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Sample records for papilloma virus genotyping

  1. Giant magnetoimpedance-based microchannel system for quick and parallel genotyping of human papilloma virus type 16/18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Chen, Lei; Lei, Chong; Zhang, Ju; Li, Ding; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Bao, Chen-Chen; Hu, Heng-Yao; Chen, Xiang; Cui, Feng; Zhang, Shuang-Xi; Zhou, Yong; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2010-07-01

    Quick and parallel genotyping of human papilloma virus (HPV) type 16/18 is carried out by a specially designed giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) based microchannel system. Micropatterned soft magnetic ribbon exhibiting large GMI ratio serves as the biosensor element. HPV genotyping can be determined by the changes in GMI ratio in corresponding detection region after hybridization. The result shows that this system has great potential in future clinical diagnostics and can be easily extended to other biomedical applications based on molecular recognition.

  2. Human Papilloma Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wright, V. Cecil

    1989-01-01

    Genital warts are believed to be caused by human papilloma viruses and to be sexually transmitted. The viruses are classified by DNA types, which appear to cause different types of disease. The choice of treatment, and usually its success rate, vary according to the type of disease and its location. PMID:21248973

  3. High-risk human papilloma virus genotypes in cervical carcinoma of Serbian women: Distribution and association with pathohistological findings.

    PubMed

    Stamenković, Miodrag; Knežević, Aleksandra; Knežević, Ivana; Kuzmanović, Igor; Karalić, Danijela; Milenković, Sanja; Jovanović, Tanja

    2016-09-01

    A significant role of high-risk Human papilloma viruses (HR HPV) in the development of cervical carcinoma is well known. HR HPV 16 and 18 account for approximately 70% of all cases of cervical cancer worldwide. The incidence of cervical cancer in Serbia, is one of the highest in Europe. The aim of our study was to investigate the distribution of HR HPV types in cervical carcinoma of Serbian women, as well as association between the HPV types and pathohistological findings. The study included 80 archival cervical cancer tissues from the same number of patients. The presence of HPV DNA was determined using MY09/MY11 primers for L1 gene and GP1/GP2 primers for E1 gene. HPV was detected in 78.75% tissues. HR HPV genotypes found in the decreasing order of frequency were: HPV16 (80.39%), HPV33 (7.84%), HPV58 (5.88%), HPV18 (1.96%), HPV45 (1.96%) and HPV53 (1.96%). The examined tissues were 91.25% squamous cell carcinomas and 8.75% adenocarcinoma. The high frequency of HPV 16 was observed in both types of carcinoma (80.8% and 75%, respectively) while the prevalence of HPV18 was low. These results may contribute to the implementation of cervical carcinoma prevention program in Serbia, including the selection of the most appropriate vaccine and immunization program. PMID:27461126

  4. Human papilloma virus genotypes in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Cervantes, Laura; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Rojas-García, Aurora Elizabeth; Barrón-Vivanco, Briscia Socorro; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; León, David Cantú-De; Hernández, Yael Yvette Bernal; Jáuregui-Martínez, Armando; Medina-Díaz, Irma Martha

    2016-01-01

    Objective In Mexico cervical cancer (CC) is the most common cause of death from neoplasia in women. Study aimed to analyze the current distribution of Human papillomavirus (HPV) types in women from Nayarit, Mexico, with Squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and Cervical cancer (CC). Methodology Between January 2011 and July 2013, cervical samples were collected from female residents of the Mexican state of Nayarit and were analyzed by means of a LINEAR ARRAY® HPV genotyping test. Data analyses were performed using Stata ver. 8.0 statistical software. Results Of the samples analyzed, 91.2%, HPV DNA was detected. Of these positive samples, 82% were High-risk (HR) viral types. The most prevalent HPV genotypes identified were 16, 58, 31, 18, and 70. Forty two percent of participants had a single infection, while 23 and 26% of participants were infected with two or more HPV genotypes, respectively. HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype identified and was frequently present as a co-infection with HPV types 18, 51, 52, 59, 66, or 70. Conclusion Women <20 years of age were most often infected with HPV, and the HPV Quadrivalent vaccine (types 16, 18, 6, and 11), currently available in Mexico, no confers protection against a subset of the HPV genotypes identified in the present study (58, 31, 70, and 35). Thus, it is important evaluate the geographical distribution of specific HPV genotypes in all health of center across Mexico in order to implement a successful vaccination program and to diagnose CC in its early stages. PMID:27610056

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of human papilloma virus DNA derived from a laryngeal papilloma.

    PubMed Central

    Gissmann, L; Diehl, V; Schultz-Coulon, H J; zur Hausen, H

    1982-01-01

    Papilloma virus DNA from a laryngeal papilloma was cloned in phage lambda L 47 and characterized after cleavage with different restriction enzymes. Hybridization with the DNAs of human papilloma virus types 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 8 showed no homology under stringent hybridization conditions. Human papilloma virus type 6 DNA, however, was partially identical to laryngeal papilloma virus DNA; different restriction enzyme fragments hybridizing with the other DNA were identified on each genome. The degree of homology was determined by reassociation kinetics to be 25%. According to the present nomenclature, laryngeal papilloma virus therefore represents a different type of human papilloma virus and is tentatively designated as human papilloma virus type 11. Sequences homologous to laryngeal papilloma virus DNA were also found in four of nine additional laryngeal papillomas. Attempt to detect homologous DNA in 12 carcinomas of the larynx were negative. Images PMID:6292500

  6. The Association of High Risk Human Papillomaviruses in Patients With Cervical Cancer: An Evidence Based Study on Patients With Squamous Cell Dysplasia or Carcinoma for Evaluation of 23 Human Papilloma Virus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Piroozmand, Ahmad; Mostafavi Zadeh, Seyed Mostafa; Madani, Azita; Soleimani, Reza; Nedaeinia, Reza; Niakan, Mohammad; Avan, Amir; Manian, Mostafa; Moradi, Mohammad; Eftekhar, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in females. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the major risk factor of cervical cancer. Objectives The aim of the current study was to explore the frequency and role of 23 different HPVs in patients with cervical cancer. Materials and Methods Overall, 117 formalin-fix and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues from cervical cancer patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or dysplasia were collected from Mirza-Kochakkhan-Jangali hospital, Tehran, Iran during year 2013, to investigate the presence of HPV- HPV- 67, 68, 6, 11, 13, 16, 17, 30, 69, 39, 40, 42, 64, 66 and 51 to 59 genotypes. Results The Pap smear report illustrated the presence of malignancy in 71 cases, while 11 cases had no evidence of malignancy. Among the patients, 26 cases had sexually transmitted disease with relative frequency of 0.58. Infection with papilloma virus was observed in 83.6% of SCC patients and 45% of the dysplasia group. The most prevalent HPV genotypes were 18 with 31.62% and 16 with 27.35% of cases. Moreover the relative frequencies of HPV-33, -6, -58, -52, -35 and -51, genotypes were 15.38, 7.69, 5.98, 5.12 and 3.41%, respectively. Among the different genotypes of HPV, 31 had the lowest and 16 had the highest relative frequency. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that HPV-16 and -18 have a higher prevalence in our population than 31 and 51. Further investigations are required to evaluate the role of these genotypes in a larger multicenter setting for establishing their values for early detection of patients, which is useful for screening and vaccination programs of cancerous and precancerous lesions of cervical cancer. PMID:27279992

  7. Human papilloma virus infection and psoriasis: Did human papilloma virus infection trigger psoriasis?

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sonia P.; Gulhane, Sachin; Pandey, Neha; Bisne, Esha

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease known to be triggered by streptococcal and HIV infections. However, human papilloma virus infection (HPV) as a triggering factor for the development of psoriasis has not been reported yet. We, hereby report a case of plaque type with inverse psoriasis which probably could have been triggered by genital warts (HPV infection) and discuss the possible pathomechanisms for their coexistence and its management. PMID:26692619

  8. Molecular identification of a papilloma virus from cutaneous lesions of captive and free-ranging Florida manatees

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, R.A.; Bonde, R.K.; Bonilla, J.A.; Romero, C.H.

    2005-01-01

    Cutaneous papillomatous lesions were biopsied from three captive Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) at Homosassa Springs State Wildlife Park (HSSWP), Homosassa, Florida, USA, and from six free-ranging Florida manatees from Crystal and Homosassa rivers, Florida. Total DNA extracted from these lesions was assayed for the presence of papilloma virus genomes using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers that target the L1 capsid protein gene. The amplification generated DNA fragments 458 base pairs in length that encompassed a highly conserved domain within the L1 capsid protein and translated into identical polypeptides of 152 amino acids, suggesting the involvement of a single papilloma virus genotype. Multiple amino acid sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the L1 fragment indicated that the Florida manatee papilloma virus is a unique and quite distinct papillomavirus from other known papilloma viruses. The emergence of this new pathogen raises concerns about its potential impact on the already endangered Florida manatee.

  9. Molecular identification of a papilloma virus from cutaneous lesions of captive and free-ranging Florida manatees.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, Rebecca A; Bonde, Robert K; Bonilla, J Alfredo; Romero, Carlos H

    2005-04-01

    Cutaneous papillomatous lesions were biopsied from three captive Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) at Homosassa Springs State Wildlife Park (HSSWP), Homosassa, Florida, USA, and from six free-ranging Florida manatees from Crystal and Homosassa rivers, Florida. Total DNA extracted from these lesions was assayed for the presence of papilloma virus genomes using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers that target the L1 capsid protein gene. The amplification generated DNA fragments 458 base pairs in length that encompassed a highly conserved domain within the L1 capsid protein and translated into identical polypeptides of 152 amino acids, suggesting the involvement of a single papilloma virus genotype. Multiple amino acid sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the L1 fragment indicated that the Florida manatee papilloma virus is a unique and quite distinct papillomavirus from other known papilloma viruses. The emergence of this new pathogen raises concerns about its potential impact on the already endangered Florida manatee. PMID:16107681

  10. Transitional cell papilloma of the penis associated with human papilloma virus infection. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pinilla, Socorro María; Rodríguez-Peralto, José Luis; Férnandez-Figueras, María Teresa

    2003-06-01

    Condylomas are one of the most common human papilloma virus (HPV)-related benign lesions of the male genitourinary tract. Although rarely, HPV has also been detected along the urinary tract, using molecular techniques, in transitional cell neoplasms without microscopic signs of koilocytic atypia. When affecting the urethra, condylomas are usually limited to its third distal portion. However, transitional cell neoplasms of the urethra are exceptional and in most of the cases remain limited to its proximal portion. To the best of our knowledge, 12 cases of transitional cell carcinomas and only one case of typical transitional cell papilloma have been described in the anterior urethra. We report two exceptional cases of typical transitional cell papilloma of the glans of the penis near the fossa navicularis which showed microscopic signs of HPV infection. PMID:12728314

  11. Chemical Studies on Polyoma and Shope Papilloma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Sidney J.

    1970-01-01

    Polyoma and Shope papilloma viruses were purified and analyzed by chemical and physical methods. Disc electrophoresis of degraded virions indicated the presence, in both cases, of only one major species of polypeptide subunit. The weight of the peptide chain of polyoma virus was estimated in 8 m urea to be about 45,000 avograms, based on the sedimentation rate in a sucrose-urea gradient and the diffusion coefficient estimated from the differential migration in electrophoresis in gels of different pore size. The presence of a minor peptide of smaller size was suggested by carboxyl-terminal and sedimentation analyses. The amino acid composition of polyoma capsid protein was reported. Chemical analyses showed that polyoma virus and Shope papilloma virus contained 16 and 17.5% deoxyribonucleic acid, respectively. Light scattering by the polyoma virion showed it to have a molecular weight of 22 × 106 and a diameter of 54 nm. Images PMID:4314556

  12. Human papilloma virus vaccines: Current scenario.

    PubMed

    Pandhi, Deepika; Sonthalia, Sidharth

    2011-07-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection with an estimated worldwide prevalence of 9-13% and approximately 6 million people being infected each year. Mostly acquired during adolescence or young adulthood, HPV presents clinically as anogenital warts and may progress to precancerous lesions and cancers of the cervix, vagina, vulva, penis and anus, and oropharynx. HPV infection is considered to contribute to almost 100% cervical cancers and at least 80% of anal and 40-60% of vulvar, vaginal, and penile cancers. At present, two prophylactic HPV vaccines are commercially available and both are prepared from purified L1 structural proteins. These proteins self-assemble to form virus-like particles that induce a protective immunity. Gardasil(®) is a quadrivalent vaccine against HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18 and is recommended for use in females 9-26 years of age, for the prevention of cervical, vulvar, and vaginal cancers and intraepithelial neoplasia and condyloma acuminata and recently for vaccination in boys and men 9-26 years of age for the prevention of genital warts. Cervarix™ is a bivalent vaccine approved for the prevention of cervical cancer and precancerous lesions caused by HPV 16 and 18, in females 10-25 years. HPV vaccines are safe and efficacious against type-specific HPV-induced anogenital warts, precancerous lesions, and cervical cancer. The vaccines are most effective when given before the onset of sexual activity and provide long-term protection. Effective vaccination coverage in young adolescent females will substantially reduce the incidence of these anogenital malignancy-related morbidity and mortality. There is need to generate India-specific data on HPV epidemiology and HPV vaccination efficacy as well as continue worldwide surveillance and development of newer vaccines. PMID:22021967

  13. Human Papilloma Virus and Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anus

    PubMed Central

    Gami, Bhavna; Kubba, Faris; Ziprin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of anal cancer is increasing. In the UK, the incidence is estimated at approximately 1.5 per 100,000. Most of this increase is attributed to certain at-risk populations. Persons who are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive and men who have sex with men (MSM), Organ transplant recipients, women with a history of cervical cancer, human papilloma virus (HPV), or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) are known to have a greater risk for anal cancer. This paper will focus on HPV as a risk factor for anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) and discusses the etiology, anatomy, pathogenesis, management of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the anus. PMID:25288893

  14. Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination in childhood: challenges and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mammas, I; Maher, F; Theodoridou, M; Spandidos, D

    2011-01-01

    Vaccination against human papilloma virus (HPV) in childhood is a significant step forward in the reduction of HPV associated morbidity and mortality and a considerable scientific achievement. However, many challenges remain to be overcome if an effective HPV vaccine programme is to be successfully introduced worldwide. The aim of this review is to identify and summarize the new issues concerning HPV vaccination that have emerged since its introduction into clinical practice in school-aged girls. According to the literature, the overall impact of HPV vaccination on cervical cancer is unlikely to be apparent for the next decade. Cost-effectiveness is of particular importance, particularly in developing countries. Determining the age at which the vaccine should be administered, whether to include boys in addition to girls, the costs and the implications for cervical screening are issues that need to be addressed by conducting further research. PMID:24391408

  15. Ethical considerations of universal vaccination against human papilloma virus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background From an epidemiological perspective, the practice of universal vaccination of girls and young women in order to prevent human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and potential development of cervical cancer is widely accepted even though it may lead to the neglect of other preventive strategies against cervical cancer. Discussion It is argued that removing the deterrent effect – the fear of developing cancer – could encourage teenage sex. This paper reflects on the ethical legitimacy of the universal vaccination of girls and young women against HPV infection, especially regarding safety issues, the need to vaccinate people who have opted to abstain from sex, the presumption of early onset of sexual relations, the commercial interests of the companies that manufacture the vaccine, and the recommendation of universal vaccination in males. Summary Based on the aforementioned information, we believe that the universal vaccination against HPV in young women is acceptable from an ethical point of view, given the medical advantages it presents. PMID:24708813

  16. Immunohistochemistry and Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection Human Papilloma Virus in Warts: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Sun; Lee, Ji Hyun; Choo, Ji Yoon; Byun, Hee Jin; Jun, Jin Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are the most widely used methods for the detection of viruses. PCR is known to be a more sensitive and specific method than the immunohistochemical method at this time, but PCR has the disadvantages of high cost and skilled work to use widely. With the progress of technology, the immunohistochemical methods used in these days has come to be highly sensitive and actively used in the diagnostic fields. Objective To evaluate and compare the usefulness of immunohistochemistry and PCR for detection human papilloma virus (HPV) in wart lesions. Methods Nine biopsy samples of verruca vulgaris and 10 of condyloma accuminatum were examined. Immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal antibody to HPV L1 capsid protein and PCR were done for the samples. DNA sequencing of the PCR products and HPV genotyping were also done. Results HPV detection rate was 78.9% (88.9% in verruca vulgaris, 70.0% in condyloma accuminatum) on immunohistochemistry and 100.0% for PCR. HPV-6 genotype showed a lower positivity rate on immunohistochemistry (50.0%) as compared to that of the other HPV genotypes. Conclusion Immunohistochemistry for HPV L1 capsid protein showed comparable sensitivity for detection HPV. Considering the high cost and great effort needed for the PCR methods, we can use immunohistochemistry for HPV L1 capsid protein with the advantage of lower cost and simple methods for HPV detection. PMID:27489431

  17. Human Papilloma Virus and Oropharyngeal Carcinoma - Lessons from History.

    PubMed

    Vlantis, Alexander Chris

    2016-03-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) is a common virus that infects epithelium in 10% of the world's population. While most sexually active people become infected, the majority with a healthy natural immunity control their infection. When the infection becomes persistent in cervical mucosa for instance, it is associated with nearly all cervical cancers. Fortunately cervical cancer screening is both sensitive and specific and when accessed has led to significant reductions of this disease. Despite this, cervical cancer still remains one of the leading causes of death from cancer. Oropharyngeal mucosa is becoming persistently infected with HPV in an increasing number of people leading to a potential epidemic of oropharyngeal carcinoma. While only 10% of new oropharyngeal infections persist, those in elderly men who smoke are more likely to do so. Some centres report more than 70% of oropharyngeal cancers are associated with HPV infection, which is different to cancers caused by alcohol and tobacco. Other centres report only a 20% association. Education against high-risk sexual behaviour has been met with limited success. Screening for oropharyngeal HPV infection has been disappointing with a pickup rate of only 40%. Some hope lies in detecting viral DNA in both the saliva and plasma. A HPV vaccine has been available since 2006 but is not yet routinely given to both sexes in many countries. Its effect on the incidence of HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinomas is currently unknown. Vigilance by dental and medical colleagues in the meantime is essential. PMID:26981602

  18. Prevalence of human papilloma virus among women with breast cancer since 2005-2009 in Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Manzouri, Leila; Salehi, Rasoul; Shariatpanahi, Shervin; rezaie, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) DNA has been detected in breast carcinoma by different laboratorial techniques, suggesting that the virus could play a role in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Materials and Methods: It was a descriptive study. Systematic random sampling was used for selecting 55 cases of breast cancer and 51 controls of benign breast lesions from the file of Seyedshohada hospital of Isfahan since 2005-2009. A total of 106 paraffin-embedded specimens were selected and HPV DNA was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced for different types of HPV in case of positivity for HPV DNA. Data analysis was performed by SPSS 16 software using descriptive statistic, Chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests. Results: Out of 55 malignant and 51 benign breast specimens, 18.2% (10) and 13.7% (7) were positive to HPV DNA, respectively (P = 0.53); 70% (7) malignant and 43% (3) benign breast specimens were positive to high-risk HPV genotypes. In malignant specimens, the most common high- and low-risk genotypes were HPV-16 (3.6%) and HPV-11 (3.6%), respectively. In benign specimens, the most common high- and low-risk genotypes were HPV-31 (3.9%) and HPV-43 (3.9%), respectively. Among malignant and benign specimens, ductal carcinoma and fibro adenoma were the most common lesions positive to different types of HPV, respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the presence of HPV genome in both malignant and benign tumor tissues in women with breast lesions in Isfahan; therefore, further larger epidemiologic studies need to be analyzed to establish the exact role of this virus in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. PMID:24627883

  19. Predictors associated with the willingness to take human papilloma virus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Naing, Cho; Pereira, Joanne; Abe, Tatsuki; Eh Zhen Wei, Daniel; Rahman Bajera, Ibrizah Binti Abdul; Kavinda Perera, Undugodage Heshan

    2012-04-01

    Human papilloma virus vaccine is considered to be the primary form of cervical cancer prevention. The objectives were (1) to determine knowledge about, and perception of human papilloma virus infection in relation to cervical cancer, (2) to explore the intention of the community to be vaccinated with human papilloma virus vaccine, and (3) to identify variables that could predict the likelihood of uptake of the vaccine. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in a semi-urban Town of Malaysia, using a pre-tested structured questionnaire. Summary statistics, Pearson chi-square test and a binary logistic regression were used for data analysis. A total of 232 respondents were interviewed. Overall, only a few had good knowledge related to human papilloma virus (14%) or vaccination (8%). Many had misconceptions that it could be transmitted through blood transfusion (57%). Sixty percent had intention to take vaccination. In the binary logistic model, willingness to take vaccination was significant with 'trusts that vaccination would be effective for prevention of cervical cancer' (P = 0.001), 'worries for themselves' (P < 0.001) or 'their family members' (P = 0.003) and 'being Indian ethnicity' (P = 0.024). The model could fairly predict the likelihood of uptake of the vaccine (Cox & Snell R(2) = .415; Nagelkerke R(2) = 0.561). Results indicate that intensive health education dispelling misconception and risk perception towards human papilloma virus infection and cervical cancer would be helpful to increase the acceptability of vaccination program. PMID:21928103

  20. Human papilloma virus vaccines: need to be introduced in India.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ramesh; Khanna, Pardeep

    2013-01-01

    Human papilloma viruses (HPVs) infect the skin and mucosal epithelium of both men and women. There are about 100 types of HPVs, which are differentiated by the genetic sequence of the outer capsid protein L1. More than 30 types of HPVs are sexually transmitted. Most cases of carcinoma of the cervix are caused by HPV. Cervical cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in women is the second biggest cause of female cancer mortality worldwide. The worldwide incidence of cervical carcinoma is 529,000 per year, and mortality is 275,000, of which an estimated 88% of deaths occur in developing countries. At least 20 million people worldwide are already chronically infected. Over 80% of cases of cervical carcinoma occurs in developing countries, with 25% estimated to occur in India. At least 50% of sexually active men and women encounter genital HPV at some time in their lives. Cervical cancer is ranked as the most frequent cancer in women in India. India has a population of approximately 366 million women above 15 y of age, who are at risk of developing cervical cancer. The current estimates indicate approximately 132,000 new cases diagnosed and 74,000 deaths annually in India, accounting for nearly one-third of the global cervical cancer deaths. HPV can be prevented by vaccination. Two types of HPV vaccines are available, as Gardasil and Cervarix, both of which are highly effective at preventing HPV infection. HPV vaccine is administered in a three-dose series administered by intramuscular injection, either in the deltoid muscle or in the antero-lateral thigh. The second and third doses should be administered 2 and 6 mo after the first dose respectively. The minimum interval between the first and second doses should be 4 weeks, between the second and third dose should be 12 weeks. PMID:23108360

  1. Multiple Human Papilloma Virus 16 Infection Presenting as Various Skin Lesions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Lee, Jun Ho

    2016-06-01

    The 53-year-old woman admitted with multiple persistent, progressive, slightly raised, red, and crusted plague form masses that suddenly occurred on left thumb, both upper and lower extremity about 10 years ago. There was no induration in the lesion or in its surrounding skin. There was no unusual opinion on a radiologic test and family history. And she had no history of working in the business related to any chemical product such as arsenic or tar which was carcinogen. The patient has had total hysterectomy to treat uterine myoma 10 years ago. The wide excision and split thickness skin graft of 2 × 1.5 cm was performed around mass in the size of 1.5 × 1.2 cm on the left thumb and wide excision and local advancement flap was done on the other sites. As a result of biopsy, masses were diagnosed as Bowen disease, actinic keratosis, and Seborrheic keratosis. These specimens were obtained during surgery: broom-type cell sampling devices were used to collect samples from the specimens, and they were placed into PreservCyt solution (Cytyc Corp, Boxborough, MA). Then, the collected samples underwent the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Diagnostics, Branchburg, NJ) that allows for the simultaneous identification of human papilloma virus (HPV) types from liquid-based cell preparations. On histopathological examination of the surgical specimen, atypical squamous cells proliferate through the whole thickness of the epidermis. The entire tumor was confined to the epidermis and did not invade into the dermis. The cells were often highly atypical. That were the irregular shape which the resection margin of masses had a negative tumor component. And HPV 16 genotyping test was positive although vaginal examination of HPV 16 genotyping was negative. PMID:27192658

  2. [Cost effectiveness of human papilloma virus testing in cervical cancer screening: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Mejía, Aurelio; Salas, Walter

    2008-03-01

    Human papilloma virus DNA testing may improve the cost effectiveness of cervical cancer screening programs. However, the circumstances to get this improvement are not the same between countries. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the cost effectiveness of introducing human papilloma virus testing in the current screening practice both in developed and developing countries. We conducted a review of published articles since January 2000 until December 2006 related to the cost effectiveness of introducing human papilloma virus testing in cervical cancer screening programs. A total of 17 original researches and six reviews were analyzed. Human papilloma virus testing is cost effective in developed countries only if it is a complementary test to Pap test and used to determine the management of women with atypical squamus cells of undetermined significance, the interval among tests is increased more than two years and it is performed in women over 30 years. On the other hand, developing countries should establish first organized screening programs and guarantee full coverage and access to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:18645671

  3. Problem-Solving Test: The Mechanism of Action of a Human Papilloma Virus Oncoprotein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: human papilloma virus; cervical cancer; oncoproteins; malignant transformation; retinoblastoma protein; cell cycle; quiescent and cycling cells; cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes; E2F; S-phase genes; enhancer element; proto-oncogenes; tumor suppressor genes; radioactive…

  4. Cloning of human papilloma virus genomic DNAs and analysis of homologous polynucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Heilman, C A; Law, M F; Israel, M A; Howley, P M

    1980-11-01

    The complete DNA genomes of four distinct human papilloma viruses (human papilloma virus subtype 1a [HPV-1a], HPV-1b, HPV-2a, and HPV-4) were molecularly cloned in Escherichia coli, using the certified plasmid vector pBR322. The restriction endonuclease patterns of the cloned HPV-1a and HPV-1b DNAs were similar to those already published for uncloned DNAs. Physical maps were constructed for HPV-2a DNA and HPV-4 DNA, since these viral DNAs had not been previously mapped. By using the cloned DNAs, the genomes of HPV-1a, HPV-2a, and HPV-4 were analyzed for nucleotide sequence homology. Under standard hybridization conditions (Tm = --28 degrees C), no homology was detectable among the genomes of these papilloma viruses, in agreement with previous reports. However, under less stringent conditions (i.e., Tm = --50 degrees C), stable DNA hybrids could be detected between these viral DNAs, indicating homologous segments in the genomes with approximately 30% base mismatch. By using specific DNA fragments immobilized on nitrocellulose filters, these regions of homology were mapped. Hybridization experiments between radiolabeled bovine papilloma virus type 1 (BPV-1) DNA and the unlabeled HPV-1a, HPV-2a, or HPV-4 DNA restriction fragments under low-stringency conditions indicated that the regions of homology among the HPV DNAs are also conserved in the BPV-1 genome with approximately the same degree of base mismatch. PMID:6253665

  5. Human papilloma virus, DNA methylation and microRNA expression in cervical cancer (Review).

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Wences, Hilda; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria

    2014-06-01

    Cancer is a complex disease caused by genetic and epigenetic abnormalities that affect gene expression. The progression from precursor lesions to invasive cervical cancer is influenced by persistent human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, which induces changes in the host genome and epigenome. Epigenetic alterations, such as aberrant miRNA expression and changes in DNA methylation status, favor the expression of oncogenes and the silencing of tumor-suppressor genes. Given that some miRNA genes can be regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, it has been proposed that alterations in the methylation status of miRNA promoters could be the driving mechanism behind their aberrant expression in cervical cancer. For these reasons, we assessed the relationship among HPV infection, cellular DNA methylation and miRNA expression. We conclude that alterations in the methylation status of protein-coding genes and various miRNA genes are influenced by HPV infection, the viral genotype, the physical state of the viral DNA, and viral oncogenic risk. Furthermore, HPV induces deregulation of miRNA expression, particularly at loci near fragile sites. This deregulation occurs through the E6 and E7 proteins, which target miRNA transcription factors such as p53. PMID:24737381

  6. Human papilloma virus, DNA methylation and microRNA expression in cervical cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    JIMÉNEZ-WENCES, HILDA; PERALTA-ZARAGOZA, OSCAR; FERNÁNDEZ-TILAPA, GLORIA

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease caused by genetic and epigenetic abnormalities that affect gene expression. The progression from precursor lesions to invasive cervical cancer is influenced by persistent human papilloma virus (HPV) infection, which induces changes in the host genome and epigenome. Epigenetic alterations, such as aberrant miRNA expression and changes in DNA methylation status, favor the expression of oncogenes and the silencing of tumor-suppressor genes. Given that some miRNA genes can be regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, it has been proposed that alterations in the methylation status of miRNA promoters could be the driving mechanism behind their aberrant expression in cervical cancer. For these reasons, we assessed the relationship among HPV infection, cellular DNA methylation and miRNA expression. We conclude that alterations in the methylation status of protein-coding genes and various miRNA genes are influenced by HPV infection, the viral genotype, the physical state of the viral DNA, and viral oncogenic risk. Furthermore, HPV induces deregulation of miRNA expression, particularly at loci near fragile sites. This deregulation occurs through the E6 and E7 proteins, which target miRNA transcription factors such as p53. PMID:24737381

  7. Detection and Typing of Human Papilloma Viruses by Nested Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jalal Kiani, Seyed; Shatizadeh Malekshahi, Somayeh; Yousefi Ghalejoogh, Zohreh; Ghavvami, Nastaran; Shafiei Jandaghi, Nazanin Zahra; Shahsiah, Reza; Jahanzad, Isa; Yavarian, Jila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer in under-developed countries. Human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and 18 are the most prevalent types associated with carcinogenesis in the cervix. Conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), type-specific and consensus primer-based PCR followed by sequencing, Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) or hybridization by specific probes are common methods for HPV detection and typing. In addition, some researchers have developed a multiplex PCR for simultaneous detection and typing of different HPVs. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection and its types in cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) using the Nested Multiplex PCR (NMPCR) assay. Patients and Methods: Sixty-six samples with histologically confirmed SCC were evaluated. Total DNA was isolated by phenol–chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. Nested multiplex PCR was performed with first-round PCR by GP-E6/E7 consensus primers for amplification of the genomic DNA of all known mucosal HPV genotypes and second-round PCR by type-specific multiplex PCR primer cocktails. Results: Human papilloma virus infection was detected in 78.8% of samples, with the highest prevalence of HPV 16 (60.6%) while concurrent infections with two types was detected in 10.6%. Conclusions: The NMPCR assay is more convenient and easy for analysis of results, which is important for fast diagnosis and patient management, in a type-specific manner. PMID:26865940

  8. Rome consensus conference - statement; human papilloma virus diseases in males

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a very resistant, ubiquitous virus that can survive in the environment without a host. The decision to analyse HPV-related diseases in males was due to the broad dissemination of the virus, and, above all, by the need to stress the importance of primary and secondary prevention measures (currently available for women exclusively). The objective of the Consensus Conference was to make evidence-based recommendations that were designed to facilitate the adoption of a standard approach in clinical practice in Italy. Methods The Sponsoring Panel put a series of questions to the members of the Scientific Committee who prepared a summary of the currently available information, relevant for each question, after the review and grading of the existing scientific literature. The summaries were presented to a Jury, also called multidisciplinary Consensus Panel, who drafted a series of recommendations. Results The prevalence of HPV in males ranges between 1.3–72.9%;. The prevalence curve in males is much higher than that in females and does not tend to decline with age. Women appear to have a higher probability of acquiring HPV genotypes associated with a high oncogenic risk, whereas in males the probability of acquiring low- or high-risk genotypes is similar. The HPV-related diseases that affect males are anogenital warts and cancers of the penis, anus and oropharynx. The quadrivalent vaccine against HPV has proved to be effective in preventing external genital lesions in males aged 16–26 years in 90.4%; (95%; CI: 69.2–98.1) of cases. It has also proved to be effective in preventing precancerous anal lesions in 77.5%; (95%; CI: 39.6–93.3) of cases in a per-protocol analysis and in 91.7%; (95%; CI: 44.6–99.8) of cases in a post-hoc analysis. Early ecological studies demonstrate reduction of genital warts in vaccinated females and some herd immunity in males when vaccine coverage is high, although males who have sex with males

  9. Risk factors and distribution of oncogenic strains of human papilloma virus in women presenting for cervical cancer screening in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Nyengidiki Tamunomie; Ikechukwu, Durugbo; Goddy, Bassey

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Human papilloma virus(HPV) accounts for most cases of cervical cancer with high risk HPV(hrHPV) genotypes largely responsible. The objective is to ascertain the distribution of oncogenic strains of human papilloma virus genotypes and predisposing risk factors in women presenting for cervical cancer screening in Nigeria. Methods A cross-sectional study of 80 women who presented for cervical cancer screening. The biodata of the participants, the presence of risk factors to HPV were recorded and hrHPV were identified using PCR technique. The information obtained was processed using the SPSS version 20 software. Results were presented in tables, test of significance and association done using student's t-test and Odds ratio, with P value < 0.05 as significant. Results The age range of patients was 19-62 years with prevalence of hrHPV of 10%. HrHPV are more in patients with more than one life time sexual partner (OR 1.26,95%CI 0.13-29.99), multiple sexual partners (OR 1.55, 95% CI 0.28-8.70), early coitarche (OR 1.57, 95% CI 0.14-15.00) and previous STI (OR 150, 95%CI 9.53-1979. 62). Four hrHPV genotypes: 16, 18, 31 and 35 were detected. Conclusion HPV genotype 18 was predominant in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. High risk sexual behaviours are associated with acquisition of hrHPV. PMID:27222684

  10. “Saving lives”: Adapting and adopting Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Katharina T.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination against the sexually transmitted Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), a necessary agent for the development of cervical cancer, has triggered much debate. In Austria, HPV policy turned from “lagging behind” in 2008 into “Europe's frontrunner” by 2013. Drawing on qualitative research, the article shows how the vaccine was transformed and made “good enough” over the course of five years. By means of tinkering and shifting storylines, policy officials and experts disassociated the vaccine from gender, vaccine manufacturers, and youth sexuality. Ultimately, the HPV vaccine functioned to strengthen the national immunization program. To this end, preventing an effective problematization of the extant screening program was essential. PMID:26921834

  11. Development of procedures for the identification of human papilloma virus DNA fragments in laser plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woellmer, Wolfgang; Meder, Tom; Jappe, Uta; Gross, Gerd; Riethdorf, Sabine; Riethdorf, Lutz; Kuhler-Obbarius, Christina; Loening, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    For the investigation of laser plume for the existence of HPV DNA fragments, which possibly occur during laser treatment of virus infected tissue, human papillomas and condylomas were treated in vitro with the CO2-laser. For the sampling of the laser plume a new method for the trapping of the material was developed by use of water-soluble gelatine filters. These samples were analyzed with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, which was optimized in regard of the gelatine filters and the specific primers. Positive PCR results for HPV DNA fragments up to the size of a complete oncogene were obtained and are discussed regarding infectiousity.

  12. Persistent infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses: cohort study, Mérida, Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Téllez, Luis; Michelli, Elvia; Mendoza, José Andrés; Vielma, Silvana; Noguera, María-Eugenia; Callejas, Diana; Cavazza, María; Correnti, María

    2015-01-01

    Cervical lesions have been associated with infection by high-risk human papilloma virus (high-risk HPV). In 409 women aged >15 years high-risk HPV lesions were identified. In a cohort of this population persistent infection was compared with cytological, colposcopic, and histological lesions. Cervical scrapes were taken and DNA was isolated. HPV was detected by PCR in the E6/E7 region. Genotyping was performed by PCR nested multiple E6/E7. HPV was detected in a 37.40% (153/409), high-risk HPV in 86% (153/178), HPV18 46.64% (83/178), HPV16 34.28% (61/178). Among these 53.93% (96/178) were multiple infections, and HPV18/16 (30/96) was the most frequent 31.25%. The cytology showed changes in 15% of positive patients. A 49.67% in women positive for HPV infection showed abnormalities in the colposcopic study, a relationship that turned out to be statistically significant ( p < 0.0019 test χ2). Among all 85% of the women were younger than 45 years of age. Fifty-seven patients were evaluated 15 months after the base study, with initial prevalence of morbidity 49.12% (28/57) and at the end 10.53% (6/57), showing in 89.29% (25/28) negative for HR-HPV infection, 10.34% (3/28) showed persistence of infection, 17.54% (10/57) presented cytological alterations, with 80% of positivity for HPV, and a regression of 100% (10/10) of the previously identified lesions. With colposcopy, 50% (14/28) presented alterations related to HPV, of these 85.71% (12/14) showed regression of such an alteration. The cumulative incidence for HPV was 10.34% (3/29). The incidence rate was 4.23% (3/71), which is equal to 4.23 new cases of HPV infection per 100 people, per year of follow-up. In conclusion, the present work shows a high frequency of infection by high-risk HPV, with predominance of HPV18 and 16 and in general for multiple infections. Colposcopy was better predictor than the Pap smear for infection. The follow-up study revealed a low percentage of persistent infection, and a high frequency

  13. A proposal to reduce the risk of transmission of human papilloma virus via transvaginal ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Combs, C Andrew; Fishman, Alan

    2016-07-01

    Three steps must be followed to prevent the transmission of infection via a contaminated transvaginal ultrasound probe: cleaning the probe after every use, high-level disinfection, and covering the probe with a single-use barrier during the examination. There may be critical flaws in at least 2 of these steps as they are currently practiced. First, 2 widely used disinfectants, glutaraldehyde and orthophthalaldehyde, have recently been found to be ineffective at neutralizing human papilloma virus type 16 and type 18. Second, commercial ultrasound probe covers have an unacceptable rate of leakage (8-81%) compared to condoms (0.9-2%). We recommend the use of a sonicated hydrogen peroxide disinfectant system rather than aldehyde-type disinfectants. We recommend that the probe be covered with a condom rather than a commercial probe cover during transvaginal ultrasound examination. Combined with probe cleaning, these 2 steps are estimated to result in an 800 million- to 250 billion-fold reduction in human papilloma virus viral load, which should translate to greatly enhanced patient safety. PMID:26994654

  14. 78 FR 18359 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Papilloma Pseudovirus and Virus-Like Particles as a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Papilloma Pseudovirus and Virus-Like Particles as a Delivery System for Human Cancer Therapeutics and Diagnostics...

  15. Respiratory papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Alagusundaramoorthy, Sayee Sundar; Agrawal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Papillomas are known to occur in the lower respiratory tract. They are however, rare compared to their occurrence in the upper respiratory tract. These are generally exophytic tumors in the more proximal upper airways however cases with more distal location with an inverted growth pattern have also been described in the literature. These can be solitary or multiple and multifocality associated with multiple papillomas in the upper respiratory/aerodigestive tract. The four major types of respiratory papillomas are (1) Recurrent respiratory papillomas, (2) solitary squamous papillomas, (3) solitary glandular papillomas, (4) mixed papillomas. We review the incidence, etiopathology, diagnosis, and possible treatment modalities and algorithms for these respiratory papillomas. PMID:27625447

  16. Human papilloma virus strain detection utilising custom-designed oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ayers, Duncan; Platt, Mark; Javad, Farzad; Day, Philip J R

    2011-01-01

    Within the past 15 years, the utilisation of microarray technology for the detection of specific pathogen strains has increased rapidly. Presently, it is possible to simply purchase a pre-manufactured "off the shelf " oligonucleotide microarray bearing a wide variety of known signature DNA sequences previously identified in the organism being studied. Consequently, a hybridisation analysis may be used to pinpoint which strain/s is present in any given clinical sample. However, there exists a problem if the study necessitates the identification of novel sequences which are not represented in commercially available microarray chips. Ideally, such investigations require an in situ oligonucleotide microarray platform with the capacity to synthesise microarrays bearing probe sequences designed solely by the researcher. This chapter will focus on the employment of the Combimatrix® B3 CustomArray™ for the synthesis of reusable, bespoke microarrays for the purpose of discerning multiple Human Papilloma Virus strains. PMID:20938834

  17. Human Papilloma Virus in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma - The Enigma Unravelled.

    PubMed

    Khot, Komal P; Deshmane, Swati; Choudhari, Sheetal

    2016-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) has long been regarded as a disease entity having a remarkable incidence worldwide and a fairly onerous prognosis; thus encouraging further research on factors that might modify disease outcome. Squamous cell carcinomas encompass at least 90% of all oral malignancies. Several factors like tobacco and tobacco-related products, alcohol, genetic predisposition and hormonal factors are suspected as possible causative factors. Human papilloma virus (HPV), the causal agent of cervical cancer also appears to be involved in the aetiology of oral and oropharyngeal cancer. HPVpositive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) seems to differ from HPV-negative SCC. Many questions about the natural history of oral HPV infection remain under investigation. The aim of this review is to highlight the current understanding of HPV-associated oral cancer with an emphasis on its prognosis, detection and management. PMID:26981603

  18. Oropharyngeal cancer and human papilloma virus: evolving diagnostic and management paradigms.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Lisa; Gupta, Ruta; Ashford, Bruce; Jabbour, Joe; Clark, Jonathan R

    2016-06-01

    The significant increase in human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) over recent years has lead to a surge in research and an improved understanding of the disease. Most patients with HPV-associated OPC present with cystic nodal metastases with a small primary tumour, and respond well to all treatment modalities including primary surgery and primary chemoradiotherapy. Current research is evaluating treatment de-escalation to reduce long-term treatment-associated morbidities. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) is particularly relevant as the transoral approach allows small primary tumours to be removed with lower morbidity than traditional surgical approaches. The current American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system for oropharyngeal cancer does not appropriately stratify HPV-associated OPC; hence, alternative risk stratification and staging classifications are being proposed. PMID:26687076

  19. Human Papilloma Virus Associated Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Ajila, Vidya; Shetty, Harish; Babu, Subhas; Shetty, Veena; Hegde, Shruthi

    2015-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the commonest causes for mortality and morbidity with squamous cell carcinoma being the sixth most frequent malignant tumour worldwide. In addition to tobacco and alcohol, human papilloma virus (HPV) is associated with a proportion of head and neck cancers. As in cervical cancers, HPV types 16 and 18 are the cause of malignant transformation. HPV-positive cancers of head and neck have unique characteristics such as occurrence in a younger age group, distinct clinical and molecular features, and better prognosis as compared to HPV-negative carcinomas. They also possess the potential for prevention by using vaccination. The present review describes in detail the salient features of HPV associated oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), its differences from HPV-negative OSCC, diagnostic features, and recent strategies in prevention and management. PMID:26483987

  20. [The care needs of women infected with the human papilloma virus: a comprehensive approach].

    PubMed

    Cestari, Maria Elisa Wotzasek; Merighi, Miriam Aparecida Barbosa; Garanhani, Mara Lúcia; Cardeli, Alexandrina Aparecida Maciel; de Jesus, Maria Cristina Pinto; Lopes, Dolores Ferreira de Melo

    2012-10-01

    This study is founded on the phenomenology of Martin Heidegger, with the objective to understand the care needs of women infected with the human papilloma virus. Participants were fourteen women who had been diagnosed with this infection. The guiding questions were: What is it like to have this diagnosis? Tell me your experience, from when you received your diagnosis until today. What has your health care been like? The questions revealed the theme - seeking care as solitude - which showed the importance of the support of family and friends. The presence of the infection as the cause of marital conflicts and separation was another highlighted aspect. The statements showed that there was a sense of resignation after an unsuccessful attempt to find accurate and clear information in order to make assertive decisions. Health interventions for infected women must overcome the traditional models of care, including interventions for health promotion and prevention, with trained professionals who are sensitive to the subjective dimension. PMID:23223722

  1. Determination of knowledge of Turkish midwifery students about human papilloma virus infection and its vaccines.

    PubMed

    Genc, Rabia Ekti; Sarican, Emine Serap; Turgay, Ayse San; Icke, Sibel; Sari, Dilek; Saydam, Birsen Karaca

    2013-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted agents and its infection is the most established cause of cervical cancer. Midwives play a key position in the implementation of cervical cancer. This descriptive study aimed to determine the level of knowledge concerning HPV and HPV vaccination among 268 midwifery students. Data were collected between November 15 and 30, 2011, through a self-reported questionnaire. The mean age of participants was 20.75 ± 1.60. Among all students, 44.4% had heard of HPV, while 40.4% had heard of HPV vaccinatiob. The relationship between the midwifery student knowledge on HPV and HPV vaccine and their current educational year was significant (p=0.001). In conclusion midwifery students have moderate level of knowledge about HPV and its vaccine and relevant information should be included in their teaching curriculum. PMID:24377604

  2. Human papilloma virus vaccine: determinants of acceptability by mothers for adolescents in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ezeanochie, Michael C; Olagbuji, Biodun N

    2014-09-01

    Vaccination of adolescent females against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), the causative agent for cervical cancer has recently become available. As minors, parental acceptance of the vaccines for adolescent daughters requires exploration. This was a cross-sectional survey of 201 mothers attending the gynaecology clinic in a University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria on acceptability of the HPV vaccines and its determinants. Although 70% accepted vaccination of their daughters, 30% were unwilling and the commonest reason for unwillingness was that it may encourage sexual promiscuity (62.3%). Mothers with poor knowledge of STI were significantly more unwilling to accept HPV vaccines compared to those with average or good knowledge (p = 0.002). Furthermore, perception of susceptibility to HPV infection by daughters was significantly associated with acceptance of the vaccines (p = 0.0001). Increased advocacy and public enlightenment on cervical cancer control and the role of HPV vaccines in its prevention is still necessary especially in developing countries. PMID:25508051

  3. Human papilloma virus vaccine: determinants of acceptability by mothers for adolescents in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ezeanochie, Michael C; Olagbuji, Biodun N

    2014-09-01

    Vaccination of adolescent females against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), the causative agent for cervical cancer has recently become available. As minors, parental acceptance of the vaccines for adolescent daughters requires exploration. This was a cross-sectional survey of 201 mothers attending the gynaecology clinic in a University Teaching Hospital in Nigeria on acceptability of the HPV vaccines and its determinants. Although 70% accepted vaccination of their daughters, 30% were unwilling and the commonest reason for unwillingness was that it may encourage sexual promiscuity (62.3%). Mothers with poor knowledge of STI were significantly more unwilling to accept HPV vaccines compared to those with average or good knowledge (p = 0.002). Furthermore, perception of susceptibility to HPV infection by daughters was significantly associated with acceptance of the vaccines (p = 0.0001). Increased advocacy and public enlightenment on cervical cancer control and the role of HPV vaccines in its prevention is still necessary especially in developing countries. PMID:25438520

  4. Effective nonvaccine interventions to be considered alongside human papilloma virus vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Hindin, Michelle J; Bloem, Paul; Ferguson, Jane

    2015-01-01

    World Health Organization recommends that girls, ages 9-13 years, get the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine. Global Alliance for Vaccines Initiative, which provides low-cost vaccine to eligible countries, requires that an additional intervention to be offered alongside the vaccine. We systematically searched and assessed the published literature in lower- and middle-income countries to identify effective interventions. We conducted systematic searches of four databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Global Index Medicus Regional Databases, and Cochrane Reviews for effective adolescent health interventions that could be delivered with the HPV vaccine in the following areas: (1) iron and folic acid supplementation (iron alone or with folic acid); (2) voucher delivery and cash transfer programs; (3) hand washing and soap provision; (4) vision screening; (5) promotion of physical activity/exercise; (6) menstrual hygiene education; (7) sexual and reproductive health education; (8) human immunodeficiency virus prevention activities; and (9) condom promotion, condom use skill building, and demonstration. We found limited evidence of consistent positive impact. Iron supplementation reduced iron-deficiency anemia and raised serum ferritin levels. Promotion of physical activity lowered blood pressure and reduced weight gain. Sexual and reproductive health and human immunodeficiency virus interventions improved adolescent communication with adults but did not influence behavioral outcomes. Countries should consider locally relevant and proven interventions to be offered alongside the HPV vaccine. PMID:25287988

  5. Periodontal pocket as a potential reservoir of high risk human papilloma virus: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dayakar, Manjunath Mundoor; Shipilova, Anna; Gupta, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Human papilloma viruses (HPVs) are small DNA viruses that have been identified in periodontal pocket as well as gingival sulcus. High risk HPVs are also associated with a subset of head and neck carcinomas. HPV detection in periodontium has previously involved DNA detection. This study attempts to: (a) Detect the presence or absence of high risk HPV in marginal periodontiun by identifying E6/E7 messenger RNA (mRNA) in cells from samples obtained by periodontal pocket scraping. (b) Detect the percentage of HPV E6/E7 mRNA in cells of pocket scrapings, which is responsible for producing oncoproteins E6 and E7. Materials and Methods: Pocket scrapings from the periodontal pockets of eight subjects with generalized chronic periodontitis were taken the detection of presence or absence of E6, E7 mRNA was performed using in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. Results: HPV E6/E7 mRNA was detected in four of the eight samples. Conclusion: Presence of high risk human papillomaviruses in periodontal pockets patients of diagnosed with chronic periodontitis, not suffering from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in the present day could link periodontitis to HPV related squamous cell carcinoma. Prevalence studies are needed detecting the presence of HPV in marginal periodontium as well as prospective studies of HPV positive periodontitis patients are required to explore this possible link. PMID:27143823

  6. [Human papilloma viruses: other risk factor of head and neck carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Woto-Gaye, G; M'Farrej, M K; Doh, K; Thiam, I; Touré, S; Diop, R; Dial, C

    2016-08-01

    Head and neck carcinoma (HNC) occupy the sixth place as the most frequent type of cancer worldwide. Next to alcohol and tobacco intoxication, other risk factors (RF) are suspected, including the human papilloma viruses (HPVs). The aim of this study was to highlight the prevalence of HPVs and histo-epidemiological characteristics of HNC HPV+ in Senegal. This is a prospective, multicenter preliminary study of 18 months (January 1, 2012-June 30, 2014). The cases of HNC histologically confirmed in Senegal were then sent to the bio-pathology department of the Curie Institute in Paris to search HPVs. In the 90 included cases, the PCR technique was successful in 54 cases (60%). HPVs were found in seven cases, that is, a prevalence of 13%. HPVs were associated with 5 cases of hypopharyngeal carcinoma and 2 cases of carcinoma of the oral cavity. Patients with HNC HPV+ had a median age of 42 years against 49 years for HPV-patients. Three patients (42.8%) with HPV+ carcinomas were smokers. Of the 47 HPV-patients, 40 patients (87.1%) had alcohol intoxication and/or smoking. The concept of oral sex was refuted by all our patients. Squamous cell carcinoma was the only histological type found. HPV+ cell carcinoma showed no specific histological appearance. HPVs are another certain RF of HNC in Senegal. The major therapeutic and prognostic impact of HPVinduced cancers requires the systematic search of the viruses by the PCR technique. PMID:27325173

  7. Human papilloma virus in neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions of the external eye

    PubMed Central

    Karcioglu, Z.; Issa, T.

    1997-01-01

    AIM—Human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16 and 18 have been associated with neoplastic conditions of the conjunctiva. However, the presence of this virus has not been reported in non-neoplastic disorders of the external eye nor has it been studied in normal conjunctival tissues.
METHODS—Ninety six paraffin embedded tissue specimens with neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions and 19 conjunctiva samples free from overt disease were studied for HPV types 16 and 18 positivity with the polymerase chain reaction.
RESULTS—HPV types 16 and 18 DNA were identified in 57% of in situ squamous cell carcinoma, in 55% of invasive squamous cell carcinoma, in 20% of climatic droplet keratopathy, in 35% of scarred corneas, and in 32% of normal conjunctival tissue obtained during routine cataract extractions.
CONCLUSION—These findings indicate that HPV types 16 and 18 are detectable with the polymerase chain reaction not only in epithelial neoplasms of the ocular mucous membrane but also in non-neoplastic lesions as well as in apparently healthy conjunctiva.

 PMID:9290377

  8. Association of human papilloma virus with pterygia and ocular-surface squamous neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, N

    2012-02-01

    There are more microorganisms that colonize the human body than resident cells; some are commensal whereas others are pathogenic. Pathogenic microorganisms are sensed by the innate or adaptive immune system, an immune response is initiated, and the infection is often cleared. Some microorganisms have developed strategies to evade immune defenses, ensuring their long-term survival with potentially devastating consequences for the host. Approximately 18% of all cancers can be attributed to infective agents; the most common being Helicobacter pylori, Human papilloma virus (HPV) and Hepatitis B and C virus in causing stomach, cervical and liver carcinoma, respectively. This review focuses on whether HPV infection is necessary for initiating pterygia, a common benign condition and ocular-surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN), a rare disease with metastatic potential. The search engine PubMed was used to identify articles from the literature related to HPV and pterygium or conjunctival neoplasia. From 34 investigations that studied HPV in pterygia and OSSN, a prevalence rate of 18.6% (136/731) and 33.8% (144/426), respectively, was recorded. The variation in HPV prevalence (0-100%) for both disease groups may have arisen from study-design faults and the techniques used to identify the virus. Overall, the data suggest that HPV is not necessary for initiating either condition but may be a co-factor in susceptible hosts. Currently, over 60 million people worldwide have been immunized with HPV vaccines, but any effect on pterygium and OSSN development may not be known for some time as these lesions can evolve over decades or occur in older individuals. PMID:22134594

  9. Intraductal papilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001238.htm Intraductal papilloma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Intraductal papilloma is a small, noncancerous (benign) tumor that grows ...

  10. Repression of bovine papilloma virus replication is mediated by a virally encoded trans-acting factor.

    PubMed

    Berg, L; Lusky, M; Stenlund, A; Botchan, M R

    1986-08-29

    Cells transformed with bovine papilloma virus type 1 mutants in the E6 or E6/7 genes are resistant to high-copy-number amplification of wild-type DNA after supertransfection. Transient and stable replication assays demonstrate this effect. If the supertransfected DNA has a mutation in a newly defined gene (M), this cellular immunity to high-copy-number replication is overcome, resulting in transient replication of the input DNA. In contrast, the resident plasmid does not participate in amplification and is maintained at a constant low copy number. Cotransformation of M- mutants and wild-type DNA into these cells leads to shutoff of replication of both genomes. Thus, M- mutants define a trans-acting negative modulator that regulates viral replication. This function is distinct from the positive factors required for replication. We propose a model that explains why the loss of E6 and E6/7 function leads to immunity of the infected cell. PMID:3017567

  11. Human Papilloma Virus Infection in Patients with Male Accessory Gland Infection: Usefulness of the Ultrasound Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Condorelli, Rosita A.; Vicari, Enzo; Mongioi, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the ultrasound (US) features of 20 patients with MAGI and concomitant papilloma virus (HPV) infection compared to 20 patients with microbial (presence of Chlamydia trachomatis alone) MAGI and 20 patients with amicrobial (inflammatory) MAGI. Patients with HPV infection showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher total prostate, seminal vesicles, and epididymal US signs (18.0 ± 2.0) compared to the other 2 groups (12.0 ± 4.0 versus 10.0 ± 3.0, resp.). In addition, patients with MAGI and HPV had a higher prevalence of complicated forms of MAGI [prostatovesiculitis (PV) and prostate-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE)] and a higher frequency of the fibrosclerotic variant compared to the other groups (70.0 ± 10.0% versus 48.0 ± 5.0% versus 15.0 ± 10.0%). Moreover, HPV infected patients had a higher number of US criteria suggestive for MAGI in the periurethral region of the prostate compared to the other groups. In particular, the patients showed a higher ratio between periurethral and lobar US criteria distribution (5.0 versus 0.5). Finally, the seminal fluid concentration of CD45pos leukocytes (2.0 ± 0.2 versus 1.3 ± 0.3 versus 1.0 ± 0.3 mil/mL) was significantly higher and sperm progressive motility was significantly lower in these patients compared to other groups. PMID:27242899

  12. [Withdrawal of an advertising campaign to promote the quadrivalent human papilloma virus vaccine in Spain].

    PubMed

    Martín-Llaguno, Marta; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The inclusion of the quadrivalent human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine in the schedule of the Spanish National Health System sparked the debate over Gardasil, which was presented to the public as a "vaccine against cervical cancer". In this context, Sanofi Pasteur MSD was sued for misleading advertising in the campaign "cuentaselo.org". Although the complaint was not admitted, the lawsuit triggered five changes in the ownership of the web domain which, although backed by scientific societies, was not supported by law. Because of the violation of the Law of the Society of Information Services, and prompted by the suspicion that the pharmaceutical company was behind these changes (as it could not advertise the product), the platform for the moratorium on the HPV vaccine filed a complaint against the Spanish Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics (whose logo appeared on the webpage) for breaching the code of advertising self-regulation. Sanofi Pasteur MSD, the advertiser which was not mentioned, "accepted the complaint and removed the webpage", thus corroborating its involvement. PMID:19523720

  13. Perceptions of Nigerian Women about Human Papilloma Virus, Cervical Cancer, and HPV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Akanbi, Olusola Anuoluwapo; Iyanda, Abiodun; Osundare, Folakemi; Opaleye, Oluyinka Oladele

    2015-01-01

    Background. Cervical cancer caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) though preventable has claimed the lives of many women worldwide. This study was embarked upon to evaluate the general knowledge and perceptions of Nigerian women on HPV, cervical cancer, and HPV vaccine. Methods. Structured questionnaires were administered to a cross section of 737 women randomly selected from the general population in two southwestern States of Nigeria. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS computer software version 16. A P value >0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. One hundred and seventy-six (23.9%) of the respondents had knowledge of HPV; 474 (64.3%) are aware of cervical cancer but only 136 (18.5%) know that HPV causes cervical cancer. 200 (27.1%) are aware that there is an HPV vaccine while 300 (40.7%) had knowledge of Pap smear test. Two hundred and sixty (35.3%) of the respondents know that early detection of HPV can prevent cervical cancer and in spite of this, only 110 (14.9%) have taken the Pap smear test before while 151 (20.5%) are not willing to go for the test at all. Conclusions. There is therefore the need to create proper awareness on the HPV and its possible consequence of cervical carcinoma. PMID:26550522

  14. Expectation prior to human papilloma virus vaccination: 11 to 12-Year-old girls' written narratives.

    PubMed

    Forsner, M; Nilsson, S; Finnström, B; Mörelius, E

    2016-09-01

    Expectations prior to needle-related procedures can influence individuals' decision making and compliance with immunization programmes. To protect from human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, the immunization needs to be given before sexual debut raising interest for this study's aim to investigate how 11 to 12-year-old girls narrate about their expectations prior to HPV vaccination. A total of 27 girls aged 11 to 12 years participated in this qualitative narrative study by writing short narratives describing their expectations. The requirement for inclusion was to have accepted HPV vaccination. Data were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Findings showed the following expectations: going to hurt, going to be scared and going to turn out fine. The expectations were based on the girls' previous experiences, knowledge and self-image. The latent content revealed that the girls tried to transform uneasiness to confidence. The conclusion drawn from this study is that most girls of this age seem confident about their ability to cope with possible unpleasantness related to vaccinations. However, nurses need to find strategies to help those children who feel uneasy about needle-related procedures. PMID:26311482

  15. Human papilloma virus DNAs immortalize normal human mammary epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Band, V.; Zajchowski, D.; Kulesa, V.; Sager, R. )

    1990-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) types 16 and 18 are most commonly associated with cervical carcinoma in patients and induce immortalization of human keratinocytes in culture. HPV has not been associated with breast cancer. This report describes the immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (76N) by plasmid pHPV18 or pHPV16, each containing the linearized viral genome. Transfectants were grown continuously for more than 60 passages, whereas 76N cells senesce after 18-20 passages. The transfectants also differ from 76N cells in cloning in a completely defined medium called D2 and growing a minimally supplemented defined medium (D3) containing epidermal growth factor. All transfectant tested contain integrated HPV DNA, express HPV RNA, and produce HPV E7 protein. HPV transfectants do not form tumors in a nude mouse assay. It is concluded that products of the HPV genome induce immortalization of human breast epithelial cells and reduce their growth factor requirements. This result raises the possibility that HPV might be involved in breast cancer. Furthermore, other tissue-specific primary epithelial cells that are presently difficult to grown and investigate may also be immortalized by HPV.

  16. [Clinical usefulness of diagnostic methods for human papilloma virus dependent lesions].

    PubMed

    Suwalska, Anna; Owczarek, Witold; Fiedor, Piotr

    2014-02-01

    Persistent infection of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is confirmed necessary factor for development of cervical cancer and anogenital neoplasia. DNA HPV is detected in 96% of cervical cancer, 40% of vulvar and vaginal cancer, 90% of anal cancer and 26% of oral cavity cancer cases in general population. The most common high-risk HPV types observed in anogenital intraepithelial neoplasia or anogenital cancer are HPV 16, 18 and 45. Numerous diagnostic methods of detection of HPV infection and lesions causes by persistent HPV infection are widely used. Epidemiological data reveals correlation of incidence and mortality reduction due to cervical cancer and consequent prosecution and improvement of screening programmes based on morphological assessment of exfoliative smears. In last decade some limitations of conventional smear method were pointed out and a new diagnostic techniques were introduced: liquid-based cytology and HPV DNA testing. Combination of cytological examination and HPV DNA testing seems to be optimal solution to be introduced in large population because of combining high sensitivity of molecular test with high specificity of cytological smear. PMID:24720112

  17. Origin of replication in episomal bovine papilloma virus type 1 DNA isolated from transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Waldeck, W; Rösl, F; Zentgraf, H

    1984-01-01

    The origin of replication of bovine papilloma virus type 1 (BPV-1) has been determined by isolating replicative intermediates (RI) of BPV-transformed hamster embryo fibroblasts (HEF-BPV). These RI were treated with single cut restriction enzymes to determine the start-position (origin) of the extending replication eyes using electron microscopic techniques. 'Cairns'-type RI molecules were shown to contain one replication eye in monomeric as well as in dimeric molecules. The position of this eye was localized at 6940 +/- 5% bp in the physical map. In a second set of experiments BPV-1 DNA fragments cloned in pBR322 were tested for transient episomal replication. Transfected cells were harvested after increasing periods of time and screened for replication with isoschizomeric restriction enzymes to differentiate between input and replicated DNA. The part of the BPV genome harboring the replication origin spans the BPV ClaI-C restriction fragment corresponding to the non-coding region of the BPV genome and coincides with the DNase I-hypersensitive control region in the chromatin, isolated from transformed cells. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 7. PMID:6092063

  18. [QUANTITATIVE DNA EVALUATION OF THE HIGH CARCINOGENIC RISK OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUSES AND HUMAN HERPES VIRUSES IN MALES WITH FERTILITY DISORDERS].

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, V V; Naumenko, V A; Tulenev, Yu A; Kurilo, L F; Kovalyk, V P; Sorokina, T M; Lebedeva, A L; Gomberg, M A; Kushch, A A

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is an actual medical and social problem. In 50% of couples it is associated with the male factor and in more than 50% of cases the etiology of the infertility remains insufficiently understood. The goal of this work was to study the prevalence and to perform quantitative analysis of the human herpes viruses (HHV) and high carcinogenic risk papilloma viruses (HR HPV) in males with infertility, as well as to assess the impact of these infections on sperm parameters. Ejaculate samples obtained from 196 males fall into 3 groups. Group 1 included men with the infertility of unknown etiology (n = 112); group 2, patients who had female partners with the history of spontaneous abortion (n = 63); group 3 (control), healthy men (n = 21). HHV and HR HPV DNA in the ejaculates were detected in a total of 42/196 (21.4%) males: in 31 and 11 patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively (p > 0.05) and in none of healthy males. HHV were detected in 24/42; HR HPV, in 18/42 males (p > 0.05) without significant difference between the groups. Among HR HPV genotypes of the clade A9 in ejaculate were more frequent (14/18, p = 0.04). Comparative analysis of the sperm parameters showed that in the ejaculates of the infected patients sperm motility as well as the number of morphologically normal cells were significantly reduced compared with the healthy men. The quantification of the viral DNA revealed that in 31% of the male ejaculates the viral load was high: > 3 Ig10/100000 cells. Conclusion. The detection of HHV and HR HPV in the ejaculate is associated with male infertility. Quantification of the viral DNA in the ejaculate is a useful indicator for monitoring viral infections in infertility and for decision to start therapy. PMID:27451497

  19. Hepatitis B virus: the genotype E puzzle.

    PubMed

    Andernach, Iris E; Hübschen, Judith M; Muller, Claude P

    2009-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is highly endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa. One of the two genotypes A and E dominates in most countries. With several subgenotypes and variants, genotype A is more diverse in Africa (4.00%) than in the rest of the world (2.96%), suggesting an African origin and a long history on the continent. Despite the African slave trade, genotype E has only sporadically been found within the Americas, indicating that this genotype was introduced only during the past 200 years into the general African population. A short history for this genotype in Africa is also supported by its conspicuously low genetic diversity (1.75%), which contrasts, however, with its excessively high HBsAg prevalence and its extensive spread throughout the vast West-African genotype E crescent. We discuss the spread and routes of transmission of genotype E and suggest that the distribution and current high prevalence levels of HBV (genotype E) in Africa are the result of the extensive use of unsafe needles, potentially solving the current African genotype E puzzle and shedding new light on the high HBV prevalence in Africa. PMID:19475565

  20. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-21

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined. PMID:27468202

  1. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined. PMID:27468202

  2. Vaccination Against Human Papilloma Viruses Leads to a Favorable Cytokine Profile of Specific T Cells.

    PubMed

    Luckau, Stefanie; Wehrs, Tim P; Brandau, Sven; Horn, Peter A; Lindemann, Monika

    2016-10-01

    Several human papilloma viruses (HPV) are known to cause malignant transformation. The high-risk type HPV 16 is associated with cervical carcinoma and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. HPV 16-positive tumor cells exclusively carry the HPV 16 oncogenes E6 and E7. These oncogenes appear as excellent targets for an adoptive immunotherapy. We here addressed the question whether specific T cells from HPV-vaccinated healthy volunteers could be especially suitable for an HPV-specific cellular immunotherapy. Of note, vaccines contain HPV 16. To quantify HPV 16 E6-specific and E7-specific cells, enzyme-linked immunospot assays to measure interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (Th1-Th2 balance) and the secretion of the cytotoxic molecules granzyme B and perforin have been optimized. The frequency of peripheral blood mononuclear cells secreting IFN-γ and perforin was significantly (P<0.05) increased in HPV-vaccinated versus nonvaccinated volunteers. Overall, however, the median frequency of HPV 16-specific cells with a favorable secretion profile (Th1 balanced and cytotoxic) was low even in vaccinated volunteers (IFN-γ: 0.0018% and 0.0023%, perforin: 0.01% and 0.0087% for E6-specific and E7-specific cells, respectively). But some vaccinated volunteers showed up to 0.1% HPV-specific, IFN-γ or perforin-secreting cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that vaccinated volunteers are superior to nonvaccinated donors for HPV-specific cellular cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27548034

  3. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min S.; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A.; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R.; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment. PMID:27280728

  4. A human papilloma virus type 11 transcript encoding an E1--E4 protein.

    PubMed

    Nasseri, M; Hirochika, R; Broker, T R; Chow, L T

    1987-08-01

    The human papilloma virus (HPV) associated with a genital wart (condyloma acuminatum) was determined to be type 11. The majority of the viral DNA molecules were monomeric circles present in the cells at high copy number, as demonstrated by one- and two-dimensional agarose gell electrophoretic separation followed by Southern blot analysis. A cDNA library in phage lambda gt11 was constructed from poly(A)-selected mRNA recovered from the tissue. Recombinant clones corresponding to the most abundant 1.2-kb viral mRNA species detected by Northern blot hybridization and by electron microscopic analysis of R loops were isolated and their nucleotide sequence was determined. Comparison to the prototype HPV-11 DNA sequence revealed that this message consisted of two exons. The promotor-proximal exon spanned nucleotides 716 through 847 and the distal exon included nucleotides 3325 through 4390 or 4392. The mRNAs were alternatively polyadenylated after either of these latter two sites, in both cases following a G and preceding a U residue. Fourteen or sixteen bases upstream from the poly(A) was the hexanucleotide AGUAAA, which apparently serves as the signal for cleavage and polyadenylation of the nascent message. The splice donor and acceptor sites conformed to the usual /GU. . .AG/pattern. The exons joined open reading frame (ORF) E1, which contributed the initiation codon and four additional triplets, to ORF E4, which specified 85 amino acids to encode a protein of 10,022 Da. The cDNA also contained the ORFs E5a and E5b toward the 3' end. The complete sequence of the cDNA revealed three single-base changes from the prototype HPV-11, two resulting in altered amino acids in E4. Neither affects the coding potential of the overlapping E2 ORF. The function of the E1--E4 protein is unknown. PMID:2887066

  5. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses.

    PubMed

    Sheaffer, Amy K; Lee, Min S; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment. PMID:27280728

  6. Basics of tumor development and importance of human papilloma virus (HPV) for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wittekindt, Claus; Wagner, Steffen; Mayer, Christina Sabine; Klussmann, Jens Peter

    2012-01-01

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas (HNSCC) are the 6th most common cancers worldwide. While incidence rates for cancer of the hypopharynx and larynx are decreasing, a significant increase in cancer of the oropharynx (OSCC) is observed. Classical risk factors for HNSCC are smoking and alcohol. It has been shown for 25 to 60% of OSCC to be associated with an infection by oncogenic human papilloma viruses (HPV). The development of “common” cancer of the head and neck is substantially enhanced by an accumulation of genetic changes, which lead to an inactivation of tumor suppressor genes or activation of proto-oncogenes. A more or less uniform sequence of different DNA-damages leads to genetic instability. In this context, an early and frequent event is deletion on the short arm of chromosome 9, which results in inactivation of the p16-gene. In contrast, for HPV-induced carcinogenesis, expression of the viral proteins E6 and E7 is most important, since they lead to inactivation of the cellular tumor-suppressor-proteins p53 and Rb. The natural route of transoral infection is a matter of debate; peroral HPV-infections might be frequent and disappear uneventfully in most cases. Smoking seems to increase the probability for developing an HPV-associated OSCC. The association of HNSCC with HPV can be proven with established methods in clinical diagnostics. In addition to classical prognostic factors, diagnosis of HPV-association may become important for selection of future therapies. Prognostic relevance of HPV probably surmounts many known risk-factors, for example regional metastasis. Until now, no other molecular markers are established in clinical routine. Future therapy concepts may vary for the two subgroups of patients, particularly patients with HPV-associated OSCC may take advantage of less aggressive treatments. Finally, an outlook will be given on possible targeted therapies. PMID:23320061

  7. Human Papilloma Virus Awareness Among Hispanic Females with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Acosta, José E; Aponte, Maysabel; Villamil, Irene; Romaguera, Josefina; Ortiz, Ana P; Torres, Esther A

    2016-03-01

    Women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be at increased risk of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection and HPV-related malignancies, as many are immunocompromised secondary to the use of immunosuppressant agents. Several studies have addressed the knowledge about cervical cancer risk factors in different populations, particularly HPV infection and its association with cervical malignancies; most of these studies show poor patient knowledge. The purpose of this study is to describe the knowledge of females with IBD about HPV infection and the HPV vaccine. We performed a cross-sectional study in 147 consecutive patients attending the clinics of the University of Puerto Rico Center for IBD from 2009 to 2010. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on demographics, lifestyles, and HPV-related knowledge of participants. Bivariate analysis using the chi-square statistics and Fisher's exact test was used to examine factors associated with HPV awareness. The mean age of participants was 36.6 years (SD = 13.91 years). Three fourth (77 %) of women had awareness of the existence of HPV, and 58 % did know about the existence of HPV vaccines. Among those who had heard about HPV, 79.6 % knew that HPV can cause cervical cancer, and 57.5 % knew that the virus is sexually transmitted. Among those who knew of the vaccine, 75.3 % learned about its existence through the media, while only 15.3 %, through their health-care provider. Only three women within recommended ages (2 %) had been vaccinated against HPV, although 50 % of participants indicated that they would definitely/probably vaccinate against HPV in the future. A significant trend was observed, where more educated women were more likely to have heard of HPV (p for trend = 0.0017). Women who were high school graduates/some college (OR = 6.63, 95 % CI = 1.71-25.66) and those with at least an associate degree (OR = 11.69, 95 % CI = 3.05-45.89) were more

  8. Schneiderian papilloma of the temporal bone

    PubMed Central

    van der Putten, Lisa; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Merkus, Paul; Hensen, Erik F

    2013-01-01

    Temporal bone Schneiderian papilloma may present as a primary tumour originating from the middle ear and mastoid process, or an extension from sinonasal disease. Both forms are rare, this being only the 18th case of primary temporal bone Schneiderian papilloma described to date. Although the current patient has remained disease free after excision of the papilloma, the reported recurrence rate is high, comparable to sinonasal Schneiderian papilloma with extrasinus extension. Malignant progression of primary Schneiderian papillomas is significantly reduced as compared to Schneiderian papillomas that extend from the sinonasal tract into the temporal bone. A positive human papilloma virus status, as found in this case, is a common feature and prognostic factor of sinonasal Schneiderian papilloma but an infrequent finding in temporal bone disease. Owing to the high recurrence rate, the risk of malignant progression and the absence of reliable prognostic markers, stringent follow-up consisting of otoscopy, nasendoscopy and imaging is essential. PMID:24311418

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation of Quadrivalent Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine for HPV-Related Disease in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khatibi, Mohsen; Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Shahverdi, Zohreh; jamshidi, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine has been added recently to the Iran Drug List. So, decision makers need information beyond that available from RCTs to recommend funding for this vaccination program to add it to the National Immunization program in Iran. Modeling and economic studies have addressed some of those information needs in foreign countries. In order to determine the long term benefit of this vaccine and impact of vaccine program on the future rate of cervical cancer in Iran, we described a model, based on the available economic and health effects of human papilloma virus (HPV), to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination of 15-year-old girls in Iran. Our objective is to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination in Iran against cervical cancer based on available data; incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) calculations were based on a model comparing a cohort of 15-year-old girls with and without vaccination. We developed a static model based on available data in Iran on the epidemiology of HPV related health outcome. The model compared the cohort of all 15-year old girls alive in the year 2013 with and without vaccination. The cost per QALY, which was found based on our assumption for the vaccination of 15-years old girl to current situation was 439,000,000 Iranian Rial rate (IRR). By considering the key parameters in our sensitivity analysis, value varied from 251,000,000 IRR to 842,000,000 IRR. In conclusion, quadrivalent HPV vaccine (Gardasil) is not cost-effective in Iran based on the base-case parameters value. PMID:24711850

  10. Evidence for and Localization of Vegetative Viral DNA Replication by Autoradiographic Detection of RNA·DNA Hybrids in Sections of Tumors Induced by Shope Papilloma Virus

    PubMed Central

    Orth, Gérard; Jeanteur, Philippe; Croissant, Odile

    1971-01-01

    The occurrence and localization of vegetative viral DNA replication was studied in sections of tumors induced by the rabbit Shope papilloma virus, in cottontail and domestic rabbit papillomas, in primary domestic rabbit carcinoma, and in transplantable VX2 carcinoma, by in situ hybridization of radioactive RNA complementary to viral DNA. Vegetative viral DNA replication and viral protein synthesis were compared by means of cytological hybridization and immunofluorescence techniques on adjacent frozen sections. Vegetative viral DNA replication is completely repressed in the proliferating cellular layers of these tumors, which suggests a provirus state of the viral genome, as in other cells transformed by oncogenic DNA viruses. Vegetative viral DNA replication is induced, after initiation of the keratinization, in cells of cottonail rabbit papillomas, where it is usually followed by viral protein synthesis; this illustrates the influence of the physiological state of the host cell on the control of viral functions. Vegetative viral DNA replication is deteced only in a few cells of domestic rabbit papillomas, at the end of the keratinization process; this observation provides indirect evidence that the DNA synthesis specifically induced in these tumors after the onset of keratinization reflects mostly the induction of cellular DNA synthesis. Images PMID:4331563

  11. Merkel cell polyomavirus and human papilloma virus in proliferative skin lesions arising in patients treated with BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Falchook, G S; Rady, P; Konopinski, J C; Busaidy, N; Hess, K; Hymes, S; Nguyen, H P; Prieto, V G; Bustinza-Linares, E; Lin, Q; Parkhurst, K L; Hong, D S; Sherman, S; Tyring, S K; Kurzrock, R

    2016-07-01

    The potential role of oncogenic viruses mediating development of proliferative skin lesions in patients treated with RAF inhibitors is poorly understood. The objective of this study was to investigate human papilloma virus (HPV) and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in skin lesions among patients treated with RAF inhibitors with the help of a case series describing prevalence of HPV, MCPyV, and RAS mutations in skin biopsies obtained from patients receiving RAF inhibitors and developing cutaneous lesions. HPV-DNA was amplified by PCR utilizing multiple nested primer systems designed for detection of a broad range of HPV types. MCPyV copy number determination with real time PCR technology was performed by a "Quantification of MCPyV, small t region" kit. Thirty-six patients were tested (squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) = 14; verruca vulgaris = 15; other = 11). Nine of 12 SCCs (75 %) and eight of 13 verruca vulgaris lesions (62 %) tested positive for MCPyV whereas none of the normal skin biopsies obtained from nine of these patients tested positive for MCPyV (p = 0.0007). HPV incidence in cutaneous SCCs was not different compared to normal skin (50 vs. 56 %, p = 0.86). The association between MCPyV and proliferative skin lesions after RAF inhibitor therapy merits further investigation. PMID:27098388

  12. Enhancing the Sensitivity of DNA Microarray Using Dye-Doped Silica Nanoparticles: Detection of Human Papilloma Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrichi, F.; Riccò, R.; Meneghello, A.; Pierobon, R.; Canton, G.; Cretaio, E.

    2010-10-01

    DNA microarray is a high-throughput technology used for detection and quantification of nucleic acid molecules and others of biological interest. The analysis is based on the specific hybridization between probe sequences deposited in array and a target ss-DNA amplified by PCR and functionalized by a fluorescent dye. Organic labels have well known disadvantages like photobleaching and low signal intensities, which put a limitation to the lower amount of DNA material that can be detected. Therefore for trace analysis the development of more efficient biomarkers is required. With this aim we present in this paper the synthesis and application of alternative hybrid nanosystems obtained by incorporating standard fluorescent molecules into monodisperse silica nanoparticles. Efficient application to the detection of Human Papilloma Virus is demonstrated. This virus is associated to the formation of cervical cancer, a leading cause of death by cancer for women worldwide. It is shown that the use of the novel biomarkers increases the optical signal of about one order of magnitude with respect to the free dyes or quantum dots in conventional instruments. This is due to the high number of molecules that can be accommodated into each nanoparticle, to the reduced photobleaching and to the improved environmental protection of the dyes when encapsulated in the silica matrix. The cheap and easy synthesis of these luminescent particles, the stability in water, the surface functionalizability and bio-compatibility make them very promising for present and future bio-labeling and bio-imaging applications.

  13. Human papilloma virus, herpes simplex virus and epstein barr virus in oral squamous cell carcinoma from eight different countries.

    PubMed

    Jalouli, Jamshid; Jalouli, Miranda M; Sapkota, Dipak; Ibrahim, Salah O; Larsson, Per-Anders; Sand, Lars

    2012-02-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a major health problem in many parts of the world, and the major causative agents are thought to be the use of alcohol and tobacco. Oncogenic viruses have also been suggested to be involved in OSCC development. This study investigated the prevalence of human papillomaviruses (HPV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in 155 OSCC from eight different countries from different ethnic groups, continents and with different socioeconomic backgrounds. 41 A total of OSCCs were diagnosed in the tongue (26%) and 23 in the floor of the mouth (15%); the other 91 OSCCs were diagnosed in other locations (59%). The patients were also investigated regarding the use of alcohol and smoking and smokeless tobacco habits. Tissue samples were obtained from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples of the OSCC. DNA was extracted and the viral genome was examined by single, nested and semi-nested PCR assays. Sequencing of double-stranded DNA from the PCR product was carried out. Following sequencing of the HPV-, HSV- and EBV-positive PCR products, 100% homology between the sampels was found. Of all the 155 OSCCs examined, 85 (55%) were positive for EBV, 54 (35%) for HPV and 24 (15%) for HSV. The highest prevalence of HPV was seen in Sudan (65%), while HSV (55%) and EBV (80%) were most prevalent in the UK. In 34% (52/155) of all the samples examined, co-infection by two (46/155=30%) or three (6/155=4%) virus specimens was detected. The most frequent double infection was HPV with EBV in 21% (32/155) of all OSCCs. There was a statistically significant higher proportion of samples with HSV (p=0.026) and EBV (p=0.015) in industrialized countries (Sweden, Norway, UK and USA) as compared to developing countries (Sudan, India, Sri Lanka and Yemen). Furthermore, there was a statistically significant higher co-infection of HSV and EBV in samples from industrialized countries (p=0.00031). No firm conclusions could be drawn regarding the

  14. Squamous papilloma of the hard palate

    PubMed Central

    Babaji, Prashant; Singh, Vikram; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap; Masamatti, Vinaykumar S; Sharma, Akanksha Manmohan

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous papillomas are benign proliferating lesions induced by human papilloma virus. These lesions are painless and slowly growing masses. As an oral lesion, it raises concern because of its clinical appearance. These lesions commonly occur between age 30 and 50 years, and sometimes can occur before the age of 10 years. Oral squamous papilloma accounts for 8% of all oral tumors in children. Common site predilection for the lesion is the tongue and soft palate, and may occur on any other surface of the oral cavity such as the uvula and vermilion of the lip. Here, we are presenting a case of squamous papilloma on the palate. PMID:25565755

  15. The role of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in non-anogenital cancer and the promise of immunotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Cobos, Chris; Figueroa, José A; Mirandola, Leonardo; Colombo, Michela; Summers, Gabby; Figueroa, Alejandro; Aulakh, Amardeep; Konala, Venu; Verma, Rashmi; Riaz, Jehanzeb; Wade, Raymond; Saadeh, Charles; Rahman, Rakhshanda L; Pandey, Apurva; Radhi, Saba; Nguyen, Diane D; Jenkins, Marjorie; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Cobos, Everardo

    2014-10-01

    Over the past 30 years, human papilloma virus (HPV) has been shown to play a role in the development of various cancers. Most notably, HPV has been linked to malignant progression in neoplasms of the anogenital region. However, high-risk HPV has also been suggested to play a significant role in the development of cancers in other anatomic locations, such as the head and neck, lung, breast and bladder. In 2006, the first vaccine for HPV, Gardasil, was approved for the prevention of subtypes 6, 11, 16 and 18. A few years later, Cevarix was approved for the prevention of subtypes 16 and 18, the HPV subtypes most frequently implicated in malignant progression. Although increased awareness and vaccination could drastically decrease the incidence of HPV-positive cancers, these approaches do not benefit patients who have already contracted HPV and developed cancer as a result. For this reason, researchers need to continue developing treatment modalities, such as targeted immunotherapies, for HPV-positive lesions. Here, we review the potential evidence linking HPV infection with the development of non-anogenital cancers and the potential role of immunotherapy in the prevention and eradication of HPV infection and its oncogenic sequela. PMID:24811210

  16. Factors associated with future commitment and past history of human papilloma virus vaccination among female college students in northern Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ping-Fen; Yeh, Ying-Tse; Sheu, Shuh-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate factors influencing commitment to human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination and prior vaccination among female college students in northern Taiwan. Methods A quota sample of 400 female college students was recruited from nine colleges in northern Taiwan during March 2013. Of these, 398 completed the self administered questionnaire which was designed based on the health promotion model. Results The results showed that factors associated with prior vaccination behavior were family history of gynecologic malignancy, ever being advised to get HPV vaccination, perceived barriers of action and perceived self-efficacy. Predictors for commitment to HPV vaccination in the next 6 months were the cost of vaccination, ever being advised to get HPV vaccination, perceived self-efficacy and situational influences. Perceived self-efficacy was significantly influenced by relationship status, past receipt of a recommendation for HPV vaccination and level of knowledge about HPV. Conclusion When formulating vaccination policies, governmental or medical institutions should include these factors to promote vaccination. PMID:25045431

  17. Papillary urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation in association with human papilloma virus: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Guma, Sergei; Maglantay, Remegio; Lau, Ryan; Wieczorek, Rosemary; Melamed, Jonathan; Deng, Fang-Ming; Zhou, Ming; Makarov, Danil; Lee, Peng; Pincus, Matthew R; Pei, Zhi-Heng

    2016-01-01

    Background: The human papilloma virus (HPV) is a carcinogen known for its strong association with cervical cancers and cervical lesions. It is also known to be associated with a variety of squamous cell carcinomas in other areas, such as the penis, vulva, anus and head and neck. However, the association with urothelial carcinoma remains controversial. Here, we report a case of urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation associated with HPV-6/HPV-11. Case presentation: This is a case of a 70 year old man who presented with nocturia and pressure during urination. During the TURP procedure for what was clinically thought to be benign prostate hyperplasia with pathologic diagnosis as prostate carcinoma, a 2 cm papillary mass was found in the distal penile urethra. The papillary mass was found to be a high grade urothelial carcinoma positive for GATA 3 expression, with focal areas of squamous differentiation. The areas with squamous differentiation demonstrated koilocytic differentiation, which were positive for strong p16 expression. The tumor was found to harbor low risk HPV 6/11 by in situ hybridization. Conclusions: This study case demonstrates HPV infection with a low risk subtype (HPV 6/11) associated with an urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation and condylomatous features. PMID:27069958

  18. Circulating interleukin-10 levels and human papilloma virus and Epstein–Barr virus-associated cancers: evidence from a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis based on 11,170 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Kai; Pang, Qing; Lin, Ting; Zhang, Li; Gu, Mingliang; Niu, Wenquan; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have showed interleukin 10 (IL-10) is a critical cytokine that determines antiviral immune response and is related to virus-associated cancers. However, whether genetically elevated circulating IL-10 levels are associated with the risk of human papilloma virus and Epstein–Barr virus-associated cancers (HEACs) is still unclear. Mendelian randomization method was implemented to meta-analyze available observational studies by employing IL-10 three variants (−592C>A, −819C>T, and −1082A>G) as instruments. A total of 24 articles encompassing 11,170 subjects were ultimately eligible for the meta-analysis. Overall, there was a significant association between IL-10 promoter variant −1082A>G and HEACs under allelic and dominant models (both P<0.01). Subgroup analysis by cancer type indicated that the risk estimate of −1082A>G was significant for nasopharyngeal cancer under allelic, homozygous genotypic and dominant models (all P<0.001). Moreover by ethnicity, carriers of −1082G allele had a 74% increased risk for nasopharyngeal cancer in Asians under dominant model (odds ratio [OR] =1.737; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.280–2.358; P<0.001). In further Mendelian randomization analysis, the predicted OR for 10 pg/mL increment in IL-10 levels was 1.14 (95% CI: 1.01–16.99) in HEACs. Our findings provided strong evidence for a critical role of genetically elevated circulating IL-10 levels in the development of HEACs, especially in Asian population and for nasopharyngeal cancer. PMID:27022283

  19. Hepatitis B virus genotypes in Mongols and Australian Aborigines.

    PubMed

    Alestig, E; Hannoun, C; Horal, P; Lindh, M

    2001-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is spread worldwide. Seven genotypes, A-G, have been described, differing by more than 8% of the genome. In eastern Asia and Oceania genotypes B and C are predominant. However, little is known about genotypes in Mongolia and Australian aborigines. We analysed the preS and S regions of HBV from 9 Mongols and 5 Australian Aborigines. All Mongolian strains were of genotype D and were most similar to Central Asian sequences. All the Australian strains were genetically of serotype ayw3, and could not be reliably classified by the S region analysis, but placed on a separate branch. By preS analysis, they were however clearly of genotype C. The 6-7% nucleotide difference from published Asian genotype C sequences suggests that they diverged from Asian genotype C branch more than 1000 years ago. PMID:11811682

  20. Knowledge of Saudi female university students regarding cervical cancer and acceptance of the human papilloma virus vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer K.; Almussaed, Eman M.; Fayed, Amel A.; Khan, Farida H.; Syed, Sadiqa B.; Al-Tamimi, Tahani N.; Elmorshedy, Hala N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the level of knowledge regarding cervical cancer and the acceptance of the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccine among Saudi female students in health colleges. Methods: This cross-sectional study of a convenient sample encompassed 1400 students in Health Colleges at Princess Nora Bint Abdul Rahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia was conducted between December 2013 and February 2014. A self-administrated questionnaire was distributed to all participants. Data collected included socio-demographic data, knowledge of cervical cancer risk factors and clinical presentation, Pap smear, and HPV vaccine acceptance. The questionnaire reliability as tested by Cronbach’s alpha was 0.82. Results: The response rate was 89.9%, and data analysis revealed that 95.7% of students had poor knowledge level. The Pap smear was poorly recognized as a screening tool, with 46.7% of students having heard of the test. Senior and medical students had a significantly higher knowledge score. Father’s health profession, high monthly income, and presence of cervical cancer among family members or friends increased the level of knowledge. Vaccine acceptance is influenced by its price, approximately 80% of students thought that an affordable vaccine price should not exceed 300 Saudi Riyals. Perceived barriers to the vaccine were fear of injections and vaccine side effects. Conclusion: There is a lack of knowledge and misinformation regarding cervical cancer, Pap smear, and HPV as a major risk factor for cancer of the cervix. These data can be used as a benchmark to formulate effective awareness programs. PMID:25316467

  1. Viral DNA load of high-risk human papilloma virus is closely associated with the grade of cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guqun; Cheng, Jingxin; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    This study is to explore the correlation between the viral load of high-risk human papilloma virus (HPV) and the degree of cervical lesions, as well as the follow-up monitoring role of high-risk HPV measurements in the treatment of patients with cervical lesions. Hybrid capture-2 method was used to measure the amount of high-risk HPV load of 361 patients who were enrolled from January 2009 to December 2010 at the Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, including 76 cases of cervical squamous carcinoma, 119 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and 166 cases of cervicitis. The correlation between the viral load of high-risk HPV and the degree of cervical lesions was analyzed using correlation analysis. Patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical squamous carcinoma were followed up until December 2013, with the follow-up time being 37-60 months. Statistically significant differences in the high-risk HPV load existed between cervicitis group, CIN group and cervical squamous carcinoma group (P = 0.000). In addition, the viral load was increased with the increase of the severity of cervical lesions, showing a positive correlation (r = 0.436, P = 0.000). During the follow-up, 6 cases of vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia, 3 cases of recurrence CIN and 1 case of vaginal squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva were found, which were shown to relate with the continuing high-risk HPV infection in vagina. Viral load of high-risk HPV were positively correlated with the severity of cervical lesions, playing an important role in the monitoring of patients with cervical lesions after treatment. PMID:25664114

  2. Investigating the Prevalence of Human Papilloma Virus in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx and Its Correlation with Disease Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Atighechi, Saeid; Meybodian, Mojtaba; Dadgarnia, Mohammad Hossein; Baradaranfar, Mohammad Hossein; Behniafard, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The human papilloma virus (HPV) can play a role in the development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Our aim was to assess the prevalence of HPV DNA in SCC of the larynx. The impact of HPV infection on patient survival was also evaluated. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was performed in 44 patients with SCC of the larynx (case group), while the control group comprised samples obtained from cadavers with no previous history of malignancy. A preliminary pathologic evaluation was performed on all samples in the control group (36 samples) to ensure the absence of dysplasia or malignancy. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect HPV DNA. After completing the treatment protocol, patients were followed to assess the impact of HPV infection on overall survival (OS). Results: PCR evaluation in the case group showed that HPV DNA was successfully isolated from 11 (25%) samples, while only two (5.6%) HPV DNA-positive were obtained from cadavers. According to these results, a significant difference was obtained in the prevalence of HPV DNA and laryngeal SCC between cases and controls (P=0.031). No statistically significant difference was observed in the OS of patients with or without HPV infection in the case group (P=0.235). Conclusion: Based on these results, we suggest that the prevalence of HPV infection is higher in laryngeal SCC subjects compared with healthy individuals. Although a longer OS was seen in HPV-positive patients, survival analysis did not show a significant difference in the comparison of HPV-positive and negative findings in SCC patients. PMID:27429948

  3. Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes in Bahrain

    PubMed Central

    Janahi, Essam M.; Al-Mannai, Mariam; Singh, Hemlata; Jahromi, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Approximately 170 million people are infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide, making it one of the world’s major infectious diseases. There are no published population based studies about the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Bahrain. Objectives: Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of HCV genotypes and subtypes among a large sample of patients with chronic HCV infection in Bahrain. Patients and Methods: Serum samples were collected from 202 HCV positive patients; of them 128 had a viral load (> 500 IU/mL) suitable for the type-specific genotyping assay. Gender-wise and age-wise differences in the distribution of HCV genotypes were determined by Chi Square and Fisher’s Exact tests. Results: The predominant genotype among Bahraini patients was type 1 (36.71%), followed by genotypes 3 and 4 (15.6% each) and the lowest frequency was found for genotype 2 (3.9%). Among genotype 1, subtype 1b had the highest frequency (21.09%), followed by subtype 1a (14.06%). Among genotype 3, subtype 3a had the highest frequency (11.72%), while among genotype 4, most of subtypes were undetermined. The frequency of all different HCV genotypes was higher in male patients compared to female patients. Genotype 1 was most common in the age group of 51 - 60 years (38.3%), genotype 2 in 21 - 30 years (60%) and genotype 3 in 51 - 60 years (30%), while genotype 4 was most frequent among the age group > 61 (40%). Conclusions: The most common HCV genotype in Bahrain was subtype 1b followed by 1a and 3a. Further studies involving sources of transmission in Bahrain are required to enhance control measures for HCV infection. PMID:26977163

  4. Global Distribution and Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Jane P; Humphreys, Isla; Flaxman, Abraham; Brown, Anthony; Cooke, Graham S; Pybus, Oliver G; Barnes, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) exhibits high genetic diversity, characterized by regional variations in genotype prevalence. This poses a challenge to the improved development of vaccines and pan-genotypic treatments, which require the consideration of global trends in HCV genotype prevalence. Here we provide the first comprehensive survey of these trends. To approximate national HCV genotype prevalence, studies published between 1989 and 2013 reporting HCV genotypes are reviewed and combined with overall HCV prevalence estimates from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) project. We also generate regional and global genotype prevalence estimates, inferring data for countries lacking genotype information. We include 1,217 studies in our analysis, representing 117 countries and 90% of the global population. We calculate that HCV genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide, comprising 83.4 million cases (46.2% of all HCV cases), approximately one-third of which are in East Asia. Genotype 3 is the next most prevalent globally (54.3 million, 30.1%); genotypes 2, 4, and 6 are responsible for a total 22.8% of all cases; genotype 5 comprises the remaining <1%. While genotypes 1 and 3 dominate in most countries irrespective of economic status, the largest proportions of genotypes 4 and 5 are in lower-income countries. Conclusion: Although genotype 1 is most common worldwide, nongenotype 1 HCV cases—which are less well served by advances in vaccine and drug development—still comprise over half of all HCV cases. Relative genotype proportions are needed to inform healthcare models, which must be geographically tailored to specific countries or regions in order to improve access to new treatments. Genotype surveillance data are needed from many countries to improve estimates of unmet need. (Hepatology 2015;61:77–87) PMID:25069599

  5. Hepatitis B virus genotype A: design of reference sequences for sub-genotypes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qun; Zhu, Huilan; Zhang, Yafei; Li, Xu; Zhang, Zhenhua

    2016-06-01

    Genotype A of hepatitis B virus (HBV/A) is widespread and is currently divided into six sub-genotypes. Suitable reference sequences for different sub-genotypes can facilitate research on HBV/A. However, the current reference sequences for this virus are insufficient. In the present work, we retrieved 442 full-length HBV/A genomic sequences from the GenBank database and classified them into sub-genotypes by phylogenetic analysis. By the maximum likelihood method using the MEGA6.0 software, we established the reference sequences for different HBV/A sub-genotypes. Our analyses demonstrated that these reference sequences clustered phylogenetically with known strains, indicating that the reference sequences we established indeed belonged to the right sub-genotypes. HBV/A subtype sequences were selected by geographic origins and grouped as sub-genotypes including A1-South Africa, A2-Europe, A3-Cameroon, and A5-Haiti. Reference sequences of sub-genotypes A1, A2, A3, and A5 were constructed and deposited into GenBank (KP234050-KP234053). By applying phylogenetic analyses, we further determined the time to most recent common ancestor of HBV/A lineages. In conclusion, these newly established reference sequences can provide suitable reference standards for studies on the molecular biology and virology of HBV genotype A. PMID:27002608

  6. Citrus tristeza virus: Evolution of Complex and Varied Genotypic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Harper, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the Closteroviridae, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is almost unique in possessing a number of distinct and characterized strains, isolates of which produce a wide range of phenotype combinations among its different hosts. There is little understanding to connect genotypes to phenotypes, and to complicate matters more, these genotypes are found throughout the world as members of mixed populations within a single host plant. There is essentially no understanding of how combinations of genotypes affect symptom expression and disease severity. We know little about the evolution of the genotypes that have been characterized to date, little about the biological role of their diversity and particularly, about the effects of recombination. Additionally, genotype grouping has not been standardized. In this study we utilized an extensive array of CTV genomic information to classify the major genotypes, and to determine the major evolutionary processes that led to their formation and subsequent retention. Our analyses suggest that three major processes act on these genotypes: (1) ancestral diversification of the major CTV lineages, followed by (2) conservation and co-evolution of the major functional domains within, though not between CTV genotypes, and (3) extensive recombination between lineages that have given rise to new genotypes that have subsequently been retained within the global population. The effects of genotype diversity and host-interaction are discussed, as is a proposal for standardizing the classification of existing and novel CTV genotypes. PMID:23630519

  7. Joint action of a chemical carcinogen and a neoplastic virus to induce cancer in rabbits; results of exposing epidermal cells to a carcinogenic hydrocarbon at time of infection with the Shope papilloma virus.

    PubMed

    ROGERS, S; ROUS, P

    1951-05-01

    Areas of rabbit skin previously rendered hyperplastic with turpentine were scarified, inoculated with the Shope papilloma virus, and covered with a dressing that contained 20-methylcholanthrene (MC) or 9:10-dimethyl-1:2-benzanthracene (9:10). The dressing was left on until healing had been well completed, a matter of 5 to 7 days. The papillomas which subsequently arose often appeared later, were fewer, and remained less vigorous than those due to the action of virus alone, but throughout several months they appeared to differ from these in no other ways. Then, more or less abruptly, the large majority became carcinomatous, frequently at several situations, whereas with few exceptions the control growths underwent no such alteration. The cancers were of the sorts ordinarily deriving, by secondary change, from epidermal cells infected with the virus. Collateral data have made plain that the hydrocarbons acted in their carcinogenic capacity to bring on the cancers. Indeed in control tests 9: 10 sometimes conferred latent neoplastic potentialities on uninoculated epidermis exposed to it while healing after scarification, a fact disclosed months later by painting these expanses with chloroform until hyperplasia occurred. Under the promoting influence of this agent papillomas formed which had the distinctive morphology of those induced by the chemical carcinogens. So strong and enduring were the effects of MC and 9:10 as to cause cancers to arise from many virus papillomas which were retrogressing after months of proliferation, that is to say under circumstances ordinarily unfavorable to malignant change. The facts justify the conclusion that the virus and the hydrocarbons acted jointly and in their carcinogenic capacities. PMID:14832395

  8. Prevalence of cervical neoplastic lesions and Human Papilloma Virus infection in Egypt: National Cervical Cancer Screening Project

    PubMed Central

    Abd El All, Howayda S; Refaat, Amany; Dandash, Khadiga

    2007-01-01

    Background Data from Egyptian studies provide widely varying estimates on the prevalence of pre-malignant and malignant cervical abnormalities and human papilloma virus (HPVs) infection. To define the prevalence and risk factors of pre-invasive and invasive cervical cancer (cacx), a community based full-scale cross sectional, household survey including 5453 women aged between 35 and 60 years was conducted. Methods The study period was between February 2000 and December 2002. Initially, conventional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears were evaluated using the Bethesda system (TBS), followed by colposcopic guided biopsy (CGB) for all epithelial abnormalities (EA). In a third step, HPV was tested on all EA by in-situ hybridization (ISH) using first the broad spectrum HPV probe recognizing HPVs 6, 11, 16, 18, 30, 31, 35, 45, 51 and 52 followed by subtyping with probes 6/11, 16/18 and 31/33. Lastly, unequivocal cases were immunostained for herpes simplex type-2 (HSV-2), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Results EA representing 7.8% (424/5453), were categorized into atypical squamous cell of undetermined significance (ASCUS) (34.4%), atypical glandular cell of undetermined significance (AGCUS) (15.3%), combined ASCUS and AGCUS (3.1%), low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) (41.0%), high grade SIL (5.2%) and invasive lesions (1%). CGB of EA (n = 281) showed non neoplastic lesions (12.8%), atypical squamous metaplasia (ASM) (19.2%), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia I (CIN) (44.4%), CIN II (4.4%), CINIII (2.8%), endocervical lesions (5.2%), combined squamous and endocervical lesions (10.0%), invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (0.02%) and extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma (MZBCL) (0.02%). The overall predictive value of cytology was 87% while the predictive value for high grade lesions was 80%. On histological basis, HPVs were present in 94.3% of squamous lesions while it was difficult to be identified in endocervical ones. ISH

  9. ASSOCIATION AMONG HISTOLOGICAL FINDINGS SUGGESTIVE OF PAPILLOMA VIRUS ON HEMORRHOIDECTOMY SPECIMENS

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA, Soraya Souto; NAKAJIMA, Gerson Suguiyama; GUIMARÃES, Ricardo Alexandre; MOURÃO, Flávia da Costa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many researchers studied human Papillomavirus infection in the anal area supposing it represents a risk factor for precursor lesions of anal cancer. Aim: To study the association between histological findings suggestive of injury by the virus in hemorrhoidectomy specimens. Method: Prevalence study was carried out based on histopathological analysis of hemorrhoidectomy specimens to find viral cytopathic effects. These findings were compared with anal condyloma acuminata that had no relationship with hemorrhoidectomy for microscopic comparison. Results: Of the 91 hemorroidectomies analyzed, eight had findings suggestive of viral cytopathic effects, with the presence of irregular acanthosis in 63%, koilocytes in 50% and other indirect viral cytopathic effects, such as hyperkeratosis (38%), parakeratosis (25% ) and papillomatosis (13%). Conclusion: This study was unable to conclude that there is an association between these two pathologic entities. PMID:26734795

  10. Geographic distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Campiotto, S; Pinho, J R R; Carrilho, F J; Da Silva, L C; Souto, F J D; Spinelli, V; Pereira, L M M B; Coelho, H S M; Silva, A O; Fonseca, J C; Rosa, H; Lacet, C M C; Bernardini, A P

    2005-01-01

    Brazil is a country of continental dimension with a population of different ethnic backgrounds. Thus, a wide variation in the frequencies of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes is expected to occur. To address this point, 1,688 sequential samples from chronic HCV patients were analyzed. HCV-RNA was amplified by the RT-PCR from blood samples collected from 1995 to 2000 at different laboratories located in different cities from all Brazilian States. Samples were collected in tubes containing a gel separator, centrifuged in the site of collection and sent by express mail in a refrigerated container to Laboratório Bioquímico Jardim Paulista, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. HCV-RNA was extracted from serum and submitted to RT and nested PCR using standard procedures. Nested PCR products were submitted to cycle sequencing reactions without prior purification. Sequences were analyzed for genotype determination and the following frequencies were found: 64.9% (1,095) for genotype 1, 4.6% (78) for genotype 2, 30.2% (510) for genotype 3, 0.2% (3) for genotype 4, and 0.1% (2) for genotype 5. The frequencies of HCV genotypes were statistically different among Brazilian regions (P = 0.00017). In all regions, genotype 1 was the most frequent (51.7 to 74.1%), reaching the highest value in the North; genotype 2 was more prevalent in the Center-West region (11.4%), especially in Mato Grosso State (25.8%), while genotype 3 was more common in the South (43.2%). Genotypes 4 and 5 were rarely found and only in the Southeast, in São Paulo State. The present data indicate the need for careful epidemiological surveys throughout Brazil since knowing the frequency and distribution of the genotypes would provide key information for understanding the spread of HCV. PMID:15665987

  11. Using Behavioral Risk Factor Data as a surveillance tool to monitor the prevalence of initiation, continuation and completion of Human Papilloma Virus vaccination in children

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Gia Elise; Dominguez, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The Human Papilloma Virus (“HPV”) is a common sexually transmitted disease that has infected approximately 79 million men and women in the United States alone. A vaccination is available but in order to be effective it must be received prior to becoming sexually active and recipients must complete a three-dose sequence. In this article we explore the predisposing, enabling and need-based factors associated with parents’ or guardians’ decision to have their child initiate, continue and complete the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine. The data file includes 5531 parents and guardians with presumptive knowledge regarding the number of HPV vaccination their child received. Data includes information on the child (e.g. child׳s age) as well as the adult respondent (e.g. health insurance status). A smaller subset of the dataset along with the code to run the model are supplied with this article. The interpretation of these data can be found in the research article published by the authors in the Journal of Preventive Medicine in 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.01.010[1]. PMID:27222864

  12. Using Behavioral Risk Factor Data as a surveillance tool to monitor the prevalence of initiation, continuation and completion of Human Papilloma Virus vaccination in children.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Gia Elise; Dominguez, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    The Human Papilloma Virus ("HPV") is a common sexually transmitted disease that has infected approximately 79 million men and women in the United States alone. A vaccination is available but in order to be effective it must be received prior to becoming sexually active and recipients must complete a three-dose sequence. In this article we explore the predisposing, enabling and need-based factors associated with parents' or guardians' decision to have their child initiate, continue and complete the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine. The data file includes 5531 parents and guardians with presumptive knowledge regarding the number of HPV vaccination their child received. Data includes information on the child (e.g. child׳s age) as well as the adult respondent (e.g. health insurance status). A smaller subset of the dataset along with the code to run the model are supplied with this article. The interpretation of these data can be found in the research article published by the authors in the Journal of Preventive Medicine in 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2016.01.010[1]. PMID:27222864

  13. The human papilloma virus 16E6 gene sensitizes human mammary epithelial cells to apoptosis induced by DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, C; Meikrantz, W; Schlegel, R; Sager, R

    1995-01-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is a normal physiological process, which could in principle be manipulated to play an important role in cancer therapy. The key importance of p53 expression in the apoptotic response to DNA-damaging agents has been stressed because mutant or deleted p53 is so common in most kinds of cancer. An important strategy, therefore, is to find ways to induce apoptosis in the absence of wild-type p53. In this paper, we compare apoptosis in normal human mammary epithelial cells, in cells immortalized with human papilloma virus (HPV), and in mammary carcinoma cell lines expressing wild-type p53, mutant p53, or no p53 protein. Apoptosis was induced with mitomycin C (MMC), a DNA cross-linking and damaging agent, or with staurosporine (SSP), a protein kinase inhibitor. The normal and HPV-transfected cells responded more strongly to SSP than did the tumor cells. After exposure to MMC, cells expressing wild-type p53 underwent extensive apoptosis, whereas cells carrying mutated p53 responded weakly. Primary breast cancer cell lines null for p53 protein were resistant to MMC. In contrast, two HPV immortalized cell lines in which p53 protein was destroyed by E6-modulated ubiquitinylation were highly sensitive to apoptosis induced by MMC. Neither p53 mRNA nor protein was induced in the HPV immortalized cells after MMC treatment, although p53 protein was elevated by MMC in cells with wild-type p53. Importantly, MMC induced p21 mRNA but not p21 protein expression in the HPV immortalized cells. Thus, HPV 16E6 can sensitize mammary epithelial cells to MMC-induced apoptosis via a p53- and p21-independent pathway. We propose that the HPV 16E6 protein modulates ubiquitin-mediated degradation not only of p53 but also of p21 and perhaps other proteins involved in apoptosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7644500

  14. Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Brazil: molecular characterization of genotype F isolates

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Francisco CA; Souto, Francisco JD; Nabuco, Leticia C; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A; Coelho, Henrique Sergio M; Franz, Helena Cristina F; Saraiva, Joao Carlos P; Virgolino, Helaine A; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita C; Melo, Mabel MM; Martins, Regina MB; Gomes, Selma A

    2007-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolates have been classified in eight genotypes, A to H, which exhibit distinct geographical distributions. Genotypes A, D and F are predominant in Brazil, a country formed by a miscegenated population, where the proportion of individuals from Caucasian, Amerindian and African origins varies by region. Genotype F, which is the most divergent, is considered indigenous to the Americas. A systematic molecular characterization of HBV isolates from different parts of the world would be invaluable in establishing HBV evolutionary origins and dispersion patterns. A large-scale study is needed to map the region-by-region distribution of the HBV genotypes in Brazil. Results Genotyping by PCR-RFLP of 303 HBV isolates from HBsAg-positive blood donors showed that at least two of the three genotypes, A, D, and F, co-circulate in each of the five geographic regions of Brazil. No other genotypes were identified. Overall, genotype A was most prevalent (48.5%), and most of these isolates were classified as subgenotype A1 (138/153; 90.2%). Genotype D was the most common genotype in the South (84.2%) and Central (47.6%) regions. The prevalence of genotype F was low (13%) countrywide. Nucleotide sequencing of the S gene and a phylogenetic analysis of 32 HBV genotype F isolates showed that a great majority (28/32; 87.5%) belonged to subgenotype F2, cluster II. The deduced serotype of 31 of 32 F isolates was adw4. The remaining isolate showed a leucine-to-isoleucine substitution at position 127. Conclusion The presence of genotypes A, D and F, and the absence of other genotypes in a large cohort of HBV infected individuals may reflect the ethnic origins of the Brazilian population. The high prevalence of isolates from subgenotype A1 (of African origin) indicates that the African influx during the colonial slavery period had a major impact on the circulation of HBV genotype A currently found in Brazil. Although most genotype F isolates belonged to

  15. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Humans and Swine, Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Annalisa; Gonzales, José Luis; Bonelli, Sara Irene; Valda, Ybar; Pieri, Angela; Segundo, Higinio; Ibañez, Ramón; Mantella, Antonia; Bartalesi, Filippo; Tolari, Francesco; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We determined the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in persons in 2 rural communities in southeastern Bolivia and the presence of HEV in human and swine fecal samples. HEV seroprevalence was 6.3%, and HEV genotype 3 strains with high sequence homology were detected. PMID:21801630

  16. New Hepatitis E Virus Genotype in Camels, the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna K.P.; Teng, Jade L.L.; Tsang, Alan K. L.; Joseph, Marina; Wong, Emily Y.M.; Tang, Ying; Sivakumar, Saritha; Xie, Jun; Bai, Ru; Wernery, Renate; Wernery, Ulrich; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-01-01

    In a molecular epidemiology study of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in dromedaries in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, HEV was detected in fecal samples from 3 camels. Complete genome sequencing of 2 strains showed >20% overall nucleotide difference to known HEVs. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed a previously unrecognized HEV genotype. PMID:24856611

  17. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 4 Outbreak, Italy, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Garbuglia, Anna R.; Scognamiglio, Paola; Petrosillo, Nicola; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Sordillo, Pasquale; Gentile, Daniele; La Scala, Patrizia; Girardi, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    During 2011, 5 persons in the area of Lazio, Italy were infected with a monophyletic strain of hepatitis E virus that showed high sequence homology with isolates from swine in China. Detection of this genotype in Italy parallels findings in other countries in Europe, signaling the possible spread of strains new to Western countries. PMID:23260079

  18. Genotypic and Pathotypic Characterization of Newcastle Disease Viruses from India

    PubMed Central

    Tirumurugaan, Krishnaswamy G.; Vijayarani, Kumanan; Kumanan, Kathaperumal; Elankumaran, Subbiah

    2011-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is an avian paramyxovirus that causes significant economic losses to the poultry industry in most parts of the world. The susceptibility of a wide variety of avian species coupled with synanthropic bird reservoirs has contributed to the vast genomic diversity of this virus as well as diagnostic failures. Since the first panzootic in 1926, Newcastle disease (ND) became enzootic in India with recurrent outbreaks in multiple avian species. The genetic characteristics of circulating strains in India, however, are largely unknown. To understand the nature of NDV genotypes in India, we characterized two representative strains isolated 13 years apart from a chicken and a pigeon by complete genome sequence analysis and pathotyping. The viruses were characterized as velogenic by pathogenicity indices devised to distinguish these strains. The genome length was 15,186 nucleotides (nt) and consisted of six non-overlapping genes, with conserved and complementary 3′ leader and 5′ trailer regions, conserved gene starts, gene stops, and intergenic sequences similar to those in avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1) strains. Matrix gene sequence analysis grouped the pigeon isolate with APMV-1 strains. Phylogeny based on the fusion (F), and hemagglutinin (HN) genes and complete genome sequence grouped these viruses into genotype IV. Genotype IV strains are considered to have “died out” after the first panzootic (1926–1960) of ND. But, our results suggest that there is persistence of genotype IV strains in India. PMID:22174801

  19. Hepatitis E virus genotype 3 in wild rats, United States.

    PubMed

    Lack, Justin B; Volk, Kylie; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A

    2012-08-01

    The role of rodents in the epidemiology of zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been a subject of considerable debate. Seroprevalence studies suggest widespread HEV infection in commensal Rattus spp. rats, but experimental transmission has been largely unsuccessful and recovery of zoonotic genotype 3 HEV RNA from wild Rattus spp. rats has never been confirmed. We surveyed R. rattus and R. norvegicus rats from across the United States and several international populations by using a hemi-nested reverse transcription PCR approach. We isolated HEV RNA in liver tissues from 35 of 446 rats examined. All but 1 of these isolates was relegated to the zoonotic HEV genotype 3, and the remaining sequence represented the recently discovered rat genotype from the United States and Germany. HEV-positive rats were detected in urban and remote localities. Genetic analyses suggest all HEV genotype 3 isolates obtained from wild Rattus spp. rats were closely related. PMID:22840202

  20. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Wild Rats, United States

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Kylie; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A.

    2012-01-01

    The role of rodents in the epidemiology of zoonotic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been a subject of considerable debate. Seroprevalence studies suggest widespread HEV infection in commensal Rattus spp. rats, but experimental transmission has been largely unsuccessful and recovery of zoonotic genotype 3 HEV RNA from wild Rattus spp. rats has never been confirmed. We surveyed R. rattus and R. norvegicus rats from across the United States and several international populations by using a hemi-nested reverse transcription PCR approach. We isolated HEV RNA in liver tissues from 35 of 446 rats examined. All but 1 of these isolates was relegated to the zoonotic HEV genotype 3, and the remaining sequence represented the recently discovered rat genotype from the United States and Germany. HEV-positive rats were detected in urban and remote localities. Genetic analyses suggest all HEV genotype 3 isolates obtained from wild Rattus spp. rats were closely related. PMID:22840202

  1. Herpes and papilloma viruses

    SciTech Connect

    De Palo, G.; Rilke, F.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains over 25 selections. Some of the titles are: Seroepidemiologic Asociation of HSV-2 with Cervical Cancers: Transforming Viral Genes; Organization and Expression of Human Papillomavirus DNA in Cervical Cancer Cell Lines; An Investigation of Cervical Scrapes by DNA Hybridization: and Human Papillomaviruses in Genital Tissue: Examination by Immunohistochemistry and in situ DNA Hybridization.

  2. Phylogeography of Japanese Encephalitis Virus: Genotype Is Associated with Climate

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Amy J.; Ward, Melissa J.; Leigh Brown, Andrew J.; Barrett, Alan D. T.

    2013-01-01

    The circulation of vector-borne zoonotic viruses is largely determined by the overlap in the geographical distributions of virus-competent vectors and reservoir hosts. What is less clear are the factors influencing the distribution of virus-specific lineages. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the most important etiologic agent of epidemic encephalitis worldwide, and is primarily maintained between vertebrate reservoir hosts (avian and swine) and culicine mosquitoes. There are five genotypes of JEV: GI-V. In recent years, GI has displaced GIII as the dominant JEV genotype and GV has re-emerged after almost 60 years of undetected virus circulation. JEV is found throughout most of Asia, extending from maritime Siberia in the north to Australia in the south, and as far as Pakistan to the west and Saipan to the east. Transmission of JEV in temperate zones is epidemic with the majority of cases occurring in summer months, while transmission in tropical zones is endemic and occurs year-round at lower rates. To test the hypothesis that viruses circulating in these two geographical zones are genetically distinct, we applied Bayesian phylogeographic, categorical data analysis and phylogeny-trait association test techniques to the largest JEV dataset compiled to date, representing the envelope (E) gene of 487 isolates collected from 12 countries over 75 years. We demonstrated that GIII and the recently emerged GI-b are temperate genotypes likely maintained year-round in northern latitudes, while GI-a and GII are tropical genotypes likely maintained primarily through mosquito-avian and mosquito-swine transmission cycles. This study represents a new paradigm directly linking viral molecular evolution and climate. PMID:24009790

  3. Determination of hepatitis C virus genotype by Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Elahe; Pourmand, Nader; Chaung, Ramsey; Rofoogaran, Ara; Boisver, Judie; Samimi-Rad, Katayon; Davis, Ronald W; Ronaghi, Mostafa

    2003-05-01

    A simple sequencing-based assay is described for genotyping of hepatitis C virus (HCV). RT-PCR was employed to amplify a 237-nucleotide-long fragment from the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of the genome using one biotinylated and one normal primer. Subsequent to capture of the PCR products on streptavidin-coated beads, single-stranded DNA separation, and hybridization of sequencing primer, Pyrosequencing was performed. The genotype of 98 samples out of which 77 samples were from American veterans and 21 samples were from Iran was determined. The samples from the American veterans contained six different subtypes, while five subtypes were found in Iranian samples. For rapid population-specific HCV subtyping, a multiplex assay was developed. This study demonstrates the suitability of this technology for low-cost, high throughput and accurate microbial genotyping. PMID:12711060

  4. Identification of a new genotype of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Balić, Davor; Lojkić, Ivana; Periškić, Marin; Bedeković, Tomislav; Jungić, Andreja; Lemo, Nina; Roić, Besi; Cač, Zeljko; Barbić, Ljubo; Madić, Josip

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the degree of genetic variability of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) strains circulating in Croatia, 29 isolates from the six largest dairy farms were examined by PCR for a segment of the gp51 env gene, followed by DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The nucleotide sequences were compared with other previously characterized BLV strains from different geographical areas, comprising all seven known BLV genotypes. The Croatian sequences showed six to eight nucleotide substitutions: six silent substitutions and two amino acid changes. Four of those substitutions were within epitopes. In comparison to the sequences of other BLV genotypes, our isolates showed the closest relationship to genotype 1 isolates PL-3252 (FJ808585) and AL-148 (FJ808573) from Argentina. The degree of variation between our sequences and those of genotype 1 was 0.2- 4.6 %. In phylogenetic trees based on 400-nt and 519-nt sequences, all of the Croatian sequences clustered separately from the other sequences, revealing a new genotype. PMID:22488472

  5. The Role of Polymerase Chain Reaction of High-Risk Human Papilloma Virus in the Screening of High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions in the Anal Mucosa of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Males Having Sex with Males

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo-Tenorio, Carmen; Rivero-Rodriguez, Mar; Gil-Anguita, Concepción; Esquivias, Javier; López-Castro, Rodrigo; Ramírez-Taboada, Jessica; de Hierro, Mercedes López; López-Ruiz, Miguel A.; Martínez, R. Javier; Llaño, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the advantages of cytology and PCR of high-risk human papilloma virus (PCR HR-HPV) infection in biopsy-derived diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL = AIN2/AIN3) in HIV-positive men having sex with men (MSM). Methods This is a single-centered study conducted between May 2010 and May 2014 in patients (n = 201, mean age 37 years) recruited from our outpatient clinic. Samples of anal canal mucosa were taken into liquid medium for PCR HPV analysis and for cytology. Anoscopy was performed for histology evaluation. Results Anoscopy showed 33.8% were normal, 47.8% low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), and 18.4% HSIL; 80.2% had HR-HPV. PCR of HR-HPV had greater sensitivity than did cytology (88.8% vs. 75.7%) in HSIL screening, with similar positive (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of 20.3 vs. 22.9 and 89.7 vs. 88.1, respectively. Combining both tests increased the sensitivity and NPV of HSIL diagnosis to 100%. Correlation of cytology vs. histology was, generally, very low and PCR of HR-HPV vs. histology was non-existent (<0.2) or low (<0.4). Area under the receiver operating characteristics (AUROC) curve analysis of cytology and PCR HR-HPV for the diagnosis of HSIL was poor (<0.6). Multivariate regression analysis showed protective factors against HSIL were: viral suppression (OR: 0.312; 95%CI: 0.099-0.984), and/or syphilis infection (OR: 0.193; 95%CI: 0.045-0.827). HSIL risk was associated with HPV-68 genotype (OR: 20.1; 95%CI: 2.04-197.82). Conclusions When cytology and PCR HR-HPV findings are normal, the diagnosis of pre-malignant HSIL can be reliably ruled-out in HIV-positive patients. HPV suppression with treatment protects against the appearance of HSIL. PMID:25849412

  6. Epidemiology and genetic characterization of hepatitis A virus genotype IIA.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Delphine; Couturier, Elisabeth; Mackiewicz, Vincent; Graube, Arielle; Letort, Marie-José; Dussaix, Elisabeth; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie

    2010-09-01

    Three hepatitis A virus (HAV) genotypes, I, II, and III, divided into subtypes A and B, infect humans. Genotype I is the most frequently reported, while genotype II is hardly ever isolated, and its genetic diversity is unknown. From 2002 to 2007, a French epidemiological survey of HAV identified 6 IIA isolates, mostly from patients who did not travel abroad. The possible African origin of IIA strains was investigated by screening the 2008 mandatory notification records of HAV infection: 171 HAV strains from travelers to West Africa and Morocco were identified. Genotyping was performed by sequencing of the VP1/2A junction in 68 available sera. Entire P1 and 5' untranslated regions of IIA strains were compared to reference sequences of other genotypes. The screening retrieved 5 imported IIA isolates. An additional autochthonous case and 2 more African cases were identified in 2008 and 2009, respectively. A total of 14 IIA isolates (8 African and 6 autochthonous) were analyzed. IIA sequences presented lower nucleotide and amino acid variability than other genotypes. The highest variability was observed in the N-terminal region of VP1, while for other genotypes the highest variability was observed at the VP1/2A junction. Phylogenetic analysis identified 2 clusters, one gathering all African and two autochthonous cases and a second including only autochthonous isolates. In conclusion, most IIA strains isolated in France are imported by travelers returning from West Africa. However, the unexplained contamination mode of autochthonous cases suggests another, still to be discovered geographical origin or a French reservoir to be explored. PMID:20592136

  7. Epidemiology and Genetic Characterization of Hepatitis A Virus Genotype IIA▿

    PubMed Central

    Desbois, Delphine; Couturier, Elisabeth; Mackiewicz, Vincent; Graube, Arielle; Letort, Marie-José; Dussaix, Elisabeth; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Three hepatitis A virus (HAV) genotypes, I, II, and III, divided into subtypes A and B, infect humans. Genotype I is the most frequently reported, while genotype II is hardly ever isolated, and its genetic diversity is unknown. From 2002 to 2007, a French epidemiological survey of HAV identified 6 IIA isolates, mostly from patients who did not travel abroad. The possible African origin of IIA strains was investigated by screening the 2008 mandatory notification records of HAV infection: 171 HAV strains from travelers to West Africa and Morocco were identified. Genotyping was performed by sequencing of the VP1/2A junction in 68 available sera. Entire P1 and 5′ untranslated regions of IIA strains were compared to reference sequences of other genotypes. The screening retrieved 5 imported IIA isolates. An additional autochthonous case and 2 more African cases were identified in 2008 and 2009, respectively. A total of 14 IIA isolates (8 African and 6 autochthonous) were analyzed. IIA sequences presented lower nucleotide and amino acid variability than other genotypes. The highest variability was observed in the N-terminal region of VP1, while for other genotypes the highest variability was observed at the VP1/2A junction. Phylogenetic analysis identified 2 clusters, one gathering all African and two autochthonous cases and a second including only autochthonous isolates. In conclusion, most IIA strains isolated in France are imported by travelers returning from West Africa. However, the unexplained contamination mode of autochthonous cases suggests another, still to be discovered geographical origin or a French reservoir to be explored. PMID:20592136

  8. Antibodies Targeting Novel Neutralizing Epitopes of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoprotein Preclude Genotype 2 Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Huiying; Jiang, Dong; Wang, Jianghua; Xie, Xingwang; Wei, Lai

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no effective vaccine to prevent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, partly due to our insufficient understanding of the virus glycoprotein immunology. Most neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) were identified using glycoprotein immunogens, such as recombinant E1E2, HCV pseudoparticles or cell culture derived HCV. However, the fact that in the HCV acute infection phase, only a small proportion of patients are self-resolved accompanied with the emergence of nAbs, indicates the limited immunogenicity of glycoprotein itself to induce effective antibodies against a highly evolved virus. Secondly, in previous reports, the immunogen sequence was mostly the genotype of the 1a H77 strain. Rarely, other genotypes/subtypes have been studied, although theoretically one genotype/subtype immunogen is able to induce cross-genotype neutralizing antibodies. To overcome these drawbacks and find potential novel neutralizing epitopes, 57 overlapping peptides encompassing the full-length glycoprotein E1E2 of subtype 1b were synthesized to immunize BALB/c mice, and the neutralizing reactive of the induced antisera against HCVpp genotypes 1–6 was determined. We defined a domain comprising amino acids (aa) 192–221, 232–251, 262–281 and 292–331 of E1, and 421–543, 564–583, 594–618 and 634–673 of E2, as the neutralizing regions of HCV glycoprotein. Peptides PUHI26 (aa 444–463) and PUHI45 (aa 604–618)-induced antisera displayed the most potent broad neutralizing reactive. Two monoclonal antibodies recognizing the PUHI26 and PUHI45 epitopes efficiently precluded genotype 2 viral (HCVcc JFH and J6 strains) infection, but they did not neutralize other genotypes. Our study mapped a neutralizing epitope region of HCV glycoprotein using a novel immunization strategy, and identified two monoclonal antibodies effective in preventing genotype 2 virus infection. PMID:26406225

  9. Antibodies Targeting Novel Neutralizing Epitopes of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoprotein Preclude Genotype 2 Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kai; Liu, Ruyu; Rao, Huiying; Jiang, Dong; Wang, Jianghua; Xie, Xingwang; Wei, Lai

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no effective vaccine to prevent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, partly due to our insufficient understanding of the virus glycoprotein immunology. Most neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) were identified using glycoprotein immunogens, such as recombinant E1E2, HCV pseudoparticles or cell culture derived HCV. However, the fact that in the HCV acute infection phase, only a small proportion of patients are self-resolved accompanied with the emergence of nAbs, indicates the limited immunogenicity of glycoprotein itself to induce effective antibodies against a highly evolved virus. Secondly, in previous reports, the immunogen sequence was mostly the genotype of the 1a H77 strain. Rarely, other genotypes/subtypes have been studied, although theoretically one genotype/subtype immunogen is able to induce cross-genotype neutralizing antibodies. To overcome these drawbacks and find potential novel neutralizing epitopes, 57 overlapping peptides encompassing the full-length glycoprotein E1E2 of subtype 1b were synthesized to immunize BALB/c mice, and the neutralizing reactive of the induced antisera against HCVpp genotypes 1-6 was determined. We defined a domain comprising amino acids (aa) 192-221, 232-251, 262-281 and 292-331 of E1, and 421-543, 564-583, 594-618 and 634-673 of E2, as the neutralizing regions of HCV glycoprotein. Peptides PUHI26 (aa 444-463) and PUHI45 (aa 604-618)-induced antisera displayed the most potent broad neutralizing reactive. Two monoclonal antibodies recognizing the PUHI26 and PUHI45 epitopes efficiently precluded genotype 2 viral (HCVcc JFH and J6 strains) infection, but they did not neutralize other genotypes. Our study mapped a neutralizing epitope region of HCV glycoprotein using a novel immunization strategy, and identified two monoclonal antibodies effective in preventing genotype 2 virus infection. PMID:26406225

  10. Dengue virus 3 genotype I in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and eggs, Brazil, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Ana P P; Figueiredo, Leandra B; dos Santos, João R; Eiras, Alvaro E; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G

    2010-06-01

    Dengue virus type 3 genotype I was detected in Brazil during epidemics in 2002-2004. To confirm this finding, we identified this virus genotype in naturally infected field-caught Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and eggs. Results showed usefulness of virus investigations in vectors as a component of active epidemiologic surveillance. PMID:20507754

  11. Dengue Virus 3 Genotype I in Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes and Eggs, Brazil, 2005–2006

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Ana P.P.; Figueiredo, Leandra B.; dos Santos, João R.; Eiras, Álvaro E.; Bonjardim, Cláudio A.; Ferreira, Paulo C.P.

    2010-01-01

    Dengue virus type 3 genotype I was detected in Brazil during epidemics in 2002–2004. To confirm this finding, we identified this virus genotype in naturally infected field-caught Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and eggs. Results showed usefulness of virus investigations in vectors as a component of active epidemiologic surveillance. PMID:20507754

  12. Simultaneous Genotyping and Quantification of Hepatitis B Virus for Genotypes B and C by Real-Time PCR Assay▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yao; Zhang, Xiu-Yu; Guo, Jin-Jun; Zeng, Ai-Zhong; Hu, Jie-Li; Huang, Wen-Xiang; Shan, You-Lan; Huang, Ai-Long

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is an important cause of human chronic liver diseases and is a major public health problem. Viral load and HBV genotype play critical roles in determining clinical outcomes and response to antiviral treatment in hepatitis B patients. Viral genotype detection and quantification assays are currently in use with different levels of effectiveness. In this study, the performance of a real-time genotyping and quantitative PCR (GQ-PCR)-based assay was evaluated. Through the use of genotype-specific primers and probes, this assay provides simultaneous identification and quantification of genotypes B and C in a single reaction. Our GQ-PCR correctly identified all predefined genotypes B and C, and no cross-reaction between genotypes B and C were observed. The GQ-PCR identified more cases of HBV infections with mixed genotypes B and C than direct sequencing did. Samples from 127 HBV-infected Chinese patients were genotyped with GQ-PCR, revealing 56.7% HBV as genotype B, 13.4% as genotype C, and 29.8% as mixed genotypes B and C. This assay provides a reliable, efficient, and cost-effective means for quantification of the B and C genotypes of HBV in single or mixed infections. This assay is suitable for sequential monitoring of viral load levels and for determining the relationship between the genotype viral load and stage of disease in Asians. PMID:20720032

  13. Biological and phylogenetic characterization of a genotype VII Newcastle disease virus from Venezuela: Efficacy of vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe the characterization a virulent genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from Venezuela and evaluate the efficacy of heterologous genotype commercial vaccination under field and controlled rearing conditions. Biological pathotyping and molecular analysis were applied. Results sh...

  14. Pepino mosaic virus genotype shift in North America and rapid genotype identification using loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic, once an emerging disease a decade ago, has become endemic on greenhouse tomatoes worldwide in recent years. Three distinct genotypes of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), including EU, US1 and CH2 have been recognized. Our earlier study in 2006-2007 demonstrated a predominant EU genotype ...

  15. Cloacal papillomas in psittacines.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; Junge, R E; O'Banion, M K; Basgall, E J; Harrison, G; Herron, A J; Shivaprasad, H L

    1986-04-01

    Papilloma-like masses affecting the cloaca of 19 Amazons, 16 macaws, 3 parrots, 1 conure, and 1 parakeet were examined. Papillomatous lesions were characterized by proliferation of the lining epithelium on thin fibrovascular stalks. Carcinoma in situ was diagnosed in the cloaca of a macaw in addition to the other 16 macaws with papillomas. Papillomavirus group-specific antigens were not detected in any of the 41 lesions, using the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique. The DNA extracts from 6 different frozen papillomas did not contain papillomavirus genomes detectable by Southern blot hybridization, using an African gray parrot cutaneous papillomavirus as a probe. Evidence of an infective agent was not found by electron microscopic examination of 8 of the papillomas. Inoculations of partially purified homogenates of a cloacal papilloma from a yellow-crowned Amazon did not induce lesion formation on cloacal mucosa of an adult yellow-crowned Amazon, green and yellow macaw, sulphur-crested cockatoo, or mollucan cockatoo. PMID:2421621

  16. Identification of new sub-genotypes of virulent Newcastle disease virus with potential panzootic features.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patti J; Haddas, Ruth; Simanov, Luba; Lublin, Avishay; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Wajid, Abdul; Bibi, Tasra; Khan, Taseer Ahmad; Yaqub, Tahir; Setiyaningsih, Surachmi; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-01-01

    Virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates from new sub-genotypes within genotype VII are rapidly spreading through Asia and the Middle East causing outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND) characterized by significant illness and mortality in poultry, suggesting the existence of a fifth panzootic. These viruses, which belong to the new sub-genotypes VIIh and VIIi, have epizootic characteristics and do not appear to have originated directly from other genotype VII NDV isolates that are currently circulating elsewhere, but are related to the present and past Indonesian NDV viruses isolated from wild birds since the 80s. Viruses from sub-genotype VIIh were isolated in Indonesia (2009-2010), Malaysia (2011), China (2011), and Cambodia (2011-2012) and are closely related to the Indonesian NDV isolated in 2007, APMV1/Chicken/Karangasem, Indonesia (Bali-01)/2007. Since 2011 and during 2012 highly related NDV isolates from sub-genotype VIIi have been isolated from poultry production facilities and occasionally from pet birds, throughout Indonesia, Pakistan and Israel. In Pakistan, the viruses of sub-genotype VIIi have replaced NDV isolates of genotype XIII, which were commonly isolated in 2009-2011, and they have become the predominant sub-genotype causing ND outbreaks since 2012. In a similar fashion, the numbers of viruses of sub-genotype VIIi isolated in Israel increased in 2012, and isolates from this sub-genotype are now found more frequently than viruses from the previously predominant sub-genotypes VIId and VIIb, from 2009 to 2012. All NDV isolates of sub-genotype VIIi are approximately 99% identical to each other and are more closely related to Indonesian viruses isolated from 1983 through 1990 than to those of genotype VII, still circulating in the region. Similarly, in addition to the Pakistani NDV isolates of the original genotype XIII (now called sub-genotype XIIIa), there is an additional sub-genotype (XIIIb) that was initially detected in India and Iran

  17. Genotyping of feline leukemia virus in Mexican housecats.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Hugo; Autran, Marcela; García, M Martha; Carmona, M Ángel; Rodríguez, Cecilia; Martínez, H Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a retrovirus with variable rates of infection globally. DNA was obtained from cats' peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and proviral DNA of pol and env genes was detected using PCR. Seventy-six percent of cats scored positive for FeLV using env-PCR; and 54 %, by pol-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of both regions identified sequences that correspond to a group that includes endogenous retroviruses. They form an independent branch and, therefore, a new group of endogenous viruses. Cat gender, age, outdoor access, and cohabitation with other cats were found to be significant risk factors associated with the disease. This strongly suggests that these FeLV genotypes are widely distributed in the studied feline population in Mexico. PMID:26747244

  18. Hepatitis C virus genotyping in Greece: unexpected high prevalence of genotype 5a in a Greek island.

    PubMed

    Karatapanis, Stylianos; Tsoplou, Panagiota; Papastergiou, Vasilios; Vasiageorgi, Aggeliki; Stampori, Maria; Saitis, Ioannis; Tsitsopoulos, Eustathios; Lisgos, Phillipos; Skorda, Lamprini; Ketikoglou, Ioannis; Goulis, Ioannis

    2012-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 5 (G5) is a rare genotype reported mainly in South Africa. However, increasing data suggest the sporadic presence of this genotype in different European countries. To assess the epidemiology of HCV-G5 in Greece, genotyping was performed in 973 consecutive patients infected with HCV, referred to 7 hepatology centers throughout Greece, from January 2005 to December 2009. Genotype 5a (19 patients, 1.9%) was the fifth most prevalent genotype after genotype 1 (408 patients, 41.9%), genotype 3 (318 patients, 32.7%), genotype 4 (158 patients, 16.2%), and genotype 2 (70 patients, 7.2%). The majority of patients infected with G5 (16/19,84.2%) were referred to the General Hospital of Rhodes, an island in south-east Greece. The HCV genotype distribution in that particular island, indicates a particularly high G5 prevalence of 12.8%, after genotype 1 (40%), genotype 3 (28%), and genotype 4 (15%). Among the patients from Rhodes infected with G5 (n = 16), 13 (81.2%) were females. The mean age was 62.3 ± 6.5 years, significantly older than the patients infected with other HCV genotypes (mean age 40.6 ± 7.2, P < 0.0001). Nine out of the 16 cases (56.2%) presented features of high pre-treatment viral loads. Advanced liver fibrosis (Metavir F3-F4) was found in four out of five performed liver biopsies. Ten patients received treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin and a sustained viral response were achieved in six cases. The source of infection is unknown but parenteral iatrogenic routes of transmission seem to have contributed significantly to the spread of genotype 5a in this region. PMID:22170541

  19. The prevalence of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in oral squamous cell carcinomas: a retrospective analysis of 88 patients and literature overview.

    PubMed

    Krüger, M; Pabst, A M; Walter, C; Sagheb, K; Günther, C; Blatt, S; Weise, K; Al-Nawas, B; Ziebart, T

    2014-10-01

    In addition to tobacco and alcohol consumption, the two main risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), recent studies have revealed infections with human papilloma virus (HPV) as an additional risk factor for OSCC development. In the field of head and neck malignancies, the prevalence of HPV infections in oropharyngeal cancer (OC) ranges in different studies up to 84%. While HPV infection is discussed as an independent risk factor in this region, its distinguished role in carcinogenesis of tumours localized to the oral cavity remains still uncertain. In this study, we analysed the HPV status in 88 consecutive patients with OSCCs localized anterior of the palatoglossal arch who were treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the University Medical Center Mainz. The HPV status analysis was performed using DNA-PCR and immunostaining of p16 protein. The prevalence of HPV-positive OSCCs was about 6% (5 patients). In 3 patients the HPV subtypes 16/18 were found. No significant differences between the HPV positive and negative patients regarding age, gender, smoking and alcohol consumption, localization and TNM level could be detected. Contrary to other studies focussing on cancers of the lingual and palatine tonsil, the prevalence of HPV infections was much lower in the oral cavity. Therefore HPV infection might play a less important role in oral carcinogenesis. PMID:24947612

  20. Sensitivity of in situ detection with biotinylated probes of human papilloma virus type 16 DNA in frozen tissue sections of squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Walboomers, J M; Melchers, W J; Mullink, H; Meijer, C J; Struyk, A; Quint, W G; van der Noordaa, J; ter Schegget, J

    1988-06-01

    The sensitivity of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) DNA detection by DNA in situ hybridization using biotinylated probes (bio-DISH) was estimated by performing this technique on snap-frozen tissue sections of 10 cervical squamous cell carcinomas containing increasing amounts of HPV-16 as determined by Southern blot hybridization. A protocol using serial sections for bio-DISH and DNA extraction was used. The number of positively stained cells and the detection limit were strongly dependent on the treatment of the sections with proteinase K prior to hybridization. At low proteinase K concentration (0.1 micrograms/ml), the detection limit appeared to be 30-40 HPV-16 DNA copies per carcinoma cell, whereas morphology was preserved. A high proteinase K concentration (1-5 micrograms/ml) often resulted in an increase in the number of positively stained cells but also in a poor morphology. The detection limit was improved to at least 20 HPV-16 DNA copies per carcinoma cell. PMID:2837906

  1. Detection of low copy human papilloma virus DNA and mRNA in routine paraffin sections of cervix by non-isotopic in situ hybridisation.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, J; Graham, A K; Frank, C; Fleming, K A; Evans, M F; McGee, J O

    1987-01-01

    In analysing human papilloma virus (HPV) infection of the cervix in formalin fixed paraffin sections by non-isotopic in situ hybridisation two main problems were found: detachment of sections from the glass during hybridisation and probe detection; inadequate sensitivity and inability to assess sensitivity of the in situ procedure. The first problem was investigated by assessing the efficiency of various tissue adhesives individually and in combination. The second problem was addressed by optimising conditions for DNA unmasking, hybridisation, and biotinylated probe detection. Sensitivity of the final in situ procedure developed was assessed by using the detection of pHY2.1 repeats as a built-in control. Extrapolation of data showed that less than 10 copies of HPV DNA can be visualised by these procedures. HPV nucleic acid, mainly in the form of DNA, was detected not only in koilocytic nuclei but also in suprabasal cells in condylomas and CIN lesions. HPV mRNA was also visualised in the cytoplasm (and probably also nuclei) of the same cell types. These non-isotopic in situ procedures give results comparable to those obtained with radiolabelled probes, but they are less time consuming and provide better morphological resolution. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 PMID:2821078

  2. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  3. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  4. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  5. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  6. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  7. Pathogenesis of new sub-genotypes of Newcastle disease virus strains from Israel and Pakistan

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease (ND) is a devastating disease of poultry worldwide caused by virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). New genotypes and sub-genotypes of NDV frequently emerge. In the past few years, NDV strains belonging to sub-genotype VIIi and XIIIb emerged in the Middle East and Asi...

  8. Viral fitness does not correlate with three genotype displacement events involving infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    PubMed Central

    Kell, Alison M; Wargo, Andrew R; Kurath, Gael

    2014-01-01

    Viral genotype displacement events are characterized by the replacement of a previously dominant virus genotype by a novel genotype of the same virus species in a given geographic region. We examine here the fitness of three pairs of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) genotypes involved in three major genotype displacement events in Washington state over the last 30 years to determine whether increased virus fitness correlates with displacement. Fitness was assessed using in vivo assays to measure viral replication in single infection, simultaneous co-infection, and sequential superinfection in the natural host, steelhead trout. In addition, virion stability of each genotype was measured in freshwater and seawater environments at various temperatures. By these methods, we found no correlation between increased viral fitness and displacement in the field. These results suggest that other pressures likely exist in the field with important consequences for IHNV evolution. PMID:25068402

  9. Viral fitness does not correlate with three genotype displacement events involving infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus.

    PubMed

    Kell, Alison M; Wargo, Andrew R; Kurath, Gael

    2014-09-01

    Viral genotype displacement events are characterized by the replacement of a previously dominant virus genotype by a novel genotype of the same virus species in a given geographic region. We examine here the fitness of three pairs of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) genotypes involved in three major genotype displacement events in Washington state over the last 30 years to determine whether increased virus fitness correlates with displacement. Fitness was assessed using in vivo assays to measure viral replication in single infection, simultaneous co-infection, and sequential superinfection in the natural host, steelhead trout. In addition, virion stability of each genotype was measured in freshwater and seawater environments at various temperatures. By these methods, we found no correlation between increased viral fitness and displacement in the field. These results suggest that other pressures likely exist in the field with important consequences for IHNV evolution. PMID:25068402

  10. Viral fitness does not correlate with three genotype displacement events involving infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kell, Alison M.; Wargo, Andrew R.; Kurath, Gael

    2014-01-01

    Viral genotype displacement events are characterized by the replacement of a previously dominant virus genotype by a novel genotype of the same virus species in a given geographic region. We examine here the fitness of three pairs of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) genotypes involved in three major genotype displacement events in Washington state over the last 30 years to determine whether increased virus fitness correlates with displacement. Fitness was assessed using in vivo assays to measure viral replication in single infection, simultaneous co-infection, and sequential superinfection in the natural host, steelhead trout. In addition, virion stability of each genotype was measured in freshwater and seawater environments at various temperatures. By these methods, we found no correlation between increased viral fitness and displacement in the field. These results suggest that other pressures likely exist in the field with important consequences for IHNV evolution.

  11. Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes Among Patients With Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Hormozgan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi, Seyedeh Farzaneh; Moosavy, Seyed Hamid; Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Eghbali, Hajar; Mahboobi, Hamidreza

    2013-01-01

    Background More than 170 million people in the world are infected with Hepatitis C virus (HCV). Determination of HCV genotype before starting the treatment is required, because HCV genotype affects the course of treatment and drug dosage Objectives We aimed to evaluate HCV genotypes among patients with positive results for anti-HCV in Bandar Abbas from 2011 to 2012. Patients and Methods Five hundred and nine consecutive patients with established chronic HCV infection referred to Behavioral Diseases Consultation Center, Blood Transfusion and Center for Special Diseases from March 2011 to March 2012 were enrolled in this cross sectional study. Five mL of peripheral blood was taken from precipitants and viral RNA extracted after plasma separation. Hepatitis C virus RNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested PCR) assay and then HCV genotypes analyzed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method. Results In overall, 509 patients enrolled to this study. The mean age of these patients was 38.87 ± 9.55 years ranging from 1 to 90 years. Routs of transmission were: 238 (46.7%) inject of substance, 149 (29.3%) unknown rout, 62 (12.2%) blood transfusion, 50 (9.8%) sexual contact, and 10 (2%) mother to child. Frequency of HCV genotypes were: 316 (62.1%) 1a, 117 (23%) 1b, and 76 (14.9%) 3a. there was no significant association between HCV genotypes and gender, educational degree, risk factor of Hepatitis C, job, monthly income, HIV infection, Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, Intravenous drug injection, and underlying disease (P > 0.05). Conclusions This results the same as many similar studies demonstrated that common HCV genotypes in Iranian patients were 1a, 3a and 1b, respectively. Patients with 1a and 1b genotypes have lower responses to interferon treatment, and it is reasonable to perform early screening to diagnose and determine HCV genotype for effective treatment and diagnose high-risk cases. PMID:24403914

  12. Nucleotide sequence variation of the envelope protein gene identifies two distinct genotypes of yellow fever virus.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, G J; Cropp, B C; Kinney, R M; Trent, D W; Gubler, D J

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of yellow fever virus over 67 years was investigated by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the envelope (E) protein genes of 20 viruses isolated in Africa, the Caribbean, and South America. Uniformly weighted parsimony algorithm analysis defined two major evolutionary yellow fever virus lineages designated E genotypes I and II. E genotype I contained viruses isolated from East and Central Africa. E genotype II viruses were divided into two sublineages: IIA viruses from West Africa and IIB viruses from America, except for a 1979 virus isolated from Trinidad (TRINID79A). Unique signature patterns were identified at 111 nucleotide and 12 amino acid positions within the yellow fever virus E gene by signature pattern analysis. Yellow fever viruses from East and Central Africa contained unique signatures at 60 nucleotide and five amino acid positions, those from West Africa contained unique signatures at 25 nucleotide and two amino acid positions, and viruses from America contained such signatures at 30 nucleotide and five amino acid positions in the E gene. The dissemination of yellow fever viruses from Africa to the Americas is supported by the close genetic relatedness of genotype IIA and IIB viruses and genetic evidence of a possible second introduction of yellow fever virus from West Africa, as illustrated by the TRINID79A virus isolate. The E protein genes of American IIB yellow fever viruses had higher frequencies of amino acid substitutions than did genes of yellow fever viruses of genotypes I and IIA on the basis of comparisons with a consensus amino acid sequence for the yellow fever E gene. The great variation in the E proteins of American yellow fever virus probably results from positive selection imposed by virus interaction with different species of mosquitoes or nonhuman primates in the Americas. PMID:7637022

  13. Virus-Like Particle Secretion and Genotype-Dependent Immunogenicity of Dengue Virus Serotype 2 DNA Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Galula, Jedhan U.; Shen, Wen-Fan; Chuang, Shih-Te

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus (DENV), composed of four distinct serotypes, is the most important and rapidly emerging arthropod-borne pathogen and imposes substantial economic and public health burdens. We constructed candidate vaccines containing the DNA of five of the genotypes of dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) and evaluated the immunogenicity, the neutralizing (Nt) activity of the elicited antibodies, and the protective efficacy elicited in mice immunized with the vaccine candidates. We observed a significant correlation between the level of in vitro virus-like particle secretion, the elicited antibody response, and the protective efficacy of the vaccines containing the DNA of the different DENV genotypes in immunized mice. However, higher total IgG antibody levels did not always translate into higher Nt antibodies against homologous and heterologous viruses. We also found that, in contrast to previous reports, more than 50% of total IgG targeted ectodomain III (EDIII) of the E protein, and a substantial fraction of this population was interdomain highly neutralizing flavivirus subgroup-cross-reactive antibodies, such as monoclonal antibody 1B7-5. In addition, the lack of a critical epitope(s) in the Sylvatic genotype virus recognized by interdomain antibodies could be the major cause of the poor protection of mice vaccinated with the Asian 1 genotype vaccine (pVD2-Asian 1) from lethal challenge with virus of the Sylvatic genotype. In conclusion, although the pVD2-Asian 1 vaccine was immunogenic, elicited sufficient titers of Nt antibodies against all DENV-2 genotypes, and provided 100% protection against challenge with virus of the homologous Asian 1 genotype and virus of the heterologous Cosmopolitan genotype, it is critical to monitor the potential emergence of Sylvatic genotype viruses, since vaccine candidates under development may not protect vaccinated humans from these viruses. IMPORTANCE Five genotype-specific dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2) DNA vaccine

  14. Determination of genotypes of hepatitis C virus in Venezuela by restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, F H; Loureiro, C L; Devesa, M; Blitz, L; Parra, K; Beker, S; Liprandi, F

    1997-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Venezuela were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism in the 5' noncoding region. The absence of BstUI digestion was found to be a useful marker for genotype 2 specimens. From 122 serum samples, 66, 20, and 2.5% were classified as genotypes 1, 2, and 3, respectively; 0.8% were classified as genotype 4; and 10% appeared to be mixed infections. PMID:9196212

  15. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Sewage and Genotype 1 in Acute Hepatitis Cases, Israel.

    PubMed

    Ram, Daniela; Manor, Yossi; Gozlan, Yael; Schwartz, Eli; Ben-Ari, Ziv; Mendelson, Ella; Mor, Orna

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging infectious agent in developed countries. HEV genotypes 1 (G1) and 3 (G3) have been identified in environmental and clinical samples in Europe. In Israel, the overall prevalence of anti-HEV IgG antibodies was found to be 10.6%; however, reports of HEV infection are scarce. In this study, the presence of HEV in Israel was investigated using 169 sewage samples from 32 treatment facilities and 49 samples from acute hepatitis patients, all collected between 2013 and 2015. Fourteen sewage samples, from Haifa (11/18 samples), Tel Aviv (2/29 samples), and Beer Sheva (1/17 samples), regions with good sanitary conditions and middle-high socioeconomic populations, were HEV positive. Among the patient samples, 6.1% (3/49) were HEV positive, all returning travelers from India. Genotype analysis revealed G1 HEV in patients and G3 HEV sequences in sewage. Evidence that HEV could be establishing itself in our region may justify more active surveillance to monitor its spread. PMID:27246446

  16. Newcastle Disease Virus in Madagascar: Identification of an Original Genotype Possibly Deriving from a Died Out Ancestor of Genotype IV

    PubMed Central

    Maminiaina, Olivier F.; Gil, Patricia; Briand, François-Xavier; Albina, Emmanuel; Keita, Djénéba; Andriamanivo, Harentsoaniaina Rasamoelina; Chevalier, Véronique; Lancelot, Renaud; Martinez, Dominique; Rakotondravao, R.; Rajaonarison, Jean-Joseph; Koko, M.; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel A.; Jestin, Véronique; Servan de Almeida, Renata

    2010-01-01

    In Madagascar, Newcastle disease (ND) has become enzootic after the first documented epizootics in 1946, with recurrent annual outbreaks causing mortality up to 40%. Four ND viruses recently isolated in Madagascar were genotypically and pathotypically characterised. By phylogenetic inference based on the F and HN genes, and also full-genome sequence analyses, the NDV Malagasy isolates form a cluster distant enough to constitute a new genotype hereby proposed as genotype XI. This new genotype is presumably deriving from an ancestor close to genotype IV introduced in the island probably more than 50 years ago. Our data show also that all the previously described neutralising epitopes are conserved between Malagasy and vaccine strains. However, the potential implication in vaccination failures of specific amino acid substitutions predominantly found on surface-exposed epitopes of F and HN proteins is discussed. PMID:21085573

  17. Hepatitis E virus genotype 3 in mussels (Mytilus galloprovinciallis), Spain.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, João R; Oliveira, Danielle; Rivadulla, Enrique; Abreu-Silva, Joana; Varela, Miguel F; Romalde, Jesús L; Nascimento, Maria S J

    2016-09-01

    Coastal waters can become contaminated with both human waste from sewage treatment plants and runoff following manure application. Thus, shellfish produced close to land can bioaccumulate enteric viruses of human and animal origin, including zoonotic hepatitis E virus that infect both human and swine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of HEV in shellfish from Galicia (NW Spain), a densely populated region with a strong tradition of swine farming, and one of the most important regions in the world for mussel production. We tested 81 mussel batches by RT-qPCR followed by conventional broad-spectrum nested RT-PCR and phylogenetic analysis. We have obtained 12 positive samples by RT-qPCR (14.81%) with HEV contamination levels ranging from 6.7 × 10(1) to 8.6 × 10(4) RNA copies/g digestive tissue. Phylogenetic analysis based on a 330 nt region of the ORF 1 showed that all sequenced isolates belonged to the zoonotic genotype 3 subgenotype e, being closely related to strains of human and swine origin. Results show that shellfish may be a potential route for HEV transmission to humans. PMID:27217353

  18. Genotypic Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    There are 16 approved human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drugs belonging to three mechanistic classes: protease inhibitors, nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors, and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors. HIV-1 resistance to these drugs is caused by mutations in the protease and RT enzymes, the molecular targets of these drugs. Drug resistance mutations arise most often in treated individuals, resulting from selective drug pressure in the presence of incompletely suppressed virus replication. HIV-1 isolates with drug resistance mutations, however, may also be transmitted to newly infected individuals. Three expert panels have recommended that HIV-1 protease and RT susceptibility testing should be used to help select HIV drug therapy. Although genotypic testing is more complex than typical antimicrobial susceptibility tests, there is a rich literature supporting the prognostic value of HIV-1 protease and RT mutations. This review describes the genetic mechanisms of HIV-1 drug resistance and summarizes published data linking individual RT and protease mutations to in vitro and in vivo resistance to the currently available HIV drugs. PMID:11932232

  19. Variability and pathogenicity of hepatitis E virus genotype 3 variants

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Samreen; Tedder, Richard S.; Hogema, Boris; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Izopet, Jacques; Bradley-Stewart, Amanda; Gunson, Rory; Harvala, Heli; Kokki, Inka; Simmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) can be clinically inapparent or produce symptoms and signs of hepatitis of varying severity and occasional fatality. This variability in clinical outcomes may reflect differences in host susceptibility or the presence of virally encoded determinants of pathogenicity. Analysis of complete genome sequences supports the division of HEV genotype 3 (HEV-3) variants into three major clades: 3ra comprising HEV isolates from rabbits, and 3efg and 3abchij comprising the corresponding named subtypes derived from humans and pigs. Using this framework, we investigated associations between viral genetic variability of HEV-3 in symptomatic and asymptomatic infections by comparing HEV-3 subgenomic sequences previously obtained from blood donors with those from patients presenting with hepatitis in the UK (54 blood donors, 148 hepatitis patients), the Netherlands (38 blood donors, 119 hepatitis patients), France (24 blood donors, 55 hepatitis patients) and Germany (14 blood donors, 36 hepatitis patients). In none of these countries was evidence found for a significant association between virus variants and patient group (P>0.05 Fisher's exact test). Furthermore, within a group of 123 patients in Scotland with clinically apparent HEV infections, we found no evidence for an association between variants of HEV-3 and disease severity or alanine aminotransferase level. The lack of detectable virally encoded determinants of disease outcomes in HEV-3 infection implies a more important role for host factors in its clinical phenotype. PMID:26282123

  20. Sociodemographic and Behavioral Correlates of Anogenital Warts and Human Papilloma Virus-Related Knowledge Among Men who have Sex with Men and Trans Women in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Brandon; Monsour, Emmi; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Galea, Jerome T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) globally, with a high burden of anogenital warts (AGW) among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transwomen (TW). Methods Six-hundred HIV negative MSM and TW (300 with AGW, 300 without) were recruited for a prospective cohort study to examine HPV outcomes and HPV vaccine knowledge. Participants completed a self-administered online questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics with HPV vaccine knowledge. Results The average participant age was 25.5 years. Most (67%) were single and 41.2% self-reported STI symptoms. The average age of first anal intercourse was 17 years, with self-reported sexual role as active (36%), passive (36%), and both (27%). Three quarters (77%) of participants reported engaging in condomless anal or oral sex up to six months prior to the study. Less than half (48%) of participants had heard of HPV. Participants with AGW were more likely to report that condoms helped prevent HPV (p=0.01) and that the absence of genital warts does not mean the absence of HPV (p<0.01). Conclusion Study participants had low levels of HPV knowledge but likely high HPV exposure due to condomless anal sex. The HPV knowledge gap may be explained in part by the stigma of sex work, underreporting of STIs, the high cost of the HPV vaccine in Peru, and misinformation about HPV vaccine. More work is needed to educate MSM and TW on HPV and the HPV vaccine. PMID:25763672

  1. Human papilloma virus 16 E6 RNA interference enhances cisplatin and death receptor-mediated apoptosis in human cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shinta; Hougardy, Brigitte M T; Meersma, Gert J; Schaap, Bessel; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; van der Zee, Ate G J; de Jong, Steven

    2012-05-01

    In cervical cancer, the p53 and retinoblastoma (pRb) tumor suppressor pathways are disrupted by the human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncoproteins, because E6 targets p53 and E7 targets pRb for rapid proteasome-mediated degradation. We have investigated whether E6 suppression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) restores p53 functionality and sensitizes the HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell line SiHa to apoptosis by cisplatin, irradiation, recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (rhTRAIL), or agonistic anti-Fas antibody. E6 siRNA resulted in decreased E6 mRNA levels and enhanced p53 and p21 expression, demonstrating the restoration of p53 functionality in SiHa cells, without inducing high levels of apoptosis (<10%). Cell surface expression of the proapoptotic death receptors (DRs) DR4, DR5, and Fas was not affected by E6 suppression. E6 suppression conferred susceptibility to cisplatin-induced apoptosis but not to irradiation-, rhTRAIL-, or anti-Fas antibody-induced apoptosis. Combining cisplatin with rhTRAIL or anti-Fas antibody induced even higher apoptosis levels in E6-suppressed cells. At the molecular level, cisplatin treatment resulted in elevated p53 levels, enhanced caspase-3 activation, and reduced p21 levels in E6-suppressed cells. Cisplatin in combination with death receptor ligands enhanced caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation and reduced X-linked inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein (XIAP) levels in these cells. We showed using siRNA that the enhanced apoptosis in E6-supressed cells was related to reduced XIAP levels and not due to reduced p21 levels. In conclusion, targeting E6 or XIAP in combination with cisplatin can efficiently potentiate rhTRAIL-induced apoptosis in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. PMID:22328720

  2. Mixed genotype transmission bodies and virions contribute to the maintenance of diversity in an insect virus

    PubMed Central

    Clavijo, Gabriel; Williams, Trevor; Muñoz, Delia; Caballero, Primitivo; López-Ferber, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    An insect nucleopolyhedrovirus naturally survives as a mixture of at least nine genotypes. Infection by multiple genotypes results in the production of virus occlusion bodies (OBs) with greater pathogenicity than those of any genotype alone. We tested the hypothesis that each OB contains a genotypically diverse population of virions. Few insects died following inoculation with an experimental two-genotype mixture at a dose of one OB per insect, but a high proportion of multiple infections were observed (50%), which differed significantly from the frequencies predicted by a non-associated transmission model in which genotypes are segregated into distinct OBs. By contrast, insects that consumed multiple OBs experienced higher mortality and infection frequencies did not differ significantly from those of the non-associated model. Inoculation with genotypically complex wild-type OBs indicated that genotypes tend to be transmitted in association, rather than as independent entities, irrespective of dose. To examine the hypothesis that virions may themselves be genotypically heterogeneous, cell culture plaques derived from individual virions were analysed to reveal that one-third of virions was of mixed genotype, irrespective of the genotypic composition of the OBs. We conclude that co-occlusion of genotypically distinct virions in each OB is an adaptive mechanism that favours the maintenance of virus diversity during insect-to-insect transmission. PMID:19939845

  3. Evaluation of novel assays for the detection of human papilloma virus in self-collected samples for cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Du, H; Zhang, R; Zhao, J H; Hu, Q C; Wang, C; Wang, G X; Tang, J L; Wu, R F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of three new high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) assays for primary cervical cancer screening, by using self-collected samples, and to identify an HPV assay that could overcome the major obstacles faced during large-scale population-based screening. Two hundred and ten women showing abnormal cervical cytology (and referred for a colposcopy) were recruited in this study. Self-collected samples obtained from all women were tested with the Cobas, Seq, and BioPerfectus Multiplex Real Time HPV assays; simultaneously, clinician-collected samples (from the same women) were tested with the gold-standard Cobas HPV assay. The results of all the assays were consistent. The sensitivity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2+ (CIN2+) and CIN3+ were comparable between the self-collected samples tested with the three new assays and the clinician-collected samples tested with the Cobas HPV assay (P > 0.05). The single-genotype HPV load per sample did not differ significantly between the self- and clinician-collected samples (P = 0.195). In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrated the applicability of the three new HPV assays for primary cervical cancer screening based on self-collection. PMID:27420961

  4. Hepatitis C virus infection: Are there still specific problems with genotype 3?

    PubMed Central

    Gondeau, Claire; Pageaux, Georges Philippe; Larrey, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease and the main indication for liver transplantation worldwide. As promising specific treatments have been introduced for genotype 1, clinicians and researchers are now focusing on patients infected by non-genotype 1 HCV, particularly genotype 3. Indeed, in the golden era of direct-acting antiviral drugs, genotype 3 infections are no longer considered as easy to treat and are associated with higher risk of developing severe liver injuries, such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, HCV genotype 3 accounts for 40% of all HCV infections in Asia and is the most frequent genotype among HCV-positive injecting drug users in several countries. Here, we review recent data on HCV genotype 3 infection/treatment, including clinical aspects and the underlying genotype-specific molecular mechanisms. PMID:26576095

  5. Distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in a diverse US integrated health care population.

    PubMed

    Manos, M Michele; Shvachko, Valentina A; Murphy, Rosemary C; Arduino, Jean Marie; Shire, Norah J

    2012-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes influence response to therapy, and recently approved direct-acting antivirals are genotype-specific. Genotype distribution information can help to guide antiviral development and elucidate infection patterns. HCV genotype distributions were studied in a diverse cross-section of patients in the Northern California Kaiser Permanente health plan. Associations between genotype and race/ethnicity, age, and sex were assessed with multivariate logistic regression models. The 10,256 patients studied were median age 56 years, 62% male, 55% White non-Hispanic. Overall, 70% were genotype 1, 16% genotype 2, 12% genotype 3, 1% genotype 4, <1% genotype 5, and 1% genotype 6. Blacks (OR 4.5 [3.8-5.5]) and Asians (OR 1.2 [1.0-1.4]) were more likely to have genotype 1 than 2/3 versus non-Hispanic Whites. Women less likely had genotype 1 versus 2/3 than did men (OR 0.86 [0.78-0.94]). Versus non-Hispanic Whites, Asians (OR 0.38 [0.31-0.46]) and Blacks (OR 0.73 [0.63-0.84]) were less likely genotype1a than 1b; Hispanics (OR 1.3 [1.1-1.5]) and Native Americans (OR 1.9 [1.2-2.8]) more likely had genotype 1a than 1b. Patients age ≥65 years less likely had genotype 1a than 1b versus those age 45-64 (OR 0.34 [0.29-0.41]). The predominance of genotype 1 among all groups studied reinforces the need for new therapies targeting this genotype. Racial/ethnic variations in HCV genotype and subtype distribution must be considered in formulating new agents and novel strategies to successfully treat the diversity of hepatitis C patients. PMID:22997077

  6. Genotypic diversity of beet curly top virus populations in the Western United States.

    PubMed

    Stenger, D C; McMahon, C L

    1997-07-01

    ABSTRACT The genotypic diversity of beet curly top virus (BCTV) present in the western United States has been examined by the analysis of 58 field isolates and eight laboratory or nursery isolates of the virus. Full-length clones for each isolate have been characterized for genotype by restriction endonuclease mapping. The results indicate that most of the genotypes examined may be classified as variants of the CFH, Worland, or Cal/Logan strains of BCTV. Two genotypes were recovered that appear to share certain genotypic markers of both Worland and CFH strains. Genotypic variants of the CFH and Worland strains and the two genotypes sharing markers of both strains were recovered from field isolates collected during 1994 and 1995. In contrast, the Cal/Logan strain was recovered only from isolates maintained in laboratories or nurseries. Comparisons of restriction endonuclease maps of cloned BCTV genomes revealed considerable variability both within and between strains. Although a total of 43 distinct genotypes of BCTV were identified, only 36 (84%) were recovered from field isolates. Of 37 field isolates for which more than a single clone was recovered, 16 (43%) contained more than a single genotype of one strain, whereas 4 (11%) harbored mixed infections of the CFH and Worland strains. A phylogenetic analysis using 43 characters derived from restriction endonuclease mapping data supported the grouping of 41 genotypes into three taxa consistent with the three currently recognized strains of BCTV. The relationships of the two genotypes sharing genotypic markers of both the Worland and CFH strains to other BCTV genotypes was unresolved in the phylogenetic analysis. Based on the mild symptom phenotype of the isolates from which these two genotypes were recovered and the presence of Worland genotypic markers in portions of the genome containing both cis- and trans-acting elements determining replication specificity, these two genotypes were tentatively considered as

  7. Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes and Precore and Core Mutants in Brazilian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sitnik, Roberta; Pinho, João Renato Rebello; Bertolini, Dennis Armando; Bernardini, Antonio Plinio; da Silva, Luiz Caetano; Carrilho, Flair José

    2004-01-01

    A method for genotyping hepatitis B virus by partial HBsAg gene sequencing with primers common to all known genotypes was developed. Mutations related to anti-HBs resistance are also detected with this method. Samples from 103 Brazilian patients were analyzed. Precore and core region of these viruses were also sequenced in 101 patients. Genotypes A, B, C, D, and F were found with frequencies of 49.5, 2.9, 13.6, 24.3, and 9.7%, respectively. Genotypes B and C were found only in Asian patients, whereas genotypes A, D, and F were more common in patients without an Asian background. Precore mutants were found in 32 (31.7%) of 101 patients, with a higher frequency in those infected with genotype D (22 of 25 [88.0%]). Analysis of nucleotide 1858 showed presence of thymine in all patients with genotypes B, C, and D and in a few patients with genotypes A (10.0%) and F (30.0%), who showed more frequently the presence of cytosine. This nucleotide was closely related to the presence of precore mutants. Mutations in the basal core promoter were found in 64 of 101 (63.4%) samples. These mutations were more frequent in patients infected with genotype F (90.0%) and less frequent in patients infected with genotype B (33.3%). Deletions in this region were found in two genotype C-infected patients. PMID:15184419

  8. Emergence of new sub-genotypes of virulent Newcastle disease virus with panzootic features

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains with epizootic characteristics from three new sub-genotypes of genotypes VII and XIII are rapidly spreading through Asia and the Middle East causing outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND) that are producing significant illness and mortality in vaccinated poultry, s...

  9. The prevalence of the citrus tristeza virus trifoliate resistant breaking genotype among Puerto Rican isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates have been grouped previously into five genotypes: T3, T30, T36, VT, B165 based on symptoms, host range and genomic sequence data. A sixth genotype has recently been identified with the novel property of replicating in trifoliate orange trees, a non host for the o...

  10. Evaluation of the Abbott Real Time HCV genotype II assay for Hepatitis C virus genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Sariguzel, Fatma Mutlu; Berk, Elife; Gokahmetoglu, Selma; Ercal, Baris Derya; Celik, Ilhami

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The determination of HCV genotypes and subtypes is very important for the selection of antiviral therapy and epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay in HCV genotyping of HCV infected patients in Kayseri, Turkey. Methods: One hundred patients with chronic hepatitis C admitted to our hospital were evaluated between June 2012 and December 2012, HCV RNA levels were determined by the COBAS® AmpliPrep/COBAS® TaqMan® 48 HCV test. HCV genotyping was investigated by the Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay. With the exception of genotype 1, subtypes of HCV genotypes could not be determined by Abbott assay. Sequencing analysis was used as the reference method. Results: Genotypes 1, 2, 3 and 4 were observed in 70, 4, 2 and 24 of the 100 patients, respectively, by two methods. The concordance between the two systems to determine HCV major genotypes was 100%. Of 70 patients with genotype 1, 66 showed infection with subtype 1b and 4 with subtype 1a by Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay. Using sequence analysis, 61 showed infection with subtype 1b and 9 with subtype 1a. In determining of HCV genotype 1 subtypes, the difference between the two methods was not statistically significant (P>0.05). HCV genotype 4 and 3 samples were found to be subtype 4d and 3a, respectively, by sequence analysis. There were four patients with genotype 2. Sequence analysis revealed that two of these patients had type 2a and the other two had type 2b. Conclusion: The Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay yielded results consistent with sequence analysis. However, further optimization of the Abbott Real Time HCV Genotype II assay for subtype identification of HCV is required. PMID:26649001

  11. Molecular Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus among Infected Egyptian and Saudi Arabian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Mohamed MS; Sofy, Ahmed R; Mousa, Adel A; Ahmed, Mohamed A; Alganzory, Mohamed R

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major health problem recognized globally. HCV is a common cause of liver fibrosis that may lead to liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV infection and genotyping among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients using different molecular techniques. HCV RNA viral load was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology. For HCV genotyping, RT-PCR hybridization fluorescence-based method and reverse hybridization line probe assay (INNO-LiPA) were used. A total of 40 anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic hepatitis C were examined for HCV RNA, genotyping, and different laboratory investigations. In the present study, HCV genotypes 4, mixed 4.1b, and 1 were detected in patients of both countries, while genotype 2 was only detected in Saudi Arabian patients. Genotyping methods for HCV showed no difference in the classification at the genotype level. With regard to HCV subtypes, INNO-LiPA assay was a reliable test in HCV genotyping for the detection of major genotypes and subtypes, while RT-PCR-based assay was a good test at the genotype level only. HCV genotype 4 was found to be the predominant genotype among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. In conclusion, data analysis for detecting and genotyping HCV was an important factor for understanding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of HCV among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. PMID:26512201

  12. High prevalence and predominance of hepatitis delta virus genotype 1 infection in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Foupouapouognigni, Yacouba; Noah, Dominique Noah; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Njouom, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Antibodies to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) were found in 17.6% of 233 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive subjects in Cameroon. Phylogenetic analyses showed the presence of HDV-1, HDV-5, HDV-6, and HDV-7 genotypes. These results enrich the limited data on HDV prevalence and molecular diversity in Cameroon. PMID:21209162

  13. High Prevalence and Predominance of Hepatitis Delta Virus Genotype 1 Infection in Cameroon▿

    PubMed Central

    Foupouapouognigni, Yacouba; Noah, Dominique Noah; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Njouom, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) were found in 17.6% of 233 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive subjects in Cameroon. Phylogenetic analyses showed the presence of HDV-1, HDV-5, HDV-6, and HDV-7 genotypes. These results enrich the limited data on HDV prevalence and molecular diversity in Cameroon. PMID:21209162

  14. Identification of new sub-genotypes of virulent Newcastle disease virus with potential panzootic features

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with epizootic characteristics are rapidly spreading through Asia and the Middle East causing outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND). Significant illness and mortality in vaccinated poultry caused by highly related viruses of new sub-genotypes within ge...

  15. Risk Factors for Infection with Different Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes in Southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Paraboni, Marisa Lúcia Romani; Sbeghen, Marina Dallagasperina; Wolff, Fernando Herz; Moreira, Leila Beltrami

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the proportion of different genotypes in countryside microregions in southern Brazil, and their association with risk factors. Methods. Cross-sectional study including a convenience sample of patients who tested positive for HCV-RNA and were referred to a regional health center for genotyping, from December 2003 to January 2008. Data were obtained through the National Disease Surveillance Data System, from laboratory registers and from patient charts. Identification of genotypes was carried out using the Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism “in house” technique. Independent associations with genotypes were evaluated in multinomial logistic regression and prevalence rates of genotypes were estimated with modified Poisson regression. Results. The sample consisted of 441 individuals, 41.1 ± 12.0 years old, 56.5% men. Genotype 1 was observed in 41.5% (95% CI 37.9–48.1) of patients, genotype 2 in 19.3% (95% CI 15.0–23.6), and genotype 3 in 39.2% (95% CI 35.6–43.0). HCV genotype was significantly associated with gender and age. Dental procedures were associated with higher proportion of genotype 2 independently of age, education, and patient treatment center. Conclusions. The hepatitis C virus genotype 1 was the most frequent. Genotype 2 was associated with female gender, age, and dental procedure exposition. PMID:22666173

  16. Full coding hepatitis E virus genotype 3 genome amplification method.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Chimeno, M; Forero, J E; Echevarría, J M; Muñoz-Bellido, J L; Vázquez-López, L; Morago, L; García-Galera, M C; Avellón, A

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 produces zoonotic infection associated with the consumption of infected animals. HEV infections can become chronic in immunocompromised (IC) patients. The viral genome has three well defined open reading frames (ORF1, ORF2 and ORF3) within which various domains and functions have been described. This paper (i) describes a new method of complete sequencing of the HEV coding region through overlapping PCR systems, (ii) establishes a consensus sequence and polymorphic positions (PP) for each domain, and (iii) analyzes the complete coding sequence of an IC patient. With regard to the consensus, a high percentage of PP was observed in protease (PP=19%) and the X domain (PP=22%) within ORF1, the N-terminal region of the S domain (PP=22%) in ORF2, and the P1 (PP=35%) and P2 (PP=25%) domains in ORF3. In contrast, the ORF1 Y, ORF2 S, ORF2 M and ORF3 D1 domains were conserved in the reference sequences (0.40, 1, 0.70 and 0% of PP, respectively). The sequence from the IC patient had more mutations in the RpRp (D1235G, Q1242R, S1454T, V1480I, I1502 V, K1511R, G1373 V, E1442D, V1693 M), the terminal ORF2 S- domain (F10L, S26T, G36S, S70P, A105 V, I113 V), the X domain (T938 M, T856 V, S898A) and the helicase (S1014N, S975T, Q1133 K). PMID:26784284

  17. Genotyping of hepatitis C virus isolates from Basque Country, Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Cilla, G.; García-Bengoechea, M.; Perez-Trallero, E.; Montalvo, I.; Vicente, D.; Arenas, J. I.

    1996-01-01

    The genotype of HCV was determined in 161 chronic HCV-infected patients. The patients were classified into three groups on the basis of the origin of the HCV infection: 50 patients had a history of intravenous drug use (IVDU) but no HIV infection; 41 patients had received blood transfusions, and 70 patients had no known exposure. The distribution of HCV genotypes was associated with the origin of infection and age of patients: genotype 1b was predominant among patients who had received blood transfusions and those without evidence of parenteral exposure (84.6% and 67.7%, respectively), whereas genotype 3a was present in 65.3% of IVDUs. Patients with genotype 1b were older than those with genotypes 1a or 3a: 50.3 +/- 12 vs. 34.1 +/- 9.9 and 31 +/- 5.4 years, respectively. These findings suggest that the pattern of HCV genotypes in our region is changing and that genotype 1b may be substituted by 3a as the dominant genotype in the future. PMID:8972680

  18. Circulation of Mumps Virus Genotypes in Spain from 1996 to 2007▿

    PubMed Central

    Echevarría, J. E.; Castellanos, A.; Sanz, J. C.; Pérez, C.; Palacios, G.; Martínez de Aragón, M. V.; Peña Rey, I.; Mosquera, M.; de Ory, F.; Royuela, E.

    2010-01-01

    Although the WHO recommends the use of genotyping as a tool for epidemiological surveillance for mumps, limited data on mumps virus (MV) genotype circulation that may be used to trace the patterns of virus spread are available. We describe the first complete series of data from Spain. The small hydrophobic region was sequenced from 237 MV-positive samples from several regions of Spain collected between 1996 and 2007. Six different genotypes were identified: A, C, D (D1), G (G1, G2), H (H1, H2), and J. Genotype H1 was predominant during the epidemic that occurred from 1999 to 2003 but was replaced by genotype G1 as the dominant genotype in the epidemic that occurred from 2005 to 2007. The same genotype G1 strain caused concomitant outbreaks in different parts of the world (the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom). The remaining genotypes (genotypes A, C, D, and J) appeared in sporadic cases or small limited outbreaks. This pattern of circulation seems to reflect continuous viral circulation at the national level, despite the high rates of vaccine coverage. PMID:20107099

  19. Hepatitis B Virus Genotyping: Is the Time Ripe for Routine Clinical Use?

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Kaushal; Tyagi, Pankaj

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B is one of the major causes of end-stage liver disease and liver cancer worldwide. A number of host and viral factors influence the disease course and outcomes. One such viral factor is hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes. There are eight major HBV genotypes described from various geographic regions of the world. Although direct sequencing appears to be the gold standard for HBV genotyping, it is expensive and laborintensive and therefore cannot be applied for routine clinical use. The newer molecular methods including serotyping have made genotyping easier and simple to apply to large number of samples rapidly. The data collected mainly over the last decade have suggested that HBV genotypes may have a bearing over the natural course of the disease and its response to therapy. This review summarizes the available literature and highlights how genotyping could be incorporated into routine clinical practice in order to improve delivery of care to HBV-infected individuals. PMID:25755425

  20. Novel measles virus genotype, East Timor and Australia.

    PubMed

    Chibo, Doris; Riddell, Michaela; Catton, Michael; Birch, Christopher

    2002-07-01

    Measles outbreaks in 1999 in Queensland and Victoria, Australia, were caused by a novel strain of clade G virus (proposed name g3). Epidemiologic and molecular evidence supports independent circulation of this virus in Queensland, northern Australia, in addition to importation of the virus by East Timor refugees seeking safe haven in Australia. PMID:12095446

  1. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2a has a better virologic response to antiviral therapy than HCV genotype 1b

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Yi; Li, Zhiqin; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Zhen; Yue, Dongli; Zhou, Rong; Li, Xiaogang; Wu, Shuhuan; Li, Jiansheng

    2015-01-01

    The standard treatment, pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV), for patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), does not provide a sustained virologic response (SVR) in a large majority of patients. In the present study, 211 treatment-naïve patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b and 2a were recruited and treated weekly with PEG-IFN plus RBV to determine the response of HCV genotype 1b and 2a patients to standard antiviral treatment. Virologic responses were assessed by TaqMan at week 4, 12, 24, 48 and 24 weeks of treatment. Patients with HCV genotype 2a had a significantly higher rapid virologic response (RVR), early virologic response, end-of-treatment response and SVR, and a lower relapse rate than patients with HCV genotype 1b. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the HCV genotype 2a patients had a HCV RNA level ≤ 5.70 log10 IU/ml, a fibrosis stage < S3, and that HLA-A02 expression and RVR were independent factors of SVR that may improve HCV clearance. PMID:26221288

  2. Structural basis for the neutralization of hepatitis E virus by a cross-genotype antibody

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Ying; Tang, Xuhua; Zhang, Xiao; Song, Cuiling; Zheng, Minghua; Wang, Kaihang; Zhang, Jun; Ng, Mun-Hon; Hew, Choy-Leong; Li, Shaowei; Xia, Ningshao; Sivaraman, J.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a non-enveloped, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus, is a major cause of enteric hepatitis. Classified into the family Hepeviridae, HEV comprises four genotypes (genotypes 1-4), which belong to a single serotype. We describe a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 8G12, which equally recognizes all four genotypes of HEV, with ∼2.53–3.45 nM binding affinity. The mAb 8G12 has a protective, neutralizing capacity, which can significantly block virus infection in host cells. Animal studies with genotypes 1, 3 and 4 confirmed the cross-genotype neutralizing capacity of 8G12 and its effective prevention of hepatitis E disease. The complex crystal structures of 8G12 with the HEV E2s domain (the most protruded region of the virus capsid) of the abundant genotypes 1 and 4 were determined at 4.0 and 2.3 Å resolution, respectively. These structures revealed that 8G12 recognizes both genotypes through the epitopes in the E2s dimerization region. Structure-based mutagenesis and cell-model assays with virus-like particles identified several conserved residues (Glu549, Lys554 and Gly591) that are essential for 8G12 neutralization. Moreover, the epitope of 8G12 is identified as a key epitope involved in virus-host interactions. These findings will help develop a common strategy for the prevention of the most abundant form of HEV infection. PMID:25793314

  3. Cross-protective immune responses between genotypically distinct lineages of infectious laryngotracheitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Won; Markham, Philip F; Coppo, Mauricio J C; Legione, Alistair R; Shil, Niraj K; Quinteros, José A; Noormohammadi, Amir H; Browning, Glenn F; Hartley, Carol A; Devlin, Joanne M

    2014-03-01

    Recent phylogenetic studies have identified different genotypic lineages of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), and these lineages can recombine in the field. The emergence of virulent recombinant field strains of ILTV by natural recombination between commercial vaccines belonging to different genotypic lineages has been reported recently. Despite the use of attenuated ILTV vaccines, these recombinant viruses were able to spread and cause disease in commercial poultry flocks, raising the question of whether the different lineages of ILTV can induce cross-protective immune responses. This study examined the capacity of the Australian-origin A20 ILTV vaccine to protect against challenge with the class 8 ILTV recombinant virus, the genome of which is predominantly derived from a heterologous genotypic lineage. Following challenge, birds vaccinated via eyedrop were protected from clinical signs of disease and pathological changes in the tracheal mucosa, although they were not completely protected from viral infection or replication. In contrast, the challenge virus induced severe clinical signs and tracheal pathology in unvaccinated birds. This is the first study to examine the ability of a vaccine from the Australian lineage to protect against challenge with a virus from a heterologous lineage. These results suggest that the two distinct genotypic lineages of ILTV can both induce cross-protection, indicating that current commercial vaccines are still likely to assist in control of ILTV in the poultry industry, in spite of the emergence of novel recombinants derived from different genotypic lineages. PMID:24758128

  4. Molecular identification of Saint Louis encephalitis virus genotype IV in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Hoyos-López, Richard; Soto, Sandra Uribe; Rúa-Uribe, Guillermo; Gallego-Gómez, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a member of the Japanese-encephalitis virus serocomplex of the genus Flavivirus. SLEV is broadly distributed in the Americas and the Caribbean Islands, where it is usually transmitted by mosquitoes of the genus Culex and primarily to birds and mammalian-hosts. Humans are occasionally infected by the virus and are dead-end hosts. SLEV causes encephalitis in temperate regions, while in tropical regions of the Americas, several human cases and a wide biological diversity of SLEV-strains have been reported. The phylogenetic analysis of the envelope (E) protein genes indicated eight-genotypes of SLEV with geographic overlap. The present paper describes the genotyping of two SLEV viruses detected in mosquito-pools collected in northern Colombia (department of Cordoba). We used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to amplify a fragment of theE-gene to confirm the virus identity and completeE-gene sequencing for phylogenetic analysis and genotyping of the two-SLEV viruses found circulating in Córdoba. This is the first report of SLEV genotype IV in Colombia (Córdoba) in mosquitoes from a region of human inhabitation, implicating the risk of human disease due to SLEV infection. Physicians should consider SLEV as a possible aetiology for undiagnosed febrile and neurologic syndromes among their patients who report exposure to mosquito-bites. PMID:26313538

  5. [Hepatitis B virus genotype E infection in Turkey: the detection of the first case].

    PubMed

    Sayan, Murat; Sanlıdağ, Tamer; Akçalı, Sinem; Arıkan, Ayşe

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global major health problem. Currently, 10 genotypes (A-J) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) are identified based on the nucleic acid sequence heterogeneity, and these genotypes have been shown to have distinct geographic distribution. Reports of the previous studies indicated that the genotype D is the predominant type among hepatitis B patients in different regions of Turkey. However, recent studies indicated that other HBV genotypes are also seen with an increasing rate. Although epidemiological and clinical information on genotype E infection is currently limited, it is known that genotype E infection is common in West and Central Africa. In this report, the first case of HBV genotype E infection in Turkey was presented. A 22-year-old Nigerian male employee who resided in Manisa for five years was admitted to Celal Bayar University Hospital Manisa, Turkey, for his routine check-up. Since HBsAg was found positive, other HBV markers were tested with a repeated serum sample. Laboratory findings were as follows; HBsAg (+), anti-HBs (-), HBeAg (-), anti-HBe (+), anti-HBc (+), anti-HCV (-), anti-HIV (-), ALT: 44 U/L and AST: 45 U/L. HBV-DNA level was detected as 700 IU/ml by real-time PCR (Artus HBV QS RGQ Qiagen, Germany). HBV-DNA isolated from the serum sample of the patient was amplified by PCR and polymerase gene segment of HBV was directly sequenced. UPGMA method was used for phylogenetic analysis and Inno-LIPA HBV genotyping method (Innogenetics, Belgium) was performed to determine multiple HBV genotype infection. On the basis of those methods the genotype of the virus was identified as genotype E. The partial sequences of the HBV polymerase gene were loaded to the international DNA data bank (GenBank) for contribution to the global HBV surveillance. This report emphasized that besides genotype D the other HBV genotypes could be found in Turkey. Since the patient was an inactive HBsAg carrier before his residence in Turkey, this

  6. Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes and Association With Viral Load in Yazd, Central Province of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hadinedoushan, Hossein; Salmanroghani, Hasan; Amirbaigy, Mohammad Kazem; Akhondi-Meybodi, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease. Infection with HCV is a global public health problem. The virus is classified into 6 genotypes and more than 80 subtypes named as a, b, c, etc. HCV genotyping has been an important parameter for the treatment of HCV infection. Objectives: The main aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Yazd, central province of Iran. In addition, the study investigated whether there was any association between HCV load and genotypes. Patients and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed on samples suspicious of HCV infection from March 2010 to June 2013. Peripheral blood sample was obtained and screened for anti-HCV antibodies using Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Then sera of anti-HCV positive samples were analyzed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction method. Plasma samples were used to determine the HCV genotypes of 1a, 1b, 2, 3, and 4 in 191 infected patients. Results: One hundred fifty-two out of 191 (79.6%) samples were from male patients. The mean of the patients’ age was 40.7 ± 11.9 years (range 21-75 years old). Sixty- three (33%) patients were included in 31-40 years group. The mean number of HCV in infected patients was 2.92 × 106 ± 1.85 × 106 copies/mL (Min: 508; Max: 2.75 × 108 copies/mL). HCV genotype 3 was the predominant genotype (50.3%) followed by subtypes 1a (38.7%) and 1b (6.8%). The distribution of other HCV genotypes showed genotype 2 in 1.6% and mixed genotypes in 2.6% of positive samples. Genotype 3 was predominant in all age groups except 21-30 years of age group. We were unable to find any significant difference between mean viral load of the patients infected with genotype 3 and those infected with genotype 1 (1a and 1b). Conclusions: Findings of the present study showed that HCV genotype 3 was the predominant genotype followed by the subtypes 1a and 1b in Yazd, central province of Iran. In addition, there was

  7. [First case of hepatitis B virus genotype H infection in Turkey].

    PubMed

    Ural, Onur; Sayan, Murat; Akhan, Sıla; Sümer, Sua; Simşek, Funda

    2013-07-01

    Clinical studies reported from Turkey indicate that hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype D is more prevalent than other genotypes. Epidemiological and clinical information on genotype H infection is currently limited. Genotype H infection is most likely due to its regional (Central and South America) prevalence throughout the world. The aim of this report is to present the first HBV genotype H infection in a chronic hepatitis B patient in Turkey. Laboratory findings of a 42 years old male patient admitted to our hospital revealed HBsAg (+), anti-HBs (-), HBeAg (-), anti-HBe (+), anti-HBc IgM (-), anti-HBc IgG (+), anti-HAV IgG (+), HBV-DNA: 5.689.776 IU/ml and high liver enzymes (ALT: 223 U/L, AST: 121 U/L). History of the patient indicated no risk factor (intravenous drug use, blood transfusion, suspicious sexual contact) related to HBV transmission. Since liver ultrasonography showed multiple hemangiomas, biopsy was performed and histologic activity index was found as 6/18 and fibrosis as 2/6, according to modified Knodell score system. HBV DNA isolated from the serum sample of the patient was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and polymerase gene segment of HBV was directly sequenced. UPGMA method was used for phylogenetic analysis, and the genotype of the virus was identified accordingly. The nucleotide sequence was compared to those from the international DNA data bank (GenBank). The genotyping of the patient revealed that the isolated HBV was genotype H. Treatment with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate was initiated and the patient responded to the treatment. This finding suggested that other HBV genotypes, except the predominant genotype D may also be in circulation in Turkey. In conclusion, detection of epidemiologic and molecular characteristics of HBV genotype H which is related to chronic hepatitis, seems to be necessary in order to better understand its circulation and progression around the world. PMID:23971934

  8. Treatment of a patient with genotype 7 hepatitis C virus infection with sofosbuvir and velpatasvir.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Jonas; McNally, John; Chodavarapu, Krishna; Svarovskaia, Evguenia; Moreno, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    During a phase 3 study evaluating the combination of sofosbuvir-velpatasvir for 12 weeks in patients with genotype 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, we enrolled a patient who was subsequently found to be infected with genotype 7 HCV. This patient tolerated the study regimen well and achieved sustained virological response 12 weeks after treatment (SVR12). (Hepatology 2016;64:983-985). PMID:27177605

  9. Detection of bovine leukemia virus and identification of its genotype in Mongolian cattle.

    PubMed

    Ochirkhuu, Nyamsuren; Konnai, Satoru; Odbileg, Raadan; Nishimori, Asami; Okagawa, Tomohiro; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection is globally distributed. However, no information regarding the disease and genetic diversity of the virus in the cattle of Mongolia is currently available. In this study, the prevalence of BLV was assessed using PCR, and the genetic diversity was analyzed through DNA sequencing. Of the 517 samples tested, 20 positives were identified. Phylogenetic analysis showed that six, one, and four isolates were classified into genotype 4, 7, and 1, respectively. Most isolates were clustered with isolates from Eastern Europe and Russia. This study is the first to investigate the BLV genotype in Mongolia. PMID:26711456

  10. Hepatitis B virus infection and genotype in asymptomatic people from 10 ethnic groups in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuan-Ying; Hou, Wei; Yang, Zhan-Qiu; Xiao, Wen

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the infection and genotype distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in ethnic groups in Yunnan, China. METHODS: Two thousand five hundred and eighty-four asymptomatic local people from 10 ethnic groups were investigated in Yunnan, China. Infection and genotype distribution were evaluated by serological and genetic methods. Genotyping was verified by sequencing. Ethnic genotype distribution was compared by proportion test. RESULTS: Four types of infection model based on HBV serum markers were identified, and the average HBV infection rate was 5.7% in those asymptomatic local people. The genotype prevalence was 59.6% for B, 21.1% for C and 19.3% BC; subgenotypes Ba, Cs and Ce were identified in this study. Hepatitis B surface antigen-positive rate and the proportion of genotype B were significantly lower in ethnic groups with a northern origin compared to those with a southern origin (50% vs 73.9%, P = 0.037; 4.2% vs 10.5%, P = 0.000). CONCLUSION: Genotype B is dominant and genotype BC has high occurrence in asymptomatic local ethnic groups in Yunnan. HBV infection status and genotype distribution may associate with ethnic origin. PMID:26640334

  11. Hepatitis C virus genotype 3a with phylogenetically distinct origin is circulating in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the leading causes of viral hepatitis worldwide and its genotype 3a is predominant in vast areas of Pakistan. Findings The present study reports the first full sequence of HCV 3a isolate PK-1 from Pakistan. This nucleotide sequence was compared with six other HCV genotype 3a full length sequences from different regions of the world by using statistical methods of phylogenetic analysis. Conclusion The nucleotide difference of these seven sequences shows that HCV genotype 3a of phylogenetically distinct origin is circulating in Pakistan. PMID:21211024

  12. Assessing Yield Potential of Cowpea Genotypes Grown Under Virus Pressure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important grain legume in many parts of the tropics. However, viral diseases, particularly cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and blackeye cowpea mosaic virus (BlCMV), can be a limiting factor in cowpea production. We evaluated in replicated field plots and unde...

  13. [Determination of hepatitis C virus genotypes among hepatitis C patients in Eastern Black Sea Region, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Buruk, Celal Kurtuluş; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Reis, Ahu; Kaklıkkaya, Neşe; Tosun, Ilknur; Aydın, Faruk

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), the major cause of transfusion-associated hepatitis, is an important public health problem in the world as well as in Turkey. HCV is grouped as six distinct genotypes and a large number of closely-related subtypes. Genotyping of HCV is an important tool for providing epidemiological data, prediction of prognosis, and optimization of antiviral therapy. This study was carried out to determine the distribution of HCV genotypes in hepatitis C patients residing in different provinces of the Eastern Black Sea Region, Turkey. A total of 304 HCV-RNA positive cases (151 male, 153 female; age range: 11-93 years, mean age: 55.2 ± 13.3 years) who were admitted to the Molecular Microbiology Unit of Department of Medical Microbiology, Karadeniz Technical University Faculty of Medicine, between January 2009 to December 2012, were included in the study. HCV genotypes were detected in plasma samples of the patients by using commercial assays [INNO-LiPA HCV II (Innogenetics, Belgium) or Abbott RealTime HCV Genotype II (Abbott Molecular Inc, USA)]. Due to the ambiguous genotyping results in some samples with these methods, an in-house multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with genotype-specific primers was also used in the study. Similar to the previous reports from Turkey, our results showed that four HCV genotypes (1, 2, 3, and 4) prevailed in the Eastern Black Sea Region and the predominant genotype and subtype were genotype 1 (92.8%) and 1b (87.5%), respectively. Distribution of genotypes were observed to vary according to the province. Prevalences of subtype 1a, genotype 2, 3, and 4 were noted as 5.3%, 1.6%, 4.9%, and 0.7%, respectively. Furthermore, the samples from Giresun, Gumushane and Bayburt provinces, which are relatively less immigrated, had higher genotype 1, and the prevalence rates in the region was affected by the presence of non-citizen residents. This study is the first report on distribution of HCV genotypes in chronic hepatitis

  14. Role of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir combination for genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Vinay; Kowdley, Kris V

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common etiologies of liver-related mortality throughout the world. Among the six HCV genotypes, genotype 1 was significantly more aggressive when utilizing the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin, as genotype 1-infected patients had the lowest likelihood of achieving cure (40%-50%) and required twice as long duration of treatment, as compared to genotypes 2 and 3. Recently, however, significant advances have been made with the advent of all-oral direct-acting antiviral agents, which have significantly improved the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of the treatment of HCV genotype 1. Among the available treatments for HCV genotype 1, the combination therapy of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir provides several advantages compared to other regimens, including use of a single-pill regimen, possibility to shorten the duration of treatment to 8 weeks, efficacy in patients exposed to protease inhibitors, safety in decompensated cirrhosis, and potential to avoid ribavirin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacotherapy of the combination of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir therapy and summarize the results of the Phase III clinical trials for this treatment in HCV genotype 1 patients. We will also discuss the data for special populations, including decompensated cirrhosis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfected patients, African-Americans, the elderly, and those who failed sofosbuvir-containing regimens. PMID:27418860

  15. Role of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir combination for genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Vinay; Kowdley, Kris V

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common etiologies of liver-related mortality throughout the world. Among the six HCV genotypes, genotype 1 was significantly more aggressive when utilizing the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin, as genotype 1-infected patients had the lowest likelihood of achieving cure (40%–50%) and required twice as long duration of treatment, as compared to genotypes 2 and 3. Recently, however, significant advances have been made with the advent of all-oral direct-acting antiviral agents, which have significantly improved the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of the treatment of HCV genotype 1. Among the available treatments for HCV genotype 1, the combination therapy of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir provides several advantages compared to other regimens, including use of a single-pill regimen, possibility to shorten the duration of treatment to 8 weeks, efficacy in patients exposed to protease inhibitors, safety in decompensated cirrhosis, and potential to avoid ribavirin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacotherapy of the combination of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir therapy and summarize the results of the Phase III clinical trials for this treatment in HCV genotype 1 patients. We will also discuss the data for special populations, including decompensated cirrhosis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfected patients, African-Americans, the elderly, and those who failed sofosbuvir-containing regimens. PMID:27418860

  16. Distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes among hemodialysis patients in Tehran--a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Hosseini-Moghaddam, Seyed Mohammadmehdi; Keyvani, Hossein; Kasiri, Hossein; Kazemeyni, Seyed Mohammad; Basiri, Abbas; Aghel, Nazanin; Alavian, Seyed-Moayed

    2006-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus has substantial heterogeneity of genotypes throughout the world. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of HCV genotypes, risk factors and clinical implications in cases of hemodialysis living in Tehran. A total of 155 patients treated by hemodialysis, who had been identified to be anti-HCV positive at 45 medical centers in Tehran, were enrolled. Genotyping was using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) on HCV-RNA positive samples. HCV-RNA was detected in 66 (42.6%) patients. Genotyping of HCV-RNA positive serum samples demonstrated that subtypes 3a and 1a were predominant accounting for 30.3 and 28.8%, respectively. The distribution of other HCV genotypes showed genotype 1b, 18.2%; genotype 4, 16.7%; mixed genotypes 1a and 1b, 3%; and genotype 3b, 3%. Genotype 2 was not detected in this study. Statistically significant differences were identified between HCV infected and non-HCV infected patients regarding history of hemodialysis unit changes more than two times (P = 0.01), and history of hemodialysis for more than 20 years (P = 0.02). However, blood transfusion, mean duration of hemodialysis therapy and the history of solid organ transplantation did not differ between these two groups. This study indicates that the dominant HCV genotypes among patients treated by hemodialysis living in Tehran were 3a and 1a, and considering previous reports from the general population, genotype 4 was strongly associated with hemodialysis. The duration of treatment by hemodialysis and, in turn, more hemodialysis unit changes will lead to more frequent HCV infections. PMID:16555284

  17. Role of hepatitis B virus genotype D & its mutants in occult hepatitis B infection

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sonali; Panda, Subrat Kumar; Acharya, Subrat Kumar; Durgapal, Hemlata

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Non-detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope protein (hepatitis B surface antigen, HBsAg) in a chronically HBV infected individual has been described as occult infection. One possible reason for this phenotype is alteration in large (L-HBsAg) to small (S-HBsAg) envelope protein ratio associated with reduced or non secretion of HBsAg. This results in quantitative levels of serum HBsAg below the detection limit of enzyme immunoassays. Genotype D of HBV has a characteristic 33 nucleotide (nt) deletion upstream of the pre-S2/S promoter. This deletion may reduce HBsAg secretion in occult infection patients infected with genotype D HBV. Additional deletions in the pre-S2/S promoter may further aggravate reduced HBsAg secretion in patients infected with genotype D HBV. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the role of genotype D specific 33nt deletion and additional pre-S2/S promoter deletions in causing reduced or no secretion of HBsAg, in occult infection. Since these deletions overlap virus polymerase, their effect on virus replication was also investigated. Methods: We examined the in vitro expression of HBsAg, ratio of cure and ‘e’ antigen (HBcAg/HBeAg), their secretion and virus replication, using overlength 1.3 mer/1.86 mer genotype A replicons, and genotype D replicons with and without additional pre-S2/S promoter deletions from cases of occult infection. Results: Genotype D replicon showed a decrease in HBsAg secretion compared to the wild-type genotype A. Genotype D replicons carrying additional pre-S2/S promoter deletions, showed further reduction in HBsAg secretion, demonstrated presence of intracellular HBcAg/HBeAg, virus replication intermediates and ‘e’ antigen secretion. Interpretation & conclusions: The characteristic 33 nt deletion of genotype D HBV reduces HBsAg secretion. Additional pre-S2/S promoter deletions may further diminish HBsAg secretion, leading to occult infection. Pre-S2/S promoter

  18. Evolutionary analysis of rubella viruses in mainland China during 2010–2012: endemic circulation of genotype 1E and introductions of genotype 2B

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhen; Rivailler, Pierre; Abernathy, Emily; Cui, Aili; Zhang, Yan; Mao, Naiyin; Xu, Songtao; Zhou, Shujie; Lei, Yue; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Huanying; He, Jilan; Chen, Ying; Li, Chongshan; Bo, Fang; Zhao, Chunfang; Chen, Meng; Lu, Peishan; Li, Fangcai; Gu, Suyi; Gao, Hui; Guo, Yu; Chen, Hui; Feng, Daxing; Wang, Shuang; Tang, Xiaomin; Lei, Yake; Feng, Yan; Deng, Lili; Gong, Tian; Fan, Lixia; Xu, Wenbo; Icenogle, Joseph; Chen, Xia; Tian, Hong; Ma, Yan; Liu, Leng; Liu, Li; Liu, Jianfeng; Fu, Hong; Yang, Yuying; Ma, Yujie; Zhao, Hua; Huang, Fang; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Xiaoling; Du, Hui; Ma, Xuemin; Zhang, Zhenying; Xu, Jin; Zhou, Jianhui; Ye, Xufang; Li, Jing; Lu, Yiyu; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yanni; Zhao, Shengcang; Ba, Zhuoma

    2015-01-01

    Rubella remains a significant burden in mainland China. In this report, 667 viruses collected in 24 of 31 provinces of mainland China during 2010–2012 were sequenced and analyzed, significantly extending previous reports on limited numbers of viruses collected before 2010. Only viruses of genotypes 1E and 2B were found. Genotype 1E viruses were found in all 24 provinces. Genotype 1E viruses were likely introduced into mainland China around 1997 and endemic transmission of primarily one lineage became established. Viruses reported here from 2010–2012 are largely in a single cluster within this lineage. Genotype 2B viruses were rarely detected in China prior to 2010. This report documents a previously undetected 2B lineage, which likely became endemic in eastern provinces of China between 2010 and 2012. Bayesian analyses were performed to estimate the evolutionary rates and dates of appearance of the genotype 1E and 2B viral linages in China. A skyline plot of viral population diversity did not provide evidence of reduction of diversity as a result of vaccination, but should be useful as a baseline for such reductions as vaccination programs for rubella become widespread in mainland China. PMID:25613734

  19. Evolutionary analysis of rubella viruses in mainland China during 2010-2012: endemic circulation of genotype 1E and introductions of genotype 2B.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen; Rivailler, Pierre; Abernathy, Emily; Cui, Aili; Zhang, Yan; Mao, Naiyin; Xu, Songtao; Zhou, Shujie; Lei, Yue; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Huanying; He, Jilan; Chen, Ying; Li, Chongshan; Bo, Fang; Zhao, Chunfang; Chen, Meng; Lu, Peishan; Li, Fangcai; Gu, Suyi; Gao, Hui; Guo, Yu; Chen, Hui; Feng, Daxing; Wang, Shuang; Tang, Xiaomin; Lei, Yake; Feng, Yan; Deng, Lili; Gong, Tian; Fan, Lixia; Xu, Wenbo; Icenogle, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Rubella remains a significant burden in mainland China. In this report, 667 viruses collected in 24 of 31 provinces of mainland China during 2010-2012 were sequenced and analyzed, significantly extending previous reports on limited numbers of viruses collected before 2010. Only viruses of genotypes 1E and 2B were found. Genotype 1E viruses were found in all 24 provinces. Genotype 1E viruses were likely introduced into mainland China around 1997 and endemic transmission of primarily one lineage became established. Viruses reported here from 2010-2012 are largely in a single cluster within this lineage. Genotype 2B viruses were rarely detected in China prior to 2010. This report documents a previously undetected 2B lineage, which likely became endemic in eastern provinces of China between 2010 and 2012. Bayesian analyses were performed to estimate the evolutionary rates and dates of appearance of the genotype 1E and 2B viral linages in China. A skyline plot of viral population diversity did not provide evidence of reduction of diversity as a result of vaccination, but should be useful as a baseline for such reductions as vaccination programs for rubella become widespread in mainland China. PMID:25613734

  20. Proteome Differences between Hepatitis B Virus Genotype-B- and Genotype-C-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Revealed by iTRAQ-Based Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wei, Dahai; Zeng, Yongyi; Xing, Xiaohua; Liu, Hongzhi; Lin, Minjie; Han, Xiao; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the main cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in southeast Asia where HBV genotype B and genotype C are the most prevalent. Viral genotypes have been reported to significantly affect the clinical outcomes of HCC. However, the underlying molecular differences among different genotypes of HBV virus infected HCC have not been revealed. Here, we applied isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) technology integrated with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis to identify the proteome differences between the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. In brief, a total of 83 proteins in the surrounding noncancerous tissues and 136 proteins in the cancerous tissues between HBV genotype-B- and genotype-C-induced HCC were identified, respectively. This information revealed that there might be different molecular mechanisms of the tumorigenesis and development of HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. Furthermore, our results indicate that the two proteins ARFIP2 and ANXA1 might be potential biomarkers for distinguishing the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC. Thus, the quantitative proteomic analysis revealed molecular differences between the HBV genotypes B- and C-induced HCC, and might provide fundamental information for further deep study. PMID:26709725

  1. Incident Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Distribution and Multiple Infection in Australian Prisons.

    PubMed

    Walker, Melanie R; Li, Hui; Teutsch, Suzy; Betz-Stablein, Brigid; Luciani, Fabio; Lloyd, Andrew R; Bull, Rowena A

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a highly diverse pathogen that is classified into seven distinct genotypes. Simultaneous or sequential reinfection with multiple HCV genotypes is recognized in high-risk populations, such as injecting drug users (IDUs). Multiple infection is of clinical concern as different genotypes have various sensitivities to current antiviral therapies. Therefore, a better understanding of the frequency of multiple infection and of the genotypes currently being transmitted is clinically relevant. An Australian cohort of IDUs (n = 123), identified with primary incident infection, was followed for multiple infection by regular HCV RNA testing between 2005 and 2013. A total of 354 samples were tested. Sequencing of primary incident infections revealed that genotype 3a was the most common circulating genotype, followed by genotype 1a. Examination of longitudinally collected samples identified complex patterns of multiple infection, including reinfection and superinfection. In those with multiple infection, there was no apparent evidence of homotypic immunity conferring protection against reinfection of the same subtype. This study revealed frequent multiple infection in a high-risk prisoner cohort, illustrating the complex nature of HCV infection and reinfection and highlighting the need for pan-genotypic antiviral therapies. PMID:27170021

  2. Rapid and sensitive genotyping of hepatitis C virus by single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Lareu, R R; Swanson, N R; Fox, S A

    1997-02-01

    There is an increasing demand for genotyping hepatitis C virus (HCV) isolates due to the rapidly expanding list of distinct HCV genotypes and the mounting evidence of genotype-specific clinical consequences. We describe an SSCP-based assay for determining genotypes in HCV infections. HCV RNA extracted from serum was amplified by a sensitive nested-PCR assay producing a 287 bp fragment of the conserved 5' non-coding region (NCR) and analysed by non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Following empirical optimisation of the SSCP assay we identified distinct conformation polymorphisms (characteristic band patterns) corresponding to types 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 2c, 3 and 4 found in the Western Australian population. Seventy-three HCV RNA-positive samples were used to evaluate the SSCP genotyping assay for accuracy and efficiency by comparison with the previously established genotyping methods of manual direct sequencing and dideoxy fingerprinting. SSCP genotyping was in concord with control methods while performing more rapidly and at a fraction of the cost. Moreover, SSCP detected two co-infected samples that were not shown by the control methods. The PCR-SSCP assay provides an accurate and rapid method for genotyping of HCV RNA-positive samples at the 5' NCR by type-specific sequence polymorphisms which is applicable to large-scale screening. PMID:9029525

  3. Universal Primers for Detection and Sequencing of Hepatitis B Virus Genomes across Genotypes A to G

    PubMed Central

    Chook, Jack Bee; Teo, Woon Li; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Tee, Kok Keng; Ng, Kee Peng

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been divided into 10 genotypes, A to J, based on an 8% nucleotide sequence divergence between genotypes. The conventional practice of using a single set of primers to amplify a near-complete HBV genome is hampered by its low analytical sensitivity. The current practice of using overlapping conserved primer sets to amplify a complete HBV genome in a clinical sample is limited by the lack of pan-primers to detect all HBV genotypes. In this study, we designed six highly conserved, overlapping primer sets to cover the complete HBV genome. We based our design on the sequences of 5,154 HBV genomes of genotypes A to I downloaded from the GenBank nucleotide database. These primer sets were tested on 126 plasma samples from Malaysia, containing genotypes A to D and with viral loads ranging from 20 to >79,780,000 IU/ml. The overall success rates for PCR amplification and sequencing were >96% and >94%, respectively. Similarly, there was 100% amplification and sequencing success when the primer sets were tested on an HBV reference panel of genotypes A to G. Thus, we have established primer sets that gave a high analytical sensitivity for PCR-based detection of HBV and a high rate of sequencing success for HBV genomes in most of the viral genotypes, if not all, without prior known sequence data for the particular genotype/genome. PMID:25788548

  4. Dual daclatasvir and sofosbuvir for treatment of genotype 3 chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Vinay; Kowdley, Kris V

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common etiologies of liver-related mortality throughout the world. Traditionally, therapy has been focused on pegylated interferon in combination with ribavirin, with clinical trials demonstrating that HCV genotype 1 had the lowest response rate (40-50%), while genotype 3 had an intermediate response rate (60-70%). Recently, significant advances have been made with all-oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy, which have significantly improved cure rates for HCV genotype 1. Accordingly, HCV genotype 3 is now potentially the most difficult to treat. One of the most potent DAA medications is sofosbuvir, a pan-genotypic nucleotide analogue that inhibits the NS5B polymerase of HCV. Daclatasvir, a pan-genotypic inhibitor of the HCV NS5A replication complex, was recently approved in the United States for treatment of HCV genotype 3 in conjunction with sofosbuvir. This combination may provide a powerful tool in the treatment of HCV genotype 3. PMID:26560449

  5. Universal Primers for Detection and Sequencing of Hepatitis B Virus Genomes across Genotypes A to G.

    PubMed

    Chook, Jack Bee; Teo, Woon Li; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Tee, Kok Keng; Ng, Kee Peng; Mohamed, Rosmawati

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been divided into 10 genotypes, A to J, based on an 8% nucleotide sequence divergence between genotypes. The conventional practice of using a single set of primers to amplify a near-complete HBV genome is hampered by its low analytical sensitivity. The current practice of using overlapping conserved primer sets to amplify a complete HBV genome in a clinical sample is limited by the lack of pan-primers to detect all HBV genotypes. In this study, we designed six highly conserved, overlapping primer sets to cover the complete HBV genome. We based our design on the sequences of 5,154 HBV genomes of genotypes A to I downloaded from the GenBank nucleotide database. These primer sets were tested on 126 plasma samples from Malaysia, containing genotypes A to D and with viral loads ranging from 20 to >79,780,000 IU/ml. The overall success rates for PCR amplification and sequencing were >96% and >94%, respectively. Similarly, there was 100% amplification and sequencing success when the primer sets were tested on an HBV reference panel of genotypes A to G. Thus, we have established primer sets that gave a high analytical sensitivity for PCR-based detection of HBV and a high rate of sequencing success for HBV genomes in most of the viral genotypes, if not all, without prior known sequence data for the particular genotype/genome. PMID:25788548

  6. Distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes in volunteer blood donors from Chengdu, China.

    PubMed

    Gong, Tianxiang; Zhao, Xin; Luo, Yijia; Hong, Ying; Li, Shuping; Fu, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant pathogen of global concern. The virus is usually spread through blood contact, such as transfusion, hemodialysis and injection of illegal drugs. HCV genotypes have a geographic distribution in different areas. In this paper, we focus on the distribution of HCV genotypes from volunteer blood donors in Chengdu. The prevalence of genotypes was analyzed using phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic trees were constructed based on the HCV core and NS5B regions from 313 sequences. HCV sequences were classified into six subtypes, and HCV genotypes were determined with the following results: 1b in 283, 2a in 14, 3b in seven, 3a in three, 6a in five and 6u in one. Subtype 1b was the most common and accounted for approximately 90.41 % (283/313), and a virus of subtype 6u was isolated for the first time from the Chengdu area. Genotypes 4 and 5 were not detected. PMID:27101072

  7. Serological Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus in Infected Patients in Zanjan Province

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilzadeh, Abdolreza; Erfanmanesh, Maryam; Ghasemi, Sousan; Mohammadi, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), a public health problem, is an enveloped, single-stranded RNA virus and a member of the Hepacivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family. Liver cancer, cirrhosis, and end-stage liver are the outcomes of chronic infection with HCV. HCV isolates show significant heterogeneity in genetics around the world. Therefore, determining HCV genotypes is a vital step in determining prognosis and planning therapeutic strategies. Objectives: As distribution of HCV genotypes is different in various geographical regions and HCV genotyping of patients has not been investigated in Zanjan City, this study was designed for the first time, to determine HCV genotypes in the region and to promote the impact of the treatment. Materials and Methods: Serum samples of 136 patients were collected and analyzed for anti-HCV antibodies using ELISA (The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) method. Then, positive samples were exposed to RT-PCR, which was performed under standard condition. Afterwards, they investigated for genotyping using allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), and HCV genotype 2.0 line probe assay (LiPA). Results: Samples indicated 216 bp bands on 2% agarose gel. Analyses of the results demonstrated that the most dominant subtype was 3a with frequency of 38.26% in Zanjan Province followed by subtypes of 1b, 1a, 2, and 4 with frequencies of 25.73%, 22.05%, 5.14%, and 4.41%, respectively. The frequency of unknown HCV genotypes was 4.41%. Conclusions: According to the results, it was found that HCV high prevalent genotype in Zanjan is subtype 3a. Analysis of the results provides identification of certain HCV genotypes, and these valuable findings could affect the type and duration of the treatment. PMID:25368655

  8. Immortalization of Human Fetal Hepatocyte by Ectopic Expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, Human Papilloma Virus (E7) and Simian Virus 40 Large T (SV40 T) Antigen Towards Bioartificial Liver Support

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Shibashish; Bader, Augustinus

    2014-01-01

    Background Generation of genetically stable and non-tumoric immortalization cell line from primary cells would be enormously useful for research and therapeutic purposes, but progress towards this goal has so far been limited. It is now universal acceptance that immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes based on recent advances of telomerase biology and oncogene, lead to unlimited population doubling could be the possible source for bioartificial liver device. Methods Immortalization of human fetal hepatocytes cell line by ectopic expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), human papilloma virus gene (E7) and simian virus 40 large T (SV40 T) antigens is main goal of present study. We used an inducible system containing human telomerase and E7, both of which are cloned into responder constructs controlled by doxycycline transactivator. We characterized the immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells by analysis of green fluorescent cells (GFP) positive cells using flow cytometry (FACs) cell sorting and morphology, proliferative rate and antigen expression by immunohistochemical analysis. In addition to we analysized lactate formation, glucose consumption, albumin secretion and urea production of immortalized human fetal hepatocyte cells. Results After 25 attempts for transfection of adult primary hepatocytes by human telomerase and E7 to immortalize them, none of the transfection systems resulted in the production of a stable, proliferating cell line. Although the transfection efficiency was more than 70% on the first day, the vast majority of the transfected hepatocytes lost their signal within the first 5–7 days. The remaining transfected hepatocytes persisted for 2–4 weeks and divided one or two times without forming a clone. After 10 attempts of transfection human fetal hepatocytes using the same transfection system, we obtained one stable human fetal hepatocytes cell line which was able albumin secretion urea production and glucose

  9. Complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus in the U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of Tobacco streak virus (TSV) infecting zucchini squash in Florida (TSV_FL13-07), through deep sequencing of sRNAs and validation by Sanger sequencing. TSV_FL13-07 only shares less than 90% sequence identity in three genomic ribonucleic...

  10. Detection of east/central/south African genotype of chikungunya virus in Myanmar, 2010.

    PubMed

    Tun, Mya Myat Ngwe; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Inoue, Shingo; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Aoki, Kotaro; Kyaw, Aung Kyaw; Myint, Tin; Tar, Thi; Maung, Kay Thwe Thwe; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Morita, Kouichi

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, chikungunya virus of the East Central South African genotype was isolated from 4 children in Myanmyar who had dengue-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the E1 gene revealed that the isolates were closely related to isolates from China, Thailand, and Malaysia that harbor the A226V mutation in this gene. PMID:25062511

  11. Phylogenetic Characterization of Genotype 4 Hepatitis C Virus Isolates from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, Victoria; Flichman, Diego; Sookoian, Silvia; Mbayed, Viviana Andrea; Campos, Rodolfo Héctor

    2001-01-01

    Among 114 patients infected with hepatitis C virus, three genotype 4 isolates, unusual in Argentina, were detected by phylogenetic analysis over different genomic regions. The patients were not related. One sample was associated with Egyptian sequences, and the others were associated with a Zairean isolate, a fact which reinforces the idea that they are from independent sources. PMID:11326031

  12. Detection of East/Central/South African Genotype of Chikungunya Virus in Myanmar, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Mya Myat Ngwe; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Inoue, Shingo; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Aoki, Kotaro; Kyaw, Aung Kyaw; Myint, Tin; Tar, Thi; Maung, Kay Thwe Thwe; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, chikungunya virus of the East Central South African genotype was isolated from 4 children in Myanmyar who had dengue-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the E1 gene revealed that the isolates were closely related to isolates from China, Thailand, and Malaysia that harbor the A226V mutation in this gene. PMID:25062511

  13. Complete genome sequence of a novel genotype of squash mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete genome sequence of a novel genotype of Squash mosaic virus (SqMV) infecting squash plants in Spain was obtained using deep sequencing of small ribonucleic acids and assembly. The low nucleotide sequence identities, with 87-88% on RNA1 and 84-86% on RNA2 to known SqMV isolates, suggest a new...

  14. Identification and complete genome sequence analysis of a genotype XIV Newcastle disease virus from Nigeria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus from genotype XIV is reported here. Strain duck/Nigeria/NG-695/KG.LOM.11-16/2009 was isolated from an apparently healthy domestic duck from a live bird market in Kogi State, Nigeria, in 2009. This strain is classified as a m...

  15. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in north eastern Algeria: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Rouabhia, Samir; Sadelaoud, Mourad; Chaabna-Mokrane, Karima; Toumi, Wided; Abenavoli, Ludovico

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of various hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes present in patients from north eastern Algeria. METHODS: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of 435 HCV infected patients from northeast Algeria, detected in the Sadelaoud laboratory and diagnosed between January 2010 and December 2012. The patients were diagnosed with HCV infection in their local hospitals and referred to be assessed for HCV genotype before the antiviral treatment. Demographic information (sex, age and address), genotype, subtype and viral load were retrieved from the patient medical records. The serum samples were tested by the type-specific genotyping assay. RESULTS: The majority of the patients (82.5%) were from the central part of the examined region (P = 0.002). The mean age of the patients studied was 53.6 ± 11.5 years. HCV genotype 1 was the most frequent (88.7%), followed by genotypes 2 (8.5%), 4 (1.1%), 3 (0.9%) and 5 (0.2%). Genotype 6 was not detected in these patients. Mixed infection across the HCV subtypes was detected in twenty patients (4.6%). The genotype distribution was related to age and region. Genotype 1 was significantly less frequent in the ≥ 60 age group than in the younger age group (OR = 0.2; 95%CI: 0.1-0.5, P < 0.001). Furthermore, genotype 1 was more frequent in the central part of the examined region than elsewhere (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The HCV genotype (type 1b was dominant) distribution in Algeria is different from those in other northern countries of Africa. PMID:23898373

  16. Rapid fluorescent lateral-flow immunoassay for hepatitis B virus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Song, Liu-Wei; Wang, Ying-Bin; Fang, Lin-Lin; Wu, Yong; Yang, Lin; Chen, Jie-Yu; Ge, Sheng-Xiang; Zhang, Jing; Xiong, You-Zheng; Deng, Xiu-Mei; Min, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Pei-Jer; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotyping plays an important role in the clinical management of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. However, the current nucleic acid based techniques are expensive, time-consuming, and inconvenient. Here, we developed a novel DNA-independent HBV genotyping tool based on a one-step fluorescent lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA). Epitope-targeting immunization and screening techniques were used to develop HBV genotype specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). These mAbs were used to develop a multitest LFIA with a matched scanning luminoscope for HBV genotyping (named the GT-LFIA). The performance of this novel assay was carefully evaluated in well-characterized clinical cohorts. The GT-LFIA, which can specifically differentiate HBV genotypes A, B, C, and D in a pretreatment-free single test, was successfully developed using four genotype specific mAbs. The detection limits of the GT-LFIA for HBV genotypes A, B, C, and D were 2.5-10.0 IU HBV surface antigen/mL, respectively. Among the sera from 456 CHB patients, 439 (96.3%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 94.1-97.8%) were genotype-differentiable by the GT-LFIA and 437 (99.5%; 95% CI, 98.4-99.9%) were consistent with viral genome sequencing. In the 21 patients receiving nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy, for end-of-treatment specimens that were HBV DNA undetectable and were not applicable for DNA-dependent genotyping, the GT-LFIA presented genotyping results that were consistent with those obtained in pretreatment specimens by viral genome sequencing and the GT-LFIA. In conclusion, the novel GT-LFIA is a convenient, fast, and reliable tool for differential HBV genotyping, especially in patients with low or undetectable HBV DNA levels. PMID:25892477

  17. Prevalence and genotype of hepatitis C virus infection in pregnant women and blood donors in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Wansbrough-Jones, M H; Frimpong, E; Cant, B; Harris, K; Evans, M R; Teo, C G

    1998-01-01

    The seroprevalence of hepatitis C virus was evaluated in blood donors and antenatal clinic attenders in Kumasi, Ghana and seropositive subjects were tested for hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The overall seroprevalence among Ghanaians was 2.8% but there was a significantly higher prevalence in males (4.6%) than in females (1.0%). No risk factor for infection was identified by a questionnaire. Among those who showed evidence of active infection with a positive PCR, the most common genotype was type 2 but the subtype could not be specifically determined; these type 2 hepatitis C viruses may be indigenous to Africa. PMID:9861360

  18. Genotype characterization of occult hepatitis B virus strains among Egyptian chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Kishk, R; Atta, H Aboul; Ragheb, M; Kamel, M; Metwally, L; Nemr, N

    2014-02-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection combined with occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been associated with increased risk of hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of occult HBV infection among Egyptian chronic HCV patients, the genotype and occurrence of surface gene mutations of HBV and the impact of co-infection on early response to treatment. The study enrolled 162 chronic HCV patients from Ismailia Fever Hospital, Egypt, who were HBV surface antigen-negative. All patients were given clinical assessment and biochemical, histological and virological examinations. HBV-DNA was detectable in sera from 3 patients out of the 40 patients who were positive for hepatitis B core antibody. These 3 patients were responsive to combination therapy at treatment week 12; only 1 of them had discontinued therapy by week 24. HBV genotype D was the only detectable genotype in those patients, with absence of "a" determinant mutations among those isolates. PMID:24945562

  19. Genotype-specific variation in West Nile virus dispersal in California.

    PubMed

    Duggal, Nisha K; Reisen, William K; Fang, Ying; Newman, Ruchi M; Yang, Xiao; Ebel, Gregory D; Brault, Aaron C

    2015-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an arbovirus that was first reported in North America in New York in 1999 and, by 2003, had spread more than 4000 km to California. However, variation in viral genetics associated with spread is not well understood. Herein, we report sequences for more than 100 WNV isolates made from mosquito pools that were collected from 2003 to 2011 as part of routine surveillance by the California Mosquito-borne Virus Surveillance System. We performed phylogeographic analyses and demonstrated that 5 independent introductions of WNV (1 WN02 genotype strain and 4 SW03 genotype strains) occurred in California. The SW03 genotype of WNV was constrained to the southwestern U.S. and had a more rapid rate of spread. In addition, geographic constraint of WNV strains within a single region for up to 6 years suggest viral maintenance has been driven by resident, rather than migratory, birds and overwintering in mosquitoes. PMID:26210076

  20. New genotypes of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Taura syndrome virus (TSV) from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kathy F J; Navarro, Solangel A; Pantoja, Carlos R; Aranguren, Fernando L; Lightner, Donald V

    2012-07-25

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) and Taura syndrome virus (TSV) are highly pathogenic to penaeid shrimp and have caused significant economic losses in the shrimp culture industry around the world. During 2010 and 2011, both WSSV and TSV were found in Saudi Arabia, where they caused severe mortalities in cultured Indian white shrimp Penaeus indicus. Most outbreaks of shrimp viruses in production facilities can be traced to the importation of infected stocks or commodity shrimp. In an attempt to determine the origins of these viral outbreaks in Saudi Arabia, we performed variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) analyses for WSSV isolates and a phylogenetic analysis for TSV isolates. From the WSSV genome, the VNTR in open reading frames (ORFs) 125 and 94 were investigated with PCR followed by DNA sequence analysis. The genotypes were categorized as {N125, N94} where N is the number of repeat units in a specific ORF, and the subscript indicates the ORF (i.e. ORFs 125 and 94 in this case). From 15 Saudi Arabia WSSV isolates, we detected 3 genotypes: {6125, 794}, {7125, del94}, and {8125, 1394}. The WSSV genotype of {7125, del94} appears to be a new variant with a 1522 bp deletion encompassing complete coding regions of ORF 94 and ORF 95 and the first 82 bp of ORF 93. For TSV genotyping, we used a phylogenetic analysis based on the amino acid sequence of TSV capsid protein 2 (CP2). We analyzed 8 Saudi Arabian isolates in addition to 36 isolates from other areas: SE Asia, Mexico, Venezuela and Belize. The Saudi Arabian TSV clustered into a new, distinct group. Based on these genotyping analyses, new WSSV and TSV genotypes were found in Saudi Arabia. The data suggest that they have come from wild shrimp Penaeus indicus from the Red Sea that are used for broodstock. PMID:22832716

  1. [The genotyping and molecular evolution of varicella-zoster virus].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Long-Feng; Gan, Lin; Chen, Jing-Xian; Wang, Ming-Li

    2012-09-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV, Human herpesvirus 3) is a member of the family Herpesviridae, and is classified as alpha-subfamily along with HSV-1 and HSV-2. VZV is the causative agent of chicken pox (varicella) mostly in children, after which it establishes latency in the sensory ganglia with the potential to reactivate at a later time to cause shingles (zoster). Increasing molecular epidemiological studies in recent years have been performed to monitor the mutations in VZV genome, discriminate vaccine virus from wild type virus, study the phylogeny of VZV strains throughout the world, and understand the evolution of the different clades of VZV. The progress has great impact on the fields of epidemiology, virology and bioinformatics. In this review, the currently available data concerning the geographic distribution and molecular evolution of VZV clades are discussed. PMID:23233938

  2. Simultaneous circulation of genotypes I and III of dengue virus 3 in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Usme-Ciro, Jose A; Mendez, Jairo A; Tenorio, Antonio; Rey, Gloria J; Domingo, Cristina; Gallego-Gomez, Juan C

    2008-01-01

    Background Dengue is a major health problem in tropical and subtropical regions. In Colombia, dengue viruses (DENV) cause about 50,000 cases annually, 10% of which involve Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever/Dengue Shock Syndrome. The picture is similar in other surrounding countries in the Americas, with recent outbreaks of severe disease, mostly associated with DENV serotype 3, strains of the Indian genotype, introduced into the Americas in 1994. Results The analysis of the 3'end (224 bp) of the envelope gene from 32 DENV-3 strains recently recovered in Colombia confirms the circulation of the Indian genotype, and surprisingly the co-circulation of an Asian-Pacific genotype only recently described in the Americas. Conclusion These results have important implications for epidemiology and surveillance of DENV infection in Central and South America. Molecular surveillance of the DENV genotypes infecting humans could be a very valuable tool for controlling/mitigating the impact of the DENV infection. PMID:18764951

  3. Two distinct human parainfluenza virus type 1 genotypes detected during the 1991 Milwaukee epidemic.

    PubMed Central

    Henrickson, K J; Savatski, L L

    1996-01-01

    The extent of genetic and antigenic variation found in a population of human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV-1) during a single local epidemic was investigated. Fifteen HPIV-1 strains isolated from children in 1991 were analyzed. Nucleotide sequence variation in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein (HN) gene demonstrated two distinct genotypes (genotypes C and D). Unique patterns were identified involving 62 nucleotide and 10 amino acid positions. These patterns represented 40% of all mutations within the HN gene. The remaining mutations were randomly distributed, and 74% involved only one (55%) or two isolates. Genotypes were statistically different from each other at both the nucleotide (P = 0.001) and amino acid (P = 0.001) levels and demonstrated unique potential N-linked glycosylation patterns. Thirty-eight monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) made to four different viral proteins (22 HN, 2 fusion [F], 1 phosphoprotein, and 13 nucleoprotein) (originating from two different genotypes [genotypes A and D]) were compared for their ability to bind to the clinical isolates in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and hemagglutinin-inhibition (HI) assays. Twenty-one MAbs bound well to all clinical isolates in ELISAs and HI assays. The remaining 17 MAbs showed variation in all four structural proteins. Three HN MAbs demonstrated genotype C- and D-specific antigenic and neutralization differences. Evolutionary analysis using parsimony methods confirmed the differences between the two genotypes. No differences in either clinical presentation or disease severity between the two genotypes were found. Geographically localized HPIV-1 epidemics can be caused by at least two distinct genotypes with minor but specific antigenic changes. The clinical and immunologic roles of HPIV-1 genotypes have not been determined. PMID:8904440

  4. Isolation of Genotype V St. Louis Encephalitis Virus in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Jason H.; White, Gregory S.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Stark, Lillian M.

    2009-01-01

    We isolated and characterized St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) from cloacal swabs of naturally exposed adult sentinel chickens in 2006. Phylogenetic analysis of SLEV strains isolated in Florida indicated that Brazilian SLEV circulated in 1972 and 2006; lineages were VA and VB. PMID:19331744

  5. Genotypic distribution of hepatitis C virus in Thailand and Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Wasitthankasem, Rujipat; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Siripon, Nipaporn; Suya, Chutima; Chulothok, Phrutsada; Chaiear, Kasemporn; Rujirojindakul, Pairaya; Kanjana, Sawan; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The majority of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in chronic infection, which can lead to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Global burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is estimated at 150 million individuals, or 3% of the world's population. The distribution of the seven major genotypes of HCV varies with geographical regions. Since Asia has a high incidence of HCV, we assessed the distribution of HCV genotypes in Thailand and Southeast Asia. From 588 HCV-positive samples obtained throughout Thailand, we characterized the HCV 5' untranslated region, Core, and NS5B regions by nested PCR. Nucleotide sequences obtained from both the Core and NS5B of these isolates were subjected to phylogenetic analysis, and genotypes were assigned using published reference genotypes. Results were compared to the epidemiological data of HCV genotypes identified within Southeast Asian. Among the HCV subtypes characterized in the Thai samples, subtype 3a was the most predominant (36.4%), followed by 1a (19.9%), 1b (12.6%), 3b (9.7%) and 2a (0.5%). While genotype 1 was prevalent throughout Thailand (27-36%), genotype 3 was more common in the south. Genotype 6 (20.9%) constituted subtype 6f (7.8%), 6n (7.7%), 6i (3.4%), 6j and 6m (0.7% each), 6c (0.3%), 6v and 6xa (0.2% each) and its prevalence was significantly lower in southern Thailand compared to the north and northeast (p = 0.027 and p = 0.030, respectively). Within Southeast Asia, high prevalence of genotype 6 occurred in northern countries such as Myanmar, Laos, and Vietnam, while genotype 3 was prevalent in Thailand and Malaysia. Island nations of Singapore, Indonesia and Philippines demonstrated prevalence of genotype 1. This study further provides regional HCV genotype information that may be useful in fostering sound public health policy and tracking future patterns of HCV spread. PMID:25962112

  6. Analysis of genotype diversity and evolution of Dengue virus serotype 2 using complete genomes

    PubMed Central

    Waman, Vaishali P.; Kolekar, Pandurang; Ramtirthkar, Mukund R.; Kale, Mohan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue is one of the most common arboviral diseases prevalent worldwide and is caused by Dengue viruses (genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae). There are four serotypes of Dengue Virus (DENV-1 to DENV-4), each of which is further subdivided into distinct genotypes. DENV-2 is frequently associated with severe dengue infections and epidemics. DENV-2 consists of six genotypes such as Asian/American, Asian I, Asian II, Cosmopolitan, American and sylvatic. Comparative genomic study was carried out to infer population structure of DENV-2 and to analyze the role of evolutionary and spatiotemporal factors in emergence of diversifying lineages. Methods Complete genome sequences of 990 strains of DENV-2 were analyzed using Bayesian-based population genetics and phylogenetic approaches to infer genetically distinct lineages. The role of spatiotemporal factors, genetic recombination and selection pressure in the evolution of DENV-2 is examined using the sequence-based bioinformatics approaches. Results DENV-2 genetic structure is complex and consists of fifteen subpopulations/lineages. The Asian/American genotype is observed to be diversified into seven lineages. The Asian I, Cosmopolitan and sylvatic genotypes were found to be subdivided into two lineages, each. The populations of American and Asian II genotypes were observed to be homogeneous. Significant evidence of episodic positive selection was observed in all the genes, except NS4A. Positive selection operational on a few codons in envelope gene confers antigenic and lineage diversity in the American strains of Asian/American genotype. Selection on codons of non-structural genes was observed to impact diversification of lineages in Asian I, cosmopolitan and sylvatic genotypes. Evidence of intra/inter-genotype recombination was obtained and the uncertainty in classification of recombinant strains was resolved using the population genetics approach. Discussion Complete genome-based analysis revealed that the

  7. Genotypic Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus in Thailand and Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Wasitthankasem, Rujipat; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Siripon, Nipaporn; Suya, Chutima; Chulothok, Phrutsada; Chaiear, Kasemporn; Rujirojindakul, Pairaya; Kanjana, Sawan; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The majority of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in chronic infection, which can lead to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Global burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is estimated at 150 million individuals, or 3% of the world’s population. The distribution of the seven major genotypes of HCV varies with geographical regions. Since Asia has a high incidence of HCV, we assessed the distribution of HCV genotypes in Thailand and Southeast Asia. From 588 HCV-positive samples obtained throughout Thailand, we characterized the HCV 5’ untranslated region, Core, and NS5B regions by nested PCR. Nucleotide sequences obtained from both the Core and NS5B of these isolates were subjected to phylogenetic analysis, and genotypes were assigned using published reference genotypes. Results were compared to the epidemiological data of HCV genotypes identified within Southeast Asian. Among the HCV subtypes characterized in the Thai samples, subtype 3a was the most predominant (36.4%), followed by 1a (19.9%), 1b (12.6%), 3b (9.7%) and 2a (0.5%). While genotype 1 was prevalent throughout Thailand (27–36%), genotype 3 was more common in the south. Genotype 6 (20.9%) constituted subtype 6f (7.8%), 6n (7.7%), 6i (3.4%), 6j and 6m (0.7% each), 6c (0.3%), 6v and 6xa (0.2% each) and its prevalence was significantly lower in southern Thailand compared to the north and northeast (p = 0.027 and p = 0.030, respectively). Within Southeast Asia, high prevalence of genotype 6 occurred in northern countries such as Myanmar, Laos, and Vietnam, while genotype 3 was prevalent in Thailand and Malaysia. Island nations of Singapore, Indonesia and Philippines demonstrated prevalence of genotype 1. This study further provides regional HCV genotype information that may be useful in fostering sound public health policy and tracking future patterns of HCV spread. PMID:25962112

  8. Persistent infection and promiscuous recombination of multiple genotypes of an RNA virus within a single host generate extensive diversity.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ziming; Barthelson, Roger; Gowda, Siddarame; Hilf, Mark E; Dawson, William O; Galbraith, David W; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2007-01-01

    Recombination and reassortment of viral genomes are major processes contributing to the creation of new, emerging viruses. These processes are especially significant in long-term persistent infections where multiple viral genotypes co-replicate in a single host, generating abundant genotypic variants, some of which may possess novel host-colonizing and pathogenicity traits. In some plants, successive vegetative propagation of infected tissues and introduction of new genotypes of a virus by vector transmission allows for viral populations to increase in complexity for hundreds of years allowing co-replication and subsequent recombination of the multiple viral genotypes. Using a resequencing microarray, we examined a persistent infection by a Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) complex in citrus, a vegetatively propagated, globally important fruit crop, and found that the complex comprised three major and a number of minor genotypes. Subsequent deep sequencing analysis of the viral population confirmed the presence of the three major CTV genotypes and, in addition, revealed that the minor genotypes consisted of an extraordinarily large number of genetic variants generated by promiscuous recombination between the major genotypes. Further analysis provided evidence that some of the recombinants underwent subsequent divergence, further increasing the genotypic complexity. These data demonstrate that persistent infection of multiple viral genotypes within a host organism is sufficient to drive the large-scale production of viral genetic variants that may evolve into new and emerging viruses. PMID:17878952

  9. Single endemic genotype of measles virus continuously circulating in China for at least 16 years.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Xu, Songtao; Wang, Huiling; Zhu, Zhen; Ji, Yixin; Liu, Chunyu; Zhang, Xiaojie; Sun, Liwei; Zhou, Jianhui; Lu, Peishan; Hu, Ying; Feng, Daxing; Zhang, Zhenying; Wang, Changyin; Fang, Xueqiang; Zheng, Huanying; Liu, Leng; Sun, Xiaodong; Tang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yan; Gao, Hui; Tian, Hong; Ma, Jiangtao; Gu, Suyi; Wang, Shuang; Feng, Yan; Bo, Fang; Liu, Jianfeng; Si, Yuan; Zhou, Shujie; Ma, Yuyan; Wu, Shengwei; Zhou, Shunde; Li, Fangcai; Ding, Zhengrong; Yang, Zhaohui; Rota, Paul A; Featherstone, David; Jee, Youngmee; Bellini, William J; Xu, Wenbo

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of measles in China from 1991 to 2008 was reviewed, and the nucleotide sequences from 1507 measles viruses (MeV) isolated during 1993 to 2008 were phylogenetically analyzed. The results showed that measles epidemics peaked approximately every 3 to 5 years with the range of measles cases detected between 56,850 and 140,048 per year. The Chinese MeV strains represented three genotypes; 1501 H1, 1 H2 and 5 A. Genotype H1 was the predominant genotype throughout China continuously circulating for at least 16 years. Genotype H1 sequences could be divided into two distinct clusters, H1a and H1b. A 4.2% average nucleotide divergence was found between the H1a and H1b clusters, and the nucleotide sequence and predicted amino acid homologies of H1a viruses were 92.3%-100% and 84.7%-100%, H1b were 97.1%-100% and 95.3%-100%, respectively. Viruses from both clusters were distributed throughout China with no apparent geographic restriction and multiple co-circulating lineages were present in many provinces. Cluster H1a and H1b viruses were co-circulating during 1993 to 2005, while no H1b viruses were detected after 2005 and the transmission of that cluster has presumably been interrupted. Analysis of the nucleotide and predicted amino acid changes in the N proteins of H1a and H1b viruses showed no evidence of selective pressure. This study investigated the genotype and cluster distribution of MeV in China over a 16-year period to establish a genetic baseline before MeV elimination in Western Pacific Region (WPR). Continuous and extensive MeV surveillance and the ability to quickly identify imported cases of measles will become more critical as measles elimination goals are achieved in China in the near future. This is the first report that a single endemic genotype of measles virus has been found to be continuously circulating in one country for at least 16 years. PMID:22532829

  10. Comparison of the antigenic relationship between Japanese encephalitis virus genotypes 1 and 3

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) genotype circulating in Korea has changed from G3 to G1. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the antigenic relationship between the two genotypes by using antibody tests. Materials and Methods Blood samples from 42 sows and 216 horses were collected, and their seroprevalence was monitored using the hemagglutination inhibition and virus neutralization tests. Antisera against JEV G1 and G3 were isolated and prepared from guinea pigs. The cross-reactivity of these two viruses was then compared using the neutralizing antibody test. Results We found that there was a difference in the seropositive ratios of JEV G1 and G3. However, the difference was dependent on the antibody test used. There was also an observed difference in the antigenicity between the two genotypes, as ascertained using the neutralizing antibody test. Conclusion There is an evident difference in JEV antigenicity between the genotypes G1 and G3. Therefore, we propose monitoring of the seroprevalence of JEV, and reevaluating the antigenicity of the current vaccine by using the relevant tests. PMID:26866021

  11. Genotypic evolution and antigenicity of H9N2 influenza viruses in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Ge, Feifei; Li, Xin; Ju, Houbin; Yang, Dequan; Liu, Jian; Qi, Xinyong; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xianchao; Qiu, Yafeng; Liu, Peihong; Zhou, Jinping

    2016-06-01

    H9N2 influenza viruses have been circulating in China since 1994, but a systematic investigation of H9N2 in Shanghai has not previously been undertaken. Here, using 14 viruses we isolated from poultry and pigs in Shanghai during 2002 and 2006-2014, together with the commercial vaccine A/chicken/Shanghai/F/1998 (Ck/SH/F/98), we analyzed the evolution of H9N2 influenza viruses in Shanghai and showed that all 14 isolates originated from Ck/SH/F/98 antigenically. We evaluated the immune protection efficiency of the vaccine. Our findings demonstrate that H9N2 viruses in Shanghai have undergone extensive reassortment. Various genotypes emerged in 2002, 2006 and 2007, while during 2009-2014 only one genotype was found. Four antigenic groups, A-D, could be identified among the 14 isolates and a variety of antigenically distinct H9N2-virus-derived avian influenza viruses (AIVs) circulated simultaneously in Shanghai during this period. Challenge experiments using vaccinated chickens indicated that the vaccine prevented shedding of antigenic group A and B viruses, but not those of the more recent groups C and D. Genetic analysis showed that compared to the vaccine strain, representative viruses of antigenic groups C and D possess greater numbers of amino acid substitutions in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein than viruses in antigenic groups A and B. Many of these substitutions are located in antigenic sites. Our results indicate that the persistence of H9N2 AIV in China might be due to incomplete vaccine protection and that the avian influenza vaccine should be regularly evaluated and updated to maintain optimal protection. PMID:26935915

  12. Clinical Features and Outcomes of Patients With Genotype 3 Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Ra Ri; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Chang Min; Ji, Sung Bok; Jung, Hee Cheul; Cho, Hyun Chin; Kim, Jin Joo; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Hong Jun; Ha, Chang Yoon; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae-Hyo; Jung, Woon Tae; Lee, Ok-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 3 infection is very rare in high-income Asia Pacific. The aim of our retrospective observational study was to evaluate the incidence, clinical features, and treatment outcomes of patients with a genotype 3 HCV infection in the Gyeongnam Province of Korea. Ninety-eight consecutive patients diagnosed with a genotype 3 HCV infection at Gyeongsang National University Hospital, between January 2005 and December 2014, were enrolled into the study. Relevant characteristics of the study group included: 80.6% men, mean age of 41.8 years, and including 69 patients with chronic hepatitis, 25 with liver cirrhosis, and 4 with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Risk factors for HCV infection, sustained virologic response rate, development of HCC, and mortality in patients with genotype 3 were retrospectively analyzed. Among all patients diagnosed with a HCV infection during the study period, the prevalence of genotype 3 was 7.3%. The incidence of genotype 3 was higher in young patients with a risk factor of IVDU (54.0%) and tattooing (62.3%). Among 45 treatment-naive genotype 3 patients, sustained virologic response was achieved with a combination of pegylated-interferon alpha and ribavirin in 75.6%. The cumulative 5-year incidence of HCC was 13.6%, and 8.9% for overall mortality. Liver cirrhosis at enrollment was an independent risk factor for HCC development. This is the first study to elucidate the clinical features and outcomes among the patients with HCV genotype 3 infection in Korea. Further prospective studies are needed to investigate transmission routes and outcomes for HCV genotype 3 infections. PMID:26871824

  13. Detection of mumps virus genotype H in two previously vaccinated patients from Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Alberto; García, Alí A; Barrón, Blanca L

    2016-06-01

    Infections caused by mumps virus (MuV) have been successfully prevented through vaccination; however, in recent years, an increasing number of mumps outbreaks have been reported within vaccinated populations. In this study, MuV was genotyped for the first time in Mexico. Saliva samples were obtained from two previously vaccinated patients in Mexico City who had developed parotitis. Viral isolation was carried out in Vero cells, and the SH and HN genes were amplified by RT-PCR. Amplicons were sequenced and compared to a set of reference sequences to identify the MuV genotype. PMID:26935913

  14. Genotypic characterization of symptomatic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Blackard, Jason T.; Rouster, Susan D.; Nady, Soad; Galal, Gehan; Marzuuk, Naglaa; Rafaat, Marwaa M.; Daef, Enas; Din, Salwa Seif El; Purcell, Robert H.; Emerson, Suzanne U.; Sherman, Kenneth E.; Shata, M. Tarek

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of acute viral hepatitis (AVH) in many developing countries. In Egypt, HEV seroprevalence is among the highest in the world; however, only a very limited number of Egyptian HEV sequences are currently available. Objectives The objectives were to determine the HEV genotype(s) currently circulating in Egypt. Study Design AVH patients without serologic evidence of hepatitis A, B, and C viruses were evaluated for possible HEV infection using serologic assays for anti-HEV IgM and anti-HEV IgG and real-time PCR for HEV RNA. Stool suspensions from suspected cases were inoculated into rhesus macaques to confirm the presence of HEV. Sequence analysis was utilized to determine HEV genotype. Results Of 287 subjects with AVH enrolled, 58 had serologic evidence of acute HEV infection. Stool samples for two of these patients were repeatedly positive for HEV RNA by real-time PCR. Macaques experimentally inoculated with these human stools also developed viremia. Sequence analysis of open reading frame (ORF) 1 demonstrated that these isolates belonged to HEV genotype 1 and were 3.9% – 9.5% divergent from other genotype 1 isolates. ORF2 was 5.3% – 8.7% divergent from previously reported Egyptian isolates. Conclusions This study strongly suggests that genotype 1 HEV related to other North African isolates is circulating in acute symptomatic patients in Egypt. Further evaluation of genotypic variability is underway in this highly endemic cohort and is considered an important component of our increased understanding of HEV pathogenesis. PMID:19651539

  15. Evaluation of Interferon Resistance in Newly Established Genotype 1b Hepatitis C Virus Cell Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Miki; Tasaka-Fujita, Megumi; Nakagawa, Mina; Watanabe, Takako; Kawai-Kitahata, Fukiko; Otani, Satoshi; Goto, Fumio; Nagata, Hiroko; Kaneko, Shun; Nitta, Sayuri; Murakawa, Miyako; Nishimura-Sakurai, Yuki; Azuma, Seishin; Itsui, Yasuhiro; Mori, Kenichi; Yagi, Shintaro; Kakinuma, Sei; Asahina, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1b is known to exhibit treatment resistance with respect to interferon (IFN) therapy. Substitution of amino acids 70 and 91 in the core region of the 1b genotype is a significant predictor of liver carcinogenesis and poor response to pegylated-IFN-α and ribavirin therapy. However, the molecular mechanism has not yet been clearly elucidated because of limitations of the HCV genotype 1b infectious model. Recently, the TPF1-M170T HCV genotype 1b cell culture system was established, in which the clone successfully replicates and infects Huh-7-derived Huh7-ALS32.50 cells. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare IFN resistance in various HCV clones using this system. Methods: HCV core amino acid substitutions R70Q and L91M were introduced to the TPF1-M170T clone and then transfected into Huh7-ALS32.50 cells. To evaluate the production of each virus, intracellular HCV core antigens were measured. Results were confirmed with Western blot analysis using anti-NS5A antibodies, and IFN sensitivity was subsequently measured. Results: Each clone was transfected successfully compared with JFH-1, with a significant difference in intracellular HCV core antigen (p < 0.05), an indicator of continuous HCV replication. Among all clones, L91M showed the highest increase in the HCV core antigen and HCV protein. There was no significant resistance against IFN treatment in core substitutions; however, IFN sensitivity was significantly different between the wildtype core and JFH-1 (p < 0.05). Conclusions: A novel genotype 1b HCV cell culture was constructed with core amino acid substitutions, which demonstrated IFN resistance of genotype 1b. This system will be useful for future analyses into the mechanisms of HCV genotype 1b treatment. PMID:27047766

  16. Molecular identification of hepatitis B virus genotypes/subgenotypes: Revised classification hurdles and updated resolutions

    PubMed Central

    Pourkarim, Mahmoud Reza; Amini-Bavil-Olyaee, Samad; Kurbanov, Fuat; Van Ranst, Marc; Tacke, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The clinical course of infections with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) substantially varies between individuals, as a consequence of a complex interplay between viral, host, environmental and other factors. Due to the high genetic variability of HBV, the virus can be categorized into different HBV genotypes and subgenotypes, which considerably differ with respect to geographical distribution, transmission routes, disease progression, responses to antiviral therapy or vaccination, and clinical outcome measures such as cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. However, HBV (sub)genotyping has caused some controversies in the past due to misclassifications and incorrect interpretations of different genotyping methods. Thus, an accurate, holistic and dynamic classification system is essential. In this review article, we aimed at highlighting potential pitfalls in genetic and phylogenetic analyses of HBV and suggest novel terms for HBV classification. Analyzing full-length genome sequences when classifying genotypes and subgenotypes is the foremost prerequisite of this classification system. Careful attention must be paid to all aspects of phylogenetic analysis, such as bootstrapping values and meeting the necessary thresholds for (sub)genotyping. Quasi-subgenotype refers to subgenotypes that were incorrectly suggested to be novel. As many of these strains were misclassified due to genetic differences resulting from recombination, we propose the term “recombino-subgenotype”. Moreover, immigration is an important confounding facet of global HBV distribution and substantially changes the geographic pattern of HBV (sub)genotypes. We therefore suggest the term “immigro-subgenotype” to distinguish exotic (sub)genotypes from native ones. We are strongly convinced that applying these two proposed terms in HBV classification will help harmonize this rapidly progressing field and allow for improved prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24966586

  17. Molecular Identification of Mumps Virus Genotypes from Clinical Samples: Standardized Method of Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, G.; Jabado, O.; Cisterna, D.; de Ory, F.; Renwick, N.; Echevarria, J. E.; Castellanos, A.; Mosquera, M.; Freire, M. C.; Campos, R. H.; Lipkin, W. I.

    2005-01-01

    A sensitive nested reverse transcription-PCR assay, targeting a short fragment of the gene encoding the small hydrophobic protein (SH gene), was developed to allow rapid characterization of mumps virus in clinical samples. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were established using representative genotypes A, B, C, D, E, and F. Mumps virus RNA was characterized directly from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and in extracts of mumps virus isolates from patients with various clinical syndromes. Direct sequencing of products and subsequent phylogenetic analysis enabled genetic classification. A simple web-based system of sequence analysis was established. The study also allowed characterization of mumps virus strains from Argentina as part of a new subgenotype. This PCR assay for characterization of mumps infections coupled to a web-based analytical program provides a rapid method for identification of known and novel strains. PMID:15815011

  18. Injecting drug use: A vector for the introduction of new hepatitis C virus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Ruta, Simona; Cernescu, Costin

    2015-10-14

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes' monitoring allows real-time insight into the dynamic changes that occur in the global epidemiological picture of HCV infection. Intravenous drug use is currently the primary driver for HCV transmission in developed and developing countries. The distribution of HCV genotypes/subtypes differs significantly between people who inject drugs (PWID) and the general population. HCV genotypes that previously exhibited a limited geographical distribution (3a, 4) are becoming more prevalent in this high-risk group. Immigration from HCV-endemic countries and the evolving networks of HCV transmission in PWID influence HCV genotypes distribution in Europe. Social vulnerabilities (e.g., unemployment, homelessness, and limited access to social and healthcare insurances systems) are important triggers for illicit drug use, which increases the associated risks of HCV infection and the frequent emergence of less prevalent genotypes. Genotype/subtype determination bears important clinical consequences in the progression of liver disease, susceptibility to antiviral therapies and the emergence of resistance-associated variants. An estimated half of the chronically HCV-infected PWID are unaware of their infection, and only one in ten of those diagnosed enter treatment. Nevertheless, PWID exhibit high response rates to new antiviral regimens, and the level of HCV reinfection is unexpectedly low. The focus of the healthcare system must be on the early detection and treatment of infection, to avoid late presentations that are associated with high levels of viremia and liver fibrosis, which may diminish the therapeutic success rate. PMID:26478672

  19. Evaluation of Mungbean Genotypes Based on Yield Stability and Reaction to Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alam, AKM Mahbubul; Somta, Prakit; Jompuk, Choosak; Chatwachirawong, Prasert; Srinives, Peerasak

    2014-01-01

    This work was conducted to identify mungbean genotypes showing yield stability and resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) disease. Sixteen genotypes were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with two replications for two years (2011 and 2012) at three locations (Gazipur, Ishurdi and Madaripur) of the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute. An analysis of variance exhibited significant effects of genotype (G), environment (E), and genotype × environment (G×E) on grain yield. Among eight agronomic characters, the principal component 1 (PC1) was always higher than the PC2. Considering G×E interaction, BM6 was the best genotype at all three locations in both years. Based on grain yield and stability performance, BM6 ranked first while the worst performing genotypes were BM1 and G10. Based on discrimination and representation, Gazipur was identified as an ideal environment for these mungbeans. Relationship between soil-plant analysis developments (SPAD) value was positive with yield but negative with MYMV severity. BM6, G1 and G2 were considered as promising sources of resistance for low disease score and stable response across the environments. The environment proved to have an influence on MYMV infection under natural infestation. A positive correlation was observed between disease score and the temperature under natural growing condition. PMID:25289012

  20. Phylogenetic Analysis of Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes Circulating in Different Risk Groups of Panama, Evidence of the Introduction of Genotype A2 in the Country

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Alexander A.; Zaldívar, Yamitzel; Arteaga, Griselda; de Castillo, Zoila; Ortiz, Alma; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Castillero, Omar; Castillo, Juan A.; Cristina, Juan; Pascale, Juan M.

    2015-01-01

    The Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) can cause acute or chronic infection it is also associated with the development of liver cancer, thousands of new infections occur on a yearly basis, and many of these cases are located in certain areas of the Caribbean and Latin America. In these areas, the HBV prevalence is still high which makes this virus a serious public health concern to the entire region. Studies performed in Panama suggest a complex pattern in the distribution of HBV among the country’s different risk groups. We use phylogenetic analysis in order to determine which HBV genotypes were circulating in these specific groups; for this we used a fragment of the PreS2/2 region of the HBV genome. Subsequently whole HBV genome sequences were used for Bayesian analysis of phylodynamics and phylogeography. Two main genotypes were found: genotype A (54.5%) and genotype F (45.5%). There was a difference in the distribution of genotypes according to risk groups: 72.9% of high risk groups were associated to genotype A, and 55.0% of samples of genotype F were associated to the low risk group (p<0.002). The Bayesian analysis of phylogeny-traits association revealed a statistically significant geographical association (p<0.0001) with both genotypes and different regions of the country. The Bayesian time of most recent common ancestor analysis (tMRCA) revealed a recent tMRCA for genotype A2 circulating in Panama (1997, 95% HPD: 1986—2005), when it is compared with Panamanian genotype F1c sequences (1930, 95% HPD: 1810 – 2005). These results suggest a possible change in the distribution of HBV genotypes in Panama and Latin America as a whole. They also serve to encourage the implementation of vaccination programs in high-risk groups, in order to prevent an increase in the number of new HBV cases in Latin America and worldwide. PMID:26230260

  1. The Hepatitis B Virus Genotype Affects the Persistence of Viral Replication in Immunodeficient NOG Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Yoshinobu; Miyagi, Takuya; Hikita, Hayato; Yoshioka, Teppei; Mukai, Kaori; Nawa, Takatoshi; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Ohkawa, Kazuyoshi; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Takahashi, Takeshi; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Ryo, Akihide; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims At least eight genotypes of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) have been identified. HBV genotype C is the most common genotype in Japan, although the incidence of HBV genotype A is increasing. The reason underlying the differences in viral multiplication of the HBV genotypes is unclear, especially in vivo. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the differences in HBV load and the persistence of viremia in vivo between genotypes A and C. Methods Immunodeficient NOG mice were transfected by hydrodynamic injection with the HBV expression plasmids pHBA1.2 or pHBC1.2, which contain overlength (1.2-mer) copies of the genomes of HBV genotype A or C, respectively. Results One day after transfection, the number of HBcAg-positive hepatocytes and serum HBV DNA levels were similar between mice transfected with pHBA1.2 and pHBC1.2. Serum levels of HBV DNA, HBsAg and HBeAg in mice transfected with pHBA1.2 were maintained over 5 months. In contrast, those in mice with pHBC1.2 gradually decreased over time and reached undetectable levels within 3 months after transfection. HBcAg-stained hepatocytes were detected in mice transfected with pHBA1.2, but not pHBC1.2, 5 months post-transfection. Double-staining immunohistochemistry revealed that the number of cleaved caspase3-stained, HBcAg-positive hepatocytes in the pHBC1.2-transfected mice was higher than in the pHBA1.2-transfected mice 3 days post-transfection. Moreover, the plasmid DNA and covalently closed circular DNA levels were decreased in the livers of pHBC1.2-transfected mice. These results suggested that hepatocytes expressing HBV genotype C were eliminated by apoptosis in the absence of immune cells more often than in hepatocytes expressing HBV genotype A. Conclusions Immunodeficient mice transfected with HBV genotype A develop persistent viremia, whereas those transfected with HBV genotype C exhibit transient viremia accompanied by apoptosis of HBV-expressing hepatocytes. This differences may affect the

  2. [Determination of hepatitis B virus genotypes by DNA sequence analysis in patients from Ankara, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Külah, Canan; Cirak, Meltem Yalinay

    2010-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes vary depending on the geographical region. The HBV genotype determined in Turkey has been genotype D which is found as the homogenously disseminated single genotype. The aim of this study was to determine HBV genotypes in a group of HBV infected patients who were admitted to a university hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Serum samples from HBsAg positive and anti-HBs negative 84 (52 male, 32 female) patients with HBV infection were included into the study. Anti-HBc was positive in 95.2%, HBeAg was positive in 47.6% and anti-HBe was positive in 11.9% of the patients. Mean HBV-DNA levels of the patients were 5.7 x 10(7) +/- 4.6 x 10(7) IU/ml; mean ALT levels were 131 +/- 171 IU/ml and mean AST levels were 98 +/- 170 IU/ml. HBV-DNA was extracted from serum by the phenol-chloroform method and PCR was performed to amplify the S gene region of HBV-DNA. Cycle sequencing of PCR products was performed by a commercial "Cy5/Cy5.5 Dye Primer Cycle Sequencing Kit" (Visible Genetics, Canada) based on dideoxy chain termination method. The sequences were read and analyzed in an automated fluorescence-based DNA-sequencing system (Long-Read Tower System, Visible Genetics, Canada). The nucleotide sequences of the patient samples were compared with the previously reported sequences in gene bank for each genotype. According to the comparative analysis of S-sequences of all patient samples with the published sequences of the genotypes in gene bank, all of the 84 hepatitis B strains (100%) were shown to be related to D genotypic group, subtype ayw. A phylogenetic analysis was performed and phylogenetic trees were constructed using programs in the PHYLIP phylogeny inference package. The patient samples clustered within the genotypic group D. According to these results, the main HBV genotype in our patients was genotype D in accordance with the previous molecular epidemiologic information on HBV in this geographic area. HBV genotype determination may help to

  3. Evolutionary history of Dengue virus type 4: insights into genotype phylodynamics.

    PubMed

    Villabona-Arenas, Christian Julián; Zanotto, Paolo Marinho de Andrade

    2011-07-01

    Dengue virus type 4 (DENV-4) circulates in tropical and subtropical countries from Asia and the Americas. Despite the importance of dengue virus distribution, little is known about the worldwide viral spread. Following a Bayesian phylogenetic approach we inferred the evolutionary history of 310 isolates sampled from 37 countries during the time period 1956-2008 and the spreading dynamics for genotypes I and II. The region (tropical rainforest biome) comprised by Malaysia-Thailand was the most likely ancestral area from which the serotype has originated and spread. Interestingly, cross-correlation analysis on demographic time series with the Asian sequences showed a statistically significant negative correlation that could be suggestive of competition among genotypes within the same serotype. PMID:21335103

  4. Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 5a Subgenomic Replicons for Evaluation of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wose Kinge, Constance N.; Espiritu, Christine; Prabdial-Sing, Nishi; Sithebe, Nomathamsaqa Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) exists as six major genotypes that differ in geographical distribution, pathogenesis, and response to antiviral therapy. In vitro replication systems for all HCV genotypes except genotype 5 have been reported. In this study, we recovered genotype 5a full-length genomes from four infected voluntary blood donors in South Africa and established a G418-selectable subgenomic replicon system using one of these strains. The replicon derived from the wild-type sequence failed to replicate in Huh-7.5 cells. However, the inclusion of the S2205I amino acid substitution, a cell culture-adaptive change originally described for a genotype 1b replicon, resulted in a small number of G418-resistant cell colonies. HCV RNA replication in these cells was confirmed by quantification of viral RNA and detection of the nonstructural protein NS5A. Sequence analysis of the viral RNAs isolated from multiple independent cell clones revealed the presence of several nonsynonymous mutations, which were localized mainly in the NS3 protein. These mutations, when introduced back into the parental backbone, significantly increased colony formation. To facilitate convenient monitoring of HCV RNA replication levels, the mutant with the highest replication level was further modified to express a fusion protein of firefly luciferase and neomycin phosphotransferase. Using such replicons from genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, 4a, and 5a, we compared the effects of various HCV inhibitors on their replication. In conclusion, we have established an in vitro replication system for HCV genotype 5a, which will be useful for the development of pan-genotype anti-HCV compounds. PMID:24982066

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Hepatitis B Virus Genotype E: The First Molecular Characterization from an Imported Case in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Fragoso-Fonseca, David Esaú; Arreguín-Porras, Dulce María; Esteban-Valencia, María del Carmen; Corona-Valdespino, Estela; Falcón-Acosta, Jaime Israel; Vázquez-Campuzano, Roberto; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Ortiz-Alcantara, Joanna María; López-Martinez, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is currently a global public health problem. Here, we present the first characterization and complete genome sequence of a strain belonging to genotype E in Mexico, obtained from a foreign carrier with chronic infection. PMID:27034495

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Genotype VI Newcastle Disease Viruses Isolated from Pigeons in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Abdul; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Sharma, Poonam; Goraichuk, Iryna V; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-01-01

    Two complete genome sequences of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are described here. Virulent isolates pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/21A/2015 and pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/25A/2015 were obtained from racing pigeons sampled in the Pakistani province of Punjab during 2015. Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion protein genes and complete genomes classified the isolates as members of NDV class II, genotype VI. PMID:27540069

  7. Complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus in the United States.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Gao, Shan; Li, Rugang; Zhang, Shouan; Fei, Zhangjun; Ling, Kai-Shu

    2014-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of an emerging genotype of tobacco streak virus (TSV) infecting zucchini squash in Florida (TSV_FL13-07), obtained using deep sequencing of short RNAs (sRNAs) and validation by Sanger sequencing. TSV_FL13-07 shares only <90% sequence identity in all three genomic RNAs to several known U.S. isolates. PMID:25377714

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Genotype VI Newcastle Disease Viruses Isolated from Pigeons in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Wajid, Abdul; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Sharma, Poonam; Goraichuk, Iryna V.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.

    2016-01-01

    Two complete genome sequences of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are described here. Virulent isolates pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/21A/2015 and pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/25A/2015 were obtained from racing pigeons sampled in the Pakistani province of Punjab during 2015. Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion protein genes and complete genomes classified the isolates as members of NDV class II, genotype VI. PMID:27540069

  9. Identification and Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of a Genotype XIV Newcastle Disease Virus from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Shittu, Ismaila; Sharma, Poonam; Volkening, Jeremy D; Solomon, Ponman; Sulaiman, Lanre K; Joannis, Tony M; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Miller, Patti J; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from genotype XIV is reported here. Strain duck/Nigeria/NG-695/KG.LOM.11-16/2009 was isolated from an apparently healthy domestic duck from a live bird market in Kogi State, Nigeria, in 2009. This strain is classified as a member of subgenotype XIVb of class II. PMID:26823576

  10. Identification and Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of a Genotype XIV Newcastle Disease Virus from Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Shittu, Ismaila; Sharma, Poonam; Volkening, Jeremy D.; Solomon, Ponman; Sulaiman, Lanre K.; Joannis, Tony M.; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Miller, Patti J.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.

    2016-01-01

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) from genotype XIV is reported here. Strain duck/Nigeria/NG-695/KG.LOM.11-16/2009 was isolated from an apparently healthy domestic duck from a live bird market in Kogi State, Nigeria, in 2009. This strain is classified as a member of subgenotype XIVb of class II. PMID:26823576

  11. Virulence correlates with fitness in vivo for two M group genotypes of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wargo, Andrew R.; Garver, Kyle A.; Kurath, Gael

    2010-01-01

    The nature of the association between viral fitness and virulence remains elusive in vertebrate virus systems, partly due to a lack of in vivo experiments using statistically sufficient numbers of replicate hosts. We examined the relationship between virulence and fitness in Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), in vivo, in intact living rainbow trout. Trout were infected with a high or low virulence genotype of M genogroup IHNV, or a mixture of the two genotypes, so as to calculate relative fitness and the effect of a competition environment on fitness. Fitness was measured as total viral load in the host at time of peak viral density, quantified by genotype-specific quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). The more virulent IHNV genotype reached higher densities in both single and mixed infections. There was no effect of competition on the performance of either genotype. Our results suggest a positive link between IHNV genotype fitness and virulence.

  12. Production and characterization of a Brazilian candidate antigen for Hepatitis E Virus genotype 3 diagnosis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Ramos, Denise; Miani, Michela; Pandolfi, Rafael; Tondo, Luis; Colli, Maikel L; Rosado Spilki, Fernando; Rovaris Gardinali, Noemi; Alves Pinto, Marcelo; Kreutz, Luiz C; Frandoloso, Rafael

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis E, caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV), is a viral infectious pathology of great importance in the public health. Hepatitis E outbreaks were registered in developing countries with poor or no sanitation, where drinking water was contaminated with fecal material, but also in many industrialized countries probably due to consumption of HEV-positive swine meat. In this study, we present the development and characterization of a recombinant antigen from ORF2 HEV genotype 3. Viral RNA was extracted from swine feces infected with the native virus. A total of 267 residues from the C-terminal ORF2((394-661)) coding sequence were cloned into the pET20a vector and expressed in Escherichia coli ER2566. Recombinant protein was purified by liquid chromatography and the fragment obtained a 98% homology against other human or swine HEV genotype 3 ORF2 sequences. Wistar rats were inoculated with ORF2p, developing antibodies able to recognize both the homologous antigen and the native HEV genotype 3 ORF2 present in infected stool. In parallel, HEV-negative swine were experimentally challenged with HEV genotype 3. ORF2 was detected by PCR 14 days post-inoculation in three-fourth piglets' feces and one week later by dot blot. In conclusion, this study proved the immunogenic and antigenic properties of the recombinant protein ORF2p. PMID:26832642

  13. Human papillomavirus genotypes in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with anal pathology in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We studied anal specimens to determine the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and co-infection occurrence. This information will contribute to the knowledge of HPV genotype distributions and provide an estimate of the prevalence of different oncogenic HPV genotypes found in patients in Madrid (Spain). Methods We studied a total of 82 anal biopsies from the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón of Madrid. These included 4 specimens with benign lesions, 52 specimens with low-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesion, 24 specimens with high-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesions and 2 specimens with invasive anal carcinoma. HPV genotyping was performed with PCR amplification and reverse dot blot hybridization. Results We detected 33 different HPV genotypes, including 16 HPVs associated with a high risk of carcinogenesis, 3 HPVs associated with a highly likely risk of carcinogenesis and 14 HPVs associated with a low-risk of carcinogenesis. In two specimens, an uncharacterized HPV genotype was detected. The most frequent HPV genotypes found were HPV-16 (10.3%; 95% CI: 6.6%-15.1%), HPV-52 (8.5%; 95% CI: 5.2%-13%) and HPV-43/44 (7.6%; 95% CI: 4.5%-11.9%). HPV-18 was only detected in 0.9% (95% CI: 0.1%-3.2%) of the total viruses detected in all lesions. HPV co-infections were found in 83.9% of all types of lesions. The majority of cases (90.2%) were concomitantly infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Conclusion The prevalence of high-risk carcinogenic genotypes in anal pathological samples was remarkable. Therefore, further studies that include a greater number of samples, particularly invasive carcinoma cases are needed to evaluate the potential influence of these HPV genotypes in the appearance of anal carcinomas. Also, the influence of other accompanying infections should be evaluated clarify the appearance of this type of carcinoma. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  14. Persistent infection and promiscuous recombination of multiple genotypes of an RNA virus within a single host generate extensive diversity.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombination and reassortment of viral genomes are major processes contributing to emerging viruses. These processes are especially significant in long-term persistent infections where multiple viral genotypes co-replicate in a single host, generating abundant genotypic variants, some of which may ...

  15. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of a New Genotype of Citrus Tristeza Virus from an Isolate Having a Mixed Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An isolate of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) that causes severe stem pitting in grapefruits (# 3800) was used for sequencing. Analysis of the isolate revealed the presence of at least three different populations, one belonging to T30 genotype and the other two belonging to new genotypes, designated T2K...

  16. Replication of a chronic hepatitis B virus genotype F1b construct.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sergio; Jiménez, Gustavo; Alarcón, Valentina; Prieto, Cristian; Muñoz, Francisca; Riquelme, Constanza; Venegas, Mauricio; Brahm, Javier; Loyola, Alejandra; Villanueva, Rodrigo A

    2016-03-01

    Genotype F is one of the less-studied genotypes of human hepatitis B virus, although it is widely distributed in regions of Central and South American. Our previous studies have shown that HBV genotype F is prevalent in Chile, and phylogenetic analysis of its full-length sequence amplified from the sera of chronically infected patients identified it as HBV subgenotype F1b. We have previously reported the full-length sequence of a HBV molecular clone obtained from a patient chronically infected with genotype F1b. In this report, we established a system to study HBV replication based on hepatoma cell lines transfected with full-length monomers of the HBV genome. Culture supernatants were analyzed after transfection and found to contain both HBsAg and HBeAg viral antigens. Consistently, fractionated cell extracts revealed the presence of viral replication, with both cytoplasmic and nuclear DNA intermediates. Analysis of HBV-transfected cells by indirect immunofluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy revealed the expression of viral antigens and cytoplasmic viral particles, respectively. To test the functionality of the ongoing viral replication further at the level of chromatinized cccDNA, transfected cells were treated with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, and this resulted in increased viral replication. This correlated with changes posttranslational modifications of histones at viral promoters. Thus, the development of this viral replication system for HBV genotype F will facilitate studies on the regulation of viral replication and the identification of new antiviral drugs. PMID:26620585

  17. Hepatitis C virus: epidemiology and genotypes in the north east of England.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, J P; Brind, A M; Chapman, C E; Bates, C L; Gould, F K; Johnson, S J; Burt, A D; Ferguson, J; Simmonds, P; Bassendine, M F

    1996-01-01

    The epidemiology of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection was studied in an English teaching hospital over an 18 month period. A total of 104 HCV antibody positive patients were referred for further investigation. They were divided into those diagnosed through screening (blood donors and intravenous drug abusers) and those diagnosed for other reasons, and their mean ages, known risk factors for HCV transmission, genotypes, and liver biopsy histology were analysed. Screened patients were significantly younger than the others. No significant difference in age was found between genotypes. Most patients genotyped (69%) were genotype 1. Intravenous drug abusers had a higher proportion of subtype 1a, and patients who acquired HCV through blood transfusion had a higher proportion of subtype 1b. Liver biopsy specimens were scored using a histological activity index for liver inflammation and fibrosis. Patients with subtype 1b had significantly more severe liver disease than other genotypes when the histological activity index scores for fibrosis were analysed (p < 0.05). Liver disease worsened significantly with age according to all three histological activity index scores (portal activity: p < 0.01, acinar activity: p < 0.001, fibrosis: p < 0.0001). Liver disease worsened with increased duration of infection (p < 0.002), and patients who also abused alcohol presented at a significantly younger age (cirrhosis, p < 0.05, hepatocellular carcinoma, p < 0.02). PMID:8801210

  18. Injecting drug use: A vector for the introduction of new hepatitis C virus genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ruta, Simona; Cernescu, Costin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes’ monitoring allows real-time insight into the dynamic changes that occur in the global epidemiological picture of HCV infection. Intravenous drug use is currently the primary driver for HCV transmission in developed and developing countries. The distribution of HCV genotypes/subtypes differs significantly between people who inject drugs (PWID) and the general population. HCV genotypes that previously exhibited a limited geographical distribution (3a, 4) are becoming more prevalent in this high-risk group. Immigration from HCV-endemic countries and the evolving networks of HCV transmission in PWID influence HCV genotypes distribution in Europe. Social vulnerabilities (e.g., unemployment, homelessness, and limited access to social and healthcare insurances systems) are important triggers for illicit drug use, which increases the associated risks of HCV infection and the frequent emergence of less prevalent genotypes. Genotype/subtype determination bears important clinical consequences in the progression of liver disease, susceptibility to antiviral therapies and the emergence of resistance-associated variants. An estimated half of the chronically HCV-infected PWID are unaware of their infection, and only one in ten of those diagnosed enter treatment. Nevertheless, PWID exhibit high response rates to new antiviral regimens, and the level of HCV reinfection is unexpectedly low. The focus of the healthcare system must be on the early detection and treatment of infection, to avoid late presentations that are associated with high levels of viremia and liver fibrosis, which may diminish the therapeutic success rate. PMID:26478672

  19. Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir fixed-dose combination for treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 infection.

    PubMed

    Nehra, V; Tan, E M; Rizza, S A; Temesgen, Z

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 4 accounts for 8-13% of all chronic HCV infections worldwide. Patients with HCV genotype 4 have been reported to have poor treatment responses to PEGylated interferon and ribavirin regimens. Recently a single tablet, fixed-dose combination of sofosbuvir, an RNA-directed RNA polymerase (NS5B) inhibitor, and ledipasvir, a nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) inhibitor, has been approved for treatment of chronic HCV infection. Two studies using the fixed-dose combination in chronic HCV genotype 4 for 12 weeks reported sustained virologic response rates at 12 weeks (SVR12) of 93-95%. Data also support the use of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir in chronic HCV genotype 4 and HIV co-infection. Administered as a single once-daily oral regimen, this ribavirin- and interferon-free regimen is well tolerated, with low potential for adverse effects and represents a significant advancement in the treatment of chronic HCV genotype 4 infection. PMID:27092340

  20. Heminested PCR assay for detection of six genotypes of rabies and rabies-related viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, P R; Johnstone, P; McElhinney, L M; Cowley, R; O'Sullivan, E; Whitby, J E

    1997-01-01

    A heminested reverse transcriptase PCR (hnRT-PCR) protocol which is rapid and sensitive for the detection of rabies virus and rabies-related viruses is described. Sixty isolates from six of the seven genotypes of rabies and rabies-related viruses were screened successfully by hnRT-PCR and Southern blot hybridization. Of the 60 isolates, 93% (56 of 60) were positive by external PCR, while all isolates were detected by heminested PCR and Southern blot hybridization. We also report on a comparison of the sensitivity of the standard fluorescent-antibody test (FAT) for rabies antigen and that of hnRT-PCR for rabies viral RNA with degraded tissue infected with a genotype 1 virus. Results indicated that FAT failed to detect viral antigen in brain tissue that was incubated at 37 degrees C for greater than 72 h, while hnRT-PCR detected viral RNA in brain tissue that was incubated at 37 degrees C for 360 h. PMID:9350729

  1. Genotype Characterization of Commonly Used Newcastle Disease Virus Vaccine Strains of India

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Satish; Kataria, Jag Mohan; Vakharia, Vikram N.

    2014-01-01

    Newcastle disease is an avian pathogen causing severe economic losses to the Indian poultry industry due to recurring outbreaks in vaccinated and unvaccinated flocks. India being an endemic country, advocates vaccination against the virus using lentogenic and mesogenic strains. Two virus strains which are commonly used for vaccination are strain F (a lentogenic virus) and strain R2B (a mesogenic virus). Strain F is given to 0–7 days old chicks and R2B is given to older birds which are around 6–8 weeks old. To understand the genetic makeup of these two strains, a complete genome study and phylogenetic analysis of the F, HN genes of these vaccine strains were carried out. Both the viral strains had a genome length of 15,186 nucleotides and consisted of six genes with conserved complimentary 3' leader and 5' trailer regions. The fusion protein cleavage site of strain F is GGRQGRL and strain R2B is RRQKRF. Although both the viral strains had different virulence attributes, the length of the HN protein was similar with 577 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis of F, HN and complete genome sequences grouped these two strains in genotype II category which are considered as early genotypes and corroborated with their years of isolation. PMID:24897503

  2. Hepatitis C Virus Genotype Diversity among Intravenous Drug Users in Yunnan Province, Southwestern China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wenlong; Feng, Ruilin; Wu, Zhongxiang; Cun, Wei; Dong, Shaozhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Recently, high proportions (15.6%–98.7%) of intravenous drug users (IDUs) in China were found to be positive for hepatitis C virus (HCV). Yunnan Province is located in southwestern China and borders one of the world's most important opium-producing regions, thus it is an important drug trafficking route to other regions of China. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we assessed 100 HCV-positive plasma samples from IDUs who were enrolled through the Kunming Center for Disease Control and Prevention in 2012. HCV C/E1 fragments were PCR-amplified and sequenced. We identified eight HCV subtypes (1a, 1b, 3a, 3b, 6a, 6n, 6u and 6v), of which genotype 6 was most predominant (frequency, 47%) followed by genotypes 3 (41%) and 1 (12%). HCV subtypes 6n (30%) and 3b (29%) were most common and were identified in 59% of the IDUs. We compared HCV genotypes among IDUs in Yunnan Province with those from other regions and found that the distribution patterns of HCV genotypes in Yunnan Province were similar to those in southern China, but different from those in eastern China. However, the distribution patterns of HCV subtypes varied among Yunnan Province and southern China, despite the shared similar genotypes. A comparison of the current data with those previously reported showed that the frequency of HCV genotype 6 increased from 25% to 47% within 5 years, especially subtypes 6a (5% to 15%) and 6n (11.2% to 30%). In contrast, the frequencies of subtypes 3b and 1b decreased by almost 50% within 5 years. Conclusion/Significance Our results provided further information to support the assertion that drug trafficking routes influence HCV transmission patterns among IDUs in Yunnan Province. The frequency of HCV genotypes and subtypes changed rapidly among IDUs in Yunnan Province and subtypes 6a and 6n may have originated in Vietnam and Myanmar, respectively. PMID:24358211

  3. Genotyping of infectious bronchitis viruses from broiler farms in Iraq during 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Seger, Waleed; GhalyanchiLangeroudi, Arash; Karimi, Vahid; Madadgar, Omid; Marandi, Mehdi Vasfi; Hashemzadeh, Masoud

    2016-05-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) is one of the most critical pathogens in the poultry industry, causing serious economic losses in all countries including Iraq. IBV has many genotypes that do not confer any cross-protection. This virus has been genotyped by sequence analysis of the S1 glycoprotein gene. A total of 100 tracheal and kidney tissue specimens from different commercial broiler flocks in the middle and south of Iraq were collected from September 2013 to September 2014. Thirty-two IBV-positive samples were selected from among the total and were further characterized by nested PCR. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that isolates belong to four groups (group I, variant 2 [IS/1494-like]; group II, 793/B-like; group III, QX-like; group IV, DY12-2-like). Sequence analysis revealed nucleotide sequence identities within groups I, II, and III of 99.68 %-100 %, 99.36 %-100 %, and 96.42 %-100 %, respectively. Group I (variant 2) was the dominant IBV genotype. One Chinese-like recombinant virus (DY12-2-like) that had not been reported in the Middle East was detected. In addition, the presence of QX on broiler chicken farms in the area studied was confirmed. This is the first comprehensive study on the genotyping of IBV in Iraq with useful information regarding the molecular epidemiology of IBV. The phylogenetic relationship of the strains with respect to different time sequences and geographical regions displayed complexity and diversity. Further studies are needed and should include the isolation and full-length molecular characterization of IBV in this region. PMID:26887967

  4. Novel Cell Culture-Adapted Genotype 2a Hepatitis C Virus Infectious Clone

    PubMed Central

    Date, Tomoko; Kato, Takanobu; Kato, Junko; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Morikawa, Kenichi; Akazawa, Daisuke; Murayama, Asako; Tanaka-Kaneko, Keiko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Mizokami, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    Although the recently developed infectious hepatitis C virus system that uses the JFH-1 clone enables the study of whole HCV viral life cycles, limited particular HCV strains have been available with the system. In this study, we isolated another genotype 2a HCV cDNA, the JFH-2 strain, from a patient with fulminant hepatitis. JFH-2 subgenomic replicons were constructed. HuH-7 cells transfected with in vitro transcribed replicon RNAs were cultured with G418, and selected colonies were isolated and expanded. From sequencing analysis of the replicon genome, several mutations were found. Some of the mutations enhanced JFH-2 replication; the 2217AS mutation in the NS5A interferon sensitivity-determining region exhibited the strongest adaptive effect. Interestingly, a full-length chimeric or wild-type JFH-2 genome with the adaptive mutation could replicate in Huh-7.5.1 cells and produce infectious virus after extensive passages of the virus genome-replicating cells. Virus infection efficiency was sufficient for autonomous virus propagation in cultured cells. Additional mutations were identified in the infectious virus genome. Interestingly, full-length viral RNA synthesized from the cDNA clone with these adaptive mutations was infectious for cultured cells. This approach may be applicable for the establishment of new infectious HCV clones. PMID:22787209

  5. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of influenza virus mutants selected with the sialidase fusion protein DAS181

    PubMed Central

    Triana-Baltzer, Gallen B.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Hedlund, Maria; Jensen, Kellie A.; Aschenbrenner, Laura M.; Larson, Jeffrey L.; Fang, Fang

    2011-01-01

    Background Influenza viruses (IFVs) frequently achieve resistance to antiviral drugs, necessitating the development of compounds with novel mechanisms of action. DAS181 (Fludase®), a sialidase fusion protein, may have a reduced potential for generating drug resistance due to its novel host-targeting mechanism of action. Methods IFV strains B/Maryland/1/59 and A/Victoria/3/75 (H3N2) were subjected to >30 passages under increasing selective pressure with DAS181. The DAS181-selected IFV isolates were characterized in vitro and in mice. Results Despite extensive passaging, DAS181-selected viruses exhibited a very low level of resistance to DAS181, which ranged between 3- and 18-fold increase in EC50. DAS181-selected viruses displayed an attenuated phenotype in vitro, as exhibited by slower growth, smaller plaque size and increased particle to pfu ratios relative to wild-type virus. Further, the DAS181 resistance phenotype was unstable and was substantially reversed over time upon DAS181 withdrawal. In mice, the DAS181-selected viruses exhibited no greater virulence than their wild-type counterparts. Genotypic and phenotypic analysis of DAS181-selected viruses revealed mutations in the haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) molecules and also changes in HA and NA function. Conclusions Results indicate that resistance to DAS181 is minimal and unstable. The DAS181-selected IFV isolates exhibit reduced fitness in vitro, likely due to altered HA and NA functions. PMID:21097900

  6. Evolutionary genetics of genotype H1 measles viruses in China from 1993 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Songtao; Zhang, Yan; Rivailler, Pierre; Wang, Huiling; Ji, Yixin; Zhen, Zhu; Mao, Naiying; Li, Chongshan; Bellini, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Virologic surveillance is a critical component of measles management. One of the criteria for verification of elimination of endemic measles is genetic analysis of wild-type viruses to demonstrate lack of an indigenous genotype. Measles is yet to be eliminated in China, and genotype H1 has been detected continuously since virologic surveillance was initiated in 1993. Virologic surveillance has been very active in China, providing a unique opportunity to conduct a detailed study of the evolution of a single, endemic genotype over a timespan of nearly two decades. Phylogenetic analysis performed on the 450 nt coding sequence for the C-terminal 150 amino acids of the nucleoprotein (N-450), fusion (F) gene and haemagglutinin (H) gene confirmed the continued circulation of genotype H1 viruses for 19 years. No evidence of selective pressure for the H protein was found. The substitution rates ranged from 0.75×10−3 substitutions site−1 year−1 for H to 1.65×10−3 substitutions site−1 year−1 for N-450. The time of most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for genotype H1 was estimated as approximately 1985 (95 % highest probability density, 1979–1989). Finally, the overall diversity of measles sequences from China decreased from 2005 to 2012, coincident with a substantial decrease in measles cases. The results suggest that detailed evolutionary analyses should facilitate the documentation of eventual measles elimination in China. Moreover, the molecular approaches used in this study can be applied in other countries approaching measles elimination. PMID:24914068

  7. Pepino mosaic virus genotype shift in North America and development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid genotype identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic, once an emerging disease a decade ago, has become endemic on greenhouse tomatoes worldwide in recent years. Three distinct genotypes of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), including EU, US1 and CH2 have been recognized. Our earlier study conducted in 2006-2007 demonstrated a predominant EU...

  8. A Genetic Variant of Hepatitis B Virus Divergent from Known Human and Ape Genotypes Isolated from a Japanese Patient and Provisionally Assigned to New Genotype J▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tatematsu, Kanako; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kurbanov, Fuat; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Mano, Shuhei; Maeshiro, Tatsuji; Nakayoshi, Tomokuni; Wakuta, Moriaki; Miyakawa, Yuzo; Mizokami, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) of a novel genotype (J) was recovered from an 88-year-old Japanese patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who had a history of residing in Borneo during the World War II. It was divergent from eight human (A to H) and four ape (chimpanzee, gorilla, gibbon, and orangutan) HBV genotypes, as well as from a recently proposed ninth human genotype I, by 9.9 to 16.5% of the entire genomic sequence and did not have evidence of recombination with any of the nine human genotypes and four nonhuman genotypes. Based on a comparison of the entire nucleotide sequence against 1,440 HBV isolates reported, HBV/J was nearest to the gibbon and orangutan genotypes (mean divergences of 10.9 and 10.7%, respectively). Based on a comparison of four open reading frames, HBV/J was closer to gibbon/orangutan genotypes than to human genotypes in the P and large S genes and closest to Australian aboriginal strains (HBV/C4) and orangutan-derived strains in the S gene, whereas it was closer to human than ape genotypes in the C gene. HBV/J shared a deletion of 33 nucleotides at the start of preS1 region with C4 and gibbon genotypes, had an S-gene sequence similar to that of C4, and expressed the ayw subtype. Efficient infection, replication, and antigen expression by HBV/J were experimentally established in two chimeric mice with the liver repopulated for human hepatocytes. The HBV DNA sequence recovered from infected mice was identical to that in the inoculum. Since HBV/J is positioned phylogenetically in between human and ape genotypes, it may help to trace the origin of HBV and merits further epidemiological surveys. PMID:19640977

  9. New insights into the hepatitis E virus genotype 3 phylodynamics and evolutionary history.

    PubMed

    Mirazo, Santiago; Mir, Daiana; Bello, Gonzalo; Ramos, Natalia; Musto, Héctor; Arbiza, Juan

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emergent hepatotropic virus endemic mainly in Asia and other developing areas. However, in the last decade it has been increasingly reported in high-income countries. Human infecting HEV strains are currently classified into four genotypes (1-4). Genotype 3 (HEV-3) is the prevalent virus genotype and the mostly associated with autochthonous and sporadic cases of HEV in developed areas. The evolutionary history of HEV worldwide remains largely unknown. In this study we reconstructed the spatiotemporal and population dynamics of HEV-3 at global scale, but with particular emphasis in South America, where case reports have increased dramatically in the last years. To achieve this, we applied a Bayesian coalescent-based approach to a comprehensive data set comprising 97 GenBank HEV-3 sequences for which the location and sampling date was documented. Our phylogenetic analyses suggest that the worldwide genetic diversity of HEV-3 can be grouped into two main Clades (I and II) with a Ƭmrca dated in approximately 320years ago (95% HPD: 420-236years) and that a unique independent introduction of HEV-3 seems to have occurred in Uruguay, where most of the human HEV cases in South America have been described. The phylodynamic inference indicates that the population size of this virus suffered substantial temporal variations after the second half of the 20th century. In this sense and conversely to what is postulated to date, we suggest that the worldwide effective population size of HEV-3 is not decreasing and that frequently sources of error in its estimates stem from assumptions that the analyzed sequences are derived from a single panmictic population. Novel insights on the global population dynamics of HEV are given. Additionally, this work constitutes an attempt to further describe in a Bayesian coalescent framework, the phylodynamics and evolutionary history of HEV-3 in the South American region. PMID:27264728

  10. Middle ear squamous papilloma: A report of four cases analyzed by HPV and EBV in situ hybridization

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, HAN; CHEN, ZHIBIN; ZHANG, WEIMING; XING, GUANGQIAN

    2014-01-01

    Squamous papilloma involving the middle ear as a primary lesion is an extremely rare occurrence. The aims of the present study were to investigate the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections in primary middle ear squamous papilloma and to describe the clinical and pathological features of the disease along with therapeutic strategies. A retrospective review was conducted of four patients with clinical and pathological diagnoses of middle ear squamous papilloma. In situ hybridization (ISH) for a wide range of HPV DNA subtypes and EBV-encoded RNA was performed in the tissue samples obtained from these patients. Only two cases of primary squamous papilloma in the middle ear have been previously reported in the English literature. These papillomas developed in males of ~60-years of age and otorrhea was the most frequent complaint. Premalignant changes were observed in two of the present cases and ISH of HPV and EBV was negative in all four cases. The results of the present study indicated that chronic inflammatory stimulation, not HPV and EBV infection, is involved in the occurrence of middle ear squamous papilloma and its malignant transformation. Radical surgery and long-term postoperative follow-up are recommended due to its malignant and recurrent potential. Further genetic investigations with additional new cases are required to clarify the pathogenesis of squamous papilloma involving the middle ear. PMID:24348817