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Sample records for par mouse neurological

  1. Nucleotide excision repair deficient mouse models and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Niedernhofer, Laura J

    2008-07-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a highly conserved mechanism to remove helix-distorting DNA base damage. A major substrate for NER is DNA damage caused by environmental genotoxins, most notably ultraviolet radiation. Xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy are three human diseases caused by inherited defects in NER. The symptoms and severity of these diseases vary dramatically, ranging from profound developmental delay to cancer predisposition and accelerated aging. All three syndromes include neurological disease, indicating an important role for NER in protecting against spontaneous DNA damage as well. To study the pathophysiology caused by DNA damage, numerous mouse models of NER-deficiency were generated by knocking-out genes required for NER or knocking-in disease-causing human mutations. This review explores the utility of these mouse models to study neurological disease caused by NER-deficiency. PMID:18272436

  2. Organization, evolution and functions of the human and mouse Ly6/uPAR family genes.

    PubMed

    Loughner, Chelsea L; Bruford, Elspeth A; McAndrews, Monica S; Delp, Emili E; Swamynathan, Sudha; Swamynathan, Shivalingappa K

    2016-01-01

    Members of the lymphocyte antigen-6 (Ly6)/urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) superfamily of proteins are cysteine-rich proteins characterized by a distinct disulfide bridge pattern that creates the three-finger Ly6/uPAR (LU) domain. Although the Ly6/uPAR family proteins share a common structure, their expression patterns and functions vary. To date, 35 human and 61 mouse Ly6/uPAR family members have been identified. Based on their subcellular localization, these proteins are further classified as GPI-anchored on the cell membrane, or secreted. The genes encoding Ly6/uPAR family proteins are conserved across different species and are clustered in syntenic regions on human chromosomes 8, 19, 6 and 11, and mouse Chromosomes 15, 7, 17, and 9, respectively. Here, we review the human and mouse Ly6/uPAR family gene and protein structure and genomic organization, expression, functions, and evolution, and introduce new names for novel family members. PMID:27098205

  3. VPA Alleviates Neurological Deficits and Restores Gene Expression in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka I., Maky; Irie, Koichiro; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Nakashima, Kinichi; Zhao, Xinyu

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that occurs once in every 10,000–15,000 live female births. Despite intensive research, no effective cure is yet available. Valproic acid (VPA) has been used widely to treat mood disorder, epilepsy, and a growing number of other disorders. In limited clinical studies, VPA has also been used to control seizure in RTT patients with promising albeit somewhat unclear efficacy. In this study we tested the effect of VPA on the neurological symptoms of RTT and discovered that short-term VPA treatment during the symptomatic period could reduce neurological symptoms in RTT mice. We found that VPA restores the expression of a subset of genes in RTT mouse brains, and these genes clustered in neurological disease and developmental disorder networks. Our data suggest that VPA could be used as a drug to alleviate RTT symptoms. PMID:24968028

  4. Albumin administration prevents neurological damage and death in a mouse model of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia

    PubMed Central

    Vodret, Simone; Bortolussi, Giulia; Schreuder, Andrea B.; Jašprová, Jana; Vitek, Libor; Verkade, Henkjan J.; Muro, Andrés F.

    2015-01-01

    Therapies to prevent severe neonatal unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia and kernicterus are phototherapy and, in unresponsive cases, exchange transfusion, which has significant morbidity and mortality risks. Neurotoxicity is caused by the fraction of unconjugated bilirubin not bound to albumin (free bilirubin, Bf). Human serum albumin (HSA) administration was suggested to increase plasma bilirubin-binding capacity. However, its clinical use is infrequent due to difficulties to address its potential preventive and curative benefits, and to the absence of reliable markers to monitor bilirubin neurotoxicity risk. We used a genetic mouse model of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia showing severe neurological impairment and neonatal lethality. We treated mutant pups with repeated HSA administration since birth, without phototherapy application. Daily intraperitoneal HSA administration completely rescued neurological damage and lethality, depending on dosage and administration frequency. Albumin infusion increased plasma bilirubin-binding capacity, mobilizing bilirubin from tissues to plasma. This resulted in reduced plasma Bf, forebrain and cerebellum bilirubin levels. We showed that, in our experimental model, Bf is the best marker to determine the risk of developing neurological damage. These results support the potential use of albumin administration in severe acute hyperbilirubinemia conditions to prevent or treat bilirubin neurotoxicity in situations in which exchange transfusion may be required. PMID:26541892

  5. PAR6, A Potential Marker for the Germ Cells Selected to Form Primordial Follicles in Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Zhang, Hua; Li, Ge; Mao, Guanping; Chen, Xiufen; Wang, Jianwei; Guo, Meng; Mu, Xinyi; Ouyang, Hong; Zhang, Meijia; Xia, Guoliang

    2009-01-01

    Partitioning-defective proteins (PAR) are detected to express mainly in the cytoplast, and play an important role in cell polarity. However, we showed here that PAR6, one kind of PAR protein, was localized in the nuclei of mouse oocytes that formed primordial follicles during the perinatal period, suggesting a new role of PAR protein. It is the first time we found that, in mouse fetal ovaries, PAR6 appeared in somatic cell cytoplasm and fell weak when somatic cells invaded germ cell cysts at 17.5 days post coitus (dpc). Meanwhile, the expression of PAR6 was observed in cysts, and became strong in the nuclei of some germ cells at 19.5 dpc and all primordial follicular oocytes at 3 day post parturition (dpp), and then obviously declined when the primordial follicles entered the folliculogenic growth phase. During the primordial follicle pool foundation, the number of PAR6 positive germ cells remained steady and was consistent with that of formed follicles at 3 dpp. There were no TUNEL (apoptosis examination) positive germ cells stained with PAR6 at any time studied. The number of follicles significantly declined when 15.5 dpc ovaries were treated with the anti-PAR6 antibody and PAR6 RNA interference. Carbenoxolone (CBX, a known blocker of gap junctions) inhibited the expression of PAR6 in germ cells and the formation of follicles. Our results suggest that PAR6 could be used as a potential marker of germ cells for the primordial follicle formation, and the expression of PAR6 by a gap junction-dependent process may contribute to the formation of primordial follicles and the maintenance of oocytes at the diplotene stage. PMID:19809506

  6. Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Deficiency Potentiates PAR-1-induced Increase in Endothelial Permeability in Mouse Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Profirovic, Jasmina; Han, Jingyan; Andreeva, Alexandra V.; Neamu, Radu F.; Pavlovic, Sasha; Vogel, Stephen M.; Walter, Ulrich; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A.

    2010-01-01

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is implicated in the protection of the endothelial barrier in vitro and in vivo. VASP function in thrombin signaling in the endothelial cells (ECs) is not known. For the first time we studied the effects of VASP deficiency on EC permeability and pulmonary vascular permeability in response to thrombin receptor stimulation. We provided the evidence that VASP deficiency potentiates the increase in endothelial permeability induced by activation of thrombin receptor in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and isolated mouse lungs. Using transendothelial resistance measurement, we showed that siRNA-mediated VASP downregulation in HUVECs leads to a potentiation of thrombin- and protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) agonist-induced increase in endothelial permeability. Compared to control cells, VASP-deficient HUVECs had delayed endothelial junctional reassembly and abrogated VE-cadherin cytoskeletal anchoring in the recovery phase after thrombin stimulation, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence studies and cell fractionation analysis, respectively. Measurement of the capillary filtration coefficient in isolated mouse lungs demonstrated that VASP−/− mice have increased microvascular permeability in response to infusion with PAR-1 agonist compared to wild type mice. Lack of VASP led to decreased Rac1 activation both in VASP-deficient HUVECs after thrombin stimulation and VASP−/− mouse lungs after PAR-1 agonist infusion, indicating that VASP effects on thrombin signaling may correlated with changes in Rac1 activity. This study demonstrates that VASP may play critical and complex role in the regulation of thrombin-dependent disruption of the endothelial barrier function. PMID:20945373

  7. The microRNA miR-17-3p inhibits mouse cardiac fibroblast senescence by targeting Par4.

    PubMed

    Du, William W; Li, Xianmin; Li, Tianbi; Li, Haoran; Khorshidi, Azam; Liu, Fengqiong; Yang, Burton B

    2015-01-15

    The microRNA miR-17-92 cluster plays a fundamental role in heart development. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a member of this cluster, miR-17, on cardiac senescence. We examined the roles of miR-17 in senescence and demonstrated that miR-17-3p attenuates cardiac aging in the myocardium by targeting Par4 (also known as PAWR). This upregulates the downstream proteins CEBPB, FAK, N-cadherin, vimentin, Oct4 and Sca-1 (also known as stem cell antigen-1), and downregulates E-cadherin. Par4 has been reported as a tumor suppressor gene that induces apoptosis in cancer cells, but not in normal cells. Repression of Par4 by miR-17-3p enhances the transcription of CEBPB and FAK, which promotes mouse cardiac fibroblast (MCF) epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and self-renewal, resulting in cellular senescence and apoptosis resistance. We conclude that Par4 can bind to the CEBPB promoter and inhibit its transcription. Decreased Par4 expression increases the amount of CEBPB, which binds to the FAK promoter and enhances FAK transcription. Par4, CEBPB and FAK form a senescence signaling pathway, playing roles in modulating cell survival, growth, apoptosis, EMT and self-renewal. Through this novel senescence signaling axis, miR-17-3p represses Par4 expression, acting pleiotropically as a negative modulator of cardiac aging and cardiac fibroblast cellular senescence. PMID:25472717

  8. Par4 is required for platelet thrombus propagation but not fibrin generation in a mouse model of thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Vandendries, Erik R.; Hamilton, Justin R.; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara C.

    2007-01-01

    Thrombin, a central mediator of hemostasis and thrombosis, converts fibrinogen to fibrin and is a potent platelet activator. Activated platelets provide a surface for assembly of the tenase and prothrombinase complexes required for thrombin generation. The role of thrombin-induced platelet activation in platelet accumulation and its interplay with fibrin deposition during thrombus assembly has not been fully defined. We studied these processes during laser-induced thrombus formation by using real-time digital fluorescence microscopy in mice lacking protease-activated receptor-4 (Par4), which is necessary for thrombin responsiveness in mouse platelets. Juxtamural platelet accumulation immediately after laser injury was not different in wild-type and Par4−/− mice. However, subsequent growth of platelet thrombi was markedly diminished in Par4−/− mice. At the time of maximal thrombus size in wild type, platelet accumulation was more than 10-fold higher in wild type than in Par4−/− mice. P-selectin expression, a marker of platelet activation, was reduced and delayed in Par4−/− thrombi. In contrast to platelet activation and accumulation, the rate and amount of fibrin deposition, predominantly intramural and juxtamural in this model, were indistinguishable in Par4−/− and wild-type mice. These results suggest that platelet activation by thrombin is necessary for normal propagation of a platelet thrombus at a distance from the injured vessel wall and hence for normal thrombus growth. However, platelet activation by thrombin is unnecessary for initial and limited accumulation of platelets at or near the vessel wall, and this limited accumulation of platelets and/or platelet-independent mechanism(s) of thrombin generation are sufficient for normal fibrin deposition in this model. PMID:17190826

  9. The neurological mouse mutations jittery and hesitant are allelic and map to the region of mouse chromosome 10 homologous to 19p13.3

    SciTech Connect

    Kapfhamer, D.; Sufalko, D.; Warren, S.

    1996-08-01

    Jittery (ji) is a recessive mouse mutation on Chromosome 10 characterized by progressive ataxic gait, dystonic movements, spontaneus seizures, and death by dehydration/starvation before fertility. Recently, a viable neurological recessive mutation, hesitant, was discovered. It is characterized by hesitant, uncoordinated movements, exaggerated stepping of the hind limbs, and reduced fertility in males. In a complementation test and by genetic mapping we have shown here that hesitant and jittery are allelic. Using several large intersubspecific backcrosses and intercrosses we have genetically mapped ji near the marker Amh and microsatellite markers D10Mit7, D10Mit21, and D10Mit23. The linked region of mouse Chromosome 10 is homologous to human 19p13.3, to which several human ataxia loci have recently been mapped. By excluding genes that map to human 21q22.3 (Pfkl) and 12q23 (Nfyb), we conclude that jittery is not likely to be a genetic mouse model for human Unverricht-Lundborg progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) on 21q22.3 nor for spinocerebellar ataxia II (SCA2) on 12q22-q24. The closely linked markers presented here will facilitate positional cloning of the ji gene. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Rosmarinic Acid Alleviates Neurological Symptoms in the G93A-SOD1 Transgenic Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji-Seon; Choi, Juli; Leem, Yea-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord, resulting in paralysis of voluntary skeletal muscles and eventually death, usually within 2~3 years of symptom onset. The pathophysiology mechanism underlying ALS is not yet clearly understood. Moreover the available medication for treating ALS, riluzole, only modestly improves neurological symptoms and increases survival by a few months. Therefore, improved therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. In the present study, we investigated whether rosmarinic acid has a therapeutic potential to alleviate neurological deterioration in the G93A-SOD1 transgenic mouse model of ALS. Treatment of G93A-SOD1 transgenic mice with rosmarinic acid from 7 weeks of age at the dose of 400 mg/kg/day significantly extended survival, and relieved motor function deficits. Specifically, disease onset and symptom progression were delayed by more than one month. These symptomatic improvements were correlated with decreased oxidative stress and reduced neuronal loss in the ventral horns of G93A-SOD1 mice. These results support that rosmarinic acid is a potentially useful supplement for relieving ALS symptoms. PMID:26713081

  11. Protease-Activated Receptor (PAR)2, but Not PAR1, Is Involved in Collateral Formation and Anti-Inflammatory Monocyte Polarization in a Mouse Hind Limb Ischemia Model

    PubMed Central

    Nossent, Anne Yael; van Oeveren-Rietdijk, Annemarie M.; de Vries, Margreet R.; Spek, C. Arnold; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Reitsma, Pieter H.; Hamming, Jaap F.; de Boer, Hetty C.; Versteeg, Henri H.; Quax, Paul H. A.

    2013-01-01

    Aims In collateral development (i.e. arteriogenesis), mononuclear cells are important and exist as a heterogeneous population consisting of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory/repair-associated cells. Protease-activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR2 are G-protein-coupled receptors that are both expressed by mononuclear cells and are involved in pro-inflammatory reactions, while PAR2 also plays a role in repair-associated responses. Here, we investigated the physiological role of PAR1 and PAR2 in arteriogenesis in a murine hind limb ischemia model. Methods and Results PAR1-deficient (PAR1-/-), PAR2-deficient (PAR2-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice underwent femoral artery ligation. Laser Doppler measurements revealed reduced post-ischemic blood flow recovery in PAR2-/- hind limbs when compared to WT, while PAR1-/- mice were not affected. Upon ischemia, reduced numbers of smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive collaterals and CD31-positive capillaries were found in PAR2-/- mice when compared to WT mice, whereas these parameters in PAR1-/- mice did not differ from WT mice. The pool of circulating repair-associated (Ly6C-low) monocytes and the number of repair-associated (CD206-positive) macrophages surrounding collaterals in the hind limbs were increased in WT and PAR1-/- mice, but unaffected in PAR2-/- mice. The number of repair-associated macrophages in PAR2-/- hind limbs correlated with CD11b- and CD115-expression on the circulating monocytes in these animals, suggesting that monocyte extravasation and M-CSF-dependent differentiation into repair-associated cells are hampered. Conclusion PAR2, but not PAR1, is involved in arteriogenesis and promotes the repair-associated response in ischemic tissues. Therefore, PAR2 potentially forms a new pro-arteriogenic target in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. PMID:23637930

  12. Transcription factor network downstream of protease activated receptors (PARs) modulating mouse bladder inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Saban, Ricardo; Simpson, Cindy; Davis, Carole A; Dozmorov, Igor; Maier, Julie; Fowler, Ben; Ihnat, Michael A; Hurst, Robert E; Wershil, Barry K; Saban, Marcia R

    2007-01-01

    Background All four PARs are present in the urinary bladder, and their expression is altered during inflammation. In order to search for therapeutic targets other than the receptors themselves, we set forth to determine TFs downstream of PAR activation in the C57BL/6 urinary bladders. Methods For this purpose, we used a protein/DNA combo array containing 345 different TF consensus sequences. Next, the TF selected was validated by EMSA and IHC. As mast cells seem to play a fundamental role in bladder inflammation, we determined whether c-kit receptor deficient (Kitw/Kitw-v) mice have an abrogated response to PAR stimulation. Finally, TFEB antibody was used for CHIP/Q-PCR assay and revealed up-regulation of genes known to be downstream of TFEB. Results TFEB, a member of the MiTF family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper, was the only TF commonly up-regulated by all PAR-APs. IHC results confirm a correlation between inflammation and TFEB expression in C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, Kitw/Kitw-v mice did not exhibit inflammation in response to PAR activation. EMSA results confirmed the increased TFEB binding activity in C57BL/6 but not in Kitw/Kitw-v mice. Conclusion This is the first report describing the increased expression of TFEB in bladder inflammation in response to PAR activation. As TFEB belongs to a family of TFs essential for mast cell survival, our findings suggest that this molecule may influence the participation of mast cells in PAR-mediated inflammation and that targeting TFEB/MiTF activity may be a novel approach for the treatment of bladder inflammatory disorders. PMID:17705868

  13. Recombination between the mouse Y chromosome short arm and an additional Y short arm-derived chromosomal segment attached distal to the X chromosome PAR.

    PubMed

    Decarpentrie, Fanny; Ojarikre, Obah A; Mitchell, Michael J; Burgoyne, Paul S

    2016-06-01

    In a male mouse, meiosis markers of processed DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) such as DMC1 and RAD51 are regularly seen in the non-PAR region of the X chromosome; these disappear late in prophase prior to entry into the first meiotic metaphase. Marker evidence for DSBs occurring in the non-PAR region of the Y chromosome is limited. Nevertheless, historically it has been documented that recombination can occur within the mouse Y short arm (Yp) when an additional Yp segment is attached distal to the X and/or the Y pseudoautosomal region (PAR). A number of recombinants identified among offsprings involved unequal exchanges involving repeated DNA segments; however, equal exchanges will have frequently been missed because of the paucity of markers to differentiate between the two Yp segments. Here, we discuss this historical data and present extensive additional data obtained for two mouse models with Yp additions to the X PAR. PCR genotyping enabled identification of a wider range of potential recombinants; the proportions of Yp exchanges identified among the recombinants were 9.7 and 22.4 %. The frequency of these exchanges suggests that the Yp segment attached to the X PAR is subject to the elevated level of recombinational DSBs that characterizes the PAR. PMID:26596988

  14. A mouse model of weight-drop closed head injury: emphasis on cognitive and neurological deficiency.

    PubMed

    Khalin, Igor; Jamari, Nor Laili Azua; Razak, Nadiawati Bt Abdul; Hasain, Zubaidah Bt; Nor, Mohd Asri Bin Mohd; Zainudin, Mohd Hakimi Bin Ahmad; Omar, Ainsah Bt; Alyautdin, Renad

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in individuals worldwide. Producing a clinically relevant TBI model in small-sized animals remains fairly challenging. For good screening of potential therapeutics, which are effective in the treatment of TBI, animal models of TBI should be established and standardized. In this study, we established mouse models of closed head injury using the Shohami weight-drop method with some modifications concerning cognitive deficiency assessment and provided a detailed description of the severe TBI animal model. We found that 250 g falling weight from 2 cm height produced severe closed head injury in C57BL/6 male mice. Cognitive disorders in mice with severe closed head injury could be detected using passive avoidance test on day 7 after injury. Findings from this study indicate that weight-drop injury animal models are suitable for further screening of brain neuroprotectants and potentially are similar to those seen in human TBI. PMID:27212925

  15. A mouse model of weight-drop closed head injury: emphasis on cognitive and neurological deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Khalin, Igor; Jamari, Nor Laili Azua; Razak, Nadiawati Bt Abdul; Hasain, Zubaidah Bt; Nor, Mohd Asri bin Mohd; Zainudin, Mohd Hakimi bin Ahmad; Omar, Ainsah Bt; Alyautdin, Renad

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in individuals worldwide. Producing a clinically relevant TBI model in small-sized animals remains fairly challenging. For good screening of potential therapeutics, which are effective in the treatment of TBI, animal models of TBI should be established and standardized. In this study, we established mouse models of closed head injury using the Shohami weight-drop method with some modifications concerning cognitive deficiency assessment and provided a detailed description of the severe TBI animal model. We found that 250 g falling weight from 2 cm height produced severe closed head injury in C57BL/6 male mice. Cognitive disorders in mice with severe closed head injury could be detected using passive avoidance test on day 7 after injury. Findings from this study indicate that weight-drop injury animal models are suitable for further screening of brain neuroprotectants and potentially are similar to those seen in human TBI. PMID:27212925

  16. Perfusion single photon emission computed tomography in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1: towards a biomarker of neurologic deficits.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Niedzielska, Dagmara; Derlin, Thorsten; Koziolek, Eva J; Amthauer, Holger; Salmen, Benedikt; Pahnke, Jens; Brenner, Winfried; Mautner, Victor F; Buchert, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a single-gene disorder affecting neurologic function in humans. The NF1+/- mouse model with germline mutation of the NF1 gene presents with deficits in learning, attention, and motor coordination, very similar to NF1 patients. The present study performed brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in NF1+/- mice to identify possible perfusion differences as surrogate marker for altered cerebral activity in NF1. Cerebral perfusion was measured with hexamethyl-propyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) SPECT in NF1+/- mice and their wild-type littermates longitudinally at juvenile age and at young adulthood. Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed to test for structural changes. There was increased HMPAO uptake in NF1 mice in the amygdala at juvenile age, which reduced to normal levels at young adulthood. There was no genotype effect on thalamic HMPAO uptake, which was confirmed by ex vivo measurements of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the thalamus. Morphologic analyses showed no major structural abnormalities. However, there was some evidence of increased density of microglial somata in the amygdala of NF1-deficient mice. In conclusion, there is evidence of increased perfusion and increased density of microglia in juvenile NF1 mice specifically in the amygdala, both of which might be associated with altered synaptic plasticity and, therefore, with cognitive deficits in NF1. PMID:25785829

  17. Imatinib therapy blocks cerebellar apoptosis and improves neurological symptoms in a mouse model of Niemann-Pick type C disease.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Alejandra R; Klein, Andrés; Castro, Juan; Cancino, Gonzalo I; Amigo, Julio; Mosqueira, Matías; Vargas, Lina M; Yévenes, L Fernanda; Bronfman, Francisca C; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2008-10-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a fatal autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol and glycosphingolipids in the endosomal-lysosomal system. Patients with NPC disease have markedly progressive neuronal loss, mainly of cerebellar Purkinje neurons. There is strong evidence indicating that cholesterol accumulation and trafficking defects activate apoptosis in NPC brains. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relevance of apoptosis and particularly the proapoptotic c-Abl/p73 system in cerebellar neuron degeneration in NPC disease. We used the NPC1 mouse model to evaluate c-Abl/p73 expression and activation in the cerebellum and the effect of therapy with the c-Abl-specific inhibitor imatinib. The proapoptotic c-Abl/p73 system and the p73 target genes are expressed in the cerebellums of NPC mice. Furthermore, inhibition of c-Abl with imatinib preserved Purkinje neurons and reduced general cell apoptosis in the cerebellum, improved neurological symptoms, and increased the survival of NPC mice. Moreover, this prosurvival effect correlated with reduced mRNA levels of p73 proapoptotic target genes. Our results suggest that the c-Abl/p73 pathway is involved in NPC neurodegeneration and show that treatment with c-Abl inhibitors is useful in delaying progressive neurodegeneration, supporting the use of imatinib for clinical treatment of patients with NPC disease. PMID:18591368

  18. Infant mouse brain passaged Dengue serotype 2 virus induces non-neurological disease with inflammatory spleen collapse in AG129 mice after splenic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Rajmane, Yogesh; Shaikh, Sameer; Basha, Khalander; Reddy, G E C Vidyadhar; Nair, Soumya; Kamath, Sangita; Sreejesh, Greeshma; Rao, Harinarayana; Ramana, Venkata; Kumar, A S Manoj

    2013-05-01

    AG129 mice are known to be permissive to infection by multiple serotypes of Dengue virus (DENV). There exists a concern that mouse passaged strains of the virus may induce neurological complications rather than increased vascular permeability in these mice, hence the use of human clinical isolates of the virus to develop the AG129 mouse model of Dengue disease with increased vascular permeability. The present study evaluated four mouse brain passaged DENV strains, each belonging to a different serotype and three of them having an original isolation history in India, for their suitability to serve as candidates to induce rapid lethal disease in AG129 mice. While all the viruses were able to establish a productive infection in the spleen, none of them induced paralysis despite their mouse brain passage history. Only the type-2 virus acquired the ability to induce a lethal disease after a single round of spleen to spleen passage, and became highly virulent after five more rounds. This apparently non-neurological lethal disease was characterized by high viral burden, elevated vascular permeability, serum TNF-α surge immediately before moribund stage, transient leukocytosis followed by severe leukopenia, lymphopenia throughout the course of the infection, and transient thrombocytopenia. The disease was also characterized by inflammatory splenic collapse during moribund stage, reminiscent of spontaneous splenic rupture reported in rare cases of severe Dengue in humans. PMID:23337909

  19. Bursting Activity of Substantia Nigra pars Reticulata Neurons in Mouse Parkinsonism in Awake and Anesthetized States

    PubMed Central

    Lobb, CJ; Jaeger, D

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological changes in basal ganglia neurons are hypothesized to underlie motor dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Previous results in head-restrained MPTP-treated non-human primates have suggested that increased bursting within the basal ganglia and related thalamic and cortical areas may be a hallmark of pathophysiological activity. In this study, we investigated whether there is increased bursting in substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) output neurons in anesthetized and awake, head-restrained unilaterally lesioned 6-OHDA mice when compared to control mice. Confirming previous studies, we show that there are significant changes in the firing rate and pattern in SNpr neuron activity under urethane anesthesia. The regular firing pattern of control urethane-anesthetized SNpr neurons was not present in the 6-OHDA-lesioned group, as the latter neurons instead became phase locked with cortical slow wave activity (SWA). Next, we examined whether such robust electrophysiological changes between groups carried over to the awake state. SNpr neurons from both groups fired at much higher frequencies in the awake state than in the anesthetized state and surprisingly showed only modest changes between awake control and 6-OHDA groups. While there were no differences in firing rate between groups in the awake state, an increase in the coefficient of variation (CV) was observed in the 6-OHDA group. Contrary to the bursting hypothesis, this increased CV was not due to changes in bursting but was instead due to a mild increase in pausing. Together, these results suggest that differences in SNpr activity between control and 6-OHDA lesioned mice may be strongly influenced by changes in network activity during different arousal and behavioral states. PMID:25576395

  20. Differential maturation of circadian rhythms in clock gene proteins in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the pars tuberalis during mouse ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Nariman; Agathagelidis, Manuel; Lee, Choogon; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of many body functions in mammals are controlled by a master pacemaker residing in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) that synchronises peripheral oscillators. The SCN and peripheral oscillators share several components of the molecular clockwork and comprise transcriptional activators (BMAL1 and CLOCK/NPAS2) and inhibitors (mPER1/2 and mCRY1/2). Here we compared the ontogenetic maturation of the clockwork in the SCN and pars tuberalis (PT). The PT is a peripheral oscillator that strongly depends on rhythmic melatonin signals. Immunoreactions for clock gene proteins were determined in the SCN and PT at four different timepoints during four differential stages of mouse ontogeny: foetal (embryonic day 18), newborn (2-day-old), infantile (10-day-old), and adult. In the foetal SCN levels of immunoreactions of all clock proteins were significantly lower as compared to adult levels except for BMAL1. In the newborn SCN the clock protein immunoreactions had not yet reached adult levels, but the infantile SCN showed similar levels of immunreactions as the adult. In contrast, immunoreactions for all clock gene proteins in the foetal PT were as intense as in newborn, infantile, and adult and showed the same phase. As the foetal pineal gland is not yet capable of rhythmic melatonin production, the rhythms in clock gene proteins in the foetal PT are presumably dependent on the maternal melatonin signal. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that maternal melatonin is important for establishing and maintaining circadian rhythms in a foetal peripheral oscillator. PMID:19222558

  1. Differential maturation of circadian rhythms in clock gene proteins in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the pars tuberalis during mouse ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Nariman; Agathagelidis, Manuel; Lee, Choogon; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2009-02-01

    Circadian rhythms of many body functions in mammals are controlled by a master pacemaker, residing in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which synchronises peripheral oscillators. The SCN and peripheral oscillators share several components of the molecular clockwork and comprise transcriptional activators (BMAL1 and CLOCK/NPAS2) and inhibitors (mPER1/2 and mCRY1/2). Here we compared the ontogenetic maturation of the clockwork in the SCN and pars tuberalis (PT). The PT is a peripheral oscillator that strongly depends on rhythmic melatonin signals. Immunoreactions for clock gene proteins were determined in the SCN and PT at four different timepoints during four differential stages of mouse ontogeny: foetal (embryonic day 18), newborn (2-day-old), infantile (10-day-old), and adult. In the foetal SCN, levels of immunoreactions of all clock proteins were significantly lower than adult levels except for BMAL1. In the newborn SCN the clock protein immunoreactions had not yet reached adult levels, but the infantile SCN showed similar levels of immunoreactions as the adult. In contrast, immunoreactions for all clock gene proteins in the foetal PT were as intense as in newborn, infantile and adult, and showed the same phase. As the foetal pineal gland is not yet capable of rhythmic melatonin production, the rhythms in clock gene proteins in the foetal PT are presumably dependent on the maternal melatonin signal. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that maternal melatonin is important for establishing and maintaining circadian rhythms in a foetal peripheral oscillator. PMID:19222558

  2. Spontaneous Ocular and Neurologic Deficits in Transgenic Mouse Models of Multiple Sclerosis and Noninvasive Investigative Modalities: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Archana A.; Ding, Di; Lee, Richard K.; Levy, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, predominantly involving myelinated neurons of the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerve. Optic neuritis is frequently associated with MS and often precedes other neurologic deficits associated with MS. A large number of patients experience visual defects and have abnormalities concomitant with neurologic abnormalities. Transgenic mice manifesting spontaneous neurologic and ocular disease are unique models that have revolutionized the study of MS. Spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (sEAE) presents with spontaneous onset of demyelination, without the need of an injectable immunogen. This review highlights the various models of sEAE, their disease characteristics, and applicability for future research. The study of optic neuropathy and neurologic manifestations of demyelination in sEAE will expand our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying MS. Early and precise diagnosis of MS with different noninvasive methods has opened new avenues in managing symptoms, reducing morbidity, and limiting disease burden. This review discusses the spectrum of available noninvasive techniques, such as electrophysiological and behavioral assessment, optical coherence tomography, scanning laser polarimetry, confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, pupillometry, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, gait, and cardiovascular monitoring, and their clinical relevance. PMID:22331505

  3. Recovery of Neurological Function Despite Immediate Sleep Disruption Following Diffuse Brain Injury in the Mouse: Clinical Relevance to Medically Untreated Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Rachel K.; Harrison, Jordan L.; O'Hara, Bruce F.; Lifshitz, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Study Objective: We investigated the relationship between immediate disruption of posttraumatic sleep and functional outcome in the diffuse brain-injured mouse. Design: Adult male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to moderate midline fluid percussion injury (n = 65; 1.4 atm; 6-10 min righting reflex time) or sham injury (n = 44). Cohorts received either intentional sleep disruption (minimally stressful gentle handling) or no sleep disruption for 6 h following injury. Following disruption, serum corticosterone levels (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) and posttraumatic sleep (noninvasive piezoelectric sleep cages) were measured. For 1-7 days postinjury, sensorimotor outcome was assessed by Rotarod and a modified Neurological Severity Score (NSS). Cognitive function was measured using Novel Object Recognition (NOR) and Morris water maze (MWM) in the first week postinjury. Setting: Neurotrauma research laboratory. Measurements and Results: Disrupting posttraumatic sleep for 6 h did not affect serum corticosterone levels or functional outcome. In the hour following the first dark onset, sleep-disrupted mice exhibited a significant increase in sleep; however, this increase was not sustained and there was no rebound of lost sleep. Regardless of sleep disruption, mice showed a time-dependent improvement in Rotarod performance, with brain-injured mice having significantly shorter latencies on day 7 compared to sham. Further, brain-injured mice, regardless of sleep disruption, had significantly higher NSS scores postinjury compared with sham. Cognitive behavioral testing showed no group differences among any treatment group measured by MWM and NOR. Conclusion: Short-duration disruption of posttraumatic sleep did not affect functional outcome, measured by motor and cognitive performance. These data raise uncertainty about posttraumatic sleep as a mechanism of recovery from diffuse brain injury. Citation: Rowe RK; Harrison JL; O'Hara BF; Lifshitz J. Recovery of neurological

  4. Par2 inactivation inhibits early production of TSLP, but not cutaneous inflammation, in Netherton syndrome adult mouse model.

    PubMed

    Briot, Anaïs; Lacroix, Matthieu; Robin, Aurélie; Steinhoff, Martin; Deraison, Céline; Hovnanian, Alain

    2010-12-01

    Netherton syndrome (NS) is a severe genodermatosis characterized by abnormal scaling and constant atopic manifestations. NS is caused by mutations in SPINK5 (Serine Protease INhibitor Kazal-type 5), which encodes LEKTI (LymphoEpithelial Kazal Type-related Inhibitor). Lack of LEKTI causes stratum corneum detachment secondary to epidermal proteases hyperactivity. Whereas a skin barrier defect is generally regarded as a major cause for atopy, we previously identified a cell-autonomous signaling cascade that triggers pro-Th2 cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) production in LEKTI-deficient epidermis. This signaling is initiated by unrestricted kallikrein 5 (KLK5) activity, which directly activates proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2)-mediated expression of TSLP and favors a cutaneous proallergic microenvironment independently of the environment and of the adaptive immune system. To further confirm these results in vivo, we generated Spink5/Par2 double knockout (DKO) mice. At embryonic day 19.5, these mice display a dramatic decrease in TSLP expression, although stratum corneum detachment persists, confirming the role of the KLK5-PAR2 cascade in TSLP-mediated early proallergic signaling. However, deletion of Par2 in adult DKO-grafted skin does not rescue the inflammatory phenotype probably resulting from stratum corneum detachment. We conclude that several mechanisms trigger and maintain the inflammatory phenotype in NS. These include skin barrier impairment, mechanical stress secondary to stratum corneum detachment, as well as protease-induced proinflammatory and proallergic pathways, including PAR2-mediated overexpression of TSLP. PMID:20703245

  5. Accelerated tau aggregation, apoptosis and neurological dysfunction caused by chronic oral administration of aluminum in a mouse model of tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Etsuko; Ishihara, Takeshi; Yokota, Osamu; Nakashima-Yasuda, Hanae; Nagao, Shigeto; Ikeda, Chikako; Naohara, Jun; Terada, Seishi; Uchitomi, Yosuke

    2013-11-01

    To clarify whether long-term oral ingestion of aluminum (Al) can increase tau aggregation in mammals, we examined the effects of oral Al administration on tau accumulation, apoptosis in the central nervous system (CNS) and motor function using tau transgenic (Tg) mice that show very slowly progressive tau accumulation. Al-treated tau Tg mice had almost twice as many tau-positive inclusions in the spinal cord as tau Tg mice without Al treatment at 12 months of age, a difference that reached statistical significance, and the development of pretangle-like tau aggregates in the brain was also significantly advanced from 9 months. Al exposure did not induce any tau pathology in wild-type (WT) mice. Apoptosis was observed in the hippocampus in Al-treated tau Tg mice, but was virtually absent in the other experimental groups. Motor function as assessed by the tail suspension test was most severely impaired in Al-treated tau Tg mice. Given our results, chronic oral ingestion of Al may more strongly promote tau aggregation, apoptosis and neurological dysfunction if individuals already had a pathological process causing tau aggregation. These findings may also implicate chronic Al neurotoxicity in humans, who frequently have had mild tau pathology from a young age. PMID:23574527

  6. A null mutation in VAMP1/synaptobrevin is associated with neurological defects and prewean mortality in the lethal-wasting mouse mutant.

    PubMed

    Nystuen, Arne M; Schwendinger, Jamie K; Sachs, Andrew J; Yang, Andy W; Haider, Neena B

    2007-01-01

    The soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment receptors are a large family of membrane-associated proteins that are critical for Ca(2+)-mediated synaptic vesicle release. This family includes the VAMP, synaptosomal-associated protein, and syntaxin proteins. In this report, we describe a mutation in vesicle-associated membrane protein 1(VAMP1)/synaptobrevin in the mouse neurological mutant lethal-wasting (lew). The lethal-wasting mutant phenotype is characterized by a general lack of movement and wasting, eventually leading to death before weaning. Mutants are visibly immobile and lay on their side by postnatal day 10 (P10). Before this stage, mutants can be identified by a failure to attempt to right themselves. Affected mice die on average at P15. We used a positional cloning strategy to identify the mutation associated with this neurological phenotype. Lethal wasting had previously been linked to chromosome 6. We further narrowed the genetic disease interval and selected a small number of candidate genes for mutation screening. Genes were evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect differences in their expression levels between control and mutant brain ribonucleic acid (RNA) samples. VAMP1 mRNA was found to be significantly downregulated in the lethal-wasting brain compared to wild-type littermates. Subsequently, a nonsense mutation was identified in the coding region of the gene. This mutation is predicted to truncate approximately half of the protein; however, Western blot analysis showed that no protein is detectable in the mutant. VAMP1 is selectively expressed in the retina and in discrete areas of the brain including the zona incerta and rostral periolivary region, although no gross histological abnormalities were observed in these tissues. Taken together, these data indicate that VAMP1 has a vital role in a subset of central nervous system tissues. PMID:17102983

  7. Current neurology

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, S.H. )

    1988-01-01

    The topics covered in this book include: Duchenne muscular dystrophy: DNA diagnosis in practice; Central nervous system magnetic resonance imaging; and Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neurologic diseases.

  8. Neurologic deficit

    MedlinePlus

    ... neurologic deficit refers to abnormal function of a body area due to weaker function of the brain, spinal cord, muscles, or nerves. Examples include: Abnormal reflexes Inability to speak Decreased sensation Loss of balance ...

  9. Neurological Assessment.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Deborah; Musial, Maryann K

    2016-01-01

    Reasons for completing a neurological exam include: detecting life-threatening conditions, identifying nervous system dysfunction and the effects of this dysfunction on activities of daily living, comparing current data to previous exams to determine trends, and to provide a database upon which to base collaborative care across disciplines. In this third article of a four-part series, subjective and objective assessment of the neurological exam is reviewed. PMID:26645839

  10. Neurological assessment.

    PubMed

    Maher, Ann Butler

    2016-08-01

    Neurological system assessment is an important skill for the orthopaedic nurse because the nervous system has such an overlap with the musculoskeletal system. Nurses whose scope of practice includes such advanced evaluation, e.g. nurse practitioners, may conduct the examination described here but the information will also be useful for nurses caring for patients who have abnormal neurological assessment findings. Within the context of orthopaedic physical assessment, possible neurological findings are evaluated as they complement the patient's history and the examiner's findings. Specific neurological assessment is integral to diagnosis of some orthopaedic conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome. In other situations such as crushing injury to the extremities, there is high risk of associated neurological or neurovascular injury. These patients need anticipatory examination and monitoring to prevent complications. This article describes a basic neurological assessment; emphasis is on sensory and motor findings that may overlap with an orthopaedic presentation. The orthopaedic nurse may incorporate all the testing covered here or choose those parts that further elucidate specific diagnostic questions suggested by the patient's history, general evaluation and focused musculoskeletal examination. Abnormal findings help to suggest further testing, consultation with colleagues or referral to a specialist. PMID:27118633

  11. Neurological channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Graves, T; Hanna, M

    2005-01-01

    Ion channels are membrane-bound proteins that perform key functions in virtually all human cells. Such channels are critically important for the normal function of the excitable tissues of the nervous system, such as muscle and brain. Until relatively recently it was considered that dysfunction of ion channels in the nervous system would be incompatible with life. However, an increasing number of human diseases associated with dysfunctional ion channels are now recognised. Such neurological channelopathies are frequently genetically determined but may also arise through autoimmune mechanisms. In this article clinical, genetic, immunological, and electrophysiological aspects of this expanding group of neurological disorders are reviewed. Clinical situations in which a neurological channelopathy should enter into the differential diagnosis are highlighted. Some practical guidance on how to investigate and treat this complex group of disorders is also included. PMID:15640425

  12. Chronic administration of an HDAC inhibitor treats both neurological and systemic Niemann-Pick type C disease in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Suhail; Getz, Michelle; Haldar, Kasturi

    2016-02-17

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are approved for treating rare cancers and are of interest as potential therapies for neurodegenerative disorders. We evaluated a triple combination formulation (TCF) comprising the pan-HDACi vorinostat, the caging agent 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPBCD), and polyethylene glycol (PEG) for treating a mouse model (the Npc1(nmf164) mouse) of Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease, a difficult-to-treat cerebellar disorder. Vorinostat alone showed activity in cultured primary cells derived from Npc1(nmf164) mice but did not improve animal survival. However, low-dose, once-weekly intraperitoneal injections of the TCF containing vorinostat increased histone acetylation in the mouse brain, preserved neurites and Purkinje cells, delayed symptoms of neurodegeneration, and extended mouse life span from 4 to almost 9 months. We demonstrate that the TCF boosted the ability of HDACi to cross the blood-brain barrier and was not toxic even when used long term. Further, the TCF enabled dose reduction, which has been a major challenge in HDACi therapy. TCF simultaneously treats neurodegenerative and systemic symptoms of Niemann-Pick type C disease in a mouse model. PMID:26888431

  13. CNS Penetration of Intrathecal-Lumbar Idursulfase in the Monkey, Dog and Mouse: Implications for Neurological Outcomes of Lysosomal Storage Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jing; Savioli, Nancy; Belov, Vasily; Huang, Yan; Lotterhand, Jason; Alessandrini, Mary; Liu, Nan; Fischman, Alan J.; Powell, Jan L.; Heartlein, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS) disorders is the lack of convenient and effective methods for delivering biological agents to the brain. Mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome) is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S). I2S is a large, highly glycosylated enzyme. Intravenous administration is not likely to be an effective therapy for disease-related neurological outcomes that require enzyme access to the brain cells, in particular neurons and oligodendrocytes. We demonstrate that intracerebroventricular and lumbar intrathecal administration of recombinant I2S in dogs and nonhuman primates resulted in widespread enzyme distribution in the brain parenchyma, including remarkable deposition in the lysosomes of both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Lumbar intrathecal administration also resulted in enzyme delivery to the spinal cord, whereas little enzyme was detected there after intraventricular administration. Mucopolysaccharidosis II model is available in mice. Lumbar administration of recombinant I2S to enzyme deficient animals reduced the storage of glycosaminoglycans in both superficial and deep brain tissues, with concurrent morphological improvements. The observed patterns of enzyme transport from cerebrospinal fluid to the CNS tissues and the resultant biological activity (a) warrant further investigation of intrathecal delivery of I2S via lumbar catheter as an experimental treatment for the neurological symptoms of Hunter syndrome and (b) may have broader implications for CNS treatment with biopharmaceuticals. PMID:22279584

  14. Bone marrow-derived macrophages and the CNS: An update on the use of experimental chimeric mouse models and bone marrow transplantation in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Larochelle, Antoine; Bellavance, Marc-André; Michaud, Jean-Philippe; Rivest, Serge

    2016-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is a very unique system with multiple features that differentiate it from systemic tissues. One of the most captivating aspects of its distinctive nature is the presence of the blood brain barrier (BBB), which seals it from the periphery. Therefore, to preserve tissue homeostasis, the CNS has to rely heavily on resident cells such as microglia. These pivotal cells of the mononuclear lineage have important and dichotomous roles according to various neurological disorders. However, certain insults can overwhelm microglia as well as compromising the integrity of the BBB, thus allowing the infiltration of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). The use of myeloablation and bone marrow transplantation allowed the generation of chimeric mice to study resident microglia and infiltrated BMDM separately. This breakthrough completely revolutionized the way we captured these 2 types of mononuclear phagocytic cells. We now realize that microglia and BMDM exhibit distinct features and appear to perform different tasks. Since these cells are central in several pathologies, it is crucial to use chimeric mice to analyze their functions and mechanisms to possibly harness them for therapeutic purpose. This review will shed light on the advent of this methodology and how it allowed deciphering the ontology of microglia and its maintenance during adulthood. We will also compare the different strategies used to perform myeloablation. Finally, we will discuss the landmark studies that used chimeric mice to characterize the roles of microglia and BMDM in several neurological disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuro Inflammation edited by Helga E. de Vries and Markus Schwaninger. PMID:26432480

  15. Sports neurology topics in neurologic practice

    PubMed Central

    Conidi, Francis X.; Drogan, Oksana; Giza, Christopher C.; Kutcher, Jeffery S.; Alessi, Anthony G.; Crutchfield, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We sought to assess neurologists' interest in sports neurology and learn about their experience in treating sports-related neurologic conditions. A survey was sent to a random sample of American Academy of Neurology members. A majority of members (77%) see at least some patients with sports-related neurologic issues. Concussion is the most common sports-related condition neurologists treat. More than half of survey participants (63%) did not receive any formal or informal training in sports neurology. At least two-thirds of respondents think it is very important to address the following issues: developing evidence-based return-to-play guidelines, identifying risk factors for long-term cognitive-behavioral sequelae, and developing objective diagnostic criteria for concussion. Our findings provide an up-to-date view of the subspecialty of sports neurology and identify areas for future research. PMID:24790800

  16. Neurology and neurologic practice in China

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions. PMID:22123780

  17. Impact of melatonin and molecular clockwork components on the expression of thyrotropin beta-chain (Tshb) and the Tsh receptor in the mouse pars tuberalis.

    PubMed

    Unfried, Claudia; Ansari, Nariman; Yasuo, Shinobu; Korf, Horst-Werner; von Gall, Charlotte

    2009-10-01

    Photoperiodic regulation of reproduction in birds and mammals involves thyrotropin beta-chain (TSHb), which is secreted from the pars tuberalis (PT) and controls the expression of deiodinase type 2 and 3 in the ependymal cell layer of the infundibular recess (EC) via TSH receptors (TSHRs). To analyze the impact of melatonin and the molecular clockwork on the expression of Tshb and Tshr, we investigated melatonin-proficient C3H wild-type (WT), melatonin receptor 1-deficient (MT1-/-) or clockprotein PERIOD1-deficient (mPER1-/-) mice. Expression of Tshb and TSHb immunoreactivity in PT were low during day and high during the night in WT, high during the day and low during the night in mPER1-deficient, and equally high during the day and night in MT1-deficient mice. Melatonin injections into WT acutely suppressed Tshb expression. Transcription assays showed that the 5' upstream region of the Tshb gene could be controlled by clockproteins. Tshr levels in PT were low during the day and high during the night in WT and mPER1-deficient mice and equally low in MT1-deficient mice. Tshr expression in the EC did not show a day/night variation. Melatonin injections into WT acutely induced Tshr expression in PT but not in EC. TSH stimulation of hypothalamic slice cultures of WT induced phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein in PT and EC and deiodinase type 2 in the EC. Our data suggest that Tshb expression in PT is controlled by melatonin and the molecular clockwork and that melatonin activates Tshr expression in PT but not in EC. They also confirm the functional importance of TSHR in the PT and EC. PMID:19589858

  18. Chapter 38: American neurology.

    PubMed

    Freemon, Frank R

    2010-01-01

    The great formative event in the history of North America, the Civil War of 1861 to 1865, was the stimulus for the development of clinical neurology and the neurosciences. The first neurological research center on the continent was the US Army hospital at Turner's Lane, Philadelphia, PA. Silas Weir Mitchell and his colleagues described causalgia (reflex sympathetic dystrophy), phantom limb sensation, and Horner's syndrome (before Horner). The medical leader of the Northern army was William Hammond. After the conclusion of hostilities, he began a huge clinical practice in New York City. In the United States, clinical neurology began in private practice, unlike Europe, where neurology began in institutions. Hammond's textbook, which first used the term athetosis, was used by a generation of physicians who encountered patients with neurological signs and symptoms. Early in the 20th century, neurological institutions were formed around universities; probably the most famous was the Montreal Neurological Institute founded by Wilder Penfield. The US federal government sponsored extensive research into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system through the Neurological Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, later called the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. The government officially classified the final 10 years of the 20th century as the Decade of the Brain and provided an even greater level of research funding. PMID:19892141

  19. ECT IN NEUROLOGICAL COUNDITIONS

    PubMed Central

    Girish, K.; Gangadhar, B.N.; Janakiramaiah, N.

    2002-01-01

    It is a myth that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) produces greater side effects and worsens the neurological condition when used in neurologically ill patients. With the advancement and sophistication in ECT practice standards and modification procedures, it can be safely administered either to treat selected neurological conditions or the co-morbid psychiatric illnesses without additional risks. However ECT should be administered only after thorough evaluation of risks and benefits in such individuals. PMID:21206577

  20. [Sleep and neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Mayer, G

    2016-06-01

    Knowledge of the physiology of sleep-wake regulation can contribute to an understanding of the pathophysiology and symptoms of neurological diseases and is helpful for initiating specific therapies for sleep-wake cycle stabilization. Based on historically important observations on the close relationship between sleep and neurological diseases, new insights and developments in selected neurological entities are presented in this review article. PMID:27167889

  1. The Preoperative Neurological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Probasco, John; Sahin, Bogachan; Tran, Tung; Chung, Tae Hwan; Rosenthal, Liana Shapiro; Mari, Zoltan; Levy, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases are prevalent in the general population, and the neurohospitalist has an important role to play in the preoperative planning for patients with and at risk for developing neurological disease. The neurohospitalist can provide patients and their families as well as anesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitalists, and other providers guidance in particular to the patient’s neurological disease and those he or she is at risk for. Here we present considerations and guidance for the neurohospitalist providing preoperative consultation for the neurological patient with or at risk of disturbances of consciousness, cerebrovascular and carotid disease, epilepsy, neuromuscular disease, and Parkinson disease. PMID:24198903

  2. Neurologic presentations of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Singer, Elyse J; Valdes-Sueiras, Miguel; Commins, Deborah; Levine, Andrew

    2010-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the cause of AIDS, has infected an estimated 33 million individuals worldwide. HIV is associated with immunodeficiency, neoplasia, and neurologic disease. The continuing evolution of the HIV epidemic has spurred an intense interest in a hitherto neglected area of medicine, neuroinfectious diseases and their consequences. This work has broad applications for the study of central nervous system (CNS) tumors, dementias, neuropathies, and CNS disease in other immunosuppressed individuals. HIV is neuroinvasive (can enter the CNS), neurotrophic (can live in neural tissues), and neurovirulent (causes disease of the nervous system). This article reviews the HIV-associated neurologic syndromes, which can be classified as primary HIV neurologic disease (in which HIV is both necessary and sufficient to cause the illness), secondary or opportunistic neurologic disease (in which HIV interacts with other pathogens, resulting in opportunistic infections and tumors), and treatment-related neurologic disease (such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome). PMID:19932385

  3. Neurology and orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Houlden, Henry; Charlton, Paul; Singh, Dishan

    2007-01-01

    Neurology encompasses all aspects of medicine and surgery, but is closer to orthopaedic surgery than many other specialities. Both neurological deficits and bone disorders lead to locomotor system abnormalities, joint complications and limb problems. The main neurological conditions that require the attention of an orthopaedic surgeon are disorders that affect the lower motor neurones. The most common disorders in this group include neuromuscular disorders and traumatic peripheral nerve lesions. Upper motor neurone disorders such as cerebral palsy and stroke are also frequently seen and discussed, as are chronic conditions such as poliomyelitis. The management of these neurological problems is often coordinated in the neurology clinic, and this group, probably more than any other, requires a multidisciplinary team approach. PMID:17308288

  4. [Palliative care in neurology].

    PubMed

    Provinciali, Leandro; Tarquini, Daniela; De Falco, Fabrizio A; Carlini, Giulia; Zappia, Mario; Toni, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care in neurology is characterized by the need of taking into account some distinguishing features which supplement and often differ from the general palliative approach to cancer or to severe organ failures. Such position is emphasized by a new concept of palliative assistance which is not limited to the "end of life" stage, as it was the traditional one, but is applied along the entire course of progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions. There are various reasons accounting for a differentiation of palliative care in neurology and for the development of specific expertise; the long duration of the advanced stages of many neurological diseases and the distinguishing features of some clinical problems (cognitive disorders, psychic disorders, etc.), in addition to the deterioration of some general aspects (nutrition, etc.), make the general criteria adopted for cancer, severe respiratory, hepatic or renal failures and heart failure inadequate. The neurological diseases which could benefit from the development of a specific palliative approach are dementia, cerebrovascular diseases, movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases, severe traumatic brain injury, brain cancers and multiple sclerosis, as well as less frequent conditions. The growing literature on palliative care in neurology provides evidence of the neurological community's increasing interest in taking care of the advanced and terminal stages of nervous system diseases, thus encouraging research, training and updating in such direction. This document aims to underline the specific neurological requirements concerning the palliative assistance. PMID:26228722

  5. William Shakespeare's neurology.

    PubMed

    Paciaroni, Maurizio; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Many of Shakespeare's plays contain characters who appear to be afflicted by neurological or psychiatric disorders. Shakespeare, in his descriptive analysis of his protagonists, was contributing to the understanding of these disorders. In fact, Charcot frequently used Shakespearean references in his neurological teaching sessions, stressing how acute objective insight is essential to achieving expert clinical diagnosis. Charcot found in Shakespeare the same rigorous observational techniques for which he himself became famous. This chapter describes many of Shakespearean characters suffering from varied neurological disorders, including Parkinsonism, epilepsy, sleeping disturbances, dementia, headache, prion disease, and paralyses. PMID:24290473

  6. Focal neurological deficits

    MedlinePlus

    A focal neurologic deficit is a problem with nerve, spinal cord, or brain function. It affects a specific ... of the back, neck, or head Electromyogram (EMG)/ nerve conduction velocities (NCV) MRI of the back, neck, or head Spinal tap

  7. Neurological Sequelae of Lupus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Synonym(s): Lupus - Neurological Sequelae, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What ... health problems and have a normal lifespan with periodic doctor visits and treatments with various drugs. What ...

  8. The neurological examination.

    PubMed

    April, R S

    1995-06-01

    This chapter describes methods of clinical history taking and examination of the PLDD candidate with lumbar radicular symptoms. It stresses features of the classical neurological examination of the back and lower extremities in a concise, systematic fashion. PMID:10150641

  9. Neurologic emergencies in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, J O

    1991-06-01

    Any one neurologic emergency is rare during pregnancy. As a group, neurologic disorders are a major cause of maternal mortality. Optimal management requires a multidisciplinary approach and ready access to the collective experience of other clinicians. This article discusses the management of status epilepticus, eclamptic hypertensive encephalopathy, stroke, including subarachnoid hemorrhage, myasthenic crisis, porphyric crisis, acute Guillain-Barré syndrome, autonomic hyperreflexia, malignant hyperthermia, chorea gravidarum, and Wernicke's encephalopathy. PMID:1945251

  10. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. PMID:25890773

  11. Neurology in Asia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chong-Tin

    2015-02-10

    Asia is important as it accounts for more than half of the world population. The majority of Asian countries fall into the middle income category. As for cultural traditions, Asia is highly varied, with many languages spoken. The pattern of neurologic diseases in Asia is largely similar to the West, with some disease features being specific to Asia. Whereas Asia constitutes 60% of the world's population, it contains only 20% of the world's neurologists. This disparity is particularly evident in South and South East Asia. As for neurologic care, it is highly variable depending on whether it is an urban or rural setting, the level of economic development, and the system of health care financing. To help remedy the shortage of neurologists, most counties with larger populations have established training programs in neurology. These programs are diverse, with many areas of concern. There are regional organizations serving as a vehicle for networking in neurology and various subspecialties, as well as an official journal (Neurology Asia). The Asian Epilepsy Academy, with its emphasis on workshops in various locations, EEG certification examination, and fellowships, may provide a template of effective regional networking for improving neurology care in the region. PMID:25666629

  12. Neurology and Don Quixote.

    PubMed

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Palma, Fermin

    2012-01-01

    Don Quixote de la Mancha, which is considered one of the most important and influential works of Western modern prose, contains many references of interest for almost all of the medical specialties. In this regard, numerous references to neurology can be found in Cervantes' immortal work. In this study, we aimed to read Don Quixote from a neurologist's point of view, describing the neurological phenomena scattered throughout the novel, including tremors, sleep disturbances, neuropsychiatric symptoms, dementia, epilepsy, paralysis, stroke, syncope, traumatic head injury, and headache; we relate these symptoms with depictions of those conditions in the medical literature of the time. We also review Cervantes' sources of neurological information, including the works by renowned Spanish authors such as Juan Huarte de San Juan, Dionisio Daza Chacón and Juan Valverde de Amusco, and we hypothesize that Don Quixote's disorder was actually a neurological condition. Although Cervantes wrote it four centuries ago, Don Quixote contains plenty of references to neurology, and many of the ideas and concepts reflected in it are still of interest. PMID:23006630

  13. Neurological complications of transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Bhardwaj, Anish; Stevens, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Recipients of solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplants are at risk of life-threatening neurological disorders including encephalopathy, seizures, infections and tumors of the central nervous system, stroke, central pontine myelinolysis, and neuromuscular disorders-often requiring admission to, or occurring in, the intensive care unit (ICU). Many of these complications are linked directly or indirectly to immunosuppressive therapy. However, neurological disorders may also result from graft versus host disease, or be an expression of the underlying disease which prompted transplantation, as well as injury induced during radiation, chemotherapy, surgery, and ICU stay. In rare cases, neuroinfectious pathogens may be transmitted with the transplanted tissue or organ. Diagnosis may be a challenge because clinical symptoms and findings on neuroimaging lack specificity, and a biological specimen or tissue diagnosis is often needed for definitive diagnosis. Management is centered on preventing further neurological injury, etiology-targeted therapy, and balancing the benefits and toxicities of specific immunosuppressive agents. PMID:21764765

  14. Genomics in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guangchun; Sun, Jiya; Wang, Jiajia; Bai, Zhouxian; Song, Fuhai; Lei, Hongxing

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders comprise a variety of complex diseases in the central nervous system, which can be roughly classified as neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. The basic and translational research of neurological disorders has been hindered by the difficulty in accessing the pathological center (i.e., the brain) in live patients. The rapid advancement of sequencing and array technologies has made it possible to investigate the disease mechanism and biomarkers from a systems perspective. In this review, recent progresses in the discovery of novel risk genes, treatment targets and peripheral biomarkers employing genomic technologies will be discussed. Our major focus will be on two of the most heavily investigated neurological disorders, namely Alzheimer’s disease and autism spectrum disorder. PMID:25108264

  15. Genetic Analysis in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Alan; Hardy, John

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, neurogenetics research had made some remarkable advances owing to the advent of genotyping arrays and next-generation sequencing. These improvements to the technology have allowed us to determine the whole-genome structure and its variation and to examine its effect on phenotype in an unprecedented manner. The identification of rare disease-causing mutations has led to the identification of new biochemical pathways and has facilitated a greater understanding of the etiology of many neurological diseases. Furthermore, genome-wide association studies have provided information on how common genetic variability impacts on the risk for the development of various complex neurological diseases. Herein, we review how these technological advances have changed the approaches being used to study the genetic basis of neurological disease and how the research findings will be translated into clinical utility. PMID:23571731

  16. [Neurological complications in uremia].

    PubMed

    Fong, Chin-Shih

    2008-06-01

    Neurological complications due to the uremic state or hemodialysis, contribute to the important cause of mortality in patients with uremia. Despite continuous advances in uremic treatment, many neurological complications of uremia, like uremic encephalopathy, peripheral neuropathy and myopathy fail to fully respond to hemodialysis. Moreover, hemodialysis or kidney transplantation may even induce neurological complications. Hemodialysis can directly or indirectly be associated with Wernicke's encephalopathy, dialytic dementia, dysequilibrium syndrome, cerebrovascular accidents, osmotic myelinolysis and mononeuropathy. Renal transplantation can give rise to rejection encephalopathy and acute femoral neuropathy. The use of immunosuppressive drugs after renal transplantation can cause reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy encephalopathy. The clinical, pathophysiological and therapeutical aspects of central nervous system, peripheral nervous system and myopathy complications in uremia are reviewed. PMID:18686653

  17. Genomic medicine and neurology.

    PubMed

    Vance, Jeffery M; Tekin, Demet

    2011-04-01

    The application of genetics to the understanding of neurology has been highly successful over the past several decades. During the past 10 years, tools were developed to begin genetic investigations into more common disorders such as Alzheimer disease, multiple sclerosis, autism, and Parkinson disease. The era of genomic medicine now has begun and will have an increasing effect on the daily care of common neurologic diseases. Thus it is important for neurologists to have a basic understanding of genomic medicine and how it differs from the traditional clinical genetics of the past. This article provides some basic information about genomic medicine and pharmacogenetics in neurology to help neurologists to begin to adopt these principles into their practice. PMID:22810818

  18. Suppression of acute proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine upregulation by post-injury administration of a novel small molecule improves long-term neurologic outcome in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Eric; Somera-Molina, Kathleen; Van Eldik, Linda J; Watterson, D Martin; Wainwright, Mark S

    2008-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) with its associated morbidity is a major area of unmet medical need that lacks effective therapies. TBI initiates a neuroinflammatory cascade characterized by activation of astrocytes and microglia, and increased production of immune mediators including proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. This inflammatory response contributes both to the acute pathologic processes following TBI including cerebral edema, in addition to longer-term neuronal damage and cognitive impairment. However, activated glia also play a neuroprotective and reparative role in recovery from injury. Thus, potential therapeutic strategies targeting the neuroinflammatory cascade must use careful dosing considerations, such as amount of drug and timing of administration post injury, in order not to interfere with the reparative contribution of activated glia. Methods We tested the hypothesis that attenuation of the acute increase in proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines following TBI would decrease neurologic injury and improve functional neurologic outcome. We used the small molecule experimental therapeutic, Minozac (Mzc), to suppress TBI-induced up-regulation of glial activation and proinflammatory cytokines back towards basal levels. Mzc was administered in a clinically relevant time window post-injury in a murine closed-skull, cortical impact model of TBI. Mzc effects on the acute increase in brain cytokine and chemokine levels were measured as well as the effect on neuronal injury and neurobehavioral function. Results Administration of Mzc (5 mg/kg) at 3 h and 9 h post-TBI attenuates the acute increase in proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels, reduces astrocyte activation, and the longer term neurologic injury, and neurobehavioral deficits measured by Y maze performance over a 28-day recovery period. Mzc-treated animals also have no significant increase in brain water content (edema), a major cause of the neurologic morbidity associated

  19. Creativity and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Lealani Mae Y

    2014-08-01

    Although humans have long valued creativity, the generation of such innovation is still incompletely understood. Looking at the healthy brain, researchers have localized certain parts for a basic understanding of these mechanisms. By researching the brain affected by neurological disease, scientists have observed unique manifestations of creativity, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and parkinsonian spectrum disorders, and stroke, which help clarify these creative underpinnings. Incorporating both healthy and disease models of cerebral functioning, neurological and neuroscientific research from recent years has built on established theories and expanded current knowledge. PMID:24938215

  20. Neurologic effects of alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, I; Messing, R O

    1994-01-01

    Alcoholism, a worldwide disorder, is the cause of a variety of neurologic disorders. In this article we discuss the cellular pathophysiology of ethanol addition and abuse as well as evidence supporting and refuting the role of inheritance in alcoholism. A genetic marker for alcoholism has not been identified, but neurophysiologic studies may be promising. Some neurologic disorders related to longterm alcoholism are due predominantly to inadequate nutrition (the thiamine deficiency that causes Wernicke's encephalopathy), but others appear to involve the neurotoxicity of ethanol on brain (alcohol withdrawal syndrome and dementia) and peripheral nerves (alcoholic neuropathy and myopathy). Images PMID:7975567

  1. [Renogenic neurologic disorders].

    PubMed

    Barbas, I M; Kodzaev, Iu K; Rudenko, T V; Skoromets, A A

    1985-01-01

    A total of 137 patients with chronic diseases of the kidneys were examined, including 34 without and 103 with chronic renal insufficiency. The neurologic syndromes under study included encephalomyelopathy with a predominant damage to the coordination systems, polyneuropathy and myopathy. These neurological changes were expressed irrespective of chronic renal failure, while their degree directly correlated with its severity. Stabilography and tremorography proved adequate and objective methods of assessing coordination disorders and made it possible to detect the above changes at the preclinical stage. PMID:3002077

  2. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, F; Wandinger, K-P

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are immune-mediated erroneous attacks on the central or peripheral nervous systems, or both, directed originally against the tumour itself. They have been known for more than 40 years, but recently the discovery of new subgroups of paraneoplastic encephalitis syndromes with a remarkably good response to immune therapy has ignited new clinical and scientific interest. Knowledge of these subgroups and their associated autoantibodies is important in therapeutic decision-making. However, the abundance of new autoantibodies and syndromes can be confusing. This review paper summarizes current knowledge and new developments in the field of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes, their classification, pathophysiology and treatment. PMID:23937626

  3. Ravel's neurological illness.

    PubMed

    Alonso, R J; Pascuzzi, R M

    1999-01-01

    In the last 10 years of his life, Maurice Ravel (1875-1937) experienced a gradually progressive decline in neurological function. Dr. Alajouanine examined Ravel, noting the presence of aphasia and apraxia with relative preservation of comprehension and memory. The exact diagnosis remains unclear, but the likelihood of a progressive degenerative disorder, such as frontotemporal dementia, is herein discussed. PMID:10718529

  4. Outpatients in Neurological Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, M. P.; Skeil, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the multidisciplinary approach used at a neurological rehabilitation clinic in England. Analysis of questionnaire responses from outpatients indicated general support for the multidisciplinary approach, though a significant minority felt intimidated by the large number of professionals seen simultaneously. Patients also…

  5. Infant neurologic assessment.

    PubMed

    Hobdell, E

    2001-08-01

    Infant neurologic assessment reflects the ongoing maturation of the central nervous system. Traditional approaches to assessment cannot be used. Key factors are accurate observation and flexibility in obtaining the data. A case example using a 4-month-old infant illustrates specific approaches to assessment. PMID:11497071

  6. Clinical neurological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Weiss, A H

    1995-06-01

    The importance of the neurological evaluation for PLDD procedures is discussed. Elements of the basic examination are outlined and the reason for specific methods of testing are offered. The physician should pay attention to patient complaints, mechanical signs, and patient capabilities. PMID:10150642

  7. Neurological Impress Method plus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flood, James; Lapp, Diane; Fisher, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of these two studies was to redirect interest to the Neurological Impress Method, a multisensory approach to reading instruction that occurs between a teacher and a student, which has been largely forgotten in mainstream and special education circles over the past decades. In addition to its emphasis on oral reading, we included a…

  8. Neurological diseases and pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequently becomes centralized through maladaptive responses within the central nervous system that can profoundly alter brain systems and thereby behaviour (e.g. depression). Chronic pain should thus be considered a brain disease in which alterations in neural networks affect multiple aspects of brain function, structure and chemistry. The study and treatment of this disease is greatly complicated by the lack of objective measures for either the symptoms or the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain. In pain associated with neurological disease, it is sometimes difficult to obtain even a subjective evaluation of pain, as is the case for patients in a vegetative state or end-stage Alzheimer's disease. It is critical that neurologists become more involved in chronic pain treatment and research (already significant in the fields of migraine and peripheral neuropathies). To achieve this goal, greater efforts are needed to enhance training for neurologists in pain treatment and promote greater interest in the field. This review describes examples of pain in different neurological diseases including primary neurological pain conditions, discusses the therapeutic potential of brain-targeted therapies and highlights the need for objective measures of pain. PMID:22067541

  9. Pars Injuries in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Oren, Jonathan H; Gallina, Jason M

    2016-03-01

    Pars injuries are common causes of low back pain in adolescent athletes. Workup traditionally has included lumbar radiographs with oblique views and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, recent literature has demonstrated the accuracy of MRI as a diagnostic modality. Acute injuries may be amenable to bracing with the goal of a healed lesion. Most cases of spondylolysis will result in asymptomatic non-union, though pars repair is an option for symptomatic pars defects without spondylolisthesis. PMID:26977552

  10. The neurological disease ontology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We are developing the Neurological Disease Ontology (ND) to provide a framework to enable representation of aspects of neurological diseases that are relevant to their treatment and study. ND is a representational tool that addresses the need for unambiguous annotation, storage, and retrieval of data associated with the treatment and study of neurological diseases. ND is being developed in compliance with the Open Biomedical Ontology Foundry principles and builds upon the paradigm established by the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) for the representation of entities in the domain of disease and medical practice. Initial applications of ND will include the annotation and analysis of large data sets and patient records for Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. Description ND is implemented in OWL 2 and currently has more than 450 terms that refer to and describe various aspects of neurological diseases. ND directly imports the development version of OGMS, which uses BFO 2. Term development in ND has primarily extended the OGMS terms ‘disease’, ‘diagnosis’, ‘disease course’, and ‘disorder’. We have imported and utilize over 700 classes from related ontology efforts including the Foundational Model of Anatomy, Ontology for Biomedical Investigations, and Protein Ontology. ND terms are annotated with ontology metadata such as a label (term name), term editors, textual definition, definition source, curation status, and alternative terms (synonyms). Many terms have logical definitions in addition to these annotations. Current development has focused on the establishment of the upper-level structure of the ND hierarchy, as well as on the representation of Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. The ontology is available as a version-controlled file at http://code.google.com/p/neurological-disease-ontology along with a discussion list and an issue tracker. Conclusion ND seeks to provide a formal

  11. PIPs in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Mark G

    2015-08-01

    Phosphoinositide (PIP) lipids regulate many aspects of cell function in the nervous system including receptor signalling, secretion, endocytosis, migration and survival. Levels of PIPs such as PI4P, PI(4,5)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3 are normally tightly regulated by phosphoinositide kinases and phosphatases. Deregulation of these biochemical pathways leads to lipid imbalances, usually on intracellular endosomal membranes, and these changes have been linked to a number of major neurological diseases including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, epilepsy, stroke, cancer and a range of rarer inherited disorders including brain overgrowth syndromes, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies and neurodevelopmental conditions such as Lowe's syndrome. This article analyses recent progress in this area and explains how PIP lipids are involved, to varying degrees, in almost every class of neurological disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brain Lipids. PMID:25680866

  12. Post dengue neurological complication.

    PubMed

    Hasliza, A H; Tohid, H; Loh, K Y; Santhi, P

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) followed by an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) weeks prior to her presentation rendering GBS secondary to the post viral URTI and AGE as the most likely diagnosis. Presence of thrombocytopenia was the only clue for dengue in this case. PMID:27099661

  13. Neurology goes global

    PubMed Central

    Mateen, Farrah J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In recent years, the need for additional neurologists and neurologic expertise in many low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) has become more apparent. Many organizations are committed to this unmet need, but the scope of the problem remains mostly underappreciated. Neurologists may be skeptical about their value in resource-limited settings, yet we are critically needed and can have a marked effect. International experiences, however, must be carried out in ethical, informed, and sustainable ways in tandem with local health care providers when possible. We present a brief overview of critical issues in global neurology, the importance of focusing on benefits to the LMIC, and options for volunteer opportunities in clinical service, education, research, and disaster relief. Finally, we offer practical pointers and resources for planning these experiences. PMID:25110621

  14. Neurology and detective writing.

    PubMed

    Kempster, Peter A; Lees, Andrew J

    2013-12-01

    When searching for clues to reach a diagnosis, neurologists often empathise with the detective who is trying to solve a case. The premise of this article is that detective stories have been part of the fabric of neurology ever since the time that it evolved into a discrete medical speciality. We will examine how this form of narrative has found expression in detective mystery fiction and popular science publications created by 20th century neurologist physician-writers. We will also investigate the power of the neurologist's alter ego, Sherlock Holmes: his relationship to founders of clinical neuroscience such as Jean-Martin Charcot, William Gowers and Sigmund Freud, and his influences on neurological practice and its literary traditions. PMID:24006370

  15. Key sleep neurologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    St. Louis, Erik K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sleep disorders are frequent comorbidities in neurologic patients. This review focuses on clinical aspects and prognosis of 3 neurologic sleep disorders: narcolepsy, restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED), and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Narcolepsy causes pervasive, enduring excessive daytime sleepiness, adversely affecting patients' daily functioning. RLS/WED is characterized by an uncomfortable urge to move the legs before sleep, often evolving toward augmentation and resulting in daylong bothersome symptoms. RBD causes potentially injurious dream enactment behaviors that often signify future evolution of overt synucleinopathy neurodegeneration in as many as 81% of patients. Timely recognition, referral for polysomnography, and longitudinal follow-up of narcolepsy, RLS/WED, and RBD patients are imperatives for neurologists in providing quality comprehensive patient care. PMID:24605270

  16. The neurologic examination.

    PubMed

    Averill, D R

    1981-08-01

    With practice, an orderly routine, and a basic understanding of neuroanatomy, the clinician should be able to tentatively localize lesions in the nervous system. Once the lesion is localized, ancillary studies are usually necessary to identify the disease process. In difficult cases when referral is impractical, an accurate description of the findings from the neurologic examination will greatly improve the value of consultation. PMID:6977917

  17. Nonconsecutive Pars Interarticularis Defects.

    PubMed

    Elgafy, Hossein; Hart, Ryan C; Tanios, Mina

    2015-12-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis is a well-recognized condition occurring in adolescents because of repetitive overuse in sports. Nonconsecutive spondylolysis involving the lumbar spine is rare. In contrast to single-level pars defects that respond well to conservative treatment, there is no consensus about the management of multiple-level pars fractures; a few reports indicated that conservative management is successful, and the majority acknowledged that surgery is often required. The current study presents a rare case of pars fracture involving nonconsecutive segments and discusses the management options. In this case report, we review the patient's history, clinical examination, radiologic findings, and management, as well as the relevant literature. An 18-year-old man presented to the clinic with worsening lower back pain related to nonconsecutive pars fractures at L2 and L5. After 6 months of conservative management, diagnostic computed tomography-guided pars block was used to localize the symptomatic level at L2, which was treated surgically; the L5 asymptomatic pars fracture did not require surgery. At the last follow-up 2 years after surgery, the patient was playing baseball and basketball, and denied any back pain. This article reports a case of rare nonconsecutive pars fractures. Conservative management for at least 6 months is recommended. Successful management depends on the choice of appropriate treatment for each level. Single-photon emission computed tomography scan, and computed tomography-guided pars block are valuable preoperative tools to identify the symptomatic level in such a case. PMID:26665257

  18. Palliative care and neurology

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Isabel; Miyasaki, Janis; Kutner, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach to the care of patients and families facing progressive and chronic illnesses that focuses on the relief of suffering due to physical symptoms, psychosocial issues, and spiritual distress. As neurologists care for patients with chronic, progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions, it is important that they understand and learn to apply the principles of palliative medicine. In this article, we aim to provide a practical starting point in palliative medicine for neurologists by answering the following questions: (1) What is palliative care and what is hospice care? (2) What are the palliative care needs of neurology patients? (3) Do neurology patients have unique palliative care needs? and (4) How can palliative care be integrated into neurology practice? We cover several fundamental palliative care skills relevant to neurologists, including communication of bad news, symptom assessment and management, advance care planning, caregiver assessment, and appropriate referral to hospice and other palliative care services. We conclude by suggesting areas for future educational efforts and research. PMID:24991027

  19. [Neurological Disorders and Pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Berlit, P

    2016-02-01

    Neurological disorders caused by pregnancy and puerperium include the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, the amniotic fluid embolism syndrome (AFES), the postpartum angiopathy due to reversible vasoconstriction syndrome, and the Sheehan syndrome. Hypertension and proteinuria are the hallmarks of preeclampsia, seizures define eclampsia. Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets constitute the HELLP syndrome. Vision disturbances including cortical blindness occur in the posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). The Sheehan syndrome presents with panhypopituitarism post partum due to apoplexia of the pituitary gland in severe peripartal blood loss leading to longstanding hypotension. Some neurological disorders occur during pregnancy and puerperium with an increased frequency. These include stroke, sinus thrombosis, the restless legs syndrome and peripheral nerve syndromes, especially the carpal tunnel syndrome. Chronic neurologic diseases need an interdisciplinary approach during pregnancy. Some anticonvulsants double the risk of birth defects. The highest risk exists for valproic acid, the lowest for lamotrigine and levetiracetam. For MS interval treatment, glatiramer acetate and interferones seem to be safe during pregnancy. All other drugs should be avoided. PMID:26953551

  20. Simulation in neurology.

    PubMed

    Micieli, Giuseppe; Cavallini, Anna; Santalucia, Paola; Gensini, Gianfranco

    2015-10-01

    Simulation is a frontier for disseminating knowledge in almost all the fields of medicine and it is attracting growing interest because it offers a means of developing new teaching and training models, as well as of verifying what has been learned in a critical setting that simulates clinical practice. The role of simulation in neurology, until now limited by the obvious physical limitations of the dummies used to train students and learners, is now increasing since, today, it allows anamnestic data to be related to the instrumental evidence necessary for diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making, i.e., to the findings of neurophysiological investigations (EEG, carotid and vertebral echography and transcranial Doppler, for example) and neuroradiological investigations (CT, MRI imaging), as well as vital parameter monitoring (ECG, saturimetry, blood pressure, respiratory frequency, etc.). Simulation, by providing learners with opportunities to discuss, with experts, different profiles of biological parameters (both during the simulation itself and in the subsequent debriefing session), is becoming an increasingly important tool for training those involved in evaluation of critical neurological patients (stroke, Guillan Barrè syndrome, myasthenia, status epilepticus, headache, vertigo, confusional status, etc.) and complex cases. In this SIMMED (Italian Society for Simulation in Medicine) position paper, the applications (present and, possibly, future) of simulation in neurology are reported. PMID:25926070

  1. Neurological Impairment: Nomenclature and Consequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spears, Catherine E.; Weber, Robert E.

    Neurological impairment as discussed includes a range of disabilities referred to as neurological impairment: minimal brain dysfunction/damage, developmental disability, perceptual handicap, learning disability, hyperkinetic behavioral syndrome, and others. Defined are causes of neurological impairment and methods of diagnosis. Symptoms…

  2. Par Pond water balance

    SciTech Connect

    Hiergesell, R.A.; Dixon, K.L.

    1996-06-01

    A water budget for the Par Pond hydrologic system was established in order to estimate the rate of groundwater influx to Par Pond. This estimate will be used in modeling exercises to predict Par Pond reservoir elevation and spillway discharge in the scenario where Savannah River water is no longer pumped and discharged into Par Pond. The principal of conservation of mass was used to develop the water budget, where water inflow was set equal to water outflow. Components of the water budget were identified, and the flux associated with each was determined. The water budget was considered balanced when inflow and outflow summed to zero. The results of this study suggest that Par Pond gains water from the groundwater system in the upper reaches of the reservoir, but looses water to the groundwater system near the dam. The rate of flux of groundwater from the water table aquifer into Par Pond was determined to be 13 cfs. The rate of flux from Par Pond to the water table aquifer near the dam was determined to be 7 cfs.

  3. Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Honnorat, Jérôme; Antoine, Jean-Christophe

    2007-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) can be defined as remote effects of cancer that are not caused by the tumor and its metastasis, or by infection, ischemia or metabolic disruptions. PNS are rare, affecting less than 1/10,000 patients with cancer. Only the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is relatively frequent, occurring in about 1% of patients with small cell lung cancer. PNS can affect any part of the central and peripheral nervous system, the neuromuscular junction, and muscle. They can be isolated or occur in association. In most patients, the neurological disorder develops before the cancer becomes clinically overt and the patient is referred to the neurologist who has the charge of identifying a neurological disorder as paraneoplastic. PNS are usually severely disabling. The most common PNS are Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), subacute cerebellar ataxia, limbic encephalitis (LE), opsoclonus-myoclonus (OM), retinopathies (cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) and melanoma-associated retinopathy (MAR), Stiff-Person syndrome (SPS), chronic gastrointestinal pseudoobstruction (CGP), sensory neuronopathy (SSN), encephalomyelitis (EM) and dermatomyositis. PNS are caused by autoimmune processes triggered by the cancer and directed against antigens common to both the cancer and the nervous system, designated as onconeural antigens. Due to their high specificity (> 90%), the best way to diagnose a neurological disorder as paraneoplastic is to identify one of the well-characterized anti-onconeural protein antibodies in the patient's serum. In addition, as these antibodies are associated with a restricted range of cancers, they can guide the search for the underlying tumor at a stage when it is frequently not clinically overt. This is a critical point as, to date, the best way to stabilize PNS is to treat the cancer as soon as possible. Unfortunately, about one-third of patients do not have detectable antibodies and 5% to 10% have an atypical antibody

  4. [Between neurology and psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Levine, Joseph; Toser, Doron; Zeev, Kaplan

    2014-06-01

    In this review we will discuss the broad spectrum of possible relationships between the fields of neurology and psychiatry alongside weighing the pros and cons of each alternative relationship. This is in the hope that such discussions will allow an informed decision regarding the construction of future relations between these two areas. The possible connections between the areas are discussed in light of possible relationships that exist between the two groups in the mathematical world with reference to the proposed solutions to the psychophysical mind-body problem. PMID:25095609

  5. Thermography in Neurologic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Eduardo Borba; Vilaça-Alves, José; Rosa, Claudio; Reis, Victor Machado

    2015-01-01

    One kind of medical images that has been developed in the last decades is thermal images. These images are assessed by infrared cameras and have shown an exponential development in recent years. In this sense, the aim of this study was to describe possibilities of thermography usage in the neurologic practice. It was performed a systematic review in Web of Knowledge (Thompson Reuters), set in all databases which used two combination of keywords as “topic”: “thermography” and “neurology”; and “thermography” and “neurologic”. The chronological period was defined from 2000 to 2014 (the least 15 years). Among the studies included in this review, only seven were with experimental design. It is few to bring thermography as a daily tool in clinical practice. However, these studies have suggested good results. The studies of review and an analyzed patent showed that the authors consider the thermography as a diagnostic tool and they recommend its usage. It can be concluded that thermography is already used as a diagnostic and monitoring tool of patients with neuropathies, particularly in complex regional pain syndrome, and stroke. And yet, this tool has great potential for future research about its application in diagnosis of other diseases of neurological origin. PMID:26191090

  6. Medical marijuana in neurology.

    PubMed

    Benbadis, Selim R; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Bozorg, Ali; Giarratano, Melissa; Kalidas, Kavita; Katzin, Lara; Robertson, Derrick; Vu, Tuan; Smith, Amanda; Zesiewicz, Theresa

    2014-12-01

    Constituents of the Cannabis plant, cannabinoids, may be of therapeutic value in neurologic diseases. The most abundant cannabinoids are Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, which possesses psychoactive properties, and cannabidiol, which has no intrinsic psychoactive effects, but exhibits neuroprotective properties in preclinical studies. A small number of high-quality clinical trials support the safety and efficacy of cannabinoids for treatment of spasticity of multiple sclerosis, pain refractory to opioids, glaucoma, nausea and vomiting. Lower level clinical evidence indicates that cannabinoids may be useful for dystonia, tics, tremors, epilepsy, migraine and weight loss. Data are also limited in regards to adverse events and safety. Common nonspecific adverse events are similar to those of other CNS 'depressants' and include weakness, mood changes and dizziness. Cannabinoids can have cardiovascular adverse events and, when smoked chronically, may affect pulmonary function. Fatalities are rare even with recreational use. There is a concern about psychological dependence, but physical dependence is less well documented. Cannabis preparations may presently offer an option for compassionate use in severe neurologic diseases, but at this point, only when standard-of-care therapy is ineffective. As more high-quality clinical data are gathered, the therapeutic application of cannabinoids will likely expand. PMID:25427150

  7. Coprophagia in neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Josephs, Keith A; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Parisi, Joseph E; Lapid, Maria I

    2016-05-01

    We report on the unusual behavior of coprophagia (eating one's own feces) in neurologic disorders. The Mayo Clinic Health Sciences-computerized clinical database was queried for all patients evaluated at our institution between 1995 and 2015 in which coprophagia was documented in the medical records. Twenty-six patients were identified of which 17 had coprophagia. Of the 17 patients, five were excluded due to age at onset less than 10 years, leaving 12 adult patients for this study. The median age at onset of coprophagia in the 12 patients was 55 years (range 20-88 years), and half were female. Additional behaviors were common including scatolia (fecal smearing), hypersexuality, aggression, and pica (eating objects of any kind). Coprophagia was associated with neurodegenerative dementia in six patients, developmental delay in two, and one each with seizures, steroid psychosis, frontal lobe tumor, and schizoaffective disorder. Brain imaging in the six patients with dementia showed moderate-to-severe medial temporal lobe atrophy, as well as mild frontal lobe atrophy. Autopsy examination was performed in one patient and revealed frontotemporal lobar degeneration pathology. Many different behavioral and pharmacologic therapies were implemented, yet only haloperidol was associated with discontinuation of the behavior. Coprophagia is associated with different neurologic disorders, particularly neurodegenerative dementias. The behavior may be related to medial temporal lobe atrophy, similar to the Klüver-Bucy syndrome. Haloperidol appears to be effective in treating the behavior, at least in some patients. PMID:27017341

  8. Fellowship programs in behavioral neurology.

    PubMed

    Green, R C; Benjamin, S; Cummings, J L

    1995-03-01

    We sent a behavioral neurology fellowship questionnaire to each of the training directors of 160 neurology residency programs throughout the world, seeking information about programs offering advanced training in behavioral neurology (or similar fellowships in cognitive neurology, neurobehavior, or cognitive neuroscience). Response rate was 100%. Thirty-four respondents reported active fellowship programs in behavioral neurology, and 28 additional respondents indicated that a behavioral neurology fellowship was planned. Nine of the 34 programs (26.5%) defined themselves as exclusively or predominantly concerned with dementia and age-related neurobehavioral disorders. Directors of the 34 active fellowship programs estimated that their combined programs had graduated 199 fellows and were currently training fifty. Most fellowships concentrated on outpatient clinical training, with teaching required by 78.1% and research required by 81.8%. Specialty certification for behavioral neurology was favored by over 75% of behavioral neurology fellowship training directors but by only 30% of training directors in residency programs without behavioral neurology fellowships. Behavioral neurology training programs have grown dramatically in response to an increased recognition of the academic interest in and the clinical needs for these services. PMID:7898686

  9. uPAR

    PubMed Central

    Uhrin, Pavel; Breuss, Johannes M.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-initiated angiogenesis requires both coordinated proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix provided by the urokinase plasminogen activator/urokinase receptor (uPA/uPAR) system and regulation of cell-migration provided by integrin–matrix interaction. Previously we have shown that stimulation of pericellular proteolysis induced by VEGF occurs via the VEGF receptor-2 leading to redistribution of uPAR to focal adhesions at the leading edge of endothelial cells. In our recent work published in Cardiovascular Research, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the uPAR-dependent modulation of VEGF-induced endothelial migration. By applying a micropatterning technique we described that VEGF stimulation results in complex formation between uPAR and α5β1-integrin on the cell surface. The subsequent internalization of this complex, important for receptor redistribution, was demonstrated by flow-cytometry and immunohistochemistry. Targeting of the interaction site between uPAR and α5β1 impairs receptor internalization and leads to the inhibition of endothelial cell migration in vitro and in an angiogenesis model in vivo. This proof-of-principle that the interface of uPAR and α5β1-integrin may represent a promising site to therapeutically target tumor angiogenesis raises hope for the development of an anti-angiogenic approach that is limited to only the mobilizing effect of VEGF to endothelial cells, and does not interfere with the inarguably positive effect of VEGF as survival factor. PMID:23076213

  10. Child neurology services in Africa.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Newton, Charles R

    2011-12-01

    The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled professionals away from Africa. Referral systems from primary to tertiary are often unpredictable and chaotic. There is a lack of access to reliable supplies of basic neurology treatments such as antiepileptic drugs. Few countries have nationally accepted guidelines either for the management of epilepsy or status epilepticus. There is a great need to develop better training capacity across Africa in the recognition and management of neurologic conditions in children, from primary health care to the subspecialist level. PMID:22019842

  11. History of neurologic examination books.

    PubMed

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors). PMID:25829645

  12. Child Neurology Services in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Wilmshurst, Jo M.; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Newton, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled professionals away from Africa. Referral systems from primary to tertiary are often unpredictable and chaotic. There is a lack of access to reliable supplies of basic neurology treatments such as antiepileptic drugs. Few countries have nationally accepted guidelines either for the management of epilepsy or status epilepticus. There is a great need to develop better training capacity across Africa in the recognition and management of neurologic conditions in children, from primary health care to the subspecialist level. PMID:22019842

  13. Antisense Therapy in Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joshua J.A.; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Antisense therapy is an approach to fighting diseases using short DNA-like molecules called antisense oligonucleotides. Recently, antisense therapy has emerged as an exciting and promising strategy for the treatment of various neurodegenerative and neuromuscular disorders. Previous and ongoing pre-clinical and clinical trials have provided encouraging early results. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), Huntington’s disease (HD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), dysferlinopathy (including limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2B; LGMD2B, Miyoshi myopathy; MM, and distal myopathy with anterior tibial onset; DMAT), and myotonic dystrophy (DM) are all reported to be promising targets for antisense therapy. This paper focuses on the current progress of antisense therapies in neurology. PMID:25562650

  14. Consciousness: a neurological perspective.

    PubMed

    Cavanna, Andrea E; Shah, Sachin; Eddy, Clare M; Williams, Adrian; Rickards, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Consciousness is a state so essentially entwined with human experience, yet so difficult to conceptually define and measure. In this article, we explore how a bidimensional model of consciousness involving both level of arousal and subjective awareness of the contents of consciousness can be used to differentiate a range of healthy and altered conscious states. These include the different sleep stages of healthy individuals and the altered states of consciousness associated with neurological conditions such as epilepsy, vegetative state and coma. In particular, we discuss how arousal and awareness are positively correlated in normal physiological states with the exception of REM sleep, while a disturbance in this relationship is characteristic of vegetative state, minimally conscious state, complex partial seizures and sleepwalking. PMID:21447904

  15. Neurology and diving.

    PubMed

    Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Diving exposes a person to the combined effects of increased ambient pressure and immersion. The reduction in pressure when surfacing can precipitate decompression sickness (DCS), caused by bubble formation within tissues due to inert gas supersaturation. Arterial gas embolism (AGE) can also occur due to pulmonary barotrauma as a result of breath holding during ascent or gas trapping due to disease, causing lung hyperexpansion, rupture and direct entry of alveolar gas into the blood. Bubble disease due to either DCS or AGE is collectively known as decompression illness. Tissue and intravascular bubbles can induce a cascade of events resulting in CNS injury. Manifestations of decompression illness can vary in severity, from mild (paresthesias, joint pains, fatigue) to severe (vertigo, hearing loss, paraplegia, quadriplegia). Particularly as these conditions are uncommon, early recognition is essential to provide appropriate management, consisting of first aid oxygen, targeted fluid resuscitation and hyperbaric oxygen, which is the definitive treatment. Less common neurologic conditions that do not require hyperbaric oxygen include rupture of a labyrinthine window due to inadequate equalization of middle ear pressure during descent, which can precipitate vertigo and hearing loss. Sinus and middle ear overpressurization during ascent can compress the trigeminal and facial nerves respectively, causing temporary facial hypesthesia and lower motor neuron facial weakness. Some conditions preclude safe diving, such as seizure disorders, since a convulsion underwater is likely to be fatal. Preventive measures to reduce neurologic complications of diving include exclusion of individuals with specific medical conditions and safe diving procedures, particularly related to descent and ascent. PMID:24365363

  16. [Cannabinoids in neurology--Brazilian Academy of Neurology].

    PubMed

    Brucki, Sonia M D; Frota, Norberto Anísio; Schestatsky, Pedro; Souza, Adélia Henriques; Carvalho, Valentina Nicole; Manreza, Maria Luiza Giraldes; Mendes, Maria Fernanda; Comini-Frota, Elizabeth; Vasconcelos, Cláudia; Tumas, Vitor; Ferraz, Henrique B; Barbosa, Egberto; Jurno, Mauro Eduardo

    2015-04-01

    The use of cannabidiol in some neurological conditions was allowed by Conselho Regional de Medicina de São Paulo and by Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA). Specialists on behalf of Academia Brasileira de Neurologia prepared a critical statement about use of cannabidiol and other cannabis derivatives in neurological diseases. PMID:25992535

  17. THE MEASURES PAR PROJECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frouin, R. J.; Franz, B.

    2009-12-01

    The solar energy available for photosynthesis, known as PAR, controls the growth of phytoplankton and, therefore, regulates the composition and evolution of marine ecosystems. Knowing the spatial and temporal distribution of PAR over the oceans is critical to understanding biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nutrients, and oxygen, and to address important climate and global change issues such as the fate of anthropogenic atmospheric carbon dioxide. In view of this, a 12-year time series of PAR at the ocean surface, starting in September 1997, is being produced by the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group from SeaWiFS, MODIS-Terra, and MODIS-Aqua data. The product covers the global oceans, with a spatial resolution of about 9.3x9.3 km (equal area grid) and a temporal resolution of one day. PAR is computed as the difference between the 400-700 nm solar flux incident on the top of the atmosphere (known) and reflected back to space by the atmosphere and surface (derived from satellite radiance), taking into account atmospheric absorption (modeled). Knowledge of pixel composition is not required, eliminating the need for cloud screening and arbitrary assumptions about sub-pixel cloudiness. Combining data from satellite sensors with different equatorial crossing times accounts for the diurnal variability of clouds and, therefore, increases accuracy on a daily time scale. The processing system, including routine check of accuracy and control of quality, is designed to operate during the entire lifetime of SeaWiFS and MODIS, and to accommodate future sensors with ocean-color capabilities. Maps of daily, weekly, and monthly PAR obtained from individual sensors are presented, as well as merged products. Accuracy is quantified in comparisons with other satellite estimates, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis product, and in-situ measurements from fixed buoys and platforms. The good statistical performance makes the satellite PAR product suitable for large

  18. [Sarcopenia and frailty in neurology].

    PubMed

    Maetzler, W; Drey, M; Jacobs, A H

    2015-04-01

    Sarcopenia and frailty are common geriatric syndromes and are associated with adverse health outcome and impaired health-related quality of life. Co-occurrences of these two syndromes with age-related neurological diseases are potentially high but not well investigated. Moreover, it is not well understood how these syndromes interact with neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and stroke. This article introduces the currently most accepted concepts of sarcopenia and frailty, discusses the potential relevance of the syndromes for geriatric patients and presents examples of studies that investigated potential interactions between these geriatric and neurological syndromes and conditions. First results indicate that (i) the co-occurrence of these geriatric syndromes and age-related neurological diseases is high, (ii) sarcopenia and frailty can influence the clinical state of neurological diseases to a relevant extent and (iii) at least some common causes and pathophysiological processes confer the geriatric and neurological conditions. In conclusion, profound knowledge about the interaction of sarcopenia, frailty and age-associated neurological conditions is currently not available. Such knowledge would have an enormous potential for improved therapy of these neurological conditions. PMID:25787725

  19. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    PubMed

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed. PMID:11143502

  20. Neurology of Volition

    PubMed Central

    Kranick, Sarah M.; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders of volition may be characterized by deficits in willing and/or agency. When we move our bodies through space, it is the sense that we intended to move (willing) and that our actions were a consequence of this intention (self-agency) that gives us the sense of voluntariness and a general feeling of being “in control.” While it is possible to have movements that share executive machinery ordinarily used for voluntary movement but lack a sense of voluntariness, such as psychogenic movement disorders, it is also possible to claim volition for presumed involuntary movements (early chorea) or even when no movement is produced (anosognosia). The study of such patients should enlighten traditional models of how the percepts of volition are generated in the brain with regards to movement. We discuss volition and its components as multi-leveled processes with feedforward and feedback information flow, and dependence on prior expectations as well as external and internal cues. PMID:23329204

  1. Neurological manifestations of malaria.

    PubMed

    Román, G C; Senanayake, N

    1992-03-01

    The involvement of the nervous system in malaria is reviewed in this paper. Cerebral malaria, the acute encephalopathy which complicates exclusively the infection by Plasmodium falciparum commonly affects children and adolescents in hyperendemic areas. Plugging of cerebral capillaries and venules by clumped, parasitized red cells causing sludging in the capillary circulation is one hypothesis to explain its pathogenesis. The other is a humoral hypothesis which proposes nonspecific, immune-mediated, inflammatory responses with release of vasoactive substances capable of producing endothelial damage and alterations of permeability. Cerebral malaria has a mortality rate up to 50%, and also a considerable longterm morbidity, particularly in children. Hypoglycemia, largely in patients treated with quinine, may complicate the cerebral symptomatology. Other central nervous manifestations of malaria include intracranial hemorrhage, cerebral arterial occlusion, and transient extrapyramidal and neuropsychiatric manifestations. A self-limiting, isolated cerebellar ataxia, presumably caused by immunological mechanisms, in patients recovering from falciparum malaria has been recognized in Sri Lanka. Malaria is a common cause of febrile seizures in the tropics, and it also contributes to the development of epilepsy in later life. Several reports of spinal cord and peripheral nerve involvement are also available. A transient muscle paralysis resembling periodic paralysis during febrile episodes of malaria has been described in some patients. The pathogenesis of these neurological manifestations remains unexplored, but offers excellent perspectives for research at a clinical as well as experimental level. PMID:1307475

  2. Neurological Symptoms of Hypophosphatasia.

    PubMed

    Taketani, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a bone metabolic disorder caused by mutations in the liver/bone/kidney alkaline phosphatase gene (ALPL), which encodes tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). This disease is characterized by disrupted bone and tooth mineralization, and reduced serum AP activity. Along with bone and tooth symptoms, many neurological symptoms, seizure, encephalopathy, intracranial hypertension, mental retardation, deafness, and growth hormone deficiency (GHD), are frequently found in HPP patients. Seizure occurs in severe HPP types soon after birth, and responds to pyridoxine, but is an indicator of lethal prognosis. Encephalopathy rarely presents in severe HPP types, but has severe sequelae. Intracranial hypertension complicated in mild HPP types develops after the age of 1 year and sometimes need neurosurgical intervention. Mental retardation, deafness and GHD are more frequently found in Japanese HPP patients. Mental retardation occurs in all HPP types. Deafness in perinatal lethal type is both conductive and sensorineural. GHD develops in all but perinatal lethal type and the diagnosis tends to delay. The pathogenesis of these neural features of HPP might be due to impairment of both vitamin B6 metabolism and central nervous system development by ALPL mutations. PMID:26219717

  3. Paraneoplastic neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Blaes, Franz; Tschernatsch, Marlene

    2010-10-01

    The article provides an overview on the diagnosis and pathogenesis of paraneoplastic neurological disorders (PNDs), and subsequently the current therapeutic strategies in these patients. PNDs are nervous system dysfunctions in cancer patients, which are not due to a local effect of the tumor or its metastases. Most of these clinically defined syndromes in adults are associated with lung cancer, especially small-cell lung cancer, lymphoma and gynecological tumors. In a part of the PND, an overlapping of different clinical syndromes can be observed. Highly specific autoantibodies directed against onconeuronal antigens led to the current hypothesis of an autoimmune pathophysiology. Whereas the most central nervous PNDs are more T-cell-mediated, limbic encephalitis can be caused by pathogenic receptor autoantibodies. The PND of the neuromuscular junction and paraneoplastic autonomic neuropathy are mainly associated with receptor or ion channel autoantibodies. The childhood opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome and the PNDs associated with receptor/ion channel autoantibodies often respond to immunosuppressive therapies, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulins. By contrast, most CNS PNDs associated with defined antineuronal antibodies directed against intracellular antigens only stabilize after tumor treatment. PMID:20925471

  4. Neurologic Itch Management.

    PubMed

    Şavk, Ekin

    2016-01-01

    Neurologic itch is defined as pruritus resulting from any dysfunction of the nervous system. Itch arising due to a neuroanatomic pathology is seen to be neuropathic. Causes of neuropathic itch range from localized entrapment of a peripheral nerve to generalized degeneration of small nerve fibers. Antipruritic medications commonly used for other types of itch such as antihistamines and corticosteroids lack efficacy in neuropathic itch. Currently there are no therapeutic options that offer relief in all types of neuropathic pruritus, and treatment strategies vary according to etiology. It is best to decide on the appropriate tests and procedures in collaboration with a neurologist during the initial work-up. Treatment of neuropathic itch includes general antipruritic measures, local or systemic pharmacotherapy, various physical modalities, and surgery. Surgical intervention is the obvious choice of therapy in cases of spinal or cerebral mass, abscess, or hemorrhagic stroke, and may provide decompression in entrapment neuropathies. Symptomatic treatment is needed in the vast majority of patients. General antipruritic measures should be encouraged. Local treatment agents with at least some antipruritic effect include capsaicin, local anesthetics, doxepin, tacrolimus, and botulinum toxin A. Current systemic therapy relies on anticonvulsants such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Phototherapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and physical therapy have also been of value in selected cases. Among the avenues to be explored are transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain, new topical cannabinoid receptor agonists, various modes of acupuncture, a holistic approach with healing touch, and cell transplantation to the spinal cord. PMID:27578080

  5. History of neurologic examination books

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word “examination” in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's “Blue Book of Neurology” (“Blue Bible”) was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors). PMID:25829645

  6. Recombination in the Human Pseudoautosomal Region PAR1

    PubMed Central

    Hinch, Anjali G.; Altemose, Nicolas; Noor, Nudrat; Donnelly, Peter; Myers, Simon R.

    2014-01-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is a short region of homology between the mammalian X and Y chromosomes, which has undergone rapid evolution. A crossover in the PAR is essential for the proper disjunction of X and Y chromosomes in male meiosis, and PAR deletion results in male sterility. This leads the human PAR with the obligatory crossover, PAR1, to having an exceptionally high male crossover rate, which is 17-fold higher than the genome-wide average. However, the mechanism by which this obligatory crossover occurs remains unknown, as does the fine-scale positioning of crossovers across this region. Recent research in mice has suggested that crossovers in PAR may be mediated independently of the protein PRDM9, which localises virtually all crossovers in the autosomes. To investigate recombination in this region, we construct the most fine-scale genetic map containing directly observed crossovers to date using African-American pedigrees. We leverage recombination rates inferred from the breakdown of linkage disequilibrium in human populations and investigate the signatures of DNA evolution due to recombination. Further, we identify direct PRDM9 binding sites using ChIP-seq in human cells. Using these independent lines of evidence, we show that, in contrast with mouse, PRDM9 does localise peaks of recombination in the human PAR1. We find that recombination is a far more rapid and intense driver of sequence evolution in PAR1 than it is on the autosomes. We also show that PAR1 hotspot activities differ significantly among human populations. Finally, we find evidence that PAR1 hotspot positions have changed between human and chimpanzee, with no evidence of sharing among the hottest hotspots. We anticipate that the genetic maps built and validated in this work will aid research on this vital and fascinating region of the genome. PMID:25033397

  7. Recombination in the human Pseudoautosomal region PAR1.

    PubMed

    Hinch, Anjali G; Altemose, Nicolas; Noor, Nudrat; Donnelly, Peter; Myers, Simon R

    2014-07-01

    The pseudoautosomal region (PAR) is a short region of homology between the mammalian X and Y chromosomes, which has undergone rapid evolution. A crossover in the PAR is essential for the proper disjunction of X and Y chromosomes in male meiosis, and PAR deletion results in male sterility. This leads the human PAR with the obligatory crossover, PAR1, to having an exceptionally high male crossover rate, which is 17-fold higher than the genome-wide average. However, the mechanism by which this obligatory crossover occurs remains unknown, as does the fine-scale positioning of crossovers across this region. Recent research in mice has suggested that crossovers in PAR may be mediated independently of the protein PRDM9, which localises virtually all crossovers in the autosomes. To investigate recombination in this region, we construct the most fine-scale genetic map containing directly observed crossovers to date using African-American pedigrees. We leverage recombination rates inferred from the breakdown of linkage disequilibrium in human populations and investigate the signatures of DNA evolution due to recombination. Further, we identify direct PRDM9 binding sites using ChIP-seq in human cells. Using these independent lines of evidence, we show that, in contrast with mouse, PRDM9 does localise peaks of recombination in the human PAR1. We find that recombination is a far more rapid and intense driver of sequence evolution in PAR1 than it is on the autosomes. We also show that PAR1 hotspot activities differ significantly among human populations. Finally, we find evidence that PAR1 hotspot positions have changed between human and chimpanzee, with no evidence of sharing among the hottest hotspots. We anticipate that the genetic maps built and validated in this work will aid research on this vital and fascinating region of the genome. PMID:25033397

  8. Cytokine Therapies in Neurological Disease.

    PubMed

    Azodi, Shila; Jacobson, Steven

    2016-07-01

    Cytokines are a heterogeneous group of glycoproteins that coordinate physiological functions. Cytokine deregulation is observed in many neurological diseases. This article reviews current research focused on human clinical trials of cytokine and anticytokine therapies in the treatment of several neurological disease including stroke, neuromuscular diseases, neuroinfectious diseases, demyelinating diseases, and neurobehavioral diseases. This research suggests that cytokine therapy applications may play an important role in offering new strategies for disease modulation and treatment. Further, this research provides insights into the causal link between cytokine deregulation and neurological diseases. PMID:27388288

  9. Neurologic Manifestations of Blood Dyscrasias.

    PubMed

    Couriel, Daniel R; Ricker, Holly; Steinbach, Mary; Lee, Catherine J

    2016-08-01

    Neurologic manifestations are common in blood diseases, and they can be caused by the hematologic disorder or its treatment. This article discusses hematologic diseases in adult patients, and categorizes them into benign and malignant conditions. The more common benign hematologic diseases associated with neurologic manifestations include anemias, particularly caused by B12 deficiency and sickle cell disease, and a variety of disorders of hemostasis causing bleeding or thrombosis, including thrombotic microangiopathy. Malignant conditions like multiple myeloma, leukemias, and lymphomas can have neurologic complications resulting from direct involvement, or caused by the different therapies to treat these cancers. PMID:27443994

  10. Neurological effects of deep diving.

    PubMed

    Grønning, Marit; Aarli, Johan A

    2011-05-15

    Deep diving is defined as diving to depths more than 50 m of seawater (msw), and is mainly used for occupational and military purposes. A deep dive is characterized by the compression phase, the bottom time and the decompression phase. Neurological and neurophysiologic effects are demonstrated in divers during the compression phase and the bottom time. Immediate and transient neurological effects after deep dives have been shown in some divers. However, the results from the epidemiological studies regarding long term neurological effects from deep diving are conflicting and still not conclusive. Prospective clinical studies with sufficient power and sensitivity are needed to solve this very important issue. PMID:21377169

  11. [Neurological syndromes, encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Tsuji, Shoji

    2010-06-01

    The remote effects of malignant tumors in most cases of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes(PNS)are mediated by autoimmune processes against antigens shared by the tumor cells and the nervous tissue(onconeural antigens). Onconeural (or paraneoplastic)antibodies are broadly categorized into two groups according to the location of the corresponding onconeural antigens, inside or on the surface of neurons. Antibodies established as clinically relevant diagnostic markers for PNS are designated as well-characterized onconeural antibodies (or classical antibodies)that target intracellular antigens(Hu, Yo, Ri, CV2/CRMP5,Ma2, and amphiphysin). They also serve as useful markers in detecting primary tumors. Recent identification of new antibodies as markers of subtypes of limbic encephalitis has also expanded the concept of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. These autoantibodies are directed to neuronal cell-surface antigens including neurotransmitter receptors(NMDA, AMPA, and GABAB receptors)and ion channels(VGKC). They are less frequently associated with cancer, so that they cannot be used as specific markers for PNS. Autoimmune limbic encephalitis with anti-neuronal cell surface antobodies and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with classical antibodies overlap in some clinical features but are pathophysiologically distinct. Classical antibodies are not simple tumor markers. They seem to be closely related to the disease mechanisms because specific intrathecal synthesis has been shown in PNS patients. However, attempts to produce an animal model of PNS by passive transfer of these antibodies have been unsuccessful, and there is no direct evidence demonstrating the pathogenic role of classical antibodies. Instead, some circumstantial evidence, including pathological studies showing extensive infiltrates of T cells in the CNS of the patients, supports the hypothesis that cytotoxic-T cell mechanisms cause irreversible neuronal damage. On the other hand, humoral immune

  12. La pelade par plaques

    PubMed Central

    Spano, Frank; Donovan, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter aux médecins de famille des renseignements de base pour faire comprendre l’épidémiologie, la pathogenèse, l’histologie et l’approche clinique au diagnostic de la pelade par plaques. Sources des données Une recension a été effectuée dans PubMed pour trouver des articles pertinents concernant la pathogenèse, le diagnostic et le pronostic de la pelade par plaques. Message principal La pelade par plaques est une forme de perte pileuse auto-immune dont la prévalence durant une vie est d’environ 2 %. Des antécédents personnels ou familiaux de troubles auto-immuns concomitants, comme le vitiligo ou une maladie de la thyroïde, peuvent être observés dans un petit sous-groupe de patients. Le diagnostic peut souvent être posé de manière clinique en se fondant sur la perte de cheveux non cicatricielle et circulaire caractéristique, accompagnée de cheveux en « point d’exclamation » en périphérie chez ceux dont le problème en est aux premiers stades. Le diagnostic des cas plus complexes ou des présentations inhabituelles peut être facilité par une biopsie et un examen histologique. Le pronostic varie largement et de mauvais résultats sont associés à une apparition à un âge précoce, une perte importante, la variante ophiasis, des changements aux ongles, des antécédents familiaux ou des troubles auto-immuns concomitants. Conclusion La pelade par plaques est une forme auto-immune de perte de cheveux périodiquement observée en soins primaires. Les médecins de famille sont bien placés pour identifier la pelade par plaques, déterminer la gravité de la maladie et poser le diagnostic différentiel approprié. De plus, ils sont en mesure de renseigner leurs patients à propos de l’évolution clinique de la maladie ainsi que du pronostic général selon le sous-type de patients.

  13. Neurologic Complications in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Nicholas A.; Matiello, Marcelo; Samuels, Martin A.

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis (IE) are common and frequently life threatening. Neurologic events are not always obvious. The prediction and management of neurologic complications of IE are not easily approached algorithmically, and the impact they have on timing and ability to surgically repair or replace the affected valve often requires a painstaking evaluation and joint effort across multiple medical disciplines in order to achieve the best possible outcome. Although specific recommendations are always tailored to the individual patient, there are some guiding principles that can be used to help direct the decision-making process. Herein, we review the pathophysiology, epidemiology, manifestations, and diagnosis of neurological complications of IE and further consider the impact they have on clinical decision making. PMID:25360207

  14. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Shrikant; Trikamji, Bhavesh; Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Parampreet; Nair, Rajasekharan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation's first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835), Calcutta (1835) and Mumbai (1848). Prior to India's independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI). Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN). Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930's. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951) include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991). The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in the amount of

  15. Neurologic manifestations of Kanzaki disease.

    PubMed

    Umehara, F; Matsumuro, K; Kurono, Y; Arimura, K; Osame, M; Kanzaki, T

    2004-05-11

    We describe the neurologic findings in a patient with alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency (Kanzaki disease). Clinical and electrophysiologic studies revealed sensory-motor polyneuropathy, and sural nerve pathology showed decreased density of myelinated fibers with axonal degeneration. The patient had mildly impaired intellectual function with abnormal brain MRI and sensory-neuronal hearing impairment with repeated episodes of vertigo attacks. These findings suggest that Kanzaki disease may develop neurologic complications in the CNS and peripheral nervous system. PMID:15136691

  16. Hippocrates: the forefather of neurology.

    PubMed

    Breitenfeld, T; Jurasic, M J; Breitenfeld, D

    2014-09-01

    Hippocrates is one of the most influential medical doctors of all times. He started observing and experimenting in times of mysticism and magic. He carried a holistic and humanitarian approach to the patient with examination as the principal approach-inspection, palpation and auscultation are still the most important tools in diagnosing algorithms of today. He had immense experience with the human body most likely due to numerous wound treatments he had performed; some even believe he performed autopsies despite the negative trend at the time. Hippocrates identified the brain as the analyst of the outside world, the interpreter of consciousness and the center of intelligence and willpower. Interestingly, Hippocrates was aware of many valid concepts in neurology; his treatise On the Sacred Disease was the most important for understanding neurology and epilepsy. His other ideas pioneered modern day neurology mentioning neurological diseases like apoplexy, spondylitis, hemiplegia, and paraplegia. Today, 10 % of neurological Pubmed and 7 % of neuroscience Scopus reviews mention Corpus Hippocraticum as one of the sources. Therefore, Hippocrates may be considered as the forefather of neurology. PMID:25027011

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction is an important cause of neurological deficits in an inflammatory model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sadeghian, Mona; Mastrolia, Vincenzo; Rezaei Haddad, Ali; Mosley, Angelina; Mullali, Gizem; Schiza, Dimitra; Sajic, Marija; Hargreaves, Iain; Heales, Simon; Duchen, Michael R; Smith, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Neuroinflammation can cause major neurological dysfunction, without demyelination, in both multiple sclerosis (MS) and a mouse model of the disease (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis; EAE), but the mechanisms remain obscure. Confocal in vivo imaging of the mouse EAE spinal cord reveals that impaired neurological function correlates with the depolarisation of both the axonal mitochondria and the axons themselves. Indeed, the depolarisation parallels the expression of neurological deficit at the onset of disease, and during relapse, improving during remission in conjunction with the deficit. Mitochondrial dysfunction, fragmentation and impaired trafficking were most severe in regions of extravasated perivascular inflammatory cells. The dysfunction at disease onset was accompanied by increased expression of the rate-limiting glycolytic enzyme phosphofructokinase-2 in activated astrocytes, and by selective reduction in spinal mitochondrial complex I activity. The metabolic changes preceded any demyelination or axonal degeneration. We conclude that mitochondrial dysfunction is a major cause of reversible neurological deficits in neuroinflammatory disease, such as MS. PMID:27624721

  18. La pelade par plaques

    PubMed Central

    Spano, Frank; Donovan, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    Résumé Objectif Présenter aux médecins de famille des renseignements de base pour faire comprendre les schémas thérapeutiques et les résultats des traitements pour la pelade par plaques, de même que les aider à identifier les patients pour qui une demande de consultation en dermatologie pourrait s’imposer. Sources des données Une recension a été effectuée dans PubMed pour trouver des articles pertinents concernant le traitement de la pelade par plaques. Message principal La pelade par plaques est une forme auto-immune de perte pileuse qui touche à la fois les enfants et les adultes. Même s’il n’y a pas de mortalité associée à la maladie, la morbidité découlant des effets psychologiques de la perte des cheveux peut être dévastatrice. Lorsque la pelade par plaques et le sous-type de la maladie sont identifiés, un schéma thérapeutique approprié peut être amorcé pour aider à arrêter la chute des cheveux et possiblement faire commencer la repousse. Les traitements de première intention sont la triamcinolone intralésionnelle avec des corticostéroïdes topiques ou du minoxidil ou les 2. Les médecins de famille peuvent prescrire ces traitements en toute sécurité et amorcer ces thérapies. Les cas plus avancés ou réfractaires pourraient avoir besoin de diphénylcyclopropénone topique ou d’anthraline topique. On peut traiter la perte de cils avec des analogues de la prostaglandine. Les personnes ayant subi une perte de cheveux abondante peuvent recourir à des options de camouflage ou à des prothèses capillaires. Il est important de surveiller les troubles psychiatriques en raison des effets psychologiques profonds de la perte de cheveux. Conclusion Les médecins de famille verront de nombreux patients qui perdent leurs cheveux. La reconnaissance de la pelade par plaques et la compréhension du processus pathologique sous-jacent permettent d’amorcer un schéma thérapeutique approprié. Les cas plus graves ou r

  19. Proteases in agricultural dust induce lung inflammation through PAR-1 and PAR-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Romberger, Debra J; Heires, Art J; Nordgren, Tara M; Souder, Chelsea P; West, William; Liu, Xiang-de; Poole, Jill A; Toews, Myron L; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-08-15

    Workers exposed to aerosolized dust present in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are susceptible to inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Extracts of dust collected from hog CAFOs [hog dust extract (HDE)] are potent stimulators of lung inflammatory responses in several model systems. The observation that HDE contains active proteases prompted the present study, which evaluated the role of CAFO dust proteases in lung inflammatory processes and tested whether protease-activated receptors (PARs) are involved in the signaling pathway for these events. We hypothesized that the damaging proinflammatory effect of HDE is due, in part, to the proteolytic activation of PARs, and inhibiting the proteases in HDE or disrupting PAR activation would attenuate HDE-mediated inflammatory indexes in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), in mouse lung slices in vitro, and in a murine in vivo exposure model. Human BECs and mouse lung slice cultures stimulated with 5% HDE released significantly more of each of the cytokines measured (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, keratinocyte-derived chemokine/CXC chemokine ligand 1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2/CXC chemokine ligand 2) than controls, and these effects were markedly diminished by protease inhibition. Inhibition of PARs also blunted the HDE-induced cytokine release from BECs. In addition, protease depletion inhibited HDE-induced BEC intracellular PKCα and PKCε activation. C57BL/6J mice administered 12.5% HDE intranasally, either once or daily for 3 wk, exhibited increased total cellular and neutrophil influx, bronchial alveolar fluid inflammatory cytokines, lung histopathology, and inflammatory scores compared with mice receiving protease-depleted HDE. These data suggest that proteases in dust from CAFOs are important mediators of lung inflammation, and these proteases and their receptors may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in CAFO dust-induced airways disease. PMID

  20. [Urgent neurologic states: experience at the Neurology Clinic in Sarajevo].

    PubMed

    Loncarević, Nedim; Dimitrijević, Jovan; Hrnjica, Mehmed; Hećo, Suad

    2004-01-01

    There is a quite good definition of medical care for patients suffering from chronicle neurological diseases. However the neurologist role in taking care of urgent cases is substantially less determined. This paper is analyzing one year efforts of the on duty neurological team in the Out Patient Department and Emergency Division of the Neurology Department in Sarajevo. During this period the on duty neurological team examined the total of 3939 patients, out of which 1022 patients where kept for treatment. The patients where most frequently assigned to the Emergency unit for following reasons: vascular incident of the Central Nervous System(1955 patients or 50%), cerebrovascular accident represented with 1290 or 33%, and TIA of the carotid and vertebrobasilar area 544 or 14% along with hypertensive encephalopathia, 118 or 3%. This is followed by the group of the short-term disturbance of consciousness (472 or 125), out of which the consciousness crises represented 257 or 7%, and epileptic crises 215 or 5%. Following are the lower percentages of the headaches (287 or 7%), radicular painful syndrome of cervical and lumbal area (209 or 5%), vertigo (183 or 5%), neurophatia (167 or 4%), etc. The more extensive number of patients admitted at the Emergency Division where suffering from brain stroke (800 or 78%), TIA was represented by a lower number (172 or 17%). Only 50 patients had other diagnosis. The ischemic stroke represented 674 or 81% with patients suffering from the brain stroke and the hemorrhagic stroke 153 or 19%. Today, the urgent neurological conditions represent a particular area of Neurology, not only neurologists need to know but also other medical doctors, to enable the patients to be forwarded on time to the appropriate care institution. PMID:15202312

  1. Occupational neurological disorders in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-A; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a literature review of occupational neurological disorders and related research in Korea, focusing on chemical hazards. We reviewed occupational neurological disorders investigated by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute of Korean Occupational Safety and Health Agency between 1992 and 2009, categorizing them as neurological disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) or as neurodegenerative disorders. We also examined peer-reviewed journal articles related to neurotoxicology, published from 1984 to 2009. Outbreaks of occupational neurological disorder of the CNS due to inorganic mercury and carbon disulfide poisoning had helped prompt the development of the occupational safety and health system of Korea. Other major neurological disorders of the CNS included methyl bromide intoxication and chronic toxic encephalopathy. Most of the PNS disorders were n-hexane-induced peripheral neuritis, reported from the electronics industry. Reports of manganese-induced Parkinsonism resulted in the introduction of neuroimaging techniques to occupational medicine. Since the late 1990s, the direction of research has been moving toward degenerative disorder and early effect of neurotoxicity. To understand the early effects of neurotoxic chemicals in the preclinical stage, more follow-up studies of a longer duration are necessary. PMID:21258587

  2. Occupational Neurological Disorders in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a literature review of occupational neurological disorders and related research in Korea, focusing on chemical hazards. We reviewed occupational neurological disorders investigated by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute of Korean Occupational Safety and Health Agency between 1992 and 2009, categorizing them as neurological disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) or as neurodegenerative disorders. We also examined peer-reviewed journal articles related to neurotoxicology, published from 1984 to 2009. Outbreaks of occupational neurological disorder of the CNS due to inorganic mercury and carbon disulfide poisoning had helped prompt the development of the occupational safety and health system of Korea. Other major neurological disorders of the CNS included methyl bromide intoxication and chronic toxic encephalopathy. Most of the PNS disorders were n-hexane-induced peripheral neuritis, reported from the electronics industry. Reports of manganese-induced Parkinsonism resulted in the introduction of neuroimaging techniques to occupational medicine. Since the late 1990s, the direction of research has been moving toward degenerative disorder and early effect of neurotoxicity. To understand the early effects of neurotoxic chemicals in the preclinical stage, more follow-up studies of a longer duration are necessary. PMID:21258587

  3. Neurologic Complications in Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Basiri, Abbas; Soltani, Mohammad Hossein; Kamranmanesh, Mohammadreza; Tabibi, Ali; Mohsen Ziaee, Seyed Amir; Nouralizadeh, Akbar; Sharifiaghdas, Farzaneh; Poorzamani, Mahtab; Gharaei, Babak; Ozhand, Ardalan; Lashay, Alireza; Ahanian, Ali; Aminsharifi, Alireza; Sichani, Mehrdad Mohammadi; Asl-Zare, Mohammad; Ali Beigi, Faramarz Mohammad; Najjaran, Vahid; Abedinzadeh, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) has been the preferred procedure for the removal of large renal stones in Iran since 1990. Recently, we encountered a series of devastating neurologic complications during PCNL, including paraplegia and hemiplegia. There are several reports of neurologic complications following PCNL owing to paradoxical air emboli, but there are no reports of paraplegia following PCNL. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who had undergone PCNL in 13 different endourologic centers and retrieved data related to neurologic complications after PCNL, including coma, paraplegia, hemiplegia, and quadriplegia. Results The total number of PCNL procedures in these 13 centers was 30,666. Among these procedures, 11 cases were complicated by neurologic events, and four of these cases experienced paraplegia. All events happened with the patient in the prone position with the use of general anesthesia and in the presence of air injection. There were no reports of neurologic complications in PCNL procedures performed with the patient under general anesthesia and in the prone position and with contrast injection. Conclusions It can be assumed that using room air to opacify the collecting system played a major role in the occurrence of these complications. Likewise, the prone position and general anesthesia may predispose to these events in the presence of air injection. PMID:23526482

  4. Neurologic complications of scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Newton, H B

    2001-06-01

    Recreational scuba diving has become a popular sport in the United States, with almost 9 million certified divers. When severe diving injury occurs, the nervous system is frequently involved. In dive-related barotrauma, compressed or expanding gas within the ears, sinuses and lungs causes various forms of neurologic injury. Otic barotrauma often induces pain, vertigo and hearing loss. In pulmonary barotrauma of ascent, lung damage can precipitate arterial gas embolism, causing blockage of cerebral blood vessels and alterations of consciousness, seizures and focal neurologic deficits. In patients with decompression sickness, the vestibular system, spinal cord and brain are affected by the formation of nitrogen bubbles. Common signs and symptoms include vertigo, thoracic myelopathy with leg weakness, confusion, headache and hemiparesis. Other diving-related neurologic complications include headache and oxygen toxicity. PMID:11417773

  5. The neurological basis of occupation.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Sharon A; Schindler, Victoria P

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to survey the literature about the neurological basis of human activity and its relationship to occupation and health. Activities related to neurological function were organized into three categories: those that activate the brain's reward system; those that promote the relaxation response; and those that preserve cognitive function into old age. The results from the literature review correlating neurological evidence and activities showed that purposeful and meaningful activities could counter the effects of stress-related diseases and reduce the risk for dementia. Specifically, it was found that music, drawing, meditation, reading, arts and crafts, and home repairs, for example, can stimulate the neurogical system and enhance health and well-being, Prospective research studies are needed to examine the effects of purposeful activities on reducing stress and slowing the rate of cognitive decline. PMID:17623380

  6. Neurological complications of underwater diving.

    PubMed

    Rosińska, Justyna; Łukasik, Maria; Kozubski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The diver's nervous system is extremely sensitive to high ambient pressure, which is the sum of atmospheric and hydrostatic pressure. Neurological complications associated with diving are a difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They occur in both commercial and recreational diving and are connected with increasing interest in the sport of diving. Hence it is very important to know the possible complications associated with this kind of sport. Complications of the nervous system may result from decompression sickness, pulmonary barotrauma associated with cerebral arterial air embolism (AGE), otic and sinus barotrauma, high pressure neurological syndrome (HPNS) and undesirable effect of gases used for breathing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the range of neurological symptoms that can occur during diving accidents and also the role of patent foramen ovale (PFO) and internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection in pathogenesis of stroke in divers. PMID:25666773

  7. [Child neurology and multimedia technology].

    PubMed

    Nihei, Kenji

    2002-01-01

    Methods of computer technology (intelligent technology, IT), such as multimedia and virtual reality, are utilized more and more in all medical fields including child neurology. Advances in the digitalization of individual medical data and multi-media technology have enabled patients to be able to obtain their own medical data by small media and to receive medical treatment at any hospitals even if they are located in distance place. Changes from a doctor oriented to patients oriented medicine is anticipated. It is necessary to store medical data from birth to adulthood and to accumulate epidemiological data of rare diseases such as metabolic diseases or degenerative diseases especially in child neurology, which highly require tele medicine and telecare at home. Moreover, IT may improve in the QOL of patients with neurological diseases and of their families. Cooperation of medicine and engineering is therefore necessary. Results of our experiments on telemedicine, telecare and virtual reality are described. PMID:11808201

  8. Proust, neurology and Stendhal's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio A G; Munhoz, Renato P; Cardoso, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Marcel Proust is one of the most important French writers of the 20th century. His relationship with medicine and with neurology is possibly linked to the fact that his asthma was considered to be a psychosomatic disease classified as neurasthenia. Stendhal's syndrome is a rare psychiatric syndrome characterized by anxiety and affective and thought disturbances when a person is exposed to a work of art. Here, the authors describe neurological aspects of Proust's work, particularly the occurrence of Stendhal's syndrome and syncope when he as well as one of the characters of In Search of Lost Time see Vermeer's View of Delft during a visit to a museum. PMID:24642490

  9. Neurological complications of rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tullu, Millind S; Rodrigues, Sean; Muranjan, Mamta N; Bavdekar, Sandeep B; Kamat, Jaishree R; Hira, Priya R

    2003-02-01

    The rabies vaccines containing neural elements are used in some countries including India. We report three cases that presented with various neurological complications following the use of these vaccines. The presenting manifestations included those of encephalitis, radiculitis and acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. These neurological complications are highlighted so that scientific evidence compels the community to discontinue the use of the neural tissue rabies vaccines. Newer generation cell culture rabies vaccines should be preferred over the neural tissue rabies vaccines for post-exposure prophylaxis. PMID:12626831

  10. Neurologic Emergencies in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Nentwich, Lauren M; Grimmnitz, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Neurologic diseases are a major cause of death and disability in elderly patients. Due to the physiologic changes and increased comorbidities that occur as people age, neurologic diseases are more common in geriatric patients and a major cause of death and disability in this population. This article discusses the elderly patient presenting to the emergency department with acute ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack, intracerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, chronic subdural hematoma, traumatic brain injury, seizures, and central nervous system infections. This article reviews the subtle presentations, difficult workups, and complicated treatment decisions as they pertain to our older patients." PMID:27475016

  11. Neurology of the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Fenner, W R

    1988-05-01

    Owing to improvements in health care, more animals are living to advanced ages. Many abnormal neurologic conditions can affect these patients, but those most commonly associated with advancing years include degenerative, neoplastic, and idiopathic processes. An understanding of the "normal" age-related changes seen on a neurologic examination must be kept in mind when evaluating geriatric patients. Special care and consideration of the patient and client are often required in managing these cases, especially because treatment protocols are often unsuccessful or do not exist, resulting in a prognosis that is often poor at best. PMID:3289252

  12. [Cerebrolysin in pediatric neurology practice].

    PubMed

    Petrukhin, A S; Pylaeva, O A

    2014-01-01

    Мany aspects of сerebrolysin treatment in a wide range of nervous system disorders in children are described. High efficacy and well tolerated therapy are revealed. These findings expand the perspectives of using сerebrolysin in pediatric neurology. PMID:24637827

  13. A Program for Neurological Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Louis

    A program for neurological organization is explained and its purposes are stated. Hints are given for working with both child and parents; and form for evaluating measures of neuromotor fitness is included. Also provided is a checklist for rating motor exploration, including movements performed lying on the back, on the knees, or standing or on…

  14. Neurology Case Studies: Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad U; Gorelick, Philip B

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses interesting vascular neurology cases including the management of intracranial stenosis, migraine headache and stroke risk, retinal artery occlusions associated with impaired hearing, intracranial occlusive disease, a heritable cause of stroke and vascular cognitive impairment, and an interesting clinico-neuroradiologic disorder associated with eclampsia. PMID:27445238

  15. Neurological Aspects of Reading Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Louis R.

    The author, a neurologist, looks at the nature of reading disabilities. He suggests that many reading disabilities are the result of normal constitutional differences and that the term "minimal brain dysfunction" is rarely appropriate and does not help the remediation process. Noted are various theories which relate neurology and reading ability.…

  16. [Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndrome with Dementia].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Keiko

    2016-04-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndrome with limbic encephalopathy tends to progress rapidly, presenting with physical symptoms such as ataxia or sensory disturbance. However, some affected patients demonstrate amnesia, inactivity, or abnormal behavior, which lead to the diagnosis of dementia. It is important to perform an extensive differential diagnosis with autoantibody-examination and tumor survey, so as not to overlook potentially treatable dementia. PMID:27056857

  17. Fly model causes neurological rethink

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandappa, Madhumala K

    2013-01-01

    A Drosophila model for a neurological disorder called type 2B Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease reveals that it has its origins in a partial loss of function, rather than a gain of function, which points to the need for a new therapeutic approach. PMID:24336781

  18. [Neurology of hysteria (conversion disorder)].

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Hysteria has served as an important driving force in the development of both neurology and psychiatry. Jean Martin Charcot's devotion to mesmerism for treating hysterical patients evoked the invention of psychoanalysis by Sigmund Freud. Meanwhile, Joseph Babinski took over the challenge to discriminate between organic and hysterical patients from Charcot and found Babinski's sign, the greatest milestone in modern neurological symptomatology. Nowadays, the usage of the term hysteria is avoided. However, new terms and new classifications are complicated and inconsistent between the two representative taxonomies, the DSM-IV and ICD-10. In the ICD-10, even the alternative term conversion disorder, which was becoming familiar to neurologists, has also disappeared as a group name. The diagnosis of hysteria remains important in clinical neurology. Extensive exclusive diagnoses and over investigation, including various imaging studies, should be avoided because they may prolong the disease course and fix their symptoms. Psychological reasons that seem to explain the conversion are not considered reliable. Positive neurological signs suggesting nonorganic etiologies are the most reliable measures for diagnosing hysteria, as Babinski first argued. Hysterical paresis has several characteristics, such as giving-way weakness or peculiar distributions of weakness. Signs to uncover nonorganic paresis utilizing synergy include Hoover's test and the Sonoo abductor test. PMID:24998831

  19. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy. PMID:24964115

  20. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... may begin with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain. Neurological complications most often occur in the second stage ... such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. Other problems, which ...

  1. [Neurology].

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Arseny A; Rossetti, Andrea O; Michel, Patrik; Benninger, David; Nater, Bernard; Wider, Christian; Hirt, Lorenz; Kuntzer, Thierry; Démonet, Jean-François; Du Pasquier, Renaud A; Vingerhoets, François

    2016-01-13

    In 2015, cerebral stimulation becomes increasingly established in the treatment of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Efficacy of endovascular treatment has been demonstrated for acute ischemic stroke. Deep brain stimulation at low frequency improves dysphagia and freezing of gait in Parkinson patients. Bimagrumab seems to increase muscular volume and force in patients with inclusion body myositis. In cluster-type headache, a transcutaneous vagal nerve stimulator is efficient in stopping acute attacks and also reducing their frequency. Initial steps have been undertaken towards modulating memory by stimulation of the proximal fornix. Teriflunomide is the first oral immunomodulatory drug for which efficacy has been shown in preventing conversion from clinical isolated syndrome to multiple sclerosis. PMID:26946707

  2. Neurotrophic factors and neurologic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, D M; Mobley, W C

    1994-01-01

    Discovered only 40 years ago, nerve growth factor is the prototypic neurotrophic factor. By binding to specific receptors on certain neurons in the peripheral nervous system and brain, nerve growth factor acts to enhance their survival, differentiation, and maintenance. In recent years, many additional neurotrophic factors have been discovered; some are structurally related to nerve growth factor while others are distinct from it. The robust actions of neurotrophic factors have suggested their use in preventing or lessening the dysfunction and death of neurons in neurologic disorders. We review the progress in defining neurotrophic factors and their receptors and in characterizing their actions. We also discuss some of the uses of neurotrophic factors in animal models of disease. Finally, we discuss how neurotrophic factors could be implicated in the pathogenesis of neurologic disorders. Images PMID:7975562

  3. Clinical neurology and executive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Filley, C M

    2000-01-01

    Executive function is a uniquely human ability that permits an individual to plan, carry out, and monitor a sequence of actions that is intended to accomplish a goal. This crucial neurobehavioral capacity depends on the integrity of the frontal lobes, most importantly the dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and their connections. Executive dysfunction is associated with a wide range of neurologic disorders that affect these regions. In this paper, executive dysfunction is considered from the perspective of behavioral neurology, and the lesion method is employed to illustrate this impairment in a diverse group of disorders. Frontal system damage leading to disturbed executive function is common and clinically significant. Recognition of this syndrome is critical for ensuring the correct diagnosis, accurate prognosis, and appropriate treatment of affected patients. Executive dysfunction also represents an intriguing aspect of brain-behavior relationships and offers important insights into one of the highest cerebral functions. PMID:10879543

  4. Neurological disorders and celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Casella, Giovanni; Bordo, Bianca M; Schalling, Renzo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Salemme, Marianna; DI Bella, Camillo; Baldini, Vittorio; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2016-06-01

    Celiac disease (CD) determines neurologic manifestations in 10% of all CD patients. We describe the most common clinical manifestations as cerebellar ataxia, gluten encephalopathy, multiple sclerosis, peripheral neuropathies, sensorineural hearing loss, epilepsy, headache, depression, cognitive deficiencies and other less described clinical conditions. Our aim is to perform, as more as possible, a review about the most recent update on the topics in international literature. It is important to consider clinical neurological manifestations in celiac patients and to research these conditions also in the follow-up because they may start also one year after the start of gluten free diet (GFD) as peripheral neuropathy. The association with autism is analysed and possible new association with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) are considered. PMID:26619901

  5. Recent imaging advances in neurology.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Lorenzo; Niccolini, Flavia; Politis, Marios

    2015-09-01

    Over the recent years, the application of neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) has considerably advanced the understanding of complex neurological disorders. PET is a powerful molecular imaging tool, which investigates the distribution and binding of radiochemicals attached to biologically relevant molecules; as such, this technique is able to give information on biochemistry and metabolism of the brain in health and disease. MRI uses high intensity magnetic fields and radiofrequency pulses to provide structural and functional information on tissues and organs in intact or diseased individuals, including the evaluation of white matter integrity, grey matter thickness and brain perfusion. The aim of this article is to review the most recent advances in neuroimaging research in common neurological disorders such as movement disorders, dementia, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury and multiple sclerosis, and to evaluate their contribution in the diagnosis and management of patients. PMID:25808503

  6. Botulinum Toxin in Pediatric Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Enas Abdallah Ali

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are natural molecules produced by anaerobic spore-forming bacteria called Clostradium boltulinum. The toxin has a peculiar mechanism of action by preventing the release of acetylcholine from the presynaptic membrane. Consequently, it has been used in the treatment of various neurological conditions related to muscle hyperactivity and/or spasticity. Also, it has an impact on the autonomic nervous system by acting on smooth muscle, leading to its use in the management of pain syndromes. The use of botulinum toxin in children separate from adults has received very little attention in the literature. This review presents the current data on the use of botulinum neurotoxin to treat various neurological disorders in children. PMID:27335961

  7. Neurological diseases in famous painters.

    PubMed

    Piechowski-Jozwiak, Bartlomiej; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Visual art production involves multiple processes including basic motor skills, such as coordination of movements, visual-spatial processing, emotional output, sociocultural context, and creativity. Thus, the relationship between artistic output and brain diseases is particularly complex, and brain disorders may lead to impairment of artistic production in multiple domains. Neurological conditions may also occasionally modify artistic style and lead to surprisingly innovative features in people with an initial loss of creativity. This chapter focuses on anecdotal reports of various neurological disorders and their potential consequences on works produced by famous or well-established artists, including Carl Frederik Reutersward, Giorgio de Chirico, Krystyna Habura, Leo Schnug, Ignatius Brennan, and many others. PMID:24041285

  8. Bravo! Neurology at the opera.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Brandy R

    2010-01-01

    Opera is a complex musical form that reflects the complexity of the human condition and the human brain. This article presents an introduction to the portrayal of medical professionals in opera, including one neurologist, as well as two characters in whom neurological disease contributes to the action of the musical drama. Consideration is also given to the neuroanatomy and neuropathology of opera singers with further speculation regarding the neural underpinnings of the passion of opera's audience. PMID:20375526

  9. Some neurological aspects of laughter.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2004-01-01

    This brief survey of laughter attempts an analysis of its neurological mechanisms, evolution, role in social behaviour and its clinicopathological importance. The mechanisms of laughter, its physiological consequences and its demonstration by sound spectrography are considered. Something resembling laughter occurs in certain primates, and possibly rodents, though there are important differences. The evolution of laughter in a social context is appraised. Pathological laughter arises rarely, usually caused by diseases of the frontal or temporal lobes, and in hypothalamic hamartomata in children. PMID:15528918

  10. Neurological manifestations of filarial infections.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Devender; Dumas, Michel; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Filarial infections cause a huge public health burden wherever they are endemic. These filaria may locate anywhere in the human body. Their manifestations and pathogenic mechanisms, except the most common ones, are rarely investigated systematically. Their neurological manifestations, however, are being increasingly recognized particularly with onchocerciasis or Loa loa infections, Wuchereria bancrofti, or Mansonella perstans. The risk of developing these manifestations may also increase in cases that harbor multiple filariasis or coinfections, for instance as with Plasmodium. The microfilaria of Onchocerca and Loa loa are seen in cerebrospinal fluid. The pathogenesis of neurological manifestations of these infections is complex; however, pathogenic reactions may be caused by mechanical disruption, e.g., degeneration often followed by granulomas, causing fibrosis or mass effects on other tissues, vascular lesions, e.g., vascular block of cerebral vessels, or disordered inflammatory responses resulting in meningitis, encephalitis or localized inflammatory responses. The chances of having neurological manifestations may also depend upon the frequency and"heaviness"of infection over a lifetime. Hence, this type of infection should no longer be considered a disease of the commonly affected areas but one that may produce systemic effects or other manifestations, and these should be considered in populations where they are endemic. PMID:23829914

  11. Neurological prognostication after cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Sandroni, Claudio; Geocadin, Romergryko G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Prediction of neurological prognosis in patients who are comatose after successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest remains difficult. Previous guidelines recommended ocular reflexes, somatosensory evoked potentials and serum biomarkers for predicting poor outcome within 72h from cardiac arrest. However, these guidelines were based on patients not treated with targeted temperature management and did not appropriately address important biases in literature. Recent findings Recent evidence reviews detected important limitations in prognostication studies, such as low precision and, most importantly, lack of blinding, which may have caused a self-fulfilling prophecy and overestimated the specificity of index tests. Maintenance of targeted temperature using sedatives and muscle relaxants may interfere with clinical examination, making assessment of neurological status before 72 h or more after cardiac arrest unreliable. Summary No index predicts poor neurological outcome after cardiac arrest with absolute certainty. Prognostic evaluation should start not earlier than 72 h after ROSC and only after major confounders have been excluded so that reliable clinical examination can be made. Multimodality appears to be the most reasonable approach for prognostication after cardiac arrest. PMID:25922894

  12. Genomic medicine and neurological disease

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Lupski, James R.

    2011-01-01

    “Genomic medicine” refers to the diagnosis, optimized management, and treatment of disease—as well as screening, counseling, and disease gene identification—in the context of information provided by an individual patient’s personal genome. Genomic medicine, to some extent synonymous with “personalized medicine,” has been made possible by recent advances in genome technologies. Genomic medicine represents a new approach to health care and disease management that attempts to optimize the care of a patient based upon information gleaned from his or her personal genome sequence. In this review, we describe recent progress in genomic medicine as it relates to neurological disease. Many neurological disorders either segregate as Mendelian phenotypes or occur sporadically in association with a new mutation in a single gene. Heritability also contributes to other neurological conditions that appear to exhibit more complex genetics. In addition to discussing current knowledge in this field, we offer suggestions for maximizing the utility of genomic information in clinical practice as the field of genomic medicine unfolds. PMID:21594611

  13. Another Neurological Disorder Tied to Zika

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_157678.html Another Neurological Disorder Tied to Zika It may cause meningoencephalitis, an infection and swelling ... list of neurological disorders potentially associated with the Zika virus continues to grow, health officials reported Wednesday. ...

  14. Human Neurological Development: Past, Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelligra, R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Neurological development is considered as the major human potential. Vision, vestibular function, intelligence, and nutrition are discussed as well as the treatment of neurological disfunctions, coma, and convulsive seizures.

  15. NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH RELEVANT TO READING--1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ISOM, JOHN B.

    ASPECTS OF NEUROLOGICAL RESEARCH ARE PRESENTED UNDER THE TOPICS OF NEUROLOGICAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT, CEREBRAL DOMINANCE, "SPLIT-BRAIN" SYNDROME, AND SEQUENCING. THE FIRST TWO AREAS INDICATE THAT ASSESSMENT OF A CHILD'S NEUROLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT MUST TAKE INTO ACCOUNT VARIATION OF RATE AND DEGREE OF DEVELOPMENT, AND THAT THE SIGNIFICANCE OF…

  16. Functional symptoms in neurology: mimics and chameleons.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon; Reuber, Markus; Carson, Alan

    2013-04-01

    The mimics and chameleons of functional symptoms in neurology could be a whole textbook of neurology. Nevertheless, there are some recurring themes when things go wrong, notably diagnostic bias introduced by the presence or absence of psychiatric comorbidity or life events, neurological diseases that look 'weird' and lack of appreciation of the more unusual features of functional symptoms themselves. PMID:23468561

  17. Protease-activated receptor (PAR)1, PAR2 and PAR4 expressions in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LI, Si-Man; JIANG, Ping; XIANG, Yang; WANG, Wei-Wei; ZHU, Yue-Chun; FENG, Wei-Yang; LI, Shu-De; YU, Guo-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Here, we used reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot to detect protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1, PAR 2 and PAR 4 expression in cancer tissues and cell lines of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and investigated the co-relationship between PAR expression and clinic-pathological data for esophageal cancer. The methylation of PAR4 gene promoter involved in esophageal carcinoma was also analyzed. By comparing the mRNA expressions of normal esophageal tissue and human esophageal epithelial cells (HEEpiC), we found that among the 28 cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, PAR1 (60%) and PAR2 (71%) were elevated in 17 and 20 cases, respectively, and PAR4 (68%) expression was lowered in 19 cases. Whereas, in human esophageal squamous cells (TE-1 and TE-10), PAR1 and PAR2 expression was increased but PAR4 was decreased. Combined with clinical data, the expression of PAR1 in poorly differentiated (P=0.016) and middle and lower parts of the esophagus (P=0.016) was higher; expression of PAR4 in poorly differentiated carcinoma was lower (P=0.049). Regarding TE-1 and TE-10 protein expression, we found that in randomized esophageal carcinoma, PAR1 (P=0.027) and PAR2 (P=0.039) expressions were increased, but lowered for PAR4 (P=0.0001). In HEEpiC, TE-1, TE-10, esophageal and normal esophagus tissue samples (case No. 7), the frequency of methylation at the 19 CpG loci of PAR4 was 35.4%, 95.2%, 83.8%, 62.6% and 48.2%, respectively. Our results indicate that the expression of PAR1 and PAR2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is increased but PAR4 is decreased. Hypermethylation of the promoter of the PAR4 gene may contribute to reduced expression of PAR4 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25297082

  18. Par Pond vegetation status 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1996-12-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995, and into the early spring and late summer of 1996. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities continue to become re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, watershield, and Pontederia are extensive and well developed. Measures of percent cover, width of beds, and estimates of area of coverage with satellite data indicate regrowth within two years of from 40 to 60% of levels prior to the draw down. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer of 1996, especially in the former warm arm of Par Pond, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the draw down still have not formed. Lotus has invaded and occupies many of the areas formerly dominated by cattail beds. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys through the summer and early fall of 1997, along with the evaluation of satellite data to map the extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.

  19. Neurology outside Paris following Charcot.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Thierry; Clarac, François; Petit, Henri; Broussolle, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    The Middle Ages saw the development of numerous universities in the different provinces that later became the kingdom of France. In 1794, Napoleon I established 3 medical schools in Paris, Montpellier and Strasbourg, which were transformed into medical faculties in 1808. France had always been a highly centralized country, but during the 19th century, this trend started to change with the creation of medical faculties in Nancy (1872), Lille (1877), Lyon (1878), Bordeaux (1879), Toulouse (1891), Algiers (1910) and Marseille (1930). Following the creation of the 12 foundation courses, specialized chairs were progressively established in Paris, but for a long time this remained restricted to the French capital. However, with the emergence of medicine as an academic discipline in several towns outside Paris, came the development of neurology. This was greatly influenced by former students of Jean-Martin Charcot, local personalities, and the interactions between the two. Leading figures included Albert Pitres in Bordeaux, Léon Ingelrans in Lille, Eugène Devic and Jules Froment in Lyon, Lucien Cornil in Marseille, Joseph Grasset in Montpellier, and Marcel Riser in Toulouse. The interaction between French and Germanic medical communities also developed at this turbulent time under the influence of several great physicians such as Wilhelm Waldeyer, Adolf Kussmaul, and later Jean Alexandre Barré in Strasbourg, and Hippolyte Bernheim in Nancy. There are a number of other university towns outside Paris in which the development of neurology was probably influenced by the same interactions with psychiatry. It would be worth carrying out a thorough analysis of these towns in order to present an exhaustive overview of the development of neurology in France. PMID:20938155

  20. [Present and future of neurology in Spain].

    PubMed

    Illa Sendra, I; García De Yébenes Prous, J; Ramo Tello, C; Polo Esteban, J M; Molinuevo Guix, J L; Robles Bayón, A; Mulas Delgado, F; Alvarez Sabín, J; Aguilar Barbera, M; Berciano Blanco JA, J A; Blesa González, R; Carnero Pardo, C; Castillo Sánchez, J; Del Ser Quijano, T; Ferrer Abizanda, I; García-Albea Ristol, E; Gómez Isla, T; Graus Ribas, F; Jiménez Hernández, M D; Liaño Martínez, H; Matías Guiu-Guia, J; Zarranz Imirizaldu, J J; Paradas López, C; Elena Martínez, G; Maltas Pérez, G; Ponce Rodríguez, M T

    2001-11-01

    This is a document prepared by the Spanish Society of Neurology (SEN), which was given to the President of Spain (Mr. José María Aznar) last September with the main aim of examining the current situation of Neurology in our country. It analyses the present and future of Neurology in clinical assistance, teaching and research. To prepare this document the criteria of patients' associations has been considered, including the Declaration of Madrid which has been subscribed by thirty of these associations. In spite of its relevant development in the previous decades, the current situation of Neurology in Spain is far from the ideal. To reach the recommendable menber of 3 or 4 neurologists per 100,000 inhabitants it is necessary to duplicate the present number of neurologists which has been estimated around 2/100,000; this situation is especially urgent in some Autonomous Communities. The most important problems in neurological assistance are: inadequate follow-up of the chronic outpatients, low numbers of neurological beds and of duties of Neurology, as well as of neurological case of patients with urgent neurological disorders. It is also necessary to increase the number of professors of Neurology to adequately cover pregraduate teaching; again there are important differences in teaching positions among Autonomous Communities. Neurology residence should be prolonged from 4 to 5 years. Finally, it is necessary to support the appearance of superespecialised units and to promote a coordinated research with other close specialities including basic neuroscience. PMID:11742621

  1. The Mouse Olfactory Peduncle

    PubMed Central

    Brunjes, Peter C; Kay, Rachel B; Arrivillaga, J. P

    2012-01-01

    The olfactory peduncle, the region connecting the olfactory bulb with the basal forebrain, contains several neural areas that have received relatively little attention. The present work includes studies that provide an overview of the region in the mouse. An analysis of cell soma size in pars principalis (pP) of the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) revealed considerable differences in tissue organization between mice and rats. An unbiased stereological study of neuron number in the cell-dense regions of pars externa (pE) and pP of the AON of 3, 12 and 24 month-old mice indicated that pE has about 16,500 cells in 0.043 mm3and pP about 58,300 cells in 0.307 mm3. Quantitative Golgi studies of pyramidal neurons in pP suggested that mouse neurons are similar though smaller to those of the rat. An immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that all peduncular regions (pE, pP, the dorsal peduncular cortex, ventral tenia tecta, and anterior olfactory tubercle and piriform cortex) have cells that express either calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin, somatostatin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, neuropeptide Y or cholecystokinin (antigens commonly co-expressed by subspecies of GABAergic neurons), though the relative numbers of each cell type differs between zones. Finally, an electron microscopic comparison of the organization of myelinated fibers in lateral olfactory tract in the anterior and posterior peduncle indicated that the region is less orderly in mice than in the rat. The results provide a caveat for investigators who generalize data between species as both similarities and differences between the laboratory mouse and rat were observed. PMID:21618219

  2. Emerging and Reemerging Neurologic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    The list of emerging and reemerging pathogens that cause neurologic disease is expanding. Various factors, including population growth and a rise in international travel, have contributed to the spread of pathogens to previously nonendemic regions. Recent advances in diagnostic methods have led to the identification of novel pathogens responsible for infections of the central nervous system. Furthermore, new issues have arisen surrounding established infections, particularly in an increasingly immunocompromised population due to advances in the treatment of rheumatologic disease and in transplant medicine. PMID:25360203

  3. Neurological infections after neuraxial anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Felicity

    2008-03-01

    Infection is the commonest cause of serious neurologic sequelae of neuraxial anesthesia. The incidence depends on operator skill and patient population. Meningitis, a complication of dural puncture, is usually caused by viridans streptococci. The risk factors are dural puncture during labor, no mask and poor aseptic technique, vaginal infection and bacteremia. Epidural abscess is a complication of epidural catheterization, route of entry the catheter track and the organism usually the staphylococcus. Principal risk factors are prolonged catheterization, poor aseptic technique and traumatic insertion. Prevention includes wearing a mask, using a full sterile technique, avoiding prolonged catheterization and prescribing antibiotics in a high-risk situation. PMID:18319178

  4. Neurology in the market place.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, I R

    1992-01-01

    The White Paper, "Working for Patients", led to a change in the way in which hospitals were funded from April 1991. The changes will have profound effects on the future shape of health care in the United Kingdom. Neurologists will need to understand the new National Health Service if their patients are to benefit from the changes. If neurology is to survive as a specialty separate from general medicine it will have to show that it can provide quality care which is accessible, relevant, efficient and effective, at a price which Districts can afford. PMID:1564499

  5. Atypical neurological manifestations of malaria

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Neeraj; Gupta, Monica; Singh, Ram; Kumar, Ashwani

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is known as a great mimic. It can manifest subtly or abruptly, typically or atypically. This aspect of the disease can frequently mislead physicians. We present two patients of malaria with atypical neurological manifestations. The first patient of Plasmodium falciparum malaria presented with fever and altered sensorium; MRI of the brain suggested cerebral venous thrombosis. The second patient of Plasmodium vivax presented with fever, double vision and right eye lateral rectus palsy due to unilateral sixth cranial nerve involvement. Both patients were managed with antimalarials and supportive medical management, and had uneventful recoveries. PMID:25150266

  6. Immunopathogenic Background of Pars Planitis.

    PubMed

    Przeździecka-Dołyk, Joanna; Węgrzyn, Agnieszka; Turno-Kręcicka, Anna; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Pars planitis is defined as an intermediate uveitis of unknown background of systemic disease with characteristic formations such as vitreous snowballs, snowbanks and changes in peripheral retina. The incidence of pars planitis varies 2.4-15.4 % of the uveitis patients. The pathogenesis of the disease is to be determined in future. Clinical and histopathological findings suggest an autoimmune etiology, most likely as a reaction to endogenous antigen of unknown source, with T cells predominant in both vitreous and pars plana infiltrations. T cells subsets play an important role as a memory-effector peripheral cell. Snowbanks are formed as an effect of post inflammatory glial proliferation of fibrous astrocytes. There is also a genetic predisposition for pars planitis by human leukocyte antigen and several other genes. A coexistence of multiple sclerosis and optic neuritis has been described in numerous studies. Epiretinal membrane, cataract, cystoid macular edema, retinal detachment, retinal vasculitis, neovascularization, vitreous peripheral traction, peripheral hole formation, vitreous hemorrhage, disc edema are common complications observed in pars planitis. There is a need to expand the knowledge of the pathogenic and immunologic background of the pars planitis to create an accurate pharmacological treatment. PMID:26438050

  7. PAR-1, -4, and the mTOR Pathway Following Germinal Matrix Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Krafft, Paul R; Klebe, Damon; Flores, Jerry; Rolland, William B; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) is the most common cause of neurological complications of prematurity and has lasting implications. PAR-1 and PAR-4 receptors are involved with upstream signaling pathways following brain hemorrhage in adult models of stroke, of which the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a potential downstream mediator. Therefore, we hypothesized a role for PAR-1, -4/ mTOR signaling following GMH brain injury. Postnatal day 7 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to GMH through stereotactic infusion of collagenase into the right ganglionic eminence. Rodents were euthanized at 72 h (short term), or 4 weeks (long term). Short-term mTOR expression was evaluated by Western blot in the context of PAR-1 (SCH-79797) and PAR-4 (P4pal10) inhibition. Pups in the long-term group were administered the selective mTOR inhibitor (rapamycin) with neurobehavioral and brain pathological examinations performed at 4 weeks. Pharmacological PAR-1, -4 antagonism normalized the increased mTOR expression following GMH. Early inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin improved long-term outcomes in rats. Mammalian-TOR signaling plays an important role in brain injury following neonatal GMH, possibly involving upstream PAR-1, -4 mechanisms. PMID:26463951

  8. Neurological Complications of VZV Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the review Varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation results in zoster, which may be complicated by postherpetic neuralgia, myelitis, meningoencephalitis and VZV vasculopathy. This review highlights the clinical features, laboratory abnormalities, imaging changes and optimal treatment of each of those conditions. Because all of these neurological disorders produced by VZV reactivation can occur in the absence of rash, the virological tests proving that VZV caused disease are discussed. Recent findings After primary infection, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. With a decline in VZV-specific cell-mediated immunity, VZV reactivates from ganglia and travels anterograde to the skin to cause zoster, which is often complicated by postherpetic neuralgia. VZV can also travel retrograde to produce meningoencephaltis, myelitis and stroke. When these complications occur without rash, VZV-induced disease can be diagnosed by detection of VZV DNA or anti-VZV antibody in CSF and treated with intravenous acyclovir. Summary Awareness of the expanding spectrum of neurological complications caused by VZV reactivation with and without rash will improve diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24792344

  9. Neurological complications in hyperemesis gravidarum.

    PubMed

    Zara, Gabriella; Codemo, Valentina; Palmieri, Arianna; Schiff, Sami; Cagnin, Annachiara; Citton, Valentina; Manara, Renzo

    2012-02-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum can impair correct absorption of an adequate amount of thiamine and can cause electrolyte imbalance. This study investigated the neurological complications in a pregnant woman with hyperemesis gravidarum. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted for hyperemesis gravidarum. Besides undernutrition, a neurological examination disclosed weakness with hyporeflexia, ophthalmoparesis, multidirectional nystagmus and optic disks swelling; the patient became rapidly comatose. Brain MRI showed symmetric signal hyperintensity and swelling of periaqueductal area, hypothalamus and mammillary bodies, medial and posterior portions of the thalamus and columns of fornix, consistent with Wernicke encephalopathy (WE). Neurophysiological studies revealed an axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy, likely due to thiamine deficiency or critical illness polyneuropathy. Sodium and potassium supplementation and parenteral thiamine were administered with improvement of consciousness state in a few days. WE evolved in Korsakoff syndrome. A repeat MRI showed a marked improvement of WE-related alterations and a new hyperintense lesion in the pons, suggestive of central pontine myelinolysis. No sign or symptom due to involvement of the pons was present. PMID:21720901

  10. Neurologic infections in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Jay, Cheryl A; Solbrig, Marylou V

    2014-01-01

    Even at a time when HIV/AIDS and immunosuppressive therapy have increased the number of individuals living with significant immunocompromise, diabetes mellitus (DM) remains a major comorbid disorder for several rare but potentially lethal infections, including rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis and malignant external otitis. DM is also a commonly associated condition in patients with nontropical pyomyositis, pyogenic spinal infections, Listeria meningitis, and blastomycosis. As West Nile virus spread to and across North America over a decade ago, DM appeared in many series as a risk factor for death or neuroinvasive disease. More recently, in several large international population-based studies, DM was identified as a risk factor for herpes zoster. The relationships among infection, DM, and the nervous system are multidirectional. Viral infections have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 DM, while parasitic infections have been hypothesized to protect against autoimmune disorders, including type 1 DM. DM-related neurologic disease can predispose to systemic infection - polyneuropathy is the predominant risk factor for diabetic foot infection. Because prognosis for many neurologic infections depends on timely institution of antimicrobial and sometimes surgical therapy, neurologists caring for diabetic patients should be familiar with the clinical features of the neuroinfectious syndromes associated with DM. PMID:25410222

  11. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Živković, Saša A

    2013-01-01

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  12. Neurologic complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zivković, Saša A

    2013-08-27

    Neurologic complications are relatively common after solid organ transplantation and affect 15%-30% of liver transplant recipients. Etiology is often related to immunosuppressant neurotoxicity and opportunistic infections. Most common complications include seizures and encephalopathy, and occurrence of central pontine myelinolysis is relatively specific for liver transplant recipients. Delayed allograft function may precipitate hepatic encephalopathy and neurotoxicity of calcineurin inhibitors typically manifests with tremor, headaches and encephalopathy. Reduction of neurotoxic immunosuppressants or conversion to an alternative medication usually result in clinical improvement. Standard preventive and diagnostic protocols have helped to reduce the prevalence of opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, but viral and fungal CNS infections still affect 1% of liver transplant recipients, and the morbidity and mortality in the affected patients remain fairly high. Critical illness myopathy may also affect up to 7% of liver transplant recipients. Liver insufficiency is also associated with various neurologic disorders which may improve or resolve after successful liver transplantation. Accurate diagnosis and timely intervention are essential to improve outcomes, while advances in clinical management and extended post-transplant survival are increasingly shifting the focus to chronic post-transplant complications which are often encountered in a community hospital and an outpatient setting. PMID:24023979

  13. Neurological causes of taste disorders.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, J G; Lang, C J G

    2006-01-01

    In caring for patients with taste disorders, the clinical assessment should include complete examination of the cranial nerves and, in particular, gustatory testing. Neurophysiological methods such as blink reflex and masseter reflex allow the testing of trigeminofacial and trigeminotrigeminal pathways. Modern imaging methods (MRI and computed tomography) enable the delineation of the neuroanatomical structures which are involved in taste and their relation to the bony skull base. From a neurological point of view, gustatory disorders can result from damage at any location of the neural gustatory pathway from the taste buds via the peripheral (facial, glossopharyngeal and vagal nerve) and central nervous system (brainstem, thalamus) to its representation within the cerebral cortex. Etiopathogenetically, a large number of causes has to be considered, e.g. drugs and physical agents, cerebrovascular disorders including dissection of the carotid artery and pontine/thalamic lesions, space-occupying processes - in particular tumors compressing the cerebellopontine angle and the jugular foramen of the skull base - head trauma and skull base fractures, isolated cranial mononeuropathy (e.g. Bell's palsy) or polyneuropathy, epilepsy, dementia, multiple sclerosis and major depression. In addition to this, aging can also lead to diminished taste perception. Due to the broad differential diagnostic considerations, it is essential to look for additional, even mild, neurological signs and symptoms. Treatment must relate to the underlying cause. Zinc may be tried in idiopathic dysgeusia. PMID:16733343

  14. Autoimmune neurologic disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ming; Gorman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune neurologic diseases are of major clinical importance in children. Antibody-mediated diseases of the central nervous system are now increasingly recognized in childhood, where the antibodies bind to cell surface epitopes on neuronal or glial proteins, and the patients demonstrate either focal or more generalized clinical signs depending on the extent of brain regions targeted by the antibodies. The antibodies are directed towards ion channels, receptors, and membrane proteins; and the diseases include limbic encephalitis and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-antibody encephalitis, among many others. Additionally there are conditions where the wider immune system is implicated. Neurologic features like seizures, movement disorders, autonomic dysfunction, and sleep disorders, with neuroimaging and electrophysiologic features, may indicate a specific antibody-mediated or immune disorder. Often, phenotypic overlap is observed between these conditions, and phenotypic variation seen in children with the same condition. Nevertheless, many patients benefit from immunotherapy with substantial improvement, although huge efforts are still required to optimize the outcome for many patients. In many patients no antibodies have yet been identified, even though they respond to immunotherapies. Here we describe the known antibodies and associated diseases, discuss conditions that are thought to be immune-mediated but have no known immunologic biomarker, and provide guidelines for the investigation and classification of these disorders. PMID:27112693

  15. Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Edward H; Wilson, James V Kinnier

    2014-09-01

    We here review Babylonian descriptions of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, stroke, psychoses, obsessive compulsive disorder, phobias, psychopathic behaviour, depression and anxiety. Most of these accounts date from the first Babylonian dynasty of the first half of the second millennium BC, within a millennium and a half of the origin of writing. The Babylonians were remarkably acute and objective observers of medical disorders and human behaviour. Their detailed descriptions are surprisingly similar to modern 19th and 20th century AD textbook accounts, with the exception of subjective thoughts and feelings which are more modern fields of enquiry. They had no knowledge of brain or psychological function. Some neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g. stroke or facial palsy, had a physical basis requiring the attention of a physician or asû, using a plant and mineral based pharmacology; some disorders such as epilepsy, psychoses, depression and anxiety were regarded as supernatural due to evil demons or spirits, or the anger of personal gods, and thus required the intervention of the priest or ašipu; other disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder and psychopathic behaviour were regarded as a mystery. The Babylonians were the first to describe the clinical foundations of neurology and psychiatry. We discuss these accounts in relation to subsequent and more modern clinical descriptions. PMID:25037816

  16. Atlantic Conjunctures in Anglo-American Neurology:

    PubMed Central

    Casper, Stephen T.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The emergence of neurology at Johns Hopkins presents a case study for reconsidering the international and institutional contexts of neurology generally. Using a variety of sources, Hopkins's interwar plans for neurology are presented and contextualized in the international environment of neurology, medical research, and philanthropy. During this period, neurology across the world, especially in Britain, was undergoing vast institutional changes. In order for Hopkins to remain at the forefront of excellence in both medicine and medical education, a program in neurology was deemed essential, and this would seem now to have been an unproblematic advance. Spearheading the project for the establishment of neurology at Hopkins was the dean of the medical school, Lewis H. Weed. Weed attempted from 1919 until 1942 to establish a department of neurology but had only limited success. The fact that finding support proved challenging for Weed and Johns Hopkins casts a provocative light on the broader historiography of neurology and illustrates the important role of the international context in defining neurology professionally. PMID:18791299

  17. Neurological deficits in mice with profound biotinidase deficiency are associated with demylination and axonal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pindolia, Kirit; Chen, Jieli; Cardwell, Cisley; Cui, Xu; Chopp, Michael; Wolf, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by neurological and cutaneous abnormalities. We have developed a transgenic knock-out mouse with biotinidase deficiency to better understand aspects of pathophysiology and natural history of the disorder in humans. Neurological deficits observed in symptomatic mice with biotinidase deficiency are similar to those seen in symptomatic children with the disorder. Using a battery of functional neurological assessment tests, the symptomatic mice performed poorly compared to wild-type mice. Demyelination, axonal degeneration, ventriculomegaly, and corpus callosum compression were found in the brains of untreated, symptomatic enzyme-deficient mice. With biotin treatment, the symptomatic mice improved neurologically and the white matter abnormalities resolved. These functional and anatomical findings and their reversal with biotin therapy are similar to those observed in untreated, symptomatic and treated individuals with biotinidase deficiency. The mouse with biotinidase deficiency appears to be an appropriate animal model in which to study the neurological abnormalities and the effects of treatment of the disorder. PMID:22579707

  18. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disorders that affect pediatric patients. It is valuable to think about 'endocrine disorder' as a cause of the neurologic manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of hormonal imbalance can rapidly relieve the neurologic symptoms. Better understanding of the interaction between the endocrine system and the nervous system, combined with the knowledge about the pathophysiology of the neurologic manifestations presented in the endocrine disorders might allow earlier diagnosis and better treatment of the endocrine disorders. PMID:25654063

  19. Neuroimaging distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders†

    PubMed Central

    Crossley, Nicolas A.; Scott, Jessica; Ellison-Wright, Ian; Mechelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background It is unclear to what extent the traditional distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders reflects biological differences. Aims To examine neuroimaging evidence for the distinction between neurological and psychiatric disorders. Method We performed an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis on voxel-based morphometry studies reporting decreased grey matter in 14 neurological and 10 psychiatric disorders, and compared the regional and network-level alterations for these two classes of disease. In addition, we estimated neuroanatomical heterogeneity within and between the two classes. Results Basal ganglia, insula, sensorimotor and temporal cortex showed greater impairment in neurological disorders; whereas cingulate, medial frontal, superior frontal and occipital cortex showed greater impairment in psychiatric disorders. The two classes of disorders affected distinct functional networks. Similarity within classes was higher than between classes; furthermore, similarity within class was higher for neurological than psychiatric disorders. Conclusions From a neuroimaging perspective, neurological and psychiatric disorders represent two distinct classes of disorders. PMID:26045351

  20. Brain banking for neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Samarasekera, Neshika; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Huitinga, Inge; Klioueva, Natasja; McLean, Catriona A; Kretzschmar, Hans; Smith, Colin; Ironside, James W

    2013-11-01

    Brain banks are used to gather, store, and provide human brain tissue for research and have been fundamental to improving our knowledge of the brain in health and disease. To maintain this role, the legal and ethical issues relevant to the operations of brain banks need to be more widely understood. In recent years, researchers have reported that shortages of high-quality brain tissue samples from both healthy and diseased people have impaired their efforts. Closer collaborations between brain banks and improved strategies for brain donation programmes will be essential to overcome these problems as the demand for brain tissue increases and new research techniques become more widespread, with the potential for substantial scientific advances in increasingly common neurological disorders. PMID:24074724

  1. Neurological complications of infantile osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Lehman, R A; Reeves, J D; Wilson, W B; Wesenberg, R L

    1977-11-01

    Seven cases of infantile osteopetrosis are presented. Five of these were available for detailed clinical examination and 2 for retrospective review, including autopsy slides. Neurological deficits in these patients are reviewed. Involvement of the central nervous system parenchyma was suggested by observations of delayed development, ocular abnormalities, and reflex changes as well as radiographic and autopsy findings. Cerebral atrophy was present in several of our patients as well as some reported in the literature and may account for the ventricular enlargement found in many of these patients. Though hydrocephalus may be present, it is unclear that this is frequent or that it can occur without antecedent intracranial hemorrhage. The large head size is not accounted for by calvarial thickening or by hydrocephalus. Despite our patients' small stature, pituitary function appeared to be normal. Surgical decompression may stabilize cranial nerve function, particularly when the optic nerves are involved. PMID:617576

  2. Neurological problems of jazz legends.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Phillip L

    2009-08-01

    A variety of neurological problems have affected the lives of giants in the jazz genre. Cole Porter courageously remained prolific after severe leg injuries secondary to an equestrian accident, until he succumbed to osteomyelitis, amputations, depression, and phantom limb pain. George Gershwin resisted explanations for uncinate seizures and personality change and herniated from a right temporal lobe brain tumor, which was a benign cystic glioma. Thelonious Monk had erratic moods, reflected in his pianism, and was ultimately mute and withdrawn, succumbing to cerebrovascular events. Charlie Parker dealt with mood lability and drug dependence, the latter emanating from analgesics following an accident, and ultimately lived as hard as he played his famous bebop saxophone lines and arpeggios. Charles Mingus hummed his last compositions into a tape recorder as he died with motor neuron disease. Bud Powell had severe posttraumatic headaches after being struck by a police stick defending Thelonious Monk during a Harlem club raid. PMID:19666887

  3. Porphyria and its neurologic manifestations.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Jennifer A; Dyck, P James B

    2014-01-01

    Porphyrias are rare disorders resulting from a defect in the heme biosynthetic pathway. They can produce significant disease of both the peripheral and central nervous systems, in addition to other organ systems, with acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria, and variegate porphyria as the subtypes associated with neurologic manifestations. The presence of a motor-predominant peripheral neuropathy (axonal predominant), accompanied by gastrointestinal distress and neuropsychiatric manifestations, should be a strong clue to the diagnosis of porphyria. Clinical confirmation can be made through evaluation of urine porphyrins during an exacerbation of disease. While hematin is helpful for acute treatment, long-term effective management requires avoidance of overstimulation of the cytochrome P450 pathway, as well as other risk factor control. PMID:24365356

  4. Neurological manifestations of osteoid osteoma.

    PubMed Central

    Kiers, L; Shield, L K; Cole, W G

    1990-01-01

    The clinical and radiological features of 38 children with osteoid osteomas were analysed retrospectively. Twenty nine patients had lesions of the femur (n = 17) or tibia (n = 12). The mean duration from the onset of symptoms to diagnosis was 13.8 months. In seven patients the history of pain and abnormalities on examination suggested a possible neurological disorder. Fourteen of 29 patients (48%) with femoral or tibial osteomas had localised muscle atrophy, and 10 patients (34%) had diminished or absent deep tendon reflexes in the affected limb. Two patients had painless lesions. Six patients had normal plain radiographs. Delay in the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma may be prevented by the knowledge that pain may be referred or radicular, that the concomitant occurrence of muscle atrophy and depressed deep tendon reflexes are relatively common findings, and that the characteristic radiological features may only appear late in the course of the disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2169226

  5. Exploration of locomotion in the ParA/ParB system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Lavisha; Emberly, Eldon

    2015-03-01

    In many bacteria the ParA/ParB system is responsible for actively segregating DNA during replication. ParB precessively moves by hydrolyzing DNA bound ParA-ATP forming a depleted ParA region in its wake. Recent in-vitro experiments have shown that a ParB covered bead can traverse a ParA bound DNA substrate. It has been suggested that the formation of a gradient in ParA leads to diffusion-ratchet like motion of the ParB bead but its origin and potential consequences requires investigation. We have developed a deterministic model for the in-vitro ParA/ParB system and show that any amount of spatial noise in ParA can lead to the spontaneous formation of its gradient. The velocity of the bead is independent of this noise but depends on the scale over which ParA exerts a force on the bead and the scale over which ParB hydrolyzes ParA from the substrate. There is a particular ratio of these scales at which the velocity is a maximum. We also explore the effects of cooperative vs independent rebinding of ParA to the substrate. Our model shows how the driving force for ParB originates and highlights necessary conditions for directed motion in the in-vitro system that may provide insight into the in-vivo behaviour of the ParA/ParB system.

  6. Nutrition in neurologically impaired children

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Malnutrition, either under- or overnutrition, is a common condition among neurologically impaired children. Energy needs are difficult to define in this heterogeneous population, and there is a lack of information on what normal growth should be in these children. Non-nutritional factors may influence growth, but nutritional factors such as insufficient caloric intake, excessive nutrient losses and abnormal energy metabolism also contribute to growth failure. Malnutrition is associated with significant morbidity, while nutritional rehabilitation improves overall health. Nutritional support should be an integral part of the management of neurologically impaired children, and should focus not only on improving nutritional status but also on improving quality of life for patients and their families. When considering nutritional intervention, oromotor dysfunction, gastroesophageal reflux and pulmonary aspiration must be addressed and a multidisciplinary team should be involved. Children at risk for nutrition-related problems should be identified early. An assessment of nutritional status should be performed at least yearly, and more frequently in infants and young children, or in children at risk for malnutrition. Oral intake should be optimized if safe, but enteral tube feedings should be initiated in children with oromotor dysfunction, leading to clinically significant aspiration, or in children unable to maintain an adequate nutritional status with oral intake. Nasogastric tube feeding should be used for short-term intervention, but if long-term nutritional intervention is required, a gastrostomy should be considered. Antireflux procedures should be reserved for children with significant gastroesophageal reflux. The patient’s response to nutritional intervention should be carefully monitored to avoid excessive weight gain after initiation of enteral nutrition, and paediatric formulas should be used to avoid micronutrient deficiencies. PMID:20592978

  7. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions. PMID:27264859

  8. Long term neurological outcome of herpes encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lahat, E; Barr, J; Barkai, G; Paret, G; Brand, N; Barzilai, A

    1999-01-01

    Twenty eight children with herpes simplex encephalitis were followed up for a mean of 5.5 years. Two children died and 26survived, of whom 16 were left with no neurological sequelae and 10 had persistent neurological sequelae. Mean (SD) Glasgow coma score was significantly lower in the patients with neurological sequelae (7.7 (1.5)) and the patients who died (4.5 (0.7)), compared with the patients without neurological sequelae (11 (1.7)).

 PMID:10325763

  9. Functional neurological disorders: the neurological assessment as treatment.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon

    2016-02-01

    The neurologist's role in patients with functional disorders has traditionally been limited to making the diagnosis, excluding a 'disease' and pronouncing the symptoms to be 'non-organic' or 'psychogenic'. In this article, I argue that there are multiple opportunities during routine assessment of a patient with a functional disorder for the neurologist to take the lead with treatment. These opportunities occur throughout history taking, during the examination and, with greatest potential for treatment, at the end of the consultation. Elements of the neurologist's discussion that may be most useful include (a) emphasis that symptoms are genuine, common and potentially reversible; (b) explanation of the positive nature of the diagnosis (ie, not a diagnosis of exclusion); (c) simple advice about distraction techniques, self-help techniques and sources of information; (d) referral on to appropriate physiotherapy and/or psychological services; and (e) offering outpatient review. I also discuss how new diagnostic criteria for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 and changes proposed for International Classification of Diseases may facilitate changes that allow neurologists to bring their management of patients with functional disorders in line with other multidisciplinary neurological disorders in the outpatient clinic. PMID:26715762

  10. [Physiology of protease-activated receptors (PARs): involvement of PARs in digestive functions].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, A; Kuroda, R; Hollenberg, M D

    1999-10-01

    The protease-activated receptor (PAR), a G protein-coupled receptor present on cell surface, mediates cellular actions of extracellular proteases. Proteases cleave the extracellular N-terminal of PAR molecules at a specific site, unmasking and exposing a novel N-terminal, a tethered ligand, that binds to the body of receptor molecules resulting in receptor activation. Amongst four distinct PARs that have been cloned, PARs 1, 3 and 4 are activated by thrombin, but PAR-2 is activated by trypsin or mast cell tryptase. Human platelets express two distinct thrombin receptors, PAR-1 and PAR-4, while murine platelets express PAR-3 and PAR-4. Apart from roles of PARs in platelet activation, PARs are distributed to a number of organs in various species, predicting their physiological importance. We have been evaluating agonists specific for each PAR, using multiple procedures including a HEK cell calcium signal receptor desensitization assay. Using specific agonists that we developed, we found the following: 1) the salivary glands express PAR-2 mRNA and secret saliva in response to PAR-2 activation; 2) pancreatic juice secretion occurs following in vivo PAR-2 activation; 3) PAR-1 and PAR-2 modulate duodenal motility. Collectively, PAR plays various physiological and/or pathophysiological roles, especially in the digestive systems, and could be a novel target for drug development. PMID:10629876

  11. PAR-1 antagonist SCH79797 ameliorates apoptosis following surgical brain injury through inhibition of ASK1-JNK in rats

    PubMed Central

    Manaenko, Anatol; Sun, Xuejun; Kim, Cherine; Yan, Junhao; Ma, Qingyi

    2012-01-01

    Neurosurgical procedures inevitably produce intraoperative hemorrhage. The subsequent entry of blood into the brain parenchyma results in the release of large amounts of thrombin, a known contributor to perihematomal edema formation and apoptosis after brain injury. The present study seeks to test 1) the effect of surgically induced brain injury (SBI) on thrombin activity, expression of thrombin’s receptor PAR-1, and PAR-1 mediated apoptosis; 2) the effect of thrombin inhibition by argatroban and PAR-1 inhibition by SCH79797 on the development of secondary brain injury in the SBI model on rats. A total of 88 Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into sham, vehicle-, argatroban-, or SCH79797-treated groups. SBI involved partial resection of the right frontal lobe under inhalation isoflurane anesthesia. Sham-operated animals received only craniotomy. Thrombin activity, brain water content, and neurological deficits were measured at 24 hours following SBI. Involvement of the Ask1/JNK pathway in PAR-1-induced post-SBI apoptosis was characterized by using Ask1 or JNK inhibitors. We observed that SBI increased thrombin activity, yet failed to demonstrate any effect on PAR-1 expression. Argatroban and SCH79797 reduced SBI-induced brain edema and neurological deficits in a dose-dependent manner. SBI-induced apoptosis seemed mediated by the PAR-1/Ask1/JNK pathways. Administration of SCH79797 ameliorated the apoptosis following SBI. Our finding indicate that PAR-1 antagonist protects against secondary brain injury after SBI by decreasing both brain edema and apoptosis by inactivating PAR-1/Ask1/JNK pathway. The anti-apoptotic effect of PAR-1 antagonists may provide a promising path for therapy following SBI. PMID:23000356

  12. Neurologic complications of thyroid dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kudrjavcev, T

    1978-01-01

    Until such time as results of more rigorous studies are available, the morbidity rates for thyroid dysfunction cited here must suffice. The 1955 to 1956 outpatient "incidence" for England and Wales was 1.1 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 1.7 per 1,000 for myxedema (18). United States in-patient "incidence" for 1971 was 0.16 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 0.13 per 1,000 for myxedema (25). The 1935 to 1967 average annual incidence of Graves' disease for females in Olmsted County, Minnesota, was 30.5 per 100,000 (10). Well over 50% of hyperthyroid patients have clinical evidence of mild or moderate muscle weakness. Usually this weakness is proximal, and electro-myography and muscle biopsy confirm the existence of myopathic process (Table 11). Severe muscular weakness of acute onset is relatively rare and is encountered in approximately 1% of hyperthyroid patients (11,17,40). Ophthalmoplegia and psychosis are reported 4% and 2% of patients, respectively (17). Myasthenia gravis, although well publicized, is estimated to occur in less than 1% of patients (3,30). TPP is virtually nonexistent in the West; in the Orient it is reported in 2 to 8% of hyperthyroid patients and is 20 to 60 times more frequent in the hyperthyroid male than in the hyperthyroid female (Table 12). The neurologic symptomatology of myxedema is more extensive, and agreement among the various series is poor. The only unselected series addressing itself to neuromuscular manifestations of myxedema that is suitable for citation is that of Scarpalezos et al. (36). This comprehensive study was done without apparent patient selection, and it reported 2% of patients with definite carpal tunnel syndrome, 6% with myopathy, and 18% with polyneuropathy (Table 13). Reported percentages of hypothyroid patients found to have neurologic manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction are extremely diverse: ataxic gait was reported in 5 to 32% (6,7,12,27) of patients and dysdiadochokinesia in 6 to 52% (7,12,27). Psychosis

  13. Neurologic complications of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, P I

    1985-03-01

    Neurologic complications continue to occur in approximately 30 per cent of all patients with infective endocarditis and represent a major factor associated with an increased mortality rate in that disease. Of these complications, cerebral embolism is the most common and the most important, occurring in as many as 30 per cent of all patients, most of whom ultimately die. Emboli that are infected also account for all the other complications (mycotic aneurysm, meningitis or meningoencephalitis, brain abscess) that may develop. Emboli are more common in patients with mitral valve infection and in those infected with more virulent organisms. Mycotic aneurysms (often preceded by an embolic event) occur more frequently and earlier in the course of acute endocarditis, rather than later, which is more common in the course of subacute disease. The management of a cerebral mycotic aneurysm depends on the presence or absence of hemorrhage, its anatomic location and the clinical course. Healing can occur during the course of effective antimicrobial therapy and thus will preclude the need for automatic surgery in all angiographically demonstrated aneurysms. The indication for surgical intervention must be evaluated on an individual basis. Meningitis is usually purulent when associated with virulent organisms, but the CSF may present an aseptic formula when associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage or multiple microscopic embolic lesions, infected or otherwise. Macroscopic brain abscesses are rare, but multiple microscopic abscesses are not uncommon in patients with acute endocarditis due to virulent organisms. Seizures are not uncommon in patients with infective endocarditis. Focal seizures are more commonly associated with acute emboli, whereas generalized seizures are more commonly associated with systemic metabolic factors. Penicillin neurotoxicity should be considered in seizure patients with compromised renal function who are receiving high doses of penicillin. The CSF tends

  14. Par3A is dispensable for the function of the glomerular filtration barrier of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Sybille; Tellkamp, Frederik; Niessen, Carien M; Bloch, Wilhelm; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Schermer, Bernhard; Benzing, Thomas; Brinkkoetter, Paul T

    2016-07-01

    Polarity signaling through the atypical PKC (aPKC)-Par polarity complex is essential for the development and maintenance of the podocyte architecture and the function of the glomerular filtration barrier of the kidney. To study the contribution of Par3A in this complex, we generated a novel Pard3 podocyte-specific knockout mouse model by targeting exon 6 of the Pard3 gene. Genetic deletion of Pard3a did not impair renal function, neither at birth nor later in life. Even challenging the animals did not result in glomerular disease. Despite its well-established role in aPKC-mediated signaling, Par3A appears to be dispensable for the function of the glomerular filtration barrier. Moreover, its homolog Pard3b, and not Pard3a, is the dominant Par3 gene expressed in podocytes and found at the basis of the slit diaphragm, where it partially colocalizes with podocin. In conclusion, Par3A function is either dispensable for slit diaphragm integrity, or compensatory mechanisms and a high redundancy of the different polarity proteins, including Par3B, Lgl, or PALS1, maintain the function of the glomerular filtration barrier, even in the absence of Par3A. PMID:27122542

  15. Functional neurological disorders: mechanisms and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Alexander; Gelauff, Jeannette; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Ludwig, Lea; McWhirter, Laura; Williams, Stevie; Gardiner, Paula; Carson, Alan; Stone, Jon

    2016-03-01

    Functional neurological disorders are common problems in neurologic practice. In the past decade there has been an increasing interest in this group of disorders both from a clinical as well as research point of view. In this review, we highlight some of the most salient and exciting publications from recent years focusing especially on new findings illuminating mechanism and studies examining treatment. PMID:26410744

  16. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications. PMID:21193369

  17. Neurology of inherited glycosylation disorders

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, HH; Eklund, E A; Ng, BG; Patterson, M C

    2013-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation comprise most of the nearly 70 genetic disorders known to be caused by impaired synthesis of glycoconjugates. The effects are expressed in most organ systems, and most involve the nervous system. Typical manifestations include structural abnormalities, (eg, rapidly progressive cerebellar atrophy), myopathies (including congenital muscular dystrophies and limb-girdle dystrophies), strokes and stroke-like episodes, epileptic seizures, developmental delay, and demyelinating neuropathy. Patients can have neurological symptoms associated with coagulopathies, immune dysfunction with or without infections, and cardiac, renal, or hepatic failure, which are common features of glycosylation disorders. The diagnosis of congenital disorders of glycosylation should be considered for any patient with multisystem disease and in those with more specific phenotypic features. Measurement of concentrations of selected glycoconjugates can be used to screen for many of these disorders, and molecular diagnosis is becoming more widely available in clinical practice. Disease-modifying treatments are available for only a few disorders, but all affected individuals benefit from early diagnosis and aggressive management. PMID:22516080

  18. Neurologic complications of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Spudich, Serena S; Ances, Beau M

    2012-01-01

    The effects of HIV-1 in the nervous system are a topic of avid interest to investigators and clinicians focused on HIV, judging by the large and discriminating audience at the oral sessions and poster presentations relating to neuroscience at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Major areas of investigation at this year's conference included the use of neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging to assess the state of the central nervous system (CNS) and effects of antiretroviral therapy during HIV infection as well as basic and clinical studies of neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). Numerous important suggestions emerged during the meeting. Among them was the proposition that earlier initiation of therapy might benefit the CNS. Another was that the relationship between HIV and normal aging remains unclear and warrants further study. Still another was that ongoing abnormalities may persist despite treatment with antiretroviral therapy-including measurable brain microglial activation, detectable cerebrospinal fluid HIV, and progression of neurologic impairment. PMID:22710906

  19. Neurology in the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Gunderson, Carl H; Daroff, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Between December 1965 and December 1971, the United States maintained armed forces in Vietnam never less than 180,000 men and women in support of the war. At one time, this commitment exceeded half a million soldiers, sailors, and airmen from both the United States and its allies. Such forces required an extensive medical presence, including 19 neurologists. All but two of the neurologists had been drafted for a 2-year tour of duty after deferment for residency training. They were assigned to Vietnam for one of those 2 years in two Army Medical Units and one Air Force facility providing neurological care for American and allied forces, as well as many civilians. Their practice included exposure to unfamiliar disorders including cerebral malaria, Japanese B encephalitis, sleep deprivation seizures, and toxic encephalitis caused by injection or inhalation of C-4 explosive. They and neurologists at facilities in the United States published studies on all of these entities both during and after the war. These publications spawned the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Study, which was conceived during the Korean War and continues today as the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Center. It initially focused on post-traumatic epilepsy and later on all effects of brain injury. The Agent Orange controversy arose after the war; during the war, it was not perceived as a threat by medical personnel. Although soldiers in previous wars had developed serious psychological impairments, post-traumatic stress disorder was formally recognized in the servicemen returning from Vietnam. PMID:27035455

  20. Neurology and the Global HIV epidemic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of people living with HIV infection reside in resource-limited settings. As compared to resource-rich settings, there are important differences in the epidemiology and outcomes of HIV infection in resource-limited settings. Nonetheless, little HIV neurology research occurs in these regions. We will first review clinical, epidemiological and translational HIV neurology research originating from resource-limited settings. We will then discuss the barriers to conducting neurological research such as limited human resources, diagnostics and access to medications. Finally, we will review existing initiatives to build capacity for research in resource-limited settings. Despite the barriers, there is growing interest in and opportunities for collaborative international neurological research. Including viral and human populations from across the globe in HIV neurology research may lead to important implementation science, clinical and basic science discoveries. PMID:24715490

  1. State neurologic societies and the AAN

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswami, Pushpa; Showers, Dave; Levi, Bruce; Showers, Melissa; Jones, Elaine C.; Busis, Neil A.; Comella, Cynthia L.; Pulst, Stefan M.; Hosey, Jonathan P.; Griggs, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This report considers the recommendations of the State Society Task Force (SSTF), which evaluated how the relationship between the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and neurologic societies of individual states can foster the care of patients with neurologic diseases. The task force also evaluated the role of state neurosociety and state medical society interactions in supporting the profession of neurology. The SSTF recommended that the AAN expand current support services to state neurosocieties and foster additional neurosociety development. Specific services to be considered by the AAN include online combined AAN/state neurosociety dues payment and enhanced Web support. The role of the AAN as a liaison between state neurosocieties and state medical societies is important to facilitate state level advocacy for neurology. PMID:25110622

  2. Neurological complications associated with epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-05-01

    Multiple case reports of neurological complications resulting from intraarterial injection of corticosteroids have led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to issue a warning, requiring label changes, warning of serious neurological events, some resulting in death. The FDA has identified 131 cases of neurological adverse events, including 41 cases of arachnoiditis. A review of the literature reveals an overwhelming proportion of the complications are related to transforaminal epidural injections, of which cervical transforaminal epidural injections constituted the majority of neurological complications. Utilization data of epidural injections in the Medicare population revealed that cervical transforaminal epidural injections constitute only 2.4 % of total epidural injections and <5 % of all transforaminal epidural injections. Multiple theories have been proposed as the cause of neurological injury including particulate steroid, arterial intimal flaps, arterial dissection, dislodgement of plaque causing embolism, arterial muscle spasm, and embolism of a fresh thrombus following disruption of the intima. PMID:25795154

  3. Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

  4. The global perspective on neurology training: the World Federation of Neurology survey.

    PubMed

    Steck, Andreas; Struhal, Walter; Sergay, Stephen M; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2013-11-15

    This World Federation of Neurology (WFN) study aimed to characterize the status quo of post-graduate neurology training throughout the world and enable a better orientation on global training in neurology. Basic data on training curricula and working conditions of neurology residents and neurologists in 39 countries worldwide were evaluated. Our data show considerable differences in manpower and training, but a continuous improvement within the last 10 years of observation. Worldwide a spread of interim evaluations and final examinations of different types are used. Online resources will undoubtedly profoundly change skill and knowledge acquisition and training practices in Neurology in the coming years. PMID:23953945

  5. Par Pond Fish, Water, and Sediment Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Paller, M.H.; Wike, L.D.

    1996-06-01

    The objectives of this report are to describe the Par Pond fish community and the impact of the drawdown and refill on the community, describe contaminant levels in Par Pond fish, sediments, and water and indicate how contaminant concentrations and distributions were affected by the drawdown and refill, and predict possible effects of future water level fluctuations in Par Pond.

  6. Profile of neurological disorders in an adult neurology clinic in Kumasi, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Akassi, John; Badu, Elizabeth; Okorozo, Aham; Ovbiagele, Bruce; Akpalu, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the burden of neurological disorders is highest among populations in developing countries there is a dearth of data on the clinical spectrum of these disorders. Objective To profile the frequency of neurologic disorders and basic demographic data in an adult neurology out-patient service commissioned in 2011 in Kumasi, Ghana. Methods The study was conducted at the neurology clinic of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana. Over a three year period, all medical records of patients enrolled at the out-patient neurology clinic was reviewed by a neurologist and neurological diagnoses classified according to ICD-10. Results 1812 adults enrolled for care in the neurology out-patient service between 2011 and 2013. This comprised of 882 males and 930 females (male: female ratio of 1.0: 1.1) with an overall median age of 54 (IQR, 39–69) years. The commonest primary neurological disorders seen were strokes, epilepsy and seizure disorders, and movement disorders at frequencies of 57.1%, 19.8%, and 8.2% respectively. Conclusions Cerebrovascular diseases, epilepsy and movement disorders were among the commonest neurological disorders and the major contributors to neurologic morbidity among Ghanaians in an urban neurology clinic. PMID:27110596

  7. Directed and persistent movement arises from mechanochemistry of the ParA/ParB system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Longhua; Vecchiarelli, Anthony G.; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi; Neuman, Keir C.; Liu, Jian

    The segregation of DNA prior to cell division is essential for faithful genetic inheritance. In many bacteria, segregation of the low-copy-number plasmids involves an active partition system composed of ParA ATPase and its stimulator protein ParB. Recent experiments suggest that ParA/ParB system motility is driven by a diffusion-ratchet mechanism in which ParB-coated plasmid both creates and follows a ParA gradient on the nucleoid surface. However, the detailed mechanism of ParA/ParB-mediated directed and persistent movement remains unknown. We develop a theoretical model describing ParA/ParB-mediated motility. We show that the ParA/ParB system can work as a Brownian ratchet, which effectively couples the ATPase-dependent cycling of ParA-nucleoid affinity to the motion of the ParB bound cargo. Paradoxically, the resulting processive motion relies on quenching diffusive plasmid motion through a large number of transient ParA/ParB-mediated tethers to the nucleoid surface. Our work sheds light on a new emergent phenomenon in which non-motor proteins work collectively via mechanochemical coupling to propel cargos -- an ingenious solution shaped by evolution to cope with the lack of processive motor proteins in bacteria.

  8. The ParB-parS Chromosome Segregation System Modulates Competence Development in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Attaiech, Laetitia; Minnen, Anita; Kjos, Morten; Gruber, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT ParB proteins bind centromere-like DNA sequences called parS sites and are involved in plasmid and chromosome segregation in bacteria. We previously showed that the opportunistic human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae contains four parS sequences located close to the origin of replication which are bound by ParB. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we found here that ParB spreads out from one of these parS sites, parS(−1.6°), for more than 5 kb and occupies the nearby comCDE operon, which drives competence development. Competence allows S. pneumoniae to take up DNA from its environment, thereby mediating horizontal gene transfer, and is also employed as a general stress response. Mutating parS(−1.6°) or deleting parB resulted in transcriptional up-regulation of comCDE and ssbB (a gene belonging to the competence regulon), demonstrating that ParB acts as a repressor of competence. However, genome-wide transcription analysis showed that ParB is not a global transcriptional regulator. Different factors, such as the composition of the growth medium and antibiotic-induced stress, can trigger the sensitive switch driving competence. This work shows that the ParB-parS chromosome segregation machinery also influences this developmental process. PMID:26126852

  9. [Prevention of virus-related neurological diseases by vaccines].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M

    1997-04-01

    Prevention of virus-related neurological diseases are surveyed. Patients of poliomyelitis has recently been drastically reduced by world-wide administrating live vaccines. In view of rare incidence of paralysis after giving live vaccine, adoption of inactivated vaccine has recently been reconsidered. A live varicella vaccine was developed and has been world-wide used for normal and high-risk children. Incidence of zoster in vaccinated acute leukemic children is several times higher in those who with rash after vaccination as compared with those without rash, and as no or few rash appears after vaccination of normal children, it is expected that vaccination of normal children would lead to reduction of zoster after their aging. Measles encephalitis has rapidly been reduced by world-wide use of live vaccines. Mouse-brain derived vaccine against Japanese encephalitis(JE) has been used in Asian countries. Development of tissue-culture derived JE vaccine is under way. PMID:9103901

  10. Neurological perspectives on voltage-gated sodium channels

    PubMed Central

    Linley, John E.; Baker, Mark D.; Minett, Michael S.; Cregg, Roman; Werdehausen, Robert; Rugiero, François

    2012-01-01

    The activity of voltage-gated sodium channels has long been linked to disorders of neuronal excitability such as epilepsy and chronic pain. Recent genetic studies have now expanded the role of sodium channels in health and disease, to include autism, migraine, multiple sclerosis, cancer as well as muscle and immune system disorders. Transgenic mouse models have proved useful in understanding the physiological role of individual sodium channels, and there has been significant progress in the development of subtype selective inhibitors of sodium channels. This review will outline the functions and roles of specific sodium channels in electrical signalling and disease, focusing on neurological aspects. We also discuss recent advances in the development of selective sodium channel inhibitors. PMID:22961543

  11. [Neurology in Japan before World War II].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Modern Western medicine was introduced into Japan by a Dutch doctor Pompe van Meerdervoort in 1855. A German physician EOE von Balz devoted himself to educating medicine at Tokyo Medical School, the predecessor of the present University of Tokyo for 25 years. Hiroshi Kawahara and Kinnosuke Miura, pioneers of Japan Neurology, received their education by him. Kawahara first described X-linked bulvo-spinal muscular atrophy, and published the first Japanese textbook of clinical neurology in 1897. In 1902, Miura and others founded the Japanese Society of Neuro-Psychiatry, the forerunner of the present " Japanese Society of Neurology ". Both Seizo Katsunuma, Professor of Nagoya University, and Junnjiro Kato, Professor of Tohoku University, succeeded Miura's neurology. Miura investigated into the cause of beriberi, but ended in failure. Hasegawa's proposal at the Diet in 1894 that the Japan Government should found an independent department of neurology in the University of Tokyo was unfortunately rejected. There was no foundation of independent institute, department and clinic of neurology before World War II. Consequently Japanese neurology was on the ebb at that time. PMID:24291835

  12. Neurologic Complications in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Rubinos, Clio; Ruland, Sean

    2016-06-01

    Complications involving the central and peripheral nervous system are frequently encountered in critically ill patients. All components of the neuraxis can be involved including the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves, neuromuscular junction, and muscles. Neurologic complications adversely impact outcome and length of stay. These complications can be related to underlying critical illness, pre-existing comorbid conditions, and commonly used and life-saving procedures and medications. Familiarity with the myriad neurologic complications that occur in the intensive care unit can facilitate their timely recognition and treatment. Additionally, awareness of treatment-related neurologic complications may inform decision-making, mitigate risk, and improve outcomes. PMID:27098953

  13. Neurology--the next 10 years.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ralf; Ferriero, Donna M; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Bettegowda, Chetan; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Kessler, John A; Vezzani, Annamaria; Waxman, Stephen G; Jarius, Sven; Wildemann, Brigitte; Weller, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Since the launch of our journal as Nature Clinical Practice Neurology in 2005, we have seen remarkable progress in many areas of neurology research, but what does the future hold? Will advances in basic research be translated into effective disease-modifying therapies, and will personalized medicine finally become a reality? For this special Viewpoint article, we invited a panel of Advisory Board members and other journal contributors to outline their research priorities and predictions in neurology for the next 10 years. PMID:26503922

  14. Complementary and alternative medicine for neurologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Kline, Karen L

    2002-02-01

    The use of complementary and alternative veterinary medicine in treating neurologic disorders has increased in popularity in response to advances in human alternative and integrative therapies. Neurolocalization of lesions to the brain, spinal cord, and neuromuscular systems is discussed, as well as the diagnostics and therapeutics used to treat such disorders. Emphasis is placed on integrative and alternative treatments for such neurologic diseases as seizures, cerebrovascular accidents, canine cognitive disorder, meningitis, intervertebral disc disease, fibrocartilagenous embolism, degenerative myelopathy, and myopathies. Thorough physical and neurologic examinations, establishment of a correct diagnosis, and integrative therapeutics are aimed at improving the overall quality of life of the veterinary patient. PMID:11890124

  15. Parallel Climate Analysis Toolkit (ParCAT)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2013-06-30

    The parallel analysis toolkit (ParCAT) provides parallel statistical processing of large climate model simulation datasets. ParCAT provides parallel point-wise average calculations, frequency distributions, sum/differences of two datasets, and difference-of-average and average-of-difference for two datasets for arbitrary subsets of simulation time. ParCAT is a command-line utility that can be easily integrated in scripts or embedded in other application. ParCAT supports CMIP5 post-processed datasets as well as non-CMIP5 post-processed datasets. ParCAT reads and writes standard netCDF files.

  16. Going high with preexisting neurological conditions.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Ralf W; Siegel, Adrian M; Hackett, Peter H

    2007-01-01

    This review presents the potential impact of high altitude exposure on preexisting neurological conditions in patients usually living at low altitude. The neurological conditions include permanent and transient ischemia of the brain, occlusive cerebral artery disease, cerebral venous thrombosis, intracranial hemorrhage and vascular malformations, multiple sclerosis, intracranial space-occupying lesions, dementia, extrapyramidal disorders, migraine and other headaches, and epileptic seizures. New developments in diagnostic work-up and treatment of preexisting neurological conditions are also mentioned where applicable. For each neurological disorder, the authors developed absolute and relative contraindications for a trip to high altitude. These recommendations are not based on the results of controlled randomized trials, but mainly on case reports, pathophysiological considerations, and extrapolations from the low altitude situation. PMID:17584004

  17. Directed and persistent movement arises from mechanochemistry of the ParA/ParB system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Longhua; Vecchiarelli, Anthony G; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi; Neuman, Keir C; Liu, Jian

    2015-12-22

    The segregation of DNA before cell division is essential for faithful genetic inheritance. In many bacteria, segregation of low-copy number plasmids involves an active partition system composed of a nonspecific DNA-binding ATPase, ParA, and its stimulator protein ParB. The ParA/ParB system drives directed and persistent movement of DNA cargo both in vivo and in vitro. Filament-based models akin to actin/microtubule-driven motility were proposed for plasmid segregation mediated by ParA. Recent experiments challenge this view and suggest that ParA/ParB system motility is driven by a diffusion ratchet mechanism in which ParB-coated plasmid both creates and follows a ParA gradient on the nucleoid surface. However, the detailed mechanism of ParA/ParB-mediated directed and persistent movement remains unknown. Here, we develop a theoretical model describing ParA/ParB-mediated motility. We show that the ParA/ParB system can work as a Brownian ratchet, which effectively couples the ATPase-dependent cycling of ParA-nucleoid affinity to the motion of the ParB-bound cargo. Paradoxically, this resulting processive motion relies on quenching diffusive plasmid motion through a large number of transient ParA/ParB-mediated tethers to the nucleoid surface. Our work thus sheds light on an emergent phenomenon in which nonmotor proteins work collectively via mechanochemical coupling to propel cargos-an ingenious solution shaped by evolution to cope with the lack of processive motor proteins in bacteria. PMID:26647183

  18. Directed and persistent movement arises from mechanochemistry of the ParA/ParB system

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Longhua; Vecchiarelli, Anthony G.; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi; Neuman, Keir C.; Liu, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The segregation of DNA before cell division is essential for faithful genetic inheritance. In many bacteria, segregation of low-copy number plasmids involves an active partition system composed of a nonspecific DNA-binding ATPase, ParA, and its stimulator protein ParB. The ParA/ParB system drives directed and persistent movement of DNA cargo both in vivo and in vitro. Filament-based models akin to actin/microtubule-driven motility were proposed for plasmid segregation mediated by ParA. Recent experiments challenge this view and suggest that ParA/ParB system motility is driven by a diffusion ratchet mechanism in which ParB-coated plasmid both creates and follows a ParA gradient on the nucleoid surface. However, the detailed mechanism of ParA/ParB-mediated directed and persistent movement remains unknown. Here, we develop a theoretical model describing ParA/ParB-mediated motility. We show that the ParA/ParB system can work as a Brownian ratchet, which effectively couples the ATPase-dependent cycling of ParA–nucleoid affinity to the motion of the ParB-bound cargo. Paradoxically, this resulting processive motion relies on quenching diffusive plasmid motion through a large number of transient ParA/ParB-mediated tethers to the nucleoid surface. Our work thus sheds light on an emergent phenomenon in which nonmotor proteins work collectively via mechanochemical coupling to propel cargos—an ingenious solution shaped by evolution to cope with the lack of processive motor proteins in bacteria. PMID:26647183

  19. Roles of Circular RNAs in Neurologic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yiye; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a novel type of endogenous noncoding RNA receiving increasing attention. They have been shown to act as a natural microRNA sponges that repress the activity of corresponding miRNAs by binding with them, thus regulating target genes. Numerous studies have shown that miRNAs are involved in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Therefore, circRNAs may act as important regulatory factors in the occurrence and development processes of neurological disease. PMID:27147959

  20. Hors d'oeuvres for neurology.

    PubMed

    Pascuzzi, R M

    1999-01-01

    From time to time, in the setting of lectures, rounds, or casual conversation, there is a need for hors d'oeuvres; small pieces, spices, and artifacts that generate a bit of thought and interest with a neurological twist. A potpourri of neurological trivia is herein presented for the purpose of stimulating the reader and serving as a brief reserve of questions and topics for use on rounds. PMID:10718544

  1. Functional Disorders in Neurology: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jon; Hoeritzauer, Ingrid; Gelauff, Jeannette; Lehn, Alex; Gardiner, Paula; van Gils, Anne; Carson, Alan

    2016-08-01

    Functional, often called psychogenic, disorders are common in neurological practice. We illustrate clinical issues and highlight some recent research findings using six case studies of functional neurological disorders. We discuss dizziness as a functional disorder, describing the relatively new consensus term Persistent Posturo-Perceptual Dizziness (PPPD), axial jerking/myoclonus as a functional movement disorder, functional speech symptoms, post-concussion disorder with functional cognitive symptoms and finally advances in treatment of dissociative seizures and functional motor disorders. PMID:27445247

  2. [Neurological manifestations in riverine populations from areas exposed to mercury in the Brazilian Amazon].

    PubMed

    Khoury, Eliana Dirce Torres; Souza, Givago da Silva; Silveira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Costa, Carlos Araújo da; Araújo, Amélia A de; Pinheiro, Maria da Conceição Nascimento

    2013-11-01

    This study evaluated current levels of mercury exposure and sensory symptoms in adults from three riverine communities in Pará State, Brazil, two of which located in the Tapajós River basin and one in the Tocantins basin. Participants in this study included 78 residents in Barreiras (Tapajós), 30 in São Luiz do Tapajós (Tapajós), and 49 in Furo do Maracujá (Tocantins). Total hair mercury concentrations were quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, and neurological evaluation was conducted by routine examination. Mercury concentrations in the Tapajós communities were higher than those in the Tocantins (p < 0.01). Evaluation of neurological changes showed no significant difference between the communities in exposed areas and control areas for the changes observed by conventional neurological examination, except for gait deviation (p < 0.05). The study concludes that despite the mercury exposure levels, there was a low frequency of sensory alterations according to conventional neurological testing. PMID:24233045

  3. Comorbidity between neurological illness and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Hesdorffer, Dale C

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in many neurological disorders, including epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and stroke. These comorbidities increase disease burden and may complicate the treatment of the combined disorders. Initial studies of the comorbidity of psychiatric and neurological disorders were cross-sectional, and time order of the associations was impossible to elucidate. More recent work has clarified time associations between psychiatric disorders and neurological disorders, particularly in epilepsy and stroke where epidemiological evidence suggests that there is a bidirectional relationship. This article takes an epidemiological approach to understanding these relationships and focuses mostly on epilepsy. Although, these relationships are understood in many neurological disorders, routine screening for psychiatric disorders in neurological disorders is infrequent, mostly due to the lack of partnerships between psychiatrists and neurologists and the paucity of neuropsychiatrists. Much more needs to be done to improve the detection and treatment of patients affected by neurological and psychiatric disorders. Understanding the scope of this overlap may inspire collaborations to improve the lives of people affected by both disorders. PMID:26898322

  4. Perimenopause as a neurological transition state.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Roberta D; Yao, Jia; Yin, Fei; Mack, Wendy J; Cadenas, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    Perimenopause is a midlife transition state experienced by women that occurs in the context of a fully functioning neurological system and results in reproductive senescence. Although primarily viewed as a reproductive transition, the symptoms of perimenopause are largely neurological in nature. Neurological symptoms that emerge during perimenopause are indicative of disruption in multiple estrogen-regulated systems (including thermoregulation, sleep, circadian rhythms and sensory processing) and affect multiple domains of cognitive function. Estrogen is a master regulator that functions through a network of estrogen receptors to ensure that the brain effectively responds at rapid, intermediate and long timescales to regulate energy metabolism in the brain via coordinated signalling and transcriptional pathways. The estrogen receptor network becomes uncoupled from the bioenergetic system during the perimenopausal transition and, as a corollary, a hypometabolic state associated with neurological dysfunction can develop. For some women, this hypometabolic state might increase the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases later in life. The perimenopausal transition might also represent a window of opportunity to prevent age-related neurological diseases. This Review considers the importance of neurological symptoms in perimenopause in the context of their relationship to the network of estrogen receptors that control metabolism in the brain. PMID:26007613

  5. Sandfly virus seroconversion associated with neurologic presentation

    PubMed Central

    Makranz, Chen; Qutteineh, Hiba; Bin, Hanna; Lustig, Yaniv; Gomori, John Moshe; Honig, Asaf; Bayya, Abed El-Raouf; Moses, Allon E.; Ben-Hur, Tamir; Averbuch, Diana; Eichel, Roni

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical presentation and unique neurologic manifestations of sandfly viruses (SFVs) in the Jerusalem area. Methods: We identified all patients with acute seroconversion to SFV at the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Centers during the years 2008–2013 and retrospectively collected and analyzed the clinical and imaging data. Results: Nine patients (ranging from 1.5 to 85 years old) were identified. Presentation included acute neurologic disease, mostly with fever, change in consciousness and behavior, seizures, headache, meningitis, limb paresis, or myelitis. Eight patients had clinical signs of meningitis, meningoencephalitis, or encephalitis alone. Four patients had myelitis. MRI identified pathologic symmetrical changes in the basal ganglia, thalami, and other deep structures in 5 patients, and additional myelitis of the spine was noted on imaging in 3 patients. Seven patients had long-term follow-up: 4 completely recovered and 3 had remaining neurologic sequelae, among them 1 with permanent severe brain damage. Conclusion: Neurologic involvement associated with acute SFV infections is considered to be benign. However, in this series, all 9 patients presented with significant neurologic pathology associated with a unique finding of myelitis and symmetrical basal ganglia, thalami, or white matter involvement. Thus, acute SFV infection should be included in the differential diagnosis in febrile onset of neurologic manifestations and neuroradiologic changes. PMID:26767189

  6. Chapter 50: history of tropical neurology.

    PubMed

    Ogunniyi, Adesola

    2010-01-01

    Tropical neurology began less than two centuries ago. Consumption of dietary toxins predominated at the beginning and gave birth to the geographic entity. The story moved from lathyrism through Jamaican neuropathy to cassava-induced epidemic neuropathy, which was contrasted with Konzo, also associated with cassava. Other tropical diseases enumerated with chronological details include: Chaga's diseases, kwashiorkor, Madras type of motor neuron disease, atlanto-axial dislocation, Burkitt's lymphoma and Kuru, associated with cannibalism among the Fore linguistic group in New Guinea. More recent documentation includes the Cuban neuropathy in 1991 with an epidemic of visual loss and neuropathy, Anaphe venata entomophagy in Nigeria presenting as seasonal ataxia, and neurological aspects of the human immunodeficiency virus infection complete the picture. With time, professional associations were formed and the pioneers were given prominence. The World Federation of Neurology featured Geographic Neurology as a theme in 1977 and Tropical Neurology was given prominence at its 1989 meeting in New Delhi, India. The situation remains unchanged with regards to rare diseases like Meniere's, multiple sclerosis, hereditary disorders. However, with westernization and continued urbanization, changing disease patterns are being observed and tropical neurology may depart from dietary toxins to more western world-type disorders. PMID:19892153

  7. Role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Meynier, Sonia; Kramer, Marianne; Ribaux, Pascale; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Delie, Florence; Petignat, Patrick; Cohen, Marie

    2015-09-01

    Prostate apoptosis response-4 (PAR-4) is considered as a tumour suppressor due to its ability to selectively induce cell apoptosis in most cancer cells. However little is known about the role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer. In this study, we investigated for the first time the role of PAR-4 in ovarian carcinogenesis. We showed that PAR-4 mRNA level is not significantly different between healthy and cancer ovarian cells. Immunohistochemistry on ovarian tissue showed that ovarian cancer cells are positive for PAR-4 nuclear and cytoplasmic staining whereas ovarian healthy cells are negative for PAR-4 nuclear staining. We then studied the role of PAR-4 in cell apoptosis. We determined that PAR-4 induces cell apoptosis in response to stimuli, in vitro, but is also involved in the relocation of GRP78 from endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface of ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV-3 cells). In ovo, PAR-4 decreases ovarian tumour development and increases the response to taxol treatment. These observations suggest that PAR-4 is a very interesting therapeutic target against ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:26246468

  8. Role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meynier, Sonia; Kramer, Marianne; Ribaux, Pascale; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Delie, Florence; Petignat, Patrick; Cohen, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Prostate apoptosis response-4 (PAR-4) is considered as a tumour suppressor due to its ability to selectively induce cell apoptosis in most cancer cells. However little is known about the role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer. In this study, we investigated for the first time the role of PAR-4 in ovarian carcinogenesis. We showed that PAR-4 mRNA level is not significantly different between healthy and cancer ovarian cells. Immunohistochemistry on ovarian tissue showed that ovarian cancer cells are positive for PAR-4 nuclear and cytoplasmic staining whereas ovarian healthy cells are negative for PAR-4 nuclear staining. We then studied the role of PAR-4 in cell apoptosis. We determined that PAR-4 induces cell apoptosis in response to stimuli, in vitro, but is also involved in the relocation of GRP78 from endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface of ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV-3 cells). In ovo, PAR-4 decreases ovarian tumour development and increases the response to taxol treatment. These observations suggest that PAR-4 is a very interesting therapeutic target against ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:26246468

  9. Pars triangularis asymmetry and language dominance.

    PubMed Central

    Foundas, A L; Leonard, C M; Gilmore, R L; Fennell, E B; Heilman, K M

    1996-01-01

    The pars triangular is a portion of Broca's area. The convolutions that form the inferior and caudal extent of the pars triangularis include the anterior horizontal and anterior ascending rami of the sylvian fissure, respectively. To learn if there are anatomic asymmetries of the pars triangularis, these convolutions were measured on volumetric magnetic resonance imaging scans of 11 patients who had undergone selective hemispheric anesthesia (Wada testing) to determine hemispheric speech and language lateralization. Of the 10 patients with language lateralized to the left hemisphere, 9 had a leftward asymmetry of the pars triangularis. The 1 patient with language lateralized to the right hemisphere had a significant rightward asymmetry of the pars triangularis. Our data suggest that asymmetries of the pars triangularis may be related to speech-language lateralization. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8570622

  10. Neurological long term consequences of deep diving.

    PubMed Central

    Todnem, K; Nyland, H; Skeidsvoll, H; Svihus, R; Rinck, P; Kambestad, B K; Riise, T; Aarli, J A

    1991-01-01

    Forty commercial saturation divers, mean age 34.9 (range 24-49) years, were examined one to seven years after their last deep dive (190-500 metres of seawater). Four had by then lost their divers' licence because of neurological problems. Twenty seven (68%) had been selected by neurological examination and electroencephalography before the deep dives. The control group consisted of 100 men, mean age 34.0 (range 22-48) years. The divers reported significantly more symptoms from the nervous system. Concentration difficulties and paraesthesia in feet and hands were common. They had more abnormal neurological findings by neurological examination compatible with dysfunction in the lumbar spinal cord or roots. They also had a larger proportion of abnormal electroencephalograms than the controls. The neurological symptoms and findings were highly significantly correlated with exposure to deep diving (depth included), but even more significantly correlated to air and saturation diving and prevalence of decompression sickness. Visual evoked potentials, brainstem auditory evoked potentials, and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not show more abnormal findings in the divers. Four (10%) divers had had episodes of cerebral dysfunction during or after the dives; two had had seizures, one had had transitory cerebral ischaemia and one had had transitory global amnesia. It is concluded that deep diving may have a long term effect on the nervous system of the divers. PMID:2025592

  11. Neurologic autoimmunity: mechanisms revealed by animal models.

    PubMed

    Bradl, Monika; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, neurologic autoimmunity has become a major consideration in the diagnosis and management of patients with many neurologic presentations. The nature of the associated antibodies and their targets has led to appreciation of the importance of the accessibility of the target antigen to antibodies, and a partial understanding of the different mechanisms that can follow antibody binding. This chapter will first describe the basic principles of autoimmune inflammation and tissue damage in the central and peripheral nervous system, and will then demonstrate what has been learnt about neurologic autoimmunity from circumstantial clinical evidence and from passive, active, and occasionally spontaneous or genetic animal models. It will cover neurologic autoimmune diseases ranging from disorders of neuromuscular transmission, peripheral and ganglionic neuropathy, to diseases of the central nervous system, where autoantibodies are either pathogenic and cause destruction or changes in function of their targets, where they are harmless bystanders of T-cell-mediated tissue damage, or are not involved at all. Finally, this chapter will summarize the relevance of current animal models for studying the different neurologic autoimmune diseases, and it will identify aspects where future animal models need to be improved to better reflect the disease reality experienced by affected patients, e.g., the chronicity or the relapsing/remitting nature of their disease. PMID:27112675

  12. Neurologic diseases in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Bilgrami, Mohammed; O'Keefe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy there has been an improvement in the quality of life for people with HIV infection. Despite the progress made, about 70% of HIV patients develop neurologic complications. These originate either in the central or the peripheral nervous system (Sacktor, 2002). These neurologic disorders are divided into primary and secondary disorders. The primary disorders result from the direct effects of the virus and include HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), HIV-associated vacuolar myelopathy (VM), and distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP). Secondary disorders result from marked immunosuppression and include opportunistic infections and primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). A differential diagnosis which can be accomplished by detailed history, neurologic examination, and by having a good understanding of the role of HIV in various neurologic disorders will help physicians in approaching these problems. The focus of this chapter is to discuss neuropathogenesis of HIV, the various opportunistic infections, primary CNS lymphoma, neurosyphilis, CNS tuberculosis, HIV-associated peripheral neuropathies, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND), and vacuolar myelopathy (VM). It also relies on the treatment recommendations and guidelines for the above mentioned neurologic disorders proposed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Infectious Diseases Society of America. PMID:24365422

  13. Factor Xa stimulates fibroblast procollagen production, proliferation, and calcium signaling via PAR{sub 1} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc-Brude, Olivier P. . E-mail: olivier.blanc-brude@larib.inserm.fr; Archer, Fabienne; Leoni, Patricia; Derian, Claudia; Bolsover, Steven; Laurent, Geoffrey J.; Chambers, Rachel C.

    2005-03-10

    Fibroblast proliferation and procollagen production are central features of tissue repair and fibrosis. In addition to its role in blood clotting, the coagulation cascade proteinase thrombin can contribute to tissue repair by stimulating fibroblasts via proteolytic activation of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR{sub 1}). During hemostasis, the coagulation cascade proteinase factor X is converted into factor Xa. We have previously shown that factor Xa upregulates fibroblast proliferation via production of autocrine PDGF. In this study, we further examined the effects of factor Xa on fibroblast function and aimed to identify its signaling receptor. We showed that factor Xa stimulates procollagen promoter activity and protein production by human and mouse fibroblasts. This effect was independent of PDGF and thrombin production, but dependent on factor Xa proteolytic activity. We also showed that PAR{sub 1}-deficient mouse fibroblasts did not upregulate procollagen production, mobilize cytosolic calcium, or proliferate in response to factor Xa. Desensitization techniques and PAR{sub 1}-specific agonists and inhibitors were used to demonstrate that PAR{sub 1} mediates factor Xa signaling in human fibroblasts. This is the first report that factor Xa stimulates extracellular matrix production. In contrast with endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts appear to be the only cell type in which the effects of factor Xa are mediated mainly via PAR{sub 1} and not PAR{sub 2}. These findings are critical for our understanding of tissue repair and fibrotic mechanisms, and for the design of novel approaches to inhibit the profibrotic effects of the coagulation cascade without compromising blood hemostasis.

  14. Neurological complications of cervical spine manipulation.

    PubMed

    Stevinson, C; Honan, W; Cooke, B; Ernst, E

    2001-03-01

    To obtain preliminary data on neurological complications of spinal manipulation in the UK all members of the Association of British Neurologists were asked to report cases referred to them of neurological complications occurring within 24 hours of cervical spine manipulation over a 12-month period. The response rate was 74%. 24 respondents reported at least one case each, contributing to a total of about 35 cases. These included 7 cases of stroke in brainstem territory (4 with confirmation of vertebral artery dissection), 2 cases of stroke in carotid territory and 1 case of acute subdural haematoma. There were 3 cases of myelopathy and 3 of cervical radiculopathy. Concern about neurological complications following cervical spine manipulation appears to be justified. A large long-term prospective study is required to determine the scale of the hazard. PMID:11285788

  15. Neurological complications of cervical spine manipulation.

    PubMed Central

    Stevinson, C; Honan, W; Cooke, B; Ernst, E

    2001-01-01

    To obtain preliminary data on neurological complications of spinal manipulation in the UK all members of the Association of British Neurologists were asked to report cases referred to them of neurological complications occurring within 24 hours of cervical spine manipulation over a 12-month period. The response rate was 74%. 24 respondents reported at least one case each, contributing to a total of about 35 cases. These included 7 cases of stroke in brainstem territory (4 with confirmation of vertebral artery dissection), 2 cases of stroke in carotid territory and 1 case of acute subdural haematoma. There were 3 cases of myelopathy and 3 of cervical radiculopathy. Concern about neurological complications following cervical spine manipulation appears to be justified. A large long-term prospective study is required to determine the scale of the hazard. PMID:11285788

  16. Placebo Controlled Procedural Trials for Neurological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Horng, Sam H.; Miller, Franklin G.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Neurological disease has been a central focus in the ongoing ethical debate over the use of invasive placebo controls, especially sham surgery. The risk to research subjects and necessary use of deception involved in these procedures must be balanced against the methodological need to control for bias and the placebo effect. We review a framework formulated for the ethical assessment of sham surgery in the context of research evaluating novel procedures for neurological conditions. Special issues raised include the growing evidence of expectation and conditioning effects in a number of neurological diseases, the escalating scale of risk from different types of invasive placebo interventions, and the increasing use of crossover designs, which allow a switch from placebo to active intervention without additional procedures. PMID:17599718

  17. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis for inherited neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Tur-Kaspa, Ilan; Jeelani, Roohi; Doraiswamy, P Murali

    2014-07-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is an option for couples at risk of having offspring with an inherited debilitating or fatal neurological disorder who wish to conceive a healthy child. PGD has been carried out for conditions with various modes of inheritance, including spinal muscular atrophy, Huntington disease, fragile X syndrome, and chromosomal or mitochondrial disorders, and for susceptibility genes for cancers with nervous system involvement. Most couples at risk of transmitting a genetic mutation would opt for PGD over prenatal testing and possible termination of a pregnancy. The aim of this Perspectives article is to assist neurologists in counselling and treating patients who wish to explore the option of PGD to enable conception of an unaffected child. PGD can be accomplished for most disorders in which the genetic basis is known, and we argue that it is time for clinicians and neurological societies to consider the evidence and to formulate guidelines for the responsible integration of PGD into modern preventative neurology. PMID:24866878

  18. Astrocytes: The missing link in neurological disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Ching John; Deneen, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is comprised of numerous cell types that work in concert to facilitate proper function and homeostasis. Disruption of these carefully orchestrated networks results in neuronal dysfunction, manifesting itself in a variety of neurological disorders. While neuronal dysregulation is causative of symptoms manifest in the clinic, the etiology of these disorders is often more complex than simply a loss of neurons or intrinsic dysregulation of their function. In the adult brain, astrocytes comprise the most abundant cell type and play key roles in CNS physiology, therefore it stands to reason that dysregulation of normal astrocyte function contributes to the etiology and progression of varied neurological disorders. We review here some neurological disorders associated with an astrocyte factor and discuss how the related astrocyte dysfunction contributes to the etiology and/or progression of these disorders. PMID:24365571

  19. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Pediatric Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Ümit Özgür; Atay Kapucu, Lütfiye Özlem

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging can provide important complementary information in the management of pediatric patients with neurological diseases. Pre-surgical localization of the epileptogenic focus in medically refractory epilepsy patients is the most common indication for nuclear medicine imaging in pediatric neurology. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, nuclear medicine imaging is particularly useful when magnetic resonance imaging findings are normal or its findings are discordant with electroencephalogram findings. In pediatric patients with brain tumors, nuclear medicine imaging can be clinically helpful in the diagnosis, directing biopsy, planning therapy, differentiating tumor recurrence from post-treatment sequelae, and assessment of response to therapy. Among other neurological diseases in which nuclear medicine has proved to be useful are patients with head trauma, inflammatory-infectious diseases and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:27299282

  20. Neurologic complications following pediatric renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Partha S; Kwon, Charles; Klein, Melanie; Corder, Julie; Ghosh, Debabrata

    2014-06-01

    We reviewed neurologic complications after renal transplantation in children over a 20-year period. Neurologic complications were classified as early (within 3 months) and delayed (beyond 3 months). Of 115 children, 10 (8.7%) had complications. Early complications were found in 4.35% of patients: seizures in 4 (posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome due to immunosuppressant toxicity, sepsis/presumed meningitis, and indeterminate) and headaches in 1. One patient with seizures received levetiracetam for 6 months and 1 with headaches received amitriptyline prophylaxis. Late complications were noted in 4.35% of patients: seizures in 3 (posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome due to hypertension, hypertensive encephalopathy), headaches in 2, and tremors in 1. Two patients with seizures were treated with anti-epilepsy medications; 1 with migraine received cyproheptadine prophylaxis. Neurologic complications develop in children after renal transplantation. Seizures due to posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome were the commonest complication. Early detection and appropriate management of these complications is important. PMID:23752071

  1. Mitochondria in Neuroplasticity and Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Mark P.; Gleichmann, Marc; Cheng, Aiwu

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial electron transport generates the ATP that is essential for the excitability and survival of neurons, and the protein phosphorylation reactions that mediate synaptic signaling and related long-term changes in neuronal structure and function. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that divide, fuse and move purposefully within axons and dendrites. An Major functions of mitochondria in neurons include the regulation of Ca2+ and redox signaling, developmental and synaptic plasticity, and the arbitration of cell survival and death. The importance of mitochondria in neurons is evident in the neurological phenotypes in rare diseases caused by mutations in mitochondrial genes. Mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress, perturbed Ca2+ homeostasis and apoptosis may also contribute to the pathogenesis of prominent neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, stroke, ALS and psychiatric disorders. Advances in understanding the molecular and cell biology of mitochondria are leading to novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:19081372

  2. Neurological disorders and inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Pastorelli, Luca; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Spina, Luisa; Baldini, Vittorio; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur in about one-third of patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and may precede the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms by many years. Neurologic disorders associated with IBD are not frequent, being reported in 3% of patients, but they often represent an important cause of morbidity and a relevant diagnostic issue. In addition, the increasing use of immunosuppressant and biological therapies for IBD may also play a pivotal role in the development of neurological disorders of different type and pathogenesis. Hence, we provide a complete and profound review of the main features of neurological complications associated with IBD, with particular reference to those related to drugs and with a specific focus on their clinical presentation and possible pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25083051

  3. What Should a Family Physician Know About Neurology?

    PubMed Central

    Murray, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    Ten per cent of patients visiting their family physician have a neurological complaint, and 1% to 2% eventually are diagnosed as having a definite neurological problem. Although most neurological problems can be managed effectively by the family physician, many physicians have trouble conducting a neurological examination confidently, interpreting the results of their findings, or deciding what tests should be done. The author outlines what the family practitioner should know about the field, including certain basic concepts about the nervous system, the appropriate attitude toward neurological problems and patients, characteristics of an efficient, high-yield neurological screening examination, and emergency management of common and treatable neurological conditions. PMID:21234042

  4. PAR for the Course: A Congruent Pedagogical Approach for a PAR Methods Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Joyce D.; Hicks, Maria; Kalman, Rowenn; Miller, Jason

    2005-01-01

    In the past two years, three graduate students and a senior faculty member have co-taught a participatory action research (PAR) course to undergraduate and graduate students. In this article the co-teachers advocate a set of pedagogical principles and practices in a PAR-oriented classroom that establishes congruency with community PAR projects in…

  5. Neurologic Complications in Treated HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Nisha S; Chow, Felicia C

    2016-07-01

    Effective combination antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV infection into a chronic disease, with HIV-infected individuals living longer and reaching older age. Neurological disease remains common in treated HIV, however, due in part to ongoing inflammation and immune activation that persist in chronic infection. In this review, we highlight recent developments in our understanding of several clinically relevant neurologic complications that can occur in HIV infection despite treatment, including HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, symptomatic CSF escape, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral neuropathy. PMID:27170369

  6. [Rehabilitation methods in small animal neurology].

    PubMed

    Kathmann, I; Demierre, S; Jaggy, A

    2001-10-01

    Rehabilitation is an important part of the treatment of neurological diseases. The primary goal of these methods is an optimal functional restoring of the neuro-muscular system. Massages, thermo-, hydro- and electrotherapy, as well as therapy of movement are different treatment possibilities with their own indication, which are combined in a physiotherapy program. It follows an overview of the different physiotherapeutic methods and their application in some of the most common neurological diseases, as for example intervertebral disc problems or degenerative myelopathy. PMID:11680910

  7. Imaging Manifestations of Neurologic Complications in Anemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ritesh; Sabat, Shyam; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-08-01

    The hallmark signs and symptoms of anemia are directly related to a decrease in oxygen delivery to vital tissues and organs and include pallor, fatigue, lightheadedness, and shortness of breath. Neurologic complications are often nonspecific and can include poor concentration, irritability, faintness, tinnitus, and headache. If undiagnosed or untreated, anemia can progress to cognitive dysfunction, psychosis, encephalopathy, myelopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and more focal syndromes, such as stroke, seizures, chorea, and transverse myelitis. Imaging can play an important role in the early diagnosis and treatment of these neurologic and systemic complications associated with anemia, and hence, better outcome. PMID:27443995

  8. How to write a neurology case report.

    PubMed

    Rison, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Neurology case reports have a long history of transmitting important medical information across many generations for the improvement of patient care. Case reports contribute much to the physician's knowledge base from which treatment hypotheses and ideas form. Elements of a modern case report, as presented in the CARE (CAse REport) guidelines, include the abstract, introduction, case presentation, discussion, conclusion, patient's perspective, and consent statement. The sections are described here, as well as the application of CARE guidelines to a published neuromuscular case report. Writing case reports offer an ideal opportunity for neurologists to publish interesting case findings and carry on the tradition of neurologic case reporting. PMID:27048575

  9. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are extensive and well developed. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Estimates from SPOT HRV, remote sensing satellite data indicated that as much as 120 hectares of emergent wetlands vegetation may have been present along the Par Pond shoreline by early October, 1995. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the continued evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.

  10. Neurological complications of prolonged hunger strike.

    PubMed

    Başoğlu, M; Yetimalar, Y; Gürgör, N; Büyükçatalbaş, S; Kurt, T; Seçil, Y; Yeniocak, A

    2006-10-01

    We investigated neurological findings in 41 prisoners (mean age: 28.6) who participated in a hunger strike between 2000 and 2002. All cases were evaluated using neuropsychological, neuroradiological, and electrophysiological methods. The total duration of fasting ranged from 130 to 324 days (mean 199 days). All cases had 200-600 mg/day thiamine orally for 60-294 days (mean 156) during the hunger strike, and had neurological findings consistent with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. All 41 patients exhibited altered consciousness which lasted from 3 to 31 days. All patients also presented gaze-evoked horizontal nystagmus and truncal ataxia. Paralysis of lateral rectus muscles was found in 14. Amnesia was apparent in all cases. Abnormal nerve conduction study parameters were not found in the patient group, but the amplitude of compound muscle action potential of the median and fibular nerves and sensory nerve action potential amplitude of the sural nerve were lower than the control group, and distal motor latency of the posterior tibial nerve was significantly prolonged as compared with the control group. The latency of visual evoked potential was prolonged in 22 cases. Somatosensory evoked potential (P37) was prolonged but not statistically significant. Our most significant finding was that the effect of hunger was more prominent on the central nervous system than on the neuromuscular system, despite the fact that all patients were taking thiamine. In our opinion, partial recovery of neurological, and neurocognitive signs in prolonged hunger could be a result of permanent neurological injury. PMID:16987161

  11. Teaching Undergraduate Medical Students the Neurological Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laguna, Jose F.; Stillman, Paula L.

    1978-01-01

    The University of Arizona College of Medicine program described extends the role of practical instructor or programmed patient to that of evaluator and teacher of neurological examinations skills for preclinical medical students. The process may help improve the quality of medical education without increasing the size of clinical faculty. (LBH)

  12. [Preventing swallowing disorders in neurological patients].

    PubMed

    Poindessous, Jean-Luc; Basta, Martial; Da Silva, José; Tillard, Audrey; Rasquier, Stéphanie; Héron, Anne

    2015-12-01

    Swallowing disorders in neurological rehabilitation are common and important as they can have harmful consequences. A multi-disciplinary hospital team was created to study ways of preventing their occurrence. This article presents the areas to focus on and the main orientations of patient management. PMID:26654505

  13. The Neurologic Manifestations of Mitochondrial Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    The nervous system contains some of the body's most metabolically demanding cells that are highly dependent on ATP produced via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, the neurological system is consistently involved in patients with mitochondrial disease. Symptoms differ depending on the part of the nervous system affected. Although almost…

  14. Episodic neurological dysfunction in hereditary peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Girish Baburao; Mailankody, Pooja; Isnwara, Pawanraj Palu; Prasad, Chandrajit; Mustare, Veerendrakumar

    2015-01-01

    Episodic transient neurological symptoms are an important set of problems presenting to a neurologist in his routine practice. Occasionally, detailed clinical history including past and family history supplemented with focused examination can bring out a rare cause for such symptoms. We describe in this report in a young male presenting with episodic focal neurological dysfunction, with family history of similar episodes in mother and brother. Examination showed features of pes cavus and peripheral neuropathy for which patient was asymptomatic. Mother and brother were established cases of hereditary neuropathy. Imaging on multiple occasions showed reversible white matter abnormalities. Clinical suspicion of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 (CMT1X) was confirmed with detection of mutation in Gap Junction B1 (GJB1) gene, which codes for connexin 32 protein (c.425G>A; p.R142Q hemizygous mutation). Though this mutation has been already reported in CMTX patients, it has not been associated with transient neurological dysfunctions. This is probably the first reported case of CMTX patient with transient neurological dysfunction from India, whose family members had similar episodes. PMID:25745327

  15. [Detection and management of the neurologic dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Leemann, Beatrice; Sergi, Sabrina; Sahinpasic, Leila; Schnider, Armin

    2016-03-01

    Neurologic dysphagia is frequent and has consequences which can be severe, such as, denutrition andpneumonia. In most cases, it can be detected with a clinical exam. The management includes some general measures, an adaptation of textures, specific rehabilitation, and nutritional assessment to judge whether complementary enteral nutrition is needed. PMID:27089605

  16. Chapter 17: cognitive assessment in neurology.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Victor W

    2010-01-01

    Modern interests in cognitive assessment began with Franz Gall's early 19th century theory of mental organology and Paul Broca's reports in the 1860s on patients with focal brain injury and aphemia. These workers spurred interest in assessing delimited mental abilities in relation to discrete cerebral areas. With roots in experimental and educational psychology, the intelligence testing movement added assessment tools that could be applied to neurological patients. Early- to mid-20th-century landmarks were Alfred Binet and Theodore Simon's intelligence scale, Howard Knox's nonverbal performance tests, and the intelligence quotient conceived by Lewis Terman and refined by David Wechsler. Also developed during this era were Henry Head's Serial Tests for aphasic patients and Kurt Goldstein's tests for brain-injured patients with impairments in "abstract attitude" and concept formation. Other investigators have contributed procedures for the evaluation of language functions, memory, visuospatial and visuoconstructive skills, praxis, and executive functions. A further milestone was the development of short standardized cognitive instruments for dementia assessment. Within a neurological arena, the historical emphasis has been on a flexible, process-driven approach to the service of neurological diagnosis and syndrome identification. Advances in clinical psychology, neurology, and the cognate clinical neurosciences continue to enrich assessment options. PMID:19892120

  17. The Transformation: Monarch Institute for Neurological Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reclaiming Children and Youth, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Those utilizing the Monarch Institute and its powerful website include educational and mental health professionals looking for training, or employers seeking qualified workers who happen to have neurological differences. Most are students and their parents who are worried and in pain because they have a problem. The young person is not progressing…

  18. Anaerobic Infections in Children with Neurological Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Itzhak

    1995-01-01

    Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection with anaerobic bacteria. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers; gastrostomy site wound infections; pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis); and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of…

  19. Prenatal Antecedents of Newborn Neurological Maturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPietro, Janet A.; Kivlighan, Katie T.; Costigan, Kathleen A.; Rubin, Suzanne E.; Shiffler, Dorothy E.; Henderson, Janice L.; Pillion, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Fetal neurobehavioral development was modeled longitudinally using data collected at weekly intervals from 24 to 38 weeks gestation in a sample of 112 healthy pregnancies. Predictive associations between 3 measures of fetal neurobehavioral functioning and their developmental trajectories to neurological maturation in the first weeks after birth…

  20. Cutaneous Adverse Effects of Neurologic Medications.

    PubMed

    Bahrani, Eman; Nunneley, Chloe E; Hsu, Sylvia; Kass, Joseph S

    2016-03-01

    Life-threatening and benign drug reactions occur frequently in the skin, affecting 8 % of the general population and 2-3 % of all hospitalized patients, emphasizing the need for physicians to effectively recognize and manage patients with drug-induced eruptions. Neurologic medications represent a vast array of drug classes with cutaneous side effects. Approximately 7 % of the United States (US) adult population is affected by adult-onset neurological disorders, reflecting a large number of patients on neurologic drug therapies. This review elucidates the cutaneous reactions associated with medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat the following neurologic pathologies: Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, epilepsy, Huntington disease, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, and pseudobulbar affect. A search of the literature was performed using the specific FDA-approved drug or drug classes in combination with the terms 'dermatologic,' 'cutaneous,' 'skin,' or 'rash.' Both PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were utilized, with side effects ranging from those cited in randomized controlled trials to case reports. It behooves neurologists, dermatologists, and primary care physicians to be aware of the recorded cutaneous adverse reactions and their severity for proper management and potential need to withdraw the offending medication. PMID:26914914

  1. Neurology of sex steroids and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Schipper, H M

    1986-11-01

    Under normal circumstances, sex steroids interact with diverse neural substrates to modulate a host of activities essential to the preservation of the individual and the species. In addition, sex hormones play an important role in various human neurologic conditions including strokes, migraine, certain movement disorders and peripheral neuropathies, and possibly even the behavior of CNS neoplasms. PMID:3025581

  2. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  3. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  4. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  5. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  6. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  7. Prevention of Neurologic Injuries in Equestrian Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, William H.; Bixby-Hammett, Doris M.

    1988-01-01

    Risk of neurological injuries accompanies horseback riding, especially for children and adolescents. This article describes the mechanisms of craniospinal injuries and suggests measures to lessen risks. Measures include: identifying individuals who should not ride, developing criteria for resumption of riding after injury, developing protective…

  8. Neurological Vision Rehabilitation: Description and Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, John; Katsaros, Jennifer; Vu, Yurika; Goodrich, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have been notable for the high rates of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that have been incurred by the troops. Visual impairments often occur following TBI and present new challenges for rehabilitation. We describe a neurological vision rehabilitation therapy that addresses the unique needs of patients with vision…

  9. Neurological susceptibility to a skull defect

    PubMed Central

    Honeybul, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Background: There continues to be considerable interest in the use of decompressive craniectomy in the management of neurological emergencies. The procedure is technically straightforward; however, it is becoming increasingly apparent that it is associated with significant complications. One complication that has received relatively little attention is the neurological dysfunction that can occur due to the absence of the bone flap and the subsequent distortion of the brain under the scalp as cerebral swelling subsides. The aim of this narrative review was to examine the literature available regarding the clinical features described, outline the proposed pathophysiology for these clinical manifestations and highlight the implications that this may have for rehabilitation of patients with a large skull defect. Methods: A literature search was performed in the MEDLINE database (1966 to June 2012). The following keywords were used: Hemicraniectomy, decompressive craniectomy, complications, syndrome of the trephined, syndrome of the sinking scalp flap, motor trephined syndrome. The bibliographies of retrieved reports were searched for additional references. Results: Various terms have been used to describe the different neurological signs and symptoms with which patients with a skull defect can present. These include; syndrome of the trephined, posttraumatic syndrome, syndrome of the sinking scalp flap, and motor trephined syndrome. There is, however, considerable overlap between the conditions described and a patient's individual clinical presentation. Conclusion: It is becoming increasingly apparent that certain patients are particularly susceptible to the presence of a large skull defect. The term “Neurological Susceptibility to a Skull Defect” (NSSD) is therefore suggested as a blanket term to describe any neurological change attributable to the absence of cranial coverage. PMID:25024883

  10. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2015-01-01

    The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS’s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. “Epigenetics”, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB), regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression. This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics

  11. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Landgrave-Gómez, Jorge; Mercado-Gómez, Octavio; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2015-01-01

    The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS's regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure. "Epigenetics", introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB), regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression. This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of epigenetics and

  12. ParAB Partition Dynamics in Firmicutes: Nucleoid Bound ParA Captures and Tethers ParB-Plasmid Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, Virginia S.; Volante, Andrea; Soberón, Nora E.; Lurz, Rudi; Ayora, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    In Firmicutes, small homodimeric ParA-like (δ2) and ParB-like (ω2) proteins, in concert with cis-acting plasmid-borne parS and the host chromosome, secure stable plasmid inheritance in a growing bacterial population. This study shows that (ω:YFP)2 binding to parS facilitates plasmid clustering in the cytosol. (δ:GFP)2 requires ATP binding but not hydrolysis to localize onto the cell’s nucleoid as a fluorescent cloud. The interaction of (δ:CFP)2 or δ2 bound to the nucleoid with (ω:YFP)2 foci facilitates plasmid capture, from a very broad distribution, towards the nucleoid and plasmid pairing. parS-bound ω2 promotes redistribution of (δ:GFP)2, leading to the dynamic release of (δ:GFP)2 from the nucleoid, in a process favored by ATP hydrolysis and protein-protein interaction. (δD60A:GFP)2, which binds but cannot hydrolyze ATP, also forms unstable complexes on the nucleoid. In the presence of ω2, (δD60A:GFP)2 accumulates foci or patched structures on the nucleoid. We propose that (δ:GFP)2 binding to different nucleoid regions and to ω2-parS might generate (δ:GFP)2 gradients that could direct plasmid movement. The iterative pairing and unpairing cycles may tether plasmids equidistantly on the nucleoid to ensure faithful plasmid segregation by a mechanism compatible with the diffusion-ratchet mechanism as proposed from in vitro reconstituted systems. PMID:26161642

  13. Contemporary Teaching of Neurology. Teaching Neurological Behavior to General Practitioners: A Fresh Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derouesne, C.; Salamon, R.

    1977-01-01

    Ways in which teaching neurology can be simplified for the nonspecialist practitioner are addressed in this assessment of the state-of-the-art in France. The hypothesis implies simplifying both the diagnoses and symptomatology. (LBH)

  14. Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ibeas Bih, Clementino; Chen, Tong; Nunn, Alistair V W; Bazelot, Michaël; Dallas, Mark; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has a long history of anecdotal medicinal use and limited licensed medicinal use. Until recently, alleged clinical effects from anecdotal reports and the use of licensed cannabinoid medicines are most likely mediated by tetrahydrocannabinol by virtue of: 1) this cannabinoid being present in the most significant quantities in these preparations; and b) the proportion:potency relationship between tetrahydrocannabinol and other plant cannabinoids derived from cannabis. However, there has recently been considerable interest in the therapeutic potential for the plant cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), in neurological disorders but the current evidence suggests that CBD does not directly interact with the endocannabinoid system except in vitro at supraphysiological concentrations. Thus, as further evidence for CBD's beneficial effects in neurological disease emerges, there remains an urgent need to establish the molecular targets through which it exerts its therapeutic effects. Here, we conducted a systematic search of the extant literature for original articles describing the molecular pharmacology of CBD. We critically appraised the results for the validity of the molecular targets proposed. Thereafter, we considered whether the molecular targets of CBD identified hold therapeutic potential in relevant neurological diseases. The molecular targets identified include numerous classical ion channels, receptors, transporters, and enzymes. Some CBD effects at these targets in in vitro assays only manifest at high concentrations, which may be difficult to achieve in vivo, particularly given CBD's relatively poor bioavailability. Moreover, several targets were asserted through experimental designs that demonstrate only correlation with a given target rather than a causal proof. When the molecular targets of CBD that were physiologically plausible were considered for their potential for exploitation in neurological therapeutics, the results were variable. In some cases

  15. [Nutritional and metabolic aspects of neurological diseases].

    PubMed

    Planas Vilà, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system regulates food intake, homoeostasis of glucose and electrolytes, and starts the sensations of hunger and satiety. Different nutritional factors are involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases. Patients with acute neurological diseases (traumatic brain injury, cerebral vascular accident hemorrhagic or ischemic, spinal cord injuries, and cancer) and chronic neurological diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease) increase the risk of malnutrition by multiple factors related to nutrient ingestion, abnormalities in the energy expenditure, changes in eating behavior, gastrointestinal changes, and by side effects of drugs administered. Patients with acute neurological diseases have in common the presence of hyper metabolism and hyper catabolism both associated to a period of prolonged fasting mainly for the frequent gastrointestinal complications, many times as a side effect of drugs administered. During the acute phase, spinal cord injuries presented a reduction in the energy expenditure but an increase in the nitrogen elimination. In order to correct the negative nitrogen balance increase intakes is performed with the result of a hyper alimentation that should be avoided due to the complications resulting. In patients with chronic neurological diseases and in the acute phase of cerebrovascular accident, dysphagia could be present which also affects intakes. Several chronic neurological diseases have also dementia, which lead to alterations in the eating behavior. The presence of malnutrition complicates the clinical evolution, increases muscular atrophy with higher incidence of respiratory failure and less capacity to disphagia recuperation, alters the immune response with higher rate of infections, increases the likelihood of fractures and of pressure ulcers, increases the incapacity degree and is an independent factor to increase mortality. The periodic nutritional

  16. Neurology as career option among postgraduate medical students

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Namit B.; Khadilkar, Satish V.; Bangar, Sachin S.; Patil, Tukaram R.; Chaudhari, Chetan R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the context of inadequacy of neurology workforce in India, it is important to understand factors that post-graduate medical students consider for and against choosing neurology as their career option. Understanding these factors will help in planning strategies to encourage students to pursue a career in neurology. At present, there is a paucity of studies addressing this issue in India. Aims and Objectives: (1) To analyze factors, which post-graduate students consider for and against choosing neurology as a career specialty. (2) To access the level and quality of neurology exposure in the current MBBS and MD curricula. Materials and Methods: Statewide questionnaire based study was conducted in the state of Maharashtra for students eligible to take DM neurology entrance examination (MD Medicine and MD Pediatrics). Results: In this survey, 243 students were enrolled. Factors bringing students to neurology were - intellectual challenge and logical reasoning (72%), inspired by role model teachers (63%), better quality-of-life (51%) and scope for independent practice without expensive infrastructure (48%). Factors preventing students from taking neurology were - perception that most neurological diseases are degenerative (78%), neurology is mainly an academic specialty (40%), neurophobia (43%) and lack of procedures (57%). Inadequate exposure and resultant lack of self-confidence were common (31%, 70-80%). 84% of the students felt the need for a short term certification course in neurology after MD. Conclusions: To attract more students to neurology, “role model” teachers of neurology could interact and teach students extensively. Neurologists’ efforts to shed their diagnostician's image and to shift their focus to therapeutics will help change the image of neurology. Out-patient neurology clinics should be incorporated early in the student's career. Procedures attract students; hence, they should be made conversant with procedures and

  17. Therapeutic effects of progesterone in animal models of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Alejandro F; Coronel, Florencia; Garay, Laura I; Gargiulo-Monachelli, Gisella; Gonzalez Deniselle, Maria Claudia; Gonzalez, Susana L; Labombarda, Florencia; Meyer, Maria; Guennoun, Rachida; Schumacher, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Substantial evidence supports that progesterone exerts many functions in the central and peripheral nervous system unrelated to its classical role in reproduction. In this review we first discussed progesterone effects following binding to the classical intracellular progesterone receptors A and B and several forms of membrane progesterone receptors, the modulation of intracellular signalling cascades and the interaction of progesterone reduced metabolites with neurotransmitter receptors. We next described our results involving animal models of human neuropathologies to elucidate the protective roles of progesterone. We described: (a) the protective and promyelinating effects of progesterone in experimental spinal cord injury; (b) the progesterone protective effects exerted upon motoneurons in the degenerating spinal cord of Wobbler mouse model of amyotropic lateral sclerosis; (c) the protective and anti-inflammatory effects of progesterone in the murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis model of multiple sclerosis and after lysolecithin demyelination; (d) the progesterone prevention of nociception and neuropathic pain which follow spinal cord injury; and (e) the protective effect of progesterone in experimental ischemic stroke. Whenever available, the molecular mechanisms involved in these progesterone effects were examined. The multiplicity of progesterone beneficial effects has opened new venues of research for neurological disorders. In this way, results obtained in animal models could provide the basis for novel therapeutic strategies and pre-clinical studies. PMID:24040821

  18. Emergency neurological care of strokes and bleeds

    PubMed Central

    Birenbaum, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Ischemic stroke and brain hemorrhage are common and challenging problems faced by emergency physicians. In this article, important details in the diagnosis and clinical management of these neurological emergencies are presented with the following goals: 1) To provide a more comprehensive understanding of the approach to the identification and management of patients who have sustained ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes; 2) to explain the importance and application of commonly used national stroke scoring and outcome scales; 3) to improve the ability to recognize important aspects in the approach and comprehensive treatment of ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms; and 4) to demonstrate the difficulties in the neurological, neurosurgical, and endovascular treatment of these catastrophic diseases. PMID:20165722

  19. An interdisciplinary fetal/neonatal neurology program.

    PubMed

    Scher, Mark S

    2012-04-01

    A fetal/neonatal neurology program should encompass interdisciplinary service, educational and research objectives, merging curricula concerning maternal, placental, fetal and neonatal contributions to brain health and disease. This approach is anchored by research in early life programming that demonstrates that prenatal and postnatal factors influence long-term neurologic health. This concept also supports the design of neuroprotective interventions during critical periods of brain development when brain circuitries more optimally adapt to maturational challenges. Preventive, rescue and repair protocols will transform pediatric medical practices, to promote improved childhood outcomes. Inclusion of life-course science and research will identify medical and socioeconomic factors that favorably or adversely affect quality of life into adulthood. Greater awareness of the convergence of developmental origins of brain health and disease and developmental aging theories will influence public health policies, to encourage financial support for programs that will improve the quality of life for the child and adult. PMID:22290854

  20. Regenerative cellular therapies for neurologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Levy, Michael; Boulis, Nicholas; Rao, Mahendra; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-05-01

    The promise of stem cell regeneration has been the hope of many neurologic patients with permanent damage to the central nervous system. There are hundreds of stem cell trials worldwide intending to test the regenerative capacity of stem cells in various neurological conditions from Parkinson׳s disease to multiple sclerosis. Although no stem cell therapy is clinically approved for use in any human disease indication, patients are seeking out trials and asking clinicians for guidance. This review summarizes the current state of regenerative stem cell transplantation divided into seven conditions for which trials are currently active: demyelinating diseases/spinal cord injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, Parkinson׳s disease, Huntington׳s disease, macular degeneration and peripheral nerve diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: PSC and the brain. PMID:26239912

  1. Protective effects of ginseng on neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Wei-Yi; Farooqui, Tahira; Koh, Hwee-Ling; Farooqui, Akhlaq A.; Ling, Eng-Ang

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng (Order: Apiales, Family: Araliaceae, Genus: Panax) has been used as a traditional herbal medicine for over 2000 years, and is recorded to have antianxiety, antidepressant and cognition enhancing properties. The protective effects of ginseng on neurological disorders are discussed in this review. Ginseng species and ginsenosides, and their intestinal metabolism and bioavailability are briefly introduced. This is followed by molecular mechanisms of effects of ginseng on the brain, including glutamatergic transmission, monoamine transmission, estrogen signaling, nitric oxide (NO) production, the Keap1/Nrf2 adaptive cellular stress pathway, neuronal survival, apoptosis, neural stem cells and neuroregeneration, microglia, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and cerebral microvessels. The molecular mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects of ginseng in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) including β-amyloid (Aβ) formation, tau hyperphosphorylation and oxidative stress, major depression, stroke, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis are presented. It is hoped that this discussion will stimulate more studies on the use of ginseng in neurological disorders. PMID:26236231

  2. The neurology of aretaeus: radix pedis neurologia.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2013-01-01

    Aretaeus (Aretaios) was a physician born in Cappadocia in about the 2nd century AD, a student of medicine and physician in Alexandria. His works are found in eight books which espoused the physiological and pathological views of the Hippocratic principles derived from the pneumatists and the eclectic schools. Though he has been called the forgotten physician, it has been said that: 'after Hippocrates no single Greek author has equalled Aretaios'. In order to give an indication of his neurological legacy, this paper offers a summary of and quotations from his principal neurological contributions: migraine, vertigo, tetanus, epilepsy, melancholia, strokes and paralysis. One of his most important discoveries was the notion that the pyramidal tract decussates. PMID:23969486

  3. Toward precision medicine in neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Lin; Jiang, Teng

    2016-01-01

    Technological development has paved the way for accelerated genomic discovery and is bringing precision medicine into view. The goal of precision medicine is to deliver optimally targeted and timed interventions tailored to an individual’s molecular drivers of disease. Neurological diseases are promisingly suited models for precision medicine because of the rapidly expanding genetic knowledge base, phenotypic classification, the development of biomarkers and the potential modifying treatments. Moving forward, it is crucial that through these integrated research platforms to provide analysis both for accurate personal genome analysis and gene and drug discovery. Here we describe our vision of how precision medicine can bring greater clarity to the clinical and biological complexity of neurological diseases. PMID:27127757

  4. Astrogliopathology in neurological, neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Parpura, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Astroglial cells represent a main element in the maintenance of homeostasis and providing defense to the brain. Consequently, their dysfunction underlies many, if not all, neurological, neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. General astrogliopathy is evident in diametrically opposing morpho-functional changes in astrocytes, i.e. their hypertrophy along with reactivity or atrophy with asthenia. Neurological disorders with astroglial participation can be genetic, of which Alexander disease is a primary sporadic astrogliopathy, environmentally caused, such as heavy metal encephalopathies, or neurodevelopmental in origin. Astroglia contribute to neurodegenerative processes seen in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. Furthermore, astroglia also play a role in major neuropsychiatric disorders, ranging from schizophrenia to depression, as well as in addictive disorders. PMID:25843667

  5. Neurological Sequelae Resulting from Encephalitic Alphavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ronca, Shannon E.; Dineley, Kelly T.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    The recent surge in viral clinical cases and associated neurological deficits have reminded us that viral infections can lead to detrimental, long-term effects, termed sequelae, in survivors. Alphaviruses are enveloped, single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses in the Togaviridae family. Transmission of alphaviruses between and within species occurs mainly via the bite of an infected mosquito bite, giving alphaviruses a place among arboviruses, or arthropod-borne viruses. Alphaviruses are found throughout the world and typically cause arthralgic or encephalitic disease in infected humans. Originally detected in the 1930s, today the major encephalitic viruses include Venezuelan, Western, and Eastern equine encephalitis viruses (VEEV, WEEV, and EEEV, respectively). VEEV, WEEV, and EEEV are endemic to the Americas and are important human pathogens, leading to thousands of human infections each year. Despite awareness of these viruses for nearly 100 years, we possess little mechanistic understanding regarding the complications (sequelae) that emerge after resolution of acute infection. Neurological sequelae are those complications involving damage to the central nervous system that results in cognitive, sensory, or motor deficits that may also manifest as emotional instability and seizures in the most severe cases. This article serves to provide an overview of clinical cases documented in the past century as well as a summary of the reported neurological sequelae due to VEEV, WEEV, and EEEV infection. We conclude with a treatise on the utility of, and practical considerations for animal models applied to the problem of neurological sequelae of viral encephalopathies in order to decipher mechanisms and interventional strategies. PMID:27379085

  6. Neurological disorders presenting mainly in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, S; Appleton, R E

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss some of the neurological diseases that present mainly in the adolescent period. The article focuses on the usual presentation and course of the more common, and some uncommon, epilepsies, neuromuscular disorders, neurodegenerative disorders, inflammatory disorders of the central nervous system and some other, miscellaneous conditions. The article ends with a very brief and general discussion about management issues in this age group. PMID:17264287

  7. Neurological involvement in the epidermal naevus syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, D L; Isenberg, D A; Gooddy, W

    1978-01-01

    The case of a left handed girl aged 18 years suffering from the "epidermal maevus syndrome" is described. She presented with dysphasia, transient left hemiparesis, and sensory symptoms due to an occlusion of the right internal carotid artery. Arterial occlusion, abnormal retinal vessels, and Raynaud's phenomenon have not been previously documented. The neurological complications of this syndrome are discussed. It is suggested that the arterial occlusion may have been caused by a dysplastic artery. Images PMID:660212

  8. Neurological complications of ankylosing spondylitis: neurophysiological assessment.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Eman M; Rashad, Sonia M; Hamed, Sherifa A; El-Zharaa, Fatma; Abdalla, Abdel Karim H

    2009-07-01

    Studies examined the neurological involvement of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are limited. This study aimed to assess the frequency of myelopathy, radiculopathy and myopathy in AS correlating them to the clinical, radiological and laboratory parameters. Included were 24 patients with AS. Axial status was assessed using bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index (BASMI). Patients underwent (a) standard cervical and lumbar spine and sacroiliac joint radiography, (b) somatosensory (SSEP) and magnetic motor (MEP) evoked potentials of upper and lower limbs, (c) electromyography (EMG) of trapezius and supraspinatus muscles. Patients' mean age and duration of illness were 36 and 5.99 years. Bath ankylosing spondylitis metrology index mean score was 4.6. Twenty-five percent (n = 6) of patients had neurological manifestations, 8.3% of them had myelopathy and 16.7% had radiculopathy. Ossification of the posterior (OPLL) and anterior (OALL) longitudinal ligaments were found in 8.3% (n = 2) and 4.2% (n = 1). About 70.8% (n = 17) had >or=1 neurophysiological test abnormalities. Twelve patients (50%) had SSEP abnormalities, seven had prolonged central conduction time (CCT) of median and/or ulnar nerves suggesting cervical myelopathy. Six had delayed peripheral or root latencies at Erb's or interpeak latency (Erb's-C5) suggesting radiculopathy. Motor evoked potentials was abnormal in 54% (n = 13). Twelve (50%) and five (20.8%) patients had abnormal MEP of upper limbs and lower limbs, respectively. About 50% (n = 12) had myopathic features of trapezius and supraspinatus muscles. Only 8.3% (n = 2) had neuropathic features. We concluded that subclinical neurological complications are frequent in AS compared to clinically manifest complications. Somatosensory evoked potential and MEP are useful to identify AS patients prone to develop neurological complications. PMID:19153738

  9. [The problem of suicide in neurologic rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Kallert, T W

    1994-05-01

    Associations between somatic as well as, in particular, neurological diseases and suicidal acts are outlined, with studies of different diseases having shown that they represent only one factor in motivating the suicidal act. Biographical predispositions and stressful variables from the current social situation are always added. Depressive and organic brain syndromes that can often be found during neurological rehabilitation are discussed in their significance as risk factors for suicidal behavior, also seeking to identify distinct phases of the rehabilitation process afflicted with high suicide risk. An active and carefully directed approach to exploration as well as grasping the psychopathological symptomatology are fundamental elements in the assessment of suicide risk. In this respect, observations of the patient's behaviour and information obtained from relatives are of special importance in neurological rehabilitation clinics. The "presuicidal syndrome" (Ringel) continues to be of high clinical value in assessing the psychodynamics of the individual patient in his development towards the suicidal act. Reflections of suicidal tendencies in countertransference reactions and the communication pathology of suicidal behaviour are more recent aspects that enrich the assessment of suicide risk. Therapeutic management of suicidal patients can firstly be characterized by the principle of specific diagnosis and treatment of the underlying disease; this means that optimum medical care even has a suicide-preventive function. The other principle considers the establishment of a therapeutical relationship as a must, and some critical points in the personal contact with suicidal patients are dealt with in some detail. Especially in neurological rehabilitation clinics, custodial aspects must not be neglected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8052730

  10. Chapter 40: history of neurology in France.

    PubMed

    Clarac, François; Boller, François

    2010-01-01

    The history of neurology in France is characterized by the very high degree of centralization in that country where "everything seems to happen in Paris," and yet the considerable degree of autonomous diversity in the evolution of some other medical schools such as Montpellier and Strasbourg. It could be argued that France saw the birth of clinical neurology as a separate discipline since Jean Martin Charcot at the Salpêtrière Hospital obtained a chair of diseases of the nervous system in 1892, a first in the history of the academic world. The chapter shows, however, that the work of Charcot was preceded by a long evolution in medical thinking, which culminated with the introduction of experimental medicine developed by Claude Bernard and François Magendie, and by the study of aphasia by Paul Broca and its localization of language in a specific area of the brain. Many of the great neurologists of France like Duchenne de Boulogne, Gilles de la Tourette, Joseph Babinski and Pierre Marie gravitated around Charcot while others like Charles-Edward Brown-Sequard and Jules Dejerine developed their talents independently. The history of Sainte-Anne Hospital further illustrates this independence. It also shows the relation between neurology and psychiatry with Henri Ey, Jean Delay and Pierre Deniker, who collaborated with Henri Laborit in the clinical development of chlorpromazine. Sainte Anne also saw the birth of modern neuropsychology with Henry Hécaen. Jean Talairach and his group developed human stereotaxic neurosurgery and a 3-dimensional brain atlas that is used around the world. The chapter also mentions institutions (the CNRS and INSERM) that have contributed to developments partially independently from medical schools. It concludes with a presentation of schools located outside of Paris that have played a significant role in the development of neurology. Six of the most important ones are described: Montpellier, Toulouse, Bordeaux, Strasbourg, Lyon, and

  11. Minor Neurological Dysfunction in Children with Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Punt, Marja; de Jong, Marianne; de Groot, Erik; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To improve understanding of brain function in children with severe dyslexia in terms of minor neurological dysfunctions (MNDs). Method: One hundred and four children (81 males, 23 females; age range 7-12y; mean age 9y 7mo, SD 1y 2mo;) with severe dyslexia (the presence of a Full-scale IQ score of greater than or equal to 85, retardation in…

  12. Urgent discectomy: Clinical features and neurological outcome

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Ruth; Lange, Max; Brawanski, Alexander; Schebesch, Karl-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the clinical features and outcome of patients with progressive neurological deficits due to disc herniation who were treated surgically within 24 h. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients who were admitted between 2004 and 2013 via the Emergency Department. Records were screened for presenting symptoms, neurological status at admission, discharge, and 6-week follow-up. Results: About 72 of 526 patients underwent surgery within 24 h. Magnetic resonance imaging showed lumbar disc herniation in 72 patients. The most common presenting symptoms included radiculopathy (n = 69), the Lasègue sign (n = 60), sensory deficits (n = 57), or motor deficits (n = 47). In addition, 11 patients experienced perineal numbness and 12 had bowel and bladder dysfunction. At discharge, motor and sensory deficits and bowel and bladder dysfunction had improved significantly (P < 0.001, P = 0.029, and P = 0.015, respectively). Conclusion: Motor deficits, sensory deficits, and cauda equina dysfunction were significantly improved immediately after urgent surgery. After 6 weeks, motor and sensory deficits were also significantly improved compared to the neurological status at discharge. Thus, we advocate immediate surgery of disc herniation in patients with acute onset of motor deficits, perineal numbness, or bladder or bowel dysfunction indicative of cauda equina syndrome. PMID:26958423

  13. Neurological involvement in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Labeyrie, Paul-Emile; Courthéoux, Patrick; Babin, Emmanuel; Bergot, Emmanuel; Touzé, Emmanuel; Pelage, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by epistaxis, telangiectases, and multi-organ vascular dysplasia. Head and neck localizations of HHT are recurrent, frequent associated with serious complications. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and imaging patterns of neurological involvement in HHT and to discuss the role of interventional radiology in the management of HHT patients. Based on a multidisciplinary experience of twenty years at our center, we report here the different aspects of neurological involvement of HHT. Depending on the genetic type of the disease, vascular abnormalities may affect different organs. The knowledge of neurological involvement according to specific localization of HHT makes detection easier. As cerebral or spinal arteriovenous fistula may be present in patients with epistaxis or pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), radiologists should be able to detect high-risk lesions and prevent related complications. Finally, we review indications and techniques of embolization for hemorrhagic lesions and emphasize that endovascular therapies are very effective and safe in experienced hands. Head and neck imaging is commonly used for the diagnosis of HHT. Imaging plays also a key role for patient evaluation before treatment as pluridisciplinary management is needed. PMID:27059009

  14. Neurological Complications of Ebola Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Billioux, Bridgette Jeanne; Smith, Bryan; Nath, Avindra

    2016-07-01

    Ebola virus disease is one of the deadliest pathogens known to man, with a mortality rate between 25-90% depending on the species and outbreak of Ebola. Typically, it presents with fever, headache, voluminous vomiting and diarrhea, and can progress to a hemorrhagic illness; neurologic symptoms, including meningoencephalitis, seizures, and coma, can also occur. Recently, an outbreak occurred in West Africa, affecting > 28,000 people, and killing > 11,000. Owing to the magnitude of this outbreak, and the large number (>17,000) of Ebola survivors, the medical and scientific communities are learning much more about the acute manifestations and sequelae of Ebola. A number of neurologic complications can occur after Ebola, such as seizures, memory loss, headaches, cranial nerve abnormalities, and tremor. Ebola may also persist in some immunologically privileged sites, including the central nervous system, and can rarely lead to relapse in disease. Owing to these findings, it is important that survivors are evaluated and monitored for neurologic symptoms. Much is unknown about this disease, and treatment remains largely supportive; however, with ongoing clinical and basic science, the mechanisms of how Ebola affects the central nervous system and how it persists after acute disease will hopefully become more clear, and better treatments and clinical practices for Ebola patients will be developed. PMID:27412684

  15. Rare Neurological Manifestation of Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Uzma; Imdad, Aamer; Beg, Mirza

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disease characterized by permanent gastrointestinal tract sensitivity to gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. It has varied clinical manifestations, ranging from gastrointestinal to extraintestinal, including neurological, skin, reproductive and psychiatric symptoms, which makes its diagnosis difficult and challenging. Known neurological manifestations of CD include epilepsy with or without occipital calcification, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and ataxia, headache, neuropathies and behavior disorders. We present the case of a 14-year-old female with headaches and blurred vision for 1 year; she was noted to have papilledema on ophthalmic examination with increased cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure on lumber puncture and was diagnosed as a case of pseudotumor cerebri (PTC). Meanwhile her workup for chronic constipation revealed elevated tissue transglutaminase IgA and antiendomysial IgA antibodies. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with duodenal biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of CD. The patient was started on a gluten-free diet, leading to resolution of not only gastrointestinal symptoms but also to almost complete resolution of symptoms of PTC. This report describes the correlation of CD and PTC as its neurological manifestation. PMID:26120302

  16. Neurological soft signs in psychometrically identified schizotypy.

    PubMed

    Kaczorowski, Jessica A; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus; Kwapil, Thomas R

    2009-12-01

    Patients with schizophrenia often exhibit structural brain abnormalities, as well as neurological soft signs (NSS), consistent with its conceptualization as a neurodevelopmental disorder. NSS are mild, presumably nonlocalizing, neurological impairments that are inferred from performance deficits in domains such as sensory integration, motor coordination, and motor sequencing. The vulnerability for schizophrenia is presumed to be expressed across a broad continuum of impairment referred to as schizotypy. It is hypothesized that nondisordered people along the schizotypy continuum should exhibit elevated rates of NSS. The present study examined the relation of psychometrically identified positive and negative schizotypy with NSS using the Neurological Evaluation Scale in a nonclinically ascertained sample of young adults (n=177). As hypothesized, negative, but not positive, schizotypy was related to increased NSS in tasks that assessed fine and gross motor coordination, motor sequencing, eye movement abnormalities, and memory recall. However, positive schizotypy was associated with increased NSS in tasks related to sensory integration dysfunction. In general, the positivexnegative schizotypy interaction term was unrelated to individual NSS tasks. The findings support: a) the theory that the vulnerability for schizophrenia is expressed across a broad continuum of subclinical and clinical impairment referred to as schizotypy; b) the multidimensional structure of schizotypy; and c) the notion that schizotypy is an appropriate construct for understanding the etiology and development of schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. PMID:19651490

  17. Gene Editing for Treatment of Neurological Infections.

    PubMed

    White, Martyn K; Kaminski, Rafal; Wollebo, Hassen; Hu, Wenhui; Malcolm, Thomas; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-07-01

    The study of neurological infections by viruses defines the field of neurovirology, which has emerged in the last 30 years and was founded upon the discovery of a number of viruses capable of infecting the human nervous system. Studies have focused on the molecular and biological basis of viral neurological diseases with the aim of revealing new therapeutic options. The first studies of neurovirological infections can be traced back to the discovery that some viruses have an affinity for the nervous system with research into rabies by Louis Pasteur and others in the 1880s. Today, the immense public health impact of neurovirological infections is illustrated by diseases such as neuroAIDS, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and viral encephalitis. Recent research has seen the development of powerful new techniques for gene editing that promise revolutionary opportunities for the development of novel therapeutic options. In particular, clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeat-associated 9 system provides an effective, highly specific and versatile tool for targeting DNA viruses that are beginning to allow the development of such new approaches. In this short review, we discuss these recent developments, how they pertain to neurological infections, and future prospects. PMID:27150390

  18. Chapter 19: visual images and neurological illustration.

    PubMed

    Ione, Amy

    2010-01-01

    This chapter examines the importance of visual materials for studying the brain in health and in disease. Surveying historical representations, this research confirms that images of the brain's form and function have long served as teaching tools and as historical reference points for neurological events. The research is divided into five sections: the first section, Early History to Printing Technology considers prehistoric and ancient imagery, pre-Renaissance thinking about the brain, and the impact of printing and printmaking on neurological research. The second section, Renaissance Illustration, focuses on Leonardo da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius, and other contributors who produced images of the brain as dissection restrictions eased. The third section, which turns to Early Modern and Modern Illustration, highlights the work of Thomas Willis, Charles Bell, and other scientists (throughout the 19th century) who demonstrated the value of a visual component within brain studies. The fourth section presents examples of Neurologically-Descriptive Illustrations, with the final section considering Historical Illustration and Contemporary Research. PMID:19892122

  19. Mycoplasma Pneumoniae Infection with Neurologic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Yimenicioğlu, Sevgi; Yakut, Ayten; Ekici, Arzu; Bora Carman, Kursat; Cagrı Dinleyici, Ener

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extrapulmonary complications of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) infection include encephalitis, optic neuritis, acute psychosis, stroke, cranial nerve palsies, aseptic meningitis and also it may be implicated in immune mediated neurological diseases such as acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome and transverse myelitis. Case Presentation: We present five cases with acute neurological diseases after M. pneumoniae infection. The clinical presentations were characterized by encephalitis in 2 patients, Gullain-Barre syndrome in 2 patients, transverse myelitis in 1 patient. M. pneumoniae infection was detected in serum by serological method. Only two patients had respiratory symptoms preceding M. pneumoniae infection. Brain MRI revealed hyperintensities on corpus striatum and mesencephalon in one patient with encephalitis, the other had front parietal coalescent periventricular white matter lesions on T2 images. The patient with transverse myelitis had cervical, dorsal and lumbar scattered hyperintense lesions on T2 images. Two patients were treated with high dose steroid, the other two patients received treatment with intravenous immune globuline. Conclusion: M. pneumoniae may reveal different neurologic complications with different radiologic findings. PMID:25793076

  20. Sparring and Neurological Function in Professional Boxers

    PubMed Central

    Stiller, John W.; Yu, Steven S.; Brenner, Lisa A.; Langenberg, Patricia; Scrofani, Phillip; Pannella, Patrick; Hsu, Edbert B.; Roberts, Darryl W.; Monsell, Ray M. T.; Binks, Sidney W.; Guzman, Alvaro; Postolache, Teodor T.

    2014-01-01

    Despite increased interest regarding the potentially long-term negative impact of chronic traumatic brain injury, limited research has been conducted regarding such injuries and neurological outcomes in real world settings. To increase understanding regarding the relationship between sparring (e.g., training under the tutelage of an experienced boxing coach for the purpose of improving skills and/or fitness) and neurological functioning, professional boxers (n = 237) who competed in Maryland between 2003 and 2008 completed measures regarding sparring exposure (Cumulative Sparring Index, CSI) and performance on tests of cognition (Symbol Digit Modalities Test, SDMT) and balance (Sharpened Romberg Test, SRT). Measures were completed prior to boxing matches. Higher scores on the CSI (increased sparring exposure) were associated with poorer performance on both tests of cognition (SDMT) and balance (SRT). A threshold effect was noted regarding performance on the SDMT, with those reporting CSI values greater than about 150 experiencing a decline in cognition. A history of frequent and/or intense sparring may pose a significant risk for developing boxing associated neurological sequelae. Implementing administration of clinically meaningful tests before bouts, such as the CSI, SDMT, and/or the SRT, as well as documentation of results into the boxer’s physicals or medical profiles may be an important step for improving boxing safety. PMID:25101253

  1. Sparring and neurological function in professional boxers.

    PubMed

    Stiller, John W; Yu, Steven S; Brenner, Lisa A; Langenberg, Patricia; Scrofani, Phillip; Pannella, Patrick; Hsu, Edbert B; Roberts, Darryl W; Monsell, Ray M T; Binks, Sidney W; Guzman, Alvaro; Postolache, Teodor T

    2014-01-01

    Despite increased interest regarding the potentially long-term negative impact of chronic traumatic brain injury, limited research has been conducted regarding such injuries and neurological outcomes in real world settings. To increase understanding regarding the relationship between sparring (e.g., training under the tutelage of an experienced boxing coach for the purpose of improving skills and/or fitness) and neurological functioning, professional boxers (n = 237) who competed in Maryland between 2003 and 2008 completed measures regarding sparring exposure (Cumulative Sparring Index, CSI) and performance on tests of cognition (Symbol Digit Modalities Test, SDMT) and balance (Sharpened Romberg Test, SRT). Measures were completed prior to boxing matches. Higher scores on the CSI (increased sparring exposure) were associated with poorer performance on both tests of cognition (SDMT) and balance (SRT). A threshold effect was noted regarding performance on the SDMT, with those reporting CSI values greater than about 150 experiencing a decline in cognition. A history of frequent and/or intense sparring may pose a significant risk for developing boxing associated neurological sequelae. Implementing administration of clinically meaningful tests before bouts, such as the CSI, SDMT, and/or the SRT, as well as documentation of results into the boxer's physicals or medical profiles may be an important step for improving boxing safety. PMID:25101253

  2. The Neurological Sequelae of Electrical Injury

    PubMed Central

    Silversides, John

    1964-01-01

    Electricity is a potentially very dangerous commodity. Community safeguards, however, result in remarkably efficient control of this hazard. Mortality figures appear to be small and constant. No satisfactory morbidity figures are available with regard to general and neurological complications in non-fatal cases. Study of relevant features of such electrical phenomena as voltage level, resistance factors, current pathway, current diffusion and grounding reveals many difficulties in reconstruction of the sequence of events involved in these injuries. These features underline our frequent inability to understand the mechanisms of initiation of unconsciousness and even of differentiation between death by cardiac arrest and death by respiratory paralysis. Fourteen cases of electrical injury with a variety of neurological complications and sequelae are discussed, and the findings in these cases are compared with those of other observers. An attempt is made to present a comprehensive picture of immediate, secondary and late neurological effects, and to illustrate some of the pathological findings in electrocution material. ImagesFigs. 1 and 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Figs. 6 and 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:14179536

  3. Human endogenous retroviruses in neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Tove

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are pathogenic - in other species than the human. Disease associations for Human Endogenous RetroViruses (HERVs) are emerging, but so far an unequivocal pathogenetic cause-effect relationship has not been established. A role for HERVs has been proposed in neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases as diverse as multiple sclerosis (MS) and schizophrenia (SCZ). Particularly for MS, many aspects of the activation and involvement of specific HERV families (HERV-H/F and HERV-W/MSRV) have been reported, both for cells in the circulation and in the central nervous system. Notably envelope genes and their gene products (Envs) appear strongly associated with the disease. For SCZ, for ALS, and for HIV-associated dementia (HAD), indications are accumulating for involvement of the HERV-K family, and also HERV-H/F and/or HERV-W. Activation is reasonably a prerequisite for causality as most HERV sequences remain quiescent in non-pathological conditions, so the importance of regulatory pathways and epigenetics involved in regulating HERV activation, derepression, and also involvement of retroviral restriction factors, is emerging. HERV-directed antiretrovirals have potential as novel therapeutic paradigms in neurologic disease, particularly in MS. The possible protective or ameliorative effects of antiretroviral therapy in MS are substantiated by reports that treatment of HIV infection may be associated with a significantly decreased risk of MS. Further studies of HERVs, their role in neurologic diseases, and their potential as therapeutic targets are essential. PMID:26818266

  4. Comparative cactus architecture and par interception

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, G.N.; Nobel, P.S. )

    1987-07-01

    Because CO{sup 2} uptake by cacti can be limited by low levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and because plant form affects PAR interception, various cactus forms were studied using a computer model, field measurements, and laboratory phototropic studies. Model predictions indicated that CO{sub 2} uptake by individual stems at an equinox was greatest when the stem were vertical, but at the summer and the winter solstice CO{sub 2} uptake was greatest for stems titled 30{degree} away from the equator. Stem tilting depended on form and taxonomic group. Not only can the shape of cacti be affected by PAR, but also shape influences PAR interception and hence CO{sub 2} uptake.

  5. Neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience: contributions to neurology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ‘Neuromarketing’ is a term that has often been used in the media in recent years. These public discussions have generally centered around potential ethical aspects and the public fear of negative consequences for society in general, and consumers in particular. However, positive contributions to the scientific discourse from developing a biological model that tries to explain context-situated human behavior such as consumption have often been neglected. We argue for a differentiated terminology, naming commercial applications of neuroscientific methods ‘neuromarketing’ and scientific ones ‘consumer neuroscience’. While marketing scholars have eagerly integrated neuroscientific evidence into their theoretical framework, neurology has only recently started to draw its attention to the results of consumer neuroscience. Discussion In this paper we address key research topics of consumer neuroscience that we think are of interest for neurologists; namely the reward system, trust and ethical issues. We argue that there are overlapping research topics in neurology and consumer neuroscience where both sides can profit from collaboration. Further, neurologists joining the public discussion of ethical issues surrounding neuromarketing and consumer neuroscience could contribute standards and experience gained in clinical research. Summary We identify the following areas where consumer neuroscience could contribute to the field of neurology: First, studies using game paradigms could help to gain further insights into the underlying pathophysiology of pathological gambling in Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, epilepsy, and Huntington’s disease. Second, we identify compulsive buying as a common interest in neurology and consumer neuroscience. Paradigms commonly used in consumer neuroscience could be applied to patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease and frontotemporal dementia to advance knowledge of this important behavioral symptom

  6. Radioecological implications of the Par Pond drawdown

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, H.; Whicker, F.W.

    1991-12-05

    The drawdown of the Par Pond reservoir created dramatic alterations in this formerly stable lentic ecosystem. In addition, the radiation environment at Par Pond has changed significantly because of the exposure of Cesium 137-contaminated sediments and the appearance of new transport pathways to the terrestrial environment. In response to this situation, SREL was asked to study the radioecological implications of the reservoir drawdown. This report contains the objectives, methods, and results of the SREL study.

  7. The morphology of the mouse masticatory musculature.

    PubMed

    Baverstock, Hester; Jeffery, Nathan S; Cobb, Samuel N

    2013-07-01

    The mouse has been the dominant model organism in studies on the development, genetics and evolution of the mammalian skull and associated soft-tissue for decades. There is the potential to take advantage of this well studied model and the range of mutant, knockin and knockout organisms with diverse craniofacial phenotypes to investigate the functional significance of variation and the role of mechanical forces on the development of the integrated craniofacial skeleton and musculature by using computational mechanical modelling methods (e.g. finite element and multibody dynamic modelling). Currently, there are no detailed published data of the mouse masticatory musculature available. Here, using a combination of micro-dissection and non-invasive segmentation of iodine-enhanced micro-computed tomography, we document the anatomy, architecture and proportions of the mouse masticatory muscles. We report on the superficial masseter (muscle, tendon and pars reflecta), deep masseter, zygomaticomandibularis (anterior, posterior, infraorbital and tendinous parts), temporalis (lateral and medial parts), external and internal pterygoid muscles. Additionally, we report a lateral expansion of the attachment of the temporalis onto the zygomatic arch, which may play a role in stabilising this bone during downwards loading. The data presented in this paper now provide a detailed reference for phenotypic comparison in mouse models and allow the mouse to be used as a model organism in biomechanical and functional modelling and simulation studies of the craniofacial skeleton and particularly the masticatory system. PMID:23692055

  8. The morphology of the mouse masticatory musculature

    PubMed Central

    Baverstock, Hester; Jeffery, Nathan S; Cobb, Samuel N

    2013-01-01

    The mouse has been the dominant model organism in studies on the development, genetics and evolution of the mammalian skull and associated soft-tissue for decades. There is the potential to take advantage of this well studied model and the range of mutant, knockin and knockout organisms with diverse craniofacial phenotypes to investigate the functional significance of variation and the role of mechanical forces on the development of the integrated craniofacial skeleton and musculature by using computational mechanical modelling methods (e.g. finite element and multibody dynamic modelling). Currently, there are no detailed published data of the mouse masticatory musculature available. Here, using a combination of micro-dissection and non-invasive segmentation of iodine-enhanced micro-computed tomography, we document the anatomy, architecture and proportions of the mouse masticatory muscles. We report on the superficial masseter (muscle, tendon and pars reflecta), deep masseter, zygomaticomandibularis (anterior, posterior, infraorbital and tendinous parts), temporalis (lateral and medial parts), external and internal pterygoid muscles. Additionally, we report a lateral expansion of the attachment of the temporalis onto the zygomatic arch, which may play a role in stabilising this bone during downwards loading. The data presented in this paper now provide a detailed reference for phenotypic comparison in mouse models and allow the mouse to be used as a model organism in biomechanical and functional modelling and simulation studies of the craniofacial skeleton and particularly the masticatory system. PMID:23692055

  9. [Neurological diseases after lightning strike : Lightning strikes twice].

    PubMed

    Gruhn, K M; Knossalla, Frauke; Schwenkreis, Peter; Hamsen, Uwe; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Tegenthoff, Martin; Sczesny-Kaiser, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Lightning strikes rarely occur but 85 % of patients have lightning-related neurological complications. This report provides an overview about different modes of energy transfer and neurological conditions related to lightning strikes. Moreover, two case reports demonstrate the importance of interdisciplinary treatment and the spectrum of neurological complications after lightning strikes. PMID:26873252

  10. Structural analysis of the ParR/parC plasmid partition complex.

    PubMed

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Ringgaard, Simon; Mercogliano, Christopher P; Gerdes, Kenn; Löwe, Jan

    2007-10-17

    Accurate DNA partition at cell division is vital to all living organisms. In bacteria, this process can involve partition loci, which are found on both chromosomes and plasmids. The initial step in Escherichia coli plasmid R1 partition involves the formation of a partition complex between the DNA-binding protein ParR and its cognate centromere site parC on the DNA. The partition complex is recognized by a second partition protein, the actin-like ATPase ParM, which forms filaments required for the active bidirectional movement of DNA replicates. Here, we present the 2.8 A crystal structure of ParR from E. coli plasmid pB171. ParR forms a tight dimer resembling a large family of dimeric ribbon-helix-helix (RHH)2 site-specific DNA-binding proteins. Crystallographic and electron microscopic data further indicate that ParR dimers assemble into a helix structure with DNA-binding sites facing outward. Genetic and biochemical experiments support a structural arrangement in which the centromere-like parC DNA is wrapped around a ParR protein scaffold. This structure holds implications for how ParM polymerization drives active DNA transport during plasmid partition. PMID:17898804

  11. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Hospitalization among Children with Neurologic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Millman, Alexander J.; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M.; Peacock, Georgina; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Anderson, Evan J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Jain, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe and compare the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and etiology of pneumonia among children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with neurologic disorders, non-neurologic underlying conditions, and no underlying conditions. Study design Children <18 years old hospitalized with clinical and radiographic CAP were enrolled at 3 US children’s hospitals. Neurologic disorders included cerebral palsy, developmental delay, Down syndrome, epilepsy, non-Down syndrome chromosomal abnormalities, and spinal cord abnormalities. We compared the epidemiology, etiology, and clinical outcomes of CAP in children with neurologic disorders with those with non-neurologic underlying conditions, and those with no underlying conditions using bivariate, age-stratified, and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results From January 2010–June 2012, 2358 children with radiographically confirmed CAP were enrolled; 280 (11.9%) had a neurologic disorder (52.1% of these individuals also had non-neurologic underlying conditions), 934 (39.6%) had non-neurologic underlying conditions only, and 1144 (48.5%) had no underlying conditions. Children with neurologic disorders were older and more likely to require intensive care unit (ICU) admission than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions and children with no underlying conditions; similar proportions were mechanically ventilated. In age-stratified analysis, children with neurologic disorders were less likely to have a pathogen detected than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions. In multivariate analysis, having a neurologic disorder was associated with ICU admission for children ≥2 years of age. Conclusions Children with neurologic disorders hospitalized with CAP were less likely to have a pathogen detected and more likely to be admitted to the ICU than children without neurologic disorders. PMID:27017483

  12. Evaluation of a Transgenic Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis with Noninvasive Methods

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez-Algeciras, Mabel; Ding, Di; Chou, Tsung-Han; Wang, Jianhua; Padgett, Kyle R.; Porciatti, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the ND4 transgenic mouse model of multiple sclerosis using noninvasive methods. Methods. Assessment of neurologic/behavioral abnormalities was made using pattern electroretinogram (PERG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optic coherence tomography (OCT), and end point histologic analysis. Results. Electrophysiologic (PERG) recordings demonstrated functional deficits in vision commensurate with neurologic/behavioral abnormalities. In ND4 mice, the authors found PERG abnormalities preceded neurologic/gait abnormalities. MRI demonstrated subtle structural changes that progressed over time in correlation with behavioral abnormalities. Conclusions. The ND4 mouse model has been evaluated using well-defined parameters of noninvasive methods (PERG, MRI, and OCT), enabling objective identification of functional and structural deficits and their correlation with neurologic/gait abnormality. PMID:21228378

  13. Techniques for measuring intercepted and absorbed PAR in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The quantity of radiation potentially available for photosynthesis that is captured by the crop is best described as absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR (APAR) is the difference between descending and ascending fluxes. The four components of APAR were measured above and within two planting densities of corn (Zea mays L.) and several methods of measuring and estimating APAR were examined. A line quantum sensor that spatially averages the photosynthetic photon flux density provided a rapid and portable method of measuring APAR. PAR reflectance from the soil (Typic Argiaquoll) surface decreased from 10% to less than 1% of the incoming PAR as the canopy cover increased. PAR reflectance from the canopy decreased to less than 3% at maximum vegetative cover. Intercepted PAR (1 - transmitted PAR) generally overestimated absorbed PAR by less than 4% throughout most of the growing season. Thus intercepted PAR appears to be a reasonable estimate of absorbed PAR.

  14. Bridging neuroanatomy, neuroradiology and neurology: three-dimensional interactive atlas of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, W L; Chua, B C

    2013-06-01

    Understanding brain pathology along with the underlying neuroanatomy and the resulting neurological deficits is of vital importance in medical education and clinical practice. To facilitate and expedite this understanding, we created a three-dimensional (3D) interactive atlas of neurological disorders providing the correspondence between a brain lesion and the resulting disorder(s). The atlas contains a 3D highly parcellated atlas of normal neuroanatomy along with a brain pathology database. Normal neuroanatomy is divided into about 2,300 components, including the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord, arteries, veins, dural sinuses, tracts, cranial nerves (CN), white matter, deep gray nuclei, ventricles, visual system, muscles, glands and cervical vertebrae (C1-C5). The brain pathology database contains 144 focal and distributed synthesized lesions (70 vascular, 36 CN-related, and 38 regional anatomy-related), each lesion labeled with the resulting disorder and associated signs, symptoms, and/or syndromes compiled from materials reported in the literature. The initial view of each lesion was preset in terms of its location and size, surrounding surface and sectional (magnetic resonance) neuroanatomy, and labeling of lesion and neuroanatomy. In addition, a glossary of neurological disorders was compiled and for each disorder materials from textbooks were included to provide neurological description. This atlas of neurological disorders is potentially useful to a wide variety of users ranging from medical students, residents and nurses to general practitioners, neuroanatomists, neuroradiologists and neurologists, as it contains both normal (surface and sectional) brain anatomy and pathology correlated with neurological disorders presented in a visual and interactive way. PMID:23859280

  15. Gene Therapy for Neurologic Manifestations of Mucopolysaccharidoses

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniel A.; Banerjee, Sharbani; Hackett, Perry B.; Whitley, Chester B.; McIvor, R. Scott; Low, Walter C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mucopolysaccharidoses are a family of lysosomal disorders caused by mutations in genes that encode enzymes involved in the catabolism of glycoaminoglycans. These mutations affect multiple organ systems and can be particularly deleterious to the nervous system. At the present time, enzyme replacement therapy and hematopoietic stem-cell therapy are used to treat patients with different forms of these disorders. However, to a great extent the nervous system is not adequately responsive to current therapeutic approaches. Areas Covered Recent advances in gene therapy show great promise for treating mucopolysaccharidoses. This article reviews the current state of the art for routes of delivery in developing genetic therapies for treating the neurologic manifestations of mucopolysaccharidoses. Expert Opinion Gene therapy for treating neurological manifestations of mucopolysaccharidoses can be achieved by intraventricular, intrathecal, intranasal, and systemic administration. The intraventricular route of administration appears to provide the most wide-spread distribution of gene therapy vectors to the brain. The intrathecal route of delivery results in predominant distribution to the caudal areas of the brain while the intranasal route of delivery results in good distribution to the rostral areas of brain. The systemic route of delivery via intravenous delivery can also achieve wide spread delivery to the CNS, however, the distribution to the brain is greatly dependent on the vector system. Intravenous delivery using lentiviral vectors appear to be less effective than adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors. Moreover, some subtypes of AAV vectors are more effective than others in crossing the blood-brain-barrier. In summary, the recent advances in gene vector technology and routes of delivery to the CNS will facilitate the clinical translation of gene therapy for the treatment of the neurological manifestations of mucopolysaccharidoses. PMID:25510418

  16. The neurology of folic acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, E H

    2014-01-01

    The metabolism of folic acid and the metabolism of vitamin B12 are intimately linked such that deficiency of either vitamin leads to an identical megaloblastic anemia. The neurologic manifestations of folate deficiency overlap with those of vitamin B12 deficiency and include cognitive impairment, dementia, depression, and, less commonly, peripheral neuropathy and subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord. In both deficiency states there is often dissociation between the neuropsychiatric and the hematologic complications. There is a similar overlap and dissociation between neurologic and hematologic manifestations of inborn errors of folate and vitamin B12 metabolism. Low folate and raised homocysteine levels are risk factors for dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, and depression. Even when folate deficiency is secondary to psychiatric illness due to apathy or poor diet it may eventually aggravate the underlying disorder in a vicious circle effect. Clinical responses to treatment with folates are usually slow over weeks and months, probably due to the efficient blood-brain barrier mechanism for the vitamin, perhaps in turn related to the experimentally demonstrated excitatory properties of folate derivatives. The inappropriate administration of folic acid in the presence of vitamin B12 deficiency may lead to both neurologic and, later, hematologic relapse. Impaired maternal folate intake and status increases the risk of neural tube defects. Periconceptual prophylactic administration of the vitamin reduces, but does not eliminate the risk of neural tube defects even in the absence of folate deficiency. Folates and vitamin B12 have fundamental roles in central nervous system function at all ages, especially in purine, thymidine, neucleotide, and DNA synthesis, genomic and nongenomic methylation and, therefore, in tissue growth, differentiation and repair. There is interest in the potential role of both vitamins in the prevention of disorders of central

  17. Paraneoplastic neurologic syndrome: A practical approach.

    PubMed

    Kannoth, Sudheeran

    2012-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) are rare disorders associated with cancer, not caused by direct invasion, metastasis or consequences of treatment. They are usually autoimmune in nature. Often, PNS precedes the manifestations of cancer. Onconeural antibodies are important in the diagnosis and management of these disorders. These antibodies are specific for the malignancy rather than for a particular neurological syndrome. Often, there are different antibodies associated with the same syndrome. Multiple antibodies are also known to coexist in a given patient with malignancy. While investigating a patient for suspected PNS, the entire gamut of onconeural antibodies should be investigated so as not to miss the diagnosis. In 30-40% of the cases, PNS can occur without antibodies. Investigations for identifying the underlying cancer can be directed by the antibody panel. If conventional screening for cancer is negative, a positron emission scanning/computed tomography scan can be useful. Patients need follow-up surveillance for cancer if not detected in the first instance. Cancer detection and treatment, immunotherapy and supportive care are important components of treatment of PNS. Immunotherapy is very effective in PNS associated with cell membrane-associated antibodies like voltage-gated potassium channel complex, NMDA receptor antibodies and voltage-gated calcium channel antibodies. Immunotherapy includes steroids, IVIgG, plasmaphereis, cytotoxic medications and rituximab. Supportive therapy includes symptomatic treatment with antiepileptic and analgesic medications, physiotherapy, speech therapy and occupational therapy. PNS can mimic any neurologic syndrome. A high index of clinical suspicion is important for early diagnosis and prompt management and better outcome. PMID:22412264

  18. Neurological complications of acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy.

    PubMed

    Brownlee, W J; Anderson, N E; Sims, J; Pereira, J A

    2016-09-01

    Acute multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy (AMPPE) is an autoimmune chorioretinal disease that can be complicated by neurological involvement. There is limited information on this potentially treatable condition in the neurological literature. The objective of this patient series is to describe the neurological complications of AMPPE. We retrospectively identified patients with neurological complications of AMPPE seen at Auckland Hospital between 2008 and 2013 and summarised cases in the literature between 1976 and 2013. We identified five patients with neurological complications of AMPPE at Auckland Hospital and 47 reported patients. These patients demonstrated a spectrum of neurological involvement including isolated headache, stroke or transient ischaemic attack, seizures, venous sinus thrombosis, optic neuritis, sensorineural hearing loss and peripheral vestibular disorder. We propose criteria to define AMPPE with neurological complications. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytosis in a patient with isolated headache may predict the development of cerebrovascular complications of AMPPE. Patients with cerebrovascular complications of AMPPE have a poor prognosis with high rates of death and neurological disability among survivors. Predictors of poor outcome in those who develop neurological complications of AMPPE are a relapsing course, generalised seizures and multifocal infarction on MRI. All patients with neurological complications of AMPPE, including headache alone, should be investigated with an MRI brain and CSF examination. Patients with focal neurological symptoms should receive intravenous (IV) methylprednisolone followed by a tapering course of oral steroids for at least 3months. Patients with AMPPE and an isolated headache with a CSF pleocytosis should be treated with oral steroids. PMID:27183958

  19. Metabolic Disturbances in Diseases with Neurological Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, João M. N.; Schuck, Patrícia F.; Wenk, Gary L.; Ferreira, Gustavo C.

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of specific neuronal populations and progressive nervous system dysfunction characterize neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. These findings are also reported in inherited diseases such as phenylketonuria and glutaric aciduria type I. The involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in these diseases was reported, elicited by genetic alterations, exogenous toxins or buildup of toxic metabolites. In this review we shall discuss some metabolic alterations related to the pathophysiology of diseases with neurological involvement and aging process. These findings may help identifying early disease biomarkers and lead to more effective therapies to improve the quality of life of the patients affected by these devastating illnesses. PMID:25110608

  20. Sports Neurology in Clinical Practice: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Tad

    2016-08-01

    With regard to persistent posttraumatic headache, there is legitimate concern that duration of symptoms may have an impact on the efficacy of future treatment attempts. Without neuropathologic confirmation, a clinical diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy cannot be made with a high degree of confidence. Sport-related headaches are challenging in a return-to-play context, because it is often unclear whether an athlete has an exacerbation of a primary headache disorder, has new-onset headache unrelated to trauma, or is in the recovery phase after concussion. Regular physical exercise may prove beneficial to multiple neurologic disease states. PMID:27445251

  1. Sedation in neurological intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Birinder S.; Paul, Gunchan

    2013-01-01

    Analgesia and sedation has been widely used in intensive care units where iatrogenic discomfort often complicates patient management. In neurological patients maximal comfort without diminishing patient responsiveness is desirable. In these patients successful management of sedation and analgesia incorporates a patient based approach that includes detection and management of predisposing and causative factors, including delirium, monitoring using sedation scales, proper medication selection, emphasis on analgesia based drugs and incorporation of protocols or algorithms. So, to optimize care clinician should be familiar with the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic variables that can affect the safety and efficacy of analgesics and sedatives. PMID:23956563

  2. Neurologic Parasitic Infections in Immigrants and Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Kiran; Zunt, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Infectious diseases are increasingly common in modern clinical practice and the contemporary neurologist must be aware of the clinical manifestations, potential complications, and management of common travel-related infections. The authors provide an approach to patients who present with neurologic symptoms, with a history of travel to or residence in tropical and developing countries. Although many other infections are important in this demographic, they focus on three parasitic infections that neurologists may encounter: cerebral malaria, neuroschistosomiasis, and neurocysticercosis. The epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment are discussed for each infection. PMID:21964842

  3. Neurologic applications of positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, G L; Pantano, P

    1984-11-01

    The impact of computerized neuroimaging in the neurologic sciences has been so dramatic that it has completely changed our approach to the individual patient. Further changes may be expected from the newborn positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in order to help the reader digest a large bulk of data and fully realize the present state of the art of PET, the authors have shaped this review mainly on results rather than on methods and on published reports rather than on future potential. PMID:6335222

  4. "The choice for death" and neurology.

    PubMed

    Durnová, Anna; Gottweis, Herbert

    2010-07-01

    In the last decade, "end-of-life" issues have gained prominence in political and social debates in many countries. The deliberate ending of the life of a patient upon his/her own request has become a hotly contested topic. This paper discusses the implications of this debate and of corresponding policy and legal developments for neurology. We discuss the nomenclature of the "choices for death", euthanasia, doctor-assisted suicide and palliative care as well as the social dynamics underlying these developments. We suggest that we need a more nuanced and empirically based understanding of the process of the "choice for death and its implications for medical practice." PMID:20393857

  5. Genome-wide association studies in neurology

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Meng-Shan; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are a powerful tool for understanding the genetic underpinnings of human disease. In this article, we briefly review the role and findings of GWAS in common neurological diseases, including Stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, migraine, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, restless legs syndrome, intracranial aneurysm, human prion diseases and moyamoya disease. We then discuss the present and future implications of these findings with regards to disease prediction, uncovering basic biology, and the development of potential therapeutic agents. PMID:25568877

  6. Cost reduction in cardiopulmonary and neurology services.

    PubMed

    Wise, P D

    1997-01-01

    A plan was developed and implemented to reduce costs per unit of service in three departments (pulmonary, cardiology, and neurology services), which resulted in a 19% reduction in cost per RVU over two years. These savings were attained primarily by a reduction of supplies and the redesign of work practices, which resulted in a reduction of both personnel and purchased service expenses. The departments have continued to improved the quality of services provided while reducing the costs of these services through this proactive approach to cost-containment. PMID:10166017

  7. Improving hand hygiene after neurological injury.

    PubMed

    Duke, Lynsay; Gibbison, Lucy; McMahon, Victoria

    Caring for hands tightened by spasticity after stroke, brain injury or other neurological conditions can be challenging for care staff. Opening and cleaning the hand, managing pressure areas, cutting nails and reducing pain becomes more complex if muscles are tight and short. Hand hygiene is key for staff but literature on patients' hand and nail care is lacking, so specialist education and care planning may be needed to help staff ensure these activities are done well. This article outlines the importance of maintaining patients' hand hygiene, explores the barriers to providing effective care and discusses how they might be overcome. PMID:26665632

  8. Genetic neurological channelopathies: molecular genetics and clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Spillane, J; Kullmann, D M; Hanna, M G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over recent years has shown that genetic neurological channelopathies can cause many different neurological diseases. Presentations relating to the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or muscle mean that channelopathies can impact on almost any area of neurological practice. Typically, neurological channelopathies are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and cause paroxysmal disturbances of neurological function, although the impairment of function can become fixed with time. These disorders are individually rare, but an accurate diagnosis is important as it has genetic counselling and often treatment implications. Furthermore, the study of less common ion channel mutation-related diseases has increased our understanding of pathomechanisms that is relevant to common neurological diseases such as migraine and epilepsy. Here, we review the molecular genetic and clinical features of inherited neurological channelopathies. PMID:26558925

  9. Genetic neurological channelopathies: molecular genetics and clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Spillane, J; Kullmann, D M; Hanna, M G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence accumulated over recent years has shown that genetic neurological channelopathies can cause many different neurological diseases. Presentations relating to the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerve or muscle mean that channelopathies can impact on almost any area of neurological practice. Typically, neurological channelopathies are inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and cause paroxysmal disturbances of neurological function, although the impairment of function can become fixed with time. These disorders are individually rare, but an accurate diagnosis is important as it has genetic counselling and often treatment implications. Furthermore, the study of less common ion channel mutation-related diseases has increased our understanding of pathomechanisms that is relevant to common neurological diseases such as migraine and epilepsy. Here, we review the molecular genetic and clinical features of inherited neurological channelopathies. PMID:26558925

  10. Cloning, analysis, and chromosomal localization of myoxin (MYH12), the human homologue to the mouse dilute gene

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, L.J.; Kennett, R.H. )

    1994-02-01

    The mouse dilute gene encodes a novel type of non-muscle myosin that structurally combines elements from both nonmuscle myosin type I and nonmuscle myosin type II. Phenotypically, mutations in the mouse dilute gene result not only in the lightening of coat color, but also in the onset of severe neurological defects shortly after birth. This may indicate that the mouse dilute gene is important in maintaining the normal neuronal function in the mouse. The authors report the isolation and sequencing of [open quotes]myoxin[close quotes] (MYH12), the human homologue of the mouse dilute gene, and its assignment to human chromosome 15. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Factor XII stimulates ERK1/2 and Akt through uPAR, integrins, and the EGFR to initiate angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    LaRusch, Gretchen A.; Mahdi, Fakhri; Shariat-Madar, Zia; Adams, Gregory; Sitrin, Robert G.; Zhang, Wan Ming; McCrae, Keith R.

    2010-01-01

    Factor XII (FXII) and high molecular weight kininogen (HK) mutually block each other's binding to the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We investigated if FXII stimulates cells by interacting with uPAR. FXII (3-62nM) with 0.05mM Zn2+ induces extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2; mitogen-activated protein kinase 44 [MAPK44] andMAPK42) and Akt (Ser473) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. FXII-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 or Akt is a zymogen activity, not an enzymatic event. ERK1/2 or Akt phosphorylation is blocked upstream by PD98059 or Wortmannin or LY294002, respectively. An uPAR signaling region for FXII is on domain 2 adjacent to uPAR's integrin binding site. Cleaved HK or peptides from HK's domain 5 blocks FXII-induced ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation. A β1 integrin peptide that binds uPAR, antibody 6S6 to β1 integrin, or the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor AG1478 blocks FXII-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt. FXII induces endothelial cell proliferation and 5-bromo-2′deoxy-uridine incorporation. FXII stimulates aortic sprouting in normal but not uPAR-deficient mouse aorta. FXII produces angiogenesis in matrigel plugs in normal but not uPAR-deficient mice. FXII knockout mice have reduced constitutive and wound-induced blood vessel number. In sum, FXII initiates signaling mediated by uPAR, β1 integrin, and the EGFR to induce human umbilical vein endothelial cell proliferation, growth, and angiogenesis. PMID:20228268

  12. Translational neurophysiology in sheep: measuring sleep and neurological dysfunction in CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep

    PubMed Central

    Perentos, Nicholas; Martins, Amadeu Q.; Watson, Thomas C.; Bartsch, Ullrich; Mitchell, Nadia L.; Palmer, David N.; Jones, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Creating valid mouse models of slowly progressing human neurological diseases is challenging, not least because the short lifespan of rodents confounds realistic modelling of disease time course. With their large brains and long lives, sheep offer significant advantages for translational studies of human disease. Here we used normal and CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep to demonstrate the use of the species for studying neurological function in a model of human disease. We show that electroencephalography can be used in sheep, and that longitudinal recordings spanning many months are possible. This is the first time such an electroencephalography study has been performed in sheep. We characterized sleep in sheep, quantifying characteristic vigilance states and neurophysiological hallmarks such as sleep spindles. Mild sleep abnormalities and abnormal epileptiform waveforms were found in the electroencephalographies of Batten disease affected sheep. These abnormalities resemble the epileptiform activity seen in children with Batten disease and demonstrate the translational relevance of both the technique and the model. Given that both spontaneous and engineered sheep models of human neurodegenerative diseases already exist, sheep constitute a powerful species in which longitudinal in vivo studies can be conducted. This will advance our understanding of normal brain function and improve our capacity for translational research into neurological disorders. PMID:25724202

  13. Translational neurophysiology in sheep: measuring sleep and neurological dysfunction in CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep.

    PubMed

    Perentos, Nicholas; Martins, Amadeu Q; Watson, Thomas C; Bartsch, Ullrich; Mitchell, Nadia L; Palmer, David N; Jones, Matthew W; Morton, A Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Creating valid mouse models of slowly progressing human neurological diseases is challenging, not least because the short lifespan of rodents confounds realistic modelling of disease time course. With their large brains and long lives, sheep offer significant advantages for translational studies of human disease. Here we used normal and CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep to demonstrate the use of the species for studying neurological function in a model of human disease. We show that electroencephalography can be used in sheep, and that longitudinal recordings spanning many months are possible. This is the first time such an electroencephalography study has been performed in sheep. We characterized sleep in sheep, quantifying characteristic vigilance states and neurophysiological hallmarks such as sleep spindles. Mild sleep abnormalities and abnormal epileptiform waveforms were found in the electroencephalographies of Batten disease affected sheep. These abnormalities resemble the epileptiform activity seen in children with Batten disease and demonstrate the translational relevance of both the technique and the model. Given that both spontaneous and engineered sheep models of human neurodegenerative diseases already exist, sheep constitute a powerful species in which longitudinal in vivo studies can be conducted. This will advance our understanding of normal brain function and improve our capacity for translational research into neurological disorders. PMID:25724202

  14. ParCAT: Parallel Climate Analysis Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Brian E.; Steed, Chad A.; Shipman, Galen M.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Thornton, Peter E.; Wehner, Michael; Williams, Dean N.

    2013-01-01

    Climate science is employing increasingly complex models and simulations to analyze the past and predict the future of Earth s climate. This growth in complexity is creating a widening gap between the data being produced and the ability to analyze the datasets. Parallel computing tools are necessary to analyze, compare, and interpret the simulation data. The Parallel Climate Analysis Toolkit (ParCAT) provides basic tools to efficiently use parallel computing techniques to make analysis of these datasets manageable. The toolkit provides the ability to compute spatio-temporal means, differences between runs or differences between averages of runs, and histograms of the values in a data set. ParCAT is implemented as a command-line utility written in C. This allows for easy integration in other tools and allows for use in scripts. This also makes it possible to run ParCAT on many platforms from laptops to supercomputers. ParCAT outputs NetCDF files so it is compatible with existing utilities such as Panoply and UV-CDAT. This paper describes ParCAT and presents results from some example runs on the Titan system at ORNL.

  15. Hepatitis C virus and neurological damage

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Shilu; Faheem, Muhammed; Ibrahim, Sara M; Iqbal, Waqas; Rauff, Bisma; Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection exhibits a wide range of extrahepatic complications, affecting various organs in the human body. Numerous HCV patients suffer neurological manifestations, ranging from cognitive impairment to peripheral neuropathy. Overexpression of the host immune response leads to the production of immune complexes, cryoglobulins, as well as autoantibodies, which is a major pathogenic mechanism responsible for nervous system dysfunction. Alternatively circulating inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and HCV replication in neurons is another factor that severely affects the nervous system. Furthermore, HCV infection causes both sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy in the mixed cryoglobulinemia as well as known as an important risk aspect for stroke. These extrahepatic manifestations are the reason behind underlying hepatic encephalopathy and chronic liver disease. The brain is an apt location for HCV replication, where the HCV virus may directly wield neurotoxicity. Other mechanisms that takes place by chronic HCV infection due the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders includes derangement of metabolic pathways of infected cells, autoimmune disorders, systemic or cerebral inflammation and alterations in neurotransmitter circuits. HCV and its pathogenic role is suggested by enhancement of psychiatric and neurological symptoms in patients attaining a sustained virologic response followed by treatment with interferon; however, further studies are required to fully assess the impact of HCV infection and its specific antiviral targets associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27134702

  16. Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A in Neurology: Update

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Marco; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Chung, Tae Mo; Bocca, Wladimir; de Souza, Jano Alves; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Moreira, Rayele Priscila; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Teixeira, Silmar; Oliveira, Acary Bulle; Moraes, Bruno da Silva; Matta, André Palma; Jacinto, Luis Jorge

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the current and most neurological (central nervous system, CNS) uses of the botulinum neurotoxin type A. The effect of these toxins at neuromuscular junction lends themselves to neurological diseases of muscle overactivity, particularly abnormalities of muscle control. There are seven serotypes of the toxin, each with a specific activity at the molecular level. Currently, serotypes A (in two preparations) and B are available for clinical purpose, and they have proved to be safe and effective for the treatment of dystonia, spasticity, headache, and other CNS disorders in which muscle hyperactivity gives rise to symptoms. Although initially thought to inhibit acetylcholine release only at the neuromuscular junction, botulinum toxins are now recognized to inhibit acetylcholine release at autonomic cholinergic nerve terminals, as well as peripheral release of neuro-transmitters involved in pain regulation. Its effects are transient and nondestructive, and largely limited to the area in which it is administered. These effects are also graded according to the dose, allowing individualized treatment of patients and disorders. It may also prove to be useful in the control of autonomic dysfunction and sialorrhea. In over 20 years of use in humans, botulinum toxin has accumulated a considerable safety record, and in many cases represents relief for thousands of patients unaided by other therapy. PMID:26487928

  17. Person-oriented perspectives in neurology.

    PubMed

    Lisak, Marijana; Demarin, Vida; Trkanjec, Zlatko; Zavoreo, Iris; Kes, Vanja Bašić

    2014-12-01

    Person-oriented medicine is characterized by a holistic approach in patient ma- nagement that embraces physical, psychological, social and spiritual aspects of health and dise- ase. It responds to the needs of patients and health care workers to form an effective therapeutic relationship based on trust, empathy, compassion and responsiveness to the individual needs of a patient. Person-oriented perspectives in neurology include active collaborative partnership between a physician and a patient, and intuitive perception, which has a neurobiological correlate in the hu- man mirror neuron system, thus expressing a considerable impact on the quality of the physician's diagnostic and therapeutic activities. On the other hand, personalized approach in medicine implies integration of clinical information and personal genotyping. Personalized neurology provides gene- based preclinical prediction of disease with improved risk assessment, early detection of disease and targeted intervention. The combination of personalized approach and clinical information accelera- tes the translation of genetic discoveries into clinical practice, which ultimately results in improved health care system. Person-oriented perspectives contribute significantly to the growing pluralism of medical science and provide a greater humanization of medicine, individualized treatment and autonomy during therapeutic processes. PMID:25868310

  18. Management of male neurologic patients with infertility.

    PubMed

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of fertility rely on intact neurologic function and thus neurologic diseases can result in infertility. While research into general female fertility and alterations in male semen quality is limited, we have an abundance of knowledge regarding ejaculatory dysfunction following nerve injury. Normal ejaculation is the result of coordinated reflex activity involving both the sympathetic and somatic nervous systems. Nerve injury can result in retrograde ejaculation, and anejaculation. With retrograde ejaculation, the ejaculate is propelled into the bladder instead of out through the urethra. In mild cases this condition can be reversed by sympathomimetic medications and, in more severe cases, sperm cells can be extracted from the bladder following ejaculation. With anejaculation, the ejaculatory reflex is not activated by normal sexual stimulation. In such cases, the first choice of treatment is assisted ejaculation, preferably by penile vibratory stimulation. If vibratory stimulation is unsuccessful, then ejaculation can almost always be induced by electroejaculation. In cases where assisted ejaculation fails, sperm can be retrieved surgically from either the epididymis or from the testis. Once viable sperm cells have been obtained, these are used in assisted reproductive techniques, including intravaginal insemination, intrauterine insemination, and in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection. PMID:26003259

  19. Chronic Hyponatremia Causes Neurologic and Psychologic Impairments.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Haruki; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Takagi, Hiroshi; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Izumida, Hisakazu; Nakashima, Kohtaro; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Seiji; Kiyota, Atsushi; Fukumoto, Kazuya; Iwama, Shintaro; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Arima, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Yukio; Murata, Yoshiharu; Oiso, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common clinical electrolyte disorder. Once thought to be asymptomatic in response to adaptation by the brain, recent evidence suggests that chronic hyponatremia may be linked to attention deficits, gait disturbances, risk of falls, and cognitive impairments. Such neurologic defects are associated with a reduction in quality of life and may be a significant cause of mortality. However, because underlying diseases such as adrenal insufficiency, heart failure, liver cirrhosis, and cancer may also affect brain function, the contribution of hyponatremia alone to neurologic manifestations and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Using a syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone rat model, we show here that sustained reduction of serum sodium ion concentration induced gait disturbances; facilitated the extinction of a contextual fear memory; caused cognitive impairment in a novel object recognition test; and impaired long-term potentiation at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses. In vivo microdialysis revealed an elevated extracellular glutamate concentration in the hippocampus of chronically hyponatremic rats. A sustained low extracellular sodium ion concentration also decreased glutamate uptake by primary astrocyte cultures, suggesting an underlying mechanism of impaired long-term potentiation. Furthermore, gait and memory performances of corrected hyponatremic rats were equivalent to those of control rats. Thus, these results suggest chronic hyponatremia in humans may cause gait disturbance and cognitive impairment, but these abnormalities are reversible and careful correction of this condition may improve quality of life and reduce mortality. PMID:26376860

  20. Drug treatment of vertigo in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Berisavac, Ivana I; Pavlović, Aleksandra M; Trajković, Jasna J Zidverc; Šternić, Nadežda M Čovičković; Bumbaširević, Ljiljana G Beslać

    2015-01-01

    Vertigo is a common symptom in everyday clinical practice. The treatment depends on the specific etiology. Vertigo may be secondary to inner ear pathology, or any existing brainstem or cerebellar lesion but may also be psychogenic. Central vertigo is a consequence of a central nervous system lesion. It is often associated with a focal neurological deficit. Peripheral vertigo is secondary to dysfunction of the peripheral vestibular system and is usually characterized by an acute vertigo with loss of balance, sensation of spinning in the space or around self, and is exaggerated with changes of the head and body position; no other neurological deficit is present. Some medications may also cause vertigo. Depending on the cause of the vertigo, drugs with different mechanisms of action, physical therapy, psychotherapy, as well as surgery may be used to combat this disabling malady. Symptomatic treatment has a particularly important role, regardless of the etiology of vertigo. We reviewed the current medications recommended for patients with vertigo, their mechanisms of action and their most frequent side effects. PMID:26588629

  1. Efficacy of Intravenous Immunoglobulin in Neurological Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lünemann, Jan D; Quast, Isaak; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2016-01-01

    Owing to its anti-inflammatory efficacy in various autoimmune disease conditions, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG)-pooled IgG obtained from the plasma of several thousands individuals-has been used for nearly three decades and is proving to be efficient in a growing number of neurological diseases. IVIG therapy has been firmly established for the treatment of Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, and multifocal motor neuropathy, either as first-line therapy or adjunctive treatment. IVIG is also recommended as rescue therapy in patients with worsening myasthenia gravis and is beneficial as a second-line therapy for dermatomyositis and stiff-person syndrome. Subcutaneous rather than intravenous administration of IgG is gaining momentum because of its effectiveness in patients with primary immunodeficiency and the ease with which it can be administered independently from hospital-based infusions. The demand for IVIG therapy is growing, resulting in rising costs and supply shortages. Strategies to replace IVIG with recombinant products have been developed based on proposed mechanisms that confer the anti-inflammatory activity of IVIG, but their efficacy has not been tested in clinical trials. This review covers new developments in the immunobiology and clinical applications of IVIG in neurological diseases. PMID:26400261

  2. Neurological manifestation of methyl bromide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Suwanlaong, Kanokrat; Phanthumchinda, Kammant

    2008-03-01

    Methyl bromide is a highly toxic gas with poor olfactory warning properties. It is widely used as insecticidal fumigant for dry foodstuffs and can be toxic to central and peripheral nervous systems. Most neurological manifestations of methyl bromide intoxication occur from inhalation. Acute toxicity characterized by headache, dizziness, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and visual disturbances. Tremor, convulsion, unconsciousness and permanent brain damage may occur in severe poisoning. Chronic exposure can cause neuropathy, pyramidal and cerebellar dysfunction, as well as neuropsychiatric disturbances. The first case of methyl bromide intoxication in Thailand has been described. The patient was a 24-year-old man who worked in a warehouse of imported vegetables fumigated with methyl bromide. He presented with unstable gait, vertigo and paresthesia of both feet, for two weeks. He had a history of chronic exposure to methyl bromide for three years. His fourteen co-workers also developed the same symptoms but less in severity. Neurological examination revealed ataxic gait, decreased pain and vibratory sense on both feet, impaired cerebellar signs and hyperactive reflex in all extremities. The serum concentration of methyl bromide was 8.18 mg/dl. Electrophysilogical study was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain (MRI) revealed bilateral symmetrical lesion of abnormal hypersignal intensity on T2 and fluid-attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences at bilateral dentate nuclei of cerebellum and periventricular area of the fourth ventricle. This incident stresses the need for improvement of worker education and safety precautions during all stages of methyl bromide fumigation. PMID:18575299

  3. Neurologic Regulation and Orthodontic Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    Kyrkanides, Stephanos; Huang, Hechang; Faber, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    Pain and discomfort are prevalent symptoms among the vast majority of patients with fixed orthodontic appliances and is the most disliked aspect of treatment. The periodontium is a highly innervated structure that also provides the necessary trophic factors, such as nerve growth factor, which promote neuronal survival, maintenance and axonal growth, via interaction with specific nerve surface receptors, such as TrkA. Various types of nerves are found in the periodontium, including thinly myelinated and unmyelinated sensory fibers that express the neuropeptides substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide among others. Tooth movement activates peripheral sensory nerve endings, which transmit painful signals to the brain after being processed at the trigeminal spinal nucleus, resulting in local expression of pain related genes, such as c-Fos. Concurrently, an attendant inflammatory process is detected in the trigeminal spinal nucleus, including activation of astrocytes, microglia and neurons. This complex neurologic reaction to tooth movement mediates orthodontic pain and also serves a source of neurogenic inflammation exhibited in the trigeminal spinal nucleus and the periodontium. Activated periodontal sensory fibers release neuropeptides in the periodontal environment, which in turn induce a local inflammatory cascade aiding in alveolar bone turnover and tooth movement per se. Control of pain with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and other prescription or over-the-counter pain killers effectively reduce this neurologic reaction and alleviate the attendant pain, but also reduce the neurogenic inflammatory component of orthodontic tooth movement causing a slowdown in bone turnover and consequently delaying orthodontic treatment. PMID:26599119

  4. Neurological complications in adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Justin A; Reid, Patrick; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    The number of surgeries performed for adult spinal deformity (ASD) has been increasing due to an aging population, longer life expectancy, and studies supporting an improvement in health-related quality of life scores after operative intervention. However, medical and surgical complication rates remain high, and neurological complications such as spinal cord injury and motor deficits can be especially debilitating to patients. Several independent factors potentially influence the likelihood of neurological complications including surgical approach (anterior, lateral, or posterior), use of osteotomies, thoracic hyperkyphosis, spinal region, patient characteristics, and revision surgery status. The majority of ASD surgeries are performed by a posterior approach to the thoracic and/or lumbar spine, but anterior and lateral approaches are commonly performed and are associated with unique neural complications such as femoral nerve palsy and lumbar plexus injuries. Spinal morphology, such as that of hyperkyphosis, has been reported to be a risk factor for complications in addition to three-column osteotomies, which are often utilized to correct large deformities. Additionally, revision surgeries are common in ASD and these patients are at an increased risk of procedure-related complications and nervous system injury. Patient selection, surgical technique, and use of intraoperative neuromonitoring may reduce the incidence of complications and optimize outcomes. PMID:27250041

  5. The use of aminopyridines in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Sedehizadeh, Saam; Keogh, Michael; Maddison, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Aminopyridines are members of a family of monoamino and diamino derivatives of pyridine, and their principal mechanism of action is dose-dependent blockade of voltage-gated potassium channels, in particular, fast voltage-gated potassium channels. To date, only 2 main broad-spectrum potassium channel blockers, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP), have been used as investigational new drugs in various neurological diseases. More recently, licensed versions of these compounds including dalfampridine extended release (Fampyra, Biogen Idec) for the improvement of walking in adult patients with multiple sclerosis, and amifampridine (Firdapse, Biomarin Europe Ltd) for the treatment of Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome have been released, and the costs associated with using these new products highlights the importance of evaluating the clinically meaningful treatment effects of these drugs.The current review summarizes the evidence of aminopyridine use in neurological conditions and in particular presents a systematic review of all randomized trials of 3,4-DAP in Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome to determine the efficacy of this treatment using meta-analysis of clinical and electrophysiological end points. PMID:22805230

  6. Neurologic Complications of Cancer and its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Giglio, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) are very susceptible to cancer and its treatment. The most direct involvement of the nervous system manifests in the development of primary brain and spinal cord tumors. Many cancers exhibit a propensity toward spread to the CNS, and brain metastases are common problems seen in malignancies such as lung, breast, and melanoma. Such spread may involve the brain or spine parenchyma or the subarachnoid space. In the PNS, spread is usually through direct infiltration of nerve roots, plexi, or muscle by neighboring malignancies. In some cases, cancer has sudden, devastating effects on the nervous system: epidural spinal cord compression or cord transection from pathologic fractures of vertebra involved by cancer; increased intracranial pressure from intracranial mass lesion growth and edema; and uncontrolled seizure activity as a result of intracranial tumors (status epilepticus), which are neuro-oncologic emergencies. The best known indirect or remote effects of cancer on the nervous system are the neurologic paraneoplastic syndromes. Cancer can also result in a hypercoagulable state causing cerebrovascular complications. Treatment of cancer can have neurologic complications. The commonest of these complications are radiation-induced injury to the brain, spine, and peripheral nerves and chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The suppressant effect of cancer and its treatment on the body’s immune system can result in infectious complications within the nervous system. PMID:20425608

  7. Immunotherapeutic approaches to paraneoplastic neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Blaes, Franz

    2002-04-01

    The review presents an overview on the pathogenesis of paraneoplastic neurological disorders (PNDs) and the current therapeutic immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory strategies used in these patients. PNDs are disturbances in the functioning of the nervous system in cancer patients, where the disturbances are not due to a local effect of the tumour or its metastases. Most of these clinically, well-defined syndromes in adults are associated with lung cancer (especially small cell lung cancer), lymphomas and gynaecological tumours. Since autoantibodies directed against proteins expressed in neurons and tumour cells have been found, PNDs are suspected to be autoimmune. In neuromuscular PND, immunosuppressive therapies, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulins are effective treatments. In contrast, central nervous system PNDs seen in adults are by far the most problematic group to treat. With exception of the stiff-man syndrome, immunosuppression appears to have little effect on these neurological disorders. Tumour therapy stabilises PNDs but does not cause improvement. Plasmapheresis reduces the autoantibody titre in the sera of these patients but, like tumour therapy, does not lead to a clinical improvement. In children with paraneoplastic opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome, steroids and intravenous immunoglobulins may lead to a complete or partial remission of PNDs. PMID:11955279

  8. Immunotherapeutic approaches to paraneoplastic neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Blaes, F

    2000-04-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological disorders (PNDs) are disturbances of the nervous system function in cancer patients, which are not due to a local effect of the tumour or its metastases. This review focuses on the neuromuscular PND and central nervous system (CNS) PND, which are by far the most problematic group to treat. Most of these clinically well-defined syndromes are associated with lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer (SCLC), lymphoma and gynaecological tumours. Since auto-antibodies directed against proteins expressed in neurones and tumour cells have been found, PNDs are suspected to be autoimmune. In neuromuscular PND, immunosuppressive therapies, plasmapheresis and iv. immunoglobulins (iv. Ig) have proven to be effective. In PND of the CNS, therapy of the tumour itself or immunosuppressive drugs seem to have little effect on the neurological syndromes. Plasmapheresis reduces the auto-antibody titre in the sera of these patients, but does not lead to a clinical improvement. This review presents an overview on the pathogenesis of PND and the possible benefit of an early immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory treatment, especially treatment with iv. immunoglobulins. PMID:11060705

  9. Hepatitis C virus and neurological damage.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Shilu; Faheem, Muhammed; Ibrahim, Sara M; Iqbal, Waqas; Rauff, Bisma; Fatima, Kaneez; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-04-28

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection exhibits a wide range of extrahepatic complications, affecting various organs in the human body. Numerous HCV patients suffer neurological manifestations, ranging from cognitive impairment to peripheral neuropathy. Overexpression of the host immune response leads to the production of immune complexes, cryoglobulins, as well as autoantibodies, which is a major pathogenic mechanism responsible for nervous system dysfunction. Alternatively circulating inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and HCV replication in neurons is another factor that severely affects the nervous system. Furthermore, HCV infection causes both sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy in the mixed cryoglobulinemia as well as known as an important risk aspect for stroke. These extrahepatic manifestations are the reason behind underlying hepatic encephalopathy and chronic liver disease. The brain is an apt location for HCV replication, where the HCV virus may directly wield neurotoxicity. Other mechanisms that takes place by chronic HCV infection due the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders includes derangement of metabolic pathways of infected cells, autoimmune disorders, systemic or cerebral inflammation and alterations in neurotransmitter circuits. HCV and its pathogenic role is suggested by enhancement of psychiatric and neurological symptoms in patients attaining a sustained virologic response followed by treatment with interferon; however, further studies are required to fully assess the impact of HCV infection and its specific antiviral targets associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27134702

  10. Clinical applications of intravenous immunoglobulins in neurology.

    PubMed

    Hughes, R A C; Dalakas, M C; Cornblath, D R; Latov, N; Weksler, M E; Relkin, N

    2009-12-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is used increasingly in the management of patients with neurological conditions. The efficacy and safety of IVIg treatment in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) and Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) have been established clearly in randomized controlled trials and summarized in Cochrane systematic reviews. However, questions remain regarding the dose, timing and duration of IVIg treatment in both disorders. Reports about successful IVIg treatment in other neurological conditions exist, but its use remains investigational. IVIg has been shown to be efficacious as second-line therapy in patients with dermatomyositis and suggested to be of benefit in some patients with polymyositis. In patients with inclusion body myositis, IVIg was not shown to be effective. IVIg is also a treatment option in exacerbations of myasthenia gravis. Studies with IVIg in patients with Alzheimer's disease have reported increased plasma anti-Abeta antibody titres associated with decreased Abeta peptide levels in the cerebrospinal fluid following IVIg treatment. These changes at the molecular level were accompanied by improved cognitive function, and large-scale randomized trials are under way. PMID:19883422

  11. Neurological caricatures since the 15th century.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    During the Renaissance, different artists began to draw medical illustrations from various viewpoints. Leonardo da Vinci was among those who sought to portray the emotional as well as the physical qualities of man. Other European artists described caricatural aspects of medical activities. In Northern Europe, Albrecht Durer, Hieronymus Bosch, and Pieter Brueghel were also famous for drawing caricatures. Later English artists, notably William Hogarth, Thomas Rowlandson, James Gillray, and the Cruikshanks, satirized life in general and the medical profession in particular. In Spain, Francisco Goya's works became increasingly macabre and satirical following his own mysterious illness and, in France, Honore Daumier used satire and humor to expose medical quackery. Also physicians such as Charles Bell and Jean-Martin Charcot were talented caricaturists. Their own personal artistic styles reflected their approach and gave a different "image" of neurology. Caricatures were popular portraits of developments in science and medicine and were frequently used whenever scientific language was too difficult to disseminate, in particular in the field of neurology. PMID:18629699

  12. Genetics of hereditary neurological disorders in children

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sui; Wu, Zhanhe; Tang, Beisha

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary neurological disorders (HNDs) are relatively common in children compared to those occurring in adulthood. Recognising clinical manifestations of HNDs is important for the selection of genetic testing, genetic testing results interpretation, and genetic consultation. Meanwhile, advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have significantly enabled the discovery of genetic causes of HNDs and also challenge paediatricians on applying genetic investigation. Combination of both clinical information and advanced technologies will enhance the genetic test yields in clinical setting. This review summarises the clinical presentations as well as genetic causes of paediatric neurological disorders in four major areas including movement disorders, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuron peripheral disorders and epilepsy. The aim of this review is to help paediatric neurologists not only to see the clinical features but also the complex genetic aspect of HNDs in order to utilise genetic investigation confidently in their clinical practice. A smooth transition from research based to clinical use of comprehensive genetic testing in HNDs in children could be foreseen in the near future while genetic testing, genetic counselling and genetic data interpretation are in place appropriately. PMID:26835329

  13. 76 FR 9587 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Initial Review...: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Initial Review Group; Neurological Sciences...

  14. Chapter 42: neurology and the neurological sciences in the German-speaking countries.

    PubMed

    Isler, Hansruedi

    2010-01-01

    Early neurology in German-speaking countries evolved aside from mainstream medicine. Animists like Stahl in the 18th century saw the soul as the cause of health and disease, and the later Vitalists insisted on life-force as the specific property of living beings, contrary to skeptics like Albrecht von Haller, whose neurophysiology they left behind. Following Willis, they studied brain tracts and speculated about reflex action. They experimented with electrotherapy, and later devised early theories of electric nerve action. The controversial medical theories of animal magnetism and phrenology also advanced brain research and clinical neurology together with their sectarian programs, which seem absurd today. The impact on natural science and medicine of the last great Vitalist, Johannes Müller, and his mechanistic students such as Remak, Schwann, Schleiden, Helmholtz, Ludwig, Brücke, Virchow, Koelliker, and Wundt was unparalleled. They provided the anatomical and physiological infrastructure for the growth of neurology. From 1845 far into the 20th century, psychiatry and neurology evolved together. Neuropsychiatrists cared for their mental patients during the day, and studied their brain tissue slides at night, as in the case of Alzheimer and Nissl. Major advances in brain research were achieved by the hypnotists Forel and Vogt, and modern psychiatry was launched by the typical neuropsychiatrists Kraepelin, Moebius, Bleuler, and Adolf Meyer. PMID:19892145

  15. Vinken and Bruyn's Handbook of Clinical Neurology. A witness of late-twentieth century neurological progress.

    PubMed

    Koehler, P J; Jennekens, F G I

    2008-01-01

    Vinken and Bruyn's Handbook of Clinical Neurology (HCN) is best characterized as an encyclopedia. In this paper we describe the origin, production, and reception of HCN. Data were gathered from a literature search, by screening of HCN-volumes, interviewing key-role persons and a study of an HCN-archive. The initiative for HCN was taken by two Excerpta Medica staff members, the one a strategist with expertise in information systems, the other a gifted neurologist with an expert knowledge of who is who in the world of neurological literature. Within a period of 38 years, 2799 authors, 28 volume editors, the two initiators, and a third chief editor for the American continent described the whole of neurology in 1909 chapters on all together 46,025 pages (excluding index volumes). HCN was sold mainly to medical institutes in affluent countries. A digital version of the revised edition was proposed by the editors but refused by the publisher for commercial reasons. HCN was in general well received by book reviewers. The main criticisms concerned the price of the volumes, lack of editorial control, inadequacy of indexes, and lack of cross references. HCN offers unrivalled information on the state of the art of the clinical neurosciences in the second half of the twentieth century. In addition, it contains extensive reviews of the history of neurological diseases in the volumes of the original edition. PMID:18161596

  16. Figures and institutions of the neurological sciences in Paris from 1800 to 1950. Part III: neurology.

    PubMed

    Broussolle, E; Poirier, J; Clarac, F; Barbara, J-G

    2012-04-01

    We present a short historical review of the major figures, their administrative functions and their works that contributed to make Paris a renowned centre of physiology and neurology during the xixth and the first half of the xxth century. We purposely chose to focus on the period 1800-1950, as 1800 corresponds to the actual beginning of neurosciences, and 1950 marks their exponential rise. Our presentation is divided into four chapters, matching the main disciplines which have progressed and contributed the most to the knowledge we have of the brain sciences: anatomy, physiology, neurology, and psychiatry-psychology. The present article is the third of four parts of this review, and deals with neurology. A special credit should be given to Jean-Martin Charcot who founded the Salpêtrière School of neurology and became one of the world's most important neurologists of the xixth century. We provide below the biographical sketches of Armand Trousseau, Guillaume Benjamin Amand Duchenne, Jean-Martin Charcot, Alfred Vulpian, Désiré-Magloire Bourneville, Paul Richer, Henri Parinaud, Albert Pitres, Jules Joseph Dejerine, Mrs. Augusta Dejerine-Klumpke, Édouard Brissaud, Pierre Marie, Georges Édouard Brutus Gilles de la Tourette, Joseph Babinski, André Thomas, Georges Marinesco, Achille Alexandre Souques, Georges Guillain and Charles Foix. PMID:22387204

  17. A drug carrier targeting murine uPAR for photodynamic therapy and tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolei; Zheng, Ke; Li, Rui; Chen, Zhuo; Yuan, Cai; Hu, Ping; Chen, Jincan; Xue, Jinping; Huang, Mingdong

    2015-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an effective therapeutical modality for tumors. In PDT, a photosensitizer was used to capture the light of specific wavelength, leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species and cytotoxicity surrounding the photosensitizer. Modifications of photosensitizers to enhance tumor specificity are common approaches to increase the efficacy and reduce the side effects of PDT. Previously, we developed a human serum albumin (HSA)-based drug carrier fused with the human amino-terminal fragment (hATF), which binds to a tumor surface marker (urokinase receptor, uPAR). However, hATF-HSA binds to murine uPAR much weaker (79-fold) than to human uPAR, and is not optimal for applications on murine tumor models. In this study, we developed a murine version of the drug carrier (mATF-HSA). A photosensitizer (mono-substituted β-carboxy phthalocyanine zinc, CPZ) was loaded into this carrier, giving a rather stable macromolecule (mATF-HSA:CPZ) that was shown to bind to murine uPAR in vitro. In addition, we evaluated both the photodynamic therapy efficacy and tumor retention capability of the macromolecule (at a dose of 0.05mg CPZ/kg mouse body weight) on murine hepatoma-22 (H22) tumor bearing mouse model. mATF-HSA:CPZ showed more accumulation in tumors compared to its human counterpart (hATF-HSA:CPZ) measured by quantitative fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). Besides, mATF-HSA:CPZ exhibited a higher tumor killing efficacy than hATF-HSA:CPZ. Together, the macromolecule mATF-HSA is a promising tumor-specific drug carrier on murine tumor models and is an useful tool to study tumor biology on murine tumor models. PMID:26004218

  18. Respiratory and neurological disease in rabbits experimentally infected with equid herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    Kanitz, Fábio A; Cargnelutti, Juliana F; Anziliero, Deniz; Gonçalves, Kelley V; Masuda, Eduardo K; Weiblen, Rudi; Flores, Eduardo F

    2015-10-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is an important pathogen of horses worldwide, associated with respiratory, reproductive and/or neurological disease. A mouse model for EHV-1 infection has been established but fails to reproduce some important aspects of the viral pathogenesis. Then, we investigated the susceptibility of rabbits to EHV-1 aiming at proposing this species as an alternative model for EHV-1 infection. Weanling rabbits inoculated intranasal with EHV-1 Kentucky D (10(7) TCID50/animal) shed virus in nasal secretions up to day 8-10 post-inoculation (pi), presented viremia up to day 14 pi and seroconverted to EHV-1 (virus neutralizing titers 4 to 64). Most rabbits (75%) developed respiratory disease, characterized by serous to hemorrhagic nasal discharge and mild to severe dyspnea. Some animals (20%) presented neurological signs as circling, bruxism and opisthotonus. Six animals died during acute disease (days 3-6); infectious virus and/or viral DNA were detected in the lungs, trigeminal ganglia (TG), olfactory bulbs (OBs) and cerebral cortex/brain (CC). Histological examination showed necrohemorrhagic, multifocal to coalescent bronchointerstitial pneumonia and diffuse alveolar edema. In two rabbits euthanized at day 50 pi, latent EHV-1 DNA was detected in the OBs. Dexamethasone administration at day 50 pi resulted in virus reactivation, demonstrated by virus shedding, viremia, clinical signs, and increase in VN titers and/or by detection of virus DNA in lungs, OBs, TGs and/or CC. These results demonstrate that rabbits are susceptible to EHV-1 infection and develop respiratory and neurological signs upon experimental inoculation. Thus, rabbits may be used to study selected aspects of EHV-1 biology and pathogenesis, extending and complementing the mouse model. PMID:26187161

  19. Intraspinal transplantation of mouse and human neural precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, Jason G.; Chen, Lu; Coleman, Ronald; Leang, Ronika; Plaisted, Warren C.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the preparation and transplantation of human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) and mouse neural precursor cells (mNPCs) into the thoracic region of the mouse spinal cord. The techniques in this unit also describe how to prepare the mouse for surgery by performing a laminectomy to expose the spinal cord for transplantation. Here we show NPCs genetically labeled with eGFP transplanted into the spinal cord of a mouse following viralmediated demyelination can efficiently be detected via eGFP expression. Transplantation of these cells into the spinal cord is an efficacious way to determine their effects in neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and spinal cord injury. PMID:24510791

  20. The Tablet Device in Hospital Neurology and in Neurology Graduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Newey, Christopher R.; Bhimraj, Adarsh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: There is limited literature on tablet devices for neurohospitalists and in neurological graduate medical education. This study evaluated utilization, benefits, and limitations of customized tablets on inpatient neurology practice and resident education. The hypothesis was the perception of the tablet would be positive, given their portability, convenience to accessing point-of-care reference, and accessibility to the electronic medical record. Methods: Second-generation iPads with neurology-specific applications and literature were provided to our in-hospital general, stroke, and consult neurology teams. After 1 year, residents on these teams were surveyed on demographic data, familiarity, and utilization of the iPad and their perceptions of the device. Results: All 27 residents responded to the survey. Most participants (23 of 27) used a tablet while on inpatient service. Twelve regularly utilized the neurology-specific apps and/or accessed scientific articles. Technologically savvy residents felt significantly more comfortable using tablets and were more quickly acquainted with the features. Thirteen respondents wanted a formal orientation on the advanced features of the tablet independent of their familiarity with the device or level of technological comfort. Conclusion: Overall, the perception was that the tablet was beneficial for inpatient clinical care and as an educational reference. Participants became easily familiarized with the device features quickly, regardless of whether they owned one previously or not. Most physicians indicated interest in advanced features of tablets; however, a formal orientation may be beneficial for optimal utilization. A reliable network connection is essential to in-hospital use of tablet devices. Additional research pertaining to patient outcomes, objective educational benefit, and cost-effectiveness is necessary. PMID:25553224

  1. Neurological phenotypes for Down syndrome across the life span

    PubMed Central

    Lott, Ira T.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews the neurological phenotype of Down syndrome (DS) in early development, childhood, and aging. Neuroanatomic abnormalities in DS are manifested as aberrations in gross brain structure as well as characteristic microdysgenetic changes. As the result of these morphological abnormalities, brain circuitry is impaired. While an intellectual disability is ubiquitous in DS, there is a wide range of variation in cognitive performance and a growing understanding between aberrant brain circuitry and the cognitive phenotype. Hypotonia is most marked at birth, affecting gait and ligamentous laxity. Seizures are bimodal in presentation with infantile spasms common in infancy and generalized seizures associated with cognitive decline observed in later years. While all individuals have the characteristic neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by age 40years, the prevalence of dementia is not universal. The tendency to develop AD is related, in part, to several genes on chromosome 21 that are overexpressed in DS. Intraneuronal accumulation of β-amyloid appears to trigger a cascade of neurodegeneration resulting in the neuropathological and clinical manifestations of dementia. Functional brain imaging has elucidated the temporal sequence of amyloid deposition and glucose metabolic rate in the development of dementia in DS. Mitochondrial abnormalities contribute to oxidative stress which is part of AD pathogenesis in DS as well as AD in the general population. A variety of medical comorbidities threaten cognitive performance including sleep apnea, abnormalities in thyroid metabolism, and behavioral disturbances. Mouse models for DS are providing a platform for the formulation of clinical trials with intervention targeted to synaptic plasticity, brain biochemistry, and morphological brain alterations. PMID:22541290

  2. The early struggles of the fledgling American Academy of Neurology: resistance from the old guard of American neurology.

    PubMed

    Louis, Elan D

    2013-01-01

    The American Neurological Association, established in 1874, was a small exclusive society comprising senior neurologists at a select number of north-eastern academic institutions. In 1948, an attempt was made to establish a second neurological society in the USA. The American Academy of Neurology was formed around a group of young neurologists who represented the country's Midwest and other regions. The American Academy of Neurology is now the larger of the two organizations, even though the American Academy of Neurology began as a small and politically vulnerable organization, arising in the shadow of the powerful and established American Neurological Association. How did the 75-year-old association react when a second, seemingly redundant, neurological association attempted to organize? This question has not been the focus of historical work, and the purpose of this study was to address this. To do so, the author studied the primary source materials in the American Academy of Neurology Historical Collection and the papers of Dr Henry Alsop Riley, an American neurologist, who was influential in both the American Neurological Association and American Academy of Neurology. On its formation, the American Academy of Neurology did not enter a vacuum. Indeed, the long-existing American Neurological Association actively resisted the new organization. There was reluctance to accept the new idea on a conceptual level, a formal attempt to hijack the new organization and discussions about punitive actions against its founder, while at the same time an attempt to bring him into the American Neurological Association leadership. Although the American Neurological Association attempted to frame itself as the patrician 'upper chamber' of American neurology, the American Academy of Neurology leadership was ultimately savvier at political manoeuvring and use of government agencies and funding organizations. The struggle of the American Academy of Neurology with the American

  3. Frontiers in therapeutic development of allopregnanolone for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Ronald W.; Solinsky, Christine M.; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2014-01-01

    Allopregnanolone (Allo), a neurosteroid, has emerged as a promising promoter of endogenous regeneration in brain. In a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, Allo induced neurogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, white matter generation and cholesterol homeostasis while simultaneously reducing β-amyloid and neuroinflammatory burden. Allo activates signaling pathways and gene expression required for regeneration of neural stem cells and their differentiation into neurons. In parallel, Allo activates systems to sustain cholesterol homeostasis and reduce β-amyloid generation. To advance Allo into studies for chronic human neurological conditions, we examined translational and clinical parameters: dose, regimen, route, formulation, outcome measures, and safety regulations. A treatment regimen of once per week at sub-sedative doses of Allo was optimal for regeneration and reduction in Alzheimer’s pathology. This regimen had a high safety profile following chronic exposure in aged normal and Alzheimer’s mice. Formulation of Allo for multiple routes of administration has been developed for both preclinical and clinical testing. Preclinical evidence for therapeutic efficacy of Allo spans multiple neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, Niemann-Pick, diabetic neuropathy, status epilepticus, and traumatic brain injury. To successfully translate Allo as a therapeutic for multiple neurological disorders, it will be necessary to tailor dose and regimen to the targeted therapeutic mechanisms and disease etiology. Treatment paradigms conducted in accelerated disease models in young animals have a low probability of successful translation to chronic diseases in adult and aged humans. Gender, genetic risks, stage and burden of disease are critical determinants of efficacy. This review focuses on recent advances in development of Allo for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that have the potential to accelerate therapeutic translation for multiple unmet

  4. Jean-Martin Charcot at the birth of Russian neurology.

    PubMed

    Vein, Alla A

    2011-01-01

    Russian neurology was virtually nonexistent in the middle of the 19th century which made a traineeship abroad an absolute necessity. Charcot and his school did not just offer professional training, but created the best minds, which would determine the direction of neurology and psychiatry in Russia for many decades. After returning home, young Russian doctors not only implemented everything they had learned in Western Europe, but proceeded to make their own original contributions. The most talented pupils of Charcot, including such prominent names as Kozhevnikov, Korsakov, Minor, Bekhterev and Darkshevich, became the founders of neurological schools in Russia. They laid the basis for the further development of neurology and psychiatry. Remarkably, though trained by the same teachers, each of these future 'founding fathers' of these neurological and psychiatric schools followed his own individual path which resulted in an undeniable diversity in Russian neurology and psychiatry during the period of their formation. PMID:21252555

  5. The beginnings of the Southern Child/Pediatric Neurology Society.

    PubMed

    Dyken, Paul Richard; Bodensteiner, John B

    2015-04-01

    The founding and early development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society was in many ways parallel to that of the Child Neurology Society. The organization started out as the Southern Child Neurology Society but the name was changed at the time of incorporation so as to avoid confusion of identity and purpose with the larger Child Neurology Society. Although there are archives of early days and the later development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society, the details have never been set down in a narrative explaining the events that led to the development of the organization. In this paper, we try to produce a written record of the history of the founding and early development of the Southern Pediatric Neurology Society. PMID:24646505

  6. Neurologic Complications of Psychomotor Stimulant Abuse.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Psychomotor stimulants are drugs that act on the central nervous system (CNS) to increase alertness, elevate mood, and produce a sense of well-being. These drugs also decrease appetite and the need for sleep. Stimulants can enhance stamina and improve performance in tasks that have been impaired by fatigue or boredom. Approved therapeutic applications of stimulants include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), narcolepsy, and obesity. These agents also possess potent reinforcing properties that can result in excessive self-administration and abuse. Chronic use is associated with adverse effects including psychosis, seizures, and cerebrovascular accidents, though these complications usually occur in individuals with preexisting risk factors. This chapter reviews the adverse neurologic consequences of chronic psychomotor stimulant use and abuse, with a focus on two prototypical stimulants methamphetamine and cocaine. PMID:26070756

  7. Neurological aspects of del(1q) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murayama, K; Greenwood, R S; Rao, K W; Aylsworth, A S

    1991-09-15

    We have studied three children with de novo terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 1 (46,XX,del(1)(q43)). They all have minor anomalies and neurological signs (severe psychomotor developmental delay, generalized hypotonia, and seizures) that have been described previously. In addition, all of these three patients have autistic-like behavior. They avoid eye contact, show no interest in people, express little emotion, and repeat stereotypic movements such as head nodding and purposeless finger manipulation. They also spend excessive time in making unusual sounds consisting of a high-pitched shrill cry with little intonation in infancy and a harsh, strained, and glottal stridency in later life. They make no labial, lingual, or nasal sounds. We suggest that these observations may be unique clinical manifestations of certain terminal 1q deletions. PMID:1746617

  8. NEUROLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN GLYCOSYLATION DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Freeze, Hudson H.; Eklund, Erik A.; Ng, Bobby G.; Patterson, Marc C.

    2016-01-01

    This review will present principles of glycosylation, describe the relevant glycosylation pathways and their related disorders, and highlight some of the neurological aspects and issues that continue to challenge researchers. Over 100 rare human genetic disorders that result from deficiencies in the different glycosylation pathways are known today. Most of these disorders impact the central and/or peripheral nervous systems. Patients typically have developmental delay/intellectual disability, hypotonia, seizures, neuropathy, and metabolic abnormalities in multiple organ systems. Between these disorders there is great clinical diversity because all cell types differentially glycosylate proteins and lipids. The patients have hundreds of mis-glycosylated products afflicting a myriad of processes including cell signaling, cell-cell interaction and cell migration. This vast complexity in glycan composition and function, along with limited analytic tools has impeded the identification of key glycosylated molecules that cause pathologies, and to date few critical target proteins have been pinpointed. PMID:25840006

  9. [Neurological manifestations of giant cell arteritis].

    PubMed

    Grachev, Yu V

    2016-01-01

    The article describes clinical, including neurological manifestations, of giant cell arteritis (GCA) - granulomatous vasculitis of large and medium-sized vessels, predominantly craniofacial, including precerebral and cerebral, arteries. Histopathological features of GCA are illustrated by the schemes of panarteritis and «postarteritis» (proliferative and fibrotic changes in the intima, underlying the development of cerebrovascular disorders). The main clinical manifestations of GCA are described as 3 groups of symptoms: general constitutional symptoms; manifestations of vasculitis of craniofacial, precerebral and cerebral arteries; polymyalgia rheumaticа. The authors present their own version of the taxonomy of visual disturbances in patients with GCA. Diagnostic steps in patients with suggestive signs of GCA are described. Therapeutic regimens of use of glucocorticoids for suggestion/diagnosis of GCA are presented. PMID:26977631

  10. Neurology of microgravity and space travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, M. D.; Patten, B. M.

    1992-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity and space travel produce several neurologic changes, including SAS, ataxia, postural disturbances, perceptual illusions, neuromuscular weakness, and fatigue. Inflight SAS, perceptual illusions, and ocular changes are of more importance. After landing, however, ataxia, perceptual illusions, neuromuscular weakness, and fatigue play greater roles in astronaut health and readaptation to a terrestrial environment. Cardiovascular adjustments to microgravity, bone demineralization, and possible decompression sickness and excessive radiation exposure contribute further to medical problems of astronauts in space. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which microgravity adversely affects the nervous system and more effective treatments will provide healthier, happier, and longer stays in space on the space station Freedom and during the mission to Mars.

  11. [Pediatric neurological disorders and genetic counseling].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yoshimitsu

    2003-07-01

    Genetic counseling provides medical and genetic information of the disease including its natural history, recurrence risk, availability and usefulness of genetic testing, as well as psycho-social support. In the field of pediatric neurology, the majority of genetic counseling seems to be a simple risk estimation of the next child and unrelated to ethical issues. However, in some cases requiring prenatal diagnosis or presymptomatic testing, we have to address serious ethical issues. Genetic counseling should be provided by an educated medical doctor at a suitable genetics clinic. In Japan, we have "Japanese Board of Medical Genetics, Clinical Geneticist" as an education system of clinical genetics for medical doctors. Pediatric neurologists should know the special issues of genetic information and contact with clinical geneticists in selected cases. PMID:12875203

  12. The neurology of solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Avila, J David; Živković, Saša

    2015-07-01

    Transplantation is the rescue treatment for end-stage organ failure with more than 110,000 solid organs transplantations performed worldwide annually. Recent advances in transplantation procedures and posttransplantation management have improved long-term survival and quality of life of transplant recipients, shifting the focus from acute perioperative critical care needs toward long-term chronic medical problems. Neurologic complications affect up to 30-60 % of solid organ transplant recipients. Common etiologies include opportunistic infections and toxicities of antirejection medications, and wide spectrum of toxic and metabolic disturbances. Most complications are common to all allograft types, but some are relatively specific for individual allograft types (e.g., central pontine myelinolysis in liver transplant recipients). Close collaboration between neurologists and other transplant team members is essential for effective management. Early recognition of complications and accurate diagnosis leading to timely treatment is essential to reduce the morbidity and improve the overall transplant outcome. PMID:26008808

  13. Ictal kissing behavior: neurological and psychodynamic overview.

    PubMed

    Taşkıran, Emine; Özmen, Mine; Kılıc, Özge; Sentürk, Aslı; Özkara, Cigdem

    2013-11-01

    This study is based on the psychodynamic and neurological analysis of three Turkish patients who displayed ictal kissing automatism during their seizures. To unveil the probable underlying causes of their kissing behaviors, all patients underwent psychiatric interviews after being evaluated by ictal video-EEG recordings. The group consisted of two females (ages 35 and 29) and one male (age 26). In addition to prominent oral automatisms, each patient also displayed behaviors of kissing or blowing kisses to individuals at close proximity. Seizures were related to the right temporal lobe in two patients and the left temporal lobe in one patient. Magnetic resonance imaging showed mesial temporal sclerosis in two of the patients (one left, one right) and was normal in one. According to the DSM-IV-TR criteria, each of the three patients also suffered from major depression, while the psychodynamic interviews revealed traumatic childhood histories and intense unfulfilled affective needs. PMID:24029004

  14. E-learning for neurological bladder management.

    PubMed

    Rognoni, Carla; Fizzotti, Gabriella; Pistarini, Caterina; Mazzoleni, M Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Regarding the impact of visceral dysfunction on quality of life, bowel and bladder management is a very important problem. The management of the patient with neurological bladder is often a source of uncertainty for both patients and healthcare personnel. Since the need of specialized training is growing, two CME e-learning courses have been developed to provide physicians and nurses competencies for the enhancement of the daily life of the patients. The present study aims at evaluating courses attendance and outcomes. Attendance data confirm the interest for both courses. The results document a pretty good objective and subjective effectiveness of the e-learning courses but low attitude to exploit he support of an asynchronous tutor. The analysis of test results gives some hints for eventual quality improvement of the courses themselves. PMID:22874390

  15. Methcathinone "Kitchen Chemistry" and Permanent Neurological Damage.

    PubMed

    Sikk, Katrin; Taba, Pille

    2015-01-01

    Methcathinone abuse is a significant cause of parkinsonism among young patients in the Eastern European countries. The drug is synthesized from over-the-counter cold remedies containing ephedrine or pseudoephedrine. The final mixture contains a high concentration of manganese if potassium permanganate is used as the oxidant agent. Though manganese is an essential trace element and its homeostasis is well maintained, exposure to a high level of manganese is neurotoxic. The use of manganese-contaminated methcathinone may cause permanent neurological damage and severe disability. Drug users develop a distinctive extrapyramidal syndrome that resembles classic manganese intoxication. Methcathinone could have additive neurotoxic effect to the progression of parkinsonism. The most prevalent symptoms are symmetrical bradykinesia, dystonias, and early postural, gait, and speech impairment. After cessation of exposure, the syndrome is generally irreversible and can even progress. PMID:26070761

  16. Neurologic manifestations of chronic methamphetamine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Rusyniak, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Chronic methamphetamine abuse has devastating effects on the central nervous system. The degree to which addicts will tolerate the dysfunction in the way they think, feel, move, and even look, is a powerful testimony to the addictive properties of this drug. While the mechanisms behind these disorders are complex, at their heart they involve the recurring increase in the concentrations of central monoamines with subsequent dysfunction in dopaminergic neurotransmission. The mainstay of treatment for the problems associated with chronic methamphetamine abuse is abstinence. However, by recognizing the manifestations of chronic abuse, clinicians will be better able to help their patients get treatment for their addiction and to deal with the neurologic complications related to chronic abuse. PMID:21803215

  17. Neurologic Aspects of Infections in International Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Han, May H.; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Background As international travel for business and pleasure becomes part of contemporary lifestyle, the clinician today is confronted with an increasing number of travelers returning ill with unfamiliar syndromes. The physician will encounter a myriad of patients with exotic infections, emerging infectious diseases, or resurgent Old-World infections. Review Summary This review article will discuss salient points of important infectious diseases associated with overseas travel, provide a syndromic approach to the traveler who returns with neurologic manifestations, and list resources for additional diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive information. Conclusions As many of infections acquired in other countries can directly or indirectly affect the nervous system, the care of the ill traveler often falls into the hands of neurologists. The contemporary neurologist should therefore be knowledgeable of the clinical manifestations, potential complications, and appropriate management of region-specific infections. PMID:15631642

  18. Robotics, motor learning, and neurologic recovery.

    PubMed

    Reinkensmeyer, David J; Emken, Jeremy L; Cramer, Steven C

    2004-01-01

    Robotic devices are helping shed light on human motor control in health and injury. By using robots to apply novel force fields to the arm, investigators are gaining insight into how the nervous system models its external dynamic environment. The nervous system builds internal models gradually by experience and uses them in combination with impedance and feedback control strategies. Internal models are robust to environmental and neural noise, generalized across space, implemented in multiple brain regions, and developed in childhood. Robots are also being used to assist in repetitive movement practice following neurologic injury, providing insight into movement recovery. Robots can haptically assess sensorimotor performance, administer training, quantify amount of training, and improve motor recovery. In addition to providing insight into motor control, robotic paradigms may eventually enhance motor learning and rehabilitation beyond the levels possible with conventional training techniques. PMID:15255778

  19. Neurology of microgravity and space travel.

    PubMed

    Fujii, M D; Patten, B M

    1992-11-01

    Exposure to microgravity and space travel produce several neurologic changes, including SAS, ataxia, postural disturbances, perceptual illusions, neuromuscular weakness, and fatigue. Inflight SAS, perceptual illusions, and ocular changes are of more importance. After landing, however, ataxia, perceptual illusions, neuromuscular weakness, and fatigue play greater roles in astronaut health and readaptation to a terrestrial environment. Cardiovascular adjustments to microgravity, bone demineralization, and possible decompression sickness and excessive radiation exposure contribute further to medical problems of astronauts in space. A better understanding of the mechanisms by which microgravity adversely affects the nervous system and more effective treatments will provide healthier, happier, and longer stays in space on the space station Freedom and during the mission to Mars. PMID:1435667

  20. Towards an Intelligent Textbook of Neurology

    PubMed Central

    Reggia, James A.; Pula, Thaddeus P.; Price, Thomas R.; Perricone, Barry T.

    1980-01-01

    We define an intelligent textbook of medicine to be a computer system that: (1) provides for storage and selective retrieval of synthesized clinical knowledge for reference purposes; and (2) supports the application by computer of its knowledge to patient information to assist physicians with decision making. This paper describes an experimental system called KMS (a Knowledge Management System) for creating and using intelligent medical textbooks. KMS is domain-independent, supports multiple inference methods and representation languages, and is designed for direct use by physicians during the knowledge acquisition process. It is presented here in the context of the development of an Intelligent Textbook of Neurology. We suggest that KMS has the potential to overcome some of the problems that have inhibited the use of knowledge-based systems by physicians in the past.

  1. ParA and ParB coordinate chromosome segregation with cell elongation and division during Streptomyces sporulation.

    PubMed

    Donczew, Magdalena; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Wróbel, Agnieszka; Flärdh, Klas; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta; Jakimowicz, Dagmara

    2016-04-01

    In unicellular bacteria, the ParA and ParB proteins segregate chromosomes and coordinate this process with cell division and chromosome replication. During sporulation of mycelial Streptomyces, ParA and ParB uniformly distribute multiple chromosomes along the filamentous sporogenic hyphal compartment, which then differentiates into a chain of unigenomic spores. However, chromosome segregation must be coordinated with cell elongation and multiple divisions. Here, we addressed the question of whether ParA and ParB are involved in the synchronization of cell-cycle processes during sporulation in Streptomyces To answer this question, we used time-lapse microscopy, which allows the monitoring of growth and division of single sporogenic hyphae. We showed that sporogenic hyphae stop extending at the time of ParA accumulation and Z-ring formation. We demonstrated that both ParA and ParB affect the rate of hyphal extension. Additionally, we showed that ParA promotes the formation of massive nucleoprotein complexes by ParB. We also showed that FtsZ ring assembly is affected by the ParB protein and/or unsegregated DNA. Our results indicate the existence of a checkpoint between the extension and septation of sporogenic hyphae that involves the ParA and ParB proteins. PMID:27248800

  2. ParA and ParB coordinate chromosome segregation with cell elongation and division during Streptomyces sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Donczew, Magdalena; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Wróbel, Agnieszka; Flärdh, Klas; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    In unicellular bacteria, the ParA and ParB proteins segregate chromosomes and coordinate this process with cell division and chromosome replication. During sporulation of mycelial Streptomyces, ParA and ParB uniformly distribute multiple chromosomes along the filamentous sporogenic hyphal compartment, which then differentiates into a chain of unigenomic spores. However, chromosome segregation must be coordinated with cell elongation and multiple divisions. Here, we addressed the question of whether ParA and ParB are involved in the synchronization of cell-cycle processes during sporulation in Streptomyces. To answer this question, we used time-lapse microscopy, which allows the monitoring of growth and division of single sporogenic hyphae. We showed that sporogenic hyphae stop extending at the time of ParA accumulation and Z-ring formation. We demonstrated that both ParA and ParB affect the rate of hyphal extension. Additionally, we showed that ParA promotes the formation of massive nucleoprotein complexes by ParB. We also showed that FtsZ ring assembly is affected by the ParB protein and/or unsegregated DNA. Our results indicate the existence of a checkpoint between the extension and septation of sporogenic hyphae that involves the ParA and ParB proteins. PMID:27248800

  3. Dysfunctional HCN ion channels in neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    DiFrancesco, Jacopo C.; DiFrancesco, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are expressed as four different isoforms (HCN1-4) in the heart and in the central and peripheral nervous systems. HCN channels are activated by membrane hyperpolarization at voltages close to resting membrane potentials and carry the hyperpolarization-activated current, dubbed If (funny current) in heart and Ih in neurons. HCN channels contribute in several ways to neuronal activity and are responsible for many important cellular functions, including cellular excitability, generation, and modulation of rhythmic activity, dendritic integration, transmission of synaptic potentials, and plasticity phenomena. Because of their role, defective HCN channels are natural candidates in the search for potential causes of neurological disorders in humans. Several data, including growing evidence that some forms of epilepsy are associated with HCN mutations, support the notion of an involvement of dysfunctional HCN channels in different experimental models of the disease. Additionally, some anti-epileptic drugs are known to modify the activity of the Ih current. HCN channels are widely expressed in the peripheral nervous system and recent evidence has highlighted the importance of the HCN2 isoform in the transmission of pain. HCN channels are also present in the midbrain system, where they finely regulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons, and a potential role of these channels in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease has recently emerged. The function of HCN channels is regulated by specific accessory proteins, which control the correct expression and modulation of the neuronal Ih current. Alteration of these proteins can severely interfere with the physiological channel function, potentially predisposing to pathological conditions. In this review we address the present knowledge of the association between HCN dysfunctions and neurological diseases, including clinical, genetic, and physiopathological

  4. The Effect of Methylphenidate on Neurological Soft Signs in ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Hrtanek, Igor; Tonhajzerova, Ingrid; Snircova, Eva; Kulhan, Tomas; Farsky, Ivan; Nosalova, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neurological soft signs are very common in children with the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and the first line medication of this disorder is methylphenidate. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of methylphenidate on the neurological soft signs in children and adolescents suffering from ADHD depending on the dose of methylphenidate. Methods Thirty five patients with ADHD were investigated by the ADHD RS-IV parent version questionnaire and the Revised Neurological Examination for Subtle Signs before treatment adjustment and after four weeks of methylphenidate medication. The changes in hyperactivity symptomatology, neurological soft signs during therapy and the influence of the methylphenidate dose were statistically analyzed. Results A significant decrease in hyperactivity symptomatology was found after one month of methylphenidate medication (p=0.0001) and significant decrease in neurological soft signs was demonstrated in 21 from a total of 26 items (p<0.05). Correlation analysis showed no relationship between the dose of methylphenidate and the improvement of neurological soft signs. Similarly, the improvement of ADHD symptomatology had not correlation with the improvement of neurological soft signs. Conclusion The study demonstrated the positive effect of methylphenidate on neurological soft signs in which improvement occurred independently of the dose, indicating that their progress may be due to methylphenidate treatment of any dose. The unrelated effect of methylphenidate on the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and neurological soft signs suggest that methylphenidate might be useful in the therapy of clumsy child syndrome and in ADHD treatment of non-responders. PMID:26508967

  5. Sleep Disorders in Neurologic Practice: A Case-based Approach.

    PubMed

    Panossian, Lori Ani; Avidan, Alon Y

    2016-08-01

    Sleep disorders are common in neurology practice, but are often undiagnosed and untreated. Specific patient cohorts, such as older adults, patients residing in nursing homes, and patients with underlying chronic neurologic and psychiatric disorders, are at particular risk. If these sleep problems are not properly evaluated and managed the patient may experience exacerbation of the underlying neurologic disorder. This article highlights some of the key sleep disorders relevant to practicing neurologists, emphasizing hypersomnolence, insomnia, and sleep-related movement disorders in the setting of neurologic disorders to enhance the tools available for evaluation, and discusses management strategies. PMID:27445242

  6. [Neurological diseases and nutrition -- what can we do?].

    PubMed

    Tamási, Péter

    2014-12-21

    Neurological diseases and nutrition are in complex relationship. In the first part of this review the nutritional consequences of acute neurological diseases is presented, with special emphasis on traumatic injuries of the nervous system and stroke. Nutritional therapy of these patients is described in detail. In addition, chronic, degenerative neurological pathological conditions are also discussed, including nutritional consequences and possibilities of therapy. Some ethical and legal issues are also considered. The second part of this review article describes neurological consequences of nutritional problems, both deficits of macro- and micronutrients and toxic effects. PMID:25497154

  7. Manipulations of MeCP2 in glutamatergic neurons highlight their contributions to Rett and other neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangling; Wang, Wei; Lu, Hui; He, Ling-jie; Chen, Wu; Chao, Eugene S; Fiorotto, Marta L; Tang, Bin; Herrera, Jose A; Seymour, Michelle L; Neul, Jeffrey L; Pereira, Fred A; Tang, Jianrong; Xue, Mingshan; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2016-01-01

    Many postnatal onset neurological disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and intellectual disability are thought to arise largely from disruption of excitatory/inhibitory homeostasis. Although mouse models of Rett syndrome (RTT), a postnatal neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2, display impaired excitatory neurotransmission, the RTT phenotype can be largely reproduced in mice simply by removing MeCP2 from inhibitory GABAergic neurons. To determine what role excitatory signaling impairment might play in RTT pathogenesis, we generated conditional mouse models with Mecp2 either removed from or expressed solely in glutamatergic neurons. MeCP2 deficiency in glutamatergic neurons leads to early lethality, obesity, tremor, altered anxiety-like behaviors, and impaired acoustic startle response, which is distinct from the phenotype of mice lacking MeCP2 only in inhibitory neurons. These findings reveal a role for excitatory signaling impairment in specific neurobehavioral abnormalities shared by RTT and other postnatal neurological disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14199.001 PMID:27328325

  8. Manipulations of MeCP2 in glutamatergic neurons highlight their contributions to Rett and other neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangling; Wang, Wei; Lu, Hui; He, Ling-Jie; Chen, Wu; Chao, Eugene S; Fiorotto, Marta L; Tang, Bin; Herrera, Jose A; Seymour, Michelle L; Neul, Jeffrey L; Pereira, Fred A; Tang, Jianrong; Xue, Mingshan; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2016-01-01

    Many postnatal onset neurological disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and intellectual disability are thought to arise largely from disruption of excitatory/inhibitory homeostasis. Although mouse models of Rett syndrome (RTT), a postnatal neurological disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2, display impaired excitatory neurotransmission, the RTT phenotype can be largely reproduced in mice simply by removing MeCP2 from inhibitory GABAergic neurons. To determine what role excitatory signaling impairment might play in RTT pathogenesis, we generated conditional mouse models with Mecp2 either removed from or expressed solely in glutamatergic neurons. MeCP2 deficiency in glutamatergic neurons leads to early lethality, obesity, tremor, altered anxiety-like behaviors, and impaired acoustic startle response, which is distinct from the phenotype of mice lacking MeCP2 only in inhibitory neurons. These findings reveal a role for excitatory signaling impairment in specific neurobehavioral abnormalities shared by RTT and other postnatal neurological disorders. PMID:27328325

  9. Par-4: A New Activator of Myosin Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Vetterkind, Susanne; Lee, Eunhee; Sundberg, Eric; Poythress, Ransom H.; Tao, Terence C.; Preuss, Ute

    2010-01-01

    Myosin phosphatase (MP) is a key regulator of myosin light chain (LC20) phosphorylation, a process essential for motility, apoptosis, and smooth muscle contractility. Although MP inhibition is well studied, little is known about MP activation. We have recently demonstrated that prostate apoptosis response (Par)-4 modulates vascular smooth muscle contractility. Here, we test the hypothesis that Par-4 regulates MP activity directly. We show, by proximity ligation assays, surface plasmon resonance and coimmunoprecipitation, that Par-4 interacts with the targeting subunit of MP, MYPT1. Binding is mediated by the leucine zippers of MYPT1 and Par-4 and reduced by Par-4 phosphorylation. Overexpression of Par-4 leads to increased phosphatase activity of immunoprecipitated MP, whereas small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous Par-4 significantly decreases MP activity and increases MYPT1 phosphorylation. LC20 phosphorylation assays demonstrate that overexpression of Par-4 reduces LC20 phosphorylation. In contrast, a phosphorylation site mutant, but not wild-type Par-4, interferes with zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK)-mediated MP inhibition. We conclude from our results Par-4 operates through a “padlock” model in which binding of Par-4 to MYPT1 activates MP by blocking access to the inhibitory phosphorylation sites, and inhibitory phosphorylation of MYPT1 by ZIPK requires “unlocking” of Par-4 by phosphorylation and displacement of Par-4 from the MP complex. PMID:20130087

  10. suPAR and Team Nephrology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) accounts for nearly 10 % of patients who require renal replacement therapy. Elevated circulating levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) have been identified as a biomarker to discriminate primary FSGS from other glomerulopathies. Subsequent reports have questioned the diagnostic utility of this test. In a study in BMC Medicine, Huang et al. demonstrate that urinary soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) excretion assists in distinguishing primary FSGS from other glomerular diseases, and that high plasma suPAR concentrations are not directly linked to a decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). This observation suggests that further investigation of suPAR is warranted in patients with FSGS. It should be interpreted in light of a recent report that B7-1 is expressed in the podocytes of a subset of patients with FSGS, and that blocking this molecule may represent the first successful targeted intervention for this disease. These advances highlight the rapid pace of scientific progress in the field of nephrology. Nephrologists should work together, share resources, and expedite the design of protocols to evaluate these novel biomarkers in a comprehensive and scientifically valid manner. Please see related article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/12/81. PMID:24885021

  11. suPAR and Team Nephrology.

    PubMed

    Trachtman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) accounts for nearly 10 % of patients who require renal replacement therapy. Elevated circulating levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) have been identified as a biomarker to discriminate primary FSGS from other glomerulopathies. Subsequent reports have questioned the diagnostic utility of this test. In a study in BMC Medicine, Huang et al. demonstrate that urinary soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) excretion assists in distinguishing primary FSGS from other glomerular diseases, and that high plasma suPAR concentrations are not directly linked to a decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). This observation suggests that further investigation of suPAR is warranted in patients with FSGS. It should be interpreted in light of a recent report that B7-1 is expressed in the podocytes of a subset of patients with FSGS, and that blocking this molecule may represent the first successful targeted intervention for this disease. These advances highlight the rapid pace of scientific progress in the field of nephrology. Nephrologists should work together, share resources, and expedite the design of protocols to evaluate these novel biomarkers in a comprehensive and scientifically valid manner. PMID:24885021

  12. Peptide-Based Optical uPAR Imaging for Surgery: In Vivo Testing of ICG-Glu-Glu-AE105

    PubMed Central

    Juhl, Karina; Christensen, Anders; Persson, Morten; Ploug, Michael; Kjaer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Near infrared intra-operative optical imaging is an emerging technique with clear implications for improved cancer surgery by enabling a more distinct delineation of the tumor margins during resection. This modality has the potential to increase the number of patients having a curative radical tumor resection. In the present study, a new uPAR-targeted fluorescent probe was developed and the in vivo applicability was evaluated in a human xenograft mouse model. Most human carcinomas express high level of uPAR in the tumor-stromal interface of invasive lesions and uPAR is therefore considered an ideal target for intra-operative imaging. Conjugation of the flourophor indocyanine green (ICG) to the uPAR agonist (AE105) provides an optical imaging ligand with sufficiently high receptor affinity to allow for a specific receptor targeting in vivo. For in vivo testing, human glioblastoma xenograft mice were subjected to optical imaging after i.v. injection of ICG-AE105, which provided an optimal contrast in the time window 6–24 h post injection. Specificity of the uPAR-targeting probe ICG-AE105 was demonstrated in vivo by 1) no uptake of unconjugated ICG after 15 hours, 2) inhibition of ICG-AE105 tumor uptake by a bolus injection of the natural uPAR ligand pro-uPA, and finally 3) the histological colocalization of ICG-AE105 fluorescence and immunohistochemical detected human uPAR on resected tumor slides. Taken together, our data supports the potential use of this probe for intra-operative optical guidance in cancer surgery to ensure complete removal of tumors while preserving adjacent, healthy tissue. PMID:26828431

  13. Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) acts via a novel Galpha13-dishevelled axis to stabilize beta-catenin levels.

    PubMed

    Turm, Hagit; Maoz, Myriam; Katz, Vered; Yin, Yong-Jun; Offermanns, Steffan; Bar-Shavit, Rachel

    2010-05-14

    We have previously shown a novel link between hPar-1 (human protease-activated receptor-1) and beta-catenin stabilization. Although it is well recognized that Wnt signaling leads to beta-catenin accumulation, the role of PAR1 in the process is unknown. We provide here evidence that PAR1 induces beta-catenin stabilization independent of Wnt, Fz (Frizzled), and the co-receptor LRP5/6 (low density lipoprotein-related protein 5/6) and identify selective mediators of the PAR1-beta-catenin axis. Immunohistological analyses of hPar1-transgenic (TG) mouse mammary tissues show the expression of both Galpha(12) and Galpha(13) compared with age-matched control counterparts. However, only Galpha(13) was found to be actively involved in PAR1-induced beta-catenin stabilization. Indeed, a dominant negative form of Galpha(13) inhibited both PAR1-induced Matrigel invasion and Lef/Tcf (lymphoid enhancer factor/T cell factor) transcription activity. PAR1-Galpha(13) association is followed by the recruitment of DVL (Dishevelled), an upstream Wnt signaling protein via the DIX domain. Small interfering RNA-Dvl silencing leads to a reduction in PAR1-induced Matrigel invasion, inhibition of Lef/Tcf transcription activity, and decreased beta-catenin accumulation. It is of note that PAR1 also promotes the binding of beta-arrestin-2 to DVL, suggesting a role for beta-arrestin-2 in PAR1-induced DVL phosphorylation dynamics. Although infection of small interfering RNA-LRP5/6 or the use of the Wnt antagonists, SFRP2 (soluble Frizzled-related protein 2) or SFRP5 potently reduced Wnt3A-mediated beta-catenin accumulation, no effect was observed on PAR1-induced beta-catenin stabilization. Collectively, our data show that PAR1 mediates beta-catenin stabilization independent of Wnt. We propose here a novel cascade of PAR1-induced Galpha(13)-DVL axis in cancer and beta-catenin stabilization. PMID:20223821

  14. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  15. View from east to west of PAR site storage building; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from east to west of PAR site storage building; formerly PAR dispensary - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Storage Building, Across street from Family Housing Units 110 & 111, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  16. View from west to east of PAR site resident engineer's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from west to east of PAR site resident engineer's office building (REOB) - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Resident Engineers Office Building, Southeast of intersection of PAR Access Road & Fourth Avenue, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  17. Suppression of ischaemia-induced injuries in rat brain by protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) activating peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Xia; Ng, Ethel Sau Kuen; Lam, Francis Fu Yuen

    2016-09-01

    Ischaemic stroke has become one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. The role of protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) in this disease is uncertain. In the present study, the actions of a protease activated receptor-1 activating peptide (PAR-1 AP) SFLLRN-NH2 were investigated in an in vivo rat model of ischaemic stroke induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and in an in vitro model induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in primary cultured rat embryonic cortical neurones. Rats subjected to MCAO exhibited increased brain infarct volume, oedema, and neurological deficit. Rat cortical neurones subjected to OGD showed increased lactate dehydrogenase, caspase-3 activity and TUNEL positive cells, whereas, mitochondrial membrane potential and cell viability were decreased. Furthermore, both models had elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, nitrite, and malondialdehyde, while anti-oxidant enzymes and bcl-2/bax ratio were decreased. These detrimental changes were suppressed by SFLLRN-NH2, and its protective actions were inhibited by a PAR-1 antagonist (BMS-200261). In summary, SFLLRN-NH2 was found to possess anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic properties, and it produced marked inhibition on the detrimental effects of ischaemia in in vivo and in vitro models of ischaemic stroke. The present findings suggest PAR-1 is a promising target for development of novel treatments of ischaemic brain disease. PMID:27238976

  18. A Combined Global and Local Approach to Elucidate Spatial Organization of the Mycobacterial ParB-parS Partition Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    B Chaudhuri; S Gupta; V Urban; M Chance; R DMello; L Smith; K Lyons; J Gee

    2011-12-31

    Combining diverse sets of data at global (size, shape) and local (residue) scales is an emerging trend for elucidating the organization and function of the cellular assemblies. We used such a strategy, combining data from X-ray and neutron scattering with H/D-contrast variation and X-ray footprinting with mass spectrometry, to elucidate the spatial organization of the ParB-parS assembly from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The ParB-parS participates in plasmid and chromosome segregation and condensation in predivisional bacterial cells. ParB polymerizes around the parS centromere(s) to form a higher-order assembly that serves to recruit cyto-skeletal ParA ATPases and SMC proteins for chromosome segregation. A hybrid model of the ParB-parS was built by combining and correlating computational models with experiment-derived information about size, shape, position of the symmetry axis within the shape, internal topology, DNA-protein interface, exposed surface patches, and prior knowledge. This first view of the ParB-parS leads us to propose how ParB spread on the chromosome to form a larger assembly.

  19. A Combined Global and Local Approach to Elucidate Spatial Organization of the Mycobacterial ParB-parS Partition

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, Barnali; Gupta, Sayan; Urban, Volker S; Chance, Mark; D'Mello, Rhijuta; Smith, Lauren; Lyons, Kelly; Gee, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Combining diverse sets of data at global (size, shape) and local (residue) scales is an emerging trend for elucidating the organization and function of the cellular assemblies. We used such a strategy, combining data from X-ray and neutron scattering with H/D-contrast variation and X-ray footprinting with mass spectrometry, to elucidate the spatial organization of the ParB-parS assembly from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The ParB-parS participates in plasmid and chromosome segregation and condensation in predivisional bacterial cells. ParB polymerizes around the parS centromere(s) to form a higher-order assembly that serves to recruit cyto-skeletal ParA ATPases and SMC proteins for chromosome segregation. A hybrid model of the ParB-parS was built by combining and correlating computational models with experiment-derived information about size, shape, position of the symmetry axis within the shape, internal topology, DNA-protein interface, exposed surface patches, and prior knowledge. This first view of the ParB-parS leads us to propose how ParB spread on the chromosome to form a larger assembly.

  20. Building a Brainier Mouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsien, Joe Z.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a genetic engineering project to build an intelligent mouse. Cites understanding the molecular basis of learning and memory as a very important step. Concludes that while science will never create a genius mouse that plays the stock market, it can turn a mouse into a quick learner with a better memory. (YDS)

  1. Headache meets neurology and psychiatry: a framework for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nasrean; McMinn, Bethan; Hartley, Louise

    2016-08-01

    This is a case of a very rare progressive disorder which presented with unusual neurological symptoms. Significant diagnostic challenges were experienced. A structured approach to each stage of the case demonstrates a framework to use when considering children with unusual neurological presentations. PMID:27225011

  2. Neurology Manpower--A Survey. NINCDS Monograph No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Neurological Association, Miami, FL.

    The three-year neurology manpower study reported here was directed toward (1) identifying the presently available neurological manpower and the demographic and professional characteristics of neurologists and neurologists-in-training in the United States as of 1971; (2) determining the current and emerging patterns for utilizing neurological…

  3. The Dubowitz Neurological Examination of the Full-Term Newborn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubowitz, Lilly; Ricciw, Daniela; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2005-01-01

    In an ideal world, each neonate should have a comprehensive neurological examination but in practice this is often difficult. In this review we will describe what a routine neurological evaluation in the full-term neonate should consist of and how the Dubowitz examination is performed. The examination has been used for over 20 years and can be…

  4. Etiology of Attention Disorders: A Neurological/Genetic Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grantham, Madeline Kay

    This paper explores the historical origins of attention deficit disorder/attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) as a neurological disorder, current neurological and genetic research concerning the etiology of ADD/ADHD, and implications for diagnosis and treatment. First, ADD/ADHD is defined and then the origins of ADD/ADHD as a…

  5. [Actual state and problems in neurology training at graduate school].

    PubMed

    Kira, Jun-ichi; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Taniwaki, Takayuki; Inuzuka, Takashi; Yoshii, Fumihito; Aoki, Masashi; Amano, Takahiro; Toyoshima, Itaru; Fukutake, Toshio; Hashimoto, Yoichiro

    2014-01-01

    To understand the status of postgraduate education in neurology in Japan, the Committee for the Education of Undergraduate Students and Junior Residents within the Japanese Society of Neurology investigated the four-year trend at 80 medical schools from 2009 to 2012. The mean number of new students to each postgraduate school increased from 1.24 to 1.67 during these four years. After training clinical neurology, more than half of the neurological residents entered the postgraduate schools. Students in the postgraduate schools seemed to be researching major neurological diseases using various methods at each neurology laboratory. However, some problems were suggested. First, the mean number of newcomers to the neurology departments of the universities decreased gradually from 2.29/year to 1.96/year. Second, many of the postgraduate students were working in patient services at university hospitals or as part-time workers at other hospitals, and may not have sufficient time for their research projects. Third, many of the postgraduate students were carrying out research at each affiliated department of neurology, and may not have the opportunity to work in laboratories specializing in basic science. Finally, there may not be sufficient opportunities for further research at other laboratories in Japan or overseas after they finished their work at postgraduate school. PMID:24807282

  6. Neurology in Federico Fellini?s work and life.

    PubMed

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Caramelli, Paulo; Cardoso, Francisco Eduardo Costa

    2014-09-01

    The authors present a historical review of the neurological diseases related to the famous moviemaker Federico Fellini. There is an account of diseases depicted on his movies as well as his ischemic stroke and consequent neurological deficit - left spatial neglect. PMID:25252239

  7. A Study of Peer Tutors Using the Neurological Impress Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Elizabeth A.

    A study investigated the efficacy of using the neurological impress method in peer tutoring during reading instruction. The neurological impress reading method is a unison reading procedure in which the student and teacher or tutor read aloud simultaneously and quickly, with the student placed slightly in front of the teacher so that the teacher's…

  8. Handwriting, Visuomotor Integration, and Neurological Condition at School Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hoorn, Jessika F.; Maathuis, Carel G. B.; Peters, Lieke H. J.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The study investigated the relationships between handwriting, visuomotor integration, and neurological condition. We paid particular attention to the presence of minor neurological dysfunction (MND). Method : Participants were 200 children (131 males, 69 females; age range 8-13y) of whom 118 received mainstream education (mean age 10y 5mo, SD…

  9. Teaching Clinical Neurology with the PLATO IV Computer System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Alan; Trynda, Richard

    1975-01-01

    A "Neurox" program entitled "Canine Neurological Diagnosis" developed at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine enables a student to obtain the results of 78 possible neurological tests or associated questions on a single case. A lesson and possible adaptations are described. (LBH)

  10. Marrow hypoplasia associated with congenital neurologic anomalies in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Drachtman, R; Weinblatt, M; Sitarz, A; Gold, A; Kochen, J

    1990-10-01

    Two siblings with congenital neurologic structural anomalies and delayed-onset selective bone marrow hypoplasia in a previously undescribed constellation of symptoms are presented. Differences between these cases and other well known syndromes are discussed. The importance of this association is the implication that children with congenital neurologic abnormalities may be at increased risk for the development of hypoplastic hematopoietic conditions. PMID:2264478

  11. Mesencephalic origin of the rostral Substantia nigra pars reticulata.

    PubMed

    Madrigal, M Pilar; Moreno-Bravo, Juan A; Martínez-López, Jesús E; Martínez, Salvador; Puelles, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    In embryonic development, the neurons that will constitute a heterogeneous nucleus may have distinct origins. The different components of these populations reach their final location by radial and tangential migrations. The Substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNR) presents a high level of neuronal heterogeneity. It is composed by GABAergic neurons located in the mes-diencephalic basal plate. These inhibitory neurons usually display tangential migrations and it has been already described that the caudal SNR is colonized tangentially from rhombomere 1. Our aim is to unveil the origin of the rostral SNR. We have localized a Nkx6.2 positive ventricular domain located in the alar midbrain. Nkx6.2 derivatives' fate map analysis showed mainly a rostral colonization of this GABAergic neuronal population. We confirmed the mesencephalic origin by the expression of Six3. Both transcription factors are sequentially expressed along the differentiation of these neurons. We demonstrated the origin of the rostral SNR; our data allowed us to postulate that this nucleus is composed by two neuronal populations distributed in opposite gradients with different origins, one from rhombomere 1, caudal to rostral, and the other from the midbrain, rostral to caudal. We can conclude that the SNR has multiple origins and follows complex mechanisms of specification and migration. Our results support vital information for the study of genetic modifications in these extremely complex processes that result in devastating behavioral alterations and predisposition to psychiatric diseases. Understanding the development, molecular identity and functional characteristics of these diverse neuronal populations might lead to better diagnosis and treatment of several forms of neurological and psychiatric disease. PMID:25579066

  12. Neurologic Manifestations of Chronic Methamphetamine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Rusyniak, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    COMMENTARY ON METHAMPHETAMINE ABUSE FOR PSYCHIATRIC PRACTICE Every decade seems to have its own unique drug problem. The 1970s had hallucinogens, the 1980s had crack cocaine, the 1990s had designer drugs, the 2000s had methamphetamine (Meth), and in the 2010s we are dealing with the scourge of prescription drug abuse. While each of these drug epidemics has distinctive problems and history, the one with perhaps the greatest impact on the practice of Psychiatry is Meth. By increasing the extracellular concentrations of dopamine while slowly damaging the dopaminergic neurotransmission, Meth is a powerfully addictive drug whose chronic use preferentially causes psychiatric complications. Chronic Meth users have deficits in memory and executive functioning as well as higher rates of anxiety, depression, and most notably psychosis. It is because of addiction and chronic psychosis from Meth abuse that the Meth user is most likely to come to the attention of the practicing Psychiatrist/Psychologist. Understanding the chronic neurologic manifestations of Meth abuse will better arm practitioners with the diagnostic and therapeutic tools needed to make the Meth epidemic one of historical interest only. PMID:23688691

  13. Type I interferon dysregulation and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    McGlasson, Sarah; Jury, Alexa; Jackson, Andrew; Hunt, David

    2015-09-01

    Type I interferon is an essential component of the brain's innate immune defence, conferring protection against viral infection. Recently, dysregulation of the type I interferon pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a spectrum of neuroinfectious and neuroinflammatory disorders. Underactivity of the type I interferon response is associated with a predisposition to herpes simplex encephalitis. Conversely, a group of 'interferonopathic' disorders, characterized by severe neuroinflammation and overactivity of type I interferon, has been described. Elucidation of the genetic basis of these Mendelian neuroinflammatory diseases has uncovered important links between nucleic acid sensors, innate immune activation and neuroinflammatory disease. These mechanisms have an important role in the pathogenesis of more common polygenic diseases that can affect the brain, such as lupus and cerebral small vessel disease. In this article, we review the spectrum of neurological disease associated with type I interferon dysregulation, as well as advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of these conditions. We highlight the potential utility of type I interferon as both a biomarker and a therapeutic target in neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:26303851

  14. Compensation for occupational neurological and mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dong-Mug; Kim, Inah

    2014-06-01

    Standards for the recognition of occupational diseases (ODs) in Korea were established in 1954 and have been amended several times. In 2013, there was a significant change in these standards. On the basis of scientific evidence and causality, the International Labour Organization list, European Commission schedule, and compensated cases in Korea were reviewed to revise the previous standards for the recognition of ODs in Korea. A disease-based approach using the International Classification of Diseases (10th version) was added on the previous standards, which were agent-specific approaches. The amended compensable occupational neurological disorders and occupational mental disorders (OMDs) in Korea are acute and chronic central nervous system (CNS) disorders, toxic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, manganese-related disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Several agents including trichloroethylene (TCE), benzene, vinyl chloride, organotin, methyl bromide, and carbon monoxide (CO) were newly included as acute CNS disorders. TCE, lead, and mercury were newly included as chronic CNS disorders. Mercury, TCE, methyl n-butyl ketone, acrylamide, and arsenic were newly included in peripheral neuropathy. Post-traumatic stress disorders were newly included as the first OMD. This amendment makes the standard more comprehensive and practical. However, this amendment does not perfectly reflect the recent scientific progress and social concerns. Ongoing effort, research, and expert consensus are needed to improve the standard. PMID:25006326

  15. Fatigue and fatigability in neurologic illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Krupp, Lauren B.; Enoka, Roger M.

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is commonly reported in many neurologic illnesses, including multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, myasthenia gravis, traumatic brain injury, and stroke. Fatigue contributes substantially to decrements in quality of life and disability in these illnesses. Despite the clear impact of fatigue as a disabling symptom, our understanding of fatigue pathophysiology is limited and current treatment options rarely lead to meaningful improvements in fatigue. Progress continues to be hampered by issues related to terminology and assessment. In this article, we propose a unified taxonomy and a novel assessment approach to addressing distinct aspects of fatigue and fatigability in clinical and research settings. This taxonomy is based on our current knowledge of the pathophysiology and phenomenology of fatigue and fatigability. Application of our approach indicates that the assessment and reporting of fatigue can be clarified and improved by utilizing this taxonomy and creating measures to address distinct aspects of fatigue and fatigability. We review the strengths and weaknesses of several common measures of fatigue and suggest, based on our model, that many research questions may be better addressed by using multiple measures. We also provide examples of how to apply and validate the taxonomy and suggest directions for future research. PMID:23339207

  16. [Specialized neurological neurosurgical intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Kuramatsu, J B; Huttner, H B; Schwab, S

    2016-06-01

    In Germany dedicated neurological-neurosurgical critical care (NCC) is the fastest growing specialty and one of the five big disciplines integrated within the German critical care society (Deutsche Interdisziplinäre Vereinigung für Intensiv- und Notfallmedizin; DIVI). High-quality investigations based on resilient evidence have underlined the need for technical advances, timely optimization of therapeutic procedures, and multidisciplinary team-work to treat those critically ill patients. This evolution has repeatedly raised questions, whether NCC-units should be run independently or better be incorporated within multidisciplinary critical care units, whether treatment variations exist that impact clinical outcome, and whether nowadays NCC-units can operate cost-efficiently? Stroke is the most frequent disease entity treated on NCC-units, one of the most common causes of death in Germany leading to a great socio-economic burden due to long-term disabled patients. The main aim of NCC employs surveillance of structural and functional integrity of the central nervous system as well as the avoidance of secondary brain damage. However, clinical evaluation of these severely injured commonly sedated and mechanically ventilated patients is challenging and highlights the importance of neuromonitoring to detect secondary damaging mechanisms. This multimodal strategy not only requires medical expertise but also enforces the need for specialized teams consisting of qualified nurses, technical assistants and medical therapists. The present article reviews most recent data and tries to answer the aforementioned questions. PMID:27206707

  17. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gano, Lindsey B.; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M.

    2014-01-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation. The high-fat/low-carbohydrate “classic KD”, as well as dietary variations such as the medium-chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins diet, the low-glycemic index treatment, and caloric restriction, enhance cellular metabolic and mitochondrial function. Hence, the broad neuroprotective properties of such therapies may stem from improved cellular metabolism. Data from clinical and preclinical studies indicate that these diets restrict glycolysis and increase fatty acid oxidation, actions which result in ketosis, replenishment of the TCA cycle (i.e., anaplerosis), restoration of neurotransmitter and ion channel function, and enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Further, there is mounting evidence that the KD and its variants can impact key signaling pathways that evolved to sense the energetic state of the cell, and that help maintain cellular homeostasis. These pathways, which include PPARs, AMP-activated kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and the sirtuins, have all been recently implicated in the neuroprotective effects of the KD. Further research in this area may lead to future therapeutic strategies aimed at mimicking the pleiotropic neuroprotective effects of the KD. PMID:24847102

  18. Speech and neurology-chemical impairment correlates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayre, Harb S.

    2002-05-01

    Speech correlates of alcohol/drug impairment and its neurological basis is presented with suggestion for further research in impairment from poly drug/medicine/inhalent/chew use/abuse, and prediagnosis of many neuro- and endocrin-related disorders. Nerve cells all over the body detect chemical entry by smoking, injection, drinking, chewing, or skin absorption, and transmit neurosignals to their corresponding cerebral subsystems, which in turn affect speech centers-Broca's and Wernick's area, and motor cortex. For instance, gustatory cells in the mouth, cranial and spinal nerve cells in the skin, and cilia/olfactory neurons in the nose are the intake sensing nerve cells. Alcohol depression, and brain cell damage were detected from telephone speech using IMPAIRLYZER-TM, and the results of these studies were presented at 1996 ASA meeting in Indianapolis, and 2001 German Acoustical Society-DEGA conference in Hamburg, Germany respectively. Speech based chemical Impairment measure results were presented at the 2001 meeting of ASA in Chicago. New data on neurotolerance based chemical impairment for alcohol, drugs, and medicine shall be presented, and shown not to fully support NIDA-SAMSHA drug and alcohol threshold used in drug testing domain.

  19. Development of an oximeter for neurology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleinik, A.; Serikbekova, Z.; Zhukova, N.; Zhukova, I.; Nikitina, M.

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral desaturation can occur during surgery manipulation, whereas other parameters vary insignificantly. Prolonged intervals of cerebral anoxia can cause serious damage to the nervous system. Commonly used method for measurement of cerebral blood flow uses invasive catheters. Other techniques include single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Tomographic methods frequently use isotope administration, that may result in anaphylactic reactions to contrast media and associated nerve diseases. Moreover, the high cost and the need for continuous monitoring make it difficult to apply these techniques in clinical practice. Cerebral oximetry is a method for measuring oxygen saturation using infrared spectrometry. Moreover reflection pulse oximetry can detect sudden changes in sympathetic tone. For this purpose the reflectance pulse oximeter for use in neurology is developed. Reflectance oximeter has a definite advantage as it can be used to measure oxygen saturation in any part of the body. Preliminary results indicate that the device has a good resolution and high reliability. Modern applied schematics have improved device characteristics compared with existing ones.

  20. The status of telerehabilitation in neurological applications.

    PubMed

    Hailey, David; Roine, Risto; Ohinmaa, Arto; Dennett, Liz

    2013-09-01

    We systematically reviewed the evidence for the effectiveness of tele-neurorehabilitation (TNR) applications. The review included recent reports on rehabilitation for any disability associated with a neurological deficit or condition. Study quality was assessed using an approach that considered both study performance and study design. Judgements were made on whether each application had been successful, and whether further data were needed to establish the application as suitable for routine use. Nineteen credible studies that reported patient outcomes or administrative changes were identified. These studies related to 13 conditions. The focus of rehabilitation included Internet-supported treatments for management of fatigue, pain and depression; promotion of physical activity; and speech therapy. Sixteen studies were of high or good quality and three were fair to good, with some limitations. In 13 of the 19 studies the TNR application was successful in providing at least equivalent outcomes to conventional approaches. Additional work would be needed on eight applications to establish suitability for routine use, and would be desirable in five. Thus the recent literature provides further support for TNR applications, showing the promise of this field in a number of areas. However, the database of credible studies remains small. PMID:24163293

  1. Control of Abnormal Synchronization in Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Tass, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    In the nervous system, synchronization processes play an important role, e.g., in the context of information processing and motor control. However, pathological, excessive synchronization may strongly impair brain function and is a hallmark of several neurological disorders. This focused review addresses the question of how an abnormal neuronal synchronization can specifically be counteracted by invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation as, for instance, by deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, or by acoustic stimulation for the treatment of tinnitus. On the example of coordinated reset (CR) neuromodulation, we illustrate how insights into the dynamics of complex systems contribute to successful model-based approaches, which use methods from synergetics, non-linear dynamics, and statistical physics, for the development of novel therapies for normalization of brain function and synaptic connectivity. Based on the intrinsic multistability of the neuronal populations induced by spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), CR neuromodulation utilizes the mutual interdependence between synaptic connectivity and dynamics of the neuronal networks in order to restore more physiological patterns of connectivity via desynchronization of neuronal activity. The very goal is to shift the neuronal population by stimulation from an abnormally coupled and synchronized state to a desynchronized regime with normalized synaptic connectivity, which significantly outlasts the stimulation cessation, so that long-lasting therapeutic effects can be achieved. PMID:25566174

  2. Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gano, Lindsey B; Patel, Manisha; Rho, Jong M

    2014-11-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is a broad-spectrum therapy for medically intractable epilepsy and is receiving growing attention as a potential treatment for neurological disorders arising in part from bioenergetic dysregulation. The high-fat/low-carbohydrate "classic KD", as well as dietary variations such as the medium-chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins diet, the low-glycemic index treatment, and caloric restriction, enhance cellular metabolic and mitochondrial function. Hence, the broad neuroprotective properties of such therapies may stem from improved cellular metabolism. Data from clinical and preclinical studies indicate that these diets restrict glycolysis and increase fatty acid oxidation, actions which result in ketosis, replenishment of the TCA cycle (i.e., anaplerosis), restoration of neurotransmitter and ion channel function, and enhanced mitochondrial respiration. Further, there is mounting evidence that the KD and its variants can impact key signaling pathways that evolved to sense the energetic state of the cell, and that help maintain cellular homeostasis. These pathways, which include PPARs, AMP-activated kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, and the sirtuins, have all been recently implicated in the neuroprotective effects of the KD. Further research in this area may lead to future therapeutic strategies aimed at mimicking the pleiotropic neuroprotective effects of the KD. PMID:24847102

  3. [Facial and eye pain - Neurological differential diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Kastrup, O; Diener, H-C; Gaul, C

    2011-12-01

    Head and facial pain are common in neurological practice and the pain often arises in the orbit or is referred into the eye. This is due to the autonomic innervation of the eye and orbit. There are acute and chronic pain syndromes. This review gives an overview of the differential diagnosis and treatment. Idiopathic headache syndromes, such as migraine and cluster headache are the most frequent and are often debilitating conditions. Trigemino-autonomic cephalalgias (SUNCT and SUNA) have to be taken into account, as well as trigeminal neuralgia. Trigemino-autonomic headache after eye operations can be puzzling and often responds well to triptans. Every new facial pain not fitting these categories must be considered symptomatic and a thorough investigation is mandatory including magnetic resonance imaging. Infiltrative and neoplastic conditions frequently lead to orbital pain. As a differential diagnosis Tolosa-Hunt syndrome and Raeder syndrome are inflammatory conditions sometimes mimicking neoplasms. Infections, such as herpes zoster ophthalmicus are extremely painful and require rapid therapy. It is important to consider carotid artery dissection as a cause for acute eye and neck pain in conjunction with Horner's syndrome and bear in mind that vascular oculomotor palsy is often painful. All of the above named conditions should be diagnosed by a neurologist with special experience in pain syndromes and many require an interdisciplinary approach. PMID:22130681

  4. The clinical maze of mitochondrial neurology

    PubMed Central

    DiMauro, Salvatore; Schon, Eric A.; Carelli, Valerio; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases involve the respiratory chain, which is under the dual control of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The complexity of mitochondrial genetics provides one explanation for the clinical heterogeneity of mitochondrial diseases, but our understanding of disease pathogenesis remains limited. Classification of Mendelian mitochondrial encephalomyopathies has been laborious, but whole-exome sequencing studies have revealed unexpected molecular aetiologies for both typical and atypical mitochondrial disease phenotypes. Mendelian mitochondrial defects can affect five components of mitochondrial biology: subunits of respiratory chain complexes (direct hits); mitochondrial assembly proteins; mtDNA translation; phospholipid composition of the inner mitochondrial membrane; or mitochondrial dynamics. A sixth category—defects of mtDNA maintenance—combines features of Mendelian and mitochondrial genetics. Genetic defects in mitochondrial dynamics are especially important in neurology as they cause optic atrophy, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. Therapy is inadequate and mostly palliative, but promising new avenues are being identified. Here, we review current knowledge on the genetics and pathogenesis of the six categories of mitochondrial disorders outlined above, focusing on their salient clinical manifestations and highlighting novel clinical entities. An outline of diagnostic clues for the various forms of mitochondrial disease, as well as potential therapeutic strategies, is also discussed. PMID:23835535

  5. Hyperhomocysteinemia and Neurologic Disorders: a Review

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Ramin; Mallack, Eric; Luo, Jin Jun

    2014-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a sulfur-containing amino acid that is generated during methionine metabolism. It has a physiologic role in DNA metabolism via methylation, a process governed by the presentation of folate, and vitamins B6 and B12. Physiologic Hcy levels are determined primarily by dietary intake and vitamin status. Elevated plasma levels of Hcy (eHcy) can be caused by deficiency of either vitamin B12 or folate, or a combination thereof. Certain genetic factors also cause eHcy, such as C667T substitution of the gene encoding methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. eHcy has been observed in several medical conditions, such as cardiovascular disorders, atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, stroke, minimal cognitive impairment, dementia, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and eclampsia. There is evidence from laboratory and clinical studies that Hcy, and especially eHcy, exerts direct toxic effects on both the vascular and nervous systems. This article provides a review of the current literature on the possible roles of eHcy relevant to various neurologic disorders. PMID:25324876

  6. Chronic hyperammonemia, glutamatergic neurotransmission and neurological alterations.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Montoliu, Carmina; Cauli, Omar; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Agustí, Ana; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Giménez-Garzó, Carla; González-Usano, Alba; Felipo, Vicente

    2013-06-01

    This mini-review focus on our studies on alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission and their role in neurological alterations in rat models of chronic hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Hyperammonemia impairs the glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway in cerebellum, which is responsible for reduced learning ability. We studied the underlying mechanisms and designed treatments to restore the pathway and learning. This was achieved by treatment with: phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, cGMP, anti-inflammatories (ibuprofen), p38 inhibitors or GABAA receptor antagonists (bicuculline). Hyperammonemia alters signal transduction associated to metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Hypokinesia in hyperammonemia and HE is due to increased extracellular glutamate and mGluR1 activation in substantia nigra; blocking this receptor restores motor activity. The motor responses to mGluRs activation in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) are altered in hyperammonemia and HE, with reduced dopamine and increased glutamate release. This leads to activation of different neuronal circuits and enhanced motor responses. These studies show that altered responses to activation of NMDA receptors and mGluRs play essential roles in cognitive and motor alterations in hyperammonemia and HE and provide new treatments restoring cognitive and motor function. PMID:23010935

  7. Wilson's disease and other neurological copper disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Bandmann, Oliver; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Kaler, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classic copper metabolism disorder, Wilson disease (WD), was first defined in 1912. Both early onset presentations in infancy and late onset manifestations in adults > 70 years are now well recognized. Modern biochemical and genetic prevalence studies suggest that WD may be considerably more common than previously appreciated. Early diagnosis of WD is crucial to ensure that patients can be started on adequate treatment but uncertainty remains about the best possible choice of medication. Direct genetic testing for ATP7B mutations is increasingly available to confirm the clinical diagnosis of WD. WD needs to be differentiated from other conditions that present clinically with hepatolenticular degeneration or share biochemical abnormalities with WD, such as reduced serum cerulo plasmin levels. Disordered copper metabolism is also implied in an increasing number of other neurological conditions, including a subtype of axonal neuropathy due to ATP7A mutations, and the common late-onset neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25496901

  8. Little Albert: A neurologically impaired child.

    PubMed

    Fridlund, Alan J; Beck, Hall P; Goldie, William D; Irons, Gary

    2012-11-01

    Evidence collected by Beck, Levinson, and Irons (2009) indicates that Albert B., the "lost" infant subject of John B. Watson and Rosalie Rayner's (1920) famous conditioning study, was Douglas Merritte (1919-1925). Following the finding that Merritte died early with hydrocephalus, questions arose as to whether Douglas's condition was congenital, rather than acquired in 1922, as cited on his death certificate. This etiology would imply that "Little Albert" was not the "healthy" and "normal" infant described by Watson and numerous secondary sources. Detailed analyses of Watson's (1923) film footage of Albert suggested substantial behavioral and neurological deficits. The anomalies we observed on film of Albert B. are insufficiently explained by his hospital upbringing but are consistent with findings from newly discovered medical records of Douglas Merritte. These documents revealed that the infant suffered from congenital obstructive hydrocephalus, iatrogenic streptococcal meningitis/ventriculitis, and retinal and optic nerve atrophy. The medical history also indicates that Albert's sessions with Watson occurred during periods when Douglas's clinical course was relatively stable. Further inquiries found ample sources of information available to Watson that would have made him aware of Douglas/Albert's medical condition at the times he tested the baby. Experimental ethics, Watson's legacy, and the Albert study are discussed in light of these new findings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:23397921

  9. Thal fundoplication in neurologically impaired children.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V; Ashcraft, K W; Sharp, R J; Murphy, P J; Snyder, C L; Gittes, G K; Bickler, S W

    1996-06-01

    Children with neurological impairment (NI) frequently require feeding gastrostomy, and this often aggravates or produces gastroesophageal reflux (GER). From 1976 to 1994, 141 children with severe NI underwent Thal fundoplication and gastrostomy (GT). GER was evident in 80%; in the rest, fundoplication was an adjunct to GT. Ph results were positive in 38 cases, and 57 children had reflux according to the barium studies. There were no major intraoperative complications. Disruption of the repair and/or recurrent GER was noted in 14 cases (10%); 8 were redone as Thals, and 6 were converted to Nissen procedures. Pyloroplasty was done later in 9 children (6%). Bowel obstruction was seen in 4 patients (3%). Clinical follow-up (mean, 54 months) showed improvement in 96%; only 5 of the 141 (3.2%) have residual symptoms. Of the patients with an intact Thal, 67% could burp or vomit. The ability to vomit may protect the Thal fundoplication and avoid disruption of the repair. PMID:8783112

  10. Acute and critical care in neurology.

    PubMed

    Bertram, M; Schwarz, S; Hacke, W

    1997-01-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic management of selected neurological diseases requiring intensive treatment is summarized with special regard for current standards and new developments in therapy. Ischemic stroke is an emergency since the outcome can be improved by immediate and adequate general supporting as well as specific (thrombolytic) therapy in specialized stroke units. Surgical evacuation of supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage is still controversial. We give an overview of conditions in which surgical therapy such as cerebellar hemorrhage and large, nondominant ganglionic hemorrhage might be advisable. Cerebral venous thrombosis is treated with full-dose intravenous heparin even if hemorrhage is present. In acute bacterial meningitis, early treatment of foci and empiric antibiotic therapy is crucial in order to prevent complications. The outcome of herpes simplex encephalitis can be favorably influenced by treatment with aciclovir and aggressive therapy of elevated ICP and seizures. Acute Guillain-Barré syndrome requires daily monitoring of vital functions in order to recognize the need for intensive care; intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis are equally recommended for clinical and financial reasons. PMID:9363827

  11. [Neurologic disorders in acute dichloroethane poisoning].

    PubMed

    Akimov, G A; Buchko, V M; Kolesnichenko, I P

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with a study of the nervous system in 121 patients with acute poisening with dichlorethane. Among the studied contingent there were 110 males and 11 females. According to the severity of the intoxication the patients were divided into 3 groups: mild--23 cases, moderate--11 cases, severe--87 cases. The following 6 neurological syndromes were distinguished: comatose, convulsive, atactic, extrapyramidal, psychotic and asthenic with vegetative-vascular insufficiency. Morphological studies detected the following: congestion plethora, vascular dystonia, microfoci hemorrhages, acute swelling of the nervous cells with signs of chromatolyses, shrunk cells, severe and ischemic change of the nervous cells. The treatment consisted in an accelerated elimination of dichlorethane from the organism and symptomatic therapy. The results of these studies demonstrated that in poisoning with dichlorethane there were diffuse, mainly dystrophic changes in the cells of the brain and spinal cord, which clinically may be expressed by symptoms of a lesion of many systems and may be qualified as toxic encephalomyelopathy. PMID:665065

  12. Neurology of widely embedded free will.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Bauke M

    2011-01-01

    Free will is classically attributed to the prefrontal cortex. In clinical neurology, prefrontal lesions have consistently been shown to cause impairment of internally driven action and increased reflex-like behaviour. Recently, parietal contributions to both free selection at early stages of sensorimotor transformations and perception of specifically self-intended movements were demonstrated in the healthy brain. Such findings generated the concept that 'free will' is not a function restricted to the prefrontal cortex but is more widely embedded in the brain, indeed including the parietal cortex. In this paper, a systematic re-interpretation of parietal symptoms, such as apraxia and reduced sense of agency, is given with reference to the consequences of reduced freedom of selection at early stages of sensorimotor transformation. Failed selection between possible movement options is argued to represent an intrinsic characteristic of apraxia. Paradoxical response facilitation supports this view. Perception of self-intended movement corresponds with a sense of agency. Impaired parietal distinction between predicted and perceived movement sensations may thus equal a restricted repertoire for selection between possible movement options of which intention is attributed to either oneself, others or an alien hand. Sense of agency, and thus perception of free will, logically fits a model of the parietal cortex as a neuronal interface between the internal drive to reach a goal and a body scheme required to select possible effectors for motor preparation. PMID:21752362

  13. Syringomyelia: a neurological and surgical spectrum.

    PubMed

    Gamache, F W; Ducker, T B

    1990-12-01

    Because of the variation in the natural history, anatomy, surgical treatment, and follow-up periods reported to date, very few firm conclusions can be drawn regarding syringomyelia. With the advent of magnetic resonance scanning, cases of syringomyelia are being detected earlier and a better understanding of the disease has been facilitated. The authors report their personal experiences with 21 patients followed for 5-20 years. No single surgical procedure appears to predictably remedy any syrinx for more than a brief period of several years. Complete collapse of the syrinx does not eradicate all symptoms. Direct treatment of the syrinx makes intuitive sense for those syrinxes that do not communicate with the fourth ventricle. On the other hand, for syrinxes that are likely to communicate with the fourth ventricle, shunting of the ventricular system, particularly where ventriculomegaly exists (i.e., any degree of radiographic evidence of ventricular enlargement), should be considered initially. Procedures such as posterior fossa decompression may be necessary as dictated by the neurological condition of the patient. In the authors' experience, shunting procedures provided better improvement, with longer duration of improvement than with posterior fossa decompression. The timing and surgical details of posterior fossa decompression remain to be elucidated. PMID:2134442

  14. Demonology, neurology, and medicine in Edwardian Britain.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Rhodri

    2004-01-01

    The idea of a conflict between demonology and psychiatry has been a foundational myth in the history of medicine. Nineteenth-century alienists such as J.-M. Charcot and Henry Maudsley developed critiques of supernatural phenomena in an attempt to pathologize religious experience. Modern historians have reanalyzed these critiques, representing them as strategies in medical professionalization. These accounts all maintain an oddly bifurcated approach to the perceived conflict, treating demonology, as a passive and unchanging set of practices, while medicine is depicted as an active and aggressive agent. An examination of early twentieth-century demonological literature reveals a very different story. Fundamentalists and Pentecostalists engaged with the problems of conversion and possession, developing sophisticated models of the normal and the pathological in spiritual experience. Their writings drew upon medical and psychiatric sources ranging widely from Pastorian germ theory to Jacksonian neurology. This article explores the points of contact between the medical and demonological communities in order to demonstrate the contested nature of biomedical innovation. PMID:15161086

  15. Neurologic Disorders in Immunocompetent Patients with Autochthonous Acute Hepatitis E

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, H. Blasco; Cintas, P.; Abravanel, F.; Gérolami, R.; d'Alteroche, L.; Raynal, J.-N.; Alric, L.; Dupuis, E.; Prudhomme, L.; Vaucher, E.; Couzigou, P.; Liversain, J.-M.; Bureau, C.; Vinel, J.-P.; Kamar, N.; Izopet, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic disorders, mainly Guillain-Barré syndrome and Parsonage–Turner syndrome (PTS), have been described in patients with hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in industrialized and developing countries. We report a wider range of neurologic disorders in nonimmunocompromised patients with acute HEV infection. Data from 15 French immunocompetent patients with acute HEV infection and neurologic disorders were retrospectively recorded from January 2006 through June 2013. The disorders could be divided into 4 main entities: mononeuritis multiplex, PTS, meningoradiculitis, and acute demyelinating neuropathy. HEV infection was treated with ribavirin in 3 patients (for PTS or mononeuritis multiplex). One patient was treated with corticosteroids (for mononeuropathy multiplex), and 5 others received intravenous immunoglobulin (for PTS, meningoradiculitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, or Miller Fisher syndrome). We conclude that pleiotropic neurologic disorders are seen in HEV-infected immunocompetent patients. Patients with acute neurologic manifestations and aminotransferase abnormalities should be screened for HEV infection. PMID:26490255

  16. A health systems constraints analysis for neurologic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Neurologic care exists within health systems and complex social, political, and economic environments. Identification of obstacles within health systems, defined as “constraints,” is crucial to improving the delivery of neurologic care within its macroclimate. Here we use the World Health Organization's 6 building blocks of a health system to examine core services for priority interventions related to neurologic disease: (1) service delivery; (2) health workforce; (3) information; (4) medical products, vaccines, and technologies; (5) financing; and (6) leadership and governance. We demonstrate the use of a constraints analysis for neurologic disorders using the example of Timor-Leste, a newly sovereign and low-income country, which aims to improve neurologic care in the coming years. PMID:24711532

  17. Lens implant surgery in pars planitis.

    PubMed

    Michelson, J B; Friedlaender, M H; Nozik, R A

    1990-08-01

    Intraocular lens (IOL) implantation is usually contraindicated in eyes with active inflammation, but patients with "burned-out" pars planitis also may be considered as candidates. Fifteen of 16 eyes in eight patients underwent extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) with posterior chamber IOL (PC IOL) implantation combined with pars plana vitrectomy for both cataracts and chronic cystoid macular edema (CME); 60% achieved visual acuity of 20/40 or better. Even with "low-grade" inflammation in these patients, however, a persistent veil of debris accumulated over the posterior and anterior surface of the IOL. One patient (patient 2) required 27 YAG procedures for two eyes, and another required 11 YAG procedures and eventual removal of the IOL. Another patient required surgical "brushing-off" of the IOL and vitrectomy. Even in eyes with "burned-out" uveitis, a continual low-grade inflammation may complicate the use of IOL implantation. PMID:2402411

  18. The Assessment of Minor Neurological Dysfunction in Infancy Using the Touwen Infant Neurological Examination: Strengths and Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Heineman, Kirsten R.; Bos, Arend F.; Middelburg, Karin J.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Little is known of minor neurological dysfunction (MND) in infancy. This study aimed to evaluate the inter-assessor reliability of the assessment of MND with the Touwen Infant Neurological Examination (TINE) and the construct and predictive validity of MND in infancy. Method: Inter-assessor agreement was determined in a sample of 40 infants…

  19. The Brazilian Neurology centenary (1912-2012) and the common origin of the fields of Neurology and Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Marleide da Mota; Cavalcanti, Jose Luiz de Sá

    2013-01-01

    It is reported the Brazilian Neurology birth (1912), that has as the hallmark its first Neurology Cathedra of Rio de Janeiro, and the links between Neurology and Psychiatry, besides the main medical protagonists at that time in Rio de Janeiro: João Carlos Teixeira Brandão (1854-1921), first professor of the cathedra of Clinical Psychiatry and Nervous Diseases (1883-1921); Juliano Moreira (1873-1933), the founder of the Brazilian scientific Psychiatry and director of the Hospício Nacional de Alienados (National Hospice for the Insane) (1903-1930); Antônio Austregésilo Rodrigues de Lima (1876-1960), first professor of the cathedra of Neurology, considered the father of the Brazilian Neurology. Aloysio de Castro (1881-1959) was a great Brazilian neurosemiologist at that time. Austregésilo practiced both disciplines, Neurology and Psychiatry, and like Jean-Martin-Charcot, he was very interested in a typically psychiatric disorder, the hysteria. It is also considered in this paper the first Brazilian authors of Neurology and/or Psychiatric texts and the places where Neurology was initially developed by the main founders: Hospício Nacional de Alienados, Santa Casa de Misericórdia do Rio de Janeiro and Policlínica Geral do Rio de Janeiro. PMID:23338164

  20. Par Pond refill water quality sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, J.W. II; Martin, F.D.; Westbury, H.M.

    1996-08-01

    This study was designed to document anoxia and its cause in the event that the anoxia caused a fish kill. However, no fish kill was observed during this study, and dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations generally remained within the range expected for southeastern reservoirs. Par Pond water quality monitoring will continue during the second summer after refill as the aquatic macrophytes become reestablished and nutrients in the sediments are released to the water column.

  1. Combined DSEK and Transconjunctival Pars Plana Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sane, Mona; Shaikh, Naazli

    2016-01-01

    We report here three patients who underwent combined Descemet's stripping with endothelial keratoplasty and transconjunctival pars plana vitrectomy for bullous keratopathy and posterior segment pathology. A surgical technique and case histories are described. Anatomic and visual outcomes of combined Descemet's stripping with endothelial keratoplasty and vitrectomy were excellent. Our experience provides technical guidelines and limitations. The combined minimally invasive techniques allow for rapid anatomical recovery and return of function and visual acuity in a single sitting. PMID:27413563

  2. Activity-Dependent Changes in MAPK Activation in the Angelman Syndrome Mouse Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filonova, Irina; Trotter, Justin H.; Banko, Jessica L.; Weeber, Edwin J.

    2014-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by disruption of the maternal "UBE3A" gene. Ube3a protein is identified as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that shows neuron-specific imprinting. Despite extensive research evaluating the localization and basal expression profiles of Ube3a in mouse models, the molecular…

  3. Mechanisms of apoptosis by the tumor suppressor Par-4.

    PubMed

    Hebbar, Nikhil; Wang, Chi; Rangnekar, Vivek M

    2012-12-01

    Par-4 is a pro-apoptotic, tumor suppressor protein that induces apoptosis selectively in cancer cells. Endoplasmic reticulum-stress and higher levels of protein kinase A in tumor cells confer the coveted feature of cancer selective response to extracellular and intracellular Par-4, respectively. Recent studies have shown that systemic Par-4 confers resistance to tumor growth in mice, and that tumor-resistance is transferable by bone-marrow transplantation. Moreover, recombinant Par-4 inhibits the growth of tumors in mice. As systemic Par-4 induces apoptosis via cell surface GRP78, strategies that promote GRP78 trafficking to the cell surface are expected sensitize cancer cells to circulating levels of Par-4. This review illustrates the domains and mechanisms by which Par-4 orchestrates the apoptotic process in both cell culture models and in physiological settings. PMID:22552839

  4. Study on Neurological Consequence of Eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Alam, M N; Uddin, M J; Hossain, M A; Bashar, S M; Akhter, M; Nahar, N; Swapan, K; Alam, M M; Sultana, N; Hallaz, M M; Alam, M M; Uddin, M; Nahar, R; Shathi, F A; Islam, M S; Ara, R

    2016-07-01

    The present study was carried out in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh, Bangladesh for a period of one year from 1st June 2009 to 30th June 2010 to see the Neurological Consequence of Eclampsia. A total number of 37 patients were enrolled in this study. Among 37 patients majority are in the age group of 21-30 years which is 19(51.4%) cases followed by less than or equal to 20 years and more than 30 years which are 13(35.1%) cases and 5(13.5%) cases respectively. Knee jerk is present in 28(75.7%) cases and absent in 8(21.6%) cases. The exaggerated knee jerk is present in only in 1(2.7%) case. The rate of Glasgow coma scale is less than 5 in 21(56.8%) cases, 14(37.8%) cases in 5-10 and 2(5.4%) cases is in more than 10. Focal sign is absent in 22(59.5%) cases and present in 15(40.5%) cases. Majority of the patients is presented with absence of neck stiffness which is 35(94.6%) cases and the rest 2(5.4%) cases are presented with neck stiffness. Flexor planter response is found in 20(54.1%) cases which is the highest in number followed by extensor which is 15(40.5%) cases. In only 2(5.4%) cases the planter reflex is not elicitable. Presence of infarct is found in 15(40.5%) cases which is the highest number. Cerebral edema and Presence of haemorrhage is found in 3(8.1%) cases in each. Leuko-encephalopathy is found in 2(5.4%) cases. Encephalopathy and Both infarct & haemorrhage is found in 1(2.7%) case of each. Normal CT scan findings of brain are found in 12(32.4%) cases. PMID:27612881

  5. Quantifying anatomical shape variations in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nikhil; Fletcher, P Thomas; Preston, J Samuel; King, Richard D; Marron, J S; Weiner, Michael W; Joshi, Sarang

    2014-04-01

    proposed methodology thus holds promise for discovering new patterns of shape changes in the human brain that could add to our understanding of disease progression in neurological disorders. PMID:24667299

  6. Microbiota and Neurological Disorders: A Gut Feeling.

    PubMed

    Moos, Walter H; Faller, Douglas V; Harpp, David N; Kanara, Iphigenia; Pernokas, Julie; Powers, Whitney R; Steliou, Kosta

    2016-01-01

    In the past century, noncommunicable diseases have surpassed infectious diseases as the principal cause of sickness and death, worldwide. Trillions of commensal microbes live in and on our body, and constitute the human microbiome. The vast majority of these microorganisms are maternally derived and live in the gut, where they perform functions essential to our health and survival, including: digesting food, activating certain drugs, producing short-chain fatty acids (which help to modulate gene expression by inhibiting the deacetylation of histone proteins), generating anti-inflammatory substances, and playing a fundamental role in the induction, training, and function of our immune system. Among the many roles the microbiome ultimately plays, it mitigates against untoward effects from our exposure to the environment by forming a biotic shield between us and the outside world. The importance of physical activity coupled with a balanced and healthy diet in the maintenance of our well-being has been recognized since antiquity. However, it is only recently that characterization of the host-microbiome intermetabolic and crosstalk pathways has come to the forefront in studying therapeutic design. As reviewed in this report, synthetic biology shows potential in developing microorganisms for correcting pathogenic dysbiosis (gut microbiota-host maladaptation), although this has yet to be proven. However, the development and use of small molecule drugs have a long and successful history in the clinic, with small molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors representing one relevant example already approved to treat cancer and other disorders. Moreover, preclinical research suggests that epigenetic treatment of neurological conditions holds significant promise. With the mouth being an extension of the digestive tract, it presents a readily accessible diagnostic site for the early detection of potential unhealthy pathogens resident in the gut. Taken together, the data outlined

  7. Frontal lobe neurology and the creative mind

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Leonardo C.; Guimarães, Henrique C.; Teixeira, Antônio L.; Caramelli, Paulo; Levy, Richard; Dubois, Bruno; Volle, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Concepts from cognitive neuroscience strongly suggest that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a crucial role in the cognitive functions necessary for creative thinking. Functional imaging studies have repeatedly demonstrated the involvement of PFC in creativity tasks. Patient studies have demonstrated that frontal damage due to focal lesions or neurodegenerative diseases are associated with impairments in various creativity tasks. However, against all odds, a series of clinical observations has reported the facilitation of artistic production in patients with neurodegenerative diseases affecting PFC, such as frontotemporal dementia (FTD). An exacerbation of creativity in frontal diseases would challenge neuroimaging findings in controls and patients, as well as the theoretical role of prefrontal functions in creativity processes. To explore this paradox, we reported the history of a FTD patient who exhibited the emergence of visual artistic productions during the course of the disease. The patient produced a large amount of drawings, which have been evaluated by a group of professional artists who were blind to the diagnosis. We also reviewed the published clinical cases reporting a change in the artistic abilities in patients with neurological diseases. We attempted to reconcile these clinical observations to previous experimental findings by addressing several questions raised by our review. For instance, to what extent can the cognitive, conative, and affective changes following frontal damage explain changes in artistic abilities? Does artistic exacerbation truly reflect increased creative capacities? These considerations could help to clarify the place of creativity—as it has been defined and explored by cognitive neuroscience—in artistic creation and may provide leads for future lesion studies. PMID:25101029

  8. Neurologic complication after a roller coaster ride.

    PubMed

    Sa Leitao, Davi; Mendonca, Dercio; Iyer, Harish; Kao, Cheng-Kai

    2012-01-01

    Neurologic complications after roller coaster rides are uncommon but potentially catastrophic. Physicians should have a high index of suspicion and prompt appropriate investigation. A 22-year-old healthy African American man presented with a 2-day history of constant occipital headache associated with vertigo, nausea, vomiting, and ambulatory dysfunction. Physical examination showed gait ataxia, slight dysmetria, and vertical nystagmus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain showed early subacute ischemic infarct in the right cerebellum in the distribution of the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Magnetic resonance angiography of the neck showed focal dissection of the right vertebral artery at C1 through C2 level. On subsequent questioning, the patient recollected riding a roller coaster 2 weeks before the onset of symptoms. Anticoagulation with heparin was started, and the patient was bridged to oral warfarin. After a 5-day uneventful hospital course, symptoms improved and patient was discharged on oral anticoagulation. Cervicocephalic arterial dissections after roller coaster rides are rarely described in literature. The acceleration and abrupt changes of direction might lead to indirect trauma that is applied to mobile portions of the cervicocephalic arteries leading to intimal tears. Magnetic resonance angiography combined with axial T1-weighted cervical MRI is preferred because it is a high-sensitive, noninvasive test. The rationale for the use of anticoagulants or antiplatelets in patients with cervicocephalic arterial dissection is to prevent early recurrence and infarction. However, a meta-analysis failed to show significant difference in the rates of disability or death between both groups. Therefore, the decision for medical treatment should be made in a case-by-case basis. PMID:20980120

  9. Music therapy in neurological rehabilitation settings.

    PubMed

    Galińska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The neurologic music therapy is a new scope of music therapy. Its techniques deal with dysfunctions resulting from diseases of the human nervous system. Music can be used as an alternative modality to access functions unavailable through non-musical stimulus. Processes in the brain activated by the influence of music can be generalized and transferred to non-musical functions. Therefore, in clinical practice, the translation of non-musical therapeutic exercises into analogous, isomorphic musical exercises is performed. They make use of the executive peculiarity of musical instruments and musical structures to prime, cue and coordinate movements. Among musical components, a repetitive rhythm plays a significant role. It regulates physiologic and behavioural functions through the mechanism of entrainment (synchronization of biological rhythms with musical rhythm based on acoustic resonance). It is especially relevant for patients with a deficient internal timing system in the brain. Additionally, regular rhythmic patterns facilitate memory encoding and decoding of non-musical information hence music is an efficient mnemonic tool. The music as a hierarchical, compound language of time, with its unique ability to access affective/motivational systems in the brain, provides time structures enhancing perception processes, mainly in the range of cognition, language and motor learning. It allows for emotional expression and improvement of the motivation for rehabilitation activities. The new technologies of rhythmic sensory stimulation (i.e. Binaural Beat Stimulation) or rhythmic music in combination with rhythmic light therapy appear. This multimodal forms of stimulation are used in the treatment of stroke, brain injury, dementia and other cognitive deficits. Clinical outcome studies provide evidence of the significant superiority of rehabilitation with music over the one without music. PMID:26488358

  10. Microbiota and Neurological Disorders: A Gut Feeling

    PubMed Central

    Moos, Walter H.; Faller, Douglas V.; Harpp, David N.; Kanara, Iphigenia; Pernokas, Julie; Powers, Whitney R.; Steliou, Kosta

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the past century, noncommunicable diseases have surpassed infectious diseases as the principal cause of sickness and death, worldwide. Trillions of commensal microbes live in and on our body, and constitute the human microbiome. The vast majority of these microorganisms are maternally derived and live in the gut, where they perform functions essential to our health and survival, including: digesting food, activating certain drugs, producing short-chain fatty acids (which help to modulate gene expression by inhibiting the deacetylation of histone proteins), generating anti-inflammatory substances, and playing a fundamental role in the induction, training, and function of our immune system. Among the many roles the microbiome ultimately plays, it mitigates against untoward effects from our exposure to the environment by forming a biotic shield between us and the outside world. The importance of physical activity coupled with a balanced and healthy diet in the maintenance of our well-being has been recognized since antiquity. However, it is only recently that characterization of the host–microbiome intermetabolic and crosstalk pathways has come to the forefront in studying therapeutic design. As reviewed in this report, synthetic biology shows potential in developing microorganisms for correcting pathogenic dysbiosis (gut microbiota–host maladaptation), although this has yet to be proven. However, the development and use of small molecule drugs have a long and successful history in the clinic, with small molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors representing one relevant example already approved to treat cancer and other disorders. Moreover, preclinical research suggests that epigenetic treatment of neurological conditions holds significant promise. With the mouth being an extension of the digestive tract, it presents a readily accessible diagnostic site for the early detection of potential unhealthy pathogens resident in the gut. Taken together, the

  11. [Anesthetic management and neurological outcomes of patient for open heart surgery with infective endocarditis and neurological complications].

    PubMed

    Kuro, M; Ohsumi, H; Takaki, O; Uchida, O; Kitaguchi, K; Hayashi, Y; Onishi, Y; Nakajima, T; Kuriyama, Y; Kawazoe, K

    1994-11-01

    No reports have focused on neurological outcomes after open heart surgery of patients with infective endocarditis (IE) and neurological complications. We evaluated parameters related to anesthetic management and neurological outcomes. The subjects analyzed were 24 patients who had undergone valvular surgeries under hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass from April 1978 to December 1990. The patients were divided into two groups according to the interval between onset of neurological complication and the time of operation: 1) acute group (within one month before the surgery: n = 11, 9.4 +/- 9 days; means +/- SD) and 2) chronic group (more than one month before the surgery: n = 13, 120 +/- 80 days). After heart surgery, 5 patients in the acute group showed newly developed neurological abnormality including death from hemorrhagic transformation, hemiplegia or aphasia. No patients in the chronic group had newly developed neurological abnormality related to the surgery. In the neurologically deteriorated patients of the acute group, interval from the onset of neurological complication to surgery was 3.5 +/- 4.5 days, whereas that of the remainders of the acute group was significantly longer (14.4 +/- 9.0 days). Intraoperative events and anesthetic management of these patients were also analyzed. However, there were no significant differences in the parameters such as cerebral perfusion pressure, arterial PaCO2, doses of anesthetics and use of vasopressors. Our results suggest that the most important factor which may influence neurological outcome was the interval between the onset of neurological abnormality and the time of operation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7861608

  12. Histone turnover and chromatin accessibility: Critical mediators of neurological development, plasticity, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wenderski, Wendy; Maze, Ian

    2016-01-01

    In postmitotic neurons, nucleosomal turnover was long considered to be a static process that is inconsequential to transcription. However, our recent studies in human and rodent brain indicate that replication-independent (RI) nucleosomal turnover, which requires the histone variant H3.3, is dynamic throughout life and is necessary for activity-dependent gene expression, synaptic connectivity, and cognition. H3.3 turnover also facilitates cellular lineage specification and plays a role in suppressing the expression of heterochromatic repetitive elements, including mutagenic transposable sequences, in mouse embryonic stem cells. In this essay, we review mechanisms and functions for RI nucleosomal turnover in brain and present the hypothesis that defects in histone dynamics may represent a common mechanism underlying neurological aging and disease. PMID:26990528

  13. A Single parS Sequence from the Cluster of Four Sites Closest to oriC Is Necessary and Sufficient for Proper Chromosome Segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jecz, Paulina; Bartosik, Aneta A.; Glabski, Krzysztof; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna

    2015-01-01

    Among the mechanisms that control chromosome segregation in bacteria are highly-conserved partitioning systems comprising three components: ParA protein (a deviant Walker-type ATPase), ParB protein (a DNA-binding element) and multiple cis-acting palindromic centromere-like sequences, designated parS. Ten putative parS sites have been identified in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome, four localized in close proximity of oriC and six, diverged by more than one nucleotide from a perfect palindromic sequence, dispersed along the chromosome. Here, we constructed and analyzed P. aeruginosa mutants deprived of each single parS sequence and their different combinations. The analysis included evaluation of a set of phenotypic features, chromosome segregation, and ParB localization in the cells. It was found that ParB binds specifically to all ten parS sites, although with different affinities. The P. aeruginosa parS mutant with all ten parS sites modified (parSnull) is viable however it demonstrates the phenotype characteristic for parAnull or parBnull mutants: slightly slower growth rate, high frequency of anucleate cells, and defects in motility. The genomic position and sequence of parS determine its role in P. aeruginosa biology. It transpired that any one of the four parS sites proximal to oriC (parS1 to parS4), which are bound by ParB with the highest affinity, is necessary and sufficient for the parABS role in chromosome partitioning. When all these four sites are mutated simultaneously, the strain shows the parSnull phenotype, which indicates that none of the remaining six parS sites can substitute for these four oriC-proximal sites in this function. A single ectopic parS2 (inserted opposite oriC in the parSnull mutant) facilitates ParB organization into regularly spaced condensed foci and reverses some of the mutant phenotypes but is not sufficient for accurate chromosome segregation. PMID:25794281

  14. Inhibition of Protease-Activated Receptor 1 Does not Affect Dendritic Homeostasis of Cultured Mouse Dentate Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuldt, Gerlind; Galanis, Christos; Strehl, Andreas; Hick, Meike; Schiener, Sabine; Lenz, Maximilian; Deller, Thomas; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). While a firm link between PAR1-activation and functional synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties exists, studies on the role of PAR1 in neural structural plasticity are scarce. The physiological function of PAR1 in the brain remains not well understood. We here sought to determine whether prolonged pharmacologic PAR1-inhibition affects dendritic morphologies of hippocampal neurons. To address this question we employed live-cell microscopy of mouse dentate granule cell dendrites in 3-week old entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures prepared from Thy1-GFP mice. A subset of cultures were treated with the PAR1-inhibitor SCH79797 (1 μM; up to 3 weeks). No major effects of PAR1-inhibition on static and dynamic parameters of dentate granule cell dendrites were detected under control conditions. Granule cells of PAR1-deficient slice cultures showed unaltered dendritic morphologies, dendritic spine densities and excitatory synaptic strength. Furthermore, we report that PAR1-inhibition does not prevent dendritic retraction following partial deafferentation in vitro. Consistent with this finding, no major changes in PAR1-mRNA levels were detected in the denervated dentate gyrus (DG). We conclude that neural PAR1 is not involved in regulating the steady-state dynamics or deafferentation-induced adaptive changes of cultured dentate granule cell dendrites. These results indicate that drugs targeting neural PAR1-signals may not affect the stability and structural integrity of neuronal networks in healthy brain regions. PMID:27378862

  15. Inhibition of Protease-Activated Receptor 1 Does not Affect Dendritic Homeostasis of Cultured Mouse Dentate Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Schuldt, Gerlind; Galanis, Christos; Strehl, Andreas; Hick, Meike; Schiener, Sabine; Lenz, Maximilian; Deller, Thomas; Maggio, Nicola; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). While a firm link between PAR1-activation and functional synaptic and intrinsic neuronal properties exists, studies on the role of PAR1 in neural structural plasticity are scarce. The physiological function of PAR1 in the brain remains not well understood. We here sought to determine whether prolonged pharmacologic PAR1-inhibition affects dendritic morphologies of hippocampal neurons. To address this question we employed live-cell microscopy of mouse dentate granule cell dendrites in 3-week old entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures prepared from Thy1-GFP mice. A subset of cultures were treated with the PAR1-inhibitor SCH79797 (1 μM; up to 3 weeks). No major effects of PAR1-inhibition on static and dynamic parameters of dentate granule cell dendrites were detected under control conditions. Granule cells of PAR1-deficient slice cultures showed unaltered dendritic morphologies, dendritic spine densities and excitatory synaptic strength. Furthermore, we report that PAR1-inhibition does not prevent dendritic retraction following partial deafferentation in vitro. Consistent with this finding, no major changes in PAR1-mRNA levels were detected in the denervated dentate gyrus (DG). We conclude that neural PAR1 is not involved in regulating the steady-state dynamics or deafferentation-induced adaptive changes of cultured dentate granule cell dendrites. These results indicate that drugs targeting neural PAR1-signals may not affect the stability and structural integrity of neuronal networks in healthy brain regions. PMID:27378862

  16. Functional neurological disorders in outpatient practice: An Australian cohort.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Omar; Ahmad, Kate E

    2016-06-01

    Functional disorders are defined as neurological symptoms without causative organic pathology identified. They are a diverse and often neglected group of disorders. The aim of this was to determine the incidence and outcome of functional neurological disorders in an Australian neurology practice. Over a 17month period, all patients presenting to a single outpatient neurology service were evaluated to determine the incidence and outcome of these disorders. A total of 884 patients were assessed and of these, 137 had a final diagnosis of functional neurological illness, equating to an incidence of 15% of all patients seen. Functional disorders were the third most common presentation overall. Patients with functional disorders were younger, more likely to be female and had a higher rate of current psychiatric comorbidity compared to other neurology patients. Sensory symptoms were the most common manifestation (48%) followed by limb weakness (37%) and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (14%). Outcome information was available for 49% of patients at an average of 3months follow-up. 45% had some improvement in their symptoms, 43% had static symptoms and 12% had worsening of symptoms. This study confirms the high incidence of functional disorders in outpatient neurology practice. Early improvement was seen in a substantial proportion of patients and is influenced by duration of symptoms. PMID:26754851

  17. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Block, Valerie A. J.; Pitsch, Erica; Tahir, Peggy; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Allen, Diane D.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps. Methods Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures), energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined. Results 137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS) (61 studies); stroke (41); Parkinson's Disease (PD) (20); dementia (11); traumatic brain injury (2) and ataxia (1). Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering. Conclusions These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability. PMID:27124611

  18. Treatment of neurological disorders by introducing mRNA in vivo using polyplex nanomicelles.

    PubMed

    Baba, Miyuki; Itaka, Keiji; Kondo, Kenji; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2015-03-10

    Sensory nerve disorders are difficult to cure completely considering poor nerve regeneration capacity and difficulties in accurately targeting neural tissues. Administering mRNA is a promising approach for treating neurological disorders because mRNA can provide proteins and peptides in their native forms for mature non-dividing neural cells, without the need of entering their nuclei. However, direct mRNA administration into neural tissues in vivo has been challenging due to too unstable manner of mRNA and its strong immunogenicity. Thus, using a suitable carrier is essential for effective mRNA administration. For this purpose, we established a novel carrier based on the self-assembly of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-polyamino acid block copolymer, i.e. polyplex nanomicelles. To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of mRNA administration for the treatment of sensory nerve disorders, we used a mouse model of experimentally induced olfactory dysfunction. Intranasal administration of mRNA-loaded nanomicelles provided an efficient and sustained protein expression for nearly two days in nasal tissues, particularly in the lamina propria which contains olfactory nerve fibers, with effectively regulating the immunogenicity of mRNA. Consequently, once-daily intranasal administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-expressing mRNA using polyplex nanomicelles remarkably enhanced the neurological recovery of olfactory function along with repairing the olfactory epithelium to a nearly normal architecture. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show the therapeutic potential of introducing exogenous mRNA for the treatment of neurological disorders. These results indicate the feasibility and safety of using mRNA, and provide a novel strategy of mRNA-based therapy. PMID:25599855

  19. Bone marrow transplantation prolongs life span and ameliorates neurologic manifestations in Sandhoff disease mice.

    PubMed

    Norflus, F; Tifft, C J; McDonald, M P; Goldstein, G; Crawley, J N; Hoffmann, A; Sandhoff, K; Suzuki, K; Proia, R L

    1998-05-01

    The GM2 gangliosidoses are a group of severe, neurodegenerative conditions that include Tay-Sachs disease, Sandhoff disease, and the GM2 activator deficiency. Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was examined as a potential treatment for these disorders using a Sandhoff disease mouse model. BMT extended the life span of these mice from approximately 4.5 mo to up to 8 mo and slowed their neurologic deterioration. BMT also corrected biochemical deficiencies in somatic tissues as indicated by decreased excretion of urinary oligosaccharides, and lower glycolipid storage and increased levels of beta-hexosaminidase activity in visceral organs. Even with neurologic improvement, neither clear reduction of brain glycolipid storage nor improvement in neuronal pathology could be detected, suggesting a complex pathogenic mechanism. Histological analysis revealed beta-hexosaminidase-positive cells in the central nervous system and visceral organs with a concomitant reduction of colloidal iron-positive macrophages. These results may be important for the design of treatment approaches for the GM2 gangliosidoses. PMID:9576752

  20. The blocking of uPAR suppresses lipopolysaccharide‐induced inflammatory osteoclastogenesis and the resultant bone loss through attenuation of integrin β3/Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ishisaki, Akira; Miyashita, Mei; Matsuo, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis, cause the bone destruction by promotion of the differentiation of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells into mature osteoclasts (OCs) with active bone‐resorbing character. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying this disorder remain unclear. We herein investigated the role of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in the bone destruction caused by chronic inflammation. Methods We investigated that the effect of uPAR on inflammatory OC formation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in inflammatory diseases. Results We found that the LPS more weakly induced OC formation and the resultant bone loss in uPAR‐deficient mice than in wild‐type mice. Additionally, we demonstrated that uPAR significantly potentiated LPS‐induced OC formation of RAW264.7 mouse monocyte/macrophage linage cells in integrin β3/Akt‐dependent manner. Moreover, we showed that the blocking of uPAR function by the administration of anti‐uPAR neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated the LPS‐induced OC formation and the resultant bone loss in mice. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that uPAR negatively regulates the LPS‐induced inflammatory OC formation and the resultant bone loss mediated through the integrin β3/Akt pathway. Our findings partly clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying bone destruction caused by chronic inflammatory diseases, and would benefit research on identifying antibody therapy for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:27621816

  1. Huntingtin Is Required for Epithelial Polarity through RAB11A-Mediated Apical Trafficking of PAR3-aPKC

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Salah; McGuire, John Russel; Yu, Hua; Humbert, Sandrine

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of apical-basolateral polarity is important for both normal development and disease, for example, during tumorigenesis and metastasis. During this process, polarity complexes are targeted to the apical surface by a RAB11A-dependent mechanism. Huntingtin (HTT), the protein that is mutated in Huntington disease, acts as a scaffold for molecular motors and promotes microtubule-based dynamics. Here, we investigated the role of HTT in apical polarity during the morphogenesis of the mouse mammary epithelium. We found that the depletion of HTT from luminal cells in vivo alters mouse ductal morphogenesis and lumen formation. HTT is required for the apical localization of PAR3-aPKC during epithelial morphogenesis in virgin, pregnant, and lactating mice. We show that HTT forms a complex with PAR3, aPKC, and RAB11A and ensures the microtubule-dependent apical vesicular translocation of PAR3-aPKC through RAB11A. We thus propose that HTT regulates polarized vesicular transport, lumen formation and mammary epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25942483

  2. Huntingtin Is Required for Epithelial Polarity through RAB11A-Mediated Apical Trafficking of PAR3-aPKC.

    PubMed

    Elias, Salah; McGuire, John Russel; Yu, Hua; Humbert, Sandrine

    2015-05-01

    The establishment of apical-basolateral polarity is important for both normal development and disease, for example, during tumorigenesis and metastasis. During this process, polarity complexes are targeted to the apical surface by a RAB11A-dependent mechanism. Huntingtin (HTT), the protein that is mutated in Huntington disease, acts as a scaffold for molecular motors and promotes microtubule-based dynamics. Here, we investigated the role of HTT in apical polarity during the morphogenesis of the mouse mammary epithelium. We found that the depletion of HTT from luminal cells in vivo alters mouse ductal morphogenesis and lumen formation. HTT is required for the apical localization of PAR3-aPKC during epithelial morphogenesis in virgin, pregnant, and lactating mice. We show that HTT forms a complex with PAR3, aPKC, and RAB11A and ensures the microtubule-dependent apical vesicular translocation of PAR3-aPKC through RAB11A. We thus propose that HTT regulates polarized vesicular transport, lumen formation and mammary epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:25942483

  3. The Italian neurological schools of the twentieth century

    PubMed Central

    Bonavita, Vincenzo

    Summary This lecture is not a historical lecture, but rather a journey through the “story” of neurology in Italy from its “prehistoric” beginning in the 19th century. The birth of a neurological school is that magical moment in which a founder attracts disciples: the more capable this founder is of transmitting methodology and allowing his pupils intellectual freedom, the longer his memory will live on. On the basis of this idea, the scientific biography of a few leading Italian neurologists of the 20th century is outlined, starting from Leonardo Bianchi, founder of the Italian Neurological Society in 1907. PMID:21729589

  4. Nonmydriatic retinal photography in the evaluation of acute neurologic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bidot, Samuel; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Summary Ocular fundus examination is a fundamental component of the neurologic examination. Finding papilledema in headache patients or retinal arterial emboli in stroke patients can be extremely useful. Although examination of the ocular fundus with a direct ophthalmoscope is an important skill for all neurologists, it is rarely and unreliably performed. Nonmydriatic ocular fundus photography, which allows direct visualization of high-quality photographs of the ocular fundus, has been recently proposed for screening neurologic patients in urgent care settings such as emergency departments. This new technology has many potential applications in neurology, including e-transmission of images for remote interpretation. PMID:24353924

  5. Protease-activated receptor-1 negatively regulates proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells derived from the hippocampal dentate gyrus of the adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayuki; Yoneyama, Masanori; Shiba, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Taro; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2016-07-01

    Thrombin-activated protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 regulates the proliferation of neural cells following brain injury. To elucidate the involvement of PAR-1 in the neurogenesis that occurs in the adult hippocampus, we examined whether PAR-1 regulated the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from the murine hippocampal dentate gyrus. NPC cultures expressed PAR-1 protein and mRNA encoding all subtypes of PAR. Direct exposure of the cells to thrombin dramatically attenuated the cell proliferation without causing cell damage. This thrombin-induced attenuation was almost completely abolished by the PAR antagonist RWJ 56110, as well as by dabigatran and 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride (AEBSF), which are selective and non-selective thrombin inhibitors, respectively. Expectedly, the PAR-1 agonist peptide (AP) SFLLR-NH2 also attenuated the cell proliferation. The cell proliferation was not affected by the PAR-1 negative control peptide RLLFT-NH2, which is an inactive peptide for PAR-1. Independently, we determined the effect of in vivo treatment with AEBSF or AP on hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult mouse. The administration of AEBSF, but not that of AP, significantly increased the number of newly-generated cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone. These data suggest that PAR-1 negatively regulated adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus by inhibiting the proliferative activity of the NPCs. PMID:27426918

  6. 78 FR 11898 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special....Strunnikova@nih.gov , Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke...

  7. 77 FR 33470 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Initial Review...: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special Emphasis Panel; Exploratory Clinical...

  8. 75 FR 5093 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Initial Review... of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Initial Review,...

  9. 77 FR 27239 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... ] Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated below in... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, including consideration of personnel qualifications...

  10. 77 FR 37421 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special... of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special Emphasis Panel,...

  11. 77 FR 65005 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Initial Review... of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special Emphasis Panel;...

  12. 75 FR 3475 - National Institute Of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute Of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.... App.), notice is hereby given of meetings of the National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke... Neurological Disorders and Stroke Council; Training, Career Development, and Special Programs...

  13. 76 FR 81951 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated below in... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, including consideration of personnel qualifications...

  14. 75 FR 53319 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.... App.), notice is ] hereby given of meetings of the National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke... Neurological Disorders and Stroke Council Training, Career Development, and Special Programs Subcommittee....

  15. 76 FR 2129 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke... Committee: National Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke Council, Basic and Preclinical...

  16. 75 FR 26268 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

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  17. 78 FR 22273 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated below in... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, including consideration of personnel qualifications...

  18. 77 FR 2740 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Initial Review..., Division of Extramural Research, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, NIH, NSC,...

  19. 75 FR 16153 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated below... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, including consideration of...

  20. 76 FR 66732 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special... cycle. Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special Emphasis...

  1. 77 FR 52337 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated below in... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, including consideration of personnel qualifications...

  2. 78 FR 13359 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... of Committee: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Special Emphasis Panel;...

  3. 76 FR 59414 - National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke... Advisory Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The meeting will be closed to the public as indicated below in... of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, including consideration of personnel qualifications...

  4. Escherichia coli low-copy-number plasmid R1 centromere parC forms a U-shaped complex with its binding protein ParR

    PubMed Central

    Hoischen, C.; Bussiek, M.; Langowski, J.; Diekmann, S.

    2008-01-01

    The Escherichia coli low-copy-number plasmid R1 contains a segregation machinery composed of parC, ParR and parM. The R1 centromere-like site parC contains two separate sets of repeats. By atomic force microscopy (AFM) we show here that ParR molecules bind to each of the 5-fold repeated iterons separately with the intervening sequence unbound by ParR. The two ParR protein complexes on parC do not complex with each other. ParR binds with a stoichiometry of about one ParR dimer per each single iteron. The measured DNA fragment lengths agreed with B-form DNA and each of the two parC 5-fold interon DNA stretches adopts a linear path in its complex with ParR. However, the overall parC/ParR complex with both iteron repeats bound by ParR forms an overall U-shaped structure: the DNA folds back on itself nearly completely, including an angle of ∼150°. Analysing linear DNA fragments, we never observed dimerized ParR complexes on one parC DNA molecule (intramolecular) nor a dimerization between ParR complexes bound to two different parC DNA molecules (intermolecular). This bacterial segrosome is compared to other bacterial segregation complexes. We speculate that partition complexes might have a similar overall structural organization and, at least in part, common functional properties. PMID:18056157

  5. Sideline Neurological Evaluation: a Detailed Approach to the Sideline, In-Game Neurological Assessment of Contact Sport Athletes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Scott; Schnebel, Brock

    2016-07-01

    Contact sport holds inherent risk of traumatic injury to participant athletes. Neurologic injury, from trauma, portends significant potential for morbidity and mortality. The in-game sideline presents a challenging setting for injury evaluation. Athletic trainers and team physicians should understand general principles of the neurologic evaluation and apply a systematic approach that allows an organized evaluation of and differential diagnosis of neurologic injury. Athlete welfare demands an immediate, accurate diagnosis followed by targeted management. Management provides appropriate referral, timely treatment, and appropriate return-to-play decision. Management begins with recognition. PMID:27215629

  6. Music Education and Medicine: Music and the Neurology of Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Frank R.

    1991-01-01

    Explores how the body's biological clock affects the way musicians practice and perform. Delineates questions concerning this phenomenon. Discusses the implications for music teaching and focuses on areas for collaborative research between neurology researchers and music educators. (NL)

  7. Usefulness of Videotape Instruction in an Academic Department of Neurology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, David M.; Kaufman, Rita G.

    1983-01-01

    Videotape instruction produced better performance in identification in only certain areas in a neurology clerkship: neuropsychologic phenomena, disorders with subtle or unique movements, and seizures. The choice and cost of equipment and some professional assurances are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  8. [Neuropediatrics: epidemiological features and etiologies at the Dakar neurology service].

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, M; Sene-Diouf, F; Diop, A G; Ndao, A K; Ndiaye, M M; Ndiaye, I P

    1999-01-01

    Child neurology is a relatively young speciality of neurosciences which is at the frontier of Neurology and Paediatrics. Its development has been impulsed by the diagnosis techniques such as Neurobiology, Genetics, Neuroimaging and pedo-psychology. We conducted a retrospective survey among the in-patients from January 1980 to December 1997 in the service of Neurology of the University Hospital. Have been included children ranged from 0 to 15 years old without any racial, sexual or origin distinctive. In Neurology Department, children of 0 to 15 years old represent 10.06% of the in-patients received from 1980 to 1997. The mortality rate was 9.23%. The diseases are dominated by epilepsy and infantile encephalopathies with 31.02%, infectious diseases with 19.36% represented by tuberculosis, other bacterial, viral and parasitical etiologies, tumors with 10.36%, vascular pathology and degenerative disorders. PMID:11957278

  9. [Neurological development disorders in very low birth weight newborns].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Dieppa, F; Soriano-Puig, J A; Roca-Molina, M; Dueñas-Gómez, E

    1992-04-01

    Thirty very low birth weight newborns (less than 1,500 g) were evaluated at term from the neurological point of view, and were followed-up during the first 2 years of life by a multidisciplinary team, in order to detect long term sequelaes. There were 3 patients with major neurological disorders, and one third presented minor alterations. Neurological evaluation at term was a good sequelae predictor. No significative differences were found in perinatal variables: birthweight, gestational age, Apgar's score, ventilotherapy and with presence of intraventricular hemorrhage when normal outcome prematures were compared with those with neurological disorders. Blindness or deafness were not detected. It's important to continue the follow-up study up to the school age. PMID:1305391

  10. Stem cells as promising therapeutic options for neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jongman; Kim, Han-Soo; Hwang, Dong-Youn

    2013-04-01

    Due to the limitations of pharmacological and other current therapeutic strategies, stem cell therapies have emerged as promising options for treating many incurable neurologic diseases. A variety of stem cells including pluripotent stem cells (i.e., embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells) and multipotent adult stem cells (i.e., fetal brain tissue, neural stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from various sources) have been explored as therapeutic options for treating many neurologic diseases, and it is becoming obvious that each type of stem cell has pros and cons as a source for cell therapy. Wise selection of stem cells with regard to the nature and status of neurologic dysfunctions is required to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. To this aim, the stem cell-mediated therapeutic efforts on four major neurological diseases, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke, will be introduced, and current problems and future directions will be discussed. PMID:23097262

  11. Neurologic Complications of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Walter R.

    1987-01-01

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a syndrome requiring unique knowledge of its versatile manifestations for accurate diagnosis and skillfull management of its numerous complications for successful treatment. The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III), a replication-complete virus, is now reported as the etiologic agent. The neurologic complications of AIDS cover the spectrum of neurologic diseases and usually have multiple causative factors, all of which should be appropriately managed. These complications can be successfully treated, although constant monitoring is required because recurrence is frequent. The neurologic complications are the second most frequent cause of death in AIDS patients. Tests that are usually reliable in diagnosing neurologic diseases may not be reliable in patients with AIDS. The management of AIDS is a multidisciplinary effort, and the neurologist should fulfill a role in the management team. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:3334059

  12. Special requirements for electronic medical records in neurology

    PubMed Central

    Longhurst, Christopher A.; Hahn, Jin S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Electronic medical records (EMRs) are being rapidly adapted in the United States with goals of improving patient care, increasing efficiency, and reducing costs. Neurologists must become knowledgeable about the utility and effectiveness of the important parts of these systems specifically needed for care of neurology patients. The field of neurology encompasses complex disorders whose diagnosis and management heavily relies on detailed medical documentation of history and physical examination, and often on specialty-specific ancillary tests and extensive neuroimaging. Small discrepancies in documentation or absence of an in-hand ancillary test result can drastically change the current workup or treatment decision of a complex patient with neurologic disease. We describe current models and opportunities for improvements to EMRs that provide utility and efficiency in the care of neurology patients. PMID:25717421

  13. Boxers--computed tomography, EEG, and neurological evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, R.J.; Cole, M.; Thompson, J.S.; Kim, K.H.

    1983-01-14

    During the last three years, 40 ex-boxers were examined to determine the effects of boxing in regard to their neurological status and the computed tomographic (CT) appearance of the brain. Thirty-eight of these patients had a CT scan of the brain, and 24 had a complete neurological examination including an EEG. The results demonstrate a significant relationship between the number of bouts fought and CT changes indicating cerebral atrophy. Positive neurological findings were not significantly correlated with the number of bouts. Electroencephalographic abnormalities were significantly correlated with the number of bouts fought. Computed tomography and EEG of the brain should be considered as part of a regular neurological examination for active boxers and, if possible, before and after each match, to detect not only the effects of acute life-threatening brain trauma such as subdural hematomas and brain hemorrhages, but the more subtle and debilitating long-term changes of cerebral atrophy.

  14. Modelisation par elements finis du muscle strie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Mathieu

    Ce present projet de recherche a permis. de creer un modele par elements finis du muscle strie humain dans le but d'etudier les mecanismes engendrant les lesions musculaires traumatiques. Ce modele constitue une plate-forme numerique capable de discerner l'influence des proprietes mecaniques des fascias et de la cellule musculaire sur le comportement dynamique du muscle lors d'une contraction excentrique, notamment le module de Young et le module de cisaillement de la couche de tissu conjonctif, l'orientation des fibres de collagene de cette membrane et le coefficient de poisson du muscle. La caracterisation experimentale in vitro de ces parametres pour des vitesses de deformation elevees a partir de muscles stries humains actifs est essentielle pour l'etude de lesions musculaires traumatiques. Le modele numerique developpe est capable de modeliser la contraction musculaire comme une transition de phase de la cellule musculaire par un changement de raideur et de volume a l'aide des lois de comportement de materiau predefinies dans le logiciel LS-DYNA (v971, Livermore Software Technology Corporation, Livermore, CA, USA). Le present projet de recherche introduit donc un phenomene physiologique qui pourrait expliquer des blessures musculaires courantes (crampes, courbatures, claquages, etc.), mais aussi des maladies ou desordres touchant le tissu conjonctif comme les collagenoses et la dystrophie musculaire. La predominance de blessures musculaires lors de contractions excentriques est egalement exposee. Le modele developpe dans ce projet de recherche met ainsi a l'avant-scene le concept de transition de phase ouvrant la porte au developpement de nouvelles technologies pour l'activation musculaire chez les personnes atteintes de paraplegie ou de muscles artificiels compacts pour l'elaboration de protheses ou d'exosquelettes. Mots-cles Muscle strie, lesion musculaire, fascia, contraction excentrique, modele par elements finis, transition de phase

  15. Evaluation of the PAR corneal topography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jindal, Prateek; Cheung, Susan; Pirouzian, Amir; Keates, Richard H.; Ren, Qiushi

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the raster photogrammetry based Corneal Topography System by determining: inter-operator variability, reproducibility of images, effects of defocused and decentered images, and the precision of data at different optical zones. 4 human cadaver eyes were used to study the inter-operator variability. To study the reproducibility of images, 3 human cadaver eyes and a test surface doped with flourescine (provided by PAR Vision Systems Corporation) were focused and their images taken four successive times. Defocused and decentered images were taken of 4 human cadaver eyes and four times of the test surface mentioned above. The precision of defocused/decentered cadaver eyes was evaluated at the following optical zones: 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, and 6 mm. All human cadaver eyes used in the above experiments had their epithelial layer removed before imaging. Average inter-operator variability was 0.06 D. In reproducibility attempts, there was an average deviation of 0.28 D for the human cadaver eyes and 0.04 D for the test surface. The defocused and decentered test surface gave an average deviation of 0.09 D. Defocused and decentered cadaver eyes resulted in an average deviation of 0.52 D, 0.37 D, 0.24 D, and 0.22 D at optical zones of 3 mm, 4 mm, 5 mm, and 6 mm, respectively. The imaging method employed by PAR Vision Systems Corporation virtually eliminates inter-operator variability. The PAR Corneal Topography System's clinical usefulness, however, could be improved by improving the reproducibility of images, decreasing the sensitivity to spatial alignment, and increasing accuracy over smaller optical zones.

  16. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and neurological features: a review.

    PubMed

    Savasta, Salvatore; Merli, Pietro; Ruggieri, Martino; Bianchi, Lucia; Spartà, Maria Valentina

    2011-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is a term that comprises a variety of inherited connective tissue disorders characterized primarily by skin hyperextensibility, joints hypermobility and excessive dislocations, easy bruisability, generalized fragility. If much is known about orthopedic or physiatric features of this syndrome, poor is known about the neurological ones. Thus neurological assessment is very important due to the possible various clinical manifestations in this syndrome. PMID:20697718

  17. An unusual neurological consequence of massive wasp stings

    PubMed Central

    Volders, José; Smits, Marcel; Folkersma, Gerbrich; Tjan, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Although rare, central and peripheral neurological manifestations after single or multiple wasp stings have been reported. The authors describe a 45-year-old man who developed periods of sudden loss of consciousness with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 6 after being stung by fifty wasps. These periods were seen directly after being stung and were continuing months later. Different mechanisms and pathophysiological findings of neurological sequela reported after wasp stings are being reviewed. PMID:22744238

  18. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Intracranial Hypertension and Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Shoykhet, Michael; Cadena, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Sustained intracranial hypertension and acute brain herniation are “brain codes,” signifying catastrophic neurological events that require immediate recognition and treatment to prevent irreversible injury and death. As in cardiac arrest, a brain code mandates the organized implementation of a stepwise management algorithm. The goal of this emergency neurological life support protocol is to implement an evidence-based, standardized approach to the evaluation and management of patients with intracranial hypertension and/or herniation. PMID:26438459

  19. Fertility treatment in spinal cord injury and other neurologic disease

    PubMed Central

    Trofimenko, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Infertility in individuals with neurologic disorders is complex in etiology and manifestation. Its management therefore often requires a multimodal approach. This review addresses the implications of spinal cord injury (SCI) and other neurologic disease on fertility, including the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction, ejaculation disorders and compromised semen parameters. Available treatment approaches discussed include assisted ejaculation techniques and assisted reproductive technology including surgical sperm retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). PMID:26904416

  20. Fat embolism syndrome in a patient demonstrating only neurologic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bardana, D; Rudan, J; Cervenko, F; Smith, R

    1998-10-01

    Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a recognized complication of both long bone fractures and intramedullary orthopedic procedures. The usual presenting features are respiratory failure, neurologic dysfunction and petechiae. In this report, a 25-year-old woman with FES presented with serious neurologic symptoms and signs in the absence of respiratory dysfunction. The diagnosis is essentially a clinical one, but nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed distinctive lesions that may help future diagnosis of FES. PMID:9793509