue located near the minor papilla (beyond the pancreas proper). The pseudotumoral nature of the disease often generates considerable clinical quandary and patient apprehension, and therefore merits a better understanding. The present study appraises the clinicoradiological manifestations of PP in 33 patients. Materials and Methods: Clinical, laboratory, and radiological manifestations of 33 patients of PP treated in gastroenterology/hepatology and hepato-pancreatico-biliary surgery units during June 2010-August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: All patients were young to middle-aged men (100%) with history of alcohol abuse (93.9%) and/or smoking (42.4%), who presented either with acute or gradually worsening abdominal pain (90.9%). Pancreatic enzymes and serum tumor markers remained normal or were mildly/transiently elevated. Cystic variant was detected in 57.6% (solid in 42.4%); the disease remained confined to the groove/duodenum (pure form) in 45.4%. Medial duodenal wall thickening with increased enhancement was seen in 87.87 and 81.81%, respectively, and duodenal/paraduodenal cysts were seen in 78.78%. Pancreatic calcifications and biliary stricture were seen 27.3% patients. Peripancreatic arteries were neither infiltrated nor encased. Conclusion: PP has a discrete predilection for middle-aged men with history of longstanding alcohol abuse and/or smoking. Distinguishing imaging findings include thickening of the pancreatic side of duodenum exhibiting increased enhancement with intramural/paraduodenal cysts. This may be accompanied by plate-like scar tissue in the groove region, which may simulate groove pancreatic carcinoma. However, as opposed to carcinoma, the peripancreatic arteries are neither infiltrated nor encased, rather are medially displaced. PMID:26288527

  12. Radiographic and computed tomographic demonstration of pseudotumor cerebri due to rapid weight gain in a child with pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Berdon, W.E.; Barker, D.H.; Barash, F.S.

    1982-06-01

    Rapid weight gain in a malnourished child can be associated with suture diastasis in the pattern of pseudotumor cerebri; this has been previously reported in deprivational dwarfism and cystic fibrosis. In a child with pelvic rhabdomyosarcoma, skull radiographs and cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans were available prior to a period of rapid weight gain induced by hyperalimentation. Suture diastasis developed and repeat CT scans showed this to be accompanied by smaller ventricles.

  13. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with pancreatic carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guannan; Cao, Zhe; Yang, Gang; Wu, Wenming; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication of pancreatic cancer, most often accompanying rare acinar cell carcinoma. We herein report a case of pancreatic panniculitis that was associated with pancreatic mucinous adenocarcinoma. Patient information: A 57-year-old male was referred to our hospital for weight loss. A physical examination revealed subcutaneous nodules on his lower extremities. The blood test showed abnormal increases in amylase, lipase, and carbohydrate antigen 19–9 levels. A computed tomography scan detected a hypodense 2 × 1.5 cm solid mass with an unclear margin in the head of the pancreas. The biopsy of subcutaneous nodules on the lower extremities was conducted and revealed lobular panniculitis. Pancreatic cancer and pancreatic panniculitis were strongly suspected. After the administration of octreotide acetate and the Whipple procedure, the serous amylase and lipase levels returned to normal, and the pancreatic panniculitis had almost resolved by 4 weeks later. Conclusion: Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare complication of pancreatic cancer. However, in the presence of a pancreatic mass, as in this case, clinicians should be aware that panniculitis may be the sentinel of pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:27495045

  14. Orbital pseudotumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome (IOIS) Images Skull anatomy References Goodlick TA, Kay MD, Glaser JS, Tse DT, Chang WJ. Orbital disease and neuro-ophthalmology. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane’s ...

  15. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. PMID:26526433

  16. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Sala; Nikolopoulos, Ioannis; Kerwat, Rajab

    2016-01-01

    Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions. PMID:27274876

  17. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.R.; Millar, A.M.; Taylor, T.V.

    1982-05-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with /sup 86/RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory.

  18. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    PubMed Central

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  19. Inflammatory pseudotumor containing necrotizing granulomatous lesions of kidney: a hitherto undescribed entity.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Herein reported is a case of inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of kidney. It is not described in WHO, AFIP, and other books. A review of the literature revealed about 35 cases. A 76-year-old man underwent nephrectomy under clinical diagnosis of renal pelvic carcinoma. Grossly, a solid tumor was seen in renal parenchyma. Microscopically, it was composed of spindle cell tissue with inflammation and many necrotizing granulomas. Epithelioid histiocytes were abundant but giant cells were few. Lymphocytes and plasma cells were also seen. The features suggested tuberculosis (TB), but Ziehl-Neelsen stains and PCR revealed no TB bacillus. Immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor spindle cells were positive for vimentin, CD68, CD45, and Ki-67 (labeling = 18%), α-smooth muscle antigen, and NSE. Focal staining of KIT (mast cells), S100 protein (Langerhans cells), and CD10 (spindle cells) was present. IgG4 was negative. The tumor spindle cells were negative for other antigens examined. PMID:25379319

  20. Pseudotumor associated with cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty: an unusual presentation as a granulomatous thigh mass.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tomohiro; Mineta, Kazuaki; Takasago, Tomoya; Hamada, Daisuke; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-10-01

    Although polyethylene wear-induced osteolysis is a common complication of hip arthroplasty, extensile osteolysis developing into a large granulomatous thigh mass at a site distant from the joint is rare. We report a case of a thigh pseudotumor 25 years after cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty, in which x-rays revealed a radiolucent line around the stem at the proximal site only, not at the diaphysis of the femur. We initially suspected a real tumor because it had a unique appearance, as if the mass resorbed the posterior cortex of the femur, and it was located at a site distant from the proximal osteolytic lesions. We clearly showed the existence of a connection between the thigh mass and the joint space by performing intra-articular injection of contrast medium with continuous pressure. It seemed that polyethylene wear particles were transported distally along the stem-cement interface by fluid pressure, and an osteolytic reaction against polyethylene wear particles had occurred at the posterior middle third of the stem where the cement mantle was nonuniform and polyethylene particles first came into contact with the bone. Our findings suggest that nonuniform cemented prosthesis with osteolysis, even if it is low grade in a limited area, carries the risk of extensile osteolysis with asymptomatic development of an extra-articular granulomatous mass. PMID:26096584

  1. Cryosurgery for pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kecheng; Yang, Daming

    2013-01-01

    The procedure of pancreatic cryosurgery is performed with intraoperative or percutaneous approaches. Based on current data and our initial experience, cryoablation appears to be a feasible, potentially safe and promising option in patients with locally advanced and unresectable pancreatic cancer. It is suggested that there are almost no known contraindications to the use of cryosurgery for pancreatic cancer. For most patients with pancreatic cancer, cryosurgery can substitute conventional surgery. PMID:25083453

  2. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Frank U.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of the body's immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli—like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells—and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. HP often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of HP patients to develop pancreatic cancer. PMID:24600409

  3. Biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Poston, G J; Gillespie, J; Guillou, P J

    1991-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fifth leading cause of death from malignant disease in Western society. Apart from the fortunate few patients who present with a resectable small pancreatic adenocarcinoma, conventional treatment offers no hope of cure and has little palliative value. Over the past two decades major steps have been made in our understanding of the biology of pancreatic growth and neoplasia. This review sets out to explore these advances, firstly in the regulation of normal pancreatic growth, and secondly the mechanism which may be involved in malignant change of the exocrine pancreas. From an understanding of this new biology, new treatment strategies may be possible for patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:1855689

  4. Use of an Intrathecal Catheter for Analgesia, Anesthesia, and Therapy in an Obstetric Patient with Pseudotumor Cerebri Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gragasin, Ferrante S; Chiarella, Angelo B

    2016-03-15

    Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS) is a rare disorder chiefly observed in obese women of childbearing age. We describe a case of a parturient with PTCS managed successfully with an intrathecal catheter, after inadvertent dural puncture, for labor analgesia, surgical anesthesia, and treatment of headache because of intracranial hypertension during the peripartum period. Prolonged placement of the intrathecal catheter (i.e., >24 hours) may have contributed to the absence of postdural puncture headache symptoms and an uneventful postpartum period. Intrathecal catheter placement may therefore be a viable option in patients with PTCS should inadvertent dural puncture occur. PMID:26825990

  5. [Pulmonar pseudotumor in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Pulmonary cancer and/or GPA? Diagnostic implications of pulmonary nodules].

    PubMed

    Horta-Baas, Gabriel; Meza-Zempoaltecatl, Esteban; Pérez-Cristóbal, Mario; Barile-Fabris, Leonor Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), formerly known as Wegener's granulomatosis, is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis, which affects small and medium sized blood vessels and is often associated with cytoplasmic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). Inflammatory pseudotumor is a rare condition characterized by the appearance of a mass lesion that mimics a malignant tumor both clinically and on imaging studies, but that is thought to have an inflammatory/reactive pathogenesis. We report a patient with a GPA which was originally diagnosed as malignancy. PMID:27595257

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2016-01-01

    Although relatively rare, pancreatic tumors are highly lethal [1]. In the United States, an estimated 48,960 individuals will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 40,560 will die from this disease in 2015 [1]. Globally, 337,872 new pancreatic cancer cases and 330,391 deaths were estimated in 2012 [2]. In contrast to most other cancers, mortality rates for pancreatic cancer are not improving; in the US, it is predicted to become the second leading cause of cancer related deaths by 2030 [3, 4]. The vast majority of tumors arise in the exocrine pancreas, with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) accounting for approximately 95% of tumors. Tumors arising in the endocrine pancreas (pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors) represent less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors [5]. Smoking, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), obesity and pancreatitis are the most consistent epidemiological risk factors for pancreatic cancer [5]. Family history is also a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer with odds ratios (OR) ranging from 1.7-2.3 for first-degree relatives in most studies, indicating that shared genetic factors may play a role in the etiology of this disease [6-9]. This review summarizes the current knowledge of germline pancreatic cancer risk variants with a special emphasis on common susceptibility alleles identified through Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). PMID:26929738

  7. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and inflammation have been suggested to be the underlying mechanisms contributing to development of diabetes-associated pancreatic cancer. Signaling pathways that regulate the metabolic process also play important roles in cell proliferation and tumor growth. Use of the antidiabetic drug metformin has been associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetics and recognized as an antitumor agent with the potential to prevent and treat this cancer. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes may indicate subclinical pancreatic cancer, and patients with new-onset diabetes may constitute a population in whom pancreatic cancer can be detected early. Biomarkers that help define high-risk individuals for clinical screening for pancreatic cancer are urgently needed. Why pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and how diabetes affects the clinical outcome of pancreatic cancer have yet to be fully determined. Improved understanding of the pathological mechanisms shared by diabetes and pancreatic cancer would be the key to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies for this cancer. PMID:22162232

  8. Diagnostic value of the optic nerve sheath diameter in pseudotumor cerebri.

    PubMed

    Bekerman, Inessa; Sigal, Tal; Kimiagar, Itzhak; Almer, Zina Evy; Vaiman, Michael

    2016-08-01

    If persistent severe headache remains the only complaint of a patient, then the diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) can be delayed because in such cases practitioners are hesitant to immediately apply invasive intracranial pressure (ICP) measurement. Our purpose was to apply the technique of measuring diameters of the optic nerve sheath (ONSD) as a diagnostic tool in cases of PTC. Our aim was to provide practitioners with an additional sign to speed up their decision making about implementation of the lumbar puncture. In a retrospective study, CT scan data of 35 consecutive adult patients with PTC were collected and analyzed. ONSD were measured at the point where the ophthalmic artery crosses the optic nerve (anatomical landmark). The correlation analysis was performed with sex, age, and neuro-ophthalmological findings. We found that the ONSD was enlarged in 94.3% of patients with PTC. The enlarged ONSD were 6.2±1.2mm for the right and 6.3±0.9mm for the left (cut-off value >5.5mm). The enlargement was bilateral, and no correlation with age or sex was found (p=0.67 and p=0.76, respectively). Presence of papilledema was detected in 91.4% of patients (32/35) presenting as a slightly less valuable diagnostic sign compared with ONSD. We conclude that in the majority of cases of PTC the ONSD is significantly enlarged, indicating elevated ICP even if CT scans are negative. Implementing this ONSD method as a diagnostic tool in cases of suspected PTC may help in early accurate diagnosis, avoiding misdiagnosis, and providing appropriate early treatment. PMID:27168453

  9. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the central nervous system and its relationship to inflammatory pseudotumor.

    PubMed

    Swain, Rebecca S; Tihan, Tarik; Horvai, Andrew E; Di Vizio, Dolores; Loda, Massimo; Burger, Peter C; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Kim, Grace E

    2008-03-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a distinctive spindle cell lesion and occurs primarily in soft tissue. Recent evidence suggests a neoplastic nature, although historically, both neoplastic and nonneoplastic processes were combined in this category. Originally described as a nonneoplastic process, the term inflammatory pseudotumor (IP) has been used synonymously with IMT. IMTs have been linked to ALK gene (2p23) rearrangements, and some have suggested an association with the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). IMT in the central nervous system (CNS) is rare, its characteristics are poorly defined, and its relation to similar tumors at other sites is unclear. To better characterize IMT within the CNS, we studied clinicopathologic features of 6 IMTs and compared them with 18 nonneoplastic lesions originally classified as IP. The IMT group consisted of 2 male and 4 female patients with a median age of 29 years. Of the six IMTs, 5 occurred within the cerebral hemispheres, and one was in the posterior fossa. All tumors were composed of neoplastic spindle cells and a variable amount of inflammatory infiltrate. Eighteen IPs included in this study consisted of predominantly inflammatory masses occasionally seen in the setting of systemic diseases. Only 1 IMT and none of the IPs recurred during the follow-up period. Four IMTs had either ALK protein overexpression or 2p23 rearrangement, and 1 case demonstrated both. None of the IPs were positive for ALK. Neither IMT nor IP cases demonstrated HHV-8 expression. We suggest that IMT in the CNS is distinct from the nonneoplastic IP, and distinguishing IMT from nonneoplastic lesions should enable better decisions for patient management. PMID:18261625

  10. Orbital Pseudotumor as a Rare Extrahepatic Manifestation of Hepatitis C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Epprecht, Jana; Mertens, Joachim; Biedermann, Luc; Scharl, Michael; Haralambieva, Eugenia; Lutterotti, Andreas; Weber, Konrad P.; Müllhaupt, Beat; Chaloupka, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C is frequently accompanied by immune-related extrahepatic manifestations affecting the skin, kidneys, central and peripheral nervous system and exocrine glands. We present the case of a 40-year-old man with left-sided ptosis, exophthalmos and headache. MRI demonstrated left-sided orbital pseudotumor with lacrimal and retro-orbital contrast enhancement extending to the cavernous sinus and the vestibulocochlear nerve. Immunological tests of serum and cerebrospinal fluid identified hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a potential causative agent but did not indicate any additional infectious, malignant or immunological disorder. Hepatological evaluation revealed no signs of advanced liver disease. After initial spontaneous improvement, the patient subsequently developed vestibulocochlear failure with gait disorder, tinnitus and transient left-parietal sensory loss. Lacrimal biopsy demonstrated lymphocytic infiltrate, prompting steroid treatment. After initial improvement, steroids could not be tapered below 40 mg daily for several months due to recurrent symptoms. Twelve months after the initial presentation, the patient's chronic HCV infection was successfully treated with sofosbuvir, simeprevir and ribavirin and he remains now free of symptoms without steroids. In patients with chronic hepatitis C, lymphocytic infiltrate of the salivary and lacrimal glands is a frequent phenomenon. However, the extent of the lymphocytic infiltrate beyond the lacrimal gland to the tip of the orbit, cavernous sinus and vestibulocochlear nerve as in our patient is highly unusual. For all symptomatic extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C infection, treatment of HCV as the underlying immune stimulus is recommended, and it helped to control the symptoms in our patient. In addition, long-term follow-up for recurrent lymphocyte infiltrate and development of lymphoma is warranted. PMID:27403111

  11. Pulmonary inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor and IgG4-related inflammatory pseudotumor: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Priyanka; Bal, Amanjit; Das, Ashim; Singh, Navneet; Singh, Harkant

    2013-12-01

    IgG4-related inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) share morphological features like a prominent fibroblastic/myofibroblastic proliferation and the presence of inflammatory cells. Since IPT is managed conservatively and IMT is treated by surgical excision, it is important to differentiate these two lesions. The aim of this study is to highlight morphological and immunohistochemical features that distinguish IPT and IMT. Clinicopathological characteristics of cases diagnosed as pulmonary IPT or IMT from 1997 to 2013 were reviewed. The histological features were studied on hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. Immunohistochemistry was done for IgG, IgG4, ALK-1, SMA, desmin, and CD34 for classification into IPT and IMT. Of the ten patients, seven were male and the age ranged from 4 to 58 years. The tumor size ranged from 1.5 to 4.0 cm in diameter. Histologically, proliferation of bland-looking spindle cells along with fibrosis and an inflammatory infiltrate comprising of lymphocytes and plasma cells were the common morphological features of both lesions. The spindle cell proliferation was more marked in IMT whereas lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate was more prominent in IPT. Obstructive phlebitis was observed only in cases of IPT. IgG4 expression was noted in IPT, and the number of IgG4-positive plasma cells and the ratio of IgG4+/IgG+ plasma cells were significantly lower in IMT than in IgG4-related IPT. Expression of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) was observed only in IMT, but not in IgG4-related IPT. The proportion of proliferating spindle cells, lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, obstructive phlebitis, IgG4+ plasma cells and the ratio of IgG4+/IgG+ plasma cells, and ALK expression are helpful in differentiating these morphologically similar but biologically different lesions, which require different treatment modalities. PMID:24100523

  12. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Goundan, Poorani; Junqueira, Ana; Kelleher-Yassen, Donna; Steenkamp, Devin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the relevant literature related to the epidemiology, pathophysiology, natural history, clinical features and treatment of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD). We review the English-language literature on this topic published between 1956 and 2014. FCPD is a form of diabetes usually associated with chronic calcific pancreatitis. It has been predominantly, though not exclusively, described in lean, young adults living in tropical developing countries. Historically linked to malnutrition, the etiology of this phenotype has not been clearly elucidated, nor has there been a clear consensus on specific diagnostic criteria or clinical features. Affected individuals usually present with a long-standing history of abdominal pain, which may begin as early as childhood. Progressive pancreatic endocrine and exocrine dysfunction, consistent with chronic pancreatitis is expected. Common causes of chronic pancreatitis, such as alcohol abuse, are usually absent. Typical radiographic and pathological features include coarse pancreatic calcifications, main pancreatic duct dilation, pancreatic fibrosis and atrophy. Progressive microvascular complications are common, but diabetic ketoacidosis is remarkably unusual. Pancreatic carcinoma is an infrequently described long term complication. FCPD is an uncommon diabetes phenotype characterized by early onset non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia, insulin deficiency and a striking resistance to ketosis. PMID:26472503

  13. Orbital pseudotumor can be a localized form of granulomatosis with polyangiitis as revealed by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, James T; Choi, Dongseok; Wilson, David J; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Harrington, Christina A; Sibley, Cailin H; Dailey, Roger A; Ng, John D; Steele, Eric A; Czyz, Craig N; Foster, Jill A; Tse, David; Alabiad, Chris; Dubovy, Sander; Parekh, Prashant K; Harris, Gerald J; Kazim, Michael; Patel, Payal J; White, Valerie A; Dolman, Peter J; Korn, Bobby S; Kikkawa, Don O; Edward, Deepak P; Alkatan, Hind M; al-Hussain, Hailah; Yeatts, R Patrick; Selva, Dinesh; Stauffer, Patrick; Planck, Stephen R

    2015-10-01

    Biopsies and ANCA testing for limited forms of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) are frequently non-diagnostic. We characterized gene expression in GPA and other causes of orbital inflammation. We tested the hypothesis that a sub-set of patients with non-specific orbital inflammation (NSOI, also known as pseudotumor) mimics a limited form of GPA. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded orbital biopsies were obtained from controls (n=20) and patients with GPA (n=6), NSOI (n=25), sarcoidosis (n=7), or thyroid eye disease (TED) (n=20) and were divided into discovery and validation sets. Transcripts in the tissues were quantified using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. Distinct gene expression profiles for controls and subjects with GPA, TED, or sarcoidosis were evident by principal coordinate analyses. Compared with healthy controls, 285 probe sets had elevated signals in subjects with GPA and 1472 were decreased (>1.5-fold difference, false discovery rate adjusted p<0.05). The immunoglobulin family of genes had the most dramatic increase in expression. Although gene expression in GPA could be readily distinguished from gene expression in TED, sarcoidosis, or controls, a comparison of gene expression in GPA versus NSOI found no statistically significant differences. Thus, forms of orbital inflammation can be distinguished based on gene expression. NSOI/pseudotumor is heterogeneous but often may be an unrecognized, localized form of GPA. PMID:26163757

  14. Hepatic inflammatory pseudotumor presenting in an 8-year-old boy: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussaini, Hussa; Azouz, Haya; Abu-Zaid, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic inflammatory pseudotumors are uncommon benign lesions. Accurately diagnosing hepatic inflammatory pseudotumor can be very challenging because the clinical presentation and radiological appearances are nonspecific and cannot be certainly distinguished from malignant neoplastic processes. Herein, we present a case of hepatic IPT in an 8-year-old boy who presented to clinic with a 3-mo history of a tender hepatic mass, fever of unknown origin, and 9-kg weight loss. The physical examination was notable for tender hepatomegaly. Laboratory investigations were notable for a normal hepatic profile and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. A T2-attenuated magnetic resonance imaging scan of the abdomen showed a 4.7 cm × 4.7 cm × 6.6 cm, contrast-enhancing, hyper-intense, well-defined lesion involving the right hepatic lobe. In view of the unremitting symptoms, tender hepatomegaly, thrombosed right hepatic vein, nonspecific radiological findings, and high suspicion of a deep-seated underlying infection or malignancy, a right hepatic lobectomy was recommended. Microscopically, the hepatic lesion exhibited a mixture of inflammatory cells (histiocytes, plasma cells, mature lymphocytes, and occasional multinucleated giant cells) in a background of dense fibrous tissue. Immunohistochemically, the cells stained negative for SMA, ALK-1, CD-21 and CD-23, diffusely positive for CD-68, and focally positive for IgG4. The final histopathological diagnosis was consistent with hepatic IPT. At the postoperative 4-mo follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic without radiological evidence of recurrence. PMID:26229415

  15. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer ... in pancreatic cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized ...

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  17. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  18. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Goess, Ruediger; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Friess, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an often-underestimated complication following pancreatic surgery. After recent advances in managing acute postoperative complications the focus of current research is now shifting onto the long-term complications following pancreatectomy. Weight loss and steatorrhea as typical symptoms have high influence on the quality of life in the postoperative period. Malnutrition-related symptoms occur late and are often misinterpreted. Enzyme replacement therapy is more or less the only possible treatment option, even though not many controlled trials have been performed in this field. In this review we summarized the pathophysiology, diagnosis, risk factors and treatment options of exocrine insufficiency and focus mainly on patients with pancreaticoduodenectomy (classical Whipple), pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (ppWhipple) or distal pancreatectomy. Incidence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after surgery depends mainly on the initial diagnosis, the preoperative exocrine function and is associated with the extent of parenchyma resection. Diagnosing exocrine failure after surgery can be difficult and specific function tests are commonly not routinely performed. Starting and monitoring of enzyme replacement treatment is more based on clinical symptoms, than on objective markers. To improve the performance status of postsurgical patients it is important to consider pancreatic exocrine function as one aspect of quality of life. Further clinical trials should be initiated to gain more specific knowledge about the influence of the different pancreatic resections on pancreatic exocrine function to initialize proper treatment even before major clinical symptoms occur. PMID:27058237

  19. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: Outstanding problems

    PubMed Central

    Zakharova, Olga P; Karmazanovsky, Grigory G; Egorov, Viacheslav I

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death and is one of the most aggressive malignant tumors with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 4%. Surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment but is only possible for 15%-20% of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. About 40% of patients have locally advanced nonresectable disease. In the past, determination of pancreatic cancer resectability was made at surgical exploration. The development of modern imaging techniques has allowed preoperative staging of patients. Institutions disagree about the criteria used to classify patients. Vascular invasion in pancreatic cancers plays a very important role in determining treatment and prognosis. There is no evidence-based consensus on the optimal preoperative imaging assessment of patients with suspected pancreatic cancer and a unified definition of borderline resectable pancreatic cancer is also lacking. Thus, there is much room for improvement in all aspects of treatment for pancreatic cancer. Multi-detector computed tomography has been widely accepted as the imaging technique of choice for diagnosing and staging pancreatic cancer. With improved surgical techniques and advanced perioperative management, vascular resection and reconstruction are performed more frequently; patients thought once to be unresectable are undergoing radical surgery. However, when attempting heroic surgery, a realistic approach concerning the patient’s age and health status, probability of recovery after surgery, perioperative morbidity and mortality and life quality after tumor resection is necessary. PMID:22655124

  20. Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?

    PubMed

    Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis-as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery. PMID:24132440

  1. Pancreatic Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Joji Kurian; Kim, Min-Sik; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Raju, Rajesh; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Khan, Aafaque Ahmad; Sakamuri, Sruthi; Tankala, Shantal Gupta; Singal, Mukul; Nair, Bipin; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Chatterjee, Aditi; Prasad, T S Keshava; Maitra, Anirban; Gowda, Harsha; Hruban, Ralph H; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. The etiology of pancreatic cancer is heterogeneous with a wide range of alterations that have already been reported at the level of the genome, transcriptome, and proteome. The past decade has witnessed a large number of experimental studies using high-throughput technology platforms to identify genes whose expression at the transcript or protein levels is altered in pancreatic cancer. Based on expression studies, a number of molecules have also been proposed as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of this deadly cancer. Currently, there are no repositories which provide an integrative view of multiple Omics data sets from published research on pancreatic cancer. Here, we describe the development of a web-based resource, Pancreatic Cancer Database (http://www.pancreaticcancerdatabase.org), as a unified platform for pancreatic cancer research. PCD contains manually curated information pertaining to quantitative alterations in miRNA, mRNA, and proteins obtained from small-scale as well as high-throughput studies of pancreatic cancer tissues and cell lines. We believe that PCD will serve as an integrative platform for scientific community involved in pancreatic cancer research. PMID:24839966

  2. Post-ERCP pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Arata, Shinju; Takada, Tadahiro; Hirata, Koichi; Yoshida, Masahiro; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Hirota, Morihisa; Yokoe, Masamichi; Hirota, Masahiko; Kiriyama, Seiki; Sekimoto, Miho; Amano, Hodaka; Wada, Keita; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Gabata, Toshifumi; Takeda, Kazunori; Kataoka, Keisho; Ito, Tetsuhide; Tanaka, Masao

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatitis remains the most common severe complication of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Detailed information about the findings of previous studies concerning post-ERCP pancreatitis has not been utilized sufficiently. The purpose of the present article was to present guidelines for the diagnostic criteria of post-ERCP pancreatitis, and its incidence, risk factors, and prophylactic procedures that are supported by evidence. To achieve this purpose, a critical examination was made of the articles on post-ERCP pancreatitis, based on the data obtained by research studies published up to 2009. At present, there are no standardized diagnostic criteria for post-ERCP pancreatitis. It is appropriate that post-ERCP pancreatitis is defined as acute pancreatitis that has developed following ERCP, and its diagnosis and severity assessment should be made according to the diagnostic criteria and severity assessment of the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The incidence of acute pancreatitis associated with diagnostic and therapeutic ERCP is 0.4-1.5 and 1.6-5.4%, respectively. Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation is associated with a high risk of acute pancreatitis compared with endoscopic sphincterotomy. It was made clear that important risk factors include dysfunction of the Oddi sphincter, being of the female sex, past history of post-ERCP pancreatitis, and performance of pancreaticography. Temporary prophylactic placement of pancreatic stents in the high-risk group is useful for the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis [odds ratio (OR) 3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-6.4, number needed to treat (NNT) 10]. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is associated with a reduction in the development of post-ERCP pancreatitis (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.32-0.65). Single rectal administration of NSAIDs is useful for the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis [relative risk (RR) 0.36, 95% CI 0.22-0.60, NNT 15] and decreases the

  3. Pseudotumoral hemicerebellitis as a mimicker of Lhermitte-Duclos disease in children: does neuroimaging help to differentiate them?

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Steinlin, Maja; Toelle, Sandra P; Beck, Jürgen; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    The clinical presentation and neuroimaging findings of children with pseudotumoral hemicerebellitis (PTHC) and Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD) may be very similar. The differentiation between these entities, however, is important because their management and prognosis are different. We report on three children with PTHC. For all three children, in the acute situation, the differentiation between PTHC and LDD was challenging. A review of the literature shows that a detailed evaluation of conventional and neuroimaging data may help to differentiate between these two entities. A striated folial pattern, brainstem involvement, and prominent veins surrounding the thickened cerebellar foliae on susceptibility weighted imaging favor LDD, while post-contrast enhancement and an increased choline peak on (1)H-Magnetic resonance spectroscopy suggest PTHC. PMID:26649682

  4. Rare case of an abdominal mass: Reactive nodular fibrous pseudotumor of the stomach encroaching on multiple abdominal organs

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xiao-Jiang; Chen, Chuang-Qi; Li, Yin; Ma, Jin-Ping; Li, Zhi-Xun; Cai, Shi-Rong; He, Yu-Long

    2014-01-01

    Reactive nodular fibrous pseudotumor (RNFP), which presents abdominal clinical manifestations and malignant radiographic results, usually requires radical resection as the treatment. However, RNFP has been recently described as an extremely rare benign post-inflammatory lesion of a reactive nature, which typically arises from the sub-serosal layer of the digestive tract or within the surrounding mesentery in association with local injury or inflammation. In addition, a postoperative diagnosis is necessary to differentiate it from the other reactive processes of the abdomen. Furthermore, RNFP shows a good prognosis without signs of recurrence or metastasis. A 16-year-old girl presented with a 3-mo history of epigastric discomfort, and auxiliary examinations suggested a malignant tumor originating from the stomach; postoperative pathology confirmed RNFP, and after a 2-year follow-up period, the patient did not display any signs of recurrence. This case highlights the importance of preoperative pathology for surgeons who may encounter similar cases. PMID:24749124

  5. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder: A case series among more than 2,000 urinary bladder tumor cases.

    PubMed

    Elawdy, Mohamed M; Harraz, Ahmed M; Zahran, Mohamed H; Abdelraheem; El-Baz, Mahmoud; El-Hefnawy, Ahmed S

    2016-01-01

    "Inflammatory pseudotumor" (IPT) has infrequently been reported in the medical journals. A retrospective analysis was conducted among more than 2,000 bladder tumor cases from January 1999 to December 2012 looking for patients with IPT in the final diagnosis. Six patients were found with median tumor size of 3.5 cm (range: 3-8 cm); computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging was used to diagnose the tumor. All patients had complete resection of the tumors. On a median follow-up of 6 years (range: 2-10 years), no recurrences for IPT have been observed in all patients. We concluded that IPT is a rare disease of the urinary bladder and should be regarded with a high degree of suspicion. Although an extensive workup may be needed for definite diagnosis, it is worth to avoid unnecessary chemoradiotherapy or radical surgeries. PMID:26834412

  6. Association of Clinical Response and Long-term Outcome Among Patients With Biopsied Orbital Pseudotumor Receiving Modern Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Prabhu, Roshan S.; Kandula, Shravan; Liebman, Lang; Wojno, Ted H.; Hayek, Brent; Hall, William A.; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Crocker, Ian

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate institutional outcomes for patients treated with modern radiation therapy (RT) for biopsied orbital pseudotumor (OP). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients (26 affected orbits) with OP were treated with RT between January 2002 and December 2011. All patients underwent biopsy with histopathologic exclusion of other disease processes. Sixteen patients (80%) were treated with intensity modulated RT, 3 (15%) with opposed lateral beams, and 1 (5%) with electrons. Median RT dose was 27 Gy (range 25.2-30.6 Gy). Response to RT was evaluated at 4 months post-RT. Partial response (PR) was defined as improvement in orbital symptoms without an increase in steroid dose. Complete response (CR) 1 and CR 2 were defined as complete resolution of orbital symptoms with reduction in steroid dose (CR 1) or complete tapering of steroids (CR 2). The median follow-up period was 18.6 months (range 4-81.6 months). Results: Seventeen patients (85%) demonstrated response to RT, with 7 (35%), 1 (5%), and 9 (45%) achieving a PR, CR 1, and CR 2, respectively. Of the 17 patients who had ≥PR at 4 months post-RT, 6 (35%) experienced recurrence of symptoms. Age (>46 years vs ≤46 years, P=.04) and clinical response to RT (CR 2 vs CR 1/PR, P=.05) were significantly associated with pseudotumor recurrence. Long-term complications were seen in 7 patients (35%), including 4 with cataract formation, 1 with chronic dry eye, 1 with enophthalmos, and 1 with keratopathy. Conclusions: RT is an effective treatment for improving symptoms and tapering steroids in patients with a biopsy supported diagnosis of OP. Older age and complete response to RT were associated with a significantly reduced probability of symptom recurrence. The observed late complications may be related to RT, chronic use of steroids/immunosuppressants, medical comorbidities, or combination of factors.

  7. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  8. Pleuropulmonary complications of pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Michael D.

    1968-01-01

    Pancreatitis, in common with many other upper abdominal diseases, often leads to pleuropulmonary complications. Radiological evidence of pleuropulmonary abnormality was found in 55% of 58 cases examined retrospectively. The majority of such abnormalities are not specific for pancreatitis; but a particular category of pleural effusions, rich in pancreatic enzymes, is a notable exception. A patient with this type of effusion, complicated by a spontaneous bronchopleural fistula and then by an empyema, is reported. The literature relating to pancreatic enzyme-rich pleural effusions (pathognomonic of pancreatitis) is reviewed. Of several possible mechanisms involved in pathogenesis, transdiaphragmatic lymphatic transfer of pancreatic enzymes, intrapleural rupture of mediastinal extensions of pseudocysts, and diaphragmatic perforation are the most important. The measurement of pleural fluid amylase, at present little employed in this country, has considerable diagnostic value. Enzyme-rich effusions are more commonly left-sided, are often blood-stained, are frequently associated with pancreatic pseudocysts, and—if long standing—may be complicated by a bronchopleural fistula. Images PMID:4872925

  9. Acute Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Werlin, Steven L.

    2001-10-01

    There are no drugs that cure or abate pancreatitis. The treatment of patients with mild and moderate episodes of pancreatitis (85%) is supportive and expectant. Central issues include the removal of the initiating process (if possible), relief of pain, and maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be required for stone extraction in patients with biliary pancreatitis. Surgery is rarely required. The aims of treatment for patients with severe disease includes treatment of local, systemic, and septic complications in addition to those for mild and moderate disease. Homeostasis is maintained by the correction of hypocalcemia, anemia, hypoalbuminemia, electrolyte imbalances, and hypoxemia. A large number of medications have been used unsuccessfully in an attempt to halt the progression of the autodigestive process within the pancreas and to reduce pancreatic secretions. Nutritional support with either enteral or parenteral feeding is given. Intravenous antibiotics or selective bowel decontamination decrease mortality in patients with severe episodes of pancreatitis. The treatment for these individuals is often prolonged. Surgical treatment of traumatic pancreatitis with ductal rupture includes repair or resection. At times, simple drainage is performed and definitive surgery is deferred until later. Surgical treatment of severe pancreatitis includes debridement of necrotic and infected tissue. The emerging consensus appears to be that necrosectomy and local lavage or open management with planned re-exploration offers better survival than the conventional therapy of resection plus drainage alone. PMID:11560787

  10. Pseudotumor-like syndrome and cerebrospinal fluid leak in meningiomas involving the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus: report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashish H; Ivan, Michael E; Komotar, Ricardo J

    2016-07-01

    Meningiomas that partially or completely occlude the superior sagittal sinus may create a pseudotumor-like syndrome in certain patients. These patients may have impaired CSF absorption as a result of higher proximal venous pressure. Higher pressures after resection may encumber adequate wound healing and worsen symptoms. Here, the authors present a small series of patients with meningiomas involving the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus, with documented high intracranial pressure prior to surgery. This paper aims to address the proposed etiology of high intracranial pressure in these patients and its associated complications, including CSF leak, wound dehiscence, pressure-related headaches, and visual complaints. In this paper, the authors propose a management plan to avoid wound complications and pseudotumor-related complications. When considering surgical intervention for patients with compromise of the posterior third of the superior sagittal sinus, careful attention must be paid to addressing potentially elevated intracranial pressure perioperatively. PMID:26684779

  11. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  12. Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Signs and symptoms of pancreatic cancer Can pancreatic cancer be found early? Pancreatic cancer is hard to ... Testing: What You Need to Know . Testing for pancreatic cancer in people at high risk For people in ...

  13. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Daniel; Friess, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients. PMID:26681935

  14. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez Muñoz, J Enrique

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the treatment of symptoms and complications, mainly pain and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis and therapy of autoimmune pancreatitis. The multimodal dynamic endoscopic ultrasound-guided secretin-stimulated evaluation of the pancreas provides relevant morphological and functional information for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at early stages. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with calcifying pancreatitis and endoscopic pancreatic stent placement are effective alternatives for pain therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significantly increase of mortality rate. Despite that, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is not prescribed in the majority of patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, or it is prescribed at a low dose. The newly developed and commercialized needles for endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy are effective in retrieving appropriate tissue samples for the histological diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. Maintenance therapy with azathioprine is effective and safe to prevent relapses in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:26520201

  15. Surgery for Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the abdomen. The surgeon can look at the pancreas and other organs for tumors and take biopsy ... pancreatic cancers appear to be confined to the pancreas at the time they are found. Even then, ...

  16. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... age at the time of diagnosis is 71. Gender Men are slightly more likely to develop pancreatic ... of these syndromes can be found by genetic testing. For more information on genetic testing, see Can ...

  17. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Beiderwellen, K; Sabet, A; Lauenstein, T C; Lahner, H; Poeppel, T D

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. PMID:27003413

  18. What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... very important to distinguish between exocrine and endocrine cancers of the pancreas. They have distinct risk factors and causes, have ... are by far the most common type of pancreas cancer. If you are told you have pancreatic cancer, ...

  19. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... sudden inflammation of the pancreas manifested clinically by abdominal pain, nausea and dehydration that is usually self-limiting ... room for evaluation should they develop any abnormal abdominal pain symptoms. Conclusions While a rare event, acute pancreatitis ...

  20. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the symptoms of pancreatitis? Common symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. However, not every patient with ... help the pancreas to recover. Patients who have abdominal pain can be treated with pain medications. Some patients ...

  1. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... allo-transplantation?" For each pancreatic islet allo-transplant infusion, researchers use specialized enzymes to remove islets from ... in a lab. Transplant patients typically receive two infusions with an average of 400,000 to 500, ...

  2. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... of immunosuppressive medications?" [ Top ] Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry Data In its 2010 annual report, 1 the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry presented data on 571 patients who received pancreatic islet allo- ...

  3. Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smyk, Daniel S.; Rigopoulou, Eirini I.; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L.; Kriese, Stephen; Burroughs, Andrew K.; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was first used to describe cases of pancreatitis with narrowing of the pancreatic duct, enlargement of the pancreas, hyper-γ-globulinaemia, and antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity serologically. The main differential diagnosis, is pancreatic cancer, which can be ruled out through radiological, serological, and histological investigations. The targets of ANA in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis do not appear to be similar to those found in other rheumatological diseases, as dsDNA, SS-A, and SS-B are not frequently recognized by AIP-related ANA. Other disease-specific autoantibodies, such as, antimitochondrial, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies or diabetes-specific autoantibodies are virtually absent. Further studies have focused on the identification of pancreas-specific autoantigens and reported significant reactivity to lactoferrin, carbonic anhydrase, pancreas secretory trypsin inhibitor, amylase-alpha, heat-shock protein, and plasminogen-binding protein. This paper discusses the findings of these investigations and their relevance to the diagnosis, management, and pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:22844291

  4. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:27555793

  5. Tropical chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Barman, K; Premalatha, G; Mohan, V

    2003-01-01

    Tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP) is a juvenile form of chronic calcific non-alcoholic pancreatitis, seen almost exclusively in the developing countries of the tropical world. The classical triad of TCP consists of abdominal pain, steatorrhoea, and diabetes. When diabetes is present, the condition is called fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) which is thus a later stage of TCP. Some of the distinctive features of TCP are younger age at onset, presence of large intraductal calculi, more aggressive course of the disease, and a high susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic calculi are the hallmark for the diagnosis of TCP and in non-calcific cases ductal dilation on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, computed tomography, or ultrasound helps to identify the disease. Diabetes is usually quite severe and of the insulin requiring type, but ketosis is rare. Microvascular complications of diabetes occur as frequently as in type 2 diabetes but macrovascular complications are uncommon. Pancreatic enzyme supplements are used for relief of abdominal pain and reducing the symptoms related to steatorrhoea. Early diagnosis and better control of the endocrine and exocrine dysfunction could help to ensure better survival and improve the prognosis and quality of life of TCP patients. PMID:14654569

  6. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Kara L; Willingham, Field F

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life) and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:27555793

  7. Nutrition in pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Meier, Rémy F; Beglinger, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    The pancreas plays a major role in nutrient digestion. Therefore, in both acute and chronic pancreatitis, exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop, impairing digestive and absorptive processes. These changes can lead to malnutrition over time. In parallel to these changes, decreased caloric intake and increased metabolic activity are often present. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. In severe acute pancreatitis, enteral nutrition with a naso-jejunal feeding tube and a low molecular diet displays clear advantages compared to parenteral nutrition. Infectious complications, length of hospital stay and the need for surgery are reduced. Furthermore, enteral nutrition is less costly than parenteral nutrition. Parenteral nutrition is reserved for patients who do not tolerate enteral nutrition. Abstinence from alcohol, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation is sufficient in over 80% of patients with chronic pancreatitis. In addition, oral supplements are helpful. Enteral nutrition can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:16782526

  8. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  9. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Krishna, S.V.S.; Lakhtakia, Sandeep; Modi, Kirtikumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis). Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson's disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis. PMID:24083160

  10. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  11. Hypovolemic shock, pancreatic blood flow, and pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Robert, J H; Toledano, A E; Toth, L S; Premus, G; Dreiling, D A

    1988-05-01

    Electromagnetic blood flow determinations were carried out on the superior pancreatic duodena (SPDA), the splenic (SA) and the superior mesenteric (SMA) arteries and compared to cardiac output (CO, thermodilution technique) in 12 anesthetized dogs submitted to hypovolemic shock of various duration: 5 dogs underwent a one-hour and 7 a three-hour period of shock. A 50 mm Hg level of mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) was maintained throughout hypovolemia. Dogs were then reinfused. Control preshock values were 4.12 l/min for CO, 38.0 ml/min for SPDA, 405.9 ml/min for SA, and 963.6 ml/min for SMA. SPDA, SA and SMA flows expressed as % of CO amounted to 0.9, 9.8 and 23.4% respectively. No significant changes in SPDA and SMA flows were noted within the first hour of shock. However, from the end of the second hour on, both flows differed significantly (P less than 0.01), SMA increasing from -75.6% of its control value at the end of bleeding to -61.0%, and SPDA decreasing from -75.6 to -86.9%. Similar observations were made when respective flows were considered as % of CO. The SA behaved somewhat in an intermediate fashion. This relative spoliation in pancreatic blood supply as hypovolemia proceeds supports an ischemic etiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), which could account for some of the so-called idiopathic cases of AP. PMID:3385221

  12. Hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Armin; Azim, Afzal; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hypocalcemia is a frequent finding in acute pancreatitis. Severe hypocalcemia can present with neurological as well as cardiovascular manifestations. Correction of hypocalcemia by parenteral calcium infusion remains a controversial topic as intracellular calcium overload is the central mechanism of acinar cell injury in pancreatitis. The current article deals with the art and science of calcium correction in pancreatitis patients. PMID:27076730

  13. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  14. Tests of pancreatic exocrine function - clinical significance in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jutta; Aghdassi, Ali Alexander; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia V; Layer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The pancreas functions as the main factory for digestive enzymes and therefore enables food utilisation. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, partial or complete loss of digestive enzyme synthesis, occurs primarily in disorders directly affecting pancreatic tissue integrity. However, other disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, such as coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome or gastric resection can either mimic or cause pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The overt clinical symptoms of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency are steatorrhoea and maldigestion, which frequently become apparent in advanced stages. Several direct and indirect function tests are available for assessment of pancreatic function but until today diagnosis of excretory insufficiency is difficult as in mild impairment clinically available function tests show limitations of diagnostic accuracy. This review focuses on diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders. PMID:19505669

  15. Pancreatic Acinar Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Béchade, Dominique; Desjardin, Marie; Salmon, Emma; Désolneux, Grégoire; Bécouarn, Yves; Evrard, Serge; Fonck, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignant neoplasm that accounts for 1–2% of all pancreatic neoplasms. Here we report two cases of ACC and describe their clinical features, the therapies used to treat them, and their prognosis. The first patient was a 65-year-old woman who had an abdominal CT scan for a urinary infection. Fortuitously, a rounded and well-delimited corporeal pancreatic tumor was discovered. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration revealed an ACC. During the puncture, a hypoechoic cavity appeared inside the lesion, corresponding to a probable necrotic area. Treatment consisted of a distal splenopancreatectomy. The second patient was a 75-year-old man who complained of abdominal pain. An abdominal CT scan showed a cephalic pancreatic lesion and two hepatic metastases. An EUS-guided fine needle aspiration showed a pancreatic ACC. The patient received chemotherapy with gemcitabine plus oxaliplatin (GEMOX regimen), which enabled an objective response after 6 cycles.

  16. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2016-06-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy remains the only treatment option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the chance of long-term survival. If a radical tumor resection is possible, 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved. Pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years and resection approaches have been extended beyond standard procedures, including vascular and multivisceral resections. Consequently, borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR-PDAC), which has recently been defined by the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS), has become a controversial issue with regard to its management in terms of upfront resection vs. neoadjuvant treatment and sequential resection. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy to define resectability of PDAC is a keypoint in this context as well as the surgical and interdisciplinary expertise to perform advanced pancreatic surgery and manage complications. The present mini-review summarizes the current state of definition, management and outcome of BR-PDAC. Furthermore, the topic of ongoing and future studies on neoadjuvant treatment which is closely related to borderline resectability in PDAC is discussed. PMID:26970276

  17. Pharmacogenetics in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Tourkantonis, Ioannis S; Peponi, Evangelia; Syrigos, Konstantinos N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor overall survival rate. Given advances in pharmacogenomics, numerous gene mutations have been identified that could be potential targets for drug development. Therefore, future research strategies may identify prognostic and predictive markers aiming to improve outcome by maximizing efficacy whilst lowering toxicity. In this commentary, we summarize several interesting results regarding pancreatic cancer pharmacogenetics that have been presented in the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting. In particular, we focus on Abstract #4124, which investigated the potential predictive role of human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) in patients treated with adjuvant gemcitabine for pancreatic cancer, on Abstract #4125, which examined the tolerability of a modified FOLFORINOX study based on UGT1A1*28 genotype guided dosing of IRI in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer, and on Abstract #4130, which confirmed the predictive role of circulating tumor and invasive cells (CTICs) from patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer in second-line chemotherapy treatment setting. PMID:25076337

  18. Genetic aspects of pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, David C

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis are complex inflammatory disorders of the pancreas with unpredictable severity, complications, and clinical courses. Growing evidence for genetic risk and modifying factors, plus strong evidence that only a minority of patients with these disorders are heavy alcohol drinkers, has revolutionized our concept of these diseases. Once considered a self-inflicted injury, pancreatitis is now recognized as a complex inflammatory condition like inflammatory bowel disease. Genetic linkage and candidate gene studies have identified six pancreas-targeting factors that are associated with changes in susceptibility to acute and/or chronic pancreatitis, including cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2), serine protease inhibitor Kazal 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), chymotrypsinogen C (CTRC) and calcium-sensing receptor (CASR). Patients with mutations in these genes are at increased risk of pancreatitis caused by a variety of stresses including hyperlipidemia and hypercalcemia. Multiple studies are reporting new polymorphisms, as well as complex gene x gene and gene x environmental interactions. PMID:20059346

  19. Pseudotumor Cerebri in a Child with Idiopathic Growth Hormone Insufficiency Two Months after Initiation of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Treatment.

    PubMed

    Loukianou, Eleni; Tasiopoulou, Anastasia; Demosthenous, Constantinos; Brouzas, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report a rare case of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) in a child two months after receiving treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and to emphasize the need of close collaboration between ophthalmologists and pediatric endocrinologists in monitoring children receiving rhGH. Methods. A 12-year-old boy with congenital hypothyroidism started treatment with rhGH on a dose of 1,5 mg/daily IM (4.5 IU daily). Eight weeks later, he was complaining of severe headache without any other accompanying symptoms. The child was further investigated with computed tomography scan and lumbar puncture. Results. Computed tomography scan showed normal ventricular size and lumbar puncture revealed an elevated opening pressure of 360 mm H2O. RhGH was discontinued and acetazolamide 250 mg per os twice daily was initiated. Eight weeks later, the papilledema was resolved. Conclusions. There appears to be a causal relationship between the initiation of treatment with rhGH and the development of PTC. All children receiving rhGH should have a complete ophthalmological examination if they report headache or visual disturbances shortly after the treatment. Discontinuation of rhGH and initiation of treatment with acetazolamide may be needed and regular follow-up examinations by an ophthalmologist should be recommended. PMID:26966604

  20. Pseudotumor Cerebri in a Child with Idiopathic Growth Hormone Insufficiency Two Months after Initiation of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Loukianou, Eleni; Tasiopoulou, Anastasia; Demosthenous, Constantinos; Brouzas, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report a rare case of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) in a child two months after receiving treatment with recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) and to emphasize the need of close collaboration between ophthalmologists and pediatric endocrinologists in monitoring children receiving rhGH. Methods. A 12-year-old boy with congenital hypothyroidism started treatment with rhGH on a dose of 1,5 mg/daily IM (4.5 IU daily). Eight weeks later, he was complaining of severe headache without any other accompanying symptoms. The child was further investigated with computed tomography scan and lumbar puncture. Results. Computed tomography scan showed normal ventricular size and lumbar puncture revealed an elevated opening pressure of 360 mm H2O. RhGH was discontinued and acetazolamide 250 mg per os twice daily was initiated. Eight weeks later, the papilledema was resolved. Conclusions. There appears to be a causal relationship between the initiation of treatment with rhGH and the development of PTC. All children receiving rhGH should have a complete ophthalmological examination if they report headache or visual disturbances shortly after the treatment. Discontinuation of rhGH and initiation of treatment with acetazolamide may be needed and regular follow-up examinations by an ophthalmologist should be recommended. PMID:26966604

  1. Clinical Features, Image Findings, and Prognosis of Inflammatory Pseudotumor of the Liver: A Multicenter Experience of 45 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Young; Lim, Young-Suk; Park, Jang Won; Kim, Seung Up; Min, Yang Won; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Paik, Yong-Han; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) of the liver is a rare disease characterized by chronic infiltration of inflammatory cells. However, the clinical characteristics and outcomes of IPT remain uncertain. Methods Clinical features, image findings, and outcomes of 55 patients with histologically proven IPT were evaluated. Results They consisted of 26 men and 19 women with median age of 65 years. Serum carcinoembryonal antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 levels were normal in 42 patients (93.3%). Enhanced CT scans indicated poorly defined peripheral enhancement (82.5%) at the arterial phase and poorly defined hyperattenuating lesions with internal hypoattenuating areas at the equilibrium phase (77.0%). Gadolinium-enhancement MRI revealed poorly defined peripheral rim-like enhancement (77.8%). Ten patients underwent surgical resection and 35 were treated conservatively with or without antibiotics. No recurrence was noted after surgical resection during follow-up (1 to 48 months). In all patients who received conservative treatment, complete resolution or size reduction was noted during follow-up (1 to 192 months). Conclusions CT and MRI provide clues to the diagnosis of IPT in patients with liver masses and normal tumor markers. However, due to the lack of pathognomonic findings, the clinician's suspicion and histological diagnosis are necessary to make an accurate diagnosis of IPT. PMID:24516702

  2. Inflammatory Pseudotumor in the Epidural Space of Lumbosacral Spine on 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Suk; Park, Shin Young

    2014-01-01

    An inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a rare benign lesion, characterized by non-neoplastic proliferation of inflammatory cells and presence of intermingling collagen fibers. IPT commonly occurs in the lungs and orbita, while an intraspinal IPT is extremely rare. IPT can mimic both clinically and radiologically malignant processes, and making a definitive preoperative diagnosis is often difficult. Recently, 18-fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has been reported to accumulate in IPT in the lung, spleen, liver, pancreas, colon, orbit, mediastinum, and mesentery. However, to the best of our knowledge, accumulation of 18F-FDG has not been reported in lumbosacral intraspinal IPT. Herein, we report a case of IPT in the epidural space of the lumbar spine, using the imaging findings of 18F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This is the first case of IPT in the epidural space, depicted by 18F-FDG PET/CT, which revealed a homogeneous, intense 18F-FDG uptake.

  3. An integrated mechanism of pediatric pseudotumor cerebri syndrome: evidence of bioenergetic and hormonal regulation of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, Claire A.; Kwon, Young Joon; Liu, Grant T.; McCormack, Shana E.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS) is defined by the presence of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) in the setting of normal brain parenchyma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Headache, vision changes, and papilledema are common presenting features. Up to 10% of appropriately treated patients may experience permanent visual loss. The mechanism(s) underlying PTCS is unknown. PTCS occurs in association with a variety of conditions, including kidney disease, obesity, and adrenal insufficiency, suggesting endocrine and/or metabolic derangements may occur. Recent studies suggest that fluid and electrolyte balance in renal epithelia is regulated by a complex interaction of metabolic and hormonal factors; these cells share many of the same features as the choroid plexus cells in the central nervous system (CNS) responsible for regulation of CSF dynamics. Thus, we posit that similar factors may influence CSF dynamics in both types of fluid-sensitive tissues. Specifically, we hypothesize that, in patients with PTCS, mitochondrial metabolites (glutamate, succinate) and steroid hormones (cortisol, aldosterone) regulate CSF production and/or absorption. In this integrated mechanism review, we consider the clinical and molecular evidence for each metabolite and hormone in turn. We illustrate how related intracellular signaling cascades may converge in the choroid plexus, drawing on evidence from functionally similar tissues. PMID:25420176

  4. Pancreatitis activates pancreatic apelin-APJ axis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Song; Englander, Ella W.; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Aronson, Judith F.; Rastellini, Cristiana; Garofalo, R. P.; Kolli, Deepthi; Quertermous, Thomas; Kundu, Ramendra

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatitis is classified into acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Apelin, a small regulatory peptide, is the endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor. Apelin and APJ are expressed in the pancreas. The aims of this study were to examine whether apelin influences the inflammatory and fibrosis responses to pancreatitis in mice and to identify mechanisms behind apelin's activities. Supramaximal cerulein induction of AP or CP caused significant (P < 0.05) elevations in pancreatic apelin and APJ expression. Levels declined during the recovery phases. In apelin gene-knockout mice with pancreatitis, pancreatic neutrophil invasion and myeloperoxidase activity were enhanced significantly, and apelin treatment suppressed both. Apelin exposure reduced CP-induced elevations of extracellular matrix-associated proteins. Apelin inhibited PDGF-simulated connective tissue growth factor production and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and keratinocyte cytokine levels were higher in apelin gene-knockout than wild-type mice with pancreatitis. Apelin reduced AP- and CP-induced elevations in pancreatic NF-κB activation. Together, these findings imply that the pancreatic apelin-APJ system functions to curb the inflammatory and fibrosis responses during pancreatitis. Furthermore, findings suggest that apelin reduces inflammation and fibrosis by reducing neutrophil recruitment and PSC activity. Inhibition of neutrophil invasion may be mediated by reduced keratinocyte cytokine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor secretion. Apelin-induced reductions in PSC proliferation and connective tissue growth factor production are putative mechanisms underlying apelin's inhibition of extracellular matrix production. The apelin-associated changes in NF-κB binding may be linked to apelin's regulation of pancreatic inflammatory and fibrosis responses during pancreatitis. PMID:23681476

  5. Pancreatitis activates pancreatic apelin-APJ axis in mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Song; Englander, Ella W; Gomez, Guillermo A; Aronson, Judith F; Rastellini, Cristiana; Garofalo, R P; Kolli, Deepthi; Quertermous, Thomas; Kundu, Ramendra; Greeley, George H

    2013-07-15

    Pancreatitis is classified into acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Apelin, a small regulatory peptide, is the endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor. Apelin and APJ are expressed in the pancreas. The aims of this study were to examine whether apelin influences the inflammatory and fibrosis responses to pancreatitis in mice and to identify mechanisms behind apelin's activities. Supramaximal cerulein induction of AP or CP caused significant (P < 0.05) elevations in pancreatic apelin and APJ expression. Levels declined during the recovery phases. In apelin gene-knockout mice with pancreatitis, pancreatic neutrophil invasion and myeloperoxidase activity were enhanced significantly, and apelin treatment suppressed both. Apelin exposure reduced CP-induced elevations of extracellular matrix-associated proteins. Apelin inhibited PDGF-simulated connective tissue growth factor production and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). Serum granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and keratinocyte cytokine levels were higher in apelin gene-knockout than wild-type mice with pancreatitis. Apelin reduced AP- and CP-induced elevations in pancreatic NF-κB activation. Together, these findings imply that the pancreatic apelin-APJ system functions to curb the inflammatory and fibrosis responses during pancreatitis. Furthermore, findings suggest that apelin reduces inflammation and fibrosis by reducing neutrophil recruitment and PSC activity. Inhibition of neutrophil invasion may be mediated by reduced keratinocyte cytokine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor secretion. Apelin-induced reductions in PSC proliferation and connective tissue growth factor production are putative mechanisms underlying apelin's inhibition of extracellular matrix production. The apelin-associated changes in NF-κB binding may be linked to apelin's regulation of pancreatic inflammatory and fibrosis responses during pancreatitis. PMID:23681476

  6. Drug-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Claudia; Maertin, Sandrina; Scheiber, Jonas; Ritter, Christoph A; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia

    2012-04-01

    Drugs are thought to be a rare cause for acute pancreatitis; however 525 different drugs are listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) database suspected to cause acute pancreatitis as a side effect. Many of them are widely used to treat highly prevalent diseases. The true incidence is not entirely clear since only few systematic population based studies exist. The majority of the available data are derived from case reports or case control studies. Furthermore, the causality for many of these drugs remains elusive and for only 31 of these 525 dugs a definite causality was established. Definite proof for causality is defined by the WHO classification if symptoms reoccur upon rechallenge.In the actual algorithm the diagnosis is confirmed if no other cause of acute pancreatitis can be detected, and the patient is taking one of the suspected drugs. PMID:22314811

  7. [Acute pancreatitis in children].

    PubMed

    Rottier, B L; Holl, R A; Draaisma, J M

    1998-02-21

    Acute pancreatitis is probably commoner in children than was previously thought. In children it is most commonly associated with trauma or viral infection. The presentation may be subtler than in adults, requiring a high index of suspicion in the clinician. In three children, two boys aged 4 and 10 and a girl of 15 years, acute pancreatitis was suspected because of the findings at ultrasonography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography performed when the disease recurred (the boy aged 4), apathy and immobility without dehydration or other obvious causes (the boy aged 10), and severe abdominal pain in combination with vomiting (the girl). All three patients had severely increased (urinary) amylase levels. Most often, acute pancreatitis in children tends to be a self-limiting disease which responds well to conservative treatment. PMID:9562770

  8. Endotherapy in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Tandan, Manu; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive disease with irreversible changes in the pancreas. Patients commonly present with pain and with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency. All therapeutic efforts in CP are directed towards relief of pain as well as the management of associated complications. Endoscopic therapy offers many advantages in patients with CP who present with ductal calculi, strictures, ductal leaks, pseudocyst or associated biliary strictures. Endotherapy offers a high rate of success with low morbidity in properly selected patients. The procedure can be repeated and failed endotherapy is not a hindrance to subsequent surgery. Endoscopic pancreatic sphincterotomy is helpful in patients with CP with minimal ductal changes while minor papilla sphincterotomy provides relief in patients with pancreas divisum and chronic pancreatitis. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is the standard of care in patients with large pancreatic ductal calculi. Long term follow up has shown pain relief in over 60% of patients. A transpapillary stent placed across the disruption provides relief in over 90% of patients with ductal leaks. Pancreatic ductal strictures are managed by single large bore stents. Multiple stents are placed for refractory strictures. CP associated benign biliary strictures (BBS) are best treated with multiple plastic stents, as the response to a single plastic stent is poor. Covered self expanding metal stents are increasingly being used in the management of BBS though further long term studies are needed. Pseudocysts are best drained endoscopically with a success rate of 80%-95% at most centers. Endosonography (EUS) has added to the therapeutic armamentarium in the management of patients with CP. Drainage of pseudcysts, cannulation of inaccessible pancreatic ducts and celiac ganglion block in patients with intractable pain are all performed using EUS. Endotherapy should be offered as the first line of therapy in properly selected patients with CP

  9. Pathogenic Microorganisms and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunsaier; Li, Jingnan

    2015-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. No effective screening methods exist, and available treatment modalities do not effectively treat the disease. Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including smoking, chronic pancreatitis, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, collectively account for less than half of all pancreatic cancer cases. Accumulating reports have demonstrated that there is an association between pathogenic microorganisms and pancreatic cancer. Summary A substantial amount of preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that microbiota are likely to influence pancreatic carcinogenesis. This review summarizes the literature on studies examining infections that have been linked to pancreatic cancer. Key Message Helicobacter pylori infection may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer; chronic hepatitis virus and oral microbiota may also play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Practical Implications Considering the worldwide burden of the disease, the association between microbiota and pancreatic cancer in this review may provide new ideas to prevent and treat pancreatic cancer more efficiently. Further studies in this direction are urgently needed. PMID:26673459

  10. Enzymatic Debridement in Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Murat; Tekin, Ahmet; Kucukkartallar, Tevfik; Vatansev, Husamettin; Kartal, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ failure and pancreatic necrosis are the factors that determine prognosis in acute pancreatitis attacks. We investigated the effects of collagenase on the debridement of experimental pancreatic necrosis. The study covered 4 groups; each group had 10 rats. Group I was the necrotizing pancreatitis group. Group II was the collagenase group with pancreatic loge by isotonic irrigation following necrotizing pancreatitis. Group III was the collagenase group with pancreatic loge following necrotizing pancreatitis. Group IV was the intraperitoneal collagenase group following necrotizing pancreatitis. The progress of the groups was compared hematologically and histopathologically. There was no difference among the groups regarding the levels of leukocyte, hemogram, and urea. The differences in AST levels between Group I and II; and differences in glucose, calcium, LDH, AST, and amylase between Group II and III; between Group II and IV; between Group I and III; and between Group I and IV were statistically significant (P < 0.05). There were statistically significant differences between Group II and III, and Group II and IV regarding edema, acinar necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, hemorrhage, and fat necrosis (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the collagenase preparation used in this experimental pancreatitis model was found to be effective in the debridement of pancreatic necrosis. PMID:26011212

  11. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  12. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-08-15

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  13. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke. PMID:21734390

  14. Gluteal muscle fatty atrophy is not associated with elevated blood metal ions or pseudotumors in patients with a unilateral metal-on-metal hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Reito, Aleksi; Elo, Petra; Nieminen, Jyrki; Puolakka, Timo; Eskelinen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose There are no international guidelines to define adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD). Muscle fatty atrophy has been reported to be common in patients with failing metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacements. We assessed whether gluteal muscle fatty atrophy is associated with elevated blood metal ion levels and pseudotumors. Patients and methods 263 consecutive patients with unilateral ASR XL total hip replacement using a posterior approach and with an unoperated contralateral hip were included in the study. All patients had undergone a standard screening program at our institution, including MRI and blood metal ion measurement. Muscle fatty atrophy was graded as being absent, mild, moderate, or severe in each of the gluteal muscles. Results The prevalance of moderate-to-severe gluteal muscle atrophy was low (12% for gluteus minimus, 10% for gluteus medius, and 2% for gluteus maximus). Muscle atrophy was neither associated with elevated blood metal ion levels (> 5 ppb) nor with the presence of a clear (solid- or mixed-type) pseudotumor seen in MRI. A combination of moderate-to-severe atrophy in MRI, elevated blood metal ion levels, and MRI-confirmed mixed or solid pseudotumor was rare. Multivariable regression revealed that “preoperative diagnosis other than osteoarthrosis” was the strongest predictor of the presence of fatty atrophy. Interpretation Gluteal muscle atrophy may be a clinically significant finding with influence on hip muscle strength in patients with MoM hip replacement. However, our results suggest that gluteal muscle atrophy seen in MRI is not associated with either the presence or severity of ARMD, at least not in patients who have been operated on using the posterior approach. PMID:26427902

  15. Nutrition in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard; Irtun, Øivind; Olesen, Søren Schou; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Holst, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is a major player in nutrient digestion. In chronic pancreatitis both exocrine and endocrine insufficiency may develop leading to malnutrition over time. Maldigestion is often a late complication of chronic pancreatic and depends on the severity of the underlying disease. The severity of malnutrition is correlated with two major factors: (1) malabsorption and depletion of nutrients (e.g., alcoholism and pain) causes impaired nutritional status; and (2) increased metabolic activity due to the severity of the disease. Nutritional deficiencies negatively affect outcome if they are not treated. Nutritional assessment and the clinical severity of the disease are important for planning any nutritional intervention. Good nutritional practice includes screening to identify patients at risk, followed by a thoroughly nutritional assessment and nutrition plan for risk patients. Treatment should be multidisciplinary and the mainstay of treatment is abstinence from alcohol, pain treatment, dietary modifications and pancreatic enzyme supplementation. To achieve energy-end protein requirements, oral supplementation might be beneficial. Enteral nutrition may be used when patients do not have sufficient calorie intake as in pylero-duodenal-stenosis, inflammation or prior to surgery and can be necessary if weight loss continues. Parenteral nutrition is very seldom used in patients with chronic pancreatitis and should only be used in case of GI-tract obstruction or as a supplement to enteral nutrition. PMID:24259957

  16. Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?

    PubMed Central

    Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis—as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery. PMID:24132440

  17. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... fewer than 10 grams of fat. About 20 potato chips contain 10 grams of fat, so it takes discipline to make sure to stay within this range. Patients who have lost the ability to digest food will be prescribed pills containing pancreatic enzymes to help with digestion. They may also be ...

  18. Laparoscopic pancreatic resection.

    PubMed

    Harrell, K N; Kooby, D A

    2015-10-01

    Though initially slow to gain acceptance, the minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection grew during the last decade and pancreatic operations such as the distal pancreatectomy and pancreatic enucleation are frequently performed laparoscopically. More complex operations such as the pancreaticoduodenectomy may also confer benefits with a minimally invasive approach but are less widely utilized. Though most research to date comparing open and laparoscopic pancreatectomy is retrospective, the current data suggest that compared with open, a laparoscopic procedure may afford postoperative benefits such as less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, and fewer wound complications. Regarding oncologic considerations, despite initial concerns, laparoscopic resection appears to be non-inferior to an open procedure in terms of lymph node retrieval, negative margin rates, and long-term survival. New technologies, such as robotics, are also gaining acceptance. Data show that while the laparoscopic approach incurs higher cost in the operating room, the resulting shorter hospital stay appears to be associated with an equivalent or lower overall cost. The minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection can be safe and appropriate with significant patient benefits and oncologic non-inferiority based on existing data. PMID:26199025

  19. Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    PubMed

    Yabar, Cinthya S; Winter, Jordan M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, yet advances in treatment options have been minimal over the past decade. In this review, we summarize the evaluation and treatments for this disease. We highlight molecular advances that hopefully will soon translate into improved outcomes. PMID:27546841

  20. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung, liver, and peritoneal cavity. An inset shows cancer cells spreading from the pancreas, through the blood and lymph system, to another ... abdomen that contains the intestines, stomach, and liver). Cancer may also have spread to ... pancreas or to lymph nodes. Stage IV pancreatic cancer. ...

  1. Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulou, E

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery is feasible and safe. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy should be widely adopted for benign lesions of the pancreas. Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy, although technically demanding, in the setting of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a number of advantages including shorter hospital stay, faster recovery, allowing patients to recover in a timelier manner and pursue adjuvant treatment options. Furthermore, it seems that progression-free survival is longer in patients undergoing laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy in comparison with those undergoing open pancreaticoduodenectomy. Minimally invasive middle pancreatectomy seems appropriate for benign or borderline tumors of the neck of the pancreas. Technological advances including intraoperative ultrasound and intraoperative fluorescence imaging systems are expected to facilitate the wide adoption of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. Although, the oncological outcome seems similar with that of open surgery, there are still concerns, as the majority of relevant evidence comes from retrospective studies. Large multicenter randomized studies comparing laparoscopic with open pancreatectomy as well as robotic assisted with both open and laparoscopic approaches are needed. Robotic approach could be possibly shown to be less invasive than conventional laparoscopic approach through the less traumatic intra-abdominal handling of tissues. In addition, robotic approach could enable the wide adoption of the technique by surgeon who is not that trained in advanced laparoscopic surgery. A putative clinical benefit of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery could be the attenuated surgical stress response leading to reduced morbidity and mortality as well as lack of the detrimental immunosuppressive effect especially for the oncological patients. PMID:26530291

  2. Pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers.

    PubMed

    Buck, Andreas K; Herrmann, Ken; Eckel, Florian; Beer, Ambros J

    2011-01-01

    Morphology-based imaging modalities have replaced classical conventional nuclear medicine modalities for detection of liver or pancreatic lesions. With positron emission tomography and the glucose analog F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), a sensitive and specific modality for the detection of hepatic metastases and extrahepatic tumor deposits from hepatocellular or pancreatic cancer is available. F-18 FDG PET can increase the accuracy of staging primary tumors of the liver or the pancreas, and can be used for response monitoring. Radiopharmaceuticals such as Ga-68 DOTATOC and F-18 DOPA allow the specific detection of neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors and their metastatic deposits. Hybrid scanners such as PET-CT integrate morphologic and metabolic information, and allow to increase the sensitivity and specificity of noninvasive imaging in many tumor entities. The development of specific radiopharmaceuticals and technical innovations such as SPECT-CT has increased the reliability of conventional scintigraphic imaging. This chapter focuses on the use of PET-CT in hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancers. PMID:21331938

  3. Patient Derived Cancer Cell Lines in Identifying Molecular Changes in Patients With Previously Untreated Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Gemcitabine Hydrochloride-Based Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  4. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E.; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L.; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E.; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M.; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F.; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  5. Externalized decondensed neutrophil chromatin occludes pancreatic ducts and drives pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Leppkes, Moritz; Maueröder, Christian; Hirth, Sebastian; Nowecki, Stefanie; Günther, Claudia; Billmeier, Ulrike; Paulus, Susanne; Biermann, Mona; Munoz, Luis E; Hoffmann, Markus; Wildner, Dane; Croxford, Andrew L; Waisman, Ari; Mowen, Kerri; Jenne, Dieter E; Krenn, Veit; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Schett, Georg; Wirtz, Stefan; Neurath, Markus F; Herrmann, Martin; Becker, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Ductal occlusion has been postulated to precipitate focal pancreatic inflammation, while the nature of the primary occluding agents has remained elusive. Neutrophils make use of histone citrullination by peptidyl arginine deiminase-4 (PADI4) in contact to particulate agents to extrude decondensed chromatin as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In high cellular density, NETs form macroscopically visible aggregates. Here we show that such aggregates form inside pancreatic ducts in humans and mice occluding pancreatic ducts and thereby driving pancreatic inflammation. Experimental models indicate that PADI4 is critical for intraductal aggregate formation and that PADI4-deficiency abrogates disease progression. Mechanistically, we identify the pancreatic juice as a strong instigator of neutrophil chromatin extrusion. Characteristic single components of pancreatic juice, such as bicarbonate ions and calcium carbonate crystals, induce aggregated NET formation. Ductal occlusion by aggregated NETs emerges as a pathomechanism with relevance in a plethora of inflammatory conditions involving secretory ducts. PMID:26964500

  6. Periampullary and Pancreatic Incidentaloma

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jordan M.; Cameron, John L.; Lillemoe, Keith D.; Campbell, Kurtis A.; Chang, David; Riall, Taylor S.; Coleman, JoAnn; Sauter, Patricia K.; Canto, Marcia; Hruban, Ralph H.; Schulick, Richard D.; Choti, Michael A.; Yeo, Charles J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: While incidental masses in certain organs have received particular attention, periampullary and pancreatic incidentalomas (PIs) remain poorly characterized. Methods: We reviewed 1944 consecutive pancreaticoduodenectomies (PD) over an 8-year period (April 1997 to October 2005). A total of 118 patients (6% of all PDs) presented with an incidental finding of a periampullary or pancreatic mass. The PI patients were analyzed and compared with the rest of the cohort (NI, nonincidentaloma group, n = 1826). Results: Thirty-one percent of the PI patients (n = 37) had malignant disease (versus 76% of the NI patients, P < 0.001), 47% (n = 55) had premalignant disease, and the remaining 22% (n = 26) had little or no risk for malignant progression. The 3 most common diagnoses in the PI group were IPMN without invasive cancer (30%), cystadenoma (17%), and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (10%). The PI group had a higher overall complication rate (55% versus 43%, P = 0.02), due in part to a significantly increased rate of pancreatic fistulas (18.4% PI versus 8.5% NI, P < 0.001). Patients in the PI group with malignant disease had a superior long-term survival (median, 30 months, P = 0.01) compared with patients in the NI group with malignant disease (median, 21 months). Conclusions: Incidentally discovered periampullary and pancreatic masses comprise a substantial proportion of patients undergoing PD. Roughly three fourths of these lesions are malignant or premalignant, and amenable to curative resection. Resected malignant PIs have favorable pathologic features as compared with resected malignant NIs, and resection of these early lesions in asymptomatic individuals is associated with improved survival, compared with patients with symptomatic disease. PMID:16633003

  7. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-08-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months.

  8. Inflammatory pancreatic masses: problems in differentiating focal pancreatitis from carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Neff, C.C.; Simeone, J.F.; Wittenberg, J.; Mueller, P.R.; Ferrucci, J.T. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The authors studied 19 patients with focal inflammatory masses of the pancreas over an 18-month period. In 13 cases, transhepatic cholangiography and/or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography were unsuccessful in differentiating pancreatitis from carcinoma. Eighteen patients had a history of alcohol abuse, and 12 had had pancreatitis previously. Pre-existing glandular injury appears to be a prerequisite to formation of focal inflammatory pancreatic masses.

  9. Minimally invasive retroperitoneal pancreatic necrosectomy in necrotising pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Shelat, V G; Diddapur, R K

    2007-08-01

    With the marriage of surgery and technology, applications of minimal access surgery are increasing exponentially. Pancreatic diseases are no exception. Minimally invasive retroperitoneal pancreatic necrosectomy (MIRP), or percutaneous video-assisted necrosectomy, is a new technique to debride the necrotic pancreas. We report a 51- year-old male patient who successfully underwent MIRP for infected pancreatic necrosis, and briefly review of literature. PMID:17657370

  10. Groove pancreatitis and pancreatic heterotopia in the minor duodenal papilla.

    PubMed

    Chatelain, Denis; Vibert, Eric; Yzet, Thierry; Geslin, Guillaume; Bartoli, Eric; Manaouil, David; Delcenserie, Richard; Brevet, Marie; Dupas, Jean-Louis; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2005-05-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of segmental chronic pancreatitis that involves the anatomic space between the head of the pancreas, the duodenum, and the common bile duct. We report 2 cases of groove pancreatitis with pancreatic heterotopia in the minor papilla. Patients were a 44-year-old woman and a 47-year-old man. Both had a past history of alcohol consumption and presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, and weight loss caused by duodenal stenosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed thickening of the duodenal wall and enlargement of the pancreatic head in both patients. In 1 patient, ultrasound endoscopy showed a dilated duct in the head of the pancreas. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed to rule out pancreatic adenocarcinoma and because of the severity of the symptoms. In both cases, gross and microscopic examinations showed fibrous scar of the groove area. The Santorini duct was dilated and contained protein plugs in both patients, with abscesses in 1 of them. In both cases, there were microscopic foci of heterotopic pancreas with mild fibrosis in the wall of the minor papilla. Groove pancreatitis is often diagnosed in middle-aged alcoholic men presenting with clinical symptoms caused by duodenal stenosis. The pathogenesis of this rare entity could be because of disturbance of the pancreatic secretion through the minor papilla. Pancreatitis in heterotopic pancreas located in the minor papilla and chronic consumption of alcohol seem to be important pathogenic factors. PMID:15841034

  11. Follicular pancreatitis: a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis-an additional mimic of pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rajib K; Xie, Bill H; Patton, Kurt T; Lisovsky, Mikhail; Burks, Eric; Behrman, Stephen W; Klimstra, David; Deshpande, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Follicular pancreatitis is a recently described variant of chronic pancreatitis characterized clinically by the formation of a discrete pancreatic mass and histologically by the presence of florid lymphoid aggregates with reactive germinal centers. Our aim was to study the clinical and histologic features of follicular pancreatitis, as well as to critically examine potential overlap with autoimmune pancreatitis. Immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2, CD21, κ and λ light chains as well as IgG4 and IgG were performed. We found a total of 6 patients (male-female ratio, 2:1; mean age, 57 years) who fulfilled the diagnosis of follicular pancreatitis in our institutions. Four had an incidental diagnosis, while two presented with abdominal pain, fatigue, and elevated liver enzymes. On imaging, 3 patients had a discrete solid mass, whereas 2 cases showed a dilated main pancreatic duct, mimicking an intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasm on imaging. One patient had a lesion in the intra-pancreatic portion of the common bile duct. On histopathology, all cases showed numerous lymphoid follicles with Bcl-2-negative germinal centers either in a periductal or in a more diffuse (periductal and intra-parenchymal) fashion, but without attendant storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, or granulocytic epithelial lesions. IgG4-to-IgG ratio was <40% in 5 cases. A comparison cohort revealed germinal centers in 25% of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis and 2% of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis cases, but none were periductal in location. In conclusion, follicular pancreatitis, an under-recognized mimic of pancreatic neoplasms is characterized by intrapancreatic lymphoid follicles with reactive germinal centers. PMID:26563969

  12. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained on 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  13. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Serafini, A.N.; Al-Sheikh, W.; Barkin, J.S.; Hourani, M.; Sfakiankis, G.; Clarke, L.P.; Ashkar, F.S.

    1982-08-01

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99//sup m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained in 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis.

  14. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Gonçalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22655256

  15. Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dabizzi, Emanuele; Assef, Mauricio Saab; Raimondo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used. PMID:24212626

  16. Early detection of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Nita

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is a low-incident but highly mortal disease. It accounts for only 3% of estimated new cancer cases each year but is currently the fourth common cause of cancer mortality. By 2030, it is expected to be the 2nd leading cause of cancer death. There is a clear need to diagnose and classify pancreatic cancer at earlier stages in order to give patients the best chance at a definitive cure through surgery. Three precursor lesions that distinctly lead to pancreatic adenocarcinoma have been identified, and we have increasing understanding the non-genetic and genetic risk factors for the disease. With increased understanding about the risk factors, the familial patters, and associated accumulation of genetic mutations involved in pancreatic cancer, we know that there are mutations that occur early in the development of pancreatic cancer and that improved genetic risk-based strategies in screening for pancreatic cancer may be possible and successful at saving or prolonging lives. The remaining challenge is that current standards for diagnosing pancreatic cancer remain too invasive and too costly for widespread screening for pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the promises of noninvasive methods of detection such as blood, saliva, and stool remain underdeveloped or lack robust testing. However, significant progress has been made, and we are drawing closer to a strategy for the screening and early detection of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26361402

  17. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  18. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Belda-Iniesta, Cristóbal; Ibáñez de Cáceres, Immaculada; Barriuso, Jorge; de Castro Carpeño, Javier; González Barón, Manuel; Feliú, Jaime

    2008-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer death. This devastating disease has the horrible honour of close to equal incidence and mortality rates. Late diagnosis and a constitutive resistance to every chemotherapy approach are responsible for this scenario. However, molecular biology tools in cooperation with translational efforts have dissected several secrets that underlie pancreatic cancer. Progressive acquisition of malignant, invasive phenotypes from pre-malignant lesions, recent revelations on core signalling pathways and new targeted designed trials offer a better future for pancreatic cancer patients. This review will summarise recent advances in the molecular biology of pancreatic cancer. PMID:18796369

  19. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. PMID:25294271

  20. [New model of acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Cherkezova-Kinova, E; Lateva, E

    1981-01-01

    The authors propose a new model of acute pancreatitis by infusing duodenal content, obtained both from animals with experimental pancreatitis and from patients with pancreatitis, hepatitis and cholecystitis, into the duodenum of experimental animals without pressure for a period of several days. Pancreatitis was established functionally and histomorphologically. The control group of animals did not reveal deviations from the norm after infusion of duodenal content. The authors suggested the presence of pathogenic substances in the duodenal content of animals and sick persons, and these components damaged the pancreas, liver and kidneys by means of blood and lymph ways. PMID:7227280

  1. Everolimus and Octreotide Acetate With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  2. Antibiosis of Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Alexander; Erhart, Wiebke; Schafmayer, Clemens; Held, Hanns-Christoph; Hampe, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Necrotizing pancreatitis is a life-threatening presentation of acute pancreatitis. The mortality of 20-80% initially depends on the persistence of organ failure and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and, in the later course of the disease, on secondary infection of the necrosis. The questions whether prophylactic antibiotics aiming to prevent this infection should be administered and which antibiotic is the best to use, as well as the problem of fungal infection under antibiotic treatment are still intriguing and insufficiently solved. Methods A search of the literature using PubMed was carried out, supplemented by a review of the programmes of the Digestive Disease Week (DDW) and the United European Gastroenterology Week (UEGW). Results Despite the widely practised prophylactic antibiotic administration in severe pancreatitis, no evidence for the benefit of this strategy exists. One of the drawbacks might be a tendency for disastrous fungal infection under prophylactic antibiotics. Bacterial translocation from the gut in the second week after the onset of symptoms is the major source for infection of pancreatic necrosis and provides a clear indication for antibiotic treatment. However, routine fine-needle aspiration for a calculated antibiotic therapy cannot be recommended, and all other tests offer only indirect signs. Important factors such as enteral versus parenteral feeding and the method of necrosectomy are mostly neglected in the trials but seem to be essential for the outcome of the patient. Conclusions Even though most meta-analyses including the newer double-blind, placebo-controlled trials on prophylactic antibiotics showed no beneficial effects in the prevention of infection of necrosis and/or outcome of the patients, this strategy is still widely used in clinical routine. Since nearly all trials published so far show systematic problems (i.e. inaccurate definition of the severity of the disease, poor statistical testing

  3. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  4. Immunohistochemistry of Pancreatic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sukhwinder; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Baine, Michael J.; Kumar, Sushil; Batra, Surinder K.

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a valuable tool to visualize the distribution and localization of specific cellular components within morphologically preserved tissue sections or cell preparations. It combines the histologic morphology of tissues for detecting the actual antigen distribution, specificity of antibody–antigen interaction for optimal detection, and sensitivity of immunochemical methods for assessing the amount of antigen in tissues. It is routinely used clinically to diagnose type (benign or malignant), stage, and grade of cancer using specific tumor markers. The application of IHC ranges from disease diagnosis and prognosis to drug development and analysis of the pathobiological roles of various molecular players during disease development. Due to better availability of highly specific antibodies and optimal methodologies for performing immunohistochemical studies, IHC is being used at an expanding rate to understand pancreatic tumor biology as well as to study the fate of various molecular markers during the initiation, progression, and metastasis of pancreatic neoplasia. Herein, we describe the detailed protocol for IHC analyses of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia in tissues and fine needle aspirates from both human and mouse samples. PMID:23359148

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Kraft, Matthias; Sielenkämper, Andreas W; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Lerch, Markus M

    2008-03-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are a well-known complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis, with a higher incidence in the latter. Diagnosis is accomplished most often by computed tomographic scanning, by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, or by ultrasound, and a rapid progress in the improvement of diagnostic tools enables detection with high sensitivity and specificity. Different strategies contribute to the treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts: endoscopic transpapillary or transmural drainage, percutaneous catheter drainage, or open surgery. The feasibility of endoscopic drainage is highly dependent on the anatomy and topography of the pseudocyst, but provides high success and low complication rates. Percutaneous drainage is used for infected pseudocysts. However, its usefulness in chronic pancreatitis-associated pseudocysts is questionable. Internal drainage and pseudocyst resection are frequently used as surgical approaches with a good overall outcome, but a somewhat higher morbidity and mortality compared with endoscopic intervention. We therefore conclude that pseudocyst treatment in chronic pancreatitis can be effectively achieved by both endoscopic and surgical means. This review entails publications referring to the classification of pancreatic pseudocysts, epidemiology, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic options for pancreatic pseudocysts. Only full articles were considered for the review. Based on a search in PubMed, the MeSH terms "pancreatic pseudocysts and classification," "diagnosis," and "endoscopic, percutaneous, and surgical treatment" were used either alone or in combination. PMID:18376299

  6. Pancreatic polypepetide inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via a cholinergic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, G.; Louie, D.S.; Owyang, C. )

    1987-11-01

    In rat pancreatic slices, rat pancreatic polypeptide (PP) or C-terminal hexapeptide of PP (PP-(31-36)) inhibited potassium-stimulated amylase release in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was unaffected by addition of hexamethonium but blocked by atropine. In contrast, PP-(31-36) did not have any effect on acetylcholine- or cholecystokinin octapeptide-stimulated amylase release. In addition, when pancreatic slices were incubated with ({sup 3}H)choline, PP-(31-36) inhibited the potassium-evoked release of synthesized ({sup 3}H)acetylcholine in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of PP was unaffected by adrenergic, dopaminergic, or opioid receptor antagonists. Thus PP inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine release. This newly identified pathway provides a novel mechanism for hormonal inhibition of pancreatic enzyme secretion via modulation of the classic neurotransmitter function.

  7. Groove Pancreatitis: A Rare form of Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Bharivi; Rzouq, Fadi; Saligram, Shreyas; Nawabi, Atta; Nicola, Marian; Dennis, Katie; Ernst, Carly; Abbaszadeh, Ali; Bonino, John; Olyaee, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the “groove” of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are the preferred imaging modalities. The treatment of choice is conservative although surgical intervention can sometimes be required. Case Report: A 57-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B presented with 4 days of epigastric pain. Abdominal exam revealed absent bowel sounds and epigastric tenderness. He had a creatinine of 1.72 mg/dL, potassium of 2.9 mmol/L, and a normal lipase level of 86 U/L. Liver enzymes and total bilirubin were normal. Computed tomography abdomen showed high-grade obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum without any obvious mass. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a mass at the duodenal bulb causing luminal narrowing, with biopsies negative for malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the region of the pancreatic head and descending duodenum. EUS revealed a 3 cm mass in the region of pancreatic head with irregular borders and no vascular invasion. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) was nondiagnostic. The patient then underwent a Whipple's procedure. Pathology of these specimens was negative for malignancy but was consistent with para-duodenal or groove pancreatitis. Conclusion: The low incidence of groove pancreatitis is partly due to lack of familiarity with the disease. Groove pancreatitis should be considered in the differential for patients presenting with pancreatic head lesions and no cholestatic jaundice, especially when a duodenal obstruction is present, and

  8. Pancreatic cancer: chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Andrén-Sandberg, Åke

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer in many cases appears in a non-curatively resectable stage when the diagnosis is made. Palliative treatment become an option in the patients with advanced stage. The present article reviewed chemotherapy and radiotherapy in various advanced stage of pancreatic cancer. PMID:22540056

  9. Surgical Management of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Dilip; Natarajan, Sathima

    2015-10-01

    Advances over the past decade have indicated that a complex interplay between environmental factors, genetic predisposition, alcohol abuse, and smoking lead towards the development of chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a complex disorder that causes significant and chronic incapacity in patients and a substantial burden on the society. Major advances have been made in the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease and the role of genetic predisposition is increasingly coming to the fore. Advances in noninvasive diagnostic modalities now allow for better diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at an early stage of the disease. The impact of these advances on surgical treatment is beginning to emerge, for example, patients with certain genetic predispositions may be better treated with total pancreatectomy versus lesser procedures. Considerable controversy remains with respect to the surgical management of chronic pancreatitis. Modern understanding of the neurobiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis suggests that a window of opportunity exists for effective treatment of the intractable pain after which central sensitization can lead to an irreversible pain syndrome in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Effective surgical procedures exist for chronic pancreatitis; however, the timing of surgery is unclear. For optimal treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis, close collaboration between a multidisciplinary team including gastroenterologists, surgeons, and pain management physicians is needed. PMID:26722211

  10. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Casari, Ilaria; Falasca, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26610570