Sample records for paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Cells Undergoing Mycelium-to-Yeast Transition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luiz R. Nunes; Regina Costa de Oliveira; Daniela Batista Leite; Vivian Schmidt da Silva; E. dos Reis Marques; M. E. da Silva Ferreira; D. C. D. Ribeiro; L. A. de Souza Bernardes; M. H. S. Goldman; R. Puccia; L. R. Travassos; W. L. Batista; M. P. Nobrega; F. G. Nobrega; D.-Y. Yang; C. A. de Braganca Pereira; G. H. Goldman

    2005-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a thermodimorphic fungus associated with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a systemic mycosis prevalent in South America. In humans, infection starts by inhalation of fungal propagules, which reach the pulmonary epithelium and transform into the yeast parasitic form. Thus, the mycelium-to- yeast transition is of particular interest because conversion to yeast is essential for infection. We have used a P.

  2. Biochemical differentiation of mycelium and yeast forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castilho, Maiara L.; Campos, Claudia B. L.; Matos, Tatiana G. F.; de Abreu, Geraldo M. A.; Martin, Airton A.; Raniero, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis the etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, is a dimorphic fungus existing as mycelia in the environment (or at 25 °C in vitro) and as yeast cells in the human host (or at 37°C in vitro). The most prominent difference between both forms is probably the cell wall polysaccharide, being 1,3-?-glucan usually found in mycelia and 1,3-?-glucan found in yeasts, but a plethora of other differences have already been described. In this work, we performed a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy analysis to compare the yeast and mycelia forms of P. brasiliensis and found additional biochemical differences. The analysis of the spectra showed that differences were distributed in chemical bonds of proteins, lipids and carbohydrates.

  3. Preparation of species-specific murine monoclonal antibodies against the yeast phase of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J I; Hamilton, A J; Bartholomew, M A; Harada, T; Fenelon, L; Hay, R J

    1990-01-01

    A panel of four murine monoclonal antibodies showing species specificity for the yeast phase of the pathogenic dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis was produced by using a modification of the standard monoclonal antibody technology. This involved the use of the immunosuppressive drug cyclophosphamide to suppress the immune response of test animals to fungi showing cross-reactivity, i.e., to Histoplasma capsulatum. One monoclonal antibody, P4, which had a high titer by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, was shown to recognize a linear antigenic epitope of P. brasiliensis at a molecular size of 70,000 to 75,000 daltons by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. The potential use of these monoclonal antibodies, which are the first species-specific probes to P. brasiliensis that have been produced, in the field of serodiagnosis is discussed. Images PMID:2394802

  4. Transcriptome analysis of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis cells undergoing mycelium-to-yeast transition.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Luiz R; Costa de Oliveira, Regina; Leite, Daniela Batista; da Silva, Vivian Schmidt; dos Reis Marques, Everaldo; da Silva Ferreira, Márcia Eliana; Ribeiro, Diógenes Custódio Duarte; de Souza Bernardes, Luciano Angelo; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Puccia, Rosana; Travassos, Luiz R; Batista, Wagner L; Nóbrega, Marina Pasetto; Nobrega, Francisco G; Yang, Ding-Yah; de Bragança Pereira, Carlos A; Goldman, Gustavo H

    2005-12-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a thermodimorphic fungus associated with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a systemic mycosis prevalent in South America. In humans, infection starts by inhalation of fungal propagules, which reach the pulmonary epithelium and transform into the yeast parasitic form. Thus, the mycelium-to-yeast transition is of particular interest because conversion to yeast is essential for infection. We have used a P. brasiliensis biochip carrying sequences of 4,692 genes from this fungus to monitor gene expression at several time points of the mycelium-to-yeast morphological shift (from 5 to 120 h). The results revealed a total of 2,583 genes that displayed statistically significant modulation in at least one experimental time point. Among the identified gene homologues, some encoded enzymes involved in amino acid catabolism, signal transduction, protein synthesis, cell wall metabolism, genome structure, oxidative stress response, growth control, and development. The expression pattern of 20 genes was independently verified by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, revealing a high degree of correlation between the data obtained with the two methodologies. One gene, encoding 4-hydroxyl-phenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (4-HPPD), was highly overexpressed during the mycelium-to-yeast differentiation, and the use of NTBC [2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)-cyclohexane-1,3-dione], a specific inhibitor of 4-HPPD activity, as well as that of NTBC derivatives, was able to inhibit growth and differentiation of the pathogenic yeast phase of the fungus in vitro. These data set the stage for further studies involving NTBC and its derivatives as new chemotherapeutic agents against PCM and confirm the potential of array-based approaches to identify new targets for the development of alternative treatments against pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:16339729

  5. Evidence for the Role of Calcineurin in Morphogenesis and Calcium Homeostasis during Mycelium-to-Yeast Dimorphism of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis?

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Claudia B. L.; Di Benedette, Joao Paulo T.; Morais, Flavia V.; Ovalle, Rafael; Nobrega, Marina P.

    2008-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a dimorphic fungus that causes paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent human deep mycosis in Latin America. The dimorphic transition from mycelium to yeast (M-Y) is triggered by a temperature shift from 25°C to 37°C and is critical for pathogenicity. Intracellular Ca2+ levels increased in hyphae immediately after temperature-induced dimorphism. The chelation of Ca2+ with extracellular (EGTA) or intracellular (BAPTA) calcium chelators inhibited temperature-induced dimorphism, whereas the addition of extracellular Ca2+ accelerated dimorphism. The calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA), but not tacrolimus (FK506), effectively decreased cell growth, halted the M-Y transition that is associated with virulence, and caused aberrant growth morphologies for all forms of P. brasiliensis. The difference between CsA and FK506 was ascribed by the higher levels of cyclophilins contrasted to FKBPs, the intracellular drug targets required for calcineurin suppression. Chronic exposure to CsA abolished intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and decreased mRNA transcription of the CCH1 gene for the plasma membrane Ca2+ channel in yeast-form cells. CsA had no detectable effect on multidrug resistance efflux pumps, while the effect of FK506 on rhodamine excretion was not correlated with the transition to yeast form. In this study, we present evidence that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin controls hyphal and yeast morphology, M-Y dimorphism, growth, and Ca2+ homeostasis in P. brasiliensis and that CsA is an effective chemical block for thermodimorphism in this organism. The effects of calcineurin inhibitors on P. brasiliensis reinforce the therapeutic potential of these drugs in a combinatory approach with antifungal drugs to treat endemic paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:18776037

  6. Cell organisation, sulphur metabolism and ion transport-related genes are differentially expressed in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis mycelium and yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rosângela V; Paes, Hugo C; Nicola, André M; de Carvalho, Maria José A; Fachin, Ana Lúcia; Cardoso, Renato S; Silva, Simoneide S; Fernandes, Larissa; Silva, Silvana P; Donadi, Eduardo A; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T; Passos, Geraldo AS; Soares, Célia MA; Brígido, Marcelo M; Felipe, Maria Sueli S

    2006-01-01

    Background Mycelium-to-yeast transition in the human host is essential for pathogenicity by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and both cell types are therefore critical to the establishment of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. The infected population is of about 10 million individuals, 2% of whom will eventually develop the disease. Previously, transcriptome analysis of mycelium and yeast cells resulted in the assembly of 6,022 sequence groups. Gene expression analysis, using both in silico EST subtraction and cDNA microarray, revealed genes that were differential to yeast or mycelium, and we discussed those involved in sugar metabolism. To advance our understanding of molecular mechanisms of dimorphic transition, we performed an extended analysis of gene expression profiles using the methods mentioned above. Results In this work, continuous data mining revealed 66 new differentially expressed sequences that were MIPS(Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences)-categorised according to the cellular process in which they are presumably involved. Two well represented classes were chosen for further analysis: (i) control of cell organisation – cell wall, membrane and cytoskeleton, whose representatives were hex (encoding for a hexagonal peroxisome protein), bgl (encoding for a 1,3-?-glucosidase) in mycelium cells; and ags (an ?-1,3-glucan synthase), cda (a chitin deacetylase) and vrp (a verprolin) in yeast cells; (ii) ion metabolism and transport – two genes putatively implicated in ion transport were confirmed to be highly expressed in mycelium cells – isc and ktp, respectively an iron-sulphur cluster-like protein and a cation transporter; and a putative P-type cation pump (pct) in yeast. Also, several enzymes from the cysteine de novo biosynthesis pathway were shown to be up regulated in the yeast form, including ATP sulphurylase, APS kinase and also PAPS reductase. Conclusion Taken together, these data show that several genes involved in cell organisation and ion metabolism/transport are expressed differentially along dimorphic transition. Hyper expression in yeast of the enzymes of sulphur metabolism reinforced that this metabolic pathway could be important for this process. Understanding these changes by functional analysis of such genes may lead to a better understanding of the infective process, thus providing new targets and strategies to control PCM. PMID:16907987

  7. Innate immunity to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection.

    PubMed

    Calich, Vera Lúcia Garcia; da Costa, Tânia Alves; Felonato, Maíra; Arruda, Celina; Bernardino, Simone; Loures, Flávio Vieira; Ribeiro, Laura Raquel Rios; de Cássia Valente-Ferreira, Rita; Pina, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    Innate immunity is based in pre-existing elements of the immune system that directly interact with all types of microbes leading to their destruction or growth inhibition. Several elements of this early defense mechanism act in concert to control initial pathogen growth and have profound effect on the adaptative immune response that further develops. Although most studies in paracoccidioidomycosis have been dedicated to understand cellular and humoral immune responses, innate immunity remains poorly defined. Hence, the main purpose of this review is to present and discuss some mechanisms of innate immunity developed by resistant and susceptible mice to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection, trying to understand how this initial host-pathogen interface interferes with the protective or deleterious adaptative immune response that will dictate disease outcome. An analysis of some mechanisms and mediators of innate immunity such as the activation of complement proteins, the microbicidal activity of natural killer cells and phagocytes, the production of inflammatory eicosanoids, cytokines, and chemokines among others, is presented trying to show the important role played by innate immunity in the host response to P. brasiliensis infection. PMID:18777631

  8. In vitro human immune reactivity of fast protein liquid chromatography fractionated Paracoccidioides brasiliensis soluble antigens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susana N Diniz; Patrícia S Cisalpino; Matilde C Koury; Glaucia M. Q Andrade; Maria G. S Nogueira; Alfredo M Goes

    1999-01-01

    Soluble antigens of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast cells (PbAg) were fractionated in a fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) system, using Q-Sepharose anion-exchange resin, in order to characterize antigenic fractions that could elicit cell reactivity and antibody recognition in human paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). PbAg fractions were eluted by 20 mM Tris-HCl solution (pH 9.6) with an increasing gradient up to 1 M NaCl. The

  9. Mutants of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strain IVIC Pb9 affected in dimorphism.

    PubMed

    San-Blas, F; San-Blas, G

    1992-01-01

    Morphological mutants were isolated after nitrosoguanidine treatment of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strain IVIC Pb9. Two of these mutants, Pb257 and Pb258, developed a typical mycelia at 23 degrees C, however, the yeast cells which developed at 37 degrees C were indistinguishable from those of the parental strain. A third mutant, strain Pb267, was thermosensitive, grew as yeast-like cells at 23 degrees C, but was unable to survive at 37 degrees C. Morphological observations as well as serological and segregation tests confirmed that the mutant strains originated from P. brasiliensis. Cell wall chemical analyses of the mutant strains grown at 23 degrees C indicated the presence of alkali-soluble, acid-insoluble polysaccharides absent in the parental wild-type strain Pb9 grown under the same conditions. The phenotypes shown by the mutant strains may be related to deficiencies in the proper synthesis of cell wall components of the mycelial phase of this fungus. PMID:1573521

  10. Antimicrobial effect of farnesol, a Candida albicans quorum sensing molecule, on Paracoccidioides brasiliensis growth and morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Derengowski, Lorena S; De-Souza-Silva, Calliandra; Braz, Shélida V; Mello-De-Sousa, Thiago M; Báo, Sônia N; Kyaw, Cynthia M; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete

    2009-01-01

    Background Farnesol is a sesquiterpene alcohol produced by many organisms, and also found in several essential oils. Its role as a quorum sensing molecule and as a virulence factor of Candida albicans has been well described. Studies revealed that farnesol affect the growth of a number of bacteria and fungi, pointing to a potential role as an antimicrobial agent. Methods Growth assays of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis cells incubated in the presence of different concentrations of farnesol were performed by measuring the optical density of the cultures. The viability of fungal cells was determined by MTT assay and by counting the colony forming units, after each farnesol treatment. The effects of farnesol on P. brasiliensis dimorphism were also evaluated by optical microscopy. The ultrastructural morphology of farnesol-treated P. brasiliensis yeast cells was evaluated by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Results In this study, the effects of farnesol on Paracoccidioides brasiliensis growth and dimorphism were described. Concentrations of this isoprenoid ranging from 25 to 300 ?M strongly inhibited P. brasiliensis growth. We have estimated that the MIC of farnesol for P. brasiliensis is 25 ?M, while the MLC is around 30 ?M. When employing levels which don't compromise cell viability (5 to 15 ?M), it was shown that farnesol also affected the morphogenesis of this fungus. We observed about 60% of inhibition in hyphal development following P. brasiliensis yeast cells treatment with 15 ?M of farnesol for 48 h. At these farnesol concentrations we also observed a significant hyphal shortening. Electron microscopy experiments showed that, despite of a remaining intact cell wall, P. brasiliensis cells treated with farnesol concentrations above 25 ?M exhibited a fully cytoplasmic degeneration. Conclusion Our data indicate that farnesol acts as a potent antimicrobial agent against P. brasiliensis. The fungicide activity of farnesol against this pathogen is probably associated to cytoplasmic degeneration. In concentrations that do not affect fungal viability, farnesol retards the germ-tube formation of P. brasiliensis, suggesting that the morphogenesis of this fungal is controlled by environmental conditions. PMID:19402910

  11. Detection of Melanin-Like Pigments in the Dimorphic Fungal Pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis In Vitro and during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Beatriz L.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Díez, Soraya; Youngchim, Sirida; Aisen, Philip; Cano, Luz E.; Restrepo, Angela; Casadevall, Arturo; Hamilton, Andrew J.

    2001-01-01

    Melanins are implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, including some microbial infections. In this study, we analyzed whether the conidia and the yeasts of the thermally dimorphic fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis produce melanin or melanin-like compounds in vitro and during infection. Growth of P. brasiliensis mycelia on water agar alone produced pigmented conidia, and growth of yeasts in minimal medium with l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) produced pigmented cells. Digestion of the pigmented conidia and yeasts with proteolytic enzymes, denaturant, and hot concentrated acid yielded dark particles that were the same size and shape as their propagules. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated reactivity of a melanin-binding monoclonal antibody (MAb) with the pigmented conidia, yeasts, and particles. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy identified the yeast-derived particles produced in vitro when P. brasiliensis was grown in l-DOPA medium as a melanin-like compound. Nonreducing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of cytoplasmic yeast extract revealed a protein that catalyzed melanin synthesis from l-DOPA. The melanin binding MAb reacted with yeast cells in tissue from mice infected with P. brasiliensis. Finally digestion of infected tissue liberated particles reactive to the melanin binding MAb that had the typical morphology of P. brasiliensis yeasts. These data strongly suggest that P. brasiliensis propagules, both conidia and yeast cells, can produce melanin or melanin-like compounds in vitro and in vivo. Based on what is known about the function of melanin in the virulence of other fungi, this pigment may play a role in the pathogenesis of paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:11500453

  12. New Paracoccidioides brasiliensis isolate reveals unexpected genomic variability in this human pathogen

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lilia L. Carrero; Gustavo Niño-Vega; Marcus M. Teixeira; Maria Jose A. Carvalho; Célia M. A. Soares; Maristela Pereira; Rosália S. A. Jesuino; Juan G. McEwen; Leonel Mendoza; John W. Taylor; Maria Sueli Felipe; Gioconda San-Blas

    2008-01-01

    By means of genealogical concordance phylogenetic species recognition (GCPSR), we have investigated coding and non-coding regions from various genes and the ITS sequences of 7 new and 14 known isolates of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Such isolates grouped within the three phylogenetic groups recently reported in the genus Paracoccidioides, with one single exception, i.e., Pb01, a strain that has been the subject

  13. The Pathogenic Fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Exports Extracellular Vesicles Containing Highly Immunogenic ?-Galactosyl Epitopes?

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, Milene C.; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Ganiko, Luciane; Medeiros, Lia C. Soares; Miranda, Kildare; Silva, Luiz S.; Freymüller-Haapalainen, Edna; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Almeida, Igor C.; Puccia, Rosana

    2011-01-01

    Exosome-like vesicles containing virulence factors, enzymes, and antigens have recently been characterized in fungal pathogens, such as Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum. Here, we describe extracellular vesicles carrying highly immunogenic ?-linked galactopyranosyl (?-Gal) epitopes in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. P. brasiliensis is a dimorphic fungus that causes human paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). For vesicle preparations, cell-free supernatant fluids from yeast cells cultivated in Ham's defined medium-glucose were concentrated in an Amicon ultrafiltration system and ultracentrifuged at 100,000 × g. P. brasiliensis antigens were present in preparations from phylogenetically distinct isolates Pb18 and Pb3, as observed in immunoblots revealed with sera from PCM patients. In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), vesicle components containing ?-Gal epitopes reacted strongly with anti-?-Gal antibodies isolated from both Chagas' disease and PCM patients, with Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA) (a lectin that recognizes terminal ?-Gal), but only faintly with natural anti-?-Gal. Reactivity was inhibited after treatment with ?-galactosidase. Vesicle preparations analyzed by electron microscopy showed vesicular structures of 20 to 200 nm that were labeled both on the surface and in the lumen with MOA. In P. brasiliensis cells, components carrying ?-Gal epitopes were found distributed on the cell wall, following a punctuated confocal pattern, and inside large intracellular vacuoles. Lipid-free vesicle fractions reacted with anti-?-Gal in ELISA only when not digested with ?-galactosidase, while reactivity with glycoproteins was reduced after ?-elimination, which is indicative of partial O-linked chain localization. Our findings open new areas to explore in terms of host-parasite relationships in PCM and the role played in vivo by vesicle components and ?-galactosyl epitopes. PMID:21216942

  14. Occurrence of Antibodies to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in Dairy Cattle from Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. H. Silveira; R. C. S. Paes; E. V. Medeiros; E. N. Itano; Z. P. Camargo; M. A. Ono

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the humoral immune response in cattle immunized with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and perform a seroepidemiological study of paracoccidioidomycosis in dairy cattle from Mato Grosso do Sul. Two animals (one\\u000a steer and one heifer) were inoculated with a suspension of P. brasiliensis in Freund incomplete adjuvant. Blood samples were collected periodically to evaluate humoral immune

  15. Serological Evidence of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection in Chickens from Paraná and Mato Grosso do Sul States, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriela G. Oliveira; Luciane H. Silveira; Eiko N. Itano; Rodrigo M. Soares; Roberta L. Freire; Maria A. E. Watanabe; Zoilo P. Camargo; Mario A. Ono

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to detect antibodies against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in free-range and caged chickens Gallus domesticus. Initially, the humoral immune response of two chickens immunized with P. brasiliensis was evaluated. Both animals showed the production of antibodies to gp43, the major P. brasiliensis antigen. The seroepidemiological survey was conducted in chickens from the Pantanal region in Mato

  16. Analysis of the Secretomes of Paracoccidioides Mycelia and Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Simone Schneider; Parente, Ana Flávia Alves; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Parente, Juliana Alves; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria

    2012-01-01

    Paracoccidioides, a complex of several phylogenetic species, is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis. The ability of pathogenic fungi to develop a multifaceted response to the wide variety of stressors found in the host environment is important for virulence and pathogenesis. Extracellular proteins represent key mediators of the host-parasite interaction. To analyze the expression profile of the proteins secreted by Paracoccidioides, Pb01 mycelia and yeast cells, we used a proteomics approach combining two-dimensional electrophoresis with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-Q-TOF MS/MS). From three biological replicates, 356 and 388 spots were detected, in mycelium and yeast cell secretomes, respectively. In this study, 160 non-redundant proteins/isoforms were indentified, including 30 and 24 proteins preferentially secreted in mycelia and yeast cells, respectively. In silico analyses revealed that 65% of the identified proteins/isoforms were secreted primarily via non-conventional pathways. We also investigated the influence of protein export inhibition in the phagocytosis of Paracoccidioides by macrophages. The addition of Brefeldin A to the culture medium significantly decreased the production of secreted proteins by both Paracoccidioides and internalized yeast cells by macrophages. In contrast, the addition of concentrated culture supernatant to the co-cultivation significantly increased the number of internalized yeast cells by macrophages. Importantly, the proteins detected in the fungal secretome were also identified within macrophages. These results indicate that Paracoccidioides extracellular proteins are important for the fungal interaction with the host. PMID:23272246

  17. Cryptic Speciation and Recombination in the Fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis as Revealed by Gene Genealogies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel R. Matute; Juan G. McEwen; Rosana Puccia; Beatriz A. Montes; Gioconda San-Blas; Eduardo Bagagli; Jason T. Rauscher; Angela Restrepo; Favia Morais; Gustavo Nino-Vega; John W. Taylor

    2005-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the etiologic agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a disease confined to Latin America and of marked importance in the endemic areas due to its frequency and severity. This species is considered to be clonal according to mycological criteria and has been shown to vary in virulence. To characterize natural genetic variation and reproductive mode in this fungus, we analyzed

  18. ISOLATION OF PARACOCCIDIOIDES BRASILIENSIS FROM ARMADILLOS (DASYPUS NOVEMINCTUS)CAPTURED IN AN ENDEMIC AREA OF PARACOCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    EDUARDO BAGAGLI; AYAKO SANO; KUNIE IABUKI COELHO; MAKOTO MIYAJI; ZOILO PIRES DE CAMARGO; GLAUCE MARY GOMES; MARCELLO FRANCO; MARIO RUBENS

    1998-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis,the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), was first isolated from armadillos from the Amazonian region where the mycosis is uncommon. In the present study, we report on the high incidence of PCM infection in armadillos from a hyperendemic region of the disease. Four nine-banded arma- dillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) were captured in the endemic area of Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil,

  19. Low Concentrations of Hydrogen Peroxide or Nitrite Induced of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Cell Proliferation in a Ras-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Haniu, Ana Eliza Coronel Janu; Maricato, Juliana Terzi; Mathias, Pedro Paulo Moraes; Castilho, Daniele Gonçalves; Miguel, Rodrigo Bernardi; Monteiro, Hugo Pequeno; Puccia, Rosana; Batista, Wagner Luiz

    2013-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), should be able to adapt to dramatic environmental changes inside the infected host after inhalation of air-borne conidia and transition to pathogenic yeasts. Proteins with antioxidant functions may protect fungal cells against reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species generated by phagocytic cells, thus acting as potential virulence factors. Ras GTPases are involved in stress responses, cell morphology, and differentiation in a range of organisms. Ras, in its activated form, interacts with effector proteins and can initiate a kinase cascade. In lower eukaryotes, Byr2 kinase represents a Ras target. The present study investigated the role of Ras in P. brasiliensis after in vitro stimulus with ROS or RNS. We have demonstrated that low concentrations of H2O2 (0.1 mM) or NO2 (0.1–0.25 µM) stimulated P. brasiliensis yeast cell proliferation and that was not observed when yeast cells were pre-incubated with farnesyltransferase inhibitor. We constructed an expression plasmid containing the Byr2 Ras-binding domain (RBD) fused with GST (RBD-Byr2-GST) to detect the Ras active form. After stimulation with low concentrations of H2O2 or NO2, the Ras active form was observed in fungal extracts. Besides, NO2 induced a rapid increase in S-nitrosylated Ras levels. This alternative posttranslational modification of Ras, probably in residue Cys123, would lead to an exchange of GDP for GTP and consequent GTPase activation in P. brasiliensis. In conclusion, low concentrations of H2O2 or NO2 stimulated P. brasiliensis proliferation through Ras activation. PMID:23922749

  20. Characterization of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis PbDfg5p, a cell-wall protein implicated in filamentous growth.

    PubMed

    da Silva Castro, Nadya; Barbosa, Mônica Santiago; Maia, Zilma Alves; Báo, Sonia Nair; Felipe, Maria Sueli Soares; Santana, Jaime Martins; Soares Mendes-Giannini, Maria José; Pereira, Maristela; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria

    2008-02-01

    The dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the causative agent of the most frequent systemic mycosis in Latin America. In humans, infection starts by inhalation of fungal propagules, which reach the pulmonary epithelium and differentiate into the yeast parasitic phase. Here we describe the characterization of a Dfg5p (defective for filamentous growth) homologue of P. brasiliensis, a predictable cell wall protein, first identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The protein, the cDNA and genomic sequences were analysed. The cloned cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified rPbDfg5p was used to obtain polyclonal antibodies. Immunoelectron microscopy and biochemical studies demonstrated the presence of PbDfg5p in the fungal cell wall. Enzymatic treatments identified PbDfg5p as a beta-glucan linked protein that undergoes N-glycosylation. The rPbDfg5p bound to extracellular matrix components, indicating that those interactions could be important for initial steps leading to P. brasiliensis attachment and colonization of host tissues. PMID:18098122

  1. Inhibition of PbGP43 Expression May Suggest that gp43 is a Virulence Factor in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Isaura; Hernandez, Orville; Tamayo, Diana; Muñoz, Jose F.; Leitão, Natanael P.; García, Ana M.; Restrepo, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Glycoprotein gp43 is an immunodominant diagnostic antigen for paracoccidioidomycosis caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. It is abundantly secreted in isolates such as Pb339. It is structurally related to beta-1,3-exoglucanases, however inactive. Its function in fungal biology is unknown, but it elicits humoral, innate and protective cellular immune responses; it binds to extracellular matrix-associated proteins. In this study we applied an antisense RNA (aRNA) technology and Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation to generate mitotically stable PbGP43 mutants (PbGP43 aRNA) derived from wild type Pb339 to study its role in P. brasiliensis biology and during infection. Control PbEV was transformed with empty vector. Growth curve, cell vitality and morphology of PbGP43 aRNA mutants were indistinguishable from those of controls. PbGP43 expression was reduced 80–85% in mutants 1 and 2, as determined by real time PCR, correlating with a massive decrease in gp43 expression. This was shown by immunoblotting of culture supernatants revealed with anti-gp43 mouse monoclonal and rabbit polyclonal antibodies, and also by affinity-ligand assays of extracellular molecules with laminin and fibronectin. In vitro, there was significantly increased TNF-? production and reduced yeast recovery when PbGP43 aRNA1 was exposed to IFN-?-stimulated macrophages, suggesting reduced binding/uptake and/or increased killing. In vivo, fungal burden in lungs of BALB/c mice infected with silenced mutant was negligible and associated with decreased lung ???10 and IL-6. Therefore, our results correlated low gp43 expression with lower pathogenicity in mice, but that will be definitely proven when PbGP43 knockouts become available. This is the first study of gp43 using genetically modified P. brasiliensis. PMID:23874627

  2. Cryptic speciation and recombination in the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis as revealed by gene genealogies.

    PubMed

    Matute, Daniel R; McEwen, Juan G; Puccia, Rosana; Montes, Beatriz A; San-Blas, Gioconda; Bagagli, Eduardo; Rauscher, Jason T; Restrepo, Angela; Morais, Favia; Niño-Vega, Gustavo; Taylor, John W

    2006-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the etiologic agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a disease confined to Latin America and of marked importance in the endemic areas due to its frequency and severity. This species is considered to be clonal according to mycological criteria and has been shown to vary in virulence. To characterize natural genetic variation and reproductive mode in this fungus, we analyzed P. brasiliensis phylogenetically in search of cryptic species and possible recombination using concordance and nondiscordance of gene genealogies with respect to phylogenies of eight regions in five nuclear loci. Our data indicate that this fungus consists of at least three distinct, previously unrecognized species: S1 (species 1 with 38 isolates), PS2 (phylogenetic species 2 with six isolates), and PS3 (phylogenetic species 3 with 21 isolates). Genealogies of four of the regions studied strongly supported the PS2 clade, composed of five Brazilian and one Venezuelan isolate. The second clade, PS3, composed solely of 21 Colombian isolates, was strongly supported by the alpha-tubulin genealogy. The remaining 38 individuals formed S1. Two of the three lineages of P. brasiliensis, S1 and PS2, are sympatric across their range, suggesting barriers to gene flow other than geographic isolation. Our study provides the first evidence for possible sexual reproduction in P. brasiliensis S1, but does not rule it out in the other two species. PMID:16151188

  3. Activation of the alternative complement pathway in canine normal serum by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Bianchini, A.A.C.; Petroni, T.F.; Fedatto, P.F.; Bianchini, R.R.; Venancio, E.J.; Itano, E.N.; Ono, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    The dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a human granulomatous disease. Recently the first case of natural disease in dogs was reported. The complement system is an important effector component of humoral immunity against infectious agents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the activation of the dog alternative complement pathway by P. brasiliensis. Initially, the ability of erythrocytes of guinea pig, rabbit, sheep, chicken and swine to activate the dog alternative pathway was evaluated. The guinea pig erythrocytes showed the greatest capacity to activate dog alternative pathway. The alternative (AH50) hemolytic activity was evaluated in 27 serum samples from healthy dogs and the mean values were 87.2 AH50/ml. No significant differences were observed in relation to sex and age. The alternative pathway activation by P. brasiliensis was higher in serum samples from adult dogs when compared to puppies and aged dogs (p ? 0.05). This is the first report of dog alternative complement pathway activation by P. brasiliensis and suggests that it may play a protective role in canine paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:24031350

  4. Rapid and reliable method for production of a specific Paracoccidioides brasiliensis immunodiffusion test antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Blumer, S O; Jalbert, M; Kaufman, L

    1984-01-01

    Previously published methods to produce Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigens for serological tests have yielded antigens of inconsistent quality and have involved the use of special semisynthetic media and growth periods of 1 to 3 months to yield suitable reagents. A simple procedure that uses commercially available potato glucose agar and either SABHI broth (Difco Laboratories) or Trypticase soy broth (BBL Microbiology Systems) inoculated with the mycelial form of P. brasiliensis consistently yielded high-titer antigens in 2 weeks or less. This new method permits the almost exclusive production of an antigen identical to the specific E antigen described by Yarzabal (Yarzabal et al., Sabouradia 14:275-280, 1976) and the apparently equivalent specific antigen 1 described by Restrepo and Moncada (A. Restrepo and L. H. Moncada, Appl. Microbiol. 28:138-144, 1974). In the immunodiffusion test, the rapidly produced antigen demonstrated a sensitivity of 90% by detecting antibody in sera from 103 of 114 proven cases of paracoccidioidomycosis. The specificity of this antigen was 100% because none of 139 sera from patients with heterologous mycotic diseases demonstrated diagnostic precipitins against the P. brasiliensis antigen. In the complement fixation tests, the rapidly produced antigen was not as suitable as the one prepared by the method of Restrepo-Moreno and Schneidau (A. Restrepo-Moreno and J. D. Schneidau, Jr., J. Bacteriol. 93:1741-1748, 1967). Images PMID:6425358

  5. Antifungal activity of trichothecenes from Fusarium sp. against clinical isolates of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fernanda Fraga; Johann, Susana; Cota, Betania Barros; Alves, Tânia Maria Almeida; Rosa, Luiz Henrique; Caligiorne, Rachel Basques; Cisalpino, Patrícia Silva; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Zani, Carlos Leomar

    2011-07-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a human mycosis caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, is a serious public health problem in several countries of Latin America. In our search we found that the crude extract of the endophytic fungus UFMGCB 551 was able to inhibit several clinical strains of P. brasiliensis, and was also active in the bioautographic assay against Cladosporium sphaerospermum. The endophytic fungus UFMGCB 551 was isolated from the plant Piptadenia adiantoides J.F. Macbr (Fabaceae). The fungus was identified as Fusarium sp. based on its macro- and micro-morphology, and on the sequence of the internally transcribed spacer regions (ITS) of its rRNA gene. The chromatographic fractionation of the fungal extract was guided by the bioautographic assay to afford three known trichothecene mycotoxins: T2-toxin (1) and a mixture of 8-n-butyrylneosolaniol (2) and 8-isobutyrylsolaniol (3). The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the these compounds against eleven clinical strains of P. brasiliensis were evaluated and found to be in the range between 75 and 640 nmol l(-1) for 1 and 160-640 nmol l(-1) for the mixture of 2 and 3. PMID:20337937

  6. Recombinant Paracoccin Reproduces the Biological Properties of the Native Protein and Induces Protective Th1 Immunity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Alegre, Ana Claudia Paiva; Oliveira, Aline Ferreira; Dos Reis Almeida, Fausto Bruno; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina; Hanna, Ebert Seixas

    2014-01-01

    Background Paracoccin is a dual-function protein of the yeast Paracoccidioides brasiliensis that has lectin properties and N-acetylglucosaminidase activities. Proteomic analysis of a paracoccin preparation from P. brasiliensis revealed that the sequence matched that of the hypothetical protein encoded by PADG-3347 of isolate Pb-18, with a polypeptide sequence similar to the family 18 endochitinases. These endochitinases are multi-functional proteins, with distinct lectin and enzymatic domains. Methodology/principal findings The multi-exon assembly and the largest exon of the predicted ORF (PADG-3347), was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and the features of the recombinant proteins were compared to those of the native paracoccin. The multi-exon protein was also used for protection assays in a mouse model of paracoccidioidomycosis. Conclusions/Significance Our results showed that the recombinant protein reproduced the biological properties described for the native protein—including binding to laminin in a manner that is dependent on carbohydrate recognition—showed N-acetylglucosaminidase activity, and stimulated murine peritoneal macrophages to produce high levels of TNF-? and nitric oxide. Considering the immunomodulatory potential of glycan-binding proteins, we also investigated whether prophylactic administration of recombinant paracoccin affected the course of experimental paracoccidioidomycosis in mice. In comparison to animals injected with vehicle (controls), mice treated with recombinant paracoccin displayed lower pulmonary fungal burdens and reduced pulmonary granulomas. These protective effects were associated with augmented pulmonary levels of IL-12 and IFN-?. We also observed that injection of paracoccin three days before challenge was the most efficient administration protocol, as the induced Th1 immunity was balanced by high levels of pulmonary IL-10, which may prevent the tissue damage caused by exacerbated inflammation. The results indicated that paracoccin is the protein encoded by PADG-3347, and we propose that this gene and homologous proteins in other P. brasiliensis strains be called paracoccin. We also concluded that recombinant paracoccin confers resistance to murine P. brasiliensis infection by exerting immunomodulatory effects. PMID:24743161

  7. Influence of Different Media, Incubation Times, and Temperatures for Determining the MICs of Seven Antifungal Agents against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis by Microdilution

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, R. C.; Werneck, S. M. C.; Oliveira, C. S.; Santos, P. C.; Soares, B. M.; Santos, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    MIC assays with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, the etiological agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, had been conducted with variable protocols, employing both macrodilution and microdilution tests and including differences in inoculum preparation, media used, incubation periods, and temperatures. Twenty-one clinical and environmental isolates of Paracoccidioides were tested using amphotericin B, itraconazole, ketoconazole, fluconazole, sulfamethoxazole, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, and terbinafine, according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, document M27-A2, 2002), with modifications such as three medium formulations (RPMI 1640 medium, McVeigh and Morton [MVM] medium, and modified Mueller-Hinton [MMH] medium), two incubation temperatures (room temperature [25 to 28°C] and 37°C), and three incubation periods (7, 10, and 15 days). The antifungal activities were also classified as fungicidal or fungistatic. The best results were obtained after 15 days of incubation, which was chosen as the standard incubation time. The MICs for most individual isolates grown for the same length of time at the same temperature varied with the different media used (P < 0.05). Of the isolates, 81% showed transition from the yeast to the mycelial form in RPMI 1640 medium at 37°C, independent of the presence of antifungals. MMH medium appears to be a suitable medium for susceptibility testing of antifungal drugs with P. brasiliensis, except for sulfamethoxazole and the combination of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, for which the MVM medium yielded better results. The incubation temperature influenced the MICs, with, in general, higher MICs at 25°C (mycelial form) than at 37°C (P < 0.05). Based on our results, we tentatively propose a microdilution assay protocol for susceptibility testing of antifungal drugs against Paracoccidioides. PMID:23175254

  8. Gamma-interferon activation of macrophages for killing of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and evidence for nonoxidative mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Brummer, E; Hanson, L H; Stevens, D A

    1988-01-01

    Fungicidal activity of murine peritoneal macrophages for the yeast form of the dimorphic fungal pathogen P. brasiliensis was studied. Killing was assessed by reduction of colony forming units (CFU) using a new medium which has a good plating efficiency. Resident peritoneal macrophages phagocytosed but did not kill P. brasiliensis. Macrophages treated overnight with recombinant gamma-interferon (IFN), lymph node cells plus concanavalin A (Con A) or Con A-stimulated spleen cell culture supernatants (Con A Sup) reproducibly killed three different isolates of P. brasiliensis (35 - 55%, P less than 0.05 - P less than 0.001). This is the first demonstration of killing of this organism by macrophages. Activated macrophages did not show enhanced phagocytosis of P. brasiliensis. Activation of macrophages for killing by IFN was dose-dependent and, varying with the isolate, 100 - 10,000 U/ml was required for inducing significant fungicidal effects against P. brasiliensis. Activation of macrophages by IFN or Con A Sup was abrogated by anti-IFN antibody. These results suggest that immune modulation may be an approach to therapy of paracoccidioidomycosis. Killing was not significantly inhibited in the presence of superoxide dismutase (450 U/ml), catalase (20,000 U/ml), dimethylsulfoxide (300 mM) or azide (1 mM). This indicated that killing mechanism(s) did not depend upon products of the oxidative burst. These results show that P. brasiliensis can be significantly killed by activated macrophages without products of the oxidative burst. PMID:3145925

  9. Melanin Protects Paracoccidioides brasiliensis from the Effects of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Inhibition and Antifungal Drugs.

    PubMed

    Baltazar, Ludmila Matos; Werneck, Silvia Maria Cordeiro; Soares, Betânia Maria; Ferreira, Marcus Vinicius L; Souza, Danielle G; Pinotti, Marcos; Santos, Daniel Assis; Cisalpino, Patrícia Silva

    2015-07-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a public health concern in Latin America and South America that when not correctly treated can lead to patient death. In this study, the influence of melanin produced by Paracoccidioides spp. on the effects of treatment with antimicrobial photodynamic inhibition (aPI) and antifungal drugs was evaluated. aPI was performed using toluidine blue (TBO) as a photosensitizer and a 630-nm light-emitting diode (LED) light. The antifungals tested were itraconazole and amphotericin B. We evaluated the effects of each approach, aPI or antifungals, against nonmelanized and melanized yeast cells by performing susceptibility tests and by quantifying oxidative and nitrosative bursts during the experiments. aPI reduced nonmelanized cells by 3.0 log units and melanized cells by 1.3 log units. The results showed that melanization protects the fungal cell, probably by acting as a scavenger of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, but not of peroxynitrite. Melanin also increased the MICs of itraconazole and amphotericin B, and the drugs were fungicidal for nonmelanized and fungistatic for melanized yeast cells. Our study shows that melanin production by Paracoccidioides yeast cells serves a protective function during aPI and treatment with itraconazole and amphotericin B. The results suggest that melanin binds to the drugs, changing their antifungal activities, and also acts as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, but not of peroxynitrite, indicating that peroxynitrite is the main radical that is responsible for fungal death after aPI. PMID:25896704

  10. Therapeutic Administration of Recombinant Paracoccin Confers Protection against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection: Involvement of TLRs

    PubMed Central

    Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Mendonça, Flávia Costa; da Silva, Thiago Aparecido; Oliveira, Aline Ferreira; Freitas, Mateus Silveira; Hanna, Ebert Seixas; Almeida, Igor C.; Gay, Nicholas J.; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Background Paracoccin (PCN) is an N-acetylglucosamine-binding lectin from the human pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Recombinant PCN (rPCN) induces a T helper (Th) 1 immune response when prophylactically administered to BALB/c mice, protecting them against subsequent challenge with P. brasiliensis. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effect of rPCN in experimental paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) and the mechanism accounting for its beneficial action. Methodology/Principal Findings Four distinct regimens of rPCN administration were assayed to identify which was the most protective, relative to vehicle administration. In all rPCN-treated mice, pulmonary granulomas were less numerous and more compact. Moreover, fewer colony-forming units were recovered from the lungs of rPCN-treated mice. Although all therapeutic regimens of rPCN were protective, maximal efficacy was obtained with two subcutaneous injections of 0.5 µg rPCN at 3 and 10 days after infection. The rPCN treatment was also associated with higher pulmonary levels of IL-12, IFN-?, TNF-?, nitric oxide (NO), and IL-10, without IL-4 augmentation. Encouraged by the pulmonary cytokine profile of treated mice and by the fact that in vitro rPCN-stimulated macrophages released high levels of IL-12, we investigated the interaction of rPCN with Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Using a reporter assay in transfected HEK293T cells, we verified that rPCN activated TLR2 and TLR4. The activation occurred independently of TLR2 heterodimerization with TLR1 or TLR6 and did not require the presence of the CD14 or CD36 co-receptors. The interaction between rPCN and TLR2 depended on carbohydrate recognition because it was affected by mutation of the receptor's N-glycosylation sites. The fourth TLR2 N-glycan was especially critical for the rPCN-TLR2 interaction. Conclusions/Significance Based on our results, we propose that PCN acts as a TLR agonist. PCN binds to N-glycans on TLRs, triggers regulated Th1 immunity, and exerts a therapeutic effect against P. brasiliensis infection. PMID:25474158

  11. Paracoccidioides lutzii Plp43 Is an Active Glucanase with Partial Antigenic Identity with P. brasiliensis gp43

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Natanael P.; Vallejo, Milene C.; Conceição, Palloma M.; Camargo, Zoilo P.; Hahn, Rosane; Puccia, Rosana

    2014-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). P. brasiliensis main diagnostic antigen is glycoprotein gp43, and its peptide sequence is 81% identical with a P. lutzii ortholog here called Plp43. P. lutzii (“Pb01-like”) apparently predominates in Midwestern/Northern Brazil, where high percentages of false-negative reactions using P. brasiliensis antigens have recently been reported. The aim of this work was to produce recombinant Plp43 to study its antigenic identity with gp43. Methodology We expressed rPlp43 as a secreted major component in Pichia pastoris and studied its reactivity in immunoblot with PCM patients' sera from Southwestern and Midwestern Brazil. Principal Findings We showed that rPlp43 is not glycosylated and bears glucanase activity. The protein did not react with anti-gp43 monoclonal antibodies in immunoblot, suggesting absence of the corresponding gp43 epitopes. Nevertheless, common epitope(s) might exist, considering that gp43-positive PCM sera recognized rPlp43 in immunoblot, while gp43-negative sera (33 out of 51) from patients resident in Midwestern Brazil were also rPlp43-negative. Two genotyped P. lutzii were from patients with gp43-negative sera, suggesting that non-reactive sera are from patients infected with this species. Conclusion Our data suggest that gp43 and Plp43 bear one or only a few common epitopes and that gp43 cannot be used in diagnosis of PCM patients infected with P. lutzii probably because Plp43 is poorly expressed during infection. PMID:25166744

  12. Antifungal activity of extracts of some plants used in Brazilian traditional medicine against the pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Johann, Susana; Cisalpino, Patricia Silva; Watanabe, Gisele Almeida; Cota, Betania Barros; de Siqueira, Ezequias Pessoa; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Zani, Carlos Leomar; de Resende, Maria Aparecida

    2010-04-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic granulomatous disease caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Almeida (Onygenales) that requires 1-2 years of treatment. In the absence of drug therapy, the disease is usually fatal, highlighting the need for the identification of safer, novel, and more effective antifungal compounds. With this need in mind, several plants employed in Brazilian traditional medicine were assayed on P. brasiliensis and murine macrophages. Extracts were prepared from 10 plant species: Inga spp. Mill. (Leguminosae), Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi (Anacardiaceae), Punica granatum L. (Punicaceae), Alternanthera brasiliana Kuntze (Amaranthaceae), Piper regnellii CDC. (Piperaceae), P. abutiloides Kunth (Piperaceae), Herissantia crispa L. Briz. (Malvaceae), Rubus urticaefolius Poir (Rosaceae), Rumex acetosa L. (Polygonaceae), and Baccharis dracunculifolia DC. (Asteraceae). Hexane fractions from hydroalcoholic extracts of Piper regnellii and Baccharis dracunculifolia were the most active against the fungus, displaying minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 7.8 microg/mL and 7.8-30 mug/mL, respectively. Additionally, neither of the extracts exhibited any apparent cytotoxic effects on murine macrophages at 20 microg/mL. Analyses of these fractions using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that the major components of B. dracunculifolia were ethyl hydrocinnamate (14.35%) and spathulenol (16.02%), while the major components of the hexane fraction of Piper regnellii were 1-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl) benzene (21.94%) and apiol (21.29%). The activities of these fractions against P. brasiliensis without evidence of cytotoxicity to macrophages justify their investigation as a potential source of new chemical agents for the treatment of PCM. PMID:20645716

  13. 43-kilodalton glycoprotein from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: immunochemical reactions with sera from patients with paracoccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, or Jorge Lobo's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Puccia, R; Travassos, L R

    1991-01-01

    Sera from patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), histoplasmosis (HP), or Jorge Lobo's disease (JL) were titrated against purified gp43 from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis by using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoprecipitation (IPP) reactions with 125I-labeled antigens. In IPP, PCM sera and other sera could be distinguished on the basis of serum titers, whereas in ELISA, 53% of the HP sera and 29% of the JL sera reacted similarly to the PCM sera. To investigate the possible role of the carbohydrate epitopes in these reactions, we compared the reactivities of sera from several patients with native and deglycosylated gp43. Competition experiments were carried out with monosaccharides as inhibitors. The results suggest that greater than 85% of the reactions of the PCM sera with gp43 involved peptide epitopes. Cross-reactions with HP and JL sera in ELISA were predominantly attributed to periodate-sensitive carbohydrate epitopes containing galactosyl residues. HP and JL sera which reacted strongly with gp43 in ELISA were only weakly reactive or did not react in IPP with labeled antigens in solution. Moreover, ELISA reactions could be significantly inhibited either by monosaccharides or by periodate treatment. Apparently, carbohydrate epitopes in gp43 are more accessible to the antibodies when the molecule is bound to a plastic substrate than when it is in solution. Structural changes in the gp43 antigen arising by N deglycosylation abolish reactivity with PCM sera and support the existence of conformational peptide epitopes. Images PMID:1722220

  14. Low-level laser therapy to the mouse femur enhances the fungicidal response of neutrophils against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Burger, Eva; Mendes, Ana Carolina S C; Bani, Giulia M A C; Brigagão, Maísa R P L; Santos, Gérsika B; Malaquias, Luiz Cosme C; Chavasco, Jorge Kleber; Verinaud, Liana M; de Camargo, Zoilo P; Hamblin, Michael R; Sperandio, Felipe F

    2015-02-01

    Neutrophils (PMN) play a central role in host defense against the neglected fungal infection paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), which is caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb). PCM is of major importance, especially in Latin America, and its treatment relies on the use of antifungal drugs. However, the course of treatment is lengthy, leading to side effects and even development of fungal resistance. The goal of the study was to use low-level laser therapy (LLLT) to stimulate PMN to fight Pb in vivo. Swiss mice with subcutaneous air pouches were inoculated with a virulent strain of Pb or fungal cell wall components (Zymosan), and then received LLLT (780 nm; 50 mW; 12.5 J/cm2; 30 seconds per point, giving a total energy of 0.5 J per point) on alternate days at two points on each hind leg. The aim was to reach the bone marrow in the femur with light. Non-irradiated animals were used as controls. The number and viability of the PMN that migrated to the inoculation site was assessed, as well as their ability to synthesize proteins, produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their fungicidal activity. The highly pure PMN populations obtained after 10 days of infection were also subsequently cultured in the presence of Pb for trials of protein production, evaluation of mitochondrial activity, ROS production and quantification of viable fungi growth. PMN from mice that received LLLT were more active metabolically, had higher fungicidal activity against Pb in vivo and also in vitro. The kinetics of neutrophil protein production also correlated with a more activated state. LLLT may be a safe and non-invasive approach to deal with PCM infection. PMID:25675431

  15. Influence of the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis 14-3-3 and gp43 proteins on the induction of apoptosis in A549 epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Vicentim, Juliana; de Oliveira, Haroldo Cesar; Marcos, Caroline Maria; Assato, Patricia Akemi; Andreotti, Patrícia Ferrari; da Silva, Juliana Leal Monteiro; Soares, Christiane Pienna; Benard, Gil; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2015-01-01

    The fungal strain Paracoccidioides brasiliensis remains viable inside of epithelial cells and can induce apoptosis in this population. However, until now, the molecules that participate in this process remained unknown. Thus, this study evaluated the contribution of two P. brasiliensis molecules, the 14-3-3 and glycoprotein of 43 kDa proteins, which had been previously described as extracellular matrix adhesins and apoptosis inductors in human pneumocytes. Accordingly, epithelial cells were treated with these molecules for different periods of time and the expression of the apoptosis regulating-proteins Bak, Bax, Bcl-2, p53 and caspases were evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling, flow cytometry and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Our results demonstrated that treatment with these molecules induces apoptosis signalling in pulmonary epithelial cells, showing the same pattern of programmed cell-death as that observed during infection with P. brasiliensis. Thus, we could conclude that P. brasiliensis uses these molecules as virulence factors that participate not only in the fungal adhesion process to host cells, but also in other important cellular mechanisms such as apoptosis. PMID:26038961

  16. Biochemical Characterization of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis ?-1,3-Glucanase Agn1p, and Its Functionality by Heterologous Expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Villalobos-Duno, Héctor; San-Blas, Gioconda; Paulinkevicius, Maryan; Sánchez-Martín, Yolanda; Nino-Vega, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    ?-1,3-Glucan is present as the outermost layer of the cell wall in the pathogenic yeastlike (Y) form of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Based on experimental evidence, this polysaccharide has been proposed as a fungal virulence factor. To degrade ?-1,3-glucan and allow remodeling of the cell wall, ?-1,3-glucanase is required. Therefore, the study of this enzyme, its encoding gene, and regulatory mechanisms, might be of interest to understand the morphogenesis and virulence process in this fungus. A single gene, orthologous to other fungal ?-1,3-glucanase genes, was identified in the Paracoccidioides genome, and labeled AGN1. Transcriptional levels of AGN1 and AGS1 (?-1,3-glucan synthase-encoding gene) increased sharply when the pathogenic Y phase was cultured in the presence of 5% horse serum, a reported booster for cell wall ?-1,3-glucan synthesis in this fungus. To study the biochemical properties of P. brasiliensis Agn1p, the enzyme was heterologously overexpressed, purified, and its activity profile determined by means of the degradation of carboxymethyl ?-1,3-glucan (SCMG, chemically modified from P. brasiliensis ?-1,3-glucan), used as a soluble substrate for the enzymatic reaction. Inhibition assays, thin layer chromatography and enzymatic reactions with alternative substrates (dextran, starch, chitin, laminarin and cellulose), showed that Agn1p displays an endolytic cut pattern and high specificity for SCMG. Complementation of a Schizosaccharomyces pombe agn1? strain with the P. brasiliensis AGN1 gene restored the wild type phenotype, indicating functionality of the gene, suggesting a possible role of Agn1p in the remodeling of P. brasiliensis Y phase cell wall. Based on amino acid sequence, P. brasiliensis Agn1p, groups within the family 71 of fungal glycoside hydrolases (GH-71), showing similar biochemical characteristics to other members of this family. Also based on amino acid sequence alignments, we propose a subdivision of fungal GH-71 into at least five groups, for which specific conserved sequences can be identified. PMID:23825576

  17. Structural and Topographic Dynamics of Pulmonary Histopathology and Local Cytokine Profiles in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Conidia-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Oswaldo G.; Restrepo, Angela; Cano, Luz Elena; Lenzi, Henrique Leonel

    2011-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), an endemic systemic mycosis caused by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), usually results in severe lung damage in patients. Methods and Findings Considering the difficulties to sequentially study the infection in humans, this work was done in mice inoculated intranasally with infective Pb-conidia. Lungs of control and Pb-infected mice were studied after 2-hours, 4, 8, 12 and 16-weeks post-infection (p.i) in order to define histopathologic patterns of pulmonary lesions, multiplex-cytokine profiles and their dynamics during the course of this mycosis. Besides the nodular/granulomatous lesions previously informed, results revealed additional non-formerly described lung abnormalities, such as periarterial sheath inflammation and pseudotumoral masses. The following chronologic stages occurring during the course of the experimental infection were defined: Stage one (2-hours p.i): mild septal infiltration composed by neutrophils and macrophages accompanied by an intense “cytokine burst” represented by significant increases in IL-1?, IL-1?, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL12p70, IL-13, IL-17, Eotaxin, G-CSF, MCP1, MIP1?, GM-CSF, IFN-?, MIP1? and TNF? levels. Stage two (4-weeks p.i): presence of nodules, evidence of incipient periarterial- and intense but disperse parenchymal- inflammation, abnormalities that continued to be accompanied by hyper-secretion of those cytokines and chemokines mentioned in the first stage of infection. Stages three and four (8 and 12-weeks p.i.): fungal proliferation, inflammation and collagenesis reached their highest intensity with particular involvement of the periarterial space. Paradoxically, lung cytokines and chemokines were down-regulated with significant decreases in IL-2,IL-3,IL-5,IL-9,IL-13,IL-15,GM-CSF,IFN-?,MIP1? and TNF?. Stage five (16-weeks p.i.): inflammation decreased becoming limited to the pseudotumoral masses and was accompanied by a “silent” cytokine response, except for PDGF, MIG, RANTES and IL12p40 which remained up-regulated for the duration of the experiment. Conclusions Results of this study identified both classic and novel patterns corresponding to histopathologic and immunologic responses occurring during the course of experimental PCM. PMID:21765962

  18. Polymorphism in the flanking regions of the PbGP43 gene from the human pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: search for protein binding sequences and poly(A) cleavage sites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio A Rocha; Flávia V Morais; Rosana Puccia

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a thermo-dimorphic fungus that causes paracoccidiodomycosis (PCM). Glycoprotein gp43 is the fungal main diagnostic antigen, which can also protect against murine PCM and interact with extracellular matrix proteins. It is structurally related to glucanases, however not active, and whose expression varies considerably. We have presently studied polymorphisms in the PbGP43 flanking regions to help understand such

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding the N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase homologue of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Mônica O; Pereira, Maristela; Felipe, Maria Sueli S; Jesuino, Rosalia Santos A; Ulhoa, Cirano J; Soares, Renata de Bastos A; Soares, Celia Maria de A

    2004-06-01

    A cDNA encoding the N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) protein of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Pb NAG1, was cloned and characterized. The 2663-nucleotide sequence of the cDNA consisted of a single open reading frame encoding a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 64.73 kDa and an isoeletric point of 6.35. The predicted protein includes a putative 30-amino-acid signal peptide. The protein as a whole shares considerable sequence similarity with 'classic' NAG. The primary sequence of Pb NAG1 was used to infer phylogenetic relationships. The amino acid sequence of Pb NAG1 has 45, 31 and 30% identity, respectively, with homologous sequences from Trichoderma harzianum, Aspergillus nidulans and Candida albicans. In particular, striking homology was observed with the active site regions of the glycosyl hydrolase group of proteins (family 20). The expected active site consensus motif G X D E and catalytic Asp and Glu residues at positions 373 and 374 were found, reinforcing that Pb NAG1 belongs to glycosyl hydrolase family 20. The nucleotide sequence of Pb nag1 and its flanking regions have been deposited, along with the amino acid sequence of the deduced protein, in GenBank under accession number AF419158. PMID:15283239

  20. Influence of 17?-Estradiol on Gene Expression of Paracoccidioides during Mycelia-to-Yeast Transition

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Jata; Wu, Thomas D.; Clemons, Karl V.; Monteiro, Jomar P.; Mirels, Laurence F.; Stevens, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioides is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection is initiated by inhalation of conidia (C) or mycelial (M) fragments, which subsequently differentiate into yeast (Y). Epidemiological studies show a striking predominance of paracoccidioidomycosis in adult men compared to premenopausal women. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that the female hormone (17?-estradiol, E2) regulates or inhibits M-or-C-to-Y transition. In this study we have profiled transcript expression to understand the molecular mechanism of how E2 inhibits M-to-Y transition. Methodology We assessed temporal gene expression in strain Pb01 in the presence or absence of E2 at various time points through 9 days of the M-to-Y transition using an 11,000 element random-shear genomic DNA microarray and verified the results using quantitative real time-PCR. E2-regulated clones were sequenced to identify genes and biological function. Principal Findings E2-treatment affected gene expression of 550 array elements, with 331 showing up-regulation and 219 showing down-regulation at one or more time points (p?0.001). Genes with low expression after 4 or 12 h exposure to E2 belonged to pathways involved in heat shock response (hsp90 and hsp70), energy metabolism, and several retrotransposable elements. Y-related genes, ?-1,3-glucan synthase, mannosyltransferase and Y20, demonstrated low or delayed expression in E2-treated cultures. Genes potentially involved in signaling, such as palmitoyltransferase (erf2), small GTPase RhoA, phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase, and protein kinase (serine/threonine) showed low expression in the presence of E2, whereas a gene encoding for an arrestin domain-containing protein showed high expression. Genes related to ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation, and oxidative stress response genes were up-regulated by E2. Conclusion This study characterizes the effect of E2 at the molecular level on the inhibition of the M-to-Y transition and is indicative that the inhibitory actions of E2 may be working through signaling genes that regulate dimorphism. PMID:22194832

  1. TLR-4 cooperates with Dectin-1 and mannose receptor to expand Th17 and Tc17 cells induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis stimulated dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Loures, Flávio V.; Araújo, Eliseu F.; Feriotti, Claudia; Bazan, Silvia B.; Calich, Vera L. G.

    2015-01-01

    The concomitant use of diverse pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) by innate immune cells can result in synergistic or inhibitory activities that profoundly influence anti-microbial immunity. Dectin-1 and the mannose receptor (MR) are C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) previously reported to cooperate with toll-like receptors (TLRs) signaling in the initial inflammatory response and in the induction of adaptive Th17 and Tc17 immunity mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. The protective immunity against paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent fungal infection of Latin America, was previously shown to be influenced by these T cell subsets motivating us to study the contribution of TLRs, Dectin-1, and MR to the development of Th17/Tc17 immunity. First, curdlan a specific Dectin-1 agonist was used to characterize the influence of this receptor in the proliferative response and Th17/Tc17 differentiation of naïve lymphocytes induced by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis activated dendritic cells (DCs) from C57BL/6 mice. Then, wild type (WT), Dectin-1–/–, TLR-2–/–, and TLR-4–/– DCs treated or untreated with anti-Dectin-1 and anti-MR antibodies were used to investigate the contribution of these receptors in lymphocyte activation and differentiation. We verified that curdlan induces an enhanced lymphocyte proliferation and development of IL-17 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, treatment of WT, TLR-2–/–, and TLR-4–/– DCs by anti-Dectin-1 antibodies or antigen presentation by Dectin-1–/– DCs led to decreased lymphoproliferation and impaired Th17 and Tc17 expansion. These responses were also inhibited by anti-MR treatment of DCs, but a synergistic action on Th17/Tc17 differentiation was mediated by TLR-4 and MR. Taken together, our results indicate that diverse TLRs and CLRs are involved in the induction of lymphocyte proliferation and Th17/Tc17 differentiation mediated by P. brasiliensis activated DCs, but a synergist action was restricted to Dectin-1, TLR-4, and MR. PMID:25873917

  2. Fibrotic sequelae in pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis: histopathological aspects in BALB/c mice infected with viable and non-viable paracoccidioides brasiliensis propagules.

    PubMed

    Cock, A M; Cano, L E; Vélez, D; Aristizábal, B H; Trujillo, J; Restrepo, A

    2000-01-01

    Patients with paracoccidioidomycosis often present pulmonary fibrosis and exhibit important respiratory limitations. Based on an already established animal model, the contribution of viable and non-viable P. brasiliensis propagules to the development of fibrosis was investigated. BALB/c male mice, 4-6 weeks old were inoculated intranasally either with 4x10(6) viable conidia (Group I), or 6. 5x10(6) fragmented yeast cells (Group II). Control animals received PBS. Six mice per period were sacrificed at 24, 48, 72h (initial) and 1, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks post-challenge (late). Paraffin embedded lungs were sectioned and stained with H&E, trichromic (Masson), reticulin and Grocot&tacute;s. During the initial period PMNs influx was important in both groups and acute inflammation involving 34% to 45% of the lungs was noticed. Later on, mononuclear cells predominated. In group I, the inflammation progressed and granulomas were formed and by the 12th week they fussed and became loose. Thick collagen I fibers were observed in 66.6% and 83.3% of the animals at 8 and 12 weeks, respectively. Collagen III, thick fibers became apparent in some animals at 4 weeks and by 12 weeks, 83% of them exhibited alterations in the organization and thickness of these elements. In group II mice, this pattern was different with stepwise decrease in the number of inflammatory foci and lack of granulomas. Although initially most animals in this group had minor alterations in thin collagen I fibers, they disappeared by the 4th week. Results indicate that tissue response to fragmented yeast cells was transitory while viable conidia evoked a progressive inflammatory reaction leading to granuloma formation and to excess production and/or disarrangement of collagens I and III; the latter led to fibrosis. PMID:10810319

  3. Molecular and Morphological Data Support the Existence of a Sexual Cycle in Species of the Genus Paracoccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Marcus de Melo; Theodoro, Raquel Cordeiro; Derengowski, Lorena da Silveira; Nicola, André Moraes; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The genus Paracoccidioides includes the thermodimorphic species Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii, both of which are etiologic agents of paracoccidioidomycosis, a systemic mycosis that affects humans in Latin America. Despite the common occurrence of a sexual stage among closely related fungi, this has not been observed with Paracoccidioides species, which have thus been considered asexual. Molecular evolutionary studies revealed recombination events within isolated populations of the genus Paracoccidioides, suggesting the possible existence of a sexual cycle. Comparative genomic analysis of all dimorphic fungi and Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated the presence of conserved genes involved in sexual reproduction, including those encoding mating regulators such as MAT, pheromone receptors, pheromone-processing enzymes, and mating signaling regulators. The expression of sex-related genes in the yeast and mycelial phases of both Paracoccidioides species was also detected by real-time PCR, with nearly all of these genes being expressed preferentially in the filamentous form of the pathogens. In addition, the expression of sex-related genes was responsive to the putative presence of pheromone in the supernatants obtained from previous cocultures of strains of two different mating types. In vitro crossing of isolates of different mating types, discriminated by phylogenetic analysis of the ?-box (MAT1-1) and the high-mobility-group (HMG) domain (MAT1-2), led to the identification of the formation of young ascocarps with constricted coiled hyphae related to the initial stage of mating. These genomic and morphological analyses strongly support the existence of a sexual cycle in species of the genus Paracoccidioides. PMID:23125354

  4. Molecular and morphological data support the existence of a sexual cycle in species of the genus Paracoccidioides.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Marcus de Melo; Theodoro, Raquel Cordeiro; Derengowski, Lorena da Silveira; Nicola, André Moraes; Bagagli, Eduardo; Felipe, Maria Sueli

    2013-03-01

    The genus Paracoccidioides includes the thermodimorphic species Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and P. lutzii, both of which are etiologic agents of paracoccidioidomycosis, a systemic mycosis that affects humans in Latin America. Despite the common occurrence of a sexual stage among closely related fungi, this has not been observed with Paracoccidioides species, which have thus been considered asexual. Molecular evolutionary studies revealed recombination events within isolated populations of the genus Paracoccidioides, suggesting the possible existence of a sexual cycle. Comparative genomic analysis of all dimorphic fungi and Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated the presence of conserved genes involved in sexual reproduction, including those encoding mating regulators such as MAT, pheromone receptors, pheromone-processing enzymes, and mating signaling regulators. The expression of sex-related genes in the yeast and mycelial phases of both Paracoccidioides species was also detected by real-time PCR, with nearly all of these genes being expressed preferentially in the filamentous form of the pathogens. In addition, the expression of sex-related genes was responsive to the putative presence of pheromone in the supernatants obtained from previous cocultures of strains of two different mating types. In vitro crossing of isolates of different mating types, discriminated by phylogenetic analysis of the ?-box (MAT1-1) and the high-mobility-group (HMG) domain (MAT1-2), led to the identification of the formation of young ascocarps with constricted coiled hyphae related to the initial stage of mating. These genomic and morphological analyses strongly support the existence of a sexual cycle in species of the genus Paracoccidioides. PMID:23125354

  5. A Morphological and Cytochemical Study of the Interaction between Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis and Neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Maria Fernanda R. G.; Filgueira, Absalom L.; de Souza, Wanderley

    2004-04-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is a systemic granulomatous disease caused by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. It is the most prevalent systemic mycosis of Latin America and 80% of the reported cases are from Brazil. Because of the great number of neutrophils found in the P. brasiliensis granuloma, studies have been done to evaluate the role of these cells during the development of the infection. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy of thin sections showed that the neutrophils ingest yeast cells through a typical phagocytic process with the formation of pseudopodes. The pseudopodes even disrupt the connection established between the mother and the bud cells. Neutrophils also associate to each other, forming a kind of extracellular vacuole where large yeast cells are encapsulated. Cytochemical studies showed that once P. brasiliensis attaches to the neutrophil surface, it triggers a respiratory burst with release of oxygen-derived products. Attachment also triggers neutrophils' degranulation, with release of endogenous peroxidase localized in cytoplasmic granules. Together, these processes lead to killing of both ingested and extracellular P. brasiliensis.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies to heat shock protein 60 induce a protective immune response against experimental Paracoccidioides lutzii.

    PubMed

    Thomaz, Luciana; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Rossi, Diego C P; Travassos, Luiz R; Taborda, Carlos P

    2014-09-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is an endemic mycosis in Latin America. PCM is primarily caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and less frequently by the recently described, closely related species Paracoccidioides lutzii. Current treatment requires protracted administration of systemic antibiotics and relapses may frequently occur despite months of initial therapy. Hence, there is a need for innovative approaches to treatment. In the present study we analyzed the impact of two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) generated against Heat Shock 60 (Hsp60) from Histoplasma capsulatum on the interactions of P. lutzii with macrophages and on the experimental P. lutzii infection. We demonstrated that the Hsp60-binding mAbs labeled P. lutzii yeast cells and enhanced their phagocytosis by macrophage cells. Treatment of mice with the mAbs to Hsp60 before infection reduced the pulmonary fungal burden as compared to mice treated with irrelevant mAb. Hence, mAbs raised to H. capsulatum Hsp60 are protective against P. lutzii, including mAb 7B6 which was non-protective against H. capsulatum, suggesting differences in their capacity to bind to these fungi and to be recognized by macrophages. These findings indicate that mAbs raised to one dimorphic fungus may be therapeutic against additional dimorphic fungi, but also suggests that biological differences in diseases may influence whether a mAb is beneficial or harmful. PMID:25161111

  7. Intermolecular interactions of the malate synthase of Paracoccidioides spp

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The fungus Paracoccidioides spp is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a pulmonary mycosis acquired by the inhalation of fungal propagules. Paracoccidioides malate synthase (PbMLS) is important in the infectious process of Paracoccidioides spp because the transcript is up-regulated during the transition from mycelium to yeast and in yeast cells during phagocytosis by murine macrophages. In addition, PbMLS acts as an adhesin in Paracoccidioides spp. The evidence for the multifunctionality of PbMLS indicates that it could interact with other proteins from the fungus and host. The objective of this study was to identify and analyze proteins that possibly bind to PbMLS (PbMLS-interacting proteins) because protein interactions are intrinsic to cell processes, and it might be possible to infer the function of a protein through the identification of its ligands. Results The search for interactions was performed using an in vivo assay with a two-hybrid library constructed in S. cerevisiae; the transcripts were sequenced and identified. In addition, an in vitro assay using pull-down GST methodology with different protein extracts (yeast, mycelium, yeast-secreted proteins and macrophage) was performed, and the resulting interactions were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Some of the protein interactions were confirmed by Far-Western blotting using specific antibodies, and the interaction of PbMLS with macrophages was validated by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. In silico analysis using molecular modeling, dynamics and docking identified the amino acids that were involved in the interactions between PbMLS and PbMLS-interacting proteins. Finally, the interactions were visualized graphically using Osprey software. Conclusion These observations indicate that PbMLS interacts with proteins that are in different functional categories, such as cellular transport, protein biosynthesis, modification and degradation of proteins and signal transduction. These data suggest that PbMLS could play different roles in the fungal cell. PMID:23672539

  8. The diversity and extracellular enzymatic activities of yeasts isolated from water tanks of Vriesea minarum, an endangered bromeliad species in Brazil, and the description of Occultifur brasiliensis f.a., sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Fátima C O; Safar, Silvana V B; Marques, Andrea R; Medeiros, Adriana O; Santos, Ana Raquel O; Carvalho, Cláudia; Lachance, Marc-André; Sampaio, José Paulo; Rosa, Carlos A

    2015-02-01

    The diversity of yeast species collected from the bromeliad tanks of Vriesea minarum, an endangered bromeliad species, and their ability to produce extracellular enzymes were studied. Water samples were collected from 30 tanks of bromeliads living in a rupestrian field site located at Serrada Piedade, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, during both the dry and rainy seasons. Thirty-six species were isolated, representing 22 basidiomycetous and 14 ascomycetous species. Occultifur sp., Cryptococcus podzolicus and Cryptococcus sp. 1 were the prevalent basidiomycetous species. The yeast-like fungus from the order Myriangiales, Candida silvae and Aureobasidium pullulans were the most frequent ascomycetous species. The diversity of the yeast communities obtained between seasons was not significantly different, but the yeast composition per bromeliad was different between seasons. These results suggest that there is significant spatial heterogeneity in the composition of populations of the yeast communities within bromeliad tanks, independent of the season. Among the 352 yeast isolates tested, 282 showed at least one enzymatic activity. Protease activity was the most widely expressed extracellular enzymatic activity, followed by xylanase, amylase, pectinase and cellulase activities. These enzymes may increase the carbon and nitrogen availability for the microbial food web in the bromeliad tank of V. minarum. Sequence analyses revealed the existence of 10 new species, indicating that bromeliad tanks are important sources of new yeasts. The novel species Occultifur brasiliensis, f.a., sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate the most frequently isolated yeast associated with V. minarum. The type strain of O. brasiliensis, f.a., sp. nov. is UFMG-CM-Y375(T) (= CBS 12687(T)). The Mycobank number is MB 809816. PMID:25515414

  9. Transcriptome Profile of the Response of Paracoccidioides spp. to a Camphene Thiosemicarbazide Derivative

    PubMed Central

    do Carmo Silva, Lívia; Tamayo Ossa, Diana Patrícia; Castro, Symone Vitoriano da Conceição; Bringel Pires, Ludmila; Alves de Oliveira, Cecília Maria; Conceição da Silva, Cleuza; Coelho, Narcimário Pereira; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Parente-Rocha, Juliana Alves; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Ruiz, Orville Hernández; Ochoa, Juan G. McEwen; Pereira, Maristela

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic granulomatous human mycosis caused by fungi of the genus Paracoccidioides, which is geographically restricted to Latin America. Inhalation of spores, the infectious particles of the fungus, is a common route of infection. The PCM treatment of choice is azoles such as itraconazole, but sulfonamides and amphotericin B are used in some cases despite their toxicity to mammalian cells. The current availability of treatments highlights the need to identify and characterize novel targets for antifungal treatment of PCM as well as the need to search for new antifungal compounds obtained from natural sources or by chemical synthesis. To this end, we evaluated the antifungal activity of a camphene thiosemicarbazide derivative (TSC-C) compound on Paracoccidioides yeast. To determine the response of Paracoccidioides spp. to TSC-C, we analyzed the transcriptional profile of the fungus after 8 h of contact with the compound. The results demonstrate that Paracoccidioides lutzii induced the expression of genes related to metabolism; cell cycle and DNA processing; biogenesis of cellular components; cell transduction/signal; cell rescue, defense and virulence; cellular transport, transport facilities and transport routes; energy; protein synthesis; protein fate; transcription; and other proteins without classification. Additionally, we observed intensely inhibited genes related to protein synthesis. Analysis by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that the compound induced the production of reactive oxygen species. Using an isolate with down-regulated SOD1 gene expression (SOD1-aRNA), we sought to determine the function of this gene in the defense of Paracoccidioides yeast cells against the compound. Mutant cells were more susceptible to TSC-C, demonstrating the importance of this gene in response to the compound. The results presented herein suggest that TSC-C is a promising candidate for PCM treatment. PMID:26114868

  10. Predicting copper-, iron-, and zinc-binding proteins in pathogenic species of the Paracoccidioides genus

    PubMed Central

    Tristão, Gabriel B.; Assunção, Leandro do Prado; dos Santos, Luiz Paulo A.; Borges, Clayton L.; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle Garcia; Soares, Célia M. de Almeida; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Bailão, Alexandre M.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately one-third of all proteins have been estimated to contain at least one metal cofactor, and these proteins are referred to as metalloproteins. These represent one of the most diverse classes of proteins, containing metal ions that bind to specific sites to perform catalytic, regulatory and structural functions. Bioinformatic tools have been developed to predict metalloproteins encoded by an organism based only on its genome sequence. Its function and the type of metal binder can also be predicted via a bioinformatics approach. Paracoccidioides complex includes termodimorphic pathogenic fungi that are found as saprobic mycelia in the environment and as yeast, the parasitic form, in host tissues. They are the etiologic agents of Paracoccidioidomycosis, a prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. Many metalloproteins are important for the virulence of several pathogenic microorganisms. Accordingly, the present work aimed to predict the copper, iron and zinc proteins encoded by the genomes of three phylogenetic species of Paracoccidioides (Pb01, Pb03, and Pb18). The metalloproteins were identified using bioinformatics approaches based on structure, annotation and domains. Cu-, Fe-, and Zn-binding proteins represent 7% of the total proteins encoded by Paracoccidioides spp. genomes. Zinc proteins were the most abundant metalloproteins, representing 5.7% of the fungus proteome, whereas copper and iron proteins represent 0.3 and 1.2%, respectively. Functional classification revealed that metalloproteins are related to many cellular processes. Furthermore, it was observed that many of these metalloproteins serve as virulence factors in the biology of the fungus. Thus, it is concluded that the Cu, Fe, and Zn metalloproteomes of the Paracoccidioides spp. are of the utmost importance for the biology and virulence of these particular human pathogens. PMID:25620964

  11. Transcriptional profile of Paracoccidioides induced by oenothein B, a potential antifungal agent from the Brazilian Cerrado plant Eugenia uniflora

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The compound oenothein B (OenB), which is isolated from the leaves of Eugenia uniflora, a Brazilian Cerrado plant, interferes with Paracoccidioides yeast cell morphology and inhibits 1,3-?-D-glucan synthase (PbFKS1) transcript accumulation, which is involved in cell wall synthesis. In this work we examined the gene expression changes in Paracoccidioides yeast cells following OenB treatment in order to investigate the adaptive cellular responses to drug stress. Results We constructed differential gene expression libraries using Representational Difference Analysis (RDA) of Paracoccidioides yeast cells treated with OenB for 90 and 180 min. Treatment for 90 min resulted in the identification of 463 up-regulated expressed sequences tags (ESTs) and 104 down-regulated ESTs. For the 180 min treatment 301 up-regulated ESTs and 143 down-regulated were identified. Genes involved in the cell wall biosynthesis, such as GLN1, KRE6 and FKS1, were found to be regulated by OenB. Infection experiments in macrophages corroborated the in vitro results. Fluorescence microscopy showed increased levels of chitin in cells treated with OenB. The carbohydrate polymer content of the cell wall of the fungus was also evaluated, and the results corroborated with the transcriptional data. Several other genes, such as those involved in a variety of important cellular processes (i.e., membrane maintenance, stress and virulence) were found to be up-regulated in response to OenB treatment. Conclusions The exposure of Paracoccidioides to OenB resulted in a complex altered gene expression profile. Some of the changes may represent specific adaptive responses to this compound in this important pathogenic fungus. PMID:24119145

  12. Inhibition of Paracoccidioides lutzii Pb01 isocitrate lyase by the natural compound argentilactone and its semi-synthetic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Prado, Renata Silva do; Alves, Ricardo Justino; Oliveira, Cecília Maria Alves de; Kato, Lucília; Silva, Roosevelt Alves da; Quintino, Guilherme Oliveira; do Desterro Cunha, Silvio; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria; Pereira, Maristela

    2014-01-01

    The dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides spp. is responsible for paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America, causing serious public health problems. Adequate treatment of mycotic infections is difficult, since fungi are eukaryotic organisms with a structure and metabolism similar to those of eukaryotic hosts. In this way, specific fungus targets have become important to search of new antifungal compound. The role of the glyoxylate cycle and its enzymes in microbial virulence has been reported in many fungal pathogens, including Paracoccidioides spp. Here, we show the action of argentilactone and its semi-synthetic derivative reduced argentilactone on recombinant and native isocitrate lyase from Paracoccidioides lutzii Pb01 (PbICL) in the presence of different carbon sources, acetate and glucose. Additionally, argentilactone and its semi-synthetic derivative reduced argentilactone exhibited relevant inhibitory activity against P. lutzii Pb01 yeast cells and dose-dependently influenced the transition from the mycelium to yeast phase. The other oxygenated derivatives tested, epoxy argentilactone and diol argentilactone-, did not show inhibitory action on the fungus. The results were supported by in silico experiments. PMID:24752170

  13. Inhibition of Paracoccidioides lutzii Pb01 Isocitrate Lyase by the Natural Compound Argentilactone and Its Semi-Synthetic Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    do Prado, Renata Silva; Alves, Ricardo Justino; de Oliveira, Cecília Maria Alves; Kato, Lucília; da Silva, Roosevelt Alves; Quintino, Guilherme Oliveira; do Desterro Cunha, Silvio; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria; Pereira, Maristela

    2014-01-01

    The dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides spp. is responsible for paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America, causing serious public health problems. Adequate treatment of mycotic infections is difficult, since fungi are eukaryotic organisms with a structure and metabolism similar to those of eukaryotic hosts. In this way, specific fungus targets have become important to search of new antifungal compound. The role of the glyoxylate cycle and its enzymes in microbial virulence has been reported in many fungal pathogens, including Paracoccidioides spp. Here, we show the action of argentilactone and its semi-synthetic derivative reduced argentilactone on recombinant and native isocitrate lyase from Paracoccidioides lutzii Pb01 (PbICL) in the presence of different carbon sources, acetate and glucose. Additionally, argentilactone and its semi-synthetic derivative reduced argentilactone exhibited relevant inhibitory activity against P. lutzii Pb01 yeast cells and dose-dependently influenced the transition from the mycelium to yeast phase. The other oxygenated derivatives tested, epoxy argentilactone and diol argentilactone-, did not show inhibitory action on the fungus. The results were supported by in silico experiments. PMID:24752170

  14. Transcriptional profile of the human pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides lutzii in response to sulfamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Zambuzzi-Carvalho, Patrícia Fernanda; Fernandes, Amanda Gregorim; Valadares, Marize Campos; Tavares, Patrícia de Mello; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria; Pereira, Maristela

    2015-06-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is the most prevalent mycosis in Latin America and is caused by a group of fungi within the Paracoccidioides genus. The disease may present clinical and pathological manifestations ranging from asymptomatic pneumonia pulmonary lesions, to disseminated forms involving multiple organs. Sulfonamides were the first drugs used to treat PCM and are still used against this fungal infection. Sulfa drugs are competitive antagonists of ?-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), a reaction catalyzed by dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS). However, the molecular effects of sulfonamides against the Paracoccidioides genus are unknown. The aim of this work was to investigate the global mechanism of action of sulfamethoxazole on Paracoccidioides lutzii. Yeast cells were grown on minimum medium in the presence or absence of sulfamethoxazole to construct EST libraries. The representational difference analysis (RDA) technique was used to identify up- and down-regulated P. lutzii genes after treatment with sulfamethoxazole. Approximately six transcripts related to mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. To confirm the RDA and bioinformatics results, several relevant genes were studied with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to evaluate their levels of expression. To confirm the impact of sulfamethoxazole on mitochondria, we measured the reduction of tetrazolium salt 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) by P. lutzii with or without exposure to the drug. MTT assays reveal that sulfamethoxazole produces a marked dose-dependent adverse effect on P. lutzii. The transcriptional activity of selected genes in infected macrophages corroborated our in vitro results. The results indicated that sulfamethoxazole acts in P. lutzii as a competitor for amino acid, nucleic acids and folate cofactor biosynthesis, disrupting mitochondrial functions. PMID:25850856

  15. Cryptic Speciation and Recombination in the Fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis as Revealed by Gene Genealogies

    E-print Network

    by Gene Genealogies Daniel R. Matute,* 1 Juan G. McEwen,*à1 Rosana Puccia,§ Beatriz A. Montes,* Gioconda and possible recombination using concordance and nondiscordance of gene genealogies with respect to phylogenies with six isolates), and PS3 (phylogenetic species 3 with 21 isolates). Genealogies of four of the regions

  16. Dendritic cell interactions with Histoplasma and Paracoccidioides.

    PubMed

    Thind, Sharanjeet K; Taborda, Carlos P; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2015-07-01

    Fungi are among the most common microbes encountered by humans. More than 100, 000 fungal species have been described in the environment to date, however only a few species cause disease in humans. Fungal infections are of particular importance to immunocompromised hosts in whom disease is often more severe, especially in those with impaired cell-mediated immunity such as individuals with HIV infection, hematologic malignancies, or those receiving TNF-? inhibitors. Nevertheless, environmental disturbances through natural processes or as a consequence of deforestation or construction can expose immunologically competent people to a large number of fungal spores resulting in asymptomatic acquisition to life-threatening disease. In recent decades, the significance of the innate immune system and more importantly the role of dendritic cells (DC) have been found to play a fundamental role in the resolution of fungal infections, such as in dimorphic fungi like Histoplasma and Paracoccidioides. In this review article the general role of DCs will be illustrated as the bridge between the innate and adaptive immune systems, as well as their specific interactions with these 2 dimorphic fungi. PMID:25933034

  17. Detection of Paracoccidioides spp. in environmental aerosol samples.

    PubMed

    Arantes, Thales Domingos; Theodoro, Raquel Cordeiro; Da Graça Macoris, Severino Assis; Bagagli, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Taking into account that paracoccidioidomycosis infection occurs by inhalation of the asexual conidia produced by Paracoccidioides spp. in its saprobic phase, this work presents the collection of aerosol samples as an option for environmental detection of this pathogen, by positioning a cyclonic air sampler at the entrance of armadillo burrows. Methods included direct culture, extinction technique culture and Nested PCR of the rRNA coding sequence, comprising the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region. In addition, we evaluated one armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) as a positive control for the studied area. Although the pathogen could not be isolated by the culturing strategies, the aerosol sampling associated with molecular detection through Nested PCR proved the best method for discovering Paracoccidioides spp. in the environment. Most of the ITS sequences obtained in this investigation proved to be highly similar with the homologous sequences of Paracoccidioides lutzii from the GenBank database, suggesting that this Paracoccidioides species may not be exclusive to mid-western Brazil as proposed so far. PMID:22762209

  18. The response of Paracoccidioides spp. to nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Parente, Ana F A; Naves, Priscila E C; Pigosso, Laurine L; Casaletti, Luciana; McEwen, Juan G; Parente-Rocha, Juliana A; Soares, Célia M A

    2015-08-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is an endemic disease in Latin America caused by species belonging to the genus Paracoccidioides. During infection, immune cells present a variety of defense mechanisms against pathogens. One of these defensive strategies is the production and release of nitric oxide (NO) and S-nitroso thiols (e.g., S-nitrosoglutathione, GSNO), which produce reactive nitrogen species (RNS). This results in damage to DNA and membranes, inhibition of respiration and inactivation of cellular enzymes. In response to nitrosative stress, human pathogenic fungi possess defense mechanisms to prevent the adverse effects of NO, which helps them survive during initial contact with the host immune system. To understand how Paracoccidioides spp. respond to nitrosative stress, we conducted this study to identify genes and proteins that might contribute to this response. The results of proteomic analysis demonstrated that nitrosative stress induced a reduction in the expression of proteins related to the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This hypothesis was supported by the reduced mitochondrial activity observed in the presence of GSNO. Additionally, lipids and branched chain amino acid metabolism enzymes were altered. The role played by enzymes acting in oxidative stress in the RNS response was remarkable. This interface among enzymes acting in both stress responses was confirmed by using a RNA approach to silence the ccp gene in Paracoccidioides. It was observed that mutants with low expression of the ccp gene were more sensitive to nitrosative stress. PMID:25841799

  19. Galleria mellonella as a model host to study Paracoccidioides lutzii and Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Thomaz, Luciana; García-Rodas, Rocío; Guimarães, Allan J.; Taborda, Carlos P.; Zaragoza, Oscar; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    Non-mammalian models have been used to investigate fungal virulence. In this work we have explored the use of Galleria mellonella as an infection model for the pathogenic dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides lutzii. In mammalian models these fungi cause similar infections, and disease outcomes are influenced by the quantity of the infective inocula. We describe a similar aspect in a G. mellonella model and characterize the pathogenesis features in this system. Infection with P. lutzii or H. capsulatum, in all inoculum used, killed larvae at 25 and 37°C. However, there was a lack of correlation between the number of yeast cells used for infection and the time to larvae death, which may indicate that the fungi induce protective responses in a dynamic manner as the lowest concentrations of fungi induced the most rapid death. For both fungi, the degree of larvae melanization was directly proportional to the inocula size, and this effect was visibly more apparent at 37°C. Histological evaluation of the larvae showed a correlation between the inoculum and granuloma-like formation. Our results suggest that G. mellonella is a potentially useful model to study virulence of dimorphic fungi. PMID:23302787

  20. Proteomic profile response of Paracoccidioides lutzii to the antifungal argentilactone

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Renata S.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Silva, Lívia C.; de Oliveira, Cecília M. A.; Marques, Monique F.; Silva, Luciano P.; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela P.; Lima, Aliny P.; Soares, Célia M.; Pereira, Maristela

    2015-01-01

    The dimorphic fungi Paracoccidioides spp. are the etiological agents of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a mycosis of high incidence in Brazil. The toxicity of drug treatment and the emergence of resistant organisms have led to research for new candidates for drugs. In this study, we demonstrate that the natural product argentilactone was not cytotoxic or genotoxic to MRC5 cells at the IC50 concentration to the fungus. We also verified the proteomic profile of Paracoccidioides lutzii after incubation with argentilactone using a label free quantitative proteome nanoUPLC-MSE. The results of this study indicated that the fungus has a global metabolic adaptation in the presence of argentilactone. Enzymes of important pathways, such as glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and the glyoxylate cycle, were repressed, which drove the metabolism to the methylcytrate cycle and beta-oxidation. Proteins involved in cell rescue, defense and stress response were induced. In this study, alternative metabolic pathways adopted by the fungi were elucidated, helping to elucidate the course of action of the compound studied. PMID:26150808

  1. Paracoccidoides brasiliensis 30 kDa Adhesin: Identification as a 14-3-3 Protein, Cloning and Subcellular Localization in Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Julhiany de Fatima; de Oliveira, Haroldo César; Marcos, Caroline Maria; da Silva, Rosângela Aparecida Moraes; da Costa, Tania Alves; Calich, Vera Lucia García; Almeida, Ana Marisa Fusco; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2013-01-01

    Paracoccidoides brasiliensis adhesion to lung epithelial cells is considered an essential event for the establishment of infection and different proteins participate in this process. One of these proteins is a 30 kDa adhesin, pI 4.9 that was described as a laminin ligand in previous studies, and it was more highly expressed in more virulent P. brasiliensis isolates. This protein may contribute to the virulence of this important fungal pathogen. Using Edman degradation and mass spectrometry analysis, this 30 kDa adhesin was identified as a 14-3-3 protein. These proteins are a conserved group of small acidic proteins involved in a variety of processes in eukaryotic organisms. However, the exact function of these proteins in some processes remains unknown. Thus, the goal of the present study was to characterize the role of this protein during the interaction between the fungus and its host. To achieve this goal, we cloned, expressed the 14-3-3 protein in a heterologous system and determined its subcellular localization in in vitro and in vivo infection models. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed the ubiquitous distribution of this protein in the yeast form of P. brasiliensis, with some concentration in the cytoplasm. Additionally, this 14-3-3 protein was also present in P. brasiliensis cells at the sites of infection in C57BL/6 mice intratracheally infected with P. brasiliensis yeast cells for 72 h (acute infections) and 30 days (chronic infection). An apparent increase in the levels of the 14-3-3 protein in the cell wall of the fungus was also noted during the interaction between P. brasiliensis and A549 cells, suggesting that this protein may be involved in host-parasite interactions, since inhibition assays with the protein and this antibody decreased P. brasiliensis adhesion to A549 epithelial cells. Our data may lead to a better understanding of P. brasiliensis interactions with host tissues and paracoccidioidomycosis pathogenesis. PMID:23638109

  2. The multifaceted roles of metabolic enzymes in the Paracoccidioides species complex

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, Caroline M.; de Oliveira, Haroldo C.; da Silva, Julhiany de F.; Assato, Patrícia A.; Fusco-Almeida, Ana M.; Mendes-Giannini, Maria J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Paracoccidioides species are dimorphic fungi and are the etiologic agents of paracoccidioidomycosis, which is a serious disease that involves multiple organs. The many tissues colonized by this fungus suggest a variety of surface molecules involved in adhesion. A surprising finding is that most enzymes in the glycolytic pathway, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and glyoxylate cycle in Paracoccidioides spp. have adhesive properties that aid in interacting with the host extracellular matrix and thus act as ‘moonlighting’ proteins. Moonlighting proteins have multiple functions, which adds a dimension to cellular complexity and benefit cells in several ways. This phenomenon occurs in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. For example, moonlighting proteins from the glycolytic pathway or TCA cycle can play a role in bacterial pathogenesis by either acting as proteins secreted in a conventional pathway and/or as cell surface components that facilitate adhesion or adherence. This review outlines the multifunctionality exhibited by many Paracoccidioides spp. enzymes, including aconitase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, triose phosphate isomerase, fumarase, and enolase. We discuss the roles that moonlighting activities play in the virulence characteristics of this fungus and several other human pathogens during their interactions with the host. PMID:25566229

  3. Effect of levamisole on experimental paracoccidioidomycosis in the Syrian hamster: Immunologic and histopathologic correlation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. T. Rezkallah-Iwasso; N. G. S. Mota; M. C. G. Gomes; M. R. Montenegro

    1984-01-01

    The effect of levamisole (LMS) was studied in hamsters inoculated with live yeast phase culture of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis by intratesticular route. One group started LMS therapy at an early stage of infection (LMS3 group), when the animals were immunocompetent, and another group was treated in a later stage, when the immune response was already depressed (LMS12 group). As control, one

  4. ANTIGENIC ANALYSES OF THE ADULT WORMS OF NIPPOSTRONGYLUS BRASILIENSIS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ANTIGENIC ANALYSES OF THE ADULT WORMS OF NIPPOSTRONGYLUS BRASILIENSIS BY CROSSED brasiliensis result in expulsion of the adult worm population (Ogilvie, 1964; Barth et al., 1966; Luffau, 19691 of the infection in hypo- thymic nu/nu mice (Mitchell et al., 1976); b) by the normal expulsion of the worms from

  5. Genetic Diversity of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis Isolated in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Hwan; Kim, Jin-Beom; Lim, Jeong-A; Han, Sang-Wook; Heu, Sunggi

    2014-01-01

    The plant pathogenic bacterial genus Pectobacteirum consists of heterogeneous strains. The P. carotovorum species is a complex strain showing divergent characteristics, and a new subspecies named P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis has been identified recently. In this paper, we re-identified the P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis isolates from those classified under the subspecies carotovorum and newly isolated P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis strains. All isolates were able to produce plant cell-wall degrading enzymes such as pectate lyase, polygalacturonase, cellulase and protease. We used genetic and biochemical methods to examine the diversity of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis isolates, and found genetic diversity within the brasiliensis subsp. isolates in Korea. The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis based on the recA gene revealed a unique pattern for the brasiliensis subspecies. The Korean brasiliensis subsp. isolates were divided into four clades based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. However, correlations between clades and isolated hosts or year could not be found, suggesting that diverse brasiliensis subsp. isolates existed. PMID:25288994

  6. Dry yeast

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ranveig Thattai (None; )

    2005-09-27

    Yeast is a type of eukaryotic organism that can live in a dormant state. It can be activated from its dormant state by water and sugar. The yeast uses the sugar to grow and produces carbon dioxide gas as a byproduct.

  7. Yeast virology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    REED B. WICKNER

    The three families of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses and two families of retroviruses (retrotranspo- sons) of the yeast Sacc\\/zaromyces cerevisiaeare all trans- mitted between cells only by cell fusion, probably re- flecting the high frequency of mating of yeast cells in nature. One dsRNA virus and two retroviruses appar- ently use ribosomal \\

  8. Counting Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, Jonathan; Welton, Briana

    1998-01-01

    Describes changes to a traditional study of population in yeast colonies. Changes to the procedures include: (1) only one culture per student team; (2) cultures are inoculated only once; and (3) the same tube is sampled daily. (DDR)

  9. Yeast Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Candida is the scientific name for yeast. It is a fungus that lives almost everywhere, including in ... infection that causes white patches in your mouth Candida esophagitis is thrush that spreads to your esophagus, ...

  10. ANIMAL MODEL OF NIPPOSTRONGYLUS BRASILIENSIS AND HELIGMOSOMOIDES POLYGYRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal models of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heligmosomoides polygyrus infection are powerful tools for the investigation of the basic biology of immune responses and protective immunity. In particular they model the induction and maintenance of Th2 type immune responses and exhibiting all the ...

  11. YEAST GENETICS Fred Winston

    E-print Network

    Winston, Fred

    YEAST GENETICS Fred Winston 7.1 Introduction Key Concepts · Genetic studies of the yeast. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an ideal experimental organism. It is a microorganism that has a fast biology. Yeast has been the focus of extensive studies in many aspects of molecular biology. These areas

  12. Genital Yeast Infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Oriel; Betty M. Partridge; Maire J. Denny; J. C. Coleman

    1972-01-01

    Genital yeast infection was studied in 533 women seen in a department of venereology. Yeasts were recovered in culture from 138 patients (26% of the total). Candida albicans accounted for 112 (81%) of the isolates and Torulopsis glabrata for 22 (16%); other yeasts were uncommon. There was no evidence that the presence of yeasts was related to age. 32% of

  13. Homologous Hevea brasiliensis REF (Hevb1) and SRPP (Hevb3) present different auto-assembling.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Karine; Lecomte, Sophie; Estevez, Yannick; Coulary-Salin, Bénédicte; Peruch, Frédéric

    2014-02-01

    HbREF and HbSRPP are two Hevea brasiliensis proteins present on rubber particles, and probably involved in the coagulation of latex. Their function is unclear, but we previously discovered that REF had amyloid properties, which could be of particular interest during the coagulation process. First, we confirmed that REF and SRPP, homologous and principal proteins in hevea latex, are not glycoproteins. In this work, we investigated various aspects of protein interactions: aggregation, auto-assembling, yeast and erythrocyte agglutination, co-interactions by various biochemical (PAGE, spectroscopy, microscopy), biophysical (DLS, ellipsometry) and structural (TEM, ATR-FTIR, PM-IRRAS) approaches. We demonstrated that both proteins are auto-assembling into different aggregative states: REF polymerizes as an amyloid rich in ?-sheets and forms quickly large aggregates (>?m), whereas SRPP auto-assembles in solution into stable nanomultimers of a more globular nature. Both proteins are however able to interact together, and SRPP may inhibit the amyloidogenesis of REF. REF is also able to interact with the membranes of yeasts and erythrocytes, leading to their agglutination. In addition, we also showed that both REF and SRPP did not have antimicrobial activity, whereas their activity on membranes has been clearly evidenced. We may suspect that these aggregative properties, even though they are clearly different, may occur during coagulation, when the membrane is destabilized. The interaction of proteins with membranes could help in the colloidal stability of latex, whereas the protein-protein interactions would contribute to the coagulation process, by bringing rubber particles together or eventually disrupting the particle monomembranes. PMID:24239687

  14. Antimutagenic effect of aqueous extract from Agaricus brasiliensis on culture of human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gameiro, Paula H; Nascimento, José S; Rocha, Beatriz H G; Piana, Clause F B; Santos, Raquel A; Takahashi, Catarina S

    2013-02-01

    The mushroom Agaricus brasiliensis (sun mushroom), native from the southeast of Brazil, is well known by its medicinal properties that include effects on diabetes, cholesterol levels, and osteoporosis. The antimutagenic effects of A. brasiliensis has been investigated recently and revealed some controversial results depending on the temperature by which the A. brasiliensis tea is obtained. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the A. brasiliensis extract prepared in two different temperatures, 4°C and 25°C, on the doxorubicin-induced DNA strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in human lymphocytes. The results demonstrated that A. brasiliensis was able to reduce the DXR-induced DNA damage in both temperatures; however, the CA test was more sensitive to demonstrate a better reduction when the cells were treated with an extract obtained at 25°C. A. brasiliensis extract obtained in different temperatures exhibited antigenotoxic and anticlastogenic effects in human lymphocytes. PMID:23289788

  15. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic Acid Synthase Genes in Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jia-Hong; Xu, Jing; Chang, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Zhi-Li

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is an important factor that stimulates Hevea brasiliensis to produce natural rubber. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) is a rate-limiting enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis. However, knowledge of the ACS gene family of H. brasiliensis is limited. In this study, nine ACS-like genes were identified in H. brasiliensis. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis results confirmed that seven isozymes (HbACS1–7) of these nine ACS-like genes were similar to ACS isozymes with ACS activity in other plants. Expression analysis results showed that seven ACS genes were differentially expressed in roots, barks, flowers, and leaves of H. brasiliensis. However, no or low ACS gene expression was detected in the latex of H. brasiliensis. Moreover, seven genes were differentially up-regulated by ethylene treatment.These results provided relevant information to help determine the functions of the ACS gene in H. brasiliensis, particularly the functions in regulating ethylene stimulation of latex production. PMID:25690030

  16. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Human Fungal Pathogens Causing Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Christopher A.; Champion, Mia D.; Holder, Jason W.; Muszewska, Anna; Goldberg, Jonathan; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Brigido, Marcelo Macedo; Ferreira, Márcia Eliana da Silva; Garcia, Ana Maria; Grynberg, Marcin; Gujja, Sharvari; Heiman, David I.; Henn, Matthew R.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; León-Narváez, Henry; Longo, Larissa V. G.; Ma, Li-Jun; Malavazi, Iran; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Morais, Flavia V.; Pereira, Maristela; Rodríguez-Brito, Sabrina; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Salem-Izacc, Silvia M.; Sykes, Sean M.; Teixeira, Marcus Melo; Vallejo, Milene C.; Walter, Maria Emília Machado Telles; Yandava, Chandri; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zucker, Jeremy; Felipe, Maria Sueli; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Haas, Brian J.; McEwen, Juan G.; Nino-Vega, Gustavo; Puccia, Rosana; San-Blas, Gioconda; Soares, Celia Maria de Almeida; Birren, Bruce W.; Cuomo, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is a fungal pathogen and the cause of paracoccidioidomycosis, a health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. Infection by Paracoccidioides, a dimorphic fungus in the order Onygenales, is coupled with a thermally regulated transition from a soil-dwelling filamentous form to a yeast-like pathogenic form. To better understand the genetic basis of growth and pathogenicity in Paracoccidioides, we sequenced the genomes of two strains of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb03 and Pb18) and one strain of Paracoccidioides lutzii (Pb01). These genomes range in size from 29.1 Mb to 32.9 Mb and encode 7,610 to 8,130 genes. To enable genetic studies, we mapped 94% of the P. brasiliensis Pb18 assembly onto five chromosomes. We characterized gene family content across Onygenales and related fungi, and within Paracoccidioides we found expansions of the fungal-specific kinase family FunK1. Additionally, the Onygenales have lost many genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism and fewer genes involved in protein metabolism, resulting in a higher ratio of proteases to carbohydrate active enzymes in the Onygenales than their relatives. To determine if gene content correlated with growth on different substrates, we screened the non-pathogenic onygenale Uncinocarpus reesii, which has orthologs for 91% of Paracoccidioides metabolic genes, for growth on 190 carbon sources. U. reesii showed growth on a limited range of carbohydrates, primarily basic plant sugars and cell wall components; this suggests that Onygenales, including dimorphic fungi, can degrade cellulosic plant material in the soil. In addition, U. reesii grew on gelatin and a wide range of dipeptides and amino acids, indicating a preference for proteinaceous growth substrates over carbohydrates, which may enable these fungi to also degrade animal biomass. These capabilities for degrading plant and animal substrates suggest a duality in lifestyle that could enable pathogenic species of Onygenales to transfer from soil to animal hosts. PMID:22046142

  17. Polymorphic microsatellite loci from the endangered Giant Otter ( Pteronura brasiliensis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carolina Ribas; Anderson V. Vasconcellos; Guilherme Mourão; William Magnusson; Antonio M. Solé-Cava; Haydée A. Cunha

    We describe the first microsatellite loci isolated from the giant otter (Pteronura brasiliensis), an endangered mustelid endemic to South America. Fourteen di- and trinucleotide polymorphic loci were characterised in\\u000a fourteen individuals from the Pantanal wetlands, Central Brazil. Number of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 5, and average\\u000a observed heterozygosity was 0.577. Two loci were in linkage disequilibrium, and

  18. Laticifer-Specific Gene Expression in Hevea Brasiliensis (Rubber Tree)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anil Kush; Elisabeth Goyvaerts; Mee-Len Chye; Nam-Hai Chua

    1990-01-01

    Natural rubber, cis-1,4-polyisoprene, is obtained from a colloidal fluid called latex, which represents the cytoplasmic content of the laticifers of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis). We have developed a method of extracting translatable mRNA from freshly tapped latex. Analysis of in vitro translation products of latex mRNA showed that the encoded polypeptides are very different from those of leaf mRNA

  19. Partial purification of protective antigens from Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in mice.

    PubMed

    Rhalem, A; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Pery, P

    1988-01-01

    The purification of antigens from Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, through their ability to provoke cellular proliferation of immune cells and through their recognition by antibodies, led to an antigenic preparation which was extracted from adult worms and which contained only two proteins (MW 14 and 43 Kd). Mice which were vaccinated by the oral route after the entrapment of these two proteins in liposomes were strongly protected. PMID:3370130

  20. Yeast Education Network

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Yeast Education Network provides a variety of resources to facilitate use of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in undergraduate science curricula. Laboratory, classroom, and computer-based activities can be used with college and advanced high school students.

  1. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... infection from your sexual partner. Condoms and dental dams may help prevent getting or passing yeast infections ... infection from your sexual partner. Condoms and dental dams may help prevent getting or passing yeast infections ...

  2. Vaginal Yeast Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Vaginal Yeast Infection Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Vaginal yeast infection, or vulvovaginal candidiasis, is a common cause ...

  3. CLONTECHInnovative Yeast Protocols Handbook

    E-print Network

    Erickson, F. Les

    CLONTECHInnovative Tools to Accelerate Discovery Yeast Protocols Handbook PT3024-1 (PR13103 FOR RESEARCH USE ONLY #12;Yeast Protocols Handbook CLONTECH Laboratories, Inc. www.clontech.com Protocol # PT3024-1 2 Version # PR13103 I. Introduction 4 II. Introduction to Yeast Promoters 5 III. Culturing

  4. Revalidation and redescription of Triatoma brasiliensis macromelasoma Galvão, 1956 and an identification key for the Triatoma brasiliensis complex (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae)

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Jane; Correia, Nathália Cordeiro; Neiva, Vanessa Lima; Gonçalves, Teresa Cristina Monte; Felix, Márcio

    2013-01-01

    Triatoma brasiliensis macromelasoma is revalidated based on the results of previous multidisciplinary studies on the Triatoma brasiliensis complex, consisting of crossing experiments and morphological, biological, ecological and molecular analyses. These taxonomic tools showed the closest relationship between T. b. macromelasoma and Triatoma brasiliensis brasiliensis. T. b. macromelasoma is redescribed based on specimens collected in the type locality and specimens from a F1 colony. The complex now comprises T. b. brasiliensis, T. b. macromelasoma, Triatoma melanica, Triatoma juazeirensis and Triatoma sherlocki. An identification key for all members of the complex is presented. This detailed comparative study of the morphological features of T. b. macromelasoma and the remaining members of the complex corroborates results from multidisciplinary analyses, suggesting that the subspecific status is applicable. This subspecies can be distinguished by the following combination of features: a pronotum with 1+1 narrow brownish-yellow stripes on the submedian carinae, not attaining its apex, hemelytra with membrane cells darkened on the central portion and legs with an incomplete brownish-yellow ring on the apical half of the femora. Because the T. brasiliensis complex is of distinct epidemiological importance throughout its geographic distribution, a precise identification of its five members is important for monitoring and controlling actions against Chagas disease transmission. PMID:24037202

  5. Immunomodulatory effect of diethylcarbamazine in mice infected with Nocardia brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, M; Castro-Corona, M A; Segoviano-Ramírez, J C; Brattig, N W; Medina-De la Garza, C E

    2014-11-01

    We tested whether diethylcarbamazine (DEC) or ivermectin (IVM), both antiparasitic drugs with reported immunomodulatory properties, were able to affect the immune system to potentiate host defense mechanisms and protect against actinomycetoma in a mouse model. Male BALB/c mice of 10-12 weeks of age were injected with either Nocardia brasiliensis or saline solution. Recorded were the effects of a treatment by DEC (6 mg/kg per os daily for one week) or IVM (200 ?g/kg subcutaneously on days 1 and 3) on (i) the development of mycetoma lesion, (ii) the expression of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) by phagocytes, (iii) the proliferation index of lymphocytes and (iv) antibody production of IgG and IgM. After an initial lesion in all mice, DEC inhibited a full development and progression of actinomycetoma resulting in a reduced lesion size (p < 0.001). IVM had no inhibitory effect on the development of mycetoma. Furthermore, DEC treatment was associated with a significant enhancement of ROI expression (p < 0.05) by polymorphonuclear neutrophils at day 3 after infection. Lymphocyte proliferation in response to N. brasiliensis antigens and concanavalin A in DEC-treated group was higher than in non-treated group at day 21 and 28 postinfection (p < 0.01). Significant changes in antibody response were not observed. By all parameters tested, DEC was superior to IVM regarding immunostimulatory potency. In conclusion, DEC expressed an in vivo influence on the immune status during the infection by N. brasiliensis leading to retrogression of the mycetoma and increasing cellular immune responses. Our findings may indicate a potential use of DEC as a putative adjuvant in infectious disease or vaccination. PMID:25150175

  6. Taxonomic and Functional Microbial Signatures of the Endemic Marine Sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Trindade-Silva, Amaro E.; Rua, Cintia; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.; Dutilh, Bas E.; Moreira, Ana Paula B.; Edwards, Robert A.; Hajdu, Eduardo; Lobo-Hajdu, Gisele; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza; Berlinck, Roberto G. S.; Thompson, Fabiano L.

    2012-01-01

    The endemic marine sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis (Porifera, Demospongiae, Haplosclerida) is a known source of secondary metabolites such as arenosclerins A-C. In the present study, we established the composition of the A. brasiliensis microbiome and the metabolic pathways associated with this community. We used 454 shotgun pyrosequencing to generate approximately 640,000 high-quality sponge-derived sequences (?150 Mb). Clustering analysis including sponge, seawater and twenty-three other metagenomes derived from marine animal microbiomes shows that A. brasiliensis contains a specific microbiome. Fourteen bacterial phyla (including Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Cloroflexi) were consistently found in the A. brasiliensis metagenomes. The A. brasiliensis microbiome is enriched for Betaproteobacteria (e.g., Burkholderia) and Gammaproteobacteria (e.g., Pseudomonas and Alteromonas) compared with the surrounding planktonic microbial communities. Functional analysis based on Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology (RAST) indicated that the A. brasiliensis microbiome is enriched for sequences associated with membrane transport and one-carbon metabolism. In addition, there was an overrepresentation of sequences associated with aerobic and anaerobic metabolism as well as the synthesis and degradation of secondary metabolites. This study represents the first analysis of sponge-associated microbial communities via shotgun pyrosequencing, a strategy commonly applied in similar analyses in other marine invertebrate hosts, such as corals and algae. We demonstrate that A. brasiliensis has a unique microbiome that is distinct from that of the surrounding planktonic microbes and from other marine organisms, indicating a species-specific microbiome. PMID:22768320

  7. Transformation of Yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert Hinnen; James B. Hicks; Gerald R. Fink

    1978-01-01

    A stable leu2- yeast strain has been transformed to LEU2+ by using a chimeric ColE1 plasmid carrying the yeast leu2 gene. We have used recently developed hybridization and restriction endonuclease mapping techniques to demonstrate directly the presence of the transforming DNA in the yeast genome and also to determine the arrangement of the sequences that were introduced. These studies show

  8. Vaginal Yeast Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... treatment is simple and painless. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection, also known as candidiasis ( ... you can be treated appropriately. Do Guys Get Yeast Infections? Guys can get an infection of the ...

  9. Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... links Read our disclaimer about external links Menu Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction On this page: Key ... will help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Red Yeast Rice Red yeast rice is made by ...

  10. Mitochondrial assembly in yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Les A Grivell; Marta Artal-Sanz; Gertjan Hakkaart; Liesbeth de Jong; Leo G. J Nijtmans; Katinka van Oosterum; Michel Siep; Hans van der Spek

    1999-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is likely to be the first organism for which a complete inventory of mitochondrial proteins and their functions can be drawn up. A survey of the 340 or so proteins currently known to be localised in yeast mitochondria reveals the considerable investment required to maintain the organelle’s own genetic system, which itself contributes seven key components

  11. Alcoholic Fermentation in Yeast

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ingrid Waldron

    Students learn about the basics of aerobic cellular respiration and alcoholic fermentation and design and carry out experiments to test how variables such as sugar concentration influence the rate of alcoholic fermentation in yeast. In an optional extension activity students can use their yeast mixture to make a small roll of bread.

  12. Yeasts: Neglected Pathogens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Poulain; Boualem Sendid; Annie Standaert-Vitse; Chantal Fradin; Thierry Jouault; Samir Jawhara; Jean-Frederic Colombel

    2009-01-01

    Background: Current research on Crohn’s disease (CD) concerns molecular events related to loss of tolerance to microbes that could trigger or maintain inflammation in genetically susceptible individuals. CD is also associated with antimicrobial antibodies, including the antibodies we described against yeast oligomannosides (ASCA). This prompted us to investigate a role for another yeast, Candida albicans, a very common commensal of

  13. Expulsion of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis by mice deficient in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Uber, C L; Roth, R L; Levy, D A

    1980-09-18

    Expulsion of the intestinal helminth, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, occurs spontaneously about 2 weeks after a primary infection of rats and mice. Cellular changes in the small intestine coincident with the period of expulsion have suggested several mechanisms by which this 'self-cure' may be effected. Local anaphylaxis was proposed as a possible means of parasite clearance; this hypothesis has been supported by the demonstration of specific reaginic antibody production and jejunal mast cell accumulation in infected animals. In addition, increased mucus secretion and more recently, goblet cell proliferation in the jejunal mucosa of rats have been noted and considered as potentially important in mediating the self-cure reaction. The data presented below indicate that in the absence of demonstrable mast cells, the course of a primary infection with this parasite is unchanged; however, they are supportive of a role for globlet cells in the self-cure reaction. PMID:7432459

  14. Drimanes from Drimys brasiliensis with leishmanicidal and antimalarial activity

    PubMed Central

    Claudino, Vanessa Duarte; da Silva, Kesia Caroline; Cechinel, Valdir; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Monache, Franco Delle; Giménez, Alberto; Salamanca, Efrain; Gutierrez-Yapu, David; Malheiros, Angela

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates CHCl3 and CH3OH extracts of the stem bark, branches and leaves of Drimys brasiliensis and drimane sesquiterpenes isolated from the stem bark against strains of Leishmania amazonensis and Leishmania braziliensis promastigotes and Plasmodium falciparum trophozoites. All of the extracts and compounds were tested in cell lines in comparison with reference standards and cell viability was determined by the XTT method. The CHCl3 and CH3OH extracts from the stem bark and branches yielded promising results against two strains of Leishmania, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50 ) values ranging from 39-100 µg/mL. The CHCl3 extract of the stem bark returned IC50 values of 39 and 40.6 µg/mL for L. amazonensis and L. braziliensis, respectively. The drimanes were relatively effective: 1-?-(p-coumaroyloxy)-polygodial produced IC50 values of 5.55 and 2.52 µM for L. amazonensis and L. braziliensis, respectively, compared with 1-?-(p-methoxycinnamoyl)-polygodial, which produced respective IC50 values of 15.85 and 17.80 µM. The CHCl3 extract demonstrated activity (IC50 of 3.0 µg/mL) against P. falciparum. The IC50 values of 1-?-(p-cumaroyloxyl)-polygodial and 1-?-(p-methoxycinnamoyl)-polygodial were 1.01 and 4.87 µM, respectively, for the trophozoite strain. Therefore, the results suggest that D. brasiliensis is a promising plant from which to obtain new and effective antiparasitic agents. PMID:23579790

  15. Yeast transcription factors Kevin Struhl

    E-print Network

    Yeast transcription factors Kevin Struhl Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA Studies of yeast Transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are fundamentally similar in eukaryotic organisms from yeasts to humans (for reviews of yeast transcription, see [1,2]). Compo- nents of the chromatin template and the basic RNA

  16. Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ai Leng Teoh; Gillian Heard; Julian Cox

    2004-01-01

    Kombucha is a traditional fermentation of sweetened tea, involving a symbiosis of yeast species and acetic acid bacteria. Despite reports of different yeast species being associated with the fermentation, little is known of the quantitative ecology of yeasts in Kombucha. Using oxytetracycline-supplemented malt extract agar, yeasts were isolated from four commercially available Kombucha products and identified using conventional biochemical and

  17. Yeast expression platforms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik Böer; Gerhard Steinborn; Gotthard Kunze; Gerd Gellissen

    2007-01-01

    Yeasts provide attractive expression platforms. They combine ease of genetic manipulations and the option for a simple fermentation\\u000a design of a microbial organism with the capabilities of an eukaryotic organism to secrete and to modify a protein according\\u000a to a general eukaryotic scheme. For platform applications, a range of yeast species has been developed during the last decades.\\u000a We present

  18. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing enzymes of yeasts.

  19. Secreted proteomes of different developmental stages of the gastrointestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Sotillo, Javier; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Harcus, Yvonne; Pickering, Darren; Bouchery, Tiffany; Camberis, Mali; Tang, Shiau-Choot; Giacomin, Paul; Mulvenna, Jason; Mitreva, Makedonka; Berriman, Matthew; LeGros, Graham; Maizels, Rick M; Loukas, Alex

    2014-10-01

    Hookworms infect more than 700 million people worldwide and cause more morbidity than most other human parasitic infections. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (the rat hookworm) has been used as an experimental model for human hookworm because of its similar life cycle and ease of maintenance in laboratory rodents. Adult N. brasiliensis, like the human hookworm, lives in the intestine of the host and releases excretory/secretory products (ESP), which represent the major host-parasite interface. We performed a comparative proteomic analysis of infective larval (L3) and adult worm stages of N. brasiliensis to gain insights into the molecular bases of host-parasite relationships and determine whether N. brasiliensis could indeed serve as an appropriate model for studying human hookworm infections. Proteomic data were matched to a transcriptomic database assembled from 245,874,892 Illumina reads from different developmental stages (eggs, L3, L4, and adult) of N. brasiliensis yielding?18,426 unigenes with 39,063 possible isoform transcripts. From this analysis, 313 proteins were identified from ESPs by LC-MS/MS-52 in the L3 and 261 in the adult worm. Most of the proteins identified in the study were stage-specific (only 13 proteins were shared by both stages); in particular, two families of proteins-astacin metalloproteases and CAP-domain containing SCP/TAPS-were highly represented in both L3 and adult ESP. These protein families are present in most nematode groups, and where studied, appear to play roles in larval migration and evasion of the host's immune response. Phylogenetic analyses of defined protein families and global gene similarity analyses showed that N. brasiliensis has a greater degree of conservation with human hookworm than other model nematodes examined. These findings validate the use of N. brasiliensis as a suitable parasite for the study of human hookworm infections in a tractable animal model. PMID:24994561

  20. Forces in yeast flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  1. Assessment of plant lectin antifungal potential against yeasts of major importance in medical mycology.

    PubMed

    Klafke, Gabriel Baracy; Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmitt Garcia; Monte, Leonardo Garcia; Pereira, Juliano Lacava; Brandolt, Tchana Martinez; Xavier, Melissa Orzechowski; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio; Pinto, Luciano da Silva

    2013-02-01

    The search for new compounds with antifungal activity is accelerating due to rising yeast and fungal resistance to commonly prescribed drugs. Among the molecules being investigated, plant lectins can be highlighted. The present work shows the potential of six plant lectins which were tested in vitro against yeasts of medical importance, Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis, Cryptococcus gattii, Cryptococcus neoformans, Malassezia pachydermatis, Rhodotorula sp. and Trichosporon sp. Broth microdilution susceptibility testing was performed in accordance with standard protocols to evaluate antifungal activity. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined at 80% yeast growth inhibition, whereas the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) was evaluated after making the subcultures of each dilution. Only C. parapsilosis growth was inhibited by the lectins tested. Abelmoschus esculentus lectin showed the highest MIC (0.97 ?g ml(-1)). Lectins from Canavalia brasiliensis, Mucuna pruriens and Clitoria fairchildiana presented the highest MFC at (3.90 ?g ml(-1)). These results encourage further studies with wider yeast strain selections, and open new perspectives for the development of pharmacological molecules. PMID:23161017

  2. Interaction between Linepithema micans (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and Eurhizococcus brasiliensis (Hemiptera: Margarodidae) in vineyards.

    PubMed

    Nondillo, Aline; Sganzerla, Vânia Maria Ambrosi; Bueno, Odair Correa; Botton, Marcos

    2013-06-01

    Eurhizococcus brasiliensis (Wille) (Hemiptera: Margarodidae) is a soil scale that is considered the main pest of vineyards in Brazil. The ant Linepithema micans (Forel) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is frequently found associated with this species of scale in infested areas. The effect of the presence of L. micans on the infestation and dispersal capacity of E. brasiliensis on vine roots was measured in a greenhouse, using Paulsen 1103 rootstock seedlings planted in simple and double "Gallotti Cages." Treatments measured were: infestation of roots with E. brasiliensis or L. micans, and infestation with both species together. In the experiment using simple Gallotti Cages, with E. brasiliensis associated with L. micans, higher mean numbers of cysts and ants per plant were recorded, a result significantly different from that found for infestation with scale only. When double Gallotti Cages were used, first-instar nymphs were transported between the cages. The results showed that L. micans transports and aids in the attachment of E. brasiliensis to vine plants. PMID:23726055

  3. Reconstructing the locomotor repertoire of Protopithecus brasiliensis. II. Forelimb morphology.

    PubMed

    Halenar, Lauren B

    2011-12-01

    The majority of previous publications have suggested that the large-bodied subfossil Protopithecus brasiliensis was a suspensory ateline with a locomotor repertoire similar to that of extant Ateles and Brachyteles. This is unexpected, as the cranial morphology of Protopithecus is very similar to Alouatta, a genus usually classified as a deliberate quadrupedal climber. Complicating matters further, as Protopithecus is twice as large as Ateles and Brachyteles, its ability to be as suspensory as those two genera is suspect and a terrestrial component of the locomotor repertoire has also been hypothesized. The forelimbs of Protopithecus, while relatively elongated as would be expected in a suspensory animal, are also quite robust and show several adaptations for climbing. To test these hypotheses about the fossil locomotor repertoire, three-dimensional geometric morphometric techniques were used to quantify the shapes of the fossil distal humerus and proximal ulna and then compare them to a broad sample of extant primates with varying body sizes and locomotor patterns. Results indicate that Protopithecus is similar to Ateles and Brachyteles in terms of its forelimb joint surface morphology; however, the overall locomotor repertoire of the fossil is reconstructed as more flexible to include forelimb suspension, climbing, and potentially some terrestrial ground use. The combination of suspensory locomotion and quadrupedal climbing supported here indicates the beginnings of the evolutionary transition from a more acrobatic style of locomotion in the last common ancestor of alouattins and atelins to the current pattern of howler locomotion. PMID:22042627

  4. Evolutionary history of Ascomyceteous Yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are important for many industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 20 ascomyceteous yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. A comp...

  5. Virtual Yeast Cell

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Learning about the various parts of a cell can be tricky business, but this virtual yeast cell offered by The University of Nottingham will come in handy for biology students and science instructors. This learning resource was created to help students in the brewing science program learn about yeast cytology, though just about anyone with an interest in cells will learn something from visiting the site. After entering the interactive cell, visitors can click on different parts of the cell (such as the cytoplasm or the nucleus) in order to learn more about the importance of each one. Visitors should remember that they can also download the virtual yeast cell and use it in the classroom or just with a group of friends.

  6. Yeast killer systems.

    PubMed Central

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Gerloni, M; Bertolotti, D; Polonelli, L

    1997-01-01

    The killer phenomenon in yeasts has been revealed to be a multicentric model for molecular biologists, virologists, phytopathologists, epidemiologists, industrial and medical microbiologists, mycologists, and pharmacologists. The surprisingly widespread occurrence of the killer phenomenon among taxonomically unrelated microorganisms, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, has engendered a new interest in its biological significance as well as its theoretical and practical applications. The search for therapeutic opportunities by using yeast killer systems has conceptually opened new avenues for the prevention and control of life-threatening fungal diseases through the idiotypic network that is apparently exploited by the immune system in the course of natural infections. In this review, the biology, ecology, epidemiology, therapeutics, serology, and idiotypy of yeast killer systems are discussed. PMID:9227858

  7. Yeast Metabolism Lab Mrs. Zimmerman

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    Yeast Metabolism Lab Mrs. Zimmerman 10/22/10 #12;Photosynthesis 6 CO2 + 6 H2O C6H12O6 + 6 O2 Oxygen Glucose Carbon Dioxide Water Energy #12;Yeast · Unicellular · Eukaryotic (like us) · Kingdom Fungi" Saccharomyces cerevisiae #12;Alcoholic Fermentation · Some organisms, including yeast, can create energy without

  8. Genetics of Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querol, Amparo; Fernández-Espinar, M. Teresa; Belloch, Carmela

    The use of yeasts in biotechnology processes dates back to ancient days. Before 7000 BC, beer was produced in Sumeria. Wine was made in Assyria in 3500 BC, and ancient Rome had over 250 bakeries, which were making leavened bread by 100 BC. And milk has been made into Kefyr and Koumiss in Asia for many centuries (Demain, Phaff, & Kurtzman, 1999). However, the importance of yeast in the food and beverage industries was only realized about 1860, when their role in food manufacturing became evident.

  9. Therapeutic Effect of Agaricus brasiliensis on Phenylhydrazine-Induced Neonatal Jaundice in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lan; Yuan, Bo; Wang, HuiPing; Gao, Ya

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of Agaricus brasiliensis extract (ABE) on phenylhydrazine-induced neonatal jaundice in rats. Administration of ABE dose-dependently reduced the elevated bilirubin level induced by phenylhydrazine. It can be somewhat supported from the results of in vitro bilirubin degradation experiment. ABE treatment also reduced the total antioxidant status (TAOS), cascade O2?/SOD, level of NF-?B protein, and adrenomedullin (AM). Overall, the results of this study demonstrated that Agaricus brasiliensis extract may be beneficial to reducing bilirubin level without causing hepatotoxicity in neonatal jaundice. PMID:25883968

  10. Therapeutic effect of Agaricus brasiliensis on phenylhydrazine-induced neonatal jaundice in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lan; Yuan, Bo; Wang, HuiPing; Gao, Ya

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of Agaricus brasiliensis extract (ABE) on phenylhydrazine-induced neonatal jaundice in rats. Administration of ABE dose-dependently reduced the elevated bilirubin level induced by phenylhydrazine. It can be somewhat supported from the results of in vitro bilirubin degradation experiment. ABE treatment also reduced the total antioxidant status (TAOS), cascade O2(-)/SOD, level of NF-?B protein, and adrenomedullin (AM). Overall, the results of this study demonstrated that Agaricus brasiliensis extract may be beneficial to reducing bilirubin level without causing hepatotoxicity in neonatal jaundice. PMID:25883968

  11. Genome evolution in yeasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard Dujon; David Sherman; Gilles Fischer; Pascal Durrens; Serge Casaregola; Ingrid Lafontaine; Jacky de Montigny; Christian Marck; Cécile Neuvéglise; Emmanuel Talla; Nicolas Goffard; Lionel Frangeul; Michel Aigle; Véronique Anthouard; Anna Babour; Valérie Barbe; Stéphanie Barnay; Sylvie Blanchin; Jean-Marie Beckerich; Emmanuelle Beyne; Claudine Bleykasten; Anita Boisramé; Jeanne Boyer; Laurence Cattolico; Fabrice Confanioleri; Antoine de Daruvar; Laurence Despons; Emmanuelle Fabre; Cécile Fairhead; Hélène Ferry-Dumazet; Alexis Groppi; Florence Hantraye; Christophe Hennequin; Nicolas Jauniaux; Philippe Joyet; Rym Kachouri; Alix Kerrest; Romain Koszul; Marc Lemaire; Isabelle Lesur; Laurence Ma; Héloïse Muller; Jean-Marc Nicaud; Macha Nikolski; Sophie Oztas; Odile Ozier-Kalogeropoulos; Stefan Pellenz; Serge Potier; Guy-Franck Richard; Marie-Laure Straub; Audrey Suleau; Dominique Swennen; Fredj Tekaia; Micheline Wésolowski-Louvel; Eric Westhof; Bénédicte Wirth; Maria Zeniou-Meyer; Ivan Zivanovic; Monique Bolotin-Fukuhara; Agnès Thierry; Christiane Bouchier; Bernard Caudron; Claude Scarpelli; Claude Gaillardin; Jean Weissenbach; Patrick Wincker; Jean-Luc Souciet

    2004-01-01

    Identifying the mechanisms of eukaryotic genome evolution by comparative genomics is often complicated by the multiplicity of events that have taken place throughout the history of individual lineages, leaving only distorted and superimposed traces in the genome of each living organism. The hemiascomycete yeasts, with their compact genomes, similar lifestyle and distinct sexual and physiological properties, provide a unique opportunity

  12. METHODS TO IDENTIFY YEAST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are commonly identified from either phenotype or, more recently, from diagnostic gene sequences. Methods based on phenotype include fermentation reactions on a select set of sugars and growth responses on various carbon and nitrogen sources or on other diagnostic compounds. Isolates are fur...

  13. Opportunistic Pathogenic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Uma

    Advances in medical research, made during the last few decades, have improved the prophylactic, diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for variety of infections/diseases. However, many of the prophylactic and therapeutic procedures have been seen in many instances to exact a price of host-vulnerability to an expanding group of opportunistic pathogens and yeasts are one of the important members in it. Fortunately amongst the vast majority of yeasts present in nature only few are considered to have the capability to cause infections when certain opportunities predisposes and these are termed as ‘opportunistic pathogenic yeasts.’ However, the term ‘pathogenic’ is quite tricky, as it depends of various factors of the host, the ‘bug’ and the environment to manifest the clinical infection. The borderline is expanding. In the present century with unprecedented increase in number of immune-compromised host in various disciplines of health care settings, where any yeast, which has the capability to grow at 37 ° C (normal body temperature of human), can be pathogenic and cause infection in particular situation

  14. Flavour-active wine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Cordente, Antonio G; Curtin, Christopher D; Varela, Cristian; Pretorius, Isak S

    2012-11-01

    The flavour of fermented beverages such as beer, cider, saké and wine owe much to the primary fermentation yeast used in their production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Where once the role of yeast in fermented beverage flavour was thought to be limited to a small number of volatile esters and higher alcohols, the discovery that wine yeast release highly potent sulfur compounds from non-volatile precursors found in grapes has driven researchers to look more closely at how choice of yeast can influence wine style. This review explores recent progress towards understanding the range of 'flavour phenotypes' that wine yeast exhibit, and how this knowledge has been used to develop novel flavour-active yeasts. In addition, emerging opportunities to augment these phenotypes by engineering yeast to produce so-called grape varietal compounds, such as monoterpenoids, will be discussed. PMID:22940803

  15. Yeasts associated with Manteca.

    PubMed

    Suzzi, Giovanna; Schirone, Maria; Martuscelli, Maria; Gatti, Monica; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Neviani, Erasmo

    2003-04-01

    Manteca is a traditional milk product of southern Italy produced from whey deriving from Caciocavallo Podolico cheese-making. This study was undertaken to obtain more information about the microbiological properties of this product and particularly about the presence, metabolic activities, and technological significance of the different yeast species naturally occurring in Manteca. High numbers of yeasts were counted after 7 days ripening (10(4)-10(5) cfu g(-1)) and then decreased to 10(2) at the end. A total of 179 isolates were identified and studied for their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. The most frequently encountered species were Trichosporon asahii (45), Candida parapsilosis (33), Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (32), Candida inconspicua (29). Some of these yeasts showed lipolytic activity (32 strains) and proteolytic activity (29 strains), NaCl resistance up to 10% and growth up to 45 degrees C (42 strains). Biogenic amines were formed by proteolytic strains, in particular phenylethylamine, putrescine and spermidine. Spermidine was produced by all the yeasts tested in this work, but only Trichosporon produced a great quantity of this compound. Histamine was not detectable. Caseinolytic activity was common to almost all strains, corresponding to the ability to efficiently split off amino-terminal amino acids. The highest and most constant activity expressed by all species was X-prolyl-dipeptidyl aminopeptidase. The findings suggest that the presence of yeasts may play a significant role in justifying interactions with lactic acid bacteria, and consequently with their metabolic activity in the definition of the peculiar characteristics of Manteca cheese. PMID:12702448

  16. Paludolactone: a new eudesmanolide lactone from Wedelia paludosa DC. (Acmela brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Block, Luciana C; Yunes, Rosendo A; Delle Monache, Franco

    2004-10-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the whole plant of Wedelia paludosa (Acmela brasiliensis) furnished a new eudesmanolide lactone, named paludolactone (2), in addition to the known eudesmanolide (1), stigmasterol, kaurenoic and oleanolic acids. 1H- and 13C-NMR, and MS spectroscopic and elemental analyses were used for the structural elucidation of these compounds. PMID:15248613

  17. Population genetic structure of Brazilian shrimp species (Farfantepenaeus sp., F. brasiliensis, F. paulensis and

    E-print Network

    Solé-Cava, Antonio M.

    Population genetic structure of Brazilian shrimp species (Farfantepenaeus sp., F. brasiliensis, F and Evolutionary Biology, Port Erin Marine Laboratory, Isle of Man, United Kingdom. Abstract Penaeid shrimps, allozymes. Received: September 25, 2003; Accepted: July 19, 2004. Introduction Penaeid shrimps are important

  18. A Novel Anelloviridae Species Detected in Tadarida brasiliensis Bats: First Sequence of a Chiropteran Anellovirus

    PubMed Central

    Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; de Sales Lima, Francisco Esmaile; do Santos, Helton Fernandes; Franco, Ana Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Using metagenomic approaches, we identified a novel Torque teno virus from Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) (TT-TbV). The TT-TbV genome and deduced protein sequences share extremely low identity with known anelloviruses. Due to a high degree of phylogenetic divergence, such putative virus could not be allocated into any Anelloviridae genera. PMID:25359906

  19. Chromatographic Fractionation of Aggregation and Sex Pheromones of Nippostrongy/us brasiliensis (Nematoda)

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Chromatographic Fractionation of Aggregation and Sex Pheromones of Nippostrongy/us brasiliensis filtration with Sephadex G-25 or Bio-Gel P-2 of homoge- nates of the sexes of the zooparasitic nematode molecular weight over 500 was found in aqueous extracts of both hel- minth sexes and was attractive to both

  20. Characterisation of HEVER, a novel stress-induced gene from Hevea brasiliensis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shanthi Sivasubramaniam; Vasanthi M. Vanniasingham; Chio-Tee Tan; Nam-Hai Chua

    1995-01-01

    A novel stress-induced gene, HEVER (Hevea ethylene-responsive) from the rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis, has been isolated and characterised. HEVER is encoded by a multigene family. The HEVER transcript is expressed at basal levels in Hevea tissues and is developmentally regulated. In addition, the HEVER transcript and protein are induced by stress treatment with salicylic acid and ethephon. Sequence analysis shows

  1. Neofusicoccum ribis Associated with Leaf Blight on Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nyaka Ngobisa, A I C; Zainal Abidin, M A; Wong, M Y; Wan Noordin, M W D

    2013-03-01

    Hevea brasiliensis is a natural source of rubber and an important plantation tree species in Malaysia. Leaf blight disease caused by Fusicoccum substantially reduces the growth and performance of H. brasiliensis. The aim of this study was to use a combination of both morphological characteristics and molecular data to clarify the taxonomic position of the fungus associated with leaf blight disease. Fusicoccum species were isolated from infected leaves collected from plantations at 3 widely separated locations - Selangor, Perak, and Johor states - in Peninsular Malaysia in 2010. All the isolates were identified according to their conidial patterns and DNA sequences generated from internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2), the 5.8S rRNA, and an unknown locus (BotF15) containing microsatellite repeats. Based on taxonomic and sequence data, Neofusicoccum ribis was identified as the main cause of leaf blight disease in H. brasiliensis in commercial plantations in Malaysia. A pathogenicity trial on detached leaves further confirmed that N. ribis causes leaf blight disease. N. ribis is an important leaf pathogen, and its detection in Malaysia has important implications for future planting of H. brasiliensis. PMID:25288924

  2. Safety assessment of the royal sun mushroom, Agaricus brasiliensis (higher Basidiomycetes) intake during rat pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gerenutti, Marli; Tribuiani, Natalia; Oliveira, Bruna Ryzik; Rosa-Castro, Raquel Mendonca; Frizo, Italo; Oshima-Franco, Yoko; Grotto, Denise

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the reproductive capacity of pregnant rats exposed to daily orally administered powder-dehydrated reconstituted of Agaricus brasiliensis (=Agaricus blazei sensu Murrill), the fetal organogenesis, and the development of the pups. Pregnant rats were exposed for the entire gestational period to water (control) and A. brasiliensis at 300 or 600 mg/kg/day. Fertility and body weight of dams were monitored. Pups were monitored for body weight, offspring vitality, morphology, and physical and neurobehavioral development. An increase in sternebrae agenesis was observed at the 600 mg/kg/day dose of A. brasiliensis, while incomplete ossification of sternebrae was seen even at a 300 mg/kg/day dose. In conclusion, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of maternal exposure to A. brasiliensis on the fetal organogenesis and development of offspring in a rat model. The 600 mg/kg/day dose showed some negative effects, and low toxicity was observed at the 300 mg/kg/day dose. PMID:25404217

  3. Vaccination of mice with liposome-entrapped adult antigens of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Rhalem, A; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Pery, P

    1988-01-01

    An immunization procedure was developed to induce protection of mice against the gastrointestinal helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Mice immunized by the oral route with antigens which were released by adult worms during their in vitro survival in a detergent-containing medium and which were entrapped in liposomes were protected against a challenge infection. PMID:3370129

  4. Epidemiology of Ornithodoros brasiliensis (mouro tick) in the southern Brazilian highlands and the description of human and animal retrospective cases of tick parasitism.

    PubMed

    Reck, José; Marks, Fernanda S; Guimarães, Jorge A; Termignoni, Carlos; Martins, João Ricardo

    2013-02-01

    Ornithodoros brasiliensis, also known as the "mouro" tick, is an argasid tick found exclusively in the southern Brazilian highlands. O. brasiliensis parasitism is frequently associated with severe symptoms directly induced by the tick bite, a condition compatible with the definition of tick toxicosis. The objectives of this work include (i) the determination of the distribution of O. brasiliensis in farms located in the tick-endemic region, (ii) the description of the characteristics of O. brasiliensis habitats, (iii) the analysis of risk factors associated with O. brasiliensis, and (iv) the retrospective description of cases of human and animal parasitism by O. brasiliensis. Of the 30 farms included in this study, O. brasiliensis was identified on 5 farms (frequency 16.7%), in which several ticks found in high density buried in soil were collected. Information regarding the tick habitats and the local population was recorded. The data indicated that O. brasiliensis feeds on humans, dogs, armadillos (Dasypus hybridus), and possibly skunks (Conepatus chinga). The analysis of risk factors indicated that the presence of house basements with an unpaved (natural soil) floor on farms and insufficient sanitary conditions significantly enhanced the probability of identifying O. brasiliensis. Additionally, we describe retrospectively cases of tick parasitism in 28 humans and 11 dogs including the most common symptoms associated with tick toxicosis. This is the first study concerning O. brasiliensis epidemiology, distribution, and habitat, and the report represents the most comprehensive characterization of Ornithodoros bite-associated toxicosis syndrome. PMID:23238249

  5. Extracellular Polysaccharides Produced by Yeasts and Yeast-Like Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; de Maeseneire, Sofie L.; Vandamme, Erick J.

    Several yeasts and yeast-like fungi are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. Most of these contain D-mannose, either alone or in combination with other sugars or phosphate. A large chemical and structural variability is found between yeast species and even among different strains. The types of polymers that are synthesized can be chemically characterized as mannans, glucans, phosphoman-nans, galactomannans, glucomannans and glucuronoxylomannans. Despite these differences, almost all of the yeast exopolysaccharides display some sort of biological activity. Some of them have already applications in chemistry, pharmacy, cosmetics or as probiotic. Furthermore, some yeast exopolysaccharides, such as pullulan, exhibit specific physico-chemical and rheological properties, making them useful in a wide range of technical applications. A survey is given here of the production, the characteristics and the application potential of currently well studied yeast extracellular polysaccharides.

  6. ''Is Yeast Alive?''

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Katrenia Hosea-Flanigan (Frank Cody High School)

    2006-04-01

    In this inquiry activity students explore the characteristics of living organisms to determine whether yeast meets the criteria of a living thing. This inquiry activity was developed by a K-12 science teacher in the American Physiological SocietyÂ?s 2006 Frontiers in Physiology Program. The NSES Standards addressed by this activity are current as of the year of development. For more information on the Frontiers in Physiology Program, please visit www.frontiersinphys.org.

  7. Emerging opportunistic yeast infections.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Marisa H; Díaz, José A; Lee, Samuel A

    2011-02-01

    A growing population of immunosuppressed patients has resulted in increasingly frequent diagnoses of invasive fungal infections, including those caused by unusual yeasts. The incidence of non-albicans species of Candida is increasing compared with that of Candida albicans, and several species, such as Candida glabrata and Candida krusei, may be resistant to azole antifungal therapy. Trichosporon species are the second most common cause of fungaemia in patients with haematological malignant disease and are characterised by resistance to amphotericin and echinocandins and poor prognosis. Rhodotorula species belong to the family Cryptococcaceae, and are a cause of catheter-related fungaemia, sepsis, and invasive disease in severely immunosuppressed patients. An increasing number of sporadic cases of invasive fungal infections by non-neoformans cryptococci have been reported in immunocompromised hosts, especially for patients with advanced HIV infection or cancer who are undergoing transplant. Other uncommon yeasts that can cause invasive disease in severely immunosuppressed patients include Geotrichum, Hansenula, Malassezia, and Saccharomyces. Host immune status is a crucial determinant of the type of invasive fungal infection a patient is at risk for. Diagnosis can be challenging and relies heavily on traditional cultures of blood and other sterile sites, although serum (1,3)-?-D-glucan testing might have an adjunctive role. Although rare yeasts are emerging as opportunistic human pathogens, diagnosis remains challenging and treatment suboptimal. PMID:21272794

  8. Changes in kinematics and aerodynamics over a range of speeds in Tadarida brasiliensis, the Brazilian free-tailed bat

    PubMed Central

    Hubel, Tatjana Y.; Hristov, Nickolay I.; Swartz, Sharon M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    To date, wake measurements using particle image velocimetry (PIV) of bats in flight have studied only three bat species, all fruit and nectar feeders. In this study, we present the first wake structure analysis for an insectivorous bat. Tadarida brasiliensis, the Brazilian free-tailed bat, is an aerial hunter that annually migrates long distances and also differs strikingly from the previously investigated species morphologically. We compare the aerodynamics of T. brasiliensis with those of other, frugivorous bats and with common swifts, Apus apus, a bird with wing morphology, kinematics and flight ecology similar to that of these bats. The comparison reveals that, for the range of speeds evaluated, the cyclical pattern of aerodynamic forces associated with a wingbeat shows more similarities between T. brasiliensis and A. apus than between T. brasiliensis and other frugivorous bats. PMID:22258554

  9. Yeast interactions and wine flavour.

    PubMed

    Fleet, Graham H

    2003-09-01

    Wine is the product of complex interactions between fungi, yeasts and bacteria that commence in the vineyard and continue throughout the fermentation process until packaging. Although grape cultivar and cultivation provide the foundations of wine flavour, microorganisms, especially yeasts, impact on the subtlety and individuality of the flavour response. Consequently, it is important to identify and understand the ecological interactions that occur between the different microbial groups, species and strains. These interactions encompass yeast-yeast, yeast-filamentous fungi and yeast-bacteria responses. The surface of healthy grapes has a predominance of Aureobasidium pullulans, Metschnikowia, Hanseniaspora (Kloeckera), Cryptococcus and Rhodotorula species depending on stage of maturity. This microflora moderates the growth of spoilage and mycotoxigenic fungi on grapes, the species and strains of yeasts that contribute to alcoholic fermentation, and the bacteria that contribute to malolactic fermentation. Damaged grapes have increased populations of lactic and acetic acid bacteria that impact on yeasts during alcoholic fermentation. Alcoholic fermentation is characterised by the successional growth of various yeast species and strains, where yeast-yeast interactions determine the ecology. Through yeast-bacterial interactions, this ecology can determine progression of the malolactic fermentation, and potential growth of spoilage bacteria in the final product. The mechanisms by which one species/strain impacts on another in grape-wine ecosystems include: production of lytic enzymes, ethanol, sulphur dioxide and killer toxin/bacteriocin like peptides; nutrient depletion including removal of oxygen, and production of carbon dioxide; and release of cell autolytic components. Cell-cell communication through quorum sensing molecules needs investigation. PMID:12892919

  10. Conservation of yeasts by dehydration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Beker; Alexander Rapoport

    The presented material concerns the theoretical basis for obtaining high-quality active dry biopreparations. It deals with the present understanding of anabiosis, contains data on yeast resistance against dehydration and the limits for preserving the viability of microorganisms in anabiosis. The process of water transport in yeast biomass during dehydration is discussed.\\u000a The changes and transformations in yeast cells occuring after

  11. IL13, IL4R?, and Stat6 Are Required for the Expulsion of the Gastrointestinal Nematode Parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph F Urban Jr.; Nancy Noben-Trauth; Debra D Donaldson; Kathleen B Madden; Suzanne C Morris; Mary Collins; Fred D Finkelman

    1998-01-01

    Although IL-4 induces expulsion of the gastrointestinal nematode parasite, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, from immunodeficient mice, this parasite is expelled normally by IL-4-deficient mice. This apparent paradox is explained by observations that IL-4 receptor ? chain (IL-4R?)-deficient mice and Stat6-deficient mice fail to expel N. brasiliensis, and a specific antagonist for IL-13, another activator of Stat6 through IL-4R?, prevents worm expulsion. Thus,

  12. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and Drugs...CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces...

  13. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and Drugs...CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces...

  14. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and Drugs...CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces...

  15. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and Drugs...CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces...

  16. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and Drugs...CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces...

  17. A Common Caatinga Cactus, Pilosocereus gounellei, is an Important Ecotope of Wild Triatoma brasiliensis Populations in the Jaguaribe Valley of Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Valença-Barbosa, Carolina; Lima, Marli M.; Sarquis, Otília; Bezerra, Claudia M.; Abad-Franch, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Triatoma brasiliensis is the most important vector of Chagas disease in the Caatinga eco-region of northeastern Brazil. Wild T. brasiliensis populations have been reported only from rocky outcrops. However, this species frequently infests/re-infests houses in rock-free sedimentary lowlands. We therefore hypothesized that it should also occupy other natural ecotopes. We show that a common Caatinga cactus, Pilosocereus gounellei, locally known as xiquexique, often harbors T. brasiliensis breeding colonies apparently associated with rodents (n = 44 cacti, infestation rate = 47.7%, 157 bugs captured). Our findings suggest that infested cacti might be involved in house re-infestation by T. brasiliensis in the Caatinga region. PMID:24710611

  18. Production of Food Grade Yeasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Argyro Bekatorou; Costas Psarianos; Athanasios A. Koutinas

    2006-01-01

    Summary Yeasts have been known to humans for thousands of years as they have been used in traditional fermentation processes like wine, beer and bread making. Today, yeasts are also used as alternative sources of high nutritional value proteins, enzymes and vitamins, and have numerous applications in the health food industry as food additives, conditioners and flavouring agents, for the

  19. Yeast Infections in Immunocompromised Hosts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmanuel Rollides; Thomas J. Walsh

    A number of yeast fungi are pathogenic, but the two genera that contain the most important animal and human pathogens are\\u000a Candida and Cryptococcus. In addition, there are a number of other yeasts that have been, more rarely, implicated in disease.

  20. Yeast interactions and wine flavour

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Graham H. Fleet

    2003-01-01

    Wine is the product of complex interactions between fungi, yeasts and bacteria that commence in the vineyard and continue throughout the fermentation process until packaging. Although grape cultivar and cultivation provide the foundations of wine flavour, microorganisms, especially yeasts, impact on the subtlety and individuality of the flavour response. Consequently, it is important to identify and understand the ecological interactions

  1. Preservation of manipulated yeast diet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joong Kyun Kim; Hae-Yoon Chung

    2002-01-01

    Manipulated yeast diet can be usedfor seed production of aquacultural organisms.Various methods for preserving the yeast dietduring the periods of circulation in marketwere tested, and the preservation of the yeastdiet by freeze-drying was the best. With thispreservation method, the manipulated yeastswere maintained fairly well (up to 71%) whenstored for three weeks under refrigeratedcondition (4 °C), while more than 80% ofthe

  2. Immunoglobulin and complement in tissues of mice infected with Nocardia brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Conde, C; Mancilla, R; Fresan, M; Ortiz-Ortiz, L

    1983-01-01

    Two weeks after mice had been infected in the footpad with cells of Nocardia brasiliensis, immunoglobulin and C3 deposits were observed in tissue from the inoculation site. Both immunoglobulin and C3 were found in the actinomycotic granules that characterize the mycetoma and in the surrounding inflammatory zones, in which plasma cells were also present. Although anti-N. brasiliensis specificity was evidenced at 14 days postinfection in an eluate of infected tissue by an immunoenzymatic assay, no such antibody was found in the serum until 45 days postinfection. Immune complexes in the lesions, as indicated by the presence of C3, may also contribute to the pathology of the disease. Images PMID:6852920

  3. Performance and meat quality of broiler chickens that are fed diets supplemented with Agaricus brasiliensis mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, João Borges; Dos Santos, Eder Clementino; Dias, Eustáquio Souza; Bertechini, Antônio Gilberto; da Silva Ávila, Carla Luiza; Dias, Francesca Silva

    2014-12-01

    This trial was performed to study the use of the mushroom Agaricus brasiliensis as an alternative additive to antimicrobial growth promoters in broiler chicken diets and to assess the quality of the broiler chicken breast meat of birds that are fed diets containing this fungus. Thus, 595 1-day-old chicks were reared in reused poultry litter without anticoccidial and antimicrobial additives. The results showed that a concentration of 1.6 g mushrooms/kg diet was ideal for these birds because it provided better bird performance. When the birds' immune system organs were analyzed, it was found that the addition of both mushrooms influenced the immune system organs of these broiler chickens. Adding A. brasiliensis to broiler chicken diets did not compromise breast meat quality. PMID:25169695

  4. Antifungal activity of fractions and two pure compounds of flowers from Wedelia paludosa (Acmela brasiliensis) (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Sartori, M R K; Pretto, J B; Cruz, A B; Bresciani, L F V; Yunes, R A; Sortino, M; Zacchino, S A; Cechinel, V Filho

    2003-08-01

    Wedelia paludosa (Acmela brasiliensis) (Asteraceae), a traditionally used native Brazilian medicinal plant, showed antifungal activity against dermatophytes in dilution tests. The hexane, dichloromethane and butanol fractions displayed activity against Epidermophyton floccosum, Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes, with minimal inhibitory concentrations between 250 and 1000 microg/mL. Two pure compounds, identified as kaurenoic acid (1) and luteolin (2), also showed activity against these dermatophytes. PMID:12967035

  5. Seasonal variation of kaurenoic acid, a hypoglycemic diterpene present in Wedelia paludosa (Acmela brasiliensis) (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Bresciani, Louisiane Faccio V; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Bürger, Cristiani; De Oliveira, Luis Eduardo; Bóf, Kauê Leal; Cechinel-Filho, Valdir

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the variation of the concentration of kaurenoic acid (1), which is a bioactive diterpene, in leaves, flowers, stems and roots from Wedelia paludosa (Acmela brasiliensis) for different seasons using the HRGC/FID method. The results indicated that the concentration of 1 is higher in the roots and stems during the autumn. The pharmacological results suggested that kaurenoic acid is responsible, at least in part, for the hypoglycemic potential detected in this plant. PMID:15241932

  6. Cross-species characterisation of polymorphic microsatellite loci in the giant otter (Pteronura brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Pickles, Robert S A; Groombridge, James J; Rojas, Veronica D Zambrana; Jordan, William C

    2009-01-01

    Nineteen microsatellite loci developed for the Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra) and 15 loci developed for the North American river otter (Lontra canadensis) were tested for ease of amplification and degree of polymorphism on a set of 20 giant otter (Pteronura brasiliensis) faecal samples from the Bolivian Amazon basin. Nineteen loci amplified consistently well, with polymorphisms ranging from two to nine alleles and observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.15 to 0.85. PMID:21564666

  7. Annual pattern of fecal corticoid excretion in captive Red-tailed parrots ( Amazona brasiliensis )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucyenne G. Popp; Patrícia P. Serafini; Angela L. S. Reghelin; Katherinne Maria Spercoski; James J. Roper; Rosana N. Morais

    2008-01-01

    Annual patterns of fecal corticoid excretion were analyzed in the threatened Red-tailed parrot (Amazona brasiliensis) in captivity. Corticoid concentration over the 15 months of the study (mean ± standard error, 12.6 ± 0.32 ng g?1, n = 585) was lowest around May (the southern Fall), and greatest around September (late winter), just prior to their normal\\u000a breeding period. Corticoid excretion follows a seasonal pattern best explained by reproductive cycles

  8. Agriculturally important yeasts: Biological control of field and postharvest diseases using yeast antagonists, and yeasts as pathogens of plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two important agricultural aspects of yeasts, control of plant diseases through application of yeasts as the control agent, and yeasts that are plant pathogens are reviewed. Yeasts as biocontrol organisms are presented first, followed by a discussion of some of the more common plant pathogenic yeas...

  9. Bioconcentration and bioaccumulation of metal in freshwater Neotropical fish Geophagus brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Carmen Lúcia; da Silva, Cleber Pinto; Doria, Halina Binde; Randi, Marco Antônio Ferreira; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto; de Campos, Sandro Xavier

    2015-06-01

    From the concentration in water and sediments, bioconcentration and bioaccumulation of copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), cadmium (Cd), chrome (Cr), silver (Ag), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), aluminum (Al), and arsenic (As) were determined in the gills, liver, and muscles of Geophagus brasiliensis in the Alagados Reservoir, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil. Metals were quantified through AAS, and a study was carried out on the existing relations between metal and body weight, size, and genre of this species. The level of metal in the water of the reservoir was lower than the maximum set forth in the legislation, except for that of Cd and Fe. In sediments, Cu, Cd, Cr, and Ni presented concentrations above the threshold effect level (TEL). Pb and Cr were above the limits for the G. brasiliensis. The tendency of metals present in the muscles of G. brasiliensis was Al?>?Cu?>?Zn?>?Fe?>?Co?>?Mn?>?Cr?>?Ag?>?Ni?>?Pb?>?Cd?>?As. In the gills, it was Al?>?Fe?>?Zn?>?Mn?>?Co?>?Ag?>?Cr?>?Ni?>?Cu?>?As?>?Pb?>?Cd, and the liver presented Al?>?Cu?>?Zn?>?Co?>?Fe?>?Mn?>?Pb?>?Ag?>?Ni?>?Cr?>?As?>?Cd. The bioconcentration and bioaccumulation of metal in the tissues follow the global tendency liver?>?gills?>?muscle. The statistical analysis did not point to significant differences in the metal concentration and body weight, size, and gender of the species in the three tissues under analysis. PMID:25520205

  10. Morphometry, Bite-Force, and Paleobiology of the Late Miocene Caiman Purussaurus brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Aureliano, Tito; Ghilardi, Aline M.; Guilherme, Edson; Souza-Filho, Jonas P.; Cavalcanti, Mauro; Riff, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Purussaurus brasiliensis thrived in the northwestern portion of South America during the Late Miocene. Although substantial material has been recovered since its early discovery, this fossil crocodilian can still be considered as very poorly understood. In the present work, we used regression equations based on modern crocodilians to present novel details about the morphometry, bite-force and paleobiology of this species. According to our results, an adult Purussaurus brasiliensis was estimated to reach around 12.5 m in length, weighing around 8.4 metric tons, with a mean daily food intake of 40.6 kg. It was capable of generating sustained bite forces of 69,000 N (around 7 metric tons-force). The extreme size and strength reached by this animal seems to have allowed it to include a wide range of prey in its diet, making it a top predator in its ecosystem. As an adult, it would have preyed upon large to very large vertebrates, and, being unmatched by any other carnivore, it avoided competition. The evolution of a large body size granted P. brasiliensis many advantages, but it may also have led to its vulnerability. The constantly changing environment on a large geological scale may have reduced its long-term survival, favoring smaller species more resilient to ecological shifts. PMID:25689140

  11. Yeasts: From genetics to biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, S.; Poli, G. [Univ. of Milan (Italy); Siman-Tov, R.B. [Univ. of Jerusalem, Rehovot (Israel)

    1995-12-31

    Yeasts have been known and used in food and alcoholic fermentations ever since the Neolithic Age. In more recent times, on the basis of their peculiar features and history, yeasts have become very important experimental models in both microbiological and genetic research, as well as the main characters in many fermentative production processes. In the last 40 years, advances in molecular biology and genetic engineering have made possible not only the genetic selection of organisms, but also the genetic modification of some of them, especially the simplest of them, such as bacteria and yeasts. These discoveries have led to the availability of new yeast strains fit to fulfill requests of industrial production and fermentation. Moreover, genetically modified and transformed yeasts have been constructed that are able to produce large amounts of biologically active proteins and enzymes. Thus, recombinant yeasts make it easier to produce drugs, biologically active products, diagnostics, and vaccines, by inexpensive and relatively simple techniques. Yeasts are going to become more and more important in the {open_quotes}biotechnological revolution{close_quotes} by virtue of both their features and their very long and safe use in human nutrition and industry. 175 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Yeast ecology of Kombucha fermentation.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Ai Leng; Heard, Gillian; Cox, Julian

    2004-09-01

    Kombucha is a traditional fermentation of sweetened tea, involving a symbiosis of yeast species and acetic acid bacteria. Despite reports of different yeast species being associated with the fermentation, little is known of the quantitative ecology of yeasts in Kombucha. Using oxytetracycline-supplemented malt extract agar, yeasts were isolated from four commercially available Kombucha products and identified using conventional biochemical and physiological tests. During the fermentation of each of the four products, yeasts were enumerated from both the cellulosic pellicle and liquor of the Kombucha. The number and diversity of species varied between products, but included Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Candida stellata, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulaspora delbrueckii and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. While these yeast species are known to occur in Kombucha, the enumeration of each species present throughout fermentation of each of the four Kombucha cultures demonstrated for the first time the dynamic nature of the yeast ecology. Kombucha fermentation is, in general, initiated by osmotolerant species, succeeded and ultimately dominated by acid-tolerant species. PMID:15282124

  13. Yeast Breads: Made at Home. 

    E-print Network

    Cox, Maeona; Harris, Jimmie Nell; Reasonover, Frances; Mason, Lousie

    1957-01-01

    tablespoons sugar ll/z teaspoons salt cup shortening 1/4 CUP lukewarm water 2 packages yeast or 2 yeast cakes 39'4 CUPS flour Apple Coffee Cake. Scald milk and stir in sugar, salt and shorten~r , Cool to lukewarm. Sprinkle or crumble yeast tnto nit1.... Honey twist. Streusel coffee cake. Butterscotch pecan rolls. STREUSEL COFFEE CAKE 2 tablespoons butter or margarine 2 tablespoons sugar cup flour CUP fine bread crumbs 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon Cream fat and sugar. Add flour, bread crumbs...

  14. Polyglutamine misfolding in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Protein misfolding is associated with many human diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and Huntington disease. Protein misfolding often results in the formation of intracellular or extracellular inclusions or aggregates. Even though deciphering the role of these aggregates has been the object of intense research activity, their role in protein misfolding diseases is unclear. Here, I discuss the implications of studies on polyglutamine aggregation and toxicity in yeast and other model organisms. These studies provide an excellent experimental and conceptual paradigm that contributes to understanding the differences between toxic and protective trajectories of protein misfolding. Future studies like the ones discussed here have the potential to transform basic concepts of protein misfolding in human diseases and may thus help to identify new therapeutic strategies for their treatment. PMID:22052348

  15. Red Yeast Rice: An Introduction

    MedlinePLUS

    ... drugs, and some may contain a potentially harmful contaminant. This fact sheet provides basic information about red ... supplements. Some red yeast rice products contain a contaminant called citrinin, which can cause kidney failure. Tell ...

  16. Mössbauer studies on yeast metallothionein

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X.-Q. Ding; E. Bill; A. X. Trautwein; H. J. Hartmann; U. Weser

    1994-01-01

    Iron-substituted yeast metallothionein, Fe(II)-yeast-MT, has been studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The iron in the protein is in the high-spin ferrous state. As maximum metal content, 4 Fe(II)\\/molecule has been determined, with the 4 metal ions forming a diamagnetic cluster due to the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between the Fe(II) ions via bridging thiolates. In case the iron titration is less than

  17. Sociobiology of the budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Wloch-Salamon, Dominika M

    2014-04-01

    Social theory has provided a useful framework for research with microorganisms. Here I describe the advantages and possible risks of using a well-known model organism, the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for sociobiological research. I discuss the problems connected with clear classification of yeast behaviour based on the fitnessbased Hamilton paradigm. Relevant traits include different types of communities, production of flocculins, invertase and toxins, and the presence of apoptosis. PMID:24736156

  18. Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

    The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

  19. Study of amyloids using yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wickner, Reed B.; Kryndushkin, Dmitry; Shewmaker, Frank; McGlinchey, Ryan; Edskes, Herman K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism in such fields as the cell cycle, regulation of transcription, protein trafficking and cell biology, primarily because of its ease of genetic manipulation. This is no less so in the area of amyloid studies. The endogenous yeast amyloids described to date include prions, infectious proteins (Table 1), and some cell wall proteins (1). and amyloids of humans and a fungal prion have also been studied using the yeast system. Accordingly, the emphasis of this chapter will be on genetic, biochemical, cell biological and physical methods particularly useful in the study of yeast prions and other amyloids studied in yeast. We limit our description of these methods to those aspects which have been most useful in studying yeast prions, citing more detailed expositions in the literature. Volumes on yeast genetics methods (2–4), and on amyloids and prions (5, 6) are useful, and Masison has edited a volume of Methods on “Identification, analysis and characterization of fungal prions” which covers some of this territory (7). We also outline some useful physical methods, pointing the reader to more extensive and authoratative descriptions. PMID:22528100

  20. Experimentally induced tick toxicosis in rats bitten by Ornithodoros brasiliensis (Chelicerata: Argasidae): a clinico-pathological characterization.

    PubMed

    Reck, José; Bandarra, Paulo; Pavarini, Saulo; Termignoni, Carlos; Driemeier, David; Martins, João Ricardo; Guimarães, Jorge A

    2014-09-01

    Ornithodoros brasiliensis, also known as the mouro tick, is an argasid tick only found in the highlands of Southern Brazil. O. brasiliensis parasitism is associated with severe reactions in its hosts ranging from local pruritus and pain to systemic disturbances. Recently, the re-emergence of O. brasiliensis parasitism in humans and dogs drew attention to the clinical findings induced by its bite, which are poorly understood and described. Moreover, rare experimental data about tick bite effects under controlled conditions were available. Thus, this study aimed to describe clinical and pathological findings induced by O. brasiliensis bites in experimentally parasitized rats. Ticks feed for ?40 min in rats, and their weight increased by approximately four times after the blood meal. Rats bitten by five adult ticks showed hyperemia of the oral/ocular mucosa, piloerection, tachypnea, claudication, ocular and nasal discharge, pruritus, and swollen and erythemic lesions. A large hemorrhagic lesion was observed on rat skin in tick attachment sites, reaching ?17 mm in diameter 12 h after a bite. Bitten rats also presented an increased bleeding tendency (?50%) 6 h after a tick bite, evaluated by the tail-cut rat model of bleeding. Blood samples of bitten rats were taken, and clinical pathology analysis showed significant alterations in the eosinophil and basophil counts, in creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and CPK MB fraction, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and fibrinogen level. Histopathological analysis revealed marked subcutaneous hemorrhage, edema and slight muscle degeneration at the bite site. Also, muscle degeneration and necrosis were observed in the myocardium of bitten rats 72 h after bites by histopathology and immunohistochemistry against troponin C. This work showed the ability of O. brasiliensis to cause severe disturbances in experimentally parasitized rats, compatible with a tick toxicosis syndrome. This observation associated with the re-emergence of O. brasiliensis parasitism makes this parasite as a public health hazard in southern Brazil. PMID:24973739

  1. Characterisation of HEVER, a novel stress-induced gene from Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramaniam, S; Vanniasingham, V M; Tan, C T; Chua, N H

    1995-10-01

    A novel stress-induced gene, HEVER (Hevea ethylene-responsive) from the rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis, has been isolated and characterised. HEVER is encoded by a multigene family. The HEVER transcript is expressed at basal levels in Hevea tissues and is developmentally regulated. In addition, the HEVER transcript and protein are induced by stress treatment with salicylic acid and ethephon. Sequence analysis shows that HEVER encodes a 33 kDa protein that has significant homology to the hypothetical protein SLEXORFA-1 from the plant, Stellaria longipes, and two bacterial proteins, BAC180K-75 from Bacillus subtilis and MVRNO3-1 from Methanococcus vannielii. PMID:7579163

  2. Coherent regulation in yeast’s cell-cycle network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aral, Ne?e; Kabakç?o?lu, Alkan

    2015-05-01

    We define a measure of coherent activity for gene regulatory networks, a property that reflects the unity of purpose between the regulatory agents with a common target. We propose that such harmonious regulatory action is desirable under a demand for energy efficiency and may be selected for under evolutionary pressures. We consider two recent models of the cell-cycle regulatory network of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a case study and calculate their degree of coherence. A comparison with random networks of similar size and composition reveals that the yeast’s cell-cycle regulation is wired to yield an exceptionally high level of coherent regulatory activity. We also investigate the mean degree of coherence as a function of the network size, connectivity and the fraction of repressory/activatory interactions.

  3. Nuclear Transport of Yeast Proteasomes

    PubMed Central

    Enenkel, Cordula

    2014-01-01

    Proteasomes are conserved protease complexes enriched in the nuclei of dividing yeast cells, a major site for protein degradation. If yeast cells do not proliferate and transit to quiescence, metabolic changes result in the dissociation of proteasomes into proteolytic core and regulatory complexes and their sequestration into motile cytosolic proteasome storage granuli. These granuli rapidly clear with the resumption of growth, releasing the stored proteasomes, which relocalize back to the nucleus to promote cell cycle progression. Here, I report on three models of how proteasomes are transported from the cytoplasm into the nucleus of yeast cells. The first model applies for dividing yeast and is based on the canonical pathway using classical nuclear localization sequences of proteasomal subcomplexes and the classical import receptor importin/karyopherin ??. The second model applies for quiescent yeast cells, which resume growth and use Blm10, a HEAT-like repeat protein structurally related to karyopherin ?, for nuclear import of proteasome core particles. In the third model, the fully-assembled proteasome is imported into the nucleus. Our still marginal knowledge about proteasome dynamics will inspire the discussion on how protein degradation by proteasomes may be regulated in different cellular compartments of dividing and quiescent eukaryotic cells. PMID:25333764

  4. Are Members of the Triatoma brasiliensis (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) Species Complex Able to Alter the Biology and Virulence of a Trypanosoma cruzi Strain?

    PubMed

    Costa, J; Araújo, C A C; Freitas, C A V; Borges-Pereira, J

    2015-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, transmitted to humans and mammals by blood-sucking hemipteran insects belonging to the Triatominae subfamily. The two main genotypes of T. cruzi (TcI and TcII) differ in many characteristics concerning their genetic profile. Despite the extensive literature on vectors and the etiologic agent, several interactive aspects between these two elements of Chagas disease are still waiting to be further clarified. Here, biological and histological features resulting from the interaction between Albino Swiss mice and T. cruzi isolate PB913 after passages through vectors of the Triatoma brasiliensis species complex were evaluated. Comparing the four members of the T. brasiliensis species complex-Triatoma brasiliensis brasiliensis Neiva, Triatoma brasiliensis macromelasoma Galvão, Triatoma melanica Neiva & Lent, and Triatoma juazeirensis Costa & Felix-no significant differences in parasitemia of the infected mice were observed. At 20 days post-infection, the highest number of parasites was observed in the group of mice that were infected with parasites obtained from T. b. macromelasoma. Tropism of the parasites to different organs such as heart, bladder, and skeletal muscles followed by inflammatory cell infiltrates was observed with quantitative and qualitative differences. Even though the four members of the T. brasiliensis species complex differ in their geographical distribution, morphology, biology, ecology, and genetics, no significant influence on the parasitemia of the T. cruzi PB913 isolate was detected. After evaluation of the tissue samples, a higher pathogenicity of parasites obtained from T. b. brasiliensis was noticeable. PMID:26013138

  5. 280 EXPRESSION IN YEAST [23] [23] Manipulating Yeast Genome Using Plasmid Vectors

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    280 EXPRESSION IN YEAST [23] [23] Manipulating Yeast Genome Using Plasmid Vectors By TIM STEARNS, HONG MA, and DAVID BOTSTEIN The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proved to be a popular high status of yeast as an experimental system is in large part due to the work of the many geneticists

  6. Pre-Absorbing Antibody with Yeast Cells Preparation of Fixed Yeast

    E-print Network

    Aris, John P.

    106 Pre-Absorbing Antibody with Yeast Cells Preparation of Fixed Yeast 1. Plan to do steps 1-10 in the yeast immunofluorescence method. But, start with 100 mls of cells at OD600=0.2. Then, do all steps in quadruplicate. Do pretreatment, and digest cells for 10 minutes. 2. Pool all yeast in SPC + Pics in one

  7. Yeast through the ages: A statistical analysis of genetic changes in aging yeast

    E-print Network

    Hardin, Jo

    Yeast through the ages: A statistical analysis of genetic changes in aging yeast A. Wise J. Hardin focuses on the analysis of data from a yeast DNA microarray experiment. The biological question that motivates our research is "What genetic changes in yeast happen over time?" In order to explore the research

  8. APPENDIX 4LGrowth and Manipulation of Yeast PREPARATION OF SELECTED YEAST MEDIA

    E-print Network

    Winston, Fred

    containers in which 2.5 kg of dextrose is packaged. Throughout this chapter, YNB -AA/AS refers to yeastAPPENDIX 4LGrowth and Manipulation of Yeast PREPARATION OF SELECTED YEAST MEDIA Like Escherichia coli, yeast can be grown in either liquid media or on the surface of (or embedded in) solid agar plates

  9. Bacteria, Yeast and Chemicals on Human Skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/videos/news/Microbes_040115-1.html Bacteria, Yeast and Chemicals on Human Skin HealthDay News ... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Play video: Bacteria, Yeast and Chemicals on Human Skin For closed ...

  10. Yeast Can Affect Behavior and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, William G.

    1984-01-01

    A pediatrician recounts his experiences in diagnosing and treating allergies to common yeast germs that may result in behavior and learning problems. He lists characteristics that may predispose children to yeast-connected health problems. (CL)

  11. Cdc42 Oscillations in Yeasts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Felipe O. Bendezu (Switzerland; University of Lausanne REV)

    2012-12-04

    A fundamental problem in cell biology is how cells define one or several discrete sites of polarity. Through mechanisms involving positive and negative feedback, the small Rho-family guanosine triphosphatase Cdc42 breaks symmetry in round budding yeast cells to define a single site of polarized cell growth. However, it is not clear how cells can define multiple sites of polarization concurrently. We discuss a study in which rod-shaped fission yeast cells, which naturally polarize growth at their two cell ends, exhibited oscillations of Cdc42 activity between these sites. We compare these findings with similar oscillatory behavior of Cdc42 detected in budding yeast cells and discuss the possible mechanism and functional outputs of these oscillations.

  12. Yeast proteome map (update 2006).

    PubMed

    Perrot, Michel; Guieysse-Peugeot, Anne-Laure; Massoni, Aurélie; Espagne, Christelle; Claverol, Stéphane; Silva, Raquel Monteiro; Jenö, Paul; Santos, Manuel; Bonneu, Marc; Boucherie, Hélian

    2007-04-01

    To improve the potential of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis for proteomic investigations in yeast we have undertaken the systematic identification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins separated on 2-D gels. We report here the identification of 187 novel protein spots. They were identified by two methods, mass spectrometry and gene inactivation. These identifications extend the number of protein spots identified on our yeast 2-D proteome map to 602, i.e. nearly half the detectable spots of the proteome map. These spots correspond to 417 different proteins. The reference map and the list of identified proteins can be accessed on the Yeast Protein Map server (www.ibgc.u-bordeaux2.fr/YPM). PMID:17351888

  13. Nocardia brasiliensis infection mimicking juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a 4-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Nitin; Adib, Navid; Grimwood, Keith

    2013-11-01

    Nocardia are ubiquitous environmental saprophytes that cause pneumonia and disseminated disease in immunocompromised patients. They can also cause localized cutaneous and soft tissue infections in healthy people after direct percutaneous inoculation. Nocardia arthritis is rare in both forms of the disease. Here we present the first published case of a child with septic arthritis caused by N brasiliensis. Importantly, this otherwise well 4-year-old girl had no known history of trauma but presented with transient cutaneous lesions and a 6-week history of arthritis involving the right fourth digit proximal interphalangeal joint without accompanying fever or raised systemic inflammatory markers. She received a diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and underwent antiinflammatory and immunosuppressant therapy. After 2 months she developed frank septic arthritis, which necessitated a surgical joint washout, from which an intraoperative swab grew N brasiliensis. The patient received 6 months of high-dose trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and remains well more than 4 years after treatment. This unusual case highlights the importance of considering an indolent infection from slow-growing organisms, including Nocardia, when diagnosing the oligoarthritis subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is especially relevant when a single joint is involved and response to antiinflammatory therapy is suboptimal because antiinflammatory agents may mask evolving signs of infection. PMID:24127474

  14. Sequence and Expression Analyses of Ethylene Response Factors Highly Expressed in Latex Cells from Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Piyatrakul, Piyanuch; Yang, Meng; Putranto, Riza-Arief; Pirrello, Julien; Dessailly, Florence; Hu, Songnian; Summo, Marilyne; Theeravatanasuk, Kannikar; Leclercq, Julie; Kuswanhadi; Montoro, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The AP2/ERF superfamily encodes transcription factors that play a key role in plant development and responses to abiotic and biotic stress. In Hevea brasiliensis, ERF genes have been identified by RNA sequencing. This study set out to validate the number of HbERF genes, and identify ERF genes involved in the regulation of latex cell metabolism. A comprehensive Hevea transcriptome was improved using additional RNA reads from reproductive tissues. Newly assembled contigs were annotated in the Gene Ontology database and were assigned to 3 main categories. The AP2/ERF superfamily is the third most represented compared with other transcription factor families. A comparison with genomic scaffolds led to an estimation of 114 AP2/ERF genes and 1 soloist in Hevea brasiliensis. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, functions were predicted for 26 HbERF genes. A relative transcript abundance analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR in various tissues. Transcripts of ERFs from group I and VIII were very abundant in all tissues while those of group VII were highly accumulated in latex cells. Seven of the thirty-five ERF expression marker genes were highly expressed in latex. Subcellular localization and transactivation analyses suggested that HbERF-VII candidate genes encoded functional transcription factors. PMID:24971876

  15. Sequence and expression analyses of ethylene response factors highly expressed in latex cells from Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Piyatrakul, Piyanuch; Yang, Meng; Putranto, Riza-Arief; Pirrello, Julien; Dessailly, Florence; Hu, Songnian; Summo, Marilyne; Theeravatanasuk, Kannikar; Leclercq, Julie; Kuswanhadi; Montoro, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The AP2/ERF superfamily encodes transcription factors that play a key role in plant development and responses to abiotic and biotic stress. In Hevea brasiliensis, ERF genes have been identified by RNA sequencing. This study set out to validate the number of HbERF genes, and identify ERF genes involved in the regulation of latex cell metabolism. A comprehensive Hevea transcriptome was improved using additional RNA reads from reproductive tissues. Newly assembled contigs were annotated in the Gene Ontology database and were assigned to 3 main categories. The AP2/ERF superfamily is the third most represented compared with other transcription factor families. A comparison with genomic scaffolds led to an estimation of 114 AP2/ERF genes and 1 soloist in Hevea brasiliensis. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, functions were predicted for 26 HbERF genes. A relative transcript abundance analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR in various tissues. Transcripts of ERFs from group I and VIII were very abundant in all tissues while those of group VII were highly accumulated in latex cells. Seven of the thirty-five ERF expression marker genes were highly expressed in latex. Subcellular localization and transactivation analyses suggested that HbERF-VII candidate genes encoded functional transcription factors. PMID:24971876

  16. Red yeast rice: a new hypolipidemic drug

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mélanie Journoud; Peter J. H Jones

    2004-01-01

    Red yeast rice is a source of fermented pigment with possible bioactive effect. Evidence shows that fermented red yeast rice lowers cholesterol levels moderately compared to other statin drugs, but with the added advantage of causing less adverse effects. A review of the body of evidence surrounding the properties of red yeast rice underscores its potential as a new alternative

  17. Enological functions of parietal yeast mannoproteins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrea Caridi

    2006-01-01

    Parietal yeast mannoproteins play a very important role in the overall vinification process. Their production and release, both during winemaking and aging on lees, depends on the specific yeast strain and the nutritional conditions. The following enological functions of parietal yeast mannoproteins have been described: (a) adsorption of ochratoxin A; (b) combination with phenolic compounds; (c) increased growth of malolactic

  18. YEASTBOOK PERSPECTIVES Yeast: An Experimental Organism

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    YEASTBOOK PERSPECTIVES Yeast: An Experimental Organism for 21st Century Biology David Botstein*,1, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 ABSTRACT In this essay, we revisit the status of yeast as a model system for biology. We first summarize important contributions of yeast to eukaryotic biology that we anticipated

  19. Yeast: A Research Organism for Teaching Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manney, Thomas R.; Manney, Monta L.

    1992-01-01

    Explains why laboratory strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are particularly suited for classroom science activities. Describes the sexual life cycle of yeast and the genetic system with visible mutations. Presents an overview of activities that can be done with yeast and gives a source for teachers to obtain more information. (PR)

  20. Mössbauer studies on yeast metallothionein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, X.-Q.; Bill, E.; Trautwein, A. X.; Hartmann, H. J.; Weser, U.

    1994-12-01

    Iron-substituted yeast metallothionein, Fe(II)-yeast-MT, has been studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The iron in the protein is in the high-spin ferrous state. As maximum metal content, 4 Fe(II)/molecule has been determined, with the 4 metal ions forming a diamagnetic cluster due to the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between the Fe(II) ions via bridging thiolates. In case the iron titration is less than 4 Fe(II)/apoprotein, the ions are magnetically noninteracting, with each individual Fe(II) behaving similar to Fe(II) in reduced rubredoxin.

  1. Combined nuclear measurements of yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, N. S.; Al-Saleh, K. A.; Arafah, D.-E.; Halim, N. A.

    1987-05-01

    Combined Rutherford backscattering (RBS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) techniques were used to determine the elemental composition of yeast. Results reveal no toxic elements (e.g. Ag, Pb, etc) in yeast. Yet results display some similarities in concentrations of some elements (e.g. Ti, Mn, Ni, Cu and Sr), large differences are observed for others (e.g. S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe and Zn). Variations are accounted due to different growing media or contamination during processing.

  2. Beer brewing using a fusant between a sake yeast and a brewer's yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nobuhiko Mukai; Chiharu Nishimori; Ikuko Wilson Fujishige; Akihiro Mizuno; Toshiro Takahashi; Kazuo Sato

    2001-01-01

    Beer brewing using a fusant between a sake yeast (a lysine auxotrophic mutant of sake yeast K-14) and a brewer's yeast (a respiratory-deficient mutant of the top fermentation yeast NCYC1333) was performed to take advantage of the beneficial characteristics of sake yeasts, i.e., the high productivity of esters, high tolerance to ethanol, and high osmotolerance. The fusant (F-32) obtained was

  3. Polyketide Synthase Gene Diversity within the Microbiome of the Sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis, Endemic to the Southern Atlantic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Trindade-Silva, Amaro E.; Rua, Cintia P. J.; Andrade, Bruno G. N.; Vicente, Ana Carolina Paulo; Silva, Genivaldo G. Z.

    2013-01-01

    Microbes associated with marine sponges are considered important producers of bioactive, structurally unique polyketides. The synthesis of such secondary metabolites involves type I polyketide synthases (PKSs), which are enzymes that reach a maximum complexity degree in bacteria. The Haplosclerida sponge Arenosclera brasiliensis hosts a complex microbiota and is the source of arenosclerins, alkaloids with cytotoxic and antibacterial activity. In the present investigation, we performed high-throughput sequencing of the ketosynthase (KS) amplicon to investigate the diversity of PKS genes present in the metagenome of A. brasiliensis. Almost 4,000 ketosynthase reads were recovered, with about 90% annotated automatically as bacterial. A total of 235 bacterial KS contigs was rigorously assembled from this sequence pool and submitted to phylogenetic analysis. A great diversity of six type I PKS groups has been consistently detected in our phylogenetic reconstructions, including a novel and A. brasiliensis-exclusive group. Our study is the first to reveal the diversity of type I PKS genes in A. brasiliensis as well as the potential of its microbiome to serve as a source of new polyketides. PMID:23275501

  4. Habitat use by Myotis yumanensis and Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana in South San Francisco Bay wetlands: An Acoustic Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theresa Brickley

    2012-01-01

    Research on bat habitat use within coastal estuaries is limited. The purposes of my study were to determine whether Yuma myotis (Myotis yumanensis) and Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana) differentiate between open water and marsh within saline and brackish habitats and to examine whether climatic factors are correlated with general activity and tidal height with foraging of the two

  5. Antioxidative and immunomodulating activities of polysaccharide extracts of the medicinal mushrooms Agaricus bisporus, Agaricus brasiliensis, Ganoderma lucidum and Phellinus linteus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maja Kozarski; Anita Klaus; Miomir Niksic; Dragica Jakovljevic; Johannes P. F. G. Helsper

    2011-01-01

    Partially purified polysaccharides were obtained from four medicinal mushroom species, Agaricus bisporus, Agaricus brasiliensis, Phellinus linteus and Ganoderma lucidum by hot water extraction, followed by ethanol precipitation. The four samples contained varying amounts of both ?- and ?-glucans as determined by FT-IR and by quantitative estimation after prior partial hydrolysis (Megazyme ?-glucan assay kit). EC50 values of the DPPH scavenging

  6. Description of the female, pupa and gall of Pisphondylia brasiliensis Couri and Maia, 1992 (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae, Schizomyiina) with new records.

    PubMed

    Maia, V C; Fleury, G; Soares, G L G; Isaias, R M S

    2010-11-01

    The gall of Pisphondylia brasiliensis on Guapira opposita, its female and pupa are described and illustrated. The geographic distribution of this species is now widened to Minas Gerais and Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil). For the first time, a female of the genus is described. PMID:21180914

  7. Domestic, peridomestic and wild hosts in the transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Caatinga area colonised by Triatoma brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Claudia Mendonça; Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona de Góes; de Souza, Rita de Cássia Moreira; Barbosa, Silvia Ermelinda; Xavier, Samanta Cristina das Chagas; Jansen, Ana Maria; Ramalho, Relrison Dias; Diotaiut, Liléia

    2014-01-01

    The role played by different mammal species in the maintenance of Trypanosoma cruzi is not constant and varies in time and place. This study aimed to characterise the importance of domestic, wild and peridomestic hosts in the transmission of T. cruzi in Tauá, state of Ceará, Caatinga area, Brazil, with an emphasis on those environments colonised by Triatoma brasiliensis. Direct parasitological examinations were performed on insects and mammals, serologic tests were performed on household and outdoor mammals and multiplex polymerase chain reaction was used on wild mammals. Cytochrome b was used as a food source for wild insects. The serum prevalence in dogs was 38% (20/53), while in pigs it was 6% (2/34). The percentages of the most abundantly infected wild animals were as follows: Thrichomys laurentius 74% (83/112) and Kerodon rupestris 10% (11/112). Of the 749 triatomines collected in the household research, 49.3% (369/749) were positive for T. brasiliensis, while 6.8% were infected with T. cruzi (25/369). In captured animals, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with T. laurentius, K. rupestris, Didelphis albiventris, Monodelphis domestica, Galea spixii, Wiedomys pyrrhorhinos, Conepatus semistriatus and Mus musculus. In animals identified via their food source, T. brasiliensis shares a natural environment with G. spixii, K. rupestris, Capra hircus, Gallus gallus, Tropidurus oreadicus and Tupinambis merianae. The high prevalence of T. cruzi in household and peridomiciliar animals reinforces the narrow relationship between the enzootic cycle and humans in environments with T. brasiliensis and characterises it as ubiquitous. PMID:25410992

  8. Yeast Cultures in Ruminant Nutrition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. DENEV; Tz. PEEVA; P. RADULOVA; N. STANCHEVA; G. STAYKOVA; G. BEEV; P. TODOROVA; S. TCHOBANOVA

    2007-01-01

    Abstract DENEV,, S. A., Tz. PEEVA, P. RADULOVA, P. STANCHEVA, G. STAYKOVA, G. BEEV, P. TODOROVA and S. TCHOBANOVA, 2007. Yeast cultures in ruminant nutrition. Bulg. J. Agric. Sci.13: 357-374 Interest in the use of fungal direct-fed microbials in ruminant nutrition is considerable.The

  9. Malassezia Baillon, emerging clinical yeasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roma Batra; Teun Boekhout; Eveline Guého; F. Javier Cabañes; Thomas L. Dawson; Aditya K. Gupta

    2005-01-01

    The human and animal pathogenic yeast genus Malassezia has received considerable attention in recent years from dermatologists, other clinicians, veterinarians and mycologists. Some points highlighted in this review include recent advances in the technological developments related to detection, identification, and classification of Malassezia species. The clinical association of Malassezia species with a number of mammalian dermatological diseases including dandruff, seborrhoeic

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum involvement in yeast cell death

    PubMed Central

    Austriaco, O. P., Nicanor

    2012-01-01

    Yeast cells undergo programed cell death (PCD) with characteristic markers associated with apoptosis in mammalian cells including chromatin breakage, nuclear fragmentation, reactive oxygen species generation, and metacaspase activation. Though significant research has focused on mitochondrial involvement in this phenomenon, more recent work with both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe has also implicated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in yeast PCD. This minireview provides an overview of ER stress-associated cell death (ER-SAD) in yeast. It begins with a description of ER structure and function in yeast before moving to a discussion of ER-SAD in both mammalian and yeast cells. Three examples of yeast cell death associated with the ER will be highlighted here including inositol starvation, lipid toxicity, and the inhibition of N-glycosylation. It closes by suggesting ways to further examine the involvement of the ER in yeast cell death. PMID:22876361

  11. Occurrence and Growth of Yeasts in Yogurts

    PubMed Central

    Suriyarachchi, V. R.; Fleet, G. H.

    1981-01-01

    Yogurts purchased from retail outlets were examined for the presence of yeasts by being plated onto oxytetracycline malt extract agar. Of the 128 samples examined, 45% exhibited yeast counts above 103 cells per g. A total of 73 yeast strains were isolated and identified as belonging to the genera Torulopsis, Kluyveromyces, Saccharomyces, Candida, Rhodotorula, Pichia, Debaryomyces, and Sporobolomyces. Torulopsis candida and Kluyveromyces fragilis were the most frequently isolated species, followed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rhodotorula rubra, Kluyveromyces lactis, and Torulopsis versatilis. The growth of yeasts in yogurts was related to the ability of the yeasts to grow at refrigeration temperatures, to ferment lactose and sucrose, and to hydrolyze milk casein. Most yeast isolates grew in the presence of 100 ?g of sorbate and benzoate preservatives per ml. Higher yeast counts from yogurts were obtained when the yogurts were plated onto oxytetracycline malt extract agar than when they were plated onto acidified malt extract agar. PMID:16345853

  12. Cultivated strains of Agaricus bisporus and A. brasiliensis: chemical characterization and evaluation of antioxidant and antimicrobial properties for the final healthy product--natural preservatives in yoghurt.

    PubMed

    Stojkovi?, Dejan; Reis, Filipa S; Glamo?lija, Jasmina; ?iri?, Ana; Barros, Lillian; Van Griensven, Leo J L D; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Sokovi?, Marina

    2014-07-25

    Agaricus bisporus (J. E. Lange) Emil J. Imbach and Agaricus brasiliensis Wasser, M. Didukh, Amazonas & Stamets are edible mushrooms. We chemically characterized these mushrooms for nutritional value, hydrophilic and lipophilic compounds. The antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of methanolic and ethanolic extracts were assessed. Hepatotoxicity was also evaluated. The ethanolic extract of both species was tested for inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes growth in yoghurt. Both species proved to be a good source of bioactive compounds. A. brasiliensis was richer in polyunsaturated fatty acids and revealed the highest concentration of phenolic acids, and tocopherols. A. bisporus showed the highest monounsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol contents. A. brasiliensis revealed the highest antioxidant potential, and its ethanolic extract displayed the highest antibacterial potential; the methanolic extract of A. bisporus revealed the highest antifungal activity. A. brasiliensis possessed better preserving properties in yoghurt. PMID:24881564

  13. Royal sun medicinal mushroom Agaricus brasiliensis (higher Basidiomycetes) and the attenuation of pulmonary inflammation induced by 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK).

    PubMed

    Croccia, Carolina; Lopes, Agnaldo Jose; Pinto, Luis Felipe Ribeiro; Sabaa-Srur, Armando Ubirajara Oliveira; Vaz, Luiz Carlos Aguiar; Trotte, Marcele Nogueira de Sousa; Tessarollo, Bernardo; Silva, Aristofanes Correa; de Matos, Haroldo Jose; Nunes, Rodolfo Acatauassu

    2013-01-01

    Agaricus brasiliensis currently is one of the most studied fungi because of its nutritional and therapeutic properties as an anti-inflammatory agent and an adjuvant in cancer chemotherapy. The effects of orally administered aqueous A. brasiliensis extract (14.3- and 42.9-mg doses) on parenchymal lung damage induced by carcinogenic 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) were observed in Wistar rats. NNK treatment induced pulmonary inflammation, but not lung cancer, in the rats. The lungs of animals treated with NNK showed a higher level of inflammation than those of the control group according to histopathologic examinations (P < 0.01) and kurtosis analysis (P < 0.001) of a global histogram generated from thoracic computed tomography scans. There was no significant difference in the alveolar and bronchial exudates between animals treated with a 14.3-mg dose of A. brasiliensis extract and the control without NNK. However, a significant difference was found between animals treated with NNK, received a 42.9-mg dose of A. brasiliensis (P < 0.05), and the controls not treated with NNK. We did not observe a significant difference between the kurtoses of the A. brasiliensis (14.3 mg) and control groups. However, a 42.9-mg dose of A. brasiliensis resulted in lower kurtosis values than those observed in the control group (P < 0.001). In conclusion, a low dose of A. brasiliensis was more effective in attenuating pulmonary inflammation. Similar to the histopathological results, the computed tomography scans also showed a protective effect of A. brasiliensis at the lower dose, which prevented gross pulmonary consolidation. PMID:23796216

  14. The left lung is preferentially targeted during experimental paracoccidioidomycosis in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Tristão, F.S.M.; Rocha, F.A.; Dias, F.C.; Rossi, M.A.; Silva, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a chronic systemic mycosis caused by the inhalation of the thermally dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis as well as the recently described P. lutzii. Because the primary infection occurs in the lungs, we investigated the differential involvement of the right and left lungs in experimental P. brasiliensis infection. Lungs were collected from C57BL/6 mice at 70 days after intravenous infection with 1×106 yeast cells of a virulent strain of P. brasiliensis (Pb18). The left lung, which in mice is smaller and has fewer lobes than the right lung, yielded increased fungal recovery associated with a predominant interleukin-4 response and diminished synthesis of interferon-? and nitric oxide compared with the right lung. Our data indicate differential involvement of the right and left lungs during experimental PCM. This knowledge emphasizes the need for an accurate, standardized protocol for tissue collection during studies of experimental P. brasiliensis infection, since experiments using the same lungs favor the collection of comparable data among different mice. PMID:24141611

  15. The Pivotal Role of 5-Lipoxygenase-Derived LTB4 in Controlling Pulmonary Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Patrícia Campi; Santos, Daniel Assis; Ribeiro, Lucas Secchim; Fagundes, Caio Tavares; de Paula, Talles Prosperi; Avila, Thiago Vinícius; Baltazar, Ludmila de Matos; Madeira, Mila Moreira; Cruz, Rosana de Carvalho; Dias, Ana Carolina Fialho; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Cisalpino, Patrícia Silva; Souza, Danielle G.

    2013-01-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) produced from arachidonic acid by the action of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) are classical mediators of inflammatory responses. However, studies published in the literature regarding these mediators are contradictory and it remains uncertain whether these lipid mediators play a role in host defense against the fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. To determine the involvement of LTs in the host response to pulmonary infection, wild-type and LT-deficient mice by targeted disruption of the 5-lipoxygenase gene (knockout mice) were studied following intratracheal challenge with P. brasiliensis yeasts. The results showed that infection is uniformly fatal in 5-LO-deficient mice and the mechanisms that account for this phenotype are an exacerbated lung injury and higher fungal pulmonary burden. Genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of LTs resulted in lower phagocytosis and fungicidal activity of macrophages in vitro, suggesting that deficiency in fungal clearance seems to be secondary to the absence of activation in 5-LO?/? macrophages. Exogenous LTB4 restored phagocytosis and fungicidal activity of 5-LO?/? macrophages. Moreover, P. brasiliensis killing promoted by LTB4 was dependent on nitric oxide (NO) production by macrophages. Taken together, these results reveal a fundamental role for 5-LO-derived LTB4 in the protective response to P. brasiliensis infection and identify relevant mechanisms for the control of fungal infection during the early stages of the host immune response. PMID:23991239

  16. Mycotoxins - prevention and decontamination by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Pfliegler, Walter P; Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Pócsi, István

    2015-07-01

    The application of yeasts has great potential in reducing the economic damage caused by toxigenic fungi in the agriculture. Some yeasts may act as biocontrol agents inhibiting the growth of filamentous fungi. These species may also gain importance in the preservation of agricultural products and in the reduction of their mycotoxin contamination, yet the extent of mycotoxin production in the presence of biocontrol agents is relatively less understood. The application of yeasts in various technological processes may have a direct inhibitory effect on the toxin production of certain molds, which is independent of their growth suppressing effect. Furthermore, several yeast species are capable of accumulating mycotoxins from agricultural products, thereby effectively decontaminating them. Probiotic yeasts or products containing yeast cell wall are also applied to counteract mycotoxicosis in livestock. Several yeast strains are also able to degrade toxins to less-toxic or even non-toxic substances. This intensively researched field would greatly benefit from a deeper knowledge on the genetic and molecular basis of toxin degradation. Moreover, yeasts and their biotechnologically important enzymes may exhibit sensitivity to certain mycotoxins, thereby mounting a considerable problem for the biotechnological industry. It is noted that yeasts are generally regarded as safe; however, there are reports of toxin degrading species that may cause human fungal infections. The aspects of yeast-mycotoxin relations with a brief consideration of strain improvement strategies and genetic modification for improved detoxifying properties and/or mycotoxin resistance are reviewed here. PMID:25682759

  17. Flight dispersal of the Chagas disease vectors Triatoma brasiliensis and Triatoma pseudomaculata in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Carbajal de la Fuente, Ana L; Minoli, Sebastian A; Lopes, Catarina M; Noireau, François; Lazzari, Claudio R; Lorenzo, Marcelo G

    2007-02-01

    The present paper reports for the first time the capture of wild Triatoma brasiliensis and Triatoma pseudomaculata by means of light traps in Brazil. We tested commercially available lighting devices powered by batteries to attract the bugs to a white piece of cloth in the field. Two main findings showed to be significant: first, the results presented here show that light traps can be used for sampling these species in wild environments; second, they reveal that house colonization by triatomines may also happen as a consequence of the arrival of flying sylvatic bugs guided by artificial light sources. In addition, we discuss the effect of some environmental and biological factors on triatomine flight activity modulation. PMID:17292320

  18. Inhibitory effect of verbascoside isolated from Buddleja brasiliensis Jacq. ex Spreng on prolyl oligopeptidase activity.

    PubMed

    Filho, Augusto G; Morel, Ademir F; Adolpho, Luciana; Ilha, Vinícius; Giralt, Ernest; Tarragó, Teresa; Dalcol, Ionara I

    2012-10-01

    The phenylpropanoid glycoside verbascoside [2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenylethyl)-1-O-?-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1?3)-?-D-(4-O-caffeyl)-glucopyranoside] (1) has been isolated as the main constituent of the crude extract of Buddleja brasiliensis Jacq. ex Spreng from Southern Brazil. The crude extract, main fractions and the compound 1 were evaluated for inhibition of the enzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE), dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) and prolyl oligopeptidase (POP). Compound 1 showed weak activity against DPP-IV with an IC(50) > 150 µM and was inactive against AChE, with a pMIQ determined by bioautography of 9.6. In contrast, 1 displayed significant inhibition of POP in a dose-dependent manner with an IC(50) value of 1.3 ± 0.2 µM, similar to the positive control, baicalin, with a POP IC(50) of 12 ± 3 µM. PMID:22275311

  19. Annual pattern of fecal corticoid excretion in captive Red-tailed parrots (Amazona brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Popp, Lucyenne G; Serafini, Patrícia P; Reghelin, Angela L S; Spercoski, Katherinne Maria; Roper, James J; Morais, Rosana N

    2008-05-01

    Annual patterns of fecal corticoid excretion were analyzed in the threatened Red-tailed parrot (Amazona brasiliensis) in captivity. Corticoid concentration over the 15 months of the study (mean +/- standard error, 12.6 +/- 0.32 ng g(-1), n = 585) was lowest around May (the southern Fall), and greatest around September (late winter), just prior to their normal breeding period. Corticoid excretion follows a seasonal pattern best explained by reproductive cycles rather than climate, although climate may be involved in the timing of corticoid excretion. Fecal corticoids also show promise as a tool to measure stress levels. We demonstrate that fecal corticoid measurement is a simple, yet efficient method for monitoring adrenocortical activity in captive, and perhaps wild, parrots. Monitoring adrenocortical activity can inform researchers about imposed stress in captivity, whether pair-bonds are forming in captive birds, and of the timing of breeding both in captivity and in nature. PMID:18180929

  20. Emergence of co-trimoxazole resistant Nocardia brasiliensis causing fatal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Khare, Vineeta; Gupta, Prashant; Himanshu, D; Kumar, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    An 85-year-old man was admitted to the medical intensive care unit with a 10-day history of severe breathlessness, fever and cough. The patient was known to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and had been receiving corticosteroids in the preceding 18 months. He had been treated for tuberculosis 2.5 years previously. On examination he was febrile, tachycardic with a respiratory rate of 46/min. Auscultation revealed bilateral crepitation's and wheeze. Chest radiograph revealed patchy infiltrates on right lung. The patient developed respiratory depression and was mechanically ventilated. His sputum and endotracheal aspirates revealed Nocardia brasiliensis on culture which was found to be co-trimoxazole resistant. Once this became known imipenem was substituted for co-trimoxazole but unfortunately condition of the patient did not improve and he died following a cardiac arrest. PMID:23598938

  1. Comparative study of electrophoretic patterns of latex proteins from clones of Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Arreguín, B; Lara, P; Rodríguez, R

    1988-07-01

    Latex serum proteins from Hevea brasiliensis were studied by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Proteins from whole serum and fractions isolated by gel chromatography on Ultrogel AcA 44 were analyzed. No qualitative clonal differences were found in the protein patterns of whole latex or in the fractions but laser densitometry revealed reliable quantitative differences in protein composition. Reproducible mobilities and molecular weights of selected bands were obtained both within single gels as well as in different gels, analyzing several lots of latex received at various times from a Hevea experimental field station. The clones compared were IAN 710, GV 31, GV 42; the first one had the highest rubber yields. PMID:3234370

  2. Tourism values for Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana) viewing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bagstad, Kenneth J.; Widerholdt, Ruscena

    2013-01-01

    Migratory species provide diverse ecosystem services to people, but these values have seldom been estimated rangewide for a single species. In this article, we summarize visitation and consumer surplus for recreational visitors to viewing sites for the Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana) throughout the Southwestern United States. Public bat viewing opportunities are available at 17 of 25 major roosts across six states; on an annual basis, we estimate that over 242,000 visitors view bats, gaining over $6.5 million in consumer surplus. A better understanding of spatial mismatches between the areas where bats provide value to people and areas most critical for maintaining migratory populations can better inform conservation planning, including economic incentive systems for conservation.

  3. Sucrose importation into laticifers of Hevea brasiliensis, in relation to ethylene stimulation of latex production

    PubMed Central

    Dusotoit-Coucaud, Anaïs; Brunel, Nicole; Kongsawadworakul, Panida; Viboonjun, Unchera; Lacointe, André; Julien, Jean-Louis; Chrestin, Hervé; Sakr, Soulaïman

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The major economic product of Hevea brasiliensis is a rubber-containing cytoplasm (latex), which flows out of laticifers (latex cells) when the bark is tapped. The latex yield is stimulated by ethylene. Sucrose, the unique precursor of rubber synthesis, must cross the plasma membrane through specific sucrose transporters before being metabolized in the laticifers. The relative importance of sucrose transporters in determining latex yield is unknown. Here, the effects of ethylene (by application of Ethrel®) on sucrose transporter gene expression in the inner bark tissues and latex cells of H. brasiliensis are described. Methods Experiments, including cloning sucrose transporters, real time RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, were carried out on virgin (untapped) trees, treated or untreated with the latex yield stimulant Ethrel. Key Results Seven putative full-length cDNAs of sucrose transporters were cloned from a latex-specific cDNA library. These transporters belong to all SUT (sucrose transporter) groups and differ by their basal gene expression in latex and inner soft bark, with a predominance of HbSUT1A and HbSUT1B. Of these sucrose transporters, only HbSUT1A and HbSUT2A were distinctly increased by ethylene. Moreover, this increase was shown to be specific to laticifers and to ethylene application. Conclusion The data and all previous information on sucrose transport show that HbSUT1A and HbSUT2A are related to the increase in sucrose import into laticifers, required for the stimulation of latex yield by ethylene in virgin trees. PMID:19567416

  4. Yeast Metabolism Lab Purpose: To determine the effects of different

    E-print Network

    Rose, Michael R.

    1 Yeast Metabolism Lab Purpose: To determine the effects of different carbohydrates on the metabolism of live yeast. Background: Some organisms are capable of photosynthesis- using energy captured treatment (yeast+water, yeast+glucose, or yeast+sweetener) will produce the most carbon dioxide (CO2) from

  5. Morphology of a human-derived YAC in yeast meiosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Josef Loidl; Harry Scherthan; Johan T. Den Dunnen; Franz Klein

    1995-01-01

    In meiosis of human males DNA is packaged along pachytene chromosomes about 20 time more compactly than in meiosis of yeast. Nevertheless, a human-derived yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) shows the same degree of compaction of DNA as endogenous chromosomes in meiotic prophase nuclei of yeast. This suggests that in yeast meiosis, human and yeast DNA adopt a similar organization of

  6. Morphology of a human-derived YAC in yeast meiosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Josef Loidl; Harry Scherthan; Johan T. Den Dunnen; Franz Klein

    1995-01-01

    In meiosis of human males DNA is packaged along pachytene chromosomes about 20 times more compactly than in meiosis of yeast. Nevertheless, a human-derived yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) shows the same degree of compaction of DNA as endogenous chromosomes in meiotic prophase nuclei of yeast. This suggests that in yeast meiosis, human and yeast DNA adopt a similar organization of

  7. Characterization of the Yeast Transcriptome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victor E. Velculescu; Lin Zhang; Wei Zhou; Jacob Vogelstein; Munira A. Basrai; Douglas E Bassett; Phil Hieter; Bert Vogelstein; Kenneth W. Kinzler

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed the set of genes expressed from the yeast genome, herein called the transcriptome, using serial analysis of gene expression. Analysis of 60,633 transcripts revealed 4,665 genes, with expression levels ranging from 0.3 to over 200 transcripts per cell. Of these genes, 1981 had known functions, while 2684 were previously uncharacterized. The integration of positional information with gene

  8. Malassezia Baillon, emerging clinical yeasts.

    PubMed

    Batra, Roma; Boekhout, Teun; Guého, Eveline; Cabañes, F Javier; Dawson, Thomas L; Gupta, Aditya K

    2005-12-01

    The human and animal pathogenic yeast genus Malassezia has received considerable attention in recent years from dermatologists, other clinicians, veterinarians and mycologists. Some points highlighted in this review include recent advances in the technological developments related to detection, identification, and classification of Malassezia species. The clinical association of Malassezia species with a number of mammalian dermatological diseases including dandruff, seborrhoeic dermatitis, pityriasis versicolor, psoriasis, folliculitis and otitis is also discussed. PMID:16084129

  9. Yeast diversity in hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Butinar, L; Santos, S; Spencer-Martins, I; Oren, A; Gunde-Cimerman, N

    2005-03-15

    Thus far it has been considered that hypersaline natural brines which are subjected to extreme solar heating, do not contain non-melanized yeast populations. Nevertheless we have isolated yeasts in eight different salterns worldwide, as well as from the Dead Sea, Enriquillo Lake (Dominican Republic) and the Great Salt Lake (Utah). Among the isolates obtained from hypersaline waters, Pichia guilliermondii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Yarrowia lipolytica and Candida parapsilosis are known contaminants of low water activity food, whereas Rhodosporidium sphaerocarpum, R. babjevae, Rhodotorula laryngis, Trichosporon mucoides, and a new species resembling C. glabrata were not known for their halotolerance and were identified for the first time in hypersaline habitats. Moreover, the ascomycetous yeast Metschnikowia bicuspidata, known to be a parasite of the brine shrimp, was isolated as a free-living form from the Great Salt Lake brine. In water rich in magnesium chloride (bitterns) from the La Trinitat salterns (Spain), two new species provisionally named C. atmosphaerica - like and P. philogaea - like were discovered. PMID:15766773

  10. Yeasts Diversity in Fermented Foods and Beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamang, Jyoti Prakash; Fleet, Graham H.

    People across the world have learnt to culture and use the essential microorganisms for production of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages. A fermented food is produced either spontaneously or by adding mixed/pure starter culture(s). Yeasts are among the essential functional microorganisms encountered in many fermented foods, and are commercially used in production of baker's yeast, breads, wine, beer, cheese, etc. In Asia, moulds are predominant followed by amylolytic and alcohol-producing yeasts in the fermentation processes, whereas in Africa, Europe, Australia and America, fermented products are prepared exclusively using bacteria or bacteria-yeasts mixed cultures. This chapter would focus on the varieties of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages produced by yeasts, their microbiology and role in food fermentation, widely used commercial starters (pilot production, molecular aspects), production technology of some common commercial fermented foods and alcoholic beverages, toxicity and food safety using yeasts cultures and socio-economy

  11. Assembly of eukaryotic algal chromosomes in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Synthetic genomic approaches offer unique opportunities to use powerful yeast and Escherichia coli genetic systems to assemble and modify chromosome-sized molecules before returning the modified DNA to the target host. For example, the entire 1 Mb Mycoplasma mycoides chromosome can be stably maintained and manipulated in yeast before being transplanted back into recipient cells. We have previously demonstrated that cloning in yeast of large (>?~?150 kb), high G?+?C (55%) prokaryotic DNA fragments was improved by addition of yeast replication origins every ~100 kb. Conversely, low G?+?C DNA is stable (up to at least 1.8 Mb) without adding supplemental yeast origins. It has not been previously tested whether addition of yeast replication origins similarly improves the yeast-based cloning of large (>150 kb) eukaryotic DNA with moderate G?+?C content. The model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum has an average G?+?C content of 48% and a 27.4 Mb genome sequence that has been assembled into chromosome-sized scaffolds making it an ideal test case for assembly and maintenance of eukaryotic chromosomes in yeast. Results We present a modified chromosome assembly technique in which eukaryotic chromosomes as large as ~500 kb can be assembled from cloned ~100 kb fragments. We used this technique to clone fragments spanning P. tricornutum chromosomes 25 and 26 and to assemble these fragments into single, chromosome-sized molecules. We found that addition of yeast replication origins improved the cloning, assembly, and maintenance of the large chromosomes in yeast. Furthermore, purification of the fragments to be assembled by electroelution greatly increased assembly efficiency. Conclusions Entire eukaryotic chromosomes can be successfully cloned, maintained, and manipulated in yeast. These results highlight the improvement in assembly and maintenance afforded by including yeast replication origins in eukaryotic DNA with moderate G?+?C content (48%). They also highlight the increased efficiency of assembly that can be achieved by purifying fragments before assembly. PMID:24325901

  12. Yeasts in floral nectar: a quantitative survey

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Carlos M.; de Vega, Clara; Canto, Azucena; Pozo, María I.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims One peculiarity of floral nectar that remains relatively unexplored from an ecological perspective is its role as a natural habitat for micro-organisms. This study assesses the frequency of occurrence and abundance of yeast cells in floral nectar of insect-pollinated plants from three contrasting plant communities on two continents. Possible correlations between interspecific differences in yeast incidence and pollinator composition are also explored. Methods The study was conducted at three widely separated areas, two in the Iberian Peninsula (Spain) and one in the Yucatán Peninsula (Mexico). Floral nectar samples from 130 species (37–63 species per region) in 44 families were examined microscopically for the presence of yeast cells. For one of the Spanish sites, the relationship across species between incidence of yeasts in nectar and the proportion of flowers visited by each of five major pollinator categories was also investigated. Key Results Yeasts occurred regularly in the floral nectar of many species, where they sometimes reached extraordinary densities (up to 4 × 105 cells mm?3). Depending on the region, between 32 and 44 % of all nectar samples contained yeasts. Yeast cell densities in the order of 104 cells mm?3 were commonplace, and densities >105 cells mm?3 were not rare. About one-fifth of species at each site had mean yeast cell densities >104 cells mm?3. Across species, yeast frequency and abundance were directly correlated with the proportion of floral visits by bumble-bees, and inversely with the proportion of visits by solitary bees. Conclusions Incorporating nectar yeasts into the scenario of plant–pollinator interactions opens up a number of intriguing avenues for research. In addition, with yeasts being as ubiquitous and abundant in floral nectars as revealed by this study, and given their astounding metabolic versatility, studies focusing on nectar chemical features should carefully control for the presence of yeasts in nectar samples. PMID:19208669

  13. Efficacy of marine yeasts and baker's yeast as immunostimulants in Fenneropenaeus indicus: A comparative study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. J. Sarlin; Rosamma Philip

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of marine yeasts Debaryomyces hansenii (S8) and Candida tropicalis (S186) as immunostimulants to Indian white prawn Fenneropenaeus indicus was estimated in comparison with Saccharomyces cerevisiae S36. Biomass of yeast strains was prepared using Malt Extract Agar and incorporated into a standard diet to prepare yeast diets of varying concentrations. F. indicus were fed these diets for a period of

  14. Role of glucose signaling in yeast metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dam, K. van [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands). E.C. Slater Inst.

    1996-10-05

    The conversion of glucose to ethanol and carbon dioxide by yeast was the first biochemical pathway to be studied in detail. The initial observation that this process is catalyzed by an extract of yeast led to the discovery of enzymes and coenzymes and laid the foundation for modern biochemistry. In this article, knowledge concerning the relation between uptake of and signaling by glucose in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed and compared to the analogous process in prokaryotes. It is concluded that (much) more fundamental knowledge concerning these processes is required before rational redesign of metabolic fluxes from glucose in yeast can be achieved.

  15. Evaluation of Automated Yeast Identification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred and nine teleomorphic and anamorphic yeast isolates representing approximately 30 taxa were used to evaluate the accuracy of the Biolog yeast identification system. Isolates derived from nomenclatural types, environmental, and clinica isolates of known identity were tested in the Biolog system. Of the isolates tested, 81 were in the Biolog database. The system correctly identified 40, incorrectly identified 29, and was unable to identify 12. Of the 28 isolates not in the database, 18 were given names, whereas 10 were not. The Biolog yeast identification system is inadequate for the identification of yeasts originating from the environment during space program activities.

  16. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983 Food...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract is the food ingredient resulting...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983 Food...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract is the food ingredient resulting...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983 Food...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract is the food ingredient resulting...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983 Food...Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract is the food ingredient resulting...

  20. Field nursery inoculation of Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg. seedling rootstock with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Ikram; A. W. Mahmud; M. N. Ghani; M. T. Ibrahim; A. B. Zainal

    1992-01-01

    The growth response of Hevea brasiliensis to vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi inoculation was assessed in two field nursery sites containing indigenous\\u000a mycorrhizal fungi (IMF). Seedling rootstocks were inoculated with mixed VAM-fungal species in a factorial combination with\\u000a phosphorus (P) fertilizer application, and planted in randomised blocks on sandy (site 1) and clayey (site 2) soils. Plants\\u000a were harvested after 26

  1. Foraging ecology of Cookiecutter Sharks ( Isistius brasiliensis ) on pelagic fishes in Hawaii, inferred from prey bite wounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yannis P. Papastamatiou; Brad M. Wetherbee; John O’Sullivan; Gwen D. Goodmanlowe; Christopher G. Lowe

    2010-01-01

    The Cookiecutter Shark (Isistius brasiliensis) is an ecto-parasitic predator of numerous large pelagic fish and mammals. However, little is known of its foraging ecology\\u000a due to its elusive foraging tactics in the pelagic environment. We used bite scar patterns on pelagic fishes landed at the\\u000a Honolulu Fish Auction to assess some of the Cookiecutter Shark foraging habits. Swordfish (Xiphias gladius)

  2. [Adoptive transfer of immunity against Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in mice. In vitro restimulation of immune cells before their transfer].

    PubMed

    Rhalem, A; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Péry, P

    1989-01-01

    When mesenteric lymph node cells from infected mice were stimulated during an in vitro culture with exoantigens or with a purified protective antigen of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, a drop was noted in the number of cells required to transfer protection to new mice. A maximal effect was already obtained after 4 hrs. of culture, but irradiated cells or cells from another mouse strain were unable to mediate this transfer. T cells were more effective than B cells in transferring the protection. PMID:2502305

  3. Distributional potential of the Triatoma brasiliensis species complex at present and under scenarios of future climate conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Triatoma brasiliensis complex is a monophyletic group, comprising three species, one of which includes two subspecific taxa, distributed across 12 Brazilian states, in the caatinga and cerrado biomes. Members of the complex are diverse in terms of epidemiological importance, morphology, biology, ecology, and genetics. Triatoma b. brasiliensis is the most disease-relevant member of the complex in terms of epidemiology, extensive distribution, broad feeding preferences, broad ecological distribution, and high rates of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi; consequently, it is considered the principal vector of Chagas disease in northeastern Brazil. Methods We used ecological niche models to estimate potential distributions of all members of the complex, and evaluated the potential for suitable adjacent areas to be colonized; we also present first evaluations of potential for climate change-mediated distributional shifts. Models were developed using the GARP and Maxent algorithms. Results Models for three members of the complex (T. b. brasiliensis, N?=?332; T. b. macromelasoma, N?=?35; and T. juazeirensis, N?=?78) had significant distributional predictivity; however, models for T. sherlocki and T. melanica, both with very small sample sizes (N?=?7), did not yield predictions that performed better than random. Model projections onto future-climate scenarios indicated little broad-scale potential for change in the potential distribution of the complex through 2050. Conclusions This study suggests that T. b. brasiliensis is the member of the complex with the greatest distributional potential to colonize new areas: overall; however, the distribution of the complex appears relatively stable. These analyses offer key information to guide proactive monitoring and remediation activities to reduce risk of Chagas disease transmission. PMID:24886587

  4. Foliar uptake of fog water and transport belowground alleviates drought effects in the cloud forest tree species, Drimys brasiliensis (Winteraceae).

    PubMed

    Eller, Cleiton B; Lima, Aline L; Oliveira, Rafael S

    2013-07-01

    Foliar water uptake (FWU) is a common water acquisition mechanism for plants inhabiting temperate fog-affected ecosystems, but the prevalence and consequences of this process for the water and carbon balance of tropical cloud forest species are unknown. We performed a series of experiments under field and glasshouse conditions using a combination of methods (sap flow, fluorescent apoplastic tracers and stable isotopes) to trace fog water movement from foliage to belowground components of Drimys brasiliensis. In addition, we measured leaf water potential, leaf gas exchange, leaf water repellency and growth of plants under contrasting soil water availabilities and fog exposure in glasshouse experiments to evaluate FWU effects on the water and carbon balance of D. brasiliensis saplings. Fog water diffused directly through leaf cuticles and contributed up to 42% of total foliar water content. FWU caused reversals in sap flow in stems and roots of up to 26% of daily maximum transpiration. Fog water transported through the xylem reached belowground pools and enhanced leaf water potential, photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and growth relative to plants sheltered from fog. Foliar uptake of fog water is an important water acquisition mechanism that can mitigate the deleterious effects of soil water deficits for D. brasiliensis. PMID:23534879

  5. Drosophila Regulate Yeast Density and Increase Yeast Community Similarity in a Natural Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Stamps, Judy A.; Yang, Louie H.; Morales, Vanessa M.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster adults and larvae, but especially larvae, had profound effects on the densities and community structure of yeasts that developed in banana fruits. Pieces of fruit exposed to adult female flies previously fed fly-conditioned bananas developed higher yeast densities than pieces of the same fruits that were not exposed to flies, supporting previous suggestions that adult Drosophila vector yeasts to new substrates. However, larvae alone had dramatic effects on yeast density and species composition. When yeast densities were compared in pieces of the same fruits assigned to different treatments, fruits that developed low yeast densities in the absence of flies developed significantly higher yeast densities when exposed to larvae. Across all of the fruits, larvae regulated yeast densities within narrow limits, as compared to a much wider range of yeast densities that developed in pieces of the same fruits not exposed to flies. Larvae also affected yeast species composition, dramatically reducing species diversity across fruits, reducing variation in yeast communities from one fruit to the next (beta diversity), and encouraging the consistent development of a yeast community composed of three species of yeast (Candida californica, C. zemplinina, and Pichia kluvyeri), all of which were palatable to larvae. Larvae excreted viable cells of these three yeast species in their fecal pools, and discouraged the growth of filamentous fungi, processes which may have contributed to their effects on the yeast communities in banana fruits. These and other findings suggest that D. melanogaster adults and their larval offspring together engage in ‘niche construction’, facilitating a predictable microbial environment in the fruit substrates in which the larvae live and develop. PMID:22860093

  6. Prevention of Yeast Spoilage in Feed and Food by the Yeast Mycocin HMK

    PubMed Central

    Lowes, K. F.; Shearman, C. A.; Payne, J.; MacKenzie, D.; Archer, D. B.; Merry, R. J.; Gasson, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The yeast Williopsis mrakii produces a mycocin or yeast killer toxin designated HMK; this toxin exhibits high thermal stability, high pH stability, and a broad spectrum of activity against other yeasts. We describe construction of a synthetic gene for mycocin HMK and heterologous expression of this toxin in Aspergillus niger. Mycocin HMK was fused to a glucoamylase protein carrier, which resulted in secretion of biologically active mycocin into the culture media. A partial purification protocol was developed, and a comparison with native W. mrakii mycocin showed that the heterologously expressed mycocin had similar physiological properties and an almost identical spectrum of biological activity against a number of yeasts isolated from silage and yoghurt. Two food and feed production systems prone to yeast spoilage were used as models to assess the ability of mycocin HMK to act as a biocontrol agent. The onset of aerobic spoilage in mature maize silage was delayed by application of A. niger mycocin HMK on opening because the toxin inhibited growth of the indigenous spoilage yeasts. This helped maintain both higher lactic acid levels and a lower pH. In yoghurt spiked with dairy spoilage yeasts, A. niger mycocin HMK was active at all of the storage temperatures tested at which yeast growth occurred, and there was no resurgence of resistant yeasts. The higher the yeast growth rate, the more effective the killing action of the mycocin. Thus, mycocin HMK has potential applications in controlling both silage spoilage and yoghurt spoilage caused by yeasts. PMID:10698773

  7. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: influence of calcium and magnesium ions on yeast resistance to dehydration-rehydration.

    PubMed

    Trofimova, Yuliya; Walker, Graeme; Rapoport, Alexander

    2010-07-01

    The influence of calcium and magnesium ions on resistance to dehydration in the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, was investigated. Magnesium ion availability directly influenced yeast cells' resistance to dehydration and, when additionally supplemented with calcium ions, this provided further significant increase of yeast resistance to dehydration. Gradual rehydration of dry yeast cells in water vapour indicated that both magnesium and calcium may be important for the stabilization of yeast cell membranes. In particular, calcium ions were shown for the first time to increase the resistance of yeast cells to dehydration in stress-sensitive cultures from exponential growth phases. It is concluded that magnesium and calcium ion supplementations in nutrient media may increase the dehydration stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae cells significantly, and this finding is important for the production of active dry yeast preparations for food and fermentation industries. PMID:20487021

  8. Yeast Breads: Made at Home. 

    E-print Network

    Reasonover, Frances

    1971-01-01

    and salt. Cool to lukewarm. Add softened yeast. Blend well. Gradually add flour to form a soft dough. Cover. Let rise in warm place until light and doubled in bulk from 1% to 2 hours. Roll out dough on well-floured surface or pastry cloth to a 15... Turn dough onto surface well dusted with . Knead until smooth, about 20 times. :sired, into crescents, rolls, etc. Place on jed baking sheet. Cover with damp cloth. warm place, free from draft, about 1 hour. F. 10 to 15 minutes, depending on size...

  9. YEAST MEIOSIS Sister kinetochores are mechanically

    E-print Network

    Asbury, Chip

    YEAST MEIOSIS Sister kinetochores are mechanically fused during meiosis I in yeast Krishna K Production of healthy gametes requires a reductional meiosis I division in which replicated sister chromatids comigrate, rather than separate as in mitosis or meiosis II. Fusion of sister kinetochores during meiosis I

  10. Chronological aging leads to apoptosis in yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eva Herker; Helmut Jungwirth; Katharina A. Lehmann; Corinna Maldener; Kai-Uwe Fröhlich; Silke Wissing; Sabrina Büttner; Markus Fehr; Stephan Sigrist; Frank Madeo

    2004-01-01

    uring the past years, yeast has been successfully established as a model to study mechanisms of apoptotic regulation. However, the beneficial effects of such a cell suicide program for a unicellular organism remained obscure. Here, we demonstrate that chronologi- cally aged yeast cultures die exhibiting typical markers of apoptosis, accumulate oxygen radicals, and show caspase activation. Age-induced cell death is

  11. Yeast flora of grape berries during ripening

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gianfranco Rosini; Federico Federici; Alessandro Martini

    1982-01-01

    The yeast flora associated with the surface of grapes during ripening was studied with regard to different sectors of the grape skin and the position in the bunch by means of traditional as well as more vigorous preisolation and precounting treatments. The yeast number per square centimeter of skin increases with ripening and is highest in the area immediately surrounding

  12. Yeast: An Experimental Organism for Modern Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botstein, David; Fink, Gerald R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the applicability and advantages of using yeasts as popular and ideal model systems for studying and understanding eukaryotic biology at the cellular and molecular levels. Cites experimental tractability and the cooperative tradition of the research community of yeast biologists as reasons for this success. (RT)

  13. Phosphoinositides in yeast: genetically tractable signalling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefaan Wera; Jan C. T. Bergsma; Johan M. Thevelein

    2001-01-01

    Research on signalling through phosphoinositides has made tremendous advances over the last few years. Studies with budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) combine the advantage of a eukaryotic system with those of a rapidly growing, genetically modifiable and tractable organism of which the genome is fully sequenced. Hence, despite some differences in phosphoinositide signalling between mammals and yeast (e.g. the absence of

  14. The oenological characteristics of commercial dry yeasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giuseppe Comi; Isabella Croattini; Marilena Marino; Michela Maifreni; Roberto Zironi

    1997-01-01

    Twenty preparations of dry active yeast (18 Saccharomyces cerevisiae and two Saccharomyces bayanus) available in Italy were tested in white and red musts (Moscato, Albana and Sangiovese) to study their oenological characteristics (i.e. fermentation rate, total alcohol and acetic acid production). After the application of chemiometric techniques for descriptive analyses to the results of the oenological assessment, the yeasts were

  15. PERSPECTIVES Chromatin Conformation of Yeast Centromeres

    E-print Network

    PERSPECTIVES Chromatin Conformation of Yeast Centromeres KERRY S. BLOOM, ENRIQUE AMAYA, JOHN CARBON The centromere region of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome III has been replaced by various DNA fragments from the centromere regions of yeast chromosomes III and Xl. A 289-base pair centromere (CEN3) sequence can stabilize

  16. Definition, classification and nomenclature of the yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This submission includes sections for the Preface, Use of this Book, Table of Contents and a chapter entitled Definition, classification and nomenclature of the yeasts, which are to be published in The Yeasts, A Taxonomic Study, 5th edition. This book has been prepared by a team of international ex...

  17. Topical Therapy for Mucosal Yeast Infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul R. Summers

    2011-01-01

    Mucosal yeast infection is best understood as a consequence of compromised mucosal cell-mediated and innate immunity. Defense against oral candidiasis is dominantly cell mediated. The innate immune system may play the main role in regulating vulvovaginal yeast infection. Conditions that compromise cell-mediated immunity such as leukemia, severe illness and HIV infection must be considered as predisposing factors for recurrent oral

  18. Life Stress and Chronic Yeast Infections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy A. Williams; Jerry L. Deffenbacher

    1983-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships of positive and negative life change to yeast infections in women having a gynecological examination at a university health center. Subjects completed the Life Experiences Survey and a questionnaire about experiences with yeast infections and received, as a routine part of their visitation of the gynecology service, a standard gynecological examination, including a laboratory test

  19. Can yeast transcriptomics help improve wine fermentation?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Varela; J. Cárdenas; E. Agosin

    Wine fermentation is a dynamic and complex process in which the yeast cell is subjected to multiple stress conditions. A successful adaptation involves changes in gene expression profiles where a large number of genes are up- or down-regulated. Functional genomic approaches are com- monly used to obtain global gene expression profiles, providing a comprehensive view of yeast physiology. We used

  20. Fermentation studies using Saccharomyces diastaticus yeast strains

    SciTech Connect

    Erratt, J.A.; Stewart, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    The yeast species, Saccharomyces diastaticus, has the ability to ferment starch and dextrin, because of the extracellular enzyme, glucoamylase, which hydrolyzes the starch/dextrin to glucose. A number of nonallelic genes--DEX 1, DEX 2, and dextrinase B which is allelic to STA 3--have been isolated, which impart to the yeast the ability to ferment dextrin. Various diploid yeast strains were constructed, each being either heterozygous or homozygous for the individual dextrinase genes. Using 12 (sup 0) plato hopped wort (30% corn adjunct) under agitated conditions, the fermentation rates of the various diploid yeast strains were monitored. A gene-dosage effect was exhibited by yeast strains containing DEX 1 or DEX 2, however, not with yeast strains containing dextrinase B (STA 3). The fermentation and growth rates and extents were determined under static conditions at 14.4 C and 21 C. With all yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes, both fermentation and growth were increased at the higher incubation temperature. Using 30-liter fermentors, beer was produced with the various yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes and the physical and organoleptic characteristics of the products were determined. The concentration of glucose in the beer was found to increase during a 3-mo storage period at 21 C, indicating that the glucoamylase from Saccharomyces diastaticus is not inactivated by pasteurization. (Refs. 36).

  1. Anaerobic digestion of food waste using yeast.

    PubMed

    Suwannarat, Jutarat; Ritchie, Raymond J

    2015-08-01

    Fermentative breakdown of food waste seems a plausible alternative to feeding food waste to pigs, incineration or garbage disposal in tourist areas. We determined the optimal conditions for the fermentative breakdown of food waste using yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in incubations up to 30days. Yeast efficiently broke down food waste with food waste loadings as high as 700g FW/l. The optimum inoculation was ?46×10(6)cells/l of culture with a 40°C optimum (25-40°C). COD and BOD were reduced by ?30-50%. Yeast used practically all the available sugars and reduced proteins and lipids by ?50%. Yeast was able to metabolize lipids much better than expected. Starch was mobilized after very long term incubations (>20days). Yeast was effective in breaking down the organic components of food waste but CO2 gas and ethanol production (?1.5%) were only significant during the first 7days of incubations. PMID:25987287

  2. Encapsulation of yeast cells in colloidosomes.

    PubMed

    Keen, Polly H R; Slater, Nigel K H; Routh, Alexander F

    2012-01-17

    Polymeric colloidosomes encapsulating viable Baker's yeast cells were prepared. To make the capsules, an aqueous suspension of 153 nm poly(methyl methacrylate-co-butyl acrylate) latex particles plus yeast cells is emulsified in a continuous phase of sunflower oil. By adding a small amount of ethanol to the oil phase, the latex particles at the surface of the emulsion droplets aggregate, forming the colloidosome shells. The microcapsules have been examined using optical, confocal, and scanning electron microscopies. The viability of the yeast cells was tested using fluorescent molecular probes. The encapsulated Baker's yeast cells were able to metabolize glucose from solution, although at a slower rate compared to nonencapsulated yeast. This demonstrates diffusion limitation through the colloidosome shell. The diffusive resistance could be increased by manufacturing colloidosomes with a double latex shell. PMID:22149136

  3. Ultrastructural organization of yeast chromatin

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The ultrastructural organization of yeast chromatin was examined in Miller spread preparations of samples prepared from spheroplasts or isolated nuclei of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Micrographs from preparations dispersed in 1 mM Tris (pH 7.2) illustrate that the basic chromatin fiber in yeast exists in two ultrastructurally distinct conformations. The majority (up to 95%) of the chromatin displays a beaded nucleosomal organization, although adjacent nucleosomes are separated by internucleosomal linkers of variable lengths. Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) fibrils are only occasionally associated with chromatin displaying the conformation. The remaining 5-10% of the chromatin appears to be devoid of discrete nucleosomes and has a smooth contour with a fiber diameter of 30-40 A. Transcriptional units, including putative ribosomal precursor RNA genes, defined by the presence of nascent RNP fibrils are restricted to chromatin displaying this smooth morphology. Chromatin released from nuclei in the presence of 5 mM Mg++ displays higher-order chromatin fibers, 200-300 A in diameter, these fibers appear to be arranged in a manner than reflects the two forms of the basic chromatin fiber. PMID:7040415

  4. New search for pectolytic yeasts.

    PubMed

    Biely, P; Sláviková, E

    1994-01-01

    A new screening method for pectin-depolymerizing microorganisms is described. The method is based on precipitation of non-hydrolyzed citrus pectin with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide in a medium solidified with a bacterial gelling gum. A substrate depolymerized by the secreted enzymes does not precipitate, and the positive strains thus show transparent areas around the colonies. The method was used to screen 300 yeast and yeast-like microorganisms belonging to 52 different genera. The secretion of pectin-depolymerizing enzymes occurred with different frequencies in 13 genera (69 positive strains of 207 tested), the lowest frequency being found in the genus Candida (13 positive out of 125 strains tested) and the highest frequency in the genera Aureobasidium (4 of 6) Cryptococcus (29 of 38), Geotrichum (4 of 9), Kluyveromyces (5 of 5), Rhodosporidium (2 of 2), Leucosporidium (2 of 2), Trichosporon (3 of 6) and Ustilago (2 of 2). Strains giving the highest number of harvested cells after growth on pectin in a liquid medium have been identified. PMID:8549997

  5. Effects of DDE on experimentally poisoned free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis): lethal brain concentrations.

    PubMed

    Clark, D R; Kroll, J C

    1977-12-01

    Adult female free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) were collected at Bracken Cave, Texas, and shipped to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Treated mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) containing 107 ppm DDE were fed to 17 bats; five other bats were fed untreated mealworms. After 40 days on dosage, during which one dosed bat was killed accidentally, four dosed bats were frozen and the remaining 17 were starved to death. The objective was to elevate brain levels of DDE to lethality and measure these concentrations. After the feeding period, dosed bats weighed less than controls. After starvation, the body condition of dosed bats was poorer than that of controls even though there was no difference in the amounts of carcass fat. During starvation, dosed bats lost weight faster than controls. Also, four dosed bats exhibited the prolonged tremoring that characterizes DDE poisoning. DDE increased in brains of starving bats as fat was metabolized. The estimated mean brain concentration of DDE diagnostic of death was 519 ppm with a range of 458-564 ppm. These values resemble diagnostic levels known for two species of passerine birds, but they exceed published levels for two free-tailed bats from Carlsbad Caverns, New Mexico. PMID:599587

  6. Effects of DDE on experimentally poisoned free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis): Lethal brain concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R., Jr.; Kroll, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Adult female free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) were collected at Bracken Cave, Texas, and shipped to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Treated mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) containing 107 ppm DDE were fed to 17 bats; five other bats were fed untreated mealworms. After 40 days on dosage, during which one dosed bat was killed accidentally, four dosed bats were frozen and the remaining 17 were starved to death. The objective was to elevate brain levels of DDE to lethality and measure these concentrations. After the feeding period, dosed bats weighed less than controls. After starvation, the body condition of dosed bats was poorer than that of controls even though there was no difference in the amounts of carcass fat. During starvation, dosed bats lost weight faster than controls. Also, four dosed bats exhibited the prolonged tremoring that characterizes DDE poisoning. DDE increased in brains of starving bats as fat was metabolized. The estimated mean brain concentration of DDE diagnostic of death was 519 ppm with a range of 458-564 ppm. These values resemble diagnostic levels known for two species of passerine birds, but they exceed published levels for two free-tailed bats from Carlsbad Caverns, New Mexico.

  7. Activation of the Na sup + ,K sup + -ATPase in Narcine brasiliensis

    SciTech Connect

    Blum, H.; Nioka, Shoko; Johnson, R.G. Jr. (Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (USA))

    1990-02-01

    The in vivo activation and turnover rates of the sodium pump (Na{sup +},K{sup +}-ATPase) were investigated in the electrocytes of the electric organ of the elasmobranch Narcine brasiliensis. The Narcine electric organ appears to be an excellent model for the study of sodium pump activation in an excitable tissue. The sodium transmembrane gradient and high-energy phosphagens were concurrently measured by {sup 23}Na and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy. The resting electric organ, which depends primarily on anaerobic metabolism displays a high concentration of phosphocreatin (PCr). It has an intracellular sodium concentration ((Na{sup +}){sub i}) of 20{plus minus}10 milliequivalents/liter as estimated by NMR. Electrical stimulation of the nerves innervating the electric organ results in an increase in (Na{sup +}){sub i} in the electrolyte and rapid depletion of PCr. Ouabain causes an 85% decrease in utilization of high-energy phosphagens, indicating that rapid PCr turnover in this tissue is mainly due to Na{sup +},K{sup +}-ATPase activity. From these data the authors can determine that the rate of sodium pump turnover increases by >3 orders of magnitude within several hundred milliseconds. The authors conclude that cholinergic stimulation of the electric organ causes a rapid and extremely large increase in sodium pump turnover, which is regulated predominantly by factors other than (Na{sup +}){sub i}.

  8. In vitro and in vivo photoprotective/photochemopreventive potential of Garcinia brasiliensis epicarp extract.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Sônia Aparecida; Vilela, Fernanda Maria Pinto; da Silva, Claudinei Alves; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; Dos Santos, Marcelo Henrique; Fonseca, Maria José Vieira

    2014-02-01

    The damaging effects of sunlight to the skin has triggered studies that involve the synthesis and extraction of organic compounds from natural sources that can absorb UV radiation, and studies on polyphenolic compounds with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can be used as photochemopreventive agents for reducing skin damage. We investigated the in vitro and in vivo photoprotective/photochemopreventive potential of Garcinia brasiliensis epicarp extract (GbEE). We evaluated the cell viability of L929 fibroblasts after UVB exposure using a quartz plate containing the extract solution or the GbEE formulation. The in vivo photoprotective effect of the GbEE formulation was evaluated by measuring the UVB damage-induced decrease in endogenous reduced glutathione (GSH), the increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and secretion of cytokines IL-1? and TNF-?. The in vitro methodology using fibroblasts showed that the photoprotective properties of the GbEE solutions and 10% GbEE formulation were similar to the commercial sunscreen (SPF-15). In vivo results demonstrated of the GbEE formulation in decreasing UVB induced-damage such as GSH depletion, an increased in MPO activity and secretion of cytokines IL-1? and TNF-?. The results showed that the extract has great potential for use as a sunscreen in topical formulations in addition to UV filters. PMID:24491421

  9. Purification and Characterization of Two Major Lectins from Araucaria brasiliensis syn. Araucaria angustifolia Seeds (Pinhão) 1

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Pradip K.; Figueroa, Maria O. D. C. R.; Lajolo, Franco M.

    1991-01-01

    Two major lectins (lectin I and lectin II) were purified to homogeneity from the seeds of Araucaria brasiliensis (Gymnospermae). The purity of the lectins was confirmed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, isoelectric focusing, and high performance liquid chromatography. They are glycoproteins in nature containing 6.3 and 2.9%, respectively, of neutral sugar and have absorption coefficients of 3.8 and 4.7, respectively, at 280 nanometers. The molecular weights of both lectins obtained by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-400 were equal: 200,000. After dissociation by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, molecular weights were 20,000 and 34,000, respectively, for lectin I and lectin II, suggesting they are decameric and hexameric in nature. The amino acid composition of both lectins showed little difference, but both had high amounts of acidic amino acids and lacked methionine in their molecule. The carbohydrate binding specificity of lectins was directed towards mannose, glucose, and their oligomers. High inhibitory activity was also found with thyroglobulin. The erythroagglutinating activity of the lectins was enhanced in the presence of high-molecular-weight substances both at 37 and 4°C. Divalent cations do not appear to be essential for activity. They maintained their agglutinating activity over a broad but different range of pH: 5.5 to 7.5 and 6.5 to 7.5, respectively. Both lectins agglutinated erythrocytes of human ABO blood types equally well. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668523

  10. A Caspase-Related Protease Regulates Apoptosis in Yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank Madeo; Eva Herker; Corinna Maldener; Silke Wissing; Stephan Lächelt; Mark Herlan; Markus Fehr; Kirsten Lauber; Stephan J Sigrist; Sebastian Wesselborg; Kai-Uwe Fröhlich

    2002-01-01

    Yeast can undergo cell death accompanied by cellular markers of apoptosis. However, orthologs of classical mammalian apoptosis regulators appeared to be missing from the yeast genome, challenging a common mechanism of yeast and mammalian apoptosis. Here we investigate Yor197w, a yeast protein with structural homology to mammalian caspases, and demonstrate caspase-like processing of the protein. Hydrogen peroxide treatment induces apoptosis

  11. Original article Screening for the potential probiotic yeast strains

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Screening for the potential probiotic yeast strains from raw milk to assimilate yeast strains, isolated from raw milk, were tested to obtain potential probiotic yeasts for assimilating cholesterol. During in vitro tests, 17 yeast strains were capable of growth in bile salt solutions, and most

  12. Genome Analysis The pattern and evolution of yeast promoter

    E-print Network

    Barkai, Naama

    Genome Analysis The pattern and evolution of yeast promoter bendability Itay Tirosh1 , Judith-less promoters from 11 yeast species, whereas the position of the rigid DNA varies substantially among species. cerevisiae promoters We examined the bendability pattern of yeast promoters. The promoters of many yeast

  13. Computational Predictions of Structures of Multichromosomes of Budding Yeast

    E-print Network

    Liang, Jie

    Computational Predictions of Structures of Multichromosomes of Budding Yeast (Accepted, Conf Proc of budding yeast nucleus. We successfully generated a large number of model genomes of yeast with appropriate yeast genome realistically. The model developed here provides a general computational framework

  14. Yeast (in press) Published online in Wiley InterScience

    E-print Network

    Lycan, Deborah E.

    Yeast Yeast (in press) Published online in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com) DOI: 10.1002/yea.1502 Yeast Functional Analysis Report A suite of Gateway cloning vectors for high of overexpression plasmids containing the entire complement of yeast open reading frames (ORFs) have recently been

  15. The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis.

    PubMed

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Dashko, Sofia; Ishchuk, Olena P; Piškur, Jure

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the non-conventional yeast Dekkera bruxellensis has been gaining more and more attention in the food industry and academic research. This yeast species is a distant relative of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is especially known for two important characteristics: on the one hand, it is considered to be one of the main spoilage organisms in the wine and bioethanol industry; on the other hand, it is 'indispensable' as a contributor to the flavour profile of Belgium lambic and gueuze beers. Additionally, it adds to the characteristic aromatic properties of some red wines. Recently this yeast has also become a model for the study of yeast evolution. In this review we focus on the recently developed molecular and genetic tools, such as complete genome sequencing and transformation, to study and manipulate this yeast. We also focus on the areas that are particularly well explored in this yeast, such as the synthesis of off-flavours, yeast detection methods, carbon metabolism and evolutionary history. PMID:24932634

  16. Quality assessment of lager brewery yeast samples and strains using barley malt extracts with anti-yeast activity.

    PubMed

    van Nierop, Sandra N E; Axcell, Barry C; Cantrell, Ian C; Rautenbach, Marina

    2009-04-01

    Membrane active anti-yeast compounds, such as antimicrobial peptides and proteins, cause yeast membrane damage which is likely to affect yeast vitality and fermentation performance, parameters which are notoriously difficult to analyse. In this work the sensitivity of lager brewery yeast strains towards barley malt extracts with anti-yeast activity was assessed with an optimised assay. It was found that yeast, obtained directly from a brewery, was much more sensitive towards the malt extracts than the same yeast strain propagated in the laboratory. Sensitivity to the malt extracts increased during the course of a laboratory scale fermentation when inoculated with brewery yeast. As the assay was able to differentiate yeast samples with different histories, it shows promise as a yeast quality assay measuring the yeast's ability to withstand stress which can be equated to vitality. The assay was also able to differentiate between different lager yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae propagated in the laboratory when challenged with a number of malt extracts of varying anti-yeast activity. The assessment of yeast strains in the presence of malt extracts will lead to the identification of yeast strains with improved quality/vitality that can withstand malt-associated anti-yeast activity during brewery fermentations. PMID:19171262

  17. Yeast is one of the most common causes of vaginal infections. Yeast infections occur when a fungus called

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech

    Yeast is one of the most common causes of vaginal infections. Yeast infections occur when a fungus bacteria in the vagina, which creates an imbalance and promotes yeast proliferation. Excessive fatigue, stress, or illness may lower the body's ability to control excessive yeast growth. Tight clothing

  18. Yeast Transformation (introducing plasmid vector into a yeast strain): This protocol is a modification (shortened version) of "The BEST

    E-print Network

    Yeast Transformation (introducing plasmid vector into a yeast strain): This protocol://www.umanitoba.ca/medicine/biochem/gietz/Trafo.html) 1. Inoculate 5 ml of YPD with a yeast colony from plate. 2. Grow culture overnight at 300 C. 3 and centrifuging at 1750xg (high speed in clinical centrifuge) for 2 minutes. 6. Carefully pour media off of yeast

  19. MAP kinase dynamics in yeast.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, F; Peter, M

    2001-09-01

    MAP kinase pathways play key roles in cellular responses towards extracellular signals. In several cases, the three core kinases interact with a scaffold molecule, but the function of these scaffolds is poorly understood. They have been proposed to contribute to signal specificity, signal amplification, or subcellular localization of MAP kinases. Several MAP kinases translocate to the nucleus in response to their activation, suggesting that nuclear transport may provide a regulatory mechanism. Here we describe new applications for Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescence Loss In Photobleaching (FLIP), to study dynamic translocations of MAPKs between different subcellular compartments. We have used these methods to measure the nuclear/cytoplasmic dynamics of several yeast MAP kinases, and in particular to address the role of scaffold proteins for MAP-kinase signaling. PMID:11730324

  20. Pityrosporum yeasts--what's new?

    PubMed

    Faergemann, J

    1997-01-01

    The lipophilic yeast Pityrosporum ovale is a member of the normal human cutaneous flora in adults but also associated with several skin diseases. In pityriasis versicolor, under the influence of predisposing factors, P. ovale changes from the round blastospore form to the mycelial form. A great problem in pityriasis versicolor is the high rate of recurrence and to avoid this a prophylactic treatment is mandatory. Pityrosporum folliculitis is a chronic disease characterized by pruritic follicular papules and pustules located primarily on the upper trunk, neck and upper arms. In direct microscopy clusters of round budding yeast cells are found. The disease responds rapidly to antimycotic therapy. There are now many studies indicating that P. ovale plays an important role in seborrhoeic dermatitis. Many of these are treatment studies showing a good effect of antimycotics paralleled by a reduction in number of organisms. Severe seborrhoeic dermatitis often difficult to treat is associated with AIDS. In peripheral blood from a high number of patients with seborrhoeic dermatitis we found an increase in number of natural killer T-cells and decreased PHA and Con-A stimulation. Secondary we found low serum IgG antibody titres in patients compared to controls. Other studies have found a reduced lymphocyte stimulation reaction when lymphocytes from patients with seborrhoeic dermatitis were stimulated with a P. ovale extract. Additionally, IL-2 and IFN gamma production by lymphocytes from patients was markedly depressed and IL-10 synthesis were increased after stimulation with P. ovale extract. The majority of adult patients with atopic dermatitis localized to the head, neck and scalp are prick-test positive to a protein P. ovale extract. One study showed that p. ovale extracts increased IL-4, IL-10 and IgE synthesis in patients with atopic dermatitis. There are also treatment studies indicating that antifungal treatment may be beneficial in these patients. PMID:9370147

  1. Assimilation spectrum of the yeast Candida utilis 49 used for producing fodder yeast from synthetic ethanol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Šestáková

    1976-01-01

    Oxidizing and assimilating ability of the yeastCandida utilis 49 was tested with 21 different low-boiling organic compounds which come as components of raw synthetic ethanol. The highest\\u000a yields of yeast dry weight were obtained with ethanol (72.0%), propanol (48.2%), ethyl acetate (43.4%) and acetic acid (34.2%).\\u000a To a minor extent, the yeast was capable of utilizing also 2-propanol, butanol and

  2. Molecular cloning of a new cDNA and expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase gene from Hevea brasiliensis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nualpun Sirinupong; Pluang Suwanmanee; Russell F. Doolittle; Wallie Suvachitanont

    2005-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGS), EC 4.1.3.5, is an essential enzyme in rubber biosynthesis in Hevea brasiliensis. We have isolated a new cDNA encoding HMGS in H. brasiliensis. The full-length hmgs2 consists of 1,916-bp and encodes a protein of 464 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 51.27 kDa and an isoelectric point of 6.02. In comparison, HMGS1 and HMGS2 show 92%

  3. Spatial analysis of egg distribution and geographic changes in the spawning habitat of the Brazilian sardine Sardinella brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, E S; Gherardi, D F M; Paes, E T; Souza, R B; Katsuragawa, M

    2010-12-01

    This paper establishes the spawning habitat of the Brazilian sardine Sardinella brasiliensis and investigates the spatial variability of egg density and its relation with oceanographic conditions in the shelf of the south-east Brazil Bight (SBB). The spawning habitats of S. brasiliensis have been defined in terms of spatial models of egg density, temperature-salinity plots, quotient (Q) analysis and remote sensing data. Quotient curves (Q(C)) were constructed using the geographic distribution of egg density, temperature and salinity from samples collected during nine survey cruises between 1976 and 1993. The interannual sea surface temperature (SST) variability was determined using principal component analysis on the SST anomalies (SSTA) estimated from remote sensing data over the period between 1985 and 2007. The spatial pattern of egg occurrences in the SBB indicated that the largest concentration occurred between Paranaguá and São Sebastião. Spawning habitat expanded and contracted during the years, fluctuating around Paranaguá. In January 1978 and January 1993, eggs were found nearly everywhere along the inner shelf of the SBB, while in January 1988 and 1991 spawning had contracted to their southernmost position. The SSTA maps for the spawning periods showed that in the case of habitat expansion (1993 only) anomalies over the SBB were zero or slightly negative, whereas for the contraction period anomalies were all positive. Sardinella brasiliensis is capable of exploring suitable spawning sites provided by the entrainment of the colder and less-saline South Atlantic Central Water onto the shelf by means of both coastal wind-driven (to the north-east of the SBB) and meander-induced (to the south-west of the SBB) upwelling. PMID:21155781

  4. De novo assembly and transcriptome analysis of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) and SNP markers development for rubber biosynthesis pathways.

    PubMed

    Mantello, Camila Campos; Cardoso-Silva, Claudio Benicio; da Silva, Carla Cristina; de Souza, Livia Moura; Scaloppi Junior, Erivaldo José; de Souza Gonçalves, Paulo; Vicentini, Renato; de Souza, Anete Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Hevea brasiliensis (Willd. Ex Adr. Juss.) Muell.-Arg. is the primary source of natural rubber that is native to the Amazon rainforest. The singular properties of natural rubber make it superior to and competitive with synthetic rubber for use in several applications. Here, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of H. brasiliensis bark on the Illumina GAIIx platform, which generated 179,326,804 raw reads on the Illumina GAIIx platform. A total of 50,384 contigs that were over 400 bp in size were obtained and subjected to further analyses. A similarity search against the non-redundant (nr) protein database returned 32,018 (63%) positive BLASTx hits. The transcriptome analysis was annotated using the clusters of orthologous groups (COG), gene ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), and Pfam databases. A search for putative molecular marker was performed to identify simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In total, 17,927 SSRs and 404,114 SNPs were detected. Finally, we selected sequences that were identified as belonging to the mevalonate (MVA) and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathways, which are involved in rubber biosynthesis, to validate the SNP markers. A total of 78 SNPs were validated in 36 genotypes of H. brasiliensis. This new dataset represents a powerful information source for rubber tree bark genes and will be an important tool for the development of microsatellites and SNP markers for use in future genetic analyses such as genetic linkage mapping, quantitative trait loci identification, investigations of linkage disequilibrium and marker-assisted selection. PMID:25048025

  5. Spontaneous Pneumothorax as an Atypical Presentation of Pulmonary Paracoccidioidomycosis: A Case Report with Emphasis on the Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Mariana Leite; Marchiori, Edson; Zanetti, Gláucia; Abdalla, Guilherme; Ventura, Nina; Constantino, Carolina Pesce Lamas; Brandão, Viviane; Martins, Pedro; Canellas, Rodrigo; Muccillo, Antonio; Varella de Oliveira, Romulo

    2010-01-01

    We describe the case of a 45-year-old male with pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis and spontaneous pneumothorax. The patient presented to the hospital with sudden and intense chest pain accompanied by dyspnea and had a six-month history of dry cough, weight loss, and progressive dyspnea on exertion. Chest X-ray showed a small right pneumothorax, bilateral nonhomogeneous opacities, and emphysematous areas in the lung base. Chest computed tomography showed consolidation in both lungs, with architectural distortion, nodules, interlobular septal thickening, and emphysema, in addition to the right pneumothorax. A lung biopsy revealed yeast consistent with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. No drainage was needed, and the lung was re-expanded. The patient was treated with antifungal drugs, showed mild improvement, and was referred to outpatient care. PMID:20592996

  6. Kinetochore Structure: Pulling Answers from Yeast

    E-print Network

    Cheeseman, Iain M.

    Despite the identification of multiple kinetochore proteins, their structure and organization has remained unclear. New work uses electron microscopy to visualize isolated budding yeast kinetochore particles and reveal the ...

  7. [Malassezia yeasts and their significance in dermatology].

    PubMed

    Hort, W; Nilles, M; Mayser, P

    2006-07-01

    Yeasts of the genus Malassezia belong to the normal microflora of the human skin. In addition they are known to cause a variety of skin diseases; the most frequent of which is pityriasis versicolor. Malassezia yeasts are also thought to be associated with seborrheic dermatitis, dandruff and Malassezia folliculitis. Recently the significance of Malassezia yeasts as a trigger factor for atopic dermatitis of the head and neck region has been pointed out. The role of the Malassezia yeasts in these different diseases has been controversial in the past and remains an issue because of difficulties in isolation, culture and differentiation of the organism. Thanks to molecular techniques, 10 species can actually be differentiated. The article presents the different Malassezia-associated diseases, their clinical picture, diagnosis and appropriate therapy. In addition the speciation of Malassezia is reviewed. PMID:16758222

  8. Monitoring Air Quality with Leaf Yeasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, D. H. S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Proposes that leaf yeast serve as quick, inexpensive, and effective techniques for monitoring air quality. Outlines procedures and provides suggestions for data analysis. Includes results from sample school groups who employed this technique. (ML)

  9. Physiological and Molecular Responses to Variation of Light Intensity in Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-feng

    2014-01-01

    Light is one of most important factors to plants because it is necessary for photosynthesis. In this study, physiological and gene expression analyses under different light intensities were performed in the seedlings of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) clone GT1. When light intensity increased from 20 to 1000 µmol m?2 s?1, there was no effect on the maximal quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry (Fv/Fm), indicating that high light intensity did not damage the structure and function of PSII reaction center. However, the effective photochemical quantum yield of PSII (Y(II)), photochemical quenching coefficient (qP), electron transfer rate (ETR), and coefficient of photochemical fluorescence quenching assuming interconnected PSII antennae (qL) were increased significantly as the light intensity increased, reached a maximum at 200 µmol m?2 s?1, but decreased from 400 µmol m?2 s?1. These results suggested that the PSII photochemistry showed an optimum performance at 200 µmol m?2 s?1 light intensity. The chlorophyll content was increased along with the increase of light intensity when it was no more than 400 µmol m?2 s?1. Since increasing light intensity caused significant increase in H2O2 content and decreases in the per unit activity of antioxidant enzymes SOD and POD, but the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was preserved at a low level even under high light intensity of 1000 µmol m?2 s?1, suggesting that high light irradiation did not induce membrane lipid peroxidation in rubber tree. Moreover, expressions of antioxidant-related genes were significantly up-regulated with the increase of light intensity. They reached the maximum expression at 400 µmol m?2 s?1, but decreased at 1000 µmol m?2 s?1. In conclusion, rubber tree could endure strong light irradiation via a specific mechanism. Adaptation to high light intensity is a complex process by regulating antioxidant enzymes activities, chloroplast formation, and related genes expressions in rubber tree. PMID:24586839

  10. Cytokine mRNA expression profiles in rats infected with the intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, S; Uchikawa, R; Yamada, M; Arizono, N

    1995-01-01

    Although the immune responses to intestinal nematode infection have been well studied and have been shown to be strongly driven by Th2-associated cytokines in mice, such information has been limited with respect to rats. We investigated changes in levels of the mRNAs encoding interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and gamma interferon in the mesenteric lymph nodes of rats infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis by reverse transcription-PCR in comparison with immunoglobulin E (IgE)/IgG2a antibody, eosinophil, basophil, and mucosal mast cell responses. In the two rat strains used, Brown Norway and Fischer-344, which show different responses to allergens, serum IgE increased to much higher levels in the former than in the latter 2 weeks after infection. Intestinal mastocytosis was observed much earlier and more intensely in Brown Norway rats than in Fischer-344 rats, but the degrees of peripheral eosinophilia and basophilia did not differ between the two strains. In both strains, IL-3, IL-4, and IL-5 mRNA expression increased and peaked around 7 to 14 days after infection, while expression of IL-2, IL-10, and gamma interferon mRNAs did not change notably throughout the experimental period. The highest IL-4 mRNA expression was observed slightly earlier in Brown Norway than in Fischer-344 rats, but levels of IL-3 and IL-5 mRNAs peaked synchronously in both strains. The amounts of mRNAs encoding these three cytokines were always higher in Brown Norway than in Fischer-344 rats. It is suggested that in rats, Th2 or Th2-like cells are also induced after nematode infection, and IgE elevation is mainly related to increased IL-4 gene expression. PMID:7591119

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of a Mlo gene in rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Qin, Bi; Zheng, Fucong; Zhang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Mlo gene encodes a plant-specific seven-transmembrane domain protein involved in a variety of cellular processes. In this study, a novel Mlo gene from rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), designated HbMlo1, was cloned by RT-PCR in rubber tree. The ORF of HbMlo1 was 1551bp in length, encoding a putative protein of 516 amino acids. HbMlo1 was a typical Mlo protein with seven-transmembrane domain. Sequence comparison between HbMlo1 and other Mlo proteins demonstrated that HbMlo1 shared the highest similarity with the Cucumis melo CmMlo1 and Arabidopsis thaliana AtMlo1 with 75.1% and 71.3% sequence identity, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that HbMlo1, CmMlo1, AtMlo1, AtMlo13, and AtMlo15 formed into the phylogenetic clade II with 100% bootstrap support value. HbMlo1 transcript exhibited tissue specificity, and it was preferentially expressed in leaf. Furthermore, the amount of HbMlo1 transcript was significantly induced by various phytohormones (including ethephon, methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, abscisic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, and gibberellic acid), H2O2, and wounding treatments. Under drought stress, HbMlo1 exhibited a complex pattern of regulation. However, HbMlo1 expression did not significantly change during powdery mildew infection. These results suggested that HbMlo1 might play a role in phytohormone signaling and abiotic stress response processes in rubber tree. PMID:25506769

  12. Identification of novel microRNAs in Hevea brasiliensis and computational prediction of their targets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plants respond to external stimuli through fine regulation of gene expression partially ensured by small RNAs. Of these, microRNAs (miRNAs) play a crucial role. They negatively regulate gene expression by targeting the cleavage or translational inhibition of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). In Hevea brasiliensis, environmental and harvesting stresses are known to affect natural rubber production. This study set out to identify abiotic stress-related miRNAs in Hevea using next-generation sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. Results Deep sequencing of small RNAs was carried out on plantlets subjected to severe abiotic stress using the Solexa technique. By combining the LeARN pipeline, data from the Plant microRNA database (PMRD) and Hevea EST sequences, we identified 48 conserved miRNA families already characterized in other plant species, and 10 putatively novel miRNA families. The results showed the most abundant size for miRNAs to be 24 nucleotides, except for seven families. Several MIR genes produced both 20-22 nucleotides and 23-27 nucleotides. The two miRNA class sizes were detected for both conserved and putative novel miRNA families, suggesting their functional duality. The EST databases were scanned with conserved and novel miRNA sequences. MiRNA targets were computationally predicted and analysed. The predicted targets involved in "responses to stimuli" and to "antioxidant" and "transcription activities" are presented. Conclusions Deep sequencing of small RNAs combined with transcriptomic data is a powerful tool for identifying conserved and novel miRNAs when the complete genome is not yet available. Our study provided additional information for evolutionary studies and revealed potentially specific regulation of the control of redox status in Hevea. PMID:22330773

  13. Identification of the Hevea brasiliensis AP2/ERF superfamily by RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) laticifers are the source of natural rubber. Rubber production depends on endogenous and exogenous ethylene (ethephon). AP2/ERF transcription factors, and especially Ethylene-Response Factors, play a crucial role in plant development and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. This study set out to sequence transcript expressed in various tissues using next-generation sequencing and to identify AP2/ERF superfamily in the rubber tree. Results The 454 sequencing technique was used to produce five tissue-type transcript libraries (leaf, bark, latex, embryogenic tissues and root). Reads from all libraries were pooled and reassembled to improve mRNA lengths and produce a global library. One hundred and seventy-three AP2/ERF contigs were identified by in silico analysis based on the amino acid sequence of the conserved AP2 domain from the global library. The 142 contigs with the full AP2 domain were classified into three main families (20 AP2 members, 115 ERF members divided into 11 groups, and 4 RAV members) and 3 soloist members. Fifty-nine AP2/ERF transcripts were found in latex. Alongside the microRNA172 already described in plants, eleven additional microRNAs were predicted to inhibit Hevea AP2/ERF transcripts. Conclusions Hevea has a similar number of AP2/ERF genes to that of other dicot species. We adapted the alignment and classification methods to data from next-generation sequencing techniques to provide reliable information. We observed several specific features for the ERF family. Three HbSoloist members form a group in Hevea. Several AP2/ERF genes highly expressed in latex suggest they have a specific function in Hevea. The analysis of AP2/ERF transcripts in Hevea presented here provides the basis for studying the molecular regulation of latex production in response to abiotic stresses and latex cell differentiation. PMID:23324139

  14. Gas exchange and hydraulics in seedlings of Hevea brasiliensis during water stress and recovery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Wen; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Xiao-Shuang; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2010-07-01

    The response of plants to drought has received significant attention, but far less attention has been given to the dynamic response of plants during recovery from drought. Photosynthetic performance and hydraulic capacity were monitored in seedlings of Hevea brasiliensis under water stress and during recovery following rewatering. Leaf water relation, gas exchange rate and hydraulic conductivity decreased gradually after water stress fell below a threshold, whereas instantaneous water use efficiency and osmolytes increased significantly. After 5 days of rewatering, leaf water relation, maximum stomatal conductance (g(s-max)) and plant hydraulic conductivity had recovered to the control levels except for sapwood area-specific hydraulic conductivity, photosynthetic assimilation rate and osmolytes. During the phase of water stress, stomata were almost completely closed before water transport efficiency decreased substantially, and moreover, the leaf hydraulic pathway was more vulnerable to water stress-induced embolism than the stem hydraulic pathway. Meanwhile, g(s-max) was linearly correlated with hydraulic capacity when water stress exceeded a threshold. In addition, a positive relationship was shown to occur between the recovery of g(s-max) and of hydraulic capacity during the phase of rewatering. Our results suggest (i) that stomatal closure effectively reduces the risk of xylem dysfunction in water-stressed plants at the cost of gas exchange, (ii) that the leaf functions as a safety valve to protect the hydraulic pathway from water stress-induced dysfunction to a larger extent than does the stem and (iii) that the full drought recovery of gas exchange is restricted by not only hydraulic factors but also non-hydraulic factors. PMID:20516484

  15. The growth of solar radiated yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, T.

    1995-09-01

    This researcher plans to determine if solar radiation affects the growth of yeast. The irradiated yeast was obtained from a sample exposed in space during a Space Shuttle flight of September 9-20, 1994. Further, the control groups were held at: (1) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland; and (2) South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The procedure used was based on the fact that yeast is most often used in consumable baked goods. Therefore, the yeast was incorporated into a basic Betty Crocker bread recipe. Data was collected by placing measured amounts of dough into sample containers with fifteen minute growth in height measurements collected and recorded. This researcher assumed the viability of yeast to be relative to its ability to produce carbon dioxide gas and cause the dough to rise. As all ingredients and surroundings were equal, this researcher assumed the yeast will produce the only significant difference in data collected. This researcher noted the approximate use date on all sample packages to be prior to arrival and experiment date. All dates equal, it was then assumed each would act in a similar manner of response. This assumption will allow for equally correct data collection.

  16. The growth of solar radiated yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Tyrone

    1995-01-01

    This researcher plans to determine if solar radiation affects the growth of yeast. The irradiated yeast was obtained from a sample exposed in space during a Space Shuttle flight of September 9-20, 1994. Further, the control groups were held at: (1) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland; and (2) South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The procedure used was based on the fact that yeast is most often used in consumable baked goods. Therefore, the yeast was incorporated into a basic Betty Crocker bread recipe. Data was collected by placing measured amounts of dough into sample containers with fifteen minute growth in height measurements collected and recorded. This researcher assumed the viability of yeast to be relative to its ability to produce carbon dioxide gas and cause the dough to rise. As all ingredients and surroundings were equal, this researcher assumed the yeast will produce the only significant difference in data collected. This researcher noted the approximate use date on all sample packages to be prior to arrival and experiment date. All dates equal, it was then assumed each would act in a similar manner of response. This assumption will allow for equally correct data collection.

  17. Physiological and environmental control of yeast prions

    PubMed Central

    Chernova, Tatiana A.; Wilkinson, Keith D.; Chernoff, Yury O.

    2014-01-01

    Prions are self-perpetuating protein isoforms that cause fatal and incurable neurodegenerative disease in mammals. Recent evidence indicates that a majority of human proteins involved in amyloid and neural inclusion disorders possess at least some prion properties. In lower eukaryotes, such as yeast, prions act as epigenetic elements, which increase phenotypic diversity by altering a range of cellular processes. While some yeast prions are clearly pathogenic, it is also postulated that prion formation could be beneficial in variable environmental conditions. Yeast and mammalian prions have similar molecular properties. Crucial cellular factors and conditions influencing prion formation and propagation were uncovered in the yeast models. Stress-related chaperones, protein quality control deposits, degradation pathways and cytoskeletal networks control prion formation and propagation in yeast. Environmental stresses trigger prion formation and loss, supposedly acting via influencing intracellular concentrations of the prion-inducing proteins, and/or by localizing prionogenic proteins to the prion induction sites via heterologous ancillary helpers. Physiological and environmental modulation of yeast prions points to new opportunities for pharmacological intervention and/or prophylactic measures targeting general cellular systems rather than the properties of individual amyloids and prions. PMID:24236638

  18. Functional adaptation between yeast actin and its cognate myosin motors.

    PubMed

    Stark, Benjamin C; Wen, Kuo-Kuang; Allingham, John S; Rubenstein, Peter A; Lord, Matthew

    2011-09-01

    We employed budding yeast and skeletal muscle actin to examine the contribution of the actin isoform to myosin motor function. While yeast and muscle actin are highly homologous, they exhibit different charge density at their N termini (a proposed myosin-binding interface). Muscle myosin-II actin-activated ATPase activity is significantly higher with muscle versus yeast actin. Whether this reflects inefficiency in the ability of yeast actin to activate myosin is not known. Here we optimized the isolation of two yeast myosins to assess actin function in a homogenous system. Yeast myosin-II (Myo1p) and myosin-V (Myo2p) accommodate the reduced N-terminal charge density of yeast actin, showing greater activity with yeast over muscle actin. Increasing the number of negative charges at the N terminus of yeast actin from two to four (as in muscle) had little effect on yeast myosin activity, while other substitutions of charged residues at the myosin interface of yeast actin reduced activity. Thus, yeast actin functions most effectively with its native myosins, which in part relies on associations mediated by its outer domain. Compared with yeast myosin-II and myosin-V, muscle myosin-II activity was very sensitive to salt. Collectively, our findings suggest differing degrees of reliance on electrostatic interactions during weak actomyosin binding in yeast versus muscle. Our study also highlights the importance of native actin isoforms when considering the function of myosins. PMID:21757693

  19. Behavioural evidence of male volatile pheromones in the sex-role reversed wolf spiders Allocosa brasiliensis and Allocosa alticeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisenberg, Anita; Baruffaldi, Luciana; González, Macarena

    2010-01-01

    The use of chemical signals in a sexual context is widespread in the animal kingdom. Most studies in spiders report the use of female pheromones that attract potential sexual partners. Allocosa brasiliensis and Allocosa alticeps are two burrowing wolf spiders that show sex-role reversal. Females locate male burrows and initiate courtship before males perform any detectable visual or vibratory signal. So, females of these species would be detecting chemical or mechanical cues left by males. Our objective was to explore the potential for male pheromones to play a role in mate detection in A. brasiliensis and A. alticeps. We designed two experiments. In Experiment 1, we tested the occurrence of male contact pheromones by evaluating female courtship when exposed to empty burrows constructed by males or females (control). In Experiment 2, we tested the existence of male volatile pheromones by evaluating female behaviour when exposed to artificial burrows connected to tubes containing males, females or empty tubes (control). Our results suggest the occurrence of male volatile pheromones that trigger female courtship in both Allocosa species. The sex-role reversal postulated for these wolf spiders could be driving the consequent reversal in typical pheromone-emitter and detector roles expected for spiders.

  20. Communication during copulation in the sex-role reversed wolf spider Allocosa brasiliensis: Female shakes for soliciting new ejaculations?

    PubMed

    Garcia Diaz, Virginia; Aisenberg, Anita; Peretti, Alfredo V

    2015-07-01

    Traditional studies on sexual communication have focused on the exchange of signals during courtship. However, communication between the sexes can also occur during or after copulation. Allocosa brasiliensis is a wolf spider that shows a reversal in typical sex roles and of the usual sexual size dimorphism expected for spiders. Females are smaller than males and they are the roving sex that initiates courtship. Occasional previous observations suggested that females performed body shaking behaviors during copulation. Our objective was to analyze if female body shaking is associated with male copulatory behavior in A. brasiliensis, and determine if this female behavior has a communicatory function in this species. For that purpose, we performed fine-scaled analysis of fifteen copulations under laboratory conditions. We video-recorded all the trials and looked for associations between female and male copulatory behaviors. The significant difference between the time before and after female shaking, in favor of the subsequent ejaculation is analyzed. We discuss if shaking could be acting as a signal to accelerate and motivate palpal insertion and ejaculation, and/or inhibiting male cannibalistic tendencies in this species. PMID:25963301

  1. Variações da abundância de larvas da sardinha-verdadeira ( Sardinella brasiliensis ) na Plataforma Continental Sudeste do Brasil e suas rel ações com a temperatura superficial do oceano

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduardo da Silva Gigliotti; Eduardo Tavares Paes; Ariana Silva Guimarães; Luiz Eduardo de Souza; Ronald Buss de Souza; Mario Katsuragawa

    Sardinella brasiliensis larvae abundance data in the Southern Brazilian Big ht between 1991-1993 was submitted to a variation partition procedure, based on a series of linear parcial correlation analyses , using a set of spatial and environmental parameters, alternating a s variables and co-variables. This method decomposed the variability in four independent components: pure sp atial variance, pure environmental variance,

  2. Water Status and Radiation Environment in Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) Systems: A comparison between monoculture and mixed rubber-Acacia mangium plots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Wijaya; Gregoire Vincent; Meine Van Noordwijk

    Interplanting of Acacia mangium within Hevea brasiliensis plot may be an attractive option for smallholder rubber farmers in the tropics to increase their land productivity. Indeed, economic prospect for timber is good as timber resource in natural forest has become severely depleted and particularly so in Sumatra where this study is conducted. A. mangium being a very fast growing tree

  3. Yeast and human mitochondrial helicases.

    PubMed

    Szczesny, Roman J; Wojcik, Magdalena A; Borowski, Lukasz S; Szewczyk, Maciej J; Skrok, Magda M; Golik, Pawel; Stepien, Piotr P

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondria are semiautonomous organelles which contain their own genome. Both maintenance and expression of mitochondrial DNA require activity of RNA and DNA helicases. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the nuclear genome encodes four DExH/D superfamily members (MSS116, SUV3, MRH4, IRC3) that act as helicases and/or RNA chaperones. Their activity is necessary for mitochondrial RNA splicing, degradation, translation and genome maintenance. In humans the ortholog of SUV3 (hSUV3, SUPV3L1) so far is the best described mitochondrial RNA helicase. The enzyme, together with the matrix-localized pool of PNPase (PNPT1), forms an RNA-degrading complex called the mitochondrial degradosome, which localizes to distinct structures (D-foci). Global regulation of mitochondrially encoded genes can be achieved by changing mitochondrial DNA copy number. This way the proteins involved in its replication, like the Twinkle helicase (c10orf2), can indirectly regulate gene expression. Here, we describe yeast and human mitochondrial helicases that are directly involved in mitochondrial RNA metabolism, and present other helicases that participate in mitochondrial DNA replication and maintenance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Biology of RNA helicases - Modulation for life. PMID:23454114

  4. Yeast prions assembly and propagation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Yeast prions are self-perpetuating protein aggregates that are at the origin of heritable and transmissible non-Mendelian phenotypic traits. Among these, [PSI+], [URE3] and [PIN+] are the most well documented prions and arise from the assembly of Sup35p, Ure2p and Rnq1p, respectively, into insoluble fibrillar assemblies. Fibril assembly depends on the presence of N- or C-terminal prion domains (PrDs) which are not homologous in sequence but share unusual amino-acid compositions, such as enrichment in polar residues (glutamines and asparagines) or the presence of oligopeptide repeats. Purified PrDs form amyloid fibrils that can convert prion-free cells to the prion state upon transformation. Nonetheless, isolated PrDs and full-length prion proteins have different aggregation, structural and infectious properties. In addition, mutations in the “non-prion” domains (non-PrDs) of Sup35p, Ure2p and Rnq1p were shown to affect their prion properties in vitro and in vivo. Despite these evidences, the implication of the functional non-PrDs in fibril assembly and prion propagation has been mostly overlooked. In this review, we discuss the contribution of non-PrDs to prion assemblies, and the structure-function relationship in prion infectivity in the light of recent findings on Sup35p and Ure2p assembly into infectious fibrils from our laboratory and others. PMID:22052349

  5. Aggregated platelets enhance adherence of Candida yeasts to endothelium.

    PubMed

    Klotz, S A; Harrison, J L; Misra, R P

    1989-10-01

    The adherence of Candida albicans yeasts to human umbilical vein endothelium to subendothelial extracellular matrix (ECM) was investigated. Yeasts added to confluent endothelium in citrated platelet-poor plasma adhered on the average of 1 colony forming unit (cfu) per culture well. When platelets were added as platelet-rich plasma, a significant increase of yeast adherence was not seen. However, when endothelium was contracted by treatment with 2 mM EDTA, resulting in exposure of ECM, yeast adherence was increased to 10 cfu/well. When platelets were added with these yeasts, the number of adhering yeasts was further increased to 23 cfu/well (P less than .01). This represented an increase in adherence of yeasts of 230%. When the endothelial cells were completely removed and ECM exposed, platelets were found to likewise augment yeast adherence. Platelets, when added to the ECM, formed aggregates to which the yeasts firmly adhered. Likewise, when platelets were aggregated by adenosine diphosphate and mixed with yeasts, yeasts were shown to bind avidly to aggregated platelets, whereas yeasts did not adhere to unactivated, discoid platelets. Thus, exposed subendothelial ECM induces the aggregation of platelets and yeasts bind avidly to these platelet aggregates. PMID:2677163

  6. Production of alpha-amylase by yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Thomse, K.K.

    1987-01-01

    The enzyme alpha-amylase confers to an organism the enzymatic activity for the degradation of polyglucosides with alpha-1,4 glycosidic bonds such as starch and glycogen which are among the major storage compounds in plants and animals. Most alpha-amylases are single polypeptides of molecular weights around 50,000 dalton. They are generally found in the digestive tract of animals and in germinating seeds. Among the products released upon enzymatic degradation of polyglucosides maltose, a sugar that can be utilized as carbon source by yeast, is a major constituent. A cDNA segment complementary to mouse salivary amylase messenger RNA has been inserted into the yeast expression vector pMA56 behind the promoter of the gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase I of yeast. Yeast transformants harboring plasmids with the normal orientation of the promoter and the mouse amylase cDNA gene produce amylase and release the enzyme in free form into the culture medium. Approximately 90% of the amylase activity is found in the medium. Yeast strains carrying MAL allele and transformed with a plasmid which directed the synthesis of mouse alpha-amylase were tested on plates containing starch and in batch fermentations using different high molecular weight sugars and oligosaccharides as carbon source. The results of these experiments will be discussed. (Refs. 21).

  7. Influence of pesticides on yeasts colonizing leaves.

    PubMed

    Vadkertiová, Renata; Sláviková, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The effect of nine different pesticides on the growth of yeasts isolated from the leaves of fruit and forest trees was investigated. Four insecticides (with the active ingredients: thiacloprid, deltamethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, and thiamethoxam) and five fungicides (with the effective substances: bitertanol, kresoxim-methyl, mancozeb, trifloxystrobin, and cupric oxychloride) were tested. The concentrations of chemicals were those recommended by the manufacturers for the spraying of trees. The yeast strains isolated from the leaves of fruit trees were not sensitive to any of the insecticides. The majority of yeast strains isolated from the leaves of forest trees were either not sensitive or only to a small extent. While Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Pichia anomala were not affected by any insecticide, the strains of Cryptococcus laurentii and Rhodotorula glutinis showed the highest sensitivity. The effects of fungicides on the growth of isolated yeasts were more substantial. The fungicide Dithane DG (mancozeb) completely inhibited the growth of all yeasts. All strains isolated from fruit tree leaves were more resistant to the tested fungicides than those isolated from the leaves of forest trees. The most resistant strains from the leaves of fruit trees belonged to the species Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia anomala, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whereas Cryptococcus albidus and C. laurentii, originating from the leaves of forest trees, showed the highest sensitivity to fungicides. PMID:22351984

  8. Natural and Vaccine-Mediated Immunity to Salmonella Typhimurium is Impaired by the Helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Bobat, Saeeda; Darby, Matthew; Mrdjen, Dunja; Cook, Charlotte; Logan, Erin; Auret, Jennifer; Jones, Elizabeth; Schnoeller, Corinna; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Ross, Ewan A.; Vira, Alykhan; López-Macías, Constantino; Henderson, Ian R.; Alexander, James; Brombacher, Frank; Horsnell, William G.; Cunningham, Adam F.

    2014-01-01

    Background The impact of exposure to multiple pathogens concurrently or consecutively on immune function is unclear. Here, immune responses induced by combinations of the bacterium Salmonella Typhimurium (STm) and the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (Nb), which causes a murine hookworm infection and an experimental porin protein vaccine against STm, were examined. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice infected with both STm and Nb induced similar numbers of Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes compared with singly infected mice, as determined by flow cytometry, although lower levels of secreted Th2, but not Th1 cytokines were detected by ELISA after re-stimulation of splenocytes. Furthermore, the density of FoxP3+ T cells in the T zone of co-infected mice was lower compared to mice that only received Nb, but was greater than those that received STm. This reflected the intermediate levels of IL-10 detected from splenocytes. Co-infection compromised clearance of both pathogens, with worms still detectable in mice weeks after they were cleared in the control group. Despite altered control of bacterial and helminth colonization in co-infected mice, robust extrafollicular Th1 and Th2-reflecting immunoglobulin-switching profiles were detected, with IgG2a, IgG1 and IgE plasma cells all detected in parallel. Whilst extrafollicular antibody responses were maintained in the first weeks after co-infection, the GC response was less than that in mice infected with Nb only. Nb infection resulted in some abrogation of the longer-term development of anti-STm IgG responses. This suggested that prior Nb infection may modulate the induction of protective antibody responses to vaccination. To assess this we immunized mice with porins, which confer protection in an antibody-dependent manner, before challenging with STm. Mice that had resolved a Nb infection prior to immunization induced less anti-porin IgG and had compromised protection against infection. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that co-infection can radically alter the development of protective immunity during natural infection and in response to immunization. PMID:25474738

  9. Abundant ribonucleotide incorporation into DNA by yeast replicative polymerases

    E-print Network

    Burgers, Peter M.

    Abundant ribonucleotide incorporation into DNA by yeast replicative polymerases Stephanie A. Nick Laboratory for Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS), Umeå University, SE-901 87, Umeå, Sweden Edited in vitro using the physiological nucleoside triphosphate concentra- tions, yeast DNA polymerase , which

  10. Cytotoxic Mechanism of Selenomethionine in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Toshihiko; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Chiba, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    Although selenium is an essential element, its excessive uptake is detrimental to living organisms. The significance of selenium for living organisms has been exploited for various purposes. However, the molecular basis of selenium toxicity is not completely understood. Here, we applied a capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approach to analysis of yeast cells treated with selenomethionine. The data indicated that intracellular thiol compounds are significantly decreased, and diselenide and selenosulfide compounds are increased in selenomethionine-treated cells. The growth defect induced by selenomethionine was recovered by extracellular addition of cysteine and by genetic modification of yeast cells that have an additional de novo synthetic pathway for cysteine. Because cysteine is an intermediate of thiol compounds, these results suggested that the loss of a reduced form of thiol compounds due to selenomethionine causes a growth defect of yeast cells. PMID:22311978

  11. New yeast recombineering tools for bacteria.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Robert M Q; Kadouri, Daniel E; MacEachran, Daniel P; O'Toole, George A

    2009-09-01

    Recombineering with Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a powerful methodology that can be used to clone multiple unmarked pieces of DNA to generate complex constructs with high efficiency. Here, we introduce two new tools that utilize the native recombination enzymes of S. cerevisiae to facilitate the manipulation of DNA. First, yeast recombineering was used to make directed nested deletions in a bacteria-yeast shuttle plasmid using only one or two single stranded oligomers, thus obviating the need for a PCR step. Second, we have generated several new shuttle vectors for yeast recombineering capable of replication in a wide variety of bacterial genera. As a demonstration of utility, some of the approaches and vectors generated in this study were used to make a pigP deletion mutation in the opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens. PMID:19477196

  12. The organization of oligonucleosomes in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Szent-Gyorgyi, C; Isenberg, I

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a method of preparing yeast chromatin that facilitates the analysis of nucleoprotein organization. Yeast chromatin, isolated as an insoluble complex, is digested with micrococcal nuclease and fractionated into major insoluble and soluble fractions. No nucleosomal repeat is seen early in digestion for the insoluble fraction. Nucleosomal complexes of the soluble fraction are excised by nuclease in a distinctive non-random pattern; they are markedly depleted in mononucleosomes. When we analyze the soluble material by high resolution native electrophoresis, we find that the nucleoproteins resolve into two bands for each DNA multimer of the nucleosomal repeat. Our results suggest that there are structural similarities between bulk yeast chromatin and chromatin configurations found in transcribing genes of complex eukaryotes. Images PMID:6344013

  13. Yeast Oligo-mediated Genome Engineering (YOGE)

    PubMed Central

    DiCarlo, JE; Conley, AJ; Penttilä, M; Jäntti, J; Wang, HH; Church, GM

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency oligonucleotide-directed recombination engineering (recombineering) has enabled rapid modification of several prokaryotic genomes to date. Here, we present a method for oligonucleotide-mediated recombineering in the model eukaryote and industrial production host S. cerevisiae, which we call Yeast Oligo-mediated Genome Engineering (YOGE). Through a combination of overexpression and knockouts of relevant genes and optimization of transformation and oligonucleotide designs, we achieve high gene modification frequencies at levels that only require screening of dozens of cells. We demonstrate the robustness of our approach in three divergent yeast strains, including those involved in industrial production of bio-based chemicals. Furthermore, YOGE can be iteratively executed via cycling to generate genomic libraries up to 105 individuals at each round for diversity generation. YOGE cycling alone, or in combination with phenotypic selections or endonuclease-based negative genotypic selections, can be used to easily generate modified alleles in yeast populations with high frequencies. PMID:24160921

  14. RNA degradation in yeast and human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Szczesny, Roman J; Borowski, Lukasz S; Malecki, Michal; Wojcik, Magdalena A; Stepien, Piotr P; Golik, Pawel

    2012-01-01

    Expression of mitochondrially encoded genes must be finely tuned according to the cell's requirements. Since yeast and human mitochondria have limited possibilities to regulate gene expression by altering the transcription initiation rate, posttranscriptional processes, including RNA degradation, are of great importance. In both organisms mitochondrial RNA degradation seems to be mostly depending on the RNA helicase Suv3. Yeast Suv3 functions in cooperation with Dss1 ribonuclease by forming a two-subunit complex called the mitochondrial degradosome. The human ortholog of Suv3 (hSuv3, hSuv3p, SUPV3L1) is also indispensable for mitochondrial RNA decay but its ribonucleolytic partner has so far escaped identification. In this review we summarize the current knowledge about RNA degradation in human and yeast mitochondria. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Gene Expression. PMID:22178375

  15. The long physiological reach of the yeast vacuolar H + ATPase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia M. Kane

    2007-01-01

    V-ATPases are structurally conserved and functionally versatile proton pumps found in all eukaryotes. The yeast V-ATPase has\\u000a emerged as a major model system, in part because yeast mutants lacking V-ATPase subunits (vma mutants) are viable and exhibit a distinctive Vma- phenotype. Yeast vma mutants are present in ordered collections of all non-essential yeast deletion mutants, and a number of additional

  16. Fermentation of maltotriose by brewer's and baker's yeasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Londesborough

    2001-01-01

    Two brewer's yeasts and one baker's yeast grew with =95% (w\\/w) pure maltotriose as carbon source in the presence of antimycin A to block respiration. Biomass yields (0.15 and 0.24 g dry yeast g-1 sugar, respectively, with and without antimycin A) were similar for growth on maltose and maltotriose, and yields of ethanol were 80% of stoichiometric. Yeasts harvested during

  17. Biochemical Comparison of Commercial Selenium Yeast Preparations.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Sheena; Owens, Rebecca; Ward, Patrick; Connolly, Cathal; Doyle, Sean; Murphy, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The trace mineral selenium (Se) is an essential element for human and animal nutrition. The addition of Se to the diet through dietary supplements or fortified food/feed is increasingly common owing to the often sub-optimal content of standard diets of many countries. Se supplements commercially available include the inorganic mineral salts such as sodium selenite or selenate, and organic forms such as Se-enriched yeast. Today, Se yeast is produced by several manufacturers and has become the most widely used source of Se for human supplementation and is also widely employed in animal nutrition where approval in all species has been granted by regulatory bodies such as the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Characterisation and comparison of Se-enriched yeast products has traditionally been made by quantifying total selenomethionine (SeMet) content. A disadvantage of this approach, however, is that it does not consider the effects of Se deposition on subsequent digestive availability. In this study, an assessment was made of the water-soluble extracts of commercially available Se-enriched yeast samples for free, peptide-bound and total water-soluble SeMet. Using LC-MS/MS, a total of 62 Se-containing proteins were identified across four Se yeast products, displaying quantitative/qualitative changes in abundance relative to the certified reference material, SELM-1 (P value <0.05; fold change ?2). Overall, the study indicates that significant differences exist between Se yeast products in terms of SeMet content, Se-containing protein abundance and associated metabolic pathways. PMID:25855372

  18. [The yeast biofilm in human medicine].

    PubMed

    R?zicka, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Votava, Miroslav

    2007-08-01

    In recent years, the role of Candida yeasts as causative agents of nosocomial infections has increased. One of the important virulence factors contributing to the development of such infections is biofilm production. This virulence factor enables yeast to colonize both native surfaces and artificial implants. The most common sources of infection are patients themselves, in particular the gastrointestinal tract and skin. The vectors of exogenous yeast infections are predominantly the hands of the health personnel and contaminated medical instruments. The adhesion of yeasts to the implant surfaces is determined both by implant surface and yeast characteristics. This is followed by proliferation and production of microcolonies and extracellular matrix. The final biofilm structure is also influenced by the production of hyphae and pseudohyphae. The entire process of biofilm production is controlled by numerous regulatory systems, with the key role being played by the quorum sensing system. Like the adhered bacterial cultures, candidas growing in the form of a biofilm are highly resistant to antimicrobial therapy. Resistance of yeast biofilms to antifungals is a complex process with multiple contributing factors. These are especially increased gene expression (e.g. genes encoding the so called multidrug efflux pumps), limited penetration of substances through the extracellular matrix, inhibited cell growth and altered microenvironment in deeper biofilm layers. The concentrations of antifungals able to effectively affect the biofilm cells exceed, by several orders of magnitude, the values of conventionally determined MICs. High biofilm resistance results in ineffective antifungal therapy of biofilm infections. Therefore, if possible, the colonized implant should be removed. Conservative therapy should involve antifungals with a proven effect on the biofilm (e.g. caspofungin). The most effective measure in fighting biofilm infections is prevention, especially adhering to aseptic techniques when manipulating with implants and their correct maintenance. PMID:17929219

  19. Research Articles Yeast Ancestral Genome Reconstructions: The Possibilities

    E-print Network

    Chauve, Cedric

    Research Articles Yeast Ancestral Genome Reconstructions: The Possibilities of Computational the availability of assembled eukaryotic genomes, the first one being a budding yeast, many computational methods them to infer and analyse the architectures of two ancestral yeast genomes, based on the sequence

  20. Growth and survival of a probiotic yeast in dairy products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Lourens-Hattingh; B. C Viljoen

    2001-01-01

    Poor survival of probiotic bacteria in yogurt has been recorded. Growth of a probiotic yeast, Saccharomyces boulardii, in association with the bio-yogurt microflora, by incorporating the yeast into commercial bio-yogurt, has been suggested to stimulate the growth of the probiotic organisms and to assure their survival during shelflife. Therefore, the ability of growth and survival of the probiotic yeast itself

  1. The humanization of N-glycosylation pathways in yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Wildt; Tilllman U. Gerngross

    2005-01-01

    Yeast and other fungal protein-expression hosts have been extensively used to produce industrial enzymes, and are often the expression system of choice when manufacturing costs are of primary concern. However, for the production of therapeutic glycoproteins intended for use in humans, yeast have been less useful owing to their inability to modify proteins with human glycosylation structures. Yeast N-glycosylation is

  2. Cycloheximide resistance as marker for monitoring yeasts in wine fermentations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F Pérez; J. A Regodón; M. E Valdés; C De Miguel; M Ram??rez

    2000-01-01

    When selected yeast strains are used in wine-making, it is necessary to ensure that the fermentation process is really conducted by the inoculated yeast. Saccharomyces cerevisiae spontaneous mutants resistant to cycloheximide (cyhr) were isolated from industrial strains. The mutations did not affect the fermentation kinetics, the quality of the wines, or the viability of active dry yeast made with the

  3. Tripartite organization of centromeric chromatin in budding yeast

    E-print Network

    Henikoff, Steven

    Tripartite organization of centromeric chromatin in budding yeast Kristina Krassovskya,b , Jorja G by nucleosomes containing the CenH3 histone variant, whereas in budding yeast, a 120-bp centromere DNA element this is the case in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where each of the 16 centromeres consists of a 120

  4. Lovastatin Content of Commercially Available Red Yeast Rice Supplements

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip J. Gregory; Rebecca Pettit; Zara Risoldi Cochrane; Amy F. Wilson; Andrew M. Abe

    2012-01-01

    Red yeast rice is a commonly used supplement in North America, primarily promoted for lowering cholesterol. The fermentation process for producing red yeast rice naturally produces a small concentration of lovastatin and related compounds. The authors evaluated label information and contacted manufacturers to inquire about lovastatin content in 117 commercially available red yeast rice supplement products. Only 14% of the

  5. 21 CFR 573.750 - Pichia pastoris dried yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Pichia pastoris dried yeast. 573.750 Section 573.750 Food...Listing § 573.750 Pichia pastoris dried yeast. (a) Identity. The food additive Pichia pastoris dried yeast may be used in feed formulations...

  6. 21 CFR 573.750 - Pichia pastoris dried yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Pichia pastoris dried yeast. 573.750 Section 573.750 Food...Listing § 573.750 Pichia pastoris dried yeast. (a) Identity . The food additive Pichia pastoris dried yeast may be used in feed formulations...

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Candida gelsemii sp. nov., a yeast

    E-print Network

    Thomson, James D.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Candida gelsemii sp. nov., a yeast of the Metschnikowiaceae clade isolated from+Business Media B.V. 2006 Abstract A new yeast species, Candida gelsemii, is described to accommodate three Metschnikowiaceae Á Gelsemium sempervirens Á Nectar alkaloids Á Gelsemine Á New yeast species Introduction Floral

  8. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172...Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout extract, as described in this...

  9. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172...Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout extract, as described in this...

  10. Yeast Genes That Enhance the Toxicity of a Mutant Huntingtin

    E-print Network

    Lindquist, Susan

    Yeast Genes That Enhance the Toxicity of a Mutant Huntingtin Fragment or -Synuclein Stephen-wide screens were performed in yeast to identify genes that enhance the toxicity of a mutant huntingtin's yeast Sac- charomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryotic organism to test the hypothesis that the down

  11. Glucose and sucrose: hazardous fast-food for industrial yeast?

    E-print Network

    Glucose and sucrose: hazardous fast-food for industrial yeast? Kevin J. Verstrepen1,2 , Dirk 197, Glen Osmond, Adelaide SA-5064, Australia Yeast cells often encounter a mixture of different resist- ance. In an industrial context, these effects lead to several yeast-related problems

  12. Clustering, Communication and Environmental Oscillations in Populations of Budding Yeast

    E-print Network

    Young, Todd

    Clustering, Communication and Environmental Oscillations in Populations of Budding Yeast Chris describe how simple models of communication, consistent with known yeast phys- iological mechanisms relevant variables during yeast growth and division have been reported and studied for over 40 years [8, 12

  13. 21 CFR 573.750 - Pichia pastoris dried yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Pichia pastoris dried yeast. 573.750 Section 573.750 Food...Listing § 573.750 Pichia pastoris dried yeast. (a) Identity . The food additive Pichia pastoris dried yeast may be used in feed formulations...

  14. GENE ENGINEERING OF YEASTS FOR THE DEGRADATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research examined the structure and function of cytochrome P-450 genes in yeast as a model for gene engineering such as eukaryotic P-450 enzymes for biodegradation of hazardous waste by yeasts. Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida tropicalis are two yeasts known to produce ma...

  15. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172...Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout extract, as described in this...

  16. Boolean Network Model Predicts Cell Cycle Sequence of Fission Yeast

    E-print Network

    Bornholdt, Stefan

    Boolean Network Model Predicts Cell Cycle Sequence of Fission Yeast Maria I. Davidich, Stefan network model of the cell-cycle regulatory network of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces Pombe sequence being a strongly attractive trajectory. Comparing the fission yeast cell-cycle model to a similar

  17. Robust Spatial Sensing of Mating Pheromone Gradients by Yeast Cells

    E-print Network

    Nie, Qing

    Robust Spatial Sensing of Mating Pheromone Gradients by Yeast Cells Travis I. Moore1,2 , Ching not degrade the pheromone input. The yeast cells exhibited good accuracy with the mating projection typically caused defects in both sensing and response. Interestingly, yeast cells employed adaptive mechanisms

  18. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172...Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout extract, as described in this...

  19. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172...Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout extract, as described in this...

  20. 21 CFR 573.750 - Pichia pastoris dried yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Pichia pastoris dried yeast. 573.750 Section 573.750 Food...Listing § 573.750 Pichia pastoris dried yeast. (a) Identity . The food additive Pichia pastoris dried yeast may be used in feed formulations...

  1. Research Focus A short history of recombination in yeast

    E-print Network

    Otto, Sarah

    Research Focus A short history of recombination in yeast Clifford W. Zeyl1* and Sarah P. Otto2* 1 of fungal genomics, we know little about either the ecology or reproductive biology of the budding yeast of a studyofhistoricalpoutcrossingeventsand inferthe genomic positions of previous recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  2. Exploring the Yeast Genome with Generalized Singular Value

    E-print Network

    Fonseca, Rodrigo

    Exploring the Yeast Genome with Generalized Singular Value Decomposition Andrew Ferguson Advisor courses of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae under two different experimental con- ditions. In the first analysis, a comparison is performed between the yeast stress response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2

  3. 21 CFR 573.750 - Pichia pastoris dried yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Pichia pastoris dried yeast. 573.750 Section 573.750 Food...Listing § 573.750 Pichia pastoris dried yeast. (a) Identity . The food additive Pichia pastoris dried yeast may be used in feed formulations...

  4. Invited Review Functional expression of heterologous proteins in yeast: insights

    E-print Network

    Rao, Rajini

    Invited Review Functional expression of heterologous proteins in yeast: insights into Ca2 signaling of heterologous proteins in yeast: insights into Ca2 signaling and Ca2 -transporting ATPases. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 287: C580­C589, 2004; 10.1152/ajpcell.00135.2004.-- The baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  5. Population genomic analysis of outcrossing and recombination in yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas M Ruderfer; Stephen C Pratt; Hannah S Seidel; Leonid Kruglyak

    2006-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used by humans for millennia to make wine, beer and bread. More recently, it became a key model organism for studies of eukaryotic biology and for genomic analysis. However, relatively little is known about the natural lifestyle and population genetics of yeast. One major question is whether genetically diverse yeast strains mate and

  6. Triacetic acid lactone production in industrial Saccharomyces yeast strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triacetic acid lactone (TAL) is a potential platform chemical that can be produced in yeast. To evaluate the potential for industrial yeast strains to produce TAL, the g2ps1 gene encoding 2-pyrone synthase was transformed into thirteen industrial yeast strains of varied genetic background. TAL produ...

  7. Principles of chromosomal organization: lessons from yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    The spatial organization of genes and chromosomes plays an important role in the regulation of several DNA processes. However, the principles and forces underlying this nonrandom organization are mostly unknown. Despite its small dimension, and thanks to new imaging and biochemical techniques, studies of the budding yeast nucleus have led to significant insights into chromosome arrangement and dynamics. The dynamic organization of the yeast genome during interphase argues for both the physical properties of the chromatin fiber and specific molecular interactions as drivers of nuclear order. PMID:21383075

  8. Hajjoul/Mathon et al. Chromatin dynamics in living yeasts High throughput chromatin motion tracking in living yeast reveals the

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Hajjoul/Mathon et al. Chromatin dynamics in living yeasts - 1 - High throughput chromatin motion tracking in living yeast reveals the flexibility of the fiber throughout the genome Houssam Hajjoul1.1101/gr.157008.113 #12;Hajjoul/Mathon et al. Chromatin dynamics in living yeasts - 2 - ABSTRACT (211 words

  9. Biodiversity of Saccharomyces yeast strains from grape berries of wine-producing areas using starter commercial yeasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eva Valero; Brigitte Cambon; Dorit Schuller; Margarida Casal; Sylvie Dequin

    2007-01-01

    The use of commercial wine yeast strains as starters has grown extensively over the past two decades. In this study, a large-scale sampling plan was devised over a period of 3 years in three different vineyards in the south of France, to evaluate autochthonous wine yeast biodiversity in vineyards around wineries where active dry yeasts have been used as fermentation

  10. Brasiliensin: A novel intestinal thrombin inhibitor from Triatoma brasiliensis (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) with an important role in blood intake.

    PubMed

    Araujo, R N; Campos, I T N; Tanaka, A S; Santos, A; Gontijo, N F; Lehane, M J; Pereira, M H

    2007-10-01

    Every hematophagous invertebrate studied to date produces at least one inhibitor of coagulation. Among these, thrombin inhibitors have most frequently been isolated. In order to study the thrombin inhibitor from Triatoma brasiliensis and its biological significance for the bug, we sequenced the corresponding gene and evaluated its biological function. The T. brasiliensis intestinal thrombin inhibitor, termed brasiliensin, was sequenced and primers were designed to synthesize double strand RNA (dsRNA). Gene knockdown (RNAi) was induced by two injections of 15mug of dsRNA into fourth instar nymphs. Forty-eight hours after the second injection, bugs from each group were allowed to feed on hamsters. PCR results showed that injections of dsRNA reduced brasiliensin expression in the anterior midgut by approximately 71% in knockdown nymphs when compared with controls. The reduction in gene expression was confirmed by the thrombin inhibitory activity assay and the citrated plasma coagulation time assay which showed activity reductions of approximately 18- and approximately 3.5-fold, respectively. Knockdown nymphs ingested approximately 39% less blood than controls. In order to confirm the importance of brasiliensin in blood ingestion, fourth instar nymphs were allowed to ingest feeding solution alone or feeding solution containing 15U of thrombin prior to blood feeding. Fifty-five percent less blood was ingested by nymphs which were fed thrombin prior to blood feeding. The results suggest that anticoagulant activity in the midgut is an important determinant of the amount of blood taken from the host. The role of anticoagulants during blood ingestion is discussed in the light of this novel insight. PMID:17575982

  11. In Vivo Anti-Herpes Simplex Virus Activity of a Sulfated Derivative of Agaricus brasiliensis Mycelial Polysaccharide

    PubMed Central

    Cardozo, F. T. G. S.; Larsen, I. V.; Carballo, E. V.; Jose, G.; Stern, R. A.; Brummel, R. C.; Camelini, C. M.; Rossi, M. J.; Simões, C. M. O.

    2013-01-01

    Agaricus brasiliensis (syn. A. subrufescens), a basidiomycete fungus native to the Atlantic forest in Brazil, contains cell walls rich in glucomannan polysaccharides. The ?-(1?2)-gluco-?-(1?3)-mannan was isolated from A. brasiliensis mycelium, chemically modified by sulfation, and named MI-S. MI-S has multiple mechanisms of action, including inhibition of herpes simplex virus (HSV) attachment, entry, and cell-to-cell spread (F. T. G. S. Cardozo, C. M. Camelini, A. Mascarello, M. J. Rossi, R. J. Nunes, C. R. Barardi, M. M. de Mendonça, and C. M. O. Simões, Antiviral Res. 92:108–114, 2011). The antiherpetic efficacy of MI-S was assessed in murine ocular, cutaneous, and genital infection models of HSV. Groups of 10 mice were infected with HSV-1 (strain KOS) or HSV-2 (strain 333). MI-S was given either topically or by oral gavage under various pre- and posttreatment regimens, and the severity of disease and viral titers in ocular and vaginal samples were determined. No toxicity was observed in the uninfected groups treated with MI-S. The topical and oral treatments with MI-S were not effective in reducing ocular disease. Topical application of MI-S on skin lesions was also not effective, but cutaneously infected mice treated orally with MI-S had significantly reduced disease scores (P < 0.05) after day 9, suggesting that healing was accelerated. Vaginal administration of MI-S 20 min before viral challenge reduced the mean disease scores on days 5 to 9 (P < 0.05), viral titers on day 1 (P < 0.05), and mortality (P < 0.0001) in comparison to the control groups (untreated and vehicle treated). These results show that MI-S may be useful as an oral agent to reduce the severity of HSV cutaneous and mucosal lesions and, more importantly, as a microbicide to block sexual transmission of HSV-2 genital infections. PMID:23507287

  12. The spindle pole body of yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Snyder

    1994-01-01

    Microtubule organizing centers play an essential cellular role in nucleating microtubule assembly and establishing the microtubule array. The microtubule organizing center of yeast, the spindle pole body (SPB), shares many functions and properties with those other organisms. In recent years considerable new information has been generated concerning components associated with the SPB, and the mechanism by which it duplicates. This

  13. Turning yeast sequence into protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Heijne, G. von

    1996-04-01

    The complete genome sequencing of the yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae leads us into a new era of potential use for such data base information. Protein engineering studies suggest that genetic selection of overproducing strains may aid the assignment of protein function. Data base management and sequencing software have been developed to scan entire genomes.

  14. Number of Cytoplasmic Factors in Yeast Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takashi Sugimura; Kazuko Okabe; Akira Imamura

    1966-01-01

    IT is well known that the self-reproducing genetic factors (rho), required for the development of mitochondria, are present in the cytoplasm of yeast cell. When the cells are allowed to grow in a medium containing acriflavine or related dyes, large numbers of mutant cells with deficient respiration are produced, which tend to dominate the entire cell population after several generations1.

  15. Actin and Endocytosis in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Bruce L.; Eskin, Julian A.; Wendland, Beverly

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis, the process whereby the plasma membrane invaginates to form vesicles, is essential for bringing many substances into the cell and for membrane turnover. The mechanism driving clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) involves > 50 different protein components assembling at a single location on the plasma membrane in a temporally ordered and hierarchal pathway. These proteins perform precisely choreographed steps that promote receptor recognition and clustering, membrane remodeling, and force-generating actin-filament assembly and turnover to drive membrane invagination and vesicle scission. Many critical aspects of the CME mechanism are conserved from yeast to mammals and were first elucidated in yeast, demonstrating that it is a powerful system for studying endocytosis. In this review, we describe our current mechanistic understanding of each step in the process of yeast CME, and the essential roles played by actin polymerization at these sites, while providing a historical perspective of how the landscape has changed since the preceding version of the YeastBook was published 17 years ago (1997). Finally, we discuss the key unresolved issues and where future studies might be headed. PMID:25657349

  16. Resurrecting ancestral alcohol dehydrogenases from yeast

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, J Michael; Gaucher, Eric A; Burgan, Michelle F; De Kee, Danny W; Li, Tang; Aris, John P; Benner, Steven A

    2013-01-01

    Modern yeast living in fleshy fruits rapidly convert sugars into bulk ethanol through pyruvate. Pyruvate loses carbon dioxide to produce acetaldehyde, which is reduced by alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) to ethanol, which accumulates. Yeast later consumes the accumulated ethanol, exploiting Adh2, an Adh1 homolog differing by 24 (of 348) amino acids. As many microorganisms cannot grow in ethanol, accumulated ethanol may help yeast defend resources in the fruit1. We report here the resurrection of the last common ancestor2 of Adh1 and Adh2, called AdhA. The kinetic behavior of AdhA suggests that the ancestor was optimized to make (not consume) ethanol. This is consistent with the hypothesis that before the Adh1-Adh2 duplication, yeast did not accumulate ethanol for later consumption but rather used AdhA to recycle NADH generated in the glycolytic pathway. Silent nucleotide dating suggests that the Adh1-Adh2 duplication occurred near the time of duplication of several other proteins involved in the accumulation of ethanol, possibly in the Cretaceous age when fleshy fruits arose. These results help to connect the chemical behavior of these enzymes through systems analysis to a time of global ecosystem change, a small but useful step towards a planetary systems biology. PMID:15864308

  17. Resurrecting ancestral alcohol dehydrogenases from yeast.

    PubMed

    Thomson, J Michael; Gaucher, Eric A; Burgan, Michelle F; De Kee, Danny W; Li, Tang; Aris, John P; Benner, Steven A

    2005-06-01

    Modern yeast living in fleshy fruits rapidly convert sugars into bulk ethanol through pyruvate. Pyruvate loses carbon dioxide to produce acetaldehyde, which is reduced by alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) to ethanol, which accumulates. Yeast later consumes the accumulated ethanol, exploiting Adh2, an Adh1 homolog differing by 24 (of 348) amino acids. As many microorganisms cannot grow in ethanol, accumulated ethanol may help yeast defend resources in the fruit. We report here the resurrection of the last common ancestor of Adh1 and Adh2, called Adh(A). The kinetic behavior of Adh(A) suggests that the ancestor was optimized to make (not consume) ethanol. This is consistent with the hypothesis that before the Adh1-Adh2 duplication, yeast did not accumulate ethanol for later consumption but rather used Adh(A) to recycle NADH generated in the glycolytic pathway. Silent nucleotide dating suggests that the Adh1-Adh2 duplication occurred near the time of duplication of several other proteins involved in the accumulation of ethanol, possibly in the Cretaceous age when fleshy fruits arose. These results help to connect the chemical behavior of these enzymes through systems analysis to a time of global ecosystem change, a small but useful step towards a planetary systems biology. PMID:15864308

  18. Cell Biology of Homologous Recombination in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single-and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:21660714

  19. Yeast and Egg Contamination of Shell Eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poultry and eggs are often contaminated with microorganisms such as bacteria, yeasts, and molds. Bacteria such as Salmonella cause illness in human who eat eggs contaminated with them, particularly if the eggs are pooled, improperly refrigerated, and eaten raw or undercooked. Other bacteria such a...

  20. yApoptosis: yeast apoptosis database

    PubMed Central

    Wanichthanarak, Kwanjeera; Cvijovic, Marija; Molt, Andrea; Petranovic, Dina

    2013-01-01

    In the past few years, programmed cell death (PCD) has become a popular research area due to its fundamental aspects and its links to human diseases. Yeast has been used as a model for studying PCD, since the discovery of morphological markers of apoptotic cell death in yeast in 1997. Increasing knowledge in identification of components and molecular pathways created a need for organization of information. To meet the demands from the research community, we have developed a curated yeast apoptosis database, yApoptosis. The database structurally collects an extensively curated set of apoptosis, PCD and related genes, their genomic information, supporting literature and relevant external links. A web interface including necessary functions is provided to access and download the data. In addition, we included several networks where the apoptosis genes or proteins are involved, and present them graphically and interactively to facilitate rapid visualization. We also promote continuous inputs and curation by experts. yApoptosis is a highly specific resource for sharing information online, which supports researches and studies in the field of yeast apoptosis and cell death. Database URL: http://www.ycelldeath.com/yapoptosis/ PMID:24082050

  1. yApoptosis: yeast apoptosis database.

    PubMed

    Wanichthanarak, Kwanjeera; Cvijovic, Marija; Molt, Andrea; Petranovic, Dina

    2013-01-01

    In the past few years, programmed cell death (PCD) has become a popular research area due to its fundamental aspects and its links to human diseases. Yeast has been used as a model for studying PCD, since the discovery of morphological markers of apoptotic cell death in yeast in 1997. Increasing knowledge in identification of components and molecular pathways created a need for organization of information. To meet the demands from the research community, we have developed a curated yeast apoptosis database, yApoptosis. The database structurally collects an extensively curated set of apoptosis, PCD and related genes, their genomic information, supporting literature and relevant external links. A web interface including necessary functions is provided to access and download the data. In addition, we included several networks where the apoptosis genes or proteins are involved, and present them graphically and interactively to facilitate rapid visualization. We also promote continuous inputs and curation by experts. yApoptosis is a highly specific resource for sharing information online, which supports researches and studies in the field of yeast apoptosis and cell death. DATABASE URL: http://www.ycelldeath.com/yapoptosis/. PMID:24082050

  2. Conflict between Noise and Plasticity in Yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ben Lehner

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression responds to changes in conditions but also stochastically among individuals. In budding yeast, both expression responsiveness across conditions (“plasticity”) and cell-to-cell variation (“noise”) have been quantified for thousands of genes and found to correlate across genes. It has been argued therefore that noise and plasticity may be strongly coupled and mechanistically linked. This is consistent with some theoretical

  3. The economics of ribosome biosynthesis in yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan R Warner

    1999-01-01

    In a rapidly growing yeast cell, 60% of total transcription is devoted to ribosomal RNA, and 50% of RNA polymerase II transcription and 90% of mRNA splicing are devoted to ribosomal proteins (RPs). Coordinate regulation of the ?150 rRNA genes and 137 RP genes that make such prodigious use of resources is essential for the economy of the cell. This

  4. Glucose-Induced Acidification in Yeast Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Alan; Bourn, Julia; Pool, Brynne

    2005-01-01

    We present an investigation (for A-level biology students and equivalent) into the mechanism of glucose-induced extracellular acidification in unbuffered yeast suspensions. The investigation is designed to enhance understanding of aspects of the A-level curriculum that relate to the phenomenon (notably glucose catabolism) and to develop key skills…

  5. Microfermentation Test For Identification Of Yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Molina, Thomas C.

    1995-01-01

    Microfermentation test developed as supplementary method for use in identifying yeasts, especially in clinical and environmental studies. In comparison with traditional fermentation tests, simpler and easier, and requiries less equipment, material, and laboratory space. Results obtained in days instead of weeks.

  6. Antarctic Yeasts: Biodiversity and Potential Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivaji, S.; Prasad, G. S.

    This review is an attempt in cataloguing the diversity of yeasts in Antarctica, highlight their biotechnological potential and understand the basis of adaptation to low temperature. As of now several psychrophilic and psychrotolerant yeasts from Antarctic soils and marine waters have been characterized with respect to their growth characteristics, ecological distribution and taxonomic significance. Interestingly most of these species belonged to basidiomycetous yeasts which as a group are known for their ability to circumvent and survive under stress conditions. Simultaneously their possible role as work horses in the biotechnological industry was recognized due to their ability to produce novel enzymes and biomolecules such as agents for the breakdown of xenobiotics, and novel pharmaceutical chemi cals. The high activity of psychrophilic enzymes at low and moderate temperatures offers potential economic benefits. As of now lipases from Pseudozyma antarctica have been extensively studied to understand their unique thermal stability at 90°C and also because of its use in the pharmaceutical, agriculture, food, cosmetics and chemical industry. A few of the other enzymes which have been studied include extracellular alpha-amylase and glucoamylase from the yeast Pseudozyma antarctica (Candida antarctica), an extra-cellular protease from Cryptococcus humicola, an aspartyl proteinase from Cryptococcus humicola, a novel extracellular subtilase from Leucosporidium antarcticum, and a xylanase from Cryptococcus adeliensis

  7. Metal cation uptake by yeast: a review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. J. Blackwell; I. Singleton; J. M. Tobin

    1995-01-01

    This review addresses metal uptake specifically by yeast. Metal uptake may be passive, active or both, depending on the viability of the biomass, and is influenced by a number of environmental and experimental factors. Uptake is typically accompanied by a degree of ion exchange and, under certain conditions, may be enhanced by the addition of an energy source, Intracellularly accumulated

  8. Inventions on baker's yeast strains and specialty ingredients.

    PubMed

    Gélinas, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    Baker's yeast is one of the oldest food microbial starters. Between 1927 and 2008, 165 inventions on more than 337 baker's yeast strains were patented. The first generation of patented yeast strains claimed improved biomass yield at the yeast plant, higher gassing power in dough or better survival to drying to prepare active dry baker's yeast. Especially between 1980 and 1995, a major interest was given to strains for multiple bakery applications such as dough with variable sugar content and stored at refrigeration (cold) or freezing temperatures. During the same period, genetically engineered yeast strains became very popular but did not find applications in the baking industry. Since year 2000, patented baker's yeast strains claimed aroma, anti-moulding or nutritive properties to better meet the needs of the baking industry. In addition to patents on yeast strains, 47 patents were issued on baker's yeast specialty ingredients for niche markets. This review shows that patents on baker's yeast with improved characteristics such as aromatic or nutritive properties have regularly been issued since the 1920's. Overall, it also confirms recent interest for a very wide range of tailored-made yeast-based ingredients for bakery applications. PMID:20653532

  9. Molecular identification of yeasts associated with traditional Egyptian dairy products.

    PubMed

    El-Sharoud, W M; Belloch, C; Peris, D; Querol, A

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed to examine the diversity and ecology of yeasts associated with traditional Egyptian dairy products employing molecular techniques in yeast identification. A total of 120 samples of fresh and stored Domiati cheese, kariesh cheese, and "Matared" cream were collected from local markets and examined. Forty yeast isolates were cultured from these samples and identified using the restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLPs) of 5.8S-ITS rDNA region and sequencing of the domains D1 and D2 of the 26S rRNA gene. Yeasts were identified as Issatchenkia orientalis (13 isolates), Candida albicans (4 isolates), Clavispora lusitaniae (Candida lusitaniae) (9 isolates), Kodamaea ohmeri (Pichia ohmeri) (1 isolate), Kluyveromyces marxianus (6 isolates), and Candida catenulata (7 isolates). With the exception of C. lusitaniae, the D1/D2 26S rRNA gene sequences were 100% identical for the yeast isolates within the same species. Phylogenetic reconstruction of C. lusitaniae isolates grouped them into 3 distinguished clusters. Kariesh cheese was found to be the most diverse in its yeast floras and contained the highest total yeast count compared with other examined dairy products. This was linked to the acidic pH and lower salt content of this cheese, which favor the growth and survival of yeasts in foodstuffs. Stored Domiati cheese also contained diverse yeast species involving isolates of the pathogenic yeast C. albicans. This raises the possibility of dairy products being vehicles of transmission of pathogenic yeasts. PMID:19895478

  10. Immunosuppressive drug rapamycin restores sporulation competence in industrial yeasts.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Nobushige; Niijima, Seiko; Tanaka, Yukari; Ito, Toshihiko

    2012-04-01

    Industrial yeasts, including a sake yeast strain Kyokai no. 7 (K7), are generally unable to sporulate. Previously, we have reported that in K7 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells, deletion of the G1 cyclin gene CLN3, a key activator of the cell cycle, allows the cells to induce IME1 transcription and sporulate under sporulation conditions. Here we show that treatment with the immunosuppressive drug rapamycin also restores sporulation competence in K7 cells. Moreover, sporulation was observed after rapamycin treatment in other industrial yeasts, namely bottom fermenting yeast strains and a wine yeast strain, which are not able to sporulate under normal sporulation conditions. These findings suggest that activation of TORC1 under sporulation conditions leads to sporulation incompetence in these yeasts. Thus, rapamycin treatment will be useful to restore sporulation competence in industrial yeasts. PMID:22197499

  11. Fractal analysis of yeast cell optical speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamholz, A.; Schneider, P. S.; Subramaniam, R.; Wong, P. K.; Lieberman, D. H.; Cheung, T. D.; Burgos, J.; Leon, K.; Romero, J.

    2006-02-01

    Steady state laser light propagation in diffuse media such as biological cells generally provide bulk parameter information, such as the mean free path and absorption, via the transmission profile. The accompanying optical speckle can be analyzed as a random spatial data series and its fractal dimension can be used to further classify biological media that show similar mean free path and absorption properties, such as those obtained from a single population. A population of yeast cells can be separated into different portions by centrifuge, and microscope analysis can be used to provide the population statistics. Fractal analysis of the speckle suggests that lower fractal dimension is associated with higher cell packing density. The spatial intensity correlation revealed that the higher cell packing gives rise to higher refractive index. A calibration sample system that behaves similar as the yeast samples in fractal dimension, spatial intensity correlation and diffusion was selected. Porous silicate slabs with different refractive index values controlled by water content were used for system calibration. The porous glass as well as the yeast random spatial data series fractal dimension was found to depend on the imaging resolution. The fractal method was also applied to fission yeast single cell fluorescent data as well as aging yeast optical data; and consistency was demonstrated. It is concluded that fractal analysis can be a high sensitivity tool for relative comparison of cell structure but that additional diffusion measurements are necessary for determining the optimal image resolution. Practical application to dental plaque bio-film and cam-pill endoscope images was also demonstrated.

  12. The rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.) homologue of the LEAFY/FLORICAULA gene is preferentially expressed in both male and female floral meristems.

    PubMed

    Dornelas, Marcelo Carnier; Rodriguez, Adriana Pinheiro Martinelli

    2005-07-01

    The rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.) is an important source of natural rubber in tropical regions and, as with many woody species, shows a long juvenile phase. To understand the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying the reproductive process in rubber trees, H. brasiliensis RRIM600 flower and inflorescence development have been characterized, the rubber tree FLORICAULA/LEAFY (FLO/LFY) orthologue, HbLFY, cloned, and its expression patterns were analysed during vegetative and reproductive development. The rubber tree, similar to other Euphorbiaceae species, produces lateral inflorescences containing male, female, and bisexual flowers. HbLFY is expressed in lateral meristems that give rise to inflorescences and in all flower meristems, consistent with a role in reproductive development. Complementation studies using Arabidopsis lfy mutants indicated that the biological function of LFY might be conserved among Brassicaceae and Euphorbiaceae species. PMID:15911556

  13. Stimulatory effects of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and of 1-naphthylacetic acid on sucrose level, invertase activity and sucrose utilization in the latex of Hevea brasiliensis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jaroslav Tupý

    1969-01-01

    Summary Treatment of the bark ofHevea brasiliensis with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) or l-naphthylacetic acid (NAA) greatly increases sucrose level, invertase activity and sucrose utilization in the latex; the efficacy of 2,4-D is considerably greater than that of NAA. The greater sucrose utilization is the consequence of increased invertase activity. The changes occur as soon as the first tapping following bark

  14. Acaulospora brasiliensis comb. nov. and Acaulospora alpina ( Glomeromycota ) from upland Scotland: morphology, molecular phylogeny and DNA-based detection in roots

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manuela Krüger; Christopher Walker; Arthur Schüßler

    2011-01-01

    Spores of two supposedly arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species, new to the United Kingdom and recently described as Acaulospora alpina and Ambispora brasiliensis (Glomeromycota), were discovered in soil samples from moorland in upland Scotland. Soil and plant trap pot cultures were established, but\\u000a attempts to establish these fungi in single-species pot cultures with Plantago lanceolata as host were unsuccessful. Nevertheless, based

  15. Plasmid vectors capable of transferring large DNA fragments to yeast.

    PubMed

    Morris, D W; Noti, J D; Osborne, F A; Szalay, A A

    1981-01-01

    We have constructed several cloning vectors which can be used in vitro packaging and yeast transformation. These plasmids have been designed for the convenient cloning of large segments of DNA and their transfer to yeast. They contain bacterial plasmid DNA sequences for replication and selection in Escherichia coli, yeast 2-microns plasmid DNA sequences or chromosomal replicators and yeast markers necessary for replication and selection in yeast, and the cohesive ends of bacteriophage lambda which allow packaging of recombinant molecules into lambda phage heads. Large fragments (22-38 kb) of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Zea mays DNA were ligated into plasmid vector pBTI-1 to make complete genome libraries. One clone from the K. pneumoniae library was amplified in E. coli and the purified DNA used to transform yeast cells. Transformation of yeast by large DNA fragments occurred at high frequencies. The recombinant plasmid was stably maintained in yeast, provided selective pressure for Leu+ transformants was maintained. The structurally complete recombinant plasmid can be recovered from yeast by transforming E. coli to ampicillin resistance. Fewer than 5% of the recovered plasmids had undergone recombination with endogenous yeast 2-microns plasmid. PMID:6299664

  16. Collaborative study on yeast activity, gas production (AACC Method 89-01)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Gélinas

    1997-01-01

    A method of the American Association of Cereal Chemists (AACC) for determining yeast activity (gas production) was tested in a collaborative study involving five laboratories. Samples of three different manufacturers for each of three yeast types (three active dry yeasts, three compressed yeasts, and three instant active dry yeasts) were duplicated and tested in three dough formulations mainly characterized by

  17. Hybrid yeast strains capable of raising an extraordinarily broad range of dough types

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Kowalski; I. Zander; S. Windisch

    1981-01-01

    Over 200 hybrid yeast strains were screened and 11 of these found to have versatile fermentation characteristics. This paper reports the results obtained with these 11 strains compared with a commercially available strain of baker's yeast used for bread making and marketed as “instant active dry yeast”. In contrast to bakers yeast, the hybrid strains fermented very well in yeast,

  18. Prion formation by a yeast GLFG nucleoporin

    PubMed Central

    Halfmann, Randal; Wright, Jessica R.; Alberti, Simon; Lindquist, Susan; Rexach, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The self-assembly of proteins into higher order structures is both central to normal biology and a dominant force in disease. Certain glutamine/asparagine (Q/N)-rich proteins in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae assemble into self-replicating amyloid-like protein polymers, or prions, that act as genetic elements in an entirely protein-based system of inheritance. The nuclear pore complex (NPC) contains multiple Q/N-rich proteins whose self-assembly has also been proposed to underlie structural and functional properties of the NPC. Here we show that an essential sequence feature of these proteins—repeating GLFG motifs—strongly promotes their self-assembly into amyloids with characteristics of prions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nup100 can form bona fide prions, thus establishing a previously undiscovered ability of yeast GLFG nucleoporins to adopt this conformational state in vivo. PMID:22561191

  19. Cloning whole bacterial genomes in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Benders, Gwynedd A.; Noskov, Vladimir N.; Denisova, Evgeniya A.; Lartigue, Carole; Gibson, Daniel G.; Assad-Garcia, Nacyra; Chuang, Ray-Yuan; Carrera, William; Moodie, Monzia; Algire, Mikkel A.; Phan, Quang; Alperovich, Nina; Vashee, Sanjay; Merryman, Chuck; Venter, J. Craig; Smith, Hamilton O.; Glass, John I.; Hutchison, Clyde A.

    2010-01-01

    Most microbes have not been cultured, and many of those that are cultivatable are difficult, dangerous or expensive to propagate or are genetically intractable. Routine cloning of large genome fractions or whole genomes from these organisms would significantly enhance their discovery and genetic and functional characterization. Here we report the cloning of whole bacterial genomes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as single-DNA molecules. We cloned the genomes of Mycoplasma genitalium (0.6 Mb), M. pneumoniae (0.8 Mb) and M. mycoides subspecies capri (1.1 Mb) as yeast circular centromeric plasmids. These genomes appear to be stably maintained in a host that has efficient, well-established methods for DNA manipulation. PMID:20211840

  20. Patulin biodegradation by marine yeast Kodameae ohmeri.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Wei; Li, Chunsheng; Ma, Ning; Xu, Ying; Meng, Xianghong

    2015-01-01

    Patulin contamination of fruit- and vegetable-based products had become a major challenge for the food industry. Biological methods of patulin control can play an important role due to their safety and high efficiency. In this study, a strain of marine yeast with high patulin degradation ability was screened. The yeast was identified as Kodameae ohmeri by the BioLog identification system and partial 26S rRNA gene sequencing. The degradation products of patulin were identified as (E)- and (Z)-ascladiol through HPLC and LC-TOF/MS. High patulin tolerance at 100 ?g ml(-1) and a high degradation rate at 35°C at a pH between 3 and 6 indicates the potential application of K. ohmeri for patulin detoxification of apple-derived products. PMID:25585640

  1. FORMATION OF AUXIN IN YEAST CULTURES

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, True W.; Stier, T. J. B.

    1941-01-01

    We have found far more auxin in the culture media of bakers' yeast than was obtained by Kögl and Kostermans from the cells themselves. The production of auxin by yeast cells resembles the formation observed in other organisms such as Rhizopus and Rhizobium which also form auxins in their culture media. The auxin yield was found to increase with the concentration of sucrose and to decrease with the concentration of peptone. An inverse relation with the rate of cell multiplication was observed. Enlarged and elongated cells appeared only in those media which contained considerable amounts of auxin. The total auxin yield in the various cultures was found to be directly proportional, below pH 5, to the hydrogen ion concentration. Thus, it was proposed that certain growth conditions favor the breakage of the link between auxin and its protein carrier (Skoog and Thimann) 1940) and consequently accelerate the rate of excretion of auxin into the growth medium. PMID:19873251

  2. Coherent regulation in yeast cell cycle network

    E-print Network

    Nese Aral; Alkan Kabakcioglu

    2014-12-14

    We define a measure of coherent activity for gene regulatory networks, a property that reflects the unity of purpose between the regulatory agents with a common target. We propose that such harmonious regulatory action is desirable under a demand for energy efficiency and may be selected for under evolutionary pressures. We consider two recent models of the cell-cycle regulatory network of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a case study and calculate their degree of coherence. A comparison with random networks of similar size and composition reveals that the yeast's cell-cycle regulation is wired to yield and exceptionally high level of coherent regulatory activity. We also investigate the mean degree of coherence as a function of the network size, connectivity and the fraction of repressory/activatory interactions.

  3. Dynamic Trans Interactions in Yeast Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Mirkin, Ekaterina V.; Chang, Frederick S.; Kleckner, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional organization of the genome is important for regulation of gene expression and maintenance of genomic stability. It also defines, and is defined by, contacts between different chromosomal loci. Interactions between loci positioned on different chromosomes, i.e. “trans” interactions are one type of such contacts. Here, we describe a case of inducible trans interaction in chromosomes of the budding yeast S. cerevisiae. Special DNA sequences, inserted in two ectopic chromosomal loci positioned in trans, pair with one another in an inducible manner. The spatial proximity diagnostic of pairing is observable by both chromosome capture analysis (3C) and epifluorescence microscopy in whole cells. Protein synthesis de novo appears to be required for this process. The three-dimensional organization of the yeast nucleus imposes a constraint on such pairing, presumably by dictating the probability with which the two sequences collide with one another. PMID:24098740

  4. Yeast secretory expression of insulin precursors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Kjeldsen

    2000-01-01

    Since the 1980s, recombinant human insulin for the treatment of diabetes mellitus has been produced using either the yeast\\u000a Saccharomyces cerevisiae or the prokaryote Escherichia coli. Here, development of the insulin secretory expression system in S. cerevisiae and its subsequent optimisation is described. Expression of proinsulin in S. cerevisiae does not result in efficient secretion of proinsulin or insulin. However,

  5. Complete DNA sequence of yeast chromosome XI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Dujon; D. Alexandraki; B. André; W. Ansorge; V. Baladron; J. P. G. Ballesta; A. Banrevi; P. A. Bolle; M. Bolotin-Fukuhara; P. Bossier; G. Bou; J. Boyer; M. J. Buitrago; G. Cherét; L. Colleaux; B. Dalgnan-Fornier; F. Del Rey; C. Dion; H. Domdey; A. Düsterhöft; S. Düsterhus; K.-D. Entian; H. Erfle; P. F. Esteban; H. Feldmann; L. Fernandes; G. M. Fobo; C. Fritz; H. Fukuhara; C. Gabel; L. Gaillon; J. M. Carcia-Cantalejo; J. J. Garcia-Ramirez; M. E. Gent; M. Ghazvini; A. Goffeau; A. Gonzaléz; D. Grothues; P. Guerreiro; J. Hegemann; N. Hewitt; F. Hilger; C. P. Hollenberg; O. Horaitis; K. J. Indge; A. Jacquier; C. M. James; J. C. Jauniaux; A. Jimenez; H. Keuchel; L. Kirchrath; K. Kleine; P. Kötter; P. Legrain; S. Liebl; E. J. Louis; A. Maia E Silva; C. Marck; A.-L. Monnier; D. Möstl; S. Müller; B. Obermaier; S. G. Oliver; C. Pallier; S. Pascolo; F. Pfeiffer; P. Philippsen; R. J. Planta; F. M. Pohl; T. M. Pohl; R. Pöhlmann; D. Portetelle; B. Purnelle; V. Puzos; M. Ramezani Rad; S. W. Rasmussen; M. Remacha; J. L. Revuelta; G.-F. Richard; M. Rieger; C. Rodrigues-Pousada; M. Rose; T. Rupp; M. A. Santos; C. Schwager; C. Sensen; J. Skala; H. Soares; F. Sor; J. Stegemann; H. Tettelin; A. Thierry; M. Tzermia; L. A. Urrestarazu; L. van Dyck; J. C. van Vliet-Reedijk; M. Valens; M. Vandenbo; C. Vilela; S. Vissers; D. von Wettstein; H. Voss; S. Wiemann; G. Xu; J. Zimmermann; M. Haasemann; I. Becker; H. W. Mewes

    1994-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XI has been determined. In addition to a compact arrangement of potential protein coding sequences, the 666,448-base-pair sequence has revealed general chromosome patterns; in particular, alternating regional variations in average base composition correlate with variations in local gene density along the chromosome. Significant discrepancies with the previously published genetic map

  6. Modelling signalling pathways – a yeast approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bodil Nordlander; Edda Klipp; Bente Kofahl; Stefan Hohmann

    MAP kinase pathways are conserved signalling systems in eukaryotes that control stress responses, cell growth, and proliferation,\\u000a as well as differentiation. Here, we discuss and compare the feedback control mechanisms of two very well studied yeast signalling\\u000a systems: the pheromone response pathway and the osmosensing HOG pathway. Mathematical models have recently been generated,\\u000a allowing in silico analysis of signalling properties

  7. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: Stabilization by exogenous lactose

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. I. Rapoport; G. M. Khroustalyova; L. M. Crowe; J. H. Crowe

    2009-01-01

    We have found that incubation in lactose solutions (0.75 M) of yeast culture Saccharomyces cerevisiae sensitive to dehydration damage increased the stability of the cells during dehydration. Simultaneously with this increase\\u000a in viability, a decrease in plasma membrane permeability during rehydration was seen. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy\\u000a to measure lipid phase transitions, we observed that the lactose treatment depressed

  8. The core meiotic transcriptome in budding yeasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Primig; Roy M. Williams; Elizabeth A. Winzeler; Gela G. Tevzadze; Andrew R. Conway; Seung Y. Hwang; Ronald W. Davis; Rochelle Easton Esposito

    2000-01-01

    We used high-density oligonucleotide microarrays to analyse the genomes and meiotic expression patterns of two yeast strains, SK1 and W303, that display distinct kinetics and efficiencies of sporulation. Hybridization of genomic DNA to arrays revealed numerous gene deletions and polymorphisms in both backgrounds. The expression analysis yielded approximately 1,600 meiotically regulated genes in each strain, with a core set of

  9. PROPHECY - a yeast phenome database, update 2006

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luciano Fernandez-ricaud; Jonas Warringer; Elke Ericson; Kerstin Glaab; Pär Davidsson; Fabian Nilsson; Graham J. L. Kemp; Olle Nerman; Anders Blomberg

    2007-01-01

    Connecting genotype to phenotype is fundamental in biomedical research and in our understanding of disease. Phenomics—the large-scale quantitative phenotypic analysis of genotypes on a genome- wide scale—connects automated data generation with the development of novel tools for phenotype data integration, mining and visualization. Our yeast phenomics database PROPHECY is available at http:\\/\\/prophecy.lundberg.gu.se. Via phenotyping of 984 heterozygous diploids for all

  10. SNF1/AMPK pathways in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hedbacker, Kristina; Carlson, Marian

    2009-01-01

    The SNF1/AMPK family of protein kinases is highly conserved in eukaryotes and is required for energy homeostasis in mammals, plants, and fungi. SNF1 protein kinase was initially identified by genetic analysis in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. SNF1 is required primarily for the adaptation of yeast cells to glucose limitation and for growth on carbon sources that are less preferred than glucose, but is also involved in responses to other environmental stresses. SNF1 regulates transcription of a large set of genes, modifies the activity of metabolic enzymes, and controls various nutrient-responsive cellular developmental processes. Like AMPK, SNF1 protein kinase is heterotrimeric. It is phosphorylated and activated by the upstream kinases Sak1, Tos3, and Elm1 and is inactivated by the Reg1-Glc7 protein phosphatase 1. Further regulation of SNF1 is achieved through autoinhibition and through control of its subcellular localization. Here we review the current understanding of SNF1 protein kinase pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other yeasts. PMID:17981722

  11. Lipids and cell death in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Tobias; Büttner, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding lipid-induced malfunction represents a major challenge of today's biomedical research. The connection of lipids to cellular and organ dysfunction, cell death, and disease (often referred to as lipotoxicity) is more complex than the sole lipotoxic effects of excess free fatty acids and requires genetically tractable model systems for mechanistic investigation. We herein summarize recent advances in the field of lipid-induced toxicity that employ the established model system for cell death and aging research of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies in yeast have shed light on various aspects of lipotoxicity, including free fatty acid toxicity, sphingolipid-modulated cell death as well as the involvement of cardiolipin and lipid peroxidation in the mitochondrial pathways of apoptosis. Regimens used range from exogenously applied lipids, genetic modulation of lipolysis and triacylglyceride synthesis, variations in sphingolipid/ceramide metabolism as well as changes in peroxisome function by either genetic or pharmacological means. In future, the yeast model of programmed cell death will further contribute to the clarification of crucial questions of lipid-associated malfunction. PMID:24119111

  12. Functional artificial free-standing yeast biofilms.

    PubMed

    Konnova, Svetlana A; Kahraman, Mehmet; Zamaleeva, Alsu I; Culha, Mustafa; Paunov, Vesselin N; Fakhrullin, Rawil F

    2011-12-01

    Here we report fabrication of artificial free-standing yeast biofilms built using sacrificial calcium carbonate-coated templates and layer-by-layer assembly of extracellular matrix-mimicking polyelectrolyte multilayers. The free-standing biofilms are freely floating multilayered films of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes and live cells incorporated in the polyelectrolyte layers. Such biofilms were initially formed on glass substrates of circular and ribbon-like shapes coated with thin layers of calcium carbonate microparticles. The templates were then coated with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes to produce a supporting multilayered thin film. Then the yeast alone or mixed with various micro- and nanoparticle inclusions was deposited onto the multilayer composite films and further coated with outer polyelectrolyte multilayers. To detach the biofilms from the glass substrates the calcium carbonate layer was chemically dissolved yielding free-standing composite biofilms. These artificial biofilms to a certain degree mimic the primitive multicellular and colonial species. We have demonstrated the added functionality of the free-standing artificial biofilms containing magnetic, latex and silver micro- and nanoparticles. We have also developed "symbiotic" multicellular biofilms containing yeast and bacteria. This approach for fabrication of free-standing artificial biofilms can be potentially helpful in development of artificial colonial microorganisms composed of several different unicellular species and an important tool for growing cell cultures free of supporting substrates. PMID:21855301

  13. Replication forks pause at yeast centromeres.

    PubMed Central

    Greenfeder, S A; Newlon, C S

    1992-01-01

    The 120 bp of yeast centromeric DNA is tightly complexed with protein to form a nuclease-resistant core structure 200 to 240 bp in size. We have used two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis to analyze the replication of the chromosomal copies of yeast CEN1, CEN3, and CEN4 and determine the fate of replication forks that encounter the protein-DNA complex at the centromere. We have shown that replication fork pause sites are coincident with each of these centromeres and therefore probably with all yeast centromeres. We have analyzed the replication of plasmids containing mutant derivatives of CEN3 to determine whether the replication fork pause site is a result of an unusual structure adopted by centromere DNA or a result of the protein-DNA complex formed at the centromere. The mutant centromere derivatives varied in function as well as the ability to form the nuclease-resistant core structure. The data obtained from analysis of these derivatives indicate that the ability to cause replication forks to pause correlates with the ability to form the nuclease-resistant core structure and not with the presence or absence of a particular DNA sequence. Our findings further suggest that the centromere protein-DNA complex is present during S phase when replication forks encounter the centromere and therefore may be present throughout the cell cycle. Images PMID:1508202

  14. Yeast glycosylation mutants are sensitive to aminoglycosides.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, N

    1995-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are a therapeutically important class of antibiotics that inhibit bacterial protein synthesis and a number of viral and eukaryotic functions by blocking RNA-protein interactions. Vanadate-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with defects in Golgi-specific glycosylation processes exhibit growth sensitivity to hygromycin B, an aminoglycoside [Ballou, L., Hitzeman, R. A., Lewis, M. S. & Ballou, C. E. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88, 3209-3212]. Here, evidence is presented that glycosylation is, in and of itself, a key factor mediating aminoglycoside sensitivity in yeast. Examination of mutants with a wide range of glycosylation abnormalities reveals that all are sensitive to aminoglycosides. This effect is specific to aminoglycosides and not merely a consequence of increased permeability of the yeast mutants to drugs. Furthermore, inhibition of glycosylation in wild-type cells leads to a marked increase in their sensitivity to aminoglycosides. These results establish that a defect in glycosylation is sufficient to render yeast cells susceptible to these clinically important drugs. Further, they suggest that a molecule which prevents the uptake or mediates removal of aminoglycosides requires glycosylation for its activity. Perhaps more importantly, this finding on drug sensitivity provides the most powerful screen to date to identify mutants and thereby to isolate genes involved in all aspects of N-linked glycosylation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7877969

  15. Measuring Chromatin Structure in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Belton, Jon-Matthew; Dekker, Job

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome conformation capture (3C) has revolutionized the ways in which the conformation of chromatin and its relationship to other molecular functions can be studied. 3C-based techniques are used to determine the spatial arrangement of chromosomes in organisms ranging from bacteria to humans. In particular, they can be applied to the study of chromosome folding and organization in model organisms with small genomes and for which powerful genetic tools exist, such as budding yeast. Studies in yeast allow the mechanisms that establish or maintain chromatin structure to be analyzed at very high resolution with relatively low cost, and further our understanding of these fundamental processes in higher eukaryotes as well. Here we provide an overview of chromatin structure and introduce methods for performing 3C, with a focus on studies in budding yeast. Variations of the basic 3C approach (e.g., 3C-PCR, 5C, and Hi-C) can be used according to the scope and goals of a given experiment. PMID:26134912

  16. Strategies for identifying new prions in yeast

    PubMed Central

    MacLea, Kyle S

    2011-01-01

    The unexpected discovery of two prions, [URE3] and [PSI+], in Saccharomyces cerevisiae led to questions about how many other proteins could undergo similar prion-based structural conversions. However, [URE3] and [PSI+] were discovered by serendipity in genetic screens. Cataloging the full range of prions in yeast or in other organisms will therefore require more systematic search methods. Taking advantage of some of the unique features of prions, various researchers have developed bioinformatic and experimental methods for identifying novel prion proteins. These methods have generated long lists of prion candidates. The systematic testing of some of these prion candidates has led to notable successes; however, even in yeast, where rapid growth rate and ease of genetic manipulation aid in testing for prion activity, such candidate testing is laborious. Development of better methods to winnow the field of prion candidates will greatly aid in the discovery of new prions, both in yeast and in other organisms, and help us to better understand the role of prions in biology. PMID:22052351

  17. A microfluidic synchronizer for fission yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Luo, Chunxiong; Ouyang, Qi

    2013-10-21

    Among all the cell cycle synchronization technologies, the baby machine may be considered as the most artifact-free method. A baby machine incubates "mother cells" under normal conditions and collects their "babies", producing cell cultures that are similar not only in cell cycle phase but also in age. Unlike many other synchronization methods, no cell-cycle-blocking agent or metabolic stress is introduced in this method. Several macroscale and microfluidic baby machines have been developed for producing synchronized cell colonies. However, for rod-shaped cells like fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), it is still a challenge to immobilize only the mother cells in a microfluidic device. Here we presented a new baby machine suitable for fission yeast. The device is fixed one end of the cell and releases the free-end daughter cell every time the cell finishes cytokinesis. A variety of structures for cell immobilization were attempted to find the optimal design. For the convenience of collection and further assay, we integrated into our baby machine chip a cell screener, which exploited the deformation of polymer material to switch between opening and closing states. Synchronous populations of fission yeast cells were produced with this device, its working detail was analyzed and performance was evaluated. The device provides a new on-chip tool for cell biology studies. PMID:23966136

  18. Engineered yeast for enhanced CO2 mineralization†

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Roberto; Carnelli, Lino; Simon, Anna; Kao, Albert; Monforte, Alessandra d’Arminio; Riccò, Moreno; Bianchi, Daniele; Belcher, Angela

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a biologically catalyzed CO2 mineralization process for the capture of CO2 from point sources was designed, constructed at a laboratory scale, and, using standard chemical process scale-up protocols, was modeled and evaluated at an industrial scale. A yeast display system in Saccharomyces cerevisae was used to screen several carbonic anhydrase isoforms and mineralization peptides for their impact on CO2 hydration, CaCO3 mineralization, and particle settling rate. Enhanced rates for each of these steps in the CaCO3 mineralization process were confirmed using quantitative techniques in lab-scale measurements. The effect of these enhanced rates on the CO2 capture cost in an industrial scale CO2 mineralization process using coal fly ash as the CaO source was evaluated. The model predicts a process using bCA2- yeast and fly ash is ~10% more cost effective per ton of CO2 captured than a process with no biological molecules, a savings not realized by wild-type yeast and high-temperature stable recombinant CA2 alone or in combination. The levelized cost of electricity for a power plant using this process was calculated and scenarios in which this process compares favorably to CO2 capture by MEA absorption process are presented. PMID:25289021

  19. On the modeling of endocytosis in yeast

    E-print Network

    T. Zhang; R. Sknepnek; M. J. Bowick; J. M. Schwarz

    2014-12-04

    The cell membrane deforms during endocytosis to surround extracellular material and draw it into the cell. Experiments on endocytosis in yeast all agree that (i) actin polymerizes into a network of filaments exerting active forces on the membrane to deform it and (ii) the large scale membrane deformation is tubular in shape. There are three competing proposals, in contrast, for precisely how the actin filament network organizes itself to drive the deformation. We use variational approaches and numerical simulations to address this competition by analyzing a meso-scale model of actin-mediated endocytosis in yeast. The meso-scale model breaks up the invagination process into three stages: (i) initiation, where clathrin interacts with the membrane via adaptor proteins, (ii) elongation, where the membrane is then further deformed by polymerizing actin filaments, followed by (iii) pinch-off. Our results suggest that the pinch-off mechanism may be assisted by a pearling-like instability. We rule out two of the three competing proposals for the organization of the actin filament network during the elongation stage. These two proposals could possibly be important in the pinch-off stage, however, where additional actin polymerization helps break off the vesicle. Implications and comparisons with earlier modeling of endocytosis in yeast are discussed.

  20. Sugarcane bagasse hydrolysis using yeast cellulolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Souza, Angelica Cristina de; Carvalho, Fernanda Paula; Silva e Batista, Cristina Ferreira; Schwan, Rosane Freitas; Dias, Disney Ribeiro

    2013-10-28

    Ethanol fuel production from lignocellulosic biomass is emerging as one of the most important technologies for sustainable development. To use this biomass, it is necessary to circumvent the physical and chemical barriers presented by the cohesive combination of the main biomass components, which hinders the hydrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose into fermentable sugars. This study evaluated the hydrolytic capacity of enzymes produced by yeasts, isolated from the soils of the Brazilian Cerrado biome (savannah) and the Amazon region, on sugarcane bagasse pre-treated with H2SO4. Among the 103 and 214 yeast isolates from the Minas Gerais Cerrado and the Amazon regions, 18 (17.47%) and 11 (5.14%) isolates, respectively, were cellulase-producing. Cryptococcus laurentii was prevalent and produced significant ?- glucosidase levels, which were higher than the endo- and exoglucanase activities. In natura sugarcane bagasse was pre-treated with 2% H2SO4 for 30 min at 150oC. Subsequently, the obtained fibrous residue was subjected to hydrolysis using the Cryptococcus laurentii yeast enzyme extract for 72 h. This enzyme extract promoted the conversion of approximately 32% of the cellulose, of which 2.4% was glucose, after the enzymatic hydrolysis reaction, suggesting that C. laurentii is a good ?-glucosidase producer. The results presented in this study highlight the importance of isolating microbial strains that produce enzymes of biotechnological interest, given their extensive application in biofuel production. PMID:23851270

  1. Studies on methanol - oxidizing yeast. III. Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Volfová, O

    1975-01-01

    Oxidation of methanol, formaldehyde and formic acid was studied in cells and cell-free extract of the yeast Candida boidinii No. 11Bh. Methanol oxidase, an enzyme oxidizing methanol to formaldehyde, was formed inducibly after the addition of methanol to yeast cells. The oxidation of methanol by cell-free extract was dependent on the presence of oxygen and independent of any addition of nicotine-amide nucleotides. Temperature optimum for the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde was 35 degrees C, pH optimum was 8.5. The Km for methanol was 0.8mM. The cell-free extract exhibited a broad substrate specificity towards primary alcohols (C1--C6). The activity of methanol oxidase was not inhibited by 1mM KCN, EDTA or monoiodoacetic acid. The strongest inhibitory action was exerted by p-chloromercuribenzoate. Both the cells and the cell-free extract contained catalase which participated in the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde; the enzyme was constitutively formed by the yeast. The pH optimum for the degradation of H2O2 was in the same range as the optimum for methanol oxidation, viz. at 8.5. Catalase was more resistant to high pH than methanol oxidase. The cell-free extract contained also GSH-dependent NAD-formaldehyde dehydrogenase with Km = 0.29mM and NAD-formate dehydrogenase with Km = 55mM. PMID:240764

  2. Mechanisms of autophagy and pexophagy in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Sibirny, A A

    2011-12-01

    Autophagy is a process of recycling of the intracellular constituents using vacuoles (lysosomes). General autophagy occurs due to involvement of highly conservative components found in all eukaryotes, from yeasts to higher plants and humans. Autophagy also could be a selective process and be involved in regulation of the cellular number of organelles, including that of peroxisomes. The process of specific autophagic peroxisome degradation is known as pexophagy. Yeasts appear to be convenient model for studying molecular mechanisms of pexophagy, and most known ATG genes (from the term AuTophaGy) were identified in yeast studies. This review examines characteristics of general autophagy, other types of autophagy as well as pexophagy, in particular, functions of Atg proteins in general autophagy and in macro- and micropexophagy. Special attention is given to mechanisms of phagophore assembly, the role of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate in pexophagy, the role of peroxines (proteins involved in peroxisome biogenesis) in pexophagy, as well as properties of Atg proteins specifically involved in micropexophagy. PMID:22150273

  3. Yeast Genomics for Bread, Beer, Biology, Bucks and Breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakharkar, Kishore R.; Sakharkar, Meena K.

    The rapid advances and scale up of projects in DNA sequencing dur ing the past two decades have produced complete genome sequences of several eukaryotic species. The versatile genetic malleability of the yeast, and the high degree of conservation between its cellular processes and those of human cells have made it a model of choice for pioneering research in molecular and cell biology. The complete sequence of yeast genome has proven to be extremely useful as a reference towards the sequences of human and for providing systems to explore key gene functions. Yeast has been a ‘legendary model’ for new technologies and gaining new biological insights into basic biological sciences and biotechnology. This chapter describes the awesome power of yeast genetics, genomics and proteomics in understanding of biological function. The applications of yeast as a screening tool to the field of drug discovery and development are highlighted and the traditional importance of yeast for bakers and brewers is discussed.

  4. A new methodology to obtain wine yeast strains overproducing mannoproteins.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Manuel; Gonzalez-Ramos, Daniel; Tabera, Laura; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2010-04-30

    Yeast mannoproteins are highly glycosylated proteins that are covalently bound to the beta-1,3-glucan present in the yeast cell wall. Among their outstanding enological properties, yeast mannoproteins contribute to several aspects of wine quality by protecting against protein haze, reducing astringency, retaining aroma compounds and stimulating growth of lactic-acid bacteria. The development of a non-recombinant method to obtain enological yeast strains overproducing mannoproteins would therefore be very useful. Our previous experience on the genetic determinants of the release of these molecules by Saccharomyces cerevisiae has allowed us to propose a new methodology to isolate and characterize wine yeast that overproduce mannoproteins. The described methodology is based on the resistance of the killer 9 toxin produced by Williopsis saturnus, a feature linked to an altered biogenesis of the yeast cell wall. PMID:20219260

  5. Isolation and characterization of ethanol tolerant yeast strains

    PubMed Central

    Tikka, Chiranjeevi; Osuru, Hari Prasad; Atluri, Navya; Raghavulu, Praveen Chakravarthi Veera; yellapu, Nanda Kumar; Mannur, Ismail Shaik; Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Aluru, Sudheer; K, Narasimha Varma; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2013-01-01

    Yeast strains are commonly associated with sugar rich environments. Various fruit samples were selected as source for isolating yeast cells. The isolated cultures were identified at Genus level by colony morphology, biochemical characteristics and cell morphological characters. An attempt has been made to check the viability of yeast cells under different concentrations of ethanol. Ethanol tolerance of each strain was studied by allowing the yeast to grow in liquid YEPD (Yeast Extract Peptone Dextrose) medium having different concentrations of ethanol. A total of fifteen yeast strains isolated from different samples were used for the study. Seven strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae obtained from different fruit sources were screened for ethanol tolerance. The results obtained in this study show a range of tolerance levels between 7%-12% in all the stains. Further, the cluster analysis based on 22 RAPD (Random Amplified polymorphic DNA) bands revealed polymorphisms in these seven Saccharomyces strains. PMID:23750092

  6. Taming wild yeast: potential of conventional and nonconventional yeasts in industrial fermentations.

    PubMed

    Steensels, Jan; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are the main driving force behind several industrial food fermentation processes, including the production of beer, wine, sake, bread, and chocolate. Historically, these processes developed from uncontrolled, spontaneous fermentation reactions that rely on a complex mixture of microbes present in the environment. Because such spontaneous processes are generally inconsistent and inefficient and often lead to the formation of off-flavors, most of today's industrial production utilizes defined starter cultures, often consisting of a specific domesticated strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, or S. pastorianus. Although this practice greatly improved process consistency, efficiency, and overall quality, it also limited the sensorial complexity of the end product. In this review, we discuss how Saccharomyces yeasts were domesticated to become the main workhorse of food fermentations, and we investigate the potential and selection of nonconventional yeasts that are often found in spontaneous fermentations, such as Brettanomyces, Hanseniaspora, and Pichia spp. PMID:24773331

  7. YeastMed: an XML-Based System for Biological Data Integration of Yeast

    E-print Network

    Briache, Abdelaali; Kerzazi, Amine; Navas-Delgado, Ismael; Montes, Jose F Aldana; Hassani, Badr D Rossi; Lairini, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    A key goal of bioinformatics is to create database systems and software platforms capable of storing and analysing large sets of biological data. Hundreds of biological databases are now available and provide access to huge amount of biological data. SGD, Yeastract, CYGD-MIPS, BioGrid and PhosphoGrid are five of the most visited databases by the yeast community. These sources provide complementary data on biological entities. Biologists are brought systematically to query these data sources in order to analyse the results of their experiments. Because of the heterogeneity of these sources, querying them separately and then manually combining the returned result is a complex and laborious task. To provide transparent and simultaneous access to these sources, we have developed a mediator-based system called YeastMed. In this paper, we present YeastMed focusing on its architecture.

  8. Brewer’s yeast: genetic structure and targets for improvement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jørgen Hansen; Morten Kielland-Brandt

    The art of beer brewing is ancient, and Saccharomyces yeast probably played a pivotal role from the beginning. Production of beer from the barley grain consists of multiple steps,\\u000a of which only the last few involve the yeast. Nevertheless, the behaviour of the yeast is highly decisive for both speed and\\u000a outcome of the whole process, and to a large

  9. Genomic stability disorders: from budding yeast to humans.

    PubMed

    Hoch, Nicolas Carlos; Lai, Xianning; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology are extensively studied in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genome maintenance pathways are highly conserved and research into a number of human genetic disorders with increased genome instability and cancer predisposition have benefited greatly from studies in budding yeast. Here, we present some of the examples where yeast research into DNA damage responses and telomere maintenance pathways paved the way to understanding these processes, and their involvement in selected human diseases. PMID:23277058

  10. Prevalence of Candida dubliniensis Isolates in a Yeast Stock Collection

    Microsoft Academic Search

    FRANK C. ODDS; LUC VAN NUFFEL; GERY DAMS

    1998-01-01

    To establish the historical prevalence of the novel yeast species Candida dubliniensis, a survey of 2,589 yeasts originally identified as Candida albicans and maintained in a stock collection dating back to the early 1970s was undertaken. A total of 590 yeasts, including 93 (18.5%) b-glucosidase-negative isolates among 502 isolates that showed abnormal colony colors on a differential chromogenic agar and

  11. Media for preservative resistant yeasts: a collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Hocking, A D

    1996-04-01

    An international collaborative study was carried out to determine the most effective medium for selective isolation and enumeration of preservative resistant yeasts. Such a medium should prevent the growth of other yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are tolerant to lower levels of commonly used food preservatives, and sensitive yeasts such as Rhodotorula species. The study compared two non-selective media that are in common use for cultivation of yeasts from foods, Malt Extract agar (MEA) and Tryptone Glucose Yeast extract agar (TGY) with media made selective for preservative resistant yeasts by addition of 0.5% acetic acid to these two basal media (MEAA and TGYA). A fifth medium, Zygosaccharomyces bailii medium (ZBM) was also included in the study. These media were compared for their efficacy in selective isolation and enumeration of the preservative resistant yeasts Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Pichia membranaefaciens. MEA and TGY without acetic acid were used as control, non-selective media, and Rhodotorula glutinis was the preservative sensitive control culture. Seven laboratories in six countries took part in the study. Of the non-selective media, TGY generally gave the highest counts, and TGY amended with 0.5% acetic acid (TGYA) was the best medium for recovery of all three preservative-resistant yeasts. ZBM was found to be selective for Z. bailii, but counts of this yeast on ZBM were significantly lower than on TGYA. R. glutinis did not grow on any of the selective media. PMID:8796419

  12. Effect of fungicides on epiphytic yeasts associated with strawberry

    PubMed Central

    Debode, Jane; Van Hemelrijck, Wendy; Creemers, Piet; Maes, Martine

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effect of two commonly used fungicides on the epiphytic yeast community of strawberry. Greenhouse and field experiments were conducted applying Switch (cyprodinil plus fludioxonil) or Signum (boscalid plus pyraclostrobin) to strawberry plants. Yeasts on leaves and fruits were assessed on treated and untreated plants at several time points via plating and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. The yeast counts on plates of the treated plants were similar to the control plants. Unripe fruits had 10 times larger yeast concentrations than ripe fruits or leaves. Some dominant yeast types were isolated and in vitro tests showed that they were at least 10 times less sensitive to Switch and Signum as compared with two important fungal strawberry pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum acutatum, which are the targets for the fungicide control. DGGE analysis showed that the applied fungicides had no effect on the composition of the yeast communities, while the growing system, strawberry tissue, and sampling time did affect the yeast communities. The yeast species most commonly identified were Cryptococcus, Rhodotorula, and Sporobolomyces. These results point toward the potential applicability of natural occurring yeast antagonists into an integrated disease control strategy for strawberry diseases.

  13. Production of d-Mannitol and Glycerol by Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    1968-01-01

    D-Mannitol has not so far been known as a major product of sugar metabolism by yeasts. Three yeast strains, a newly isolated yeast from soy-sauce mash, Torulopsis versatilis, and T. anomala, were found to be good mannitol producers. Under optimal conditions, the isolate produced mannitol at good yield of 30% of the sugar consumed. Glucose, fructose, mannose, galactose, maltose, glycerol, and xylitol were suitable substrates for mannitol formation. High concentrations of yeast extract, Casamino Acids, NaCl, and KCl in media affected significantly the mannitol yield, whereas high levels of inorganic phosphate did not show any detrimental effect. PMID:5749751

  14. A Photometer for Measuring Population Growth in Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatina, Robert; Hartley, Tamela; Thomas, Danita

    1999-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, portable photometer designed specifically for estimating population sizes in yeast cultures. Suggests activities for use with the photometer. (WRM)

  15. Cytokinesis Depends on the Motor Domains of Myosin-II in Fission Yeast but Not in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Matthew; Laves, Ellen; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2005-01-01

    Budding yeast possesses one myosin-II, Myo1p, whereas fission yeast has two, Myo2p and Myp2p, all of which contribute to cytokinesis. We find that chimeras consisting of Myo2p or Myp2p motor domains fused to the tail of Myo1p are fully functional in supporting budding yeast cytokinesis. Remarkably, the tail alone of budding yeast Myo1p localizes to the contractile ring, supporting both its constriction and cytokinesis. In contrast, fission yeast Myo2p and Myp2p require both the catalytic head domain as well as tail domains for function, with the tails providing distinct functions (Bezanilla and Pollard, 2000). Myo1p is the first example of a myosin whose cellular function does not require a catalytic motor domain revealing a novel mechanism of action for budding yeast myosin-II independent of actin binding and ATPase activity. PMID:16148042

  16. A novel ascosporogenous yeast species, Zygosaccharomyces siamensis , and the sugar tolerant yeasts associated with raw honey collected in Thailand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sujinan Saksinchai; Motofumi Suzuki; Panuwan Chantawannakul; Moriya Ohkuma; Saisamorn Lumyong

    Diversity of yeasts in association with bees and their food sources has been explored during the last decade. In Thailand,\\u000a there has been no study of yeast identification in honey and bees. Hence, a total of 186 yeast strains were isolated from\\u000a 37 honey samples of 12 different bee species. On the basis of morphological and physiological characteristics, 55 representative

  17. Genome-wide analysis of microRNAs in rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis L.) using high throughput sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lertpanyasampatha, Manassawe; Gao, Lei; Kongsawadworakul, Panida; Viboonjun, Unchera; Chrestin, Hervé; Liu, Renyi

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNAs with essential roles in gene regulation in various organisms including higher plants. In contrast to the vast information on miRNAs from many economically important plants, almost nothing has been reported on the identification or analysis of miRNAs from rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis L.), the most important natural rubber-producing crop. To identify miRNAs and their target genes in rubber tree, high throughput sequencing combined with a computational approach was performed. Four small RNA libraries were constructed for deep sequencing from mature and young leaves of two rubber tree clones, PB 260 and PB 217, which provide high and low latex yield, respectively. 115 miRNAs belonging to 56 known miRNA families were identified, and northern hybridization validated miRNA expression and revealed developmental stage-dependent and clone-specific expression for some miRNAs. We took advantage of the newly released rubber tree genome assembly and predicted 20 novel miRNAs. Further computational analysis uncovered potential targets of the known and novel miRNAs. Predicted target genes included not only transcription factors but also genes involved in various biological processes including stress responses, primary and secondary metabolism, and signal transduction. In particular, genes with roles in rubber biosynthesis are predicted targets of miRNAs. This study provides a basic catalog of miRNAs and their targets in rubber tree to facilitate future improvement and exploitation of rubber tree. PMID:22407387

  18. Screening of bacterial biocontrols against sapstain fungus (Lasiodiplodia theobromae Pat.) of rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis Muell.Arg.).

    PubMed

    Sajitha, K L; Maria Florence, E J; Dev, Suma Arun

    2014-09-01

    Diverse bacterial biocontrol agents from various sources of aerobic composts against the sapstain fungus Lasiodiplodia theobromae in rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis) were isolated, screened and identified by various morphological, biochemical and molecular techniques. The inhibitory effect of seventeen bacterial isolates was examined and seven exhibited inhibition towards the sapstain fungus. Among the seven antagonists, six were conclusively identified as Bacillus subtilis and one as Paenibacillus polymyxa using 16S rRNA-encoding gene sequencing. This is the first report on the occurrence of P. polymyxa, a potent biofertilizer and antagonist in vermicompost. HiCrome Bacillus agar was identified as an effective medium for differentiation of B. subtilis from other Bacillus species. The present work demonstrates the efficacy of the antagonistic property of B. subtilis strains against rubberwood sapstain fungus. Culture-based antagonistic inhibition displayed by B. subtilis can be extended to cater to the biocontrol requirements of wood-based industries against the stain fungus. The study showed the utility of an integrated approach, employing morphological, biochemical and molecular tools for conclusive identification of several bacterial isolates present in aerobic composts from diverse sources. PMID:25049165

  19. Identification of fluorinases from Streptomyces sp MA37, Norcardia brasiliensis, and Actinoplanes sp N902-109 by genome mining.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hai; Ma, Long; Bandaranayaka, Nouchali; Qin, Zhiwei; Mann, Greg; Kyeremeh, Kwaku; Yu, Yi; Shepherd, Thomas; Naismith, James H; O'Hagan, David

    2014-02-10

    The fluorinase is an enzyme that catalyses the combination of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) and a fluoride ion to generate 5'-fluorodeoxy adenosine (FDA) and L-methionine through a nucleophilic substitution reaction with a fluoride ion as the nucleophile. It is the only native fluorination enzyme that has been characterised. The fluorinase was isolated in 2002 from Streptomyces cattleya, and, to date, this has been the only source of the fluorinase enzyme. Herein, we report three new fluorinase isolates that have been identified by genome mining. The novel fluorinases from Streptomyces sp. MA37, Nocardia brasiliensis, and an Actinoplanes sp. have high homology (80-87 % identity) to the original S. cattleya enzyme. They all possess a characteristic 21-residue loop. The three newly identified genes were overexpressed in E. coli and shown to be fluorination enzymes. An X-ray crystallographic study of the Streptomyces sp. MA37 enzyme demonstrated that it is almost identical in structure to the original fluorinase. Culturing of the Streptomyces sp. MA37 strain demonstrated that it not only also elaborates the fluorometabolites, fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine, similar to S. cattleya, but this strain also produces a range of unidentified fluorometabolites. These are the first new fluorinases to be reported since the first isolate, over a decade ago, and their identification extends the range of fluorination genes available for fluorination biotechnology. PMID:24449539

  20. In vivo efficacy of PF1022A and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists alone and in combination against Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Kulke, Daniel; Krücken, Jürgen; Harder, Achim; Krebber, Ralph; Fraatz, Kristine; Mehlhorn, Heinz; VON Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2013-09-01

    The cyclooctadepsipeptide PF1022A and the aminophenylamidines amidantel, deacylated amidantel (dAMD) and tribendimidine were tested as examples for drug classes potentially interesting for development as anthelmintics against human helminthiases. These compounds and levamisole were tested alone and in combination to determine their efficacy against the rat hookworm Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. After three oral treatments, intestinal worms were counted. Drug effects on parasite morphology were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Plasma pharmacokinetics were determined for tribendimidine and dAMD. All drugs reduced worm burden in a dose-dependent manner, however amidantel was significantly less active than the other aminophenylamidines. Combinations of tribendimidine and dAMD with levamisole or PF1022A at suboptimal doses revealed additive effects. While PF1022A caused virtually no changes in morphology, levamisole, dAMD and tribendimidine caused severe contraction, particularly in the hind body region. Worms exposed to combinations of PF1022A and aminophenylamidines were indistinguishable from worms exposed only to aminophenylamidines. After oral treatment with tribendimidine, only the active metabolite dAMD was detectable in plasma and concentrations were not significantly different for oral treatment with dAMD. The results support further evaluation of cyclooctadepsipeptides alone and in combination with cholinergic drugs to improve efficacy. Combining these with registered drugs may help to prevent development of resistance. PMID:23742764

  1. Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of Nocardia brasiliensis HUJEG-1 Reveals a Saprobic Lifestyle and the Genes Needed for Human Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Elizondo-Gonzalez, Ramiro; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is an important etiologic agent of mycetoma. These bacteria live as a saprobe in soil or organic material and enter the tissue via minor trauma. Mycetoma is characterized by tumefaction and the production of fistula and abscesses, with no spontaneous cure. By using mass sequencing, we determined the complete genomic nucleotide sequence of the bacteria. According to our data, the genome is a circular chromosome 9,436,348-bp long with 68% G+C content that encodes 8,414 proteins. We observed orthologs for virulence factors, a higher number of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and catabolism, and gene clusters for the synthesis of bioactive compounds, such as antibiotics, terpenes, and polyketides. An in silico analysis of the sequence supports the conclusion that the bacteria acquired diverse genes by horizontal transfer from other soil bacteria, even from eukaryotic organisms. The genome composition reflects the evolution of bacteria via the acquisition of a large amount of DNA, which allows it to survive in new ecological niches, including humans. PMID:23755230

  2. Intestinal mucosal mast cells from rats infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis contain protease-resistant chondroitin sulfate di-B proteoglycans

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.L.; Lee, T.D.G.; Seldin, D.C.; Austen, K.F.; Befus, A.D.; Bienenstock, J.

    1986-07-01

    Rats infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis were injected i.p. with 2 mCi of (/sup 35/S) sulfate on days 13, 15, 17, and 19 after infection. The intestines were removed from animals on day 20 or 21 after infection, the intestinal cells were obtained by collagenase treatment and mechanical dispersion of the tissue, and the /sup 35/S-labeled mucosal mast cells (MMC) were enriched to 60 to 65% purity by Percoll centrifugation. The isolated proteoglycans were of approx. 150,000 m.w., were resistant to pronase degradation, and contained highly sulfated chondroitin sulfate side chains. The presence in normal mammalian cells of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that contain a high percentage of the unusual disulfated di-B disaccharide has not been previously reported. The rat intestinal MMC proteoglycans are the first chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that have been isolated from an enriched populations of normal mast cells. They are homologous to the chondroitin sulfate-rich proteoglycans of the transformed rat basophilic leumekia-1 cell and the cultured interleukin 3-dependent mouse bone marrow-derived mast cell, in that these chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans are all highly sulfated, protease-resistant proteoglycans.

  3. Water quality assessment of the Tubarão River through chemical analysis and biomarkers in the Neotropical fish Geophagus brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Osório, Flávio Henrique Tincani; Silva, Luis Felipe Oliveira; Piancini, Laercio Dante Stein; Azevedo, Ana Carolina Barni; Liebel, Samuel; Yamamoto, Flavia Yoshie; Philippi, Vivian Prá; Oliveira, Marcos Leandro Silva; Ortolani-Machado, Claudia Feijó; Filipak Neto, Francisco; Cestari, Marta Margarete; da Silva de Assis, Helena Cristina; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Ciro Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The Tubarão River rises in Santa Catarina, Brazil, and has been historically affected by coal mining activities around its springhead. To evaluate its water conditions, an investigation regarding a possible decontamination gradient associated with the increased river flow toward the estuary, as well as the influence of seasonality over this gradient was performed through a series of biomarkers (vitellogenin, comet assay, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, gluthatione, gluthatione S-transferase, acetylcholinesterase, light microscopy in liver, and scanning electron microscopy in gills) and chemical analysis (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in bile and metal analysis in sediment) in the cichlid Geophagus brasiliensis. Two collections (summer and winter) were made in four distinct sites along the river, while sediments were sampled between those seasons. As expected, the contamination linked exclusively to mining activities was not observed, possibly due to punctual inputs of contaminants. The decontamination gradient was not observed, although seasonality seemed to have a critical role in the responses of biomarkers and availability of contaminants. In the summer, the fish presented higher histopathological damages and lower concentrations of PAHs, while in the winter they showed both higher genetic damage and accumulation of PAHs. The Tubarão suffers impacts from diverse activities, representing health risks for wild and human populations. PMID:23397177

  4. The antimicrobial activity of lapachol and its thiosemicarbazone and semicarbazone derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Marina Azevêdo; Johann, Susana; Lima, Luciana Alves Rodrigues dos Santos; Campos, Fernanda Fraga; Mendes, Isolda Castro; Beraldo, Heloisa; de Souza-Fagundes, Elaine Maria; Cisalpino, Patrícia Silva; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Alves, Tânia Maria de Almeida; de Sá, Nívea Pereira; Zani, Carlos Leomar

    2013-01-01

    Lapachol was chemically modified to obtain its thiosemicarbazone and semicarbazone derivatives. These compounds were tested for antimicrobial activity against several bacteria and fungi by the broth microdilution method. The thiosemicarbazone and semicarbazone derivatives of lapachol exhibited antimicrobial activity against the bacteria Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 0.05 and 0.10 µmol/mL, respectively. The thiosemicarbazone and semicarbazone derivatives were also active against the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus gattii (MICs of 0.10 and 0.20 µmol/mL, respectively). In addition, the lapachol thiosemicarbazone derivative was active against 11 clinical isolates of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, with MICs ranging from 0.01-0.10 µmol/mL. The lapachol-derived thiosemicarbazone was not cytotoxic to normal cells at the concentrations that were active against fungi and bacteria. We synthesised, for the first time, thiosemicarbazone and semicarbazone derivatives of lapachol. The MICs for the lapachol-derived thiosemicarbazone against S. aureus, E. faecalis, C. gattii and several isolates of P. brasiliensis indicated that this compound has the potential to be developed into novel drugs to treat infections caused these microbes. PMID:23778660

  5. Yeast and Mammalian Metallothioneins Functionally Substitute for Yeast Copper-Zinc Superoxide Dismutase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamai, Katherine T.; Gralla, Edith B.; Ellerby, Lisa M.; Valentine, Joan S.; Thiele, Dennis J.

    1993-09-01

    Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase catalyzes the disproportionation of superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide and dioxygen and is thought to play an important role in protecting cells from oxygen toxicity. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains lacking copper-zinc superoxide dismutase, which is encoded by the SOD1 gene, are sensitive to oxidative stress and exhibit a variety of growth defects including hypersensitivity to dioxygen and to superoxide-generating drugs such as paraquat. We have found that in addition to these known phenotypes, SOD1-deletion strains fail to grow on agar containing the respiratory carbon source lactate. We demonstrate here that expression of the yeast or monkey metallothionein proteins in the presence of copper suppresses the lactate growth defect and some other phenotypes associated with SOD1-deletion strains, indicating that copper metallothioneins substitute for copper-zinc superoxide dismutase in vivo to protect cells from oxygen toxicity. Consistent with these results, we show that yeast metallothionein mRNA levels are dramatically elevated under conditions of oxidative stress. Furthermore, in vitro assays demonstrate that yeast metallothionein, purified or from whole-cell extracts, exhibits copper-dependent antioxidant activity. Taken together, these data suggest that both yeast and mammalian metallothioneins may play a direct role in the cellular defense against oxidative stress by functioning as antioxidants.

  6. Genetically modified yeast species and fermentation processes using genetically modified yeast

    DOEpatents

    Rajgarhia, Vineet (Kingsport, TN); Koivuranta, Kari (Helsinki, FI); Penttila, Merja (Helsinki, FI); Ilmen, Marja (Helsinki, FI); Suominen, Pirkko (Maple Grove, MN); Aristidou, Aristos (Maple Grove, MN); Miller, Christopher Kenneth (Cottage Grove, MN); Olson, Stacey (St. Bonifacius, MN); Ruohonen, Laura (Helsinki, FI)

    2011-05-17

    Yeast cells are transformed with an exogenous xylose isomerase gene. Additional genetic modifications enhance the ability of the transformed cells to ferment xylose to ethanol or other desired fermentation products. Those modifications', include deletion of non-specific or specific aldose reductase gene(s), deletion of xylitol dehydrogenase gene(s) and/or overexpression of xylulokinase.

  7. Crystal structure of yeast Sco1

    SciTech Connect

    Abajian, Carnie; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (NWU)

    2010-03-05

    The Sco family of proteins are involved in the assembly of the dinuclear CuA site in cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal enzyme in aerobic respiration. These proteins, which are found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, are characterized by a conserved CXXXC sequence motif that binds copper ions and that has also been proposed to perform a thiol:disulfide oxidoreductase function. The crystal structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae apo Sco1 (apo-ySco1) and Sco1 in the presence of copper ions (Cu-ySco1) were determined to 1.8- and 2.3-{angstrom} resolutions, respectively. Yeast Sco1 exhibits a thioredoxin-like fold, similar to that observed for human Sco1 and a homolog from Bacillus subtilis. The Cu-ySco1 structure, obtained by soaking apo-ySco1 crystals in copper ions, reveals an unexpected copper-binding site involving Cys181 and Cys216, cysteine residues present in ySco1 but not in other homologs. The conserved CXXXC cysteines, Cys148 and Cys152, can undergo redox chemistry in the crystal. An essential histidine residue, His239, is located on a highly flexible loop, denoted the Sco loop, and can adopt positions proximal to both pairs of cysteines. Interactions between ySco1 and its partner proteins yeast Cox17 and yeast COX2 are likely to occur via complementary electrostatic surfaces. This high-resolution model of a eukaryotic Sco protein provides new insight into Sco copper binding and function.

  8. Studying Functions of All Yeast Genes Simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Eason, Robert G.; Poumand, Nader; Herman, Zelek S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Anthony Kevin; Jejelowo, Olufisayo

    2006-01-01

    A method of studying the functions of all the genes of a given species of microorganism simultaneously has been developed in experiments on Saccharomyces cerevisiae (commonly known as baker's or brewer's yeast). It is already known that many yeast genes perform functions similar to those of corresponding human genes; therefore, by facilitating understanding of yeast genes, the method may ultimately also contribute to the knowledge needed to treat some diseases in humans. Because of the complexity of the method and the highly specialized nature of the underlying knowledge, it is possible to give only a brief and sketchy summary here. The method involves the use of unique synthetic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences that are denoted as DNA bar codes because of their utility as molecular labels. The method also involves the disruption of gene functions through deletion of genes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a particularly powerful experimental system in that multiple deletion strains easily can be pooled for parallel growth assays. Individual deletion strains recently have been created for 5,918 open reading frames, representing nearly all of the estimated 6,000 genetic loci of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Tagging of each deletion strain with one or two unique 20-nucleotide sequences enables identification of genes affected by specific growth conditions, without prior knowledge of gene functions. Hybridization of bar-code DNA to oligonucleotide arrays can be used to measure the growth rate of each strain over several cell-division generations. The growth rate thus measured serves as an index of the fitness of the strain.

  9. Cell Polarization and Cytokinesis in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Erfei; Park, Hay-Oak

    2012-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division, which includes cell polarization and cytokinesis, is essential for generating cell diversity during development. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reproduces by asymmetric cell division, and has thus served as an attractive model for unraveling the general principles of eukaryotic cell polarization and cytokinesis. Polarity development requires G-protein signaling, cytoskeletal polarization, and exocytosis, whereas cytokinesis requires concerted actions of a contractile actomyosin ring and targeted membrane deposition. In this chapter, we discuss the mechanics and spatial control of polarity development and cytokinesis, emphasizing the key concepts, mechanisms, and emerging questions in the field. PMID:22701052

  10. Minimal nutritional requirements for immobilized yeast.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Dale, M C; Okos, M R

    1990-12-01

    The effect of reduced nutritional levels (particularly nitrogen source) for immobilized K. fragilis type yeast were studied using a trickle flow, "differential" plug flow type reactor with cells immobilized by adsorption onto an absorbant packing matrix. Minimizing nutrient levels in a feed stream to an immobilized cell reactor (ICR) might have the benefits of reducing cell growth and clogging problems in the ICR, reducing feed preparation costs, as well as reducing effluent disposal costs. In this study step changes in test feed medium nutrient compositions were introduced to the ICR, followed by a return to a basal medium. Gas evolution rates were monitored and logged on a continuous basis, and effluent cell density was used as an indicator of cell growth rate of the immobilized cell mass. Startup of the reactor using a YEP medium showed a rapid buildup of cells in the reactor during the initial 110 h operation. The population density then stabilized at 1.6 x 10(11) cells/g sponge. A defined medium containing a complex mix of essential nutrients with an inorganic nitrogen source (ammonium sulfate) was able to maintain 90% of the productivity in the ICR as compared to the YEP medium, but proved unable to promote growth of the immobilized cell mass during startup. Experiments on reduced ammonium sulfate in the defined medium, and reduced yeast extract and peptone in YEP medium indicated that stable productivity could be maintained for extended periods (80 h) in the complete absence of any nutrients besides a few salts (potassium phosphate and magnesium sulfate). It was found that productivity rates dropped by 35-65% from maximal values as nitrogenous nutrients were eliminated from the test mediums, while growth rates (as determined by shed cell density from the reactor) dropped by 75-95%. Thus, nutritional deficiencies largely decoupled growth and productivity of the immobilized yeast which suggests productivity is both growth- and non-growth-associated for the immobilized cells. A yeast extract concentration of 0.375 g/L with or without 1 g/L ammonium sulfate was determined to be the minimum level which gave a sustained increase in productivity rates as compared to the nutritionally deficient salt medium. This represents a 94% reduction in complex nitrogenous nutrient levels compared to standard YEP batch medium (3 g/L YE and 3.5 g/L peptone). PMID:18595037

  11. [Mechanisms of yeast resistance to environmental stress].

    PubMed

    Piecuch, Agata; Ob??k, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Changes in environmental conditions might be a stress factor for yeast cells. There are several mechanisms of stress tolerance, developed by the cell, which activate when the stress appears. Different transcription factors coordinate the expression of stress response genes. Msn2/4p regulate the expression of the general stress response. Heat shock defense involves heat shock proteins (Hsp), controlled by Hsf1p. Osmotic shock induces the MAP kinase cascade (HOG), whereas the oxidative stress response requires the YAP network. Fungicide resistance is mediated mainly by the activity of membrane transporters and changes in the structure of the plasma membrane.  PMID:23619223

  12. d-Arabinose Countertransport in Bakers' Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Peter O.

    1967-01-01

    The initial rate of the glucose-induced countertransport of d-arabinose was measured at several concentrations of extracellular glucose. These data permit the calculation of the intracellular concentration of free glucose, and, if the rate of glucose metabolism is known, the maximal rate of glucose transport can be estimated. Since the maximal transport rate remained essentially constant when the extracellular glucose concentration was increased from 2 to 100 mm, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that, during glucose metabolism, glucose is transported across the yeast cell membrane by a symmetrical carrier system which functions independently of metabolism. PMID:6025445

  13. [Prevalence of endodontic yeasts in periapical infections].

    PubMed

    Zbidi, N D; Zaki, A; Zouiten, S; Boughzala, A; Baccouche, C

    2005-06-01

    In literature, microbiology results of periapical lesions are limited. Only several types are frequently isolated in rebellious cases. These ones include Enterococcus Faecalis and Enterococcus gram. Recently, a gain of interest is focused on discussion concerning endodontic yeasts that is why we developed our research in this way. From the 81 cases of endodontic culture studied, 20% were positive isolating Candida in which 14% weren't C. albicans, for the rest we identify C. glabrata, C.sp., C. kefyr, C. kruseii. The predominance of Candida albicans was justified by their frequency as commensal oral flora, explaining someway the failure of some intracanal endodontic medication. PMID:16245760

  14. Dynamic modeling of yeast meiotic initiation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Meiosis is the sexual reproduction process common to eukaryotes. The diploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes meiosis in sporulation medium to form four haploid spores. Initiation of the process is tightly controlled by intricate networks of positive and negative feedback loops. Intriguingly, expression of early meiotic proteins occurs within a narrow time window. Further, sporulation efficiency is strikingly different for yeast strains with distinct mutations or genetic backgrounds. To investigate signal transduction pathways that regulate transient protein expression and sporulation efficiency, we develop a mathematical model using ordinary differential equations. The model describes early meiotic events, particularly feedback mechanisms at the system level and phosphorylation of signaling molecules for regulating protein activities. Results The mathematical model is capable of simulating the orderly and transient dynamics of meiotic proteins including Ime1, the master regulator of meiotic initiation, and Ime2, a kinase encoded by an early gene. The model is validated by quantitative sporulation phenotypes of single-gene knockouts. Thus, we can use the model to make novel predictions on the cooperation between proteins in the signaling pathway. Virtual perturbations on feedback loops suggest that both positive and negative feedback loops are required to terminate expression of early meiotic proteins. Bifurcation analyses on feedback loops indicate that multiple feedback loops are coordinated to modulate sporulation efficiency. In particular, positive auto-regulation of Ime2 produces a bistable system with a normal meiotic state and a more efficient meiotic state. Conclusions By systematically scanning through feedback loops in the mathematical model, we demonstrate that, in yeast, the decisions to terminate protein expression and to sporulate at different efficiencies stem from feedback signals toward the master regulator Ime1 and the early meiotic protein Ime2. We argue that the architecture of meiotic initiation pathway generates a robust mechanism that assures a rapid and complete transition into meiosis. This type of systems-level regulation is a commonly used mechanism controlling developmental programs in yeast and other organisms. Our mathematical model uncovers key regulations that can be manipulated to enhance sporulation efficiency, an important first step in the development of new strategies for producing gametes with high quality and quantity. PMID:23631506

  15. Zebrafish genomic library in yeast artificial chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, T P; Kaphingst, K; Akella, U; Haldi, M; Lander, E S; Fishman, M C

    1998-02-15

    We have constructed a zebrafish yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library using genomic DNA isolated from the inbred AB zebrafish strain. The average insert size is 470 kb, estimated from analysis of 155 random selected YACs. The library consists of 17,000 clones, providing about a 4.7-fold coverage of zebrafish genome. The YAC clones have been arrayed in individual wells of 96-well microplates and also pooled to permit rapid polymerase chain reaction screening of the entire library. We have also found that the YAC ends can be easily rescued and sequenced from pRML1/pRML2-based mini-YAC clones. PMID:9503028

  16. New insights into treating Parkinson's from yeast, stem cell experiments

    E-print Network

    Sabatini, David M.

    New insights into treating Parkinson's from yeast, stem cell experiments By Carolyn Y. Johnson cells created from Parkinson's disease patients' stem cells. The work, described in a pair of studies problems of Parkinson's disease may seem tenuous at best, the researchers engineered the yeast

  17. Description of new yeast species – is one strain enough?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The issue of description of new yeast species on the basis of a single strain is discussed. Single gene sequences, such as those from D1/D2 LSU rRNA, or sequences from ITS1/ITS2 are commonly used as the basis for recognizing new yeast species. Evidence is presented that hybrids and species with poly...

  18. ASCOMYCETOUS MITOSIS IN BASIDIOMYCETOUS YEASTS: ITS EVOLUTIONARY IMPLICATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In budding cells of ascomycetous yeasts, mitosis occurs in the parent, while in basidiomyceteous yeasts it occurs in the bud. However, in the basidiomycete Agaricostilbum pulcherrimum mitosis occurs in the parent and parent-bud junction. To test whether A. pulcherrimum has a novel mitotic pattern, i...

  19. Iron enriched yeast biomass – A promising mineral feed supplement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maja Paš; Barbara Piškur; Matevž Šuštari?; Peter Raspor

    2007-01-01

    Yeast biomass enriched with iron could represent a new and safer solution for prevention from anaemia development. Such an iron source is less toxic and has better absorbability in organisms. The purpose of our research was the determination of the most suitable iron source in the cultivation medium for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, regarding good growth and iron accumulation in

  20. Improving industrial yeast strains: exploiting natural and artificial diversity

    PubMed Central

    Steensels, Jan; Snoek, Tim; Meersman, Esther; Nicolino, Martina Picca; Voordeckers, Karin; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts have been used for thousands of years to make fermented foods and beverages, such as beer, wine, sake, and bread. However, the choice for a particular yeast strain or species for a specific industrial application is often based on historical, rather than scientific grounds. Moreover, new biotechnological yeast applications, such as the production of second-generation biofuels, confront yeast with environments and challenges that differ from those encountered in traditional food fermentations. Together, this implies that there are interesting opportunities to isolate or generate yeast variants that perform better than the currently used strains. Here, we discuss the different strategies of strain selection and improvement available for both conventional and nonconventional yeasts. Exploiting the existing natural diversity and using techniques such as mutagenesis, protoplast fusion, breeding, genome shuffling and directed evolution to generate artificial diversity, or the use of genetic modification strategies to alter traits in a more targeted way, have led to the selection of superior industrial yeasts. Furthermore, recent technological advances allowed the development of high-throughput techniques, such as ‘global transcription machinery engineering’ (gTME), to induce genetic variation, providing a new source of yeast genetic diversity. PMID:24724938

  1. Quantitative Analysis of the Effective Functional Structure in Yeast Glycolysis

    E-print Network

    Cortes, Jesus

    Quantitative Analysis of the Effective Functional Structure in Yeast Glycolysis Ildefonso M. De la glycolysis. Citation: De la Fuente IM, Cortes JM (2012) Quantitative Analysis of the Effective Functional Structure in Yeast Glycolysis. PLoS ONE 7(2): e30162. doi:10.1371/ journal.pone.0030162 Editor: Christos A

  2. The yeast flora of the coast redwood, Sequoia sempervirens.

    PubMed

    Middelhoven, W J

    2003-01-01

    Only four yeast species could be isolated from young and perannual shoots of the coast redwood tree, Sequoia sempervirens, and from soil beneath the trees, viz. both varieties of Debaryomyces hansenii, Trichosporon pullulans, T. porosum and an unidentified red basidiomycetous yeast. PMID:12879747

  3. The yeast flora of the coast redwood, Sequoia sempervirens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Middelhoven

    2003-01-01

    Only four yeast species could be isolated from young and perannual shoots of the coast redwood tree,Sequoia sempervirens, and from soil beneath the trees,viz. both varieties ofDebaryomyces hansenii, Trichosporon pullulans, T. porosum and an unidentified red basidiomycetous yeast.

  4. Telomere Regulation During the Cell Cycle in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Bettina A.; Chang, Ya-Ting; Nakamura, Toru M.

    2015-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has emerged as a useful model organism to study telomere maintenance mechanisms. In this chapter, we provide detailed protocols for quantitative ChIP and BrdU incorporation analyses to investigate how fission yeast telomeres are regulated during the cell cycle by utilizing cdc25-22 synchronized cell cultures. PMID:24906327

  5. Spray Drying of Extracts from Red Yeast Fermentation Broth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. C. C. Teixeira; G. A. Teixeira; L. A. P. Freitas

    2011-01-01

    Red yeast rice is a pigmented material that is traditionally used in Asia as a food colorant. In addition to food applications, red yeast rice is known in traditional Chinese medicine for its therapeutic actions. The aim of this work was to study the quality interactions during spray drying of extracts from the Monascus ruber van Tiegham fermentation broth. The

  6. Dual fluorochrome flow cytometric assessment of yeast viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel staining protocol is reported for the assessment of viability in yeast, specifically the biocontrol yeast, Pichia anomala. Employing both the red fluorescent membrane potential sensitive oxonol stain DiBAC4(5) (Bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)pentamethine oxonol), a structural analog of the ...

  7. Mechanical dispersion procedures improve the rehydration of active dry yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roberto Ferrarini; Enrico Bocca; Agostino Cavazza

    2007-01-01

    The process of reactivating the yeast preparation and inoculating it into the must constitutes a critical stage in the management of alcoholic fermentation.Various parameters condition the efficiency of active dry yeast (ADY) reactivation for oenological use: temperature, composition of the medium (concentration of sugar and assimilable nitrogen), the way of dispersion in water and associated hydration times.This paper reports the

  8. Formulation and Cost-Effective Drying of Probiotic Yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Varsha S. Joshi; Bhaskar N. Thorat

    2011-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii yeast is considered as a probiotic according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Like any other probiotic, Saccharomyces boulardii is available as a freeze-dried formulation. Although freeze drying is the most preferred method of preserving the microorganisms, the process is very expensive. The cost of capsules containing freeze-dried probiotic yeast is certainly out of reach of the underprivileged

  9. Metabolic acclimatization: preparing active dry yeast for fuel ethanol production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Bellissimi; W. M. Ingledew

    2005-01-01

    “Propagation” or “conditioning” of active dry yeast (ADY) for the production of fuel ethanol is thought to reduce lag times in fermentation and reduce overall fermentation times. The objectives of this study were to determine the optimal time that ADY should be conditioned prior to fermentation and to determine how well yeast and bacterial contaminants present in ADY are propagated.

  10. Vitality enhancement of the rehydrated active dry wine yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Rodríguez-Porrata; M. Novo; J. Guillamón; N. Rozès; A. Mas; R. Cordero Otero

    2008-01-01

    In winemaking, spontaneous grape must fermentations have been replaced by inoculation of commercial active dry wine yeast (ADWY). Yeast rehydration is the key to avoiding stuck and sluggish fermentations. Despite the importance of this step, not enough is known about what this process implies for winemaking as a whole or about what kind of practices could help to improve it.

  11. Medical significance of the so-called black yeasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Matsumoto; A. A. Padhye; L. Ajello

    1987-01-01

    Infections caused by the black yeasts (leveduras pretas) are reviewed with respect to their clinical manifestations, classification under the umbrella term, phaeohyphomycosis, and differentiation from chromoblastomycosis. Data on the prevalence of black yeasts submitted to a national reference diagnostic center are provided. Cases of phaeohyphomycosis caused by Aureobasidium pullulans, Exophiala jeanselmei, E. moniliae, E. spinifera, Phaeoannelomyces werneckii, Phaeosclera dematioirles, Sarcinomyces

  12. The protein kinases of budding yeast: six score and more

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tony Hunter; Gregory D. Plowman

    1997-01-01

    The completion of the budding yeast genome sequencing project has made it possible to determine not only the total number of genes, but also the exact number of genes of a particular type1–3. As a consequence, we now know exactly how many protein kinases are encoded by the yeast genome, a number of considerable interest because of the importance of

  13. Global analysis of protein localization in budding yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Won-Ki Huh; James V. Falvo; Luke C. Gerke; Adam S. Carroll; Russell W. Howson; Jonathan S. Weissman; Erin K. O'Shea

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental goal of cell biology is to define the functions of proteins in the context of compartments that organize them in the cellular environment. Here we describe the construction and analysis of a collection of yeast strains expressing full-length, chromosomally tagged green fluorescent protein fusion proteins. We classify these proteins, representing 75% of the yeast proteome, into 22 distinct

  14. Analysis of the inhibition of food spoilage yeasts by vanillin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J Fitzgerald; Malcolm Stratford; Arjan Narbad

    2003-01-01

    The antimicrobial potential of vanillin, the major component of vanilla flavour, was examined against the growth of three yeasts associated with food spoilage, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 21, 20 and 13 mM vanillin were determined for the three yeast strains, respectively. The observed inhibition was found to be biostatic. During fermentation,

  15. Yeasts from high-altitude lakes: influence of UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Libkind, Diego; Moliné, Martín; Sampaio, José Paulo; van Broock, Maria

    2009-09-01

    Mountain lakes located at a high elevation are typically exposed to high UV radiation (UVR). Little is known about the ecology and diversity of yeasts inhabiting these extreme environments. We studied yeast occurrence (with special emphasis on those producing carotenoid pigments) at five high-altitude (>1400 m a.s.l.) water bodies located in the Nahuel Huapi National Park (Bariloche, Argentina). Isolates were identified using a polyphasic approach. Production of photoprotective compounds (carotenoids and mycosporines) by yeast isolates, and UVB resistance of selected species were studied. All water samples contained viable yeast cells in variable numbers, generally ranging from 49 to 209 cells L(-1). A total of 24 yeast species was found; at least four represented novel species. Carotenogenic yeasts prevailed in lakes with low water conductivity and higher transparency and chlorophyll a levels. Apparently, the ability to produce photoprotective compounds in yeasts was related to the transparency of mountain lake waters, and strains from more transparent waters developed increased UVB resistance. Our results indicate that UVR is an important environmental factor affecting the yeast community structure in aquatic habitats. PMID:19624739

  16. Oral yeast carriage correlates with presence of oral epithelial dysplasia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M McCullough; M Jaber; A. W Barrett; L Bain; P. M Speight; S. R Porter

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested a link between the presence of Candida albicans and the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The aim of the present study was to assess the presence and level of colonisation of oral yeast in patients undergoing an incisional oral mucosal biopsy in order to assess whether the amount of oral yeast present correlated with

  17. Exploring the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Protein Degradation Pathway in Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Tamara J.; McWatters, Melissa K.; McQuade, Kristi L.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory investigating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in yeast. In this exercise, the enzyme beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) is expressed in yeast under the control of a stress response promoter. Following exposure to heat stress to induce beta-gal expression, cycloheximide is added to halt…

  18. Vulvovaginal carriage of yeasts other than Candida albicans

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Holland; M L Young; O Lee; S C-A Chen

    2003-01-01

    Aims: We investigated the spectrum of yeasts isolated, and compared the epidemiological and laboratory characteristics of women carrying vulvovaginal Candida albicans with those carrying yeasts other than C albicans.Method: Between April and June 2001, 5802 consecutively received genital swabs from women were plated onto Candida ID chromogenic media (BioMerieux). Blue colonies were reported as C albicans; all other colonies (white

  19. How often are gonorrhoea and genital yeast infection sexually transmitted?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R N Thin; P Rendell; J Wadsworth

    1979-01-01

    Although gonorrhoea is often regarded as the sexually transmitted disease against which others are measured, its infectivity is not clearly understood. Estimates of the infection rate have varied from 5--90%. In this study, 50 couples with gonorrhoea were matched with 50 couples with genital yeast infection. Gonorrhoea was diagnosed in both partners of 32 couples and genital yeast infection in

  20. Molecular evolution of eukaryotic genomes: hemiascomycetous yeast spliceosomal introns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elisabeth Bon; Serge Casaregola; Gaelle Blandin; Bertrand Llorente; Martin Munsterkotter; Ulrich Guldener; Hans-Werner Mewes; Jacques Van Helden; Bernard Dujon; Claude Gaillardin

    2003-01-01

    As part of the exploratory sequencing program Genolevures, visual scrutinisation and bioinfor- matic tools were used to detect spliceosomal introns in seven hemiascomycetous yeast species. A total of 153 putative novel introns were identified. Introns are rare in yeast nuclear genes (<5% have an intron), mainly located at the 5¢ end of ORFs, and not highly conserved in sequence. They

  1. Baker's yeast assay procedure for testing heavy metal toxicity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gabriel Bitton; Ben Koopman; Hsien-Deng Wang

    1984-01-01

    Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) is microorganism which is commercially available and sold as packaged dry pellets in any food store at low cost. Studies have been undertaken on the effects of organic xenobiotics as well as heavy metals on yeast metabolism. This type of study has been generally useful in examining the mechanism(s) of chemical toxicity. However, a rapid and

  2. Evolutionarily conserved elements in vertebrate, insect, worm, and yeast genomes

    E-print Network

    Miller, Webb

    Evolutionarily conserved elements in vertebrate, insect, worm, and yeast genomes Adam Siepel,1%­53%), Caenorhabditis elegans (18%­37%), and Saccharaomyces cerevisiae (47%­68%) genomes. From yeasts to vertebrates://genome.ucsc.edu). The phastCons program is part of a software package called PHAST (PHylogenetic Analysis with Space

  3. Unusual chromosome structure of fission yeast DNA in mouse cells.

    PubMed

    McManus, J; Perry, P; Sumner, A T; Wright, D M; Thomson, E J; Allshire, R C; Hastie, N D; Bickmore, W A

    1994-03-01

    Chromosomes from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe have been introduced into mouse cells by protoplast fusion. In most cell lines the yeast DNA integrates into a single site within a mouse chromosome and results in striking chromosome morphology at metaphase. Both light and electron microscopy show that the yeast chromosome region is narrower than the flanking mouse DNA. Regions of the yeast insert stain less intensely with propidium iodide than surrounding DNA and bear a morphological resemblance to fragile sites. We investigate the composition of the yeast transgenomes and the modification and chromatin structure of this yeast DNA in mouse cells. We suggest that the underlying basis for the structure we see lies above the level of DNA modification and nucleosome assembly, and may reflect the attachment of the yeast DNA to the rodent cell nucleoskeleton. The yeast integrant replicates late in S phase at a time when G bands of the mouse chromosomes are being replicated, and participates in sister chromatid exchanges at a high frequency. We discuss the implications of these studies to the understanding of how chromatin folding relates to metaphase chromosome morphology and how large stretches of foreign DNA behave when introduced into mammalian cells. PMID:8006067

  4. Genetic and phenotypic characteristics of baker's yeast: relevance to baking.

    PubMed

    Randez-Gil, Francisca; Córcoles-Sáez, Isaac; Prieto, José A

    2013-01-01

    Yeasts rarely encounter ideal physiological conditions during their industrial life span; therefore, their ability to adapt to changing conditions determines their usefulness and applicability. This is especially true for baking strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The success of this yeast in the ancient art of bread making is based on its capacity to rapidly transform carbohydrates into CO2 rather than its unusual resistance to environmental stresses. Moreover, baker's yeast must exhibit efficient respiratory metabolism during yeast manufacturing, which determines biomass yield. However, optimal growth conditions often have negative consequences in other commercially important aspects, such as fermentative power or stress tolerance. This article reviews the genetic and physiological characteristics of baking yeast strains, emphasizing the activation of regulatory mechanisms in response to carbon source and stress signaling and their importance in defining targets for strain selection and improvement. PMID:23464571

  5. New lager yeast strains generated by interspecific hybridization.

    PubMed

    Krogerus, Kristoffer; Magalhães, Frederico; Vidgren, Virve; Gibson, Brian

    2015-05-01

    The interspecific hybrid Saccharomyces pastorianus is the most commonly used yeast in brewery fermentations worldwide. Here, we generated de novo lager yeast hybrids by mating a domesticated and strongly flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae ale strain with the Saccharomyces eubayanus type strain. The hybrids were characterized with respect to the parent strains in a wort fermentation performed at temperatures typical for lager brewing (12 °C). The resulting beers were analysed for sugar and aroma compounds, while the yeasts were tested for their flocculation ability and ?-glucoside transport capability. These hybrids inherited beneficial properties from both parent strains (cryotolerance, maltotriose utilization and strong flocculation) and showed apparent hybrid vigour, fermenting faster and producing beer with higher alcohol content (5.6 vs 4.5 % ABV) than the parents. Results suggest that interspecific hybridization is suitable for production of novel non-GM lager yeast strains with unique properties and will help in elucidating the evolutionary history of industrial lager yeast. PMID:25682107

  6. Yeast cell factories for fine chemical and API production

    PubMed Central

    Pscheidt, Beate; Glieder, Anton

    2008-01-01

    This review gives an overview of different yeast strains and enzyme classes involved in yeast whole-cell biotransformations. A focus was put on the synthesis of compounds for fine chemical and API (= active pharmaceutical ingredient) production employing single or only few-step enzymatic reactions. Accounting for recent success stories in metabolic engineering, the construction and use of synthetic pathways was also highlighted. Examples from academia and industry and advances in the field of designed yeast strain construction demonstrate the broad significance of yeast whole-cell applications. In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alternative yeast whole-cell biocatalysts are discussed such as Candida sp., Cryptococcus sp., Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia sp., Kloeckera sp., Kluyveromyces sp., Pichia sp. (including Hansenula polymorpha = P. angusta), Rhodotorula sp., Rhodosporidium sp., alternative Saccharomyces sp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulopsis sp., Trichosporon sp., Trigonopsis variabilis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. PMID:18684335

  7. Uniform Yeast Cell Assembly Based on Microfluidic Microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; He, Peng; Marquez, Manuel; Cheng, Zhengdong; Marquez, Samantha M.

    2011-03-01

    We present a novel microgel templated Yeastosome (Yeast- Celloidosome ) based on self-assembly of yeast cells onto liquid-gel interfaces. To organize living cells onto the surface of the gel particles, strong positive charges were first introduced via LbL (layer by layer) polyelectrolyte decoration on monodisperse agarose microgel templates fabricated with a microfluidic flow focusing device. Native yeasts, bearing negative surface charges can then be driven electrostatically to form a monolayer shell around the gel core. Surface coverage/packing density of the yeast biofilm on varying microgel-to-yeast size ratio assemblies is evaluated with optical microscopy. Mechanical properties of the corresponding shells are characterized with buckling or collapse behavior during drying-hydrating cycle. We demonstrate the capability to fabricate narrow size distribution Yeastosome with a soft hydrogel core. The combination of microfluidic fabrication with cell assembly offers excellent control over inner core properties and could enable further hierarchy bio-structures.

  8. Hitting an Unintended Target: Phylogeography of Bombus brasiliensis Lepeletier, 1836 and the First New Brazilian Bumblebee Species in a Century (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Santos Júnior, José Eustáquio; Santos, Fabrício R; Silveira, Fernando A

    2015-01-01

    This work tested whether or not populations of Bombus brasiliensis isolated on mountain tops of southeastern Brazil belonged to the same species as populations widespread in lowland areas in the Atlantic coast and westward along the Paraná-river valley. Phylogeographic and population genetic analyses showed that those populations were all conspecific. However, they revealed a previously unrecognized, apparently rare, and potentially endangered species in one of the most threatened biodiversity hotspots of the World, the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. This species is described here as Bombus bahiensis sp. n., and included in a revised key for the identification of the bumblebee species known to occur in Brazil. Phylogenetic analyses based on two mtDNA markers suggest this new species to be sister to B. brasiliensis, from which its workers and queens can be easily distinguished by the lack of a yellow hair-band on the first metasomal tergum. The results presented here are consistent with the hypothesis that B. bahiensis sp. n. may have originated from an ancestral population isolated in an evergreen-forest refuge (the so-called Bahia refuge) during cold, dry periods of the Pleistocene. This refuge is also known as an important area of endemism for several animal taxa, including other bees. Secondary contact between B. bahiensis and B. brasiliensis may be presently prevented by a strip of semi-deciduous forest in a climate zone characterized by relatively long dry seasons. Considering the relatively limited range of this new species and the current anthropic pressure on its environment, attention should be given to its conservation status. PMID:25992624

  9. Modeling Disease Vector Occurrence When Detection Is Imperfect II: Drivers of Site-Occupancy by Synanthropic Triatoma brasiliensis in the Brazilian Northeast

    PubMed Central

    Valença-Barbosa, Carolina; Lima, Marli M.; Sarquis, Otília; Bezerra, Claudia M.; Abad-Franch, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the drivers of habitat selection by insect disease vectors is instrumental to the design and operation of rational control-surveillance systems. One pervasive yet often overlooked drawback of vector studies is that detection failures result in some sites being misclassified as uninfested; naïve infestation indices are therefore biased, and this can confound our view of vector habitat preferences. Here, we present an initial attempt at applying methods that explicitly account for imperfect detection to investigate the ecology of Chagas disease vectors in man-made environments. Methodology We combined triplicate-sampling of individual ecotopes (n?=?203) and site-occupancy models (SOMs) to test a suite of pre-specified hypotheses about habitat selection by Triatoma brasiliensis. SOM results were compared with those of standard generalized linear models (GLMs) that assume perfect detection even with single bug-searches. Principal Findings Triatoma brasiliensis was strongly associated with key hosts (native rodents, goats/sheep and, to a lesser extent, fowl) in peridomestic environments; ecotope structure had, in comparison, small to negligible effects, although wooden ecotopes were slightly preferred. We found evidence of dwelling-level aggregation of infestation foci; when there was one such focus, same-dwelling ecotopes, whether houses or peridomestic structures, were more likely to become infested too. GLMs yielded negatively-biased covariate effect estimates and standard errors; both were, on average, about four times smaller than those derived from SOMs. Conclusions/Significance Our results confirm substantial population-level ecological heterogeneity in T. brasiliensis. They also suggest that, at least in some sites, control of this species may benefit from peridomestic rodent control and changes in goat/sheep husbandry practices. Finally, our comparative analyses highlight the importance of accounting for the various sources of uncertainty inherent to vector studies, including imperfect detection. We anticipate that future research on infectious disease ecology will increasingly rely on approaches akin to those described here. PMID:24811125

  10. Extrachromosomal circular DNA is common in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Henrik D.; Parsons, Lance; Jørgensen, Tue S.; Botstein, David; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    Examples of extrachromosomal circular DNAs (eccDNAs) are found in many organisms, but their impact on genetic variation at the genome scale has not been investigated. We mapped 1,756 eccDNAs in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome using Circle-Seq, a highly sensitive eccDNA purification method. Yeast eccDNAs ranged from an arbitrary lower limit of 1 kb up to 38 kb and covered 23% of the genome, representing thousands of genes. EccDNA arose both from genomic regions with repetitive sequences ?15 bases long and from regions with short or no repetitive sequences. Some eccDNAs were identified in several yeast populations. These eccDNAs contained ribosomal genes, transposon remnants, and tandemly repeated genes (HXT6/7, ENA1/2/5, and CUP1-1/-2) that were generally enriched on eccDNAs. EccDNAs seemed to be replicated and 80% contained consensus sequences for autonomous replication origins that could explain their maintenance. Our data suggest that eccDNAs are common in S. cerevisiae, where they might contribute substantially to genetic variation and evolution. PMID:26038577

  11. Stationary phase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Werner-Washburne, M; Braun, E; Johnston, G C; Singer, R A

    1993-01-01

    Growth and proliferation of microorganisms such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are controlled in part by the availability of nutrients. When proliferating yeast cells exhaust available nutrients, they enter a stationary phase characterized by cell cycle arrest and specific physiological, biochemical, and morphological changes. These changes include thickening of the cell wall, accumulation of reserve carbohydrates, and acquisition of thermotolerance. Recent characterization of mutant cells that are conditionally defective only for the resumption of proliferation from stationary phase provides evidence that stationary phase is a unique developmental state. Strains with mutations affecting entry into and survival during stationary phase have also been isolated, and the mutations have been shown to affect at least seven different cellular processes: (i) signal transduction, (ii) protein synthesis, (iii) protein N-terminal acetylation, (iv) protein turnover, (v) protein secretion, (vi) membrane biosynthesis, and (vii) cell polarity. The exact nature of the relationship between these processes and survival during stationary phase remains to be elucidated. We propose that cell cycle arrest coordinated with the ability to remain viable in the absence of additional nutrients provides a good operational definition of starvation-induced stationary phase. PMID:8393130

  12. Origins of multicellular evolvability in snowflake yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, William C.; Fankhauser, Johnathon D.; Rogers, David W.; Greig, Duncan; Travisano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Complex life has arisen through a series of ‘major transitions’ in which collectives of formerly autonomous individuals evolve into a single, integrated organism. A key step in this process is the origin of higher-level evolvability, but little is known about how higher-level entities originate and gain the capacity to evolve as an individual. Here we report a single mutation that not only creates a new level of biological organization, but also potentiates higher-level evolvability. Disrupting the transcription factor ACE2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae prevents mother–daughter cell separation, generating multicellular ‘snowflake’ yeast. Snowflake yeast develop through deterministic rules that produce geometrically defined clusters that preclude genetic conflict and display a high broad-sense heritability for multicellular traits; as a result they are preadapted to multicellular adaptation. This work demonstrates that simple microevolutionary changes can have profound macroevolutionary consequences, and suggests that the formation of clonally developing clusters may often be the first step to multicellularity. PMID:25600558

  13. Extrachromosomal circular DNA is common in yeast.

    PubMed

    Møller, Henrik D; Parsons, Lance; Jørgensen, Tue S; Botstein, David; Regenberg, Birgitte

    2015-06-16

    Examples of extrachromosomal circular DNAs (eccDNAs) are found in many organisms, but their impact on genetic variation at the genome scale has not been investigated. We mapped 1,756 eccDNAs in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome using Circle-Seq, a highly sensitive eccDNA purification method. Yeast eccDNAs ranged from an arbitrary lower limit of 1 kb up to 38 kb and covered 23% of the genome, representing thousands of genes. EccDNA arose both from genomic regions with repetitive sequences ?15 bases long and from regions with short or no repetitive sequences. Some eccDNAs were identified in several yeast populations. These eccDNAs contained ribosomal genes, transposon remnants, and tandemly repeated genes (HXT6/7, ENA1/2/5, and CUP1-1/-2) that were generally enriched on eccDNAs. EccDNAs seemed to be replicated and 80% contained consensus sequences for autonomous replication origins that could explain their maintenance. Our data suggest that eccDNAs are common in S. cerevisiae, where they might contribute substantially to genetic variation and evolution. PMID:26038577

  14. Yeast cell adhesion on oligopeptide modified surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dhadwar, S S; Bemman, T; Anderson, W A; Chen, P

    2003-08-01

    Self-assembling oligopeptides are novel materials with potential bioengineering applications; this paper explores the use of one of these oligopeptides, EAK 16 II, for modifying the surface properties of cell-supporting substrates. To characterize the surface properties, thermodynamic measurements of liquid contact angle and surface free energy were correlated to atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations. A critical concentration of 0.1 mg/ml was found necessary to completely modify the surface properties of the substrate with EAK 16 II. Adhesion of a yeast cell, Candida utilis, was modified by the coating of EAK 16 II on both hydrophobic (plastic) and hydrophilic (glass) surfaces: Cell coverage was slightly enhanced on the glass substrate, but decreased significantly on the plastic substrate. This indicates that the yeast cell adhesion was mainly determined via hydrophobic interactions between the substrate and the cell wall. However, on the EAK 16 II modified glass substrate, surface roughness might be a factor in causing a slightly larger cell adhesion than that on bare glass. The morphology of adhered cells was also obtained with AFM imaging, showing a depression at the center of the cell on all substrates. Small depressions on the oligopeptide-coated surfaces and plastic substrate may indicate good water-retaining ability by the cell. There was no apparent difference in cell adhesion and morphology among cells obtained from lag, exponential and stationary growth phases. PMID:14499122

  15. METABOLIC CONTROL OF ?-GLUCOSIDASE SYNTHESIS IN YEAST

    PubMed Central

    MacQuillan, Anthony M.; Halvorson, Harlyn O.

    1962-01-01

    MacQuillan, Anthony M. (University of Wisconsin, Madison) and Harlyn O. Halvorson. Metabolic control of ?-glucosidase synthesis in yeast. J. Bacteriol. 84:23–30. 1962—The hybrid Saccharomyces fragilis × S. dobzhanskii produced a constitutive ?-glucosidase when grown in succinate synthetic medium. Upon addition of ?-glucosides, thio-?-glucosides, or low concentrations of glucose, a further induction of enzyme synthesis was observed. Studies with other sugars revealed some specificity in response to hexose induction. Phenyl-thio-?-d-glucoside did not affect constitutive synthesis nor induction by glucosides, thio-glucosides, or glucose. Repression of ?-glucosidase synthesis is brought about by high concentrations of glucose and other carbon compounds. Preinduction does not confer resistance to catabolic repression of enzyme synthesis; this leads to the conclusion that two sites of control for ?-glucosidase synthesis are present in yeast. Multiplicity of control is further suggested from: (i) the properties of the inducing system; (ii) semiconstitutive nature of enzyme synthesis; (iii) the repression of constitutive synthesis by glucose; (iv) the elevated derepressed rates of enzyme synthesis after glucose inhibition; and (v) the selection of a family of low constitutive mutants with variable inducibility. PMID:14468063

  16. Origins of multicellular evolvability in snowflake yeast.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, William C; Fankhauser, Johnathon D; Rogers, David W; Greig, Duncan; Travisano, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Complex life has arisen through a series of 'major transitions' in which collectives of formerly autonomous individuals evolve into a single, integrated organism. A key step in this process is the origin of higher-level evolvability, but little is known about how higher-level entities originate and gain the capacity to evolve as an individual. Here we report a single mutation that not only creates a new level of biological organization, but also potentiates higher-level evolvability. Disrupting the transcription factor ACE2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae prevents mother-daughter cell separation, generating multicellular 'snowflake' yeast. Snowflake yeast develop through deterministic rules that produce geometrically defined clusters that preclude genetic conflict and display a high broad-sense heritability for multicellular traits; as a result they are preadapted to multicellular adaptation. This work demonstrates that simple microevolutionary changes can have profound macroevolutionary consequences, and suggests that the formation of clonally developing clusters may often be the first step to multicellularity. PMID:25600558

  17. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection in the rat: effect of iron and protein deficiency on the anthelmintic efficacy of mebendazole, pyrantel, piperazine, and levamisole.

    PubMed Central

    Duncombe, V M; Bolin, T D; Davis, A E; Fagan, M R; Kelly, J D

    1979-01-01

    The benzimidazole anthelmintics mebendazole and fenbendazole have been shown to be much less effective against Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infections in the rat on a combined iron and protein deficient diet. In the present experiments it was shown that the anthelmintic efficacy of mebendazole was significantly impaired in the rat on either an iron deficient or a protein deficient diet. Furthermore, iron and protein deficiency reduced the efficacy of the anthelmintics pyrantel and piperazine but not levamisole. The finding that nutritional deficiencies reduce anthelmintic efficacy may well be relevant to worm eradication programmes in iron deficient and protein calorie malnourished populations. PMID:447110

  18. Dialysable leukocyte extracts modify the course of experimental paracoccidioidomycosis in the Syrian hamster

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. T. S. Peraçoli; M. T. Rezkallah-Iwasso; N. G. S. Mota; M. R. Montenegro

    1993-01-01

    The effect of dialysable leukocyte extracts (DLE) obtained from hamsters immunized withParacoccidioides brasiliensis (immune DLE) and from non-immunized hamsters (non-immune DLE) was studied in hamsters inoculated withP. brasiliensis by the intratesticular route. Treatment with immune or non-immune DLE was started during the third week of infection and was repeated at 7, 11, 15 and 19 weeks. A group of untreated

  19. Paracoccidioidomycosis in wild monkeys from Paraná State, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andreia C. Corte; Walfrido K. Svoboda; Italmar T. Navarro; Roberta L. Freire; Luciano S. Malanski; M. M. Shiozawa; Gabriela Ludwig; Lucas M. Aguiar; Fernando C. Passos; Angela Maron; Zoilo P. Camargo; Eiko N. Itano; Mario Augusto Ono

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the seroprevalence of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection in wild New World monkeys (Cebus sp. and Alouatta caraya). A total of 93 animals (Cebus sp., n = 68 and Alouatta caraya, n = 25) were captured in the Paran? River basin, Paran? State, Brazil and the serum samples were analyzed by ELISA and immunodiffusion\\u000a using P. brasiliensis gp43 and

  20. Polysaccharide fraction of Agaricus brasiliensis avoids tumor-induced IL-10 production and changes the microenvironment of subcutaneous Ehrlich adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Andréa Vanessa Ferreira da Silva; Martins, Priscila Raquel; Romagnoli, Graziela Gorete; Campanelli, Ana Paula; Terezan, Ana Paula; Filho, Edson Rodrigues; Ferreira da Eira, Augusto; Kaneno, Ramon

    2009-01-01

    Subcutaneous Ehrlich tumor-bearing mice were treated with in situ inoculation of a beta-glucan-rich extract of Agaricus brasiliensis (ATF), which reduced tumor growth. Histopathological analysis showed that the tumor masses of control mice (Ehr) presented giant tumor cells and many mitotic figures whereas the tumor tissue obtained from ATF-treated animals (Ehr-ATF) presented a lower frequency of both mitotic and giant cells, associated with a higher frequency of apoptotic cells than Ehr. Analysis of the lymphoproliferative activity of spleen cells showed that the treatment had a suppressive rather than a stimulatory effect. Spleen cells of the Ehr group produced higher in vitro levels of IL-10 than normal controls and this occurrence was partially avoided by treatment with ATF. Analysis of cytokine production by tumor-infiltrating cells (ELISpot) showed that ATF induced a higher number of IFN-gamma-producing cells at 7 and 14days as well as reduction of IL-10-secreting cells at the latter time. Confocal microscopy analysis showed higher intensity of labeling of CD4+ and Mac-3+ cells in ATF-treated mice. Analysis of in situ expression of angiogenic growth factors showed a slight decrease of FGF-2 mRNA in Ehr-ATF animals (7th day) but not of VEGF-A or TGF-beta expression. This fraction could not directly lyse either lymphocytes or tumor cells and we speculate that antitumor effect of ATF could be due to induction of a selective migration of immunocompetent cells from the spleen to the tumor site and to the switch of cytokine production. PMID:19243740

  1. Responses of seedlings of tropical woody plants to environmental stresses with emphasis on Theobroma cacao and Hevea brasiliensis

    SciTech Connect

    Sena Gomes, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    Relative humidity, flooding, temperature, wind, and SO/sub 2/ variously influenced physiological processes and growth of tropical woody plants, with emphasis on three Theobroma cacao varieties and three Hevea brasiliensis families. Stomata were smaller and more numerous in Theobroma than in Hevea. In Theobroma, but not Heavea, stomatal frequency decreased from the leaf base to the apex and from the midrib outward. Stomata of Theobroma cacao var. Catongo opened in high relative humidity (RH) and closed in low RH. The more open stomata in high RH were associated with high rates of photosynthesis, low leaf water potential, high water use efficiency (WUE), and low transpiration rate (TR). Variations in TR and WUE were correlated with changes in vapor pressure deficit. Other responses included stomatal closure, decreased chlorophyll content, leaf epinasty, production of hypertrophied lenticels and adventitious roots, and acceleration of ethylene production. Responses to flooding varied with species, Theobroma varieties and Hevea families. Effects of temperature regimes on growth varied with species, varieties and families, plant parts, growth parameters, and time of harvesting. Optimal temperatures for dry weight increase of stems or roots of Theobroma cacao var. Comum were 22.2 C; and 33.3 C for dry weight increase or relative growth rates of leaves or seedlings. Optimal temperatures for growth varied for Hevea families. Wind injured leaves of Theobroma cacao, with more injury by wind of 6.0 than 3.0 m s/sup -1/. Stomata were more open on windy than on calm days, but tended to close at high wind speeds. Wind lowered transpiration rate but the reduction was not correlated with leaf dehydration. SO/sub 2/ at 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 ppm for 24 h did not injure Theobroma leaves but reduced dry weight increment of leaves of var. Catongo but not Catongo/Sial.

  2. Parasites of Urophycis brasiliensis (Gadiformes: Phycidae) as indicators of marine ecoregions in coastal areas of the South American Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Aldenice N; Pantoja, Camila; Luque, José L; Timi, Juan T

    2014-11-01

    The potential value of parasites as ecosystem markers was tested by analyzing the metazoan assemblages of Urophycis brasiliensis caught in four locations distributed in three ecoregions of the Warm Temperate Southwestern Atlantic. A total of 5,001 metazoan parasites belonging to 33 species were found. The identified parasites varied across locations in terms of presence, prevalence, and abundance, and their multivariate analyses resulted in clear similarity patterns. No differences were observed between two locations of the same ecoregion, whereas an evident separation of samples was observed across ecoregions in support of the existing hypotheses regarding the ecoregional division of the southwestern Atlantic. We proposed that parasite assemblages, which are composed of several metazoan phyla, are potentially useful as ecosystem indicators. This suggestion is derived from the combined evidence of the evolutionary history and biogeography of multiple lineages, which is expected to be more efficient in capturing recurrent patterns in overall biodiversity than individual lineages. Furthermore, as many parasites have complex life cycles, their distribution patterns are dependent not only on environmental conditions but also on the distribution and population density of all hosts involved in their life cycles, adding further sources of distributional variability that act synergistically to define robust geographical patterns. The selection of long-lived parasites and their comparative analysis provided evidence supporting the existence of three different stocks in the four sampled areas. The best parasite tags were those with low specificity in fish hosts, constituting promising biological tags for the stock discrimination of other fish species in the region. PMID:25245108

  3. An intervention resembling caloric restriction prolongs life span and retards aging in yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James C. Jiang; Ewa Jaruga; Marina V. Repnevskaya; S. Michal Jazwinski

    2000-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a finite life span that is measured by the number of daughter cells an individual produces. The 20 genes known to determine yeast life span appear to function in more than one pathway, implicating a variety of physiological processes in yeast longevity. Less attention has been focused on environmental effects on yeast aging. We have

  4. Trehalose and glycogen in wine-making yeasts: methodological aspects and variability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Louis Roustan; Jean-Marie Sablayrolles

    2002-01-01

    Trehalose and glycogen, which can represent up to 30% of wine yeasts, was evaluated by different methods in (i) yeasts during fermentation of musts (200 g sugar l-1) and (ii) active dry yeasts. Fermentation trials demonstrated the potential value of monitoring changes in trehalose concentration during the rehydration step so that the performance of the yeasts can be evaluated.

  5. Influence of yeast drying process on different lager brewing strains viability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Irina C. Bolat; Maria Turtoi; Michael C. Walsh

    The potential for the application active dry yeast within brewing industry is supported by the advantages this type of yeast offers. Dried yeast is more robust and stable for transportation, distribution and storage. Further, there is no requirement for skilled laboratory staff as there is for yeast supplied on slope. During the drying process though, performed at high temperatures, a

  6. Dynamics of indigenous yeast populations during spontaneous fermentation of wines from Mendoza, Argentina

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Combina; A. Elía; L. Mercado; C. Catania; A. Ganga; C. Martinez

    2005-01-01

    Fermentation of wine is a complex microbial reaction, which involves the sequential development of various species of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria. Of these, yeasts are the main group responsible for alcoholic fermentation. The aim of this work was to study, under industrial conditions, the evolution of yeast populations and to describe the individual evolution of the most important yeasts

  7. Cell Cycle and Chaperone-Mediated Regulation of H3K56ac Incorporation in Yeast

    E-print Network

    Friedman, Nir

    Cell Cycle­ and Chaperone-Mediated Regulation of H3K56ac Incorporation in Yeast Tommy Kaplan1 growing yeast cultures, as well as in yeast proceeding synchronously through the cell cycle. We developed replaced in G1 phase to stably bound during M phase. Finally, by measuring H3 replacement in yeast deleted

  8. Yeast UCS proteins promote actomyosin interactions and limit myosin turnover in cells

    E-print Network

    Yeast UCS proteins promote actomyosin interactions and limit myosin turnover in cells Matthew Lord of folded myosins. We examined both func- tions in yeast. The fission yeast UCS protein (Rng3p) concentrates and supports actin filament gliding. In budding yeast the single UCS protein (She4p) acts on both myosin

  9. High-Frequency Transformation of Yeast: Autonomous Replication of Hybrid DNA Molecules

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin Struhl; Dan T. Stinchcomb; Stewart Scherer; Ronald W. Davis

    1979-01-01

    A set of vector DNAs (Y vectors) useful for the cloning of DNA fragments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) and in Escherichia coli are characterized. With these vectors, three modes of yeast transformation are defined. (i) Vectors containing yeast chromosomal DNA sequences (YIp1, YIp5) transform yeast cells at low frequency (1-10 colonies per mu g) and integrate into the genome by

  10. Performance of CHROMAGAR candida and BIGGY agar for identification of yeast species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mine Yücesoy; Serhat Marol

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The importance of identifying the pathogenic fungi rapidly has encouraged the development of differential media for the presumptive identification of yeasts. In this study two differential media, CHROMagar Candida and bismuth sulphite glucose glycine yeast agar, were evaluated for the presumptive identification of yeast species. METHODS: A total number of 270 yeast strains including 169 Candida albicans, 33 C.

  11. Antifungal susceptibility of emerging opportunistic yeasts and yeast-like fungi from Rhea americana.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar Cordeiro, Rossana; Pereira de Alencar, Lucas; Nogueira Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia; de Souza Collares Maia Castelo-Branco, Débora; Cordeiro Teixeira, Carlos Eduardo; de Brito Macedo, Ramila; Teixeira Lima, Daniel; Paiva de Araújo Neto, Manoel; Jalles Monteiro, André; Dutra Alves, Nilza; Franco de Oliveira, Moacir; Costa Sidrim, José Júlio; Rocha Gadelha, Marcos Fábio

    2013-08-01

    Opportunistic yeasts and yeast-like fungi have been recognized as important pathogens in high-risk patients. This study aimed to evaluate the presence of these microorganisms in the microbiota of captive rheas and to investigate the antifungal susceptibility of the isolated strains. Isolates representing Magnusiomyces capitatus (Geotrichum capitatum, n = 11), Trichosporon mucoides (n = 11), Trichosporon asteroides (n = 5), Rhodotorula mucilaginosa (n = 4), Trichosporon asahii (n = 3), Trichosporon cutaneum (n = 3), and Trichosporon ovoides (n = 3) were obtained from the oropharynx, cloaca, and feces of 58 animals. Most of the isolates were susceptible to antifungals in vitro; however, resistance against fluconazole (n = 1) and itraconazole (n = 2) was detected among T. mucoides. This study indicates that healthy rheas can be reservoirs of opportunistic pathogens. Primary resistance to azoles in T. mucoides obtained from these animals demonstrates the potential risk to humans. PMID:23899001

  12. Rapid isolation of yeast genomic DNA: Bust n' Grab

    PubMed Central

    Harju, Susanna; Fedosyuk, Halyna; Peterson, Kenneth R

    2004-01-01

    Background Mutagenesis of yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) often requires analysis of large numbers of yeast clones to obtain correctly targeted mutants. Conventional ways to isolate yeast genomic DNA utilize either glass beads or enzymatic digestion to disrupt yeast cell wall. Using small glass beads is messy, whereas enzymatic digestion of the cells is expensive when many samples need to be analyzed. We sought to develop an easier and faster protocol than the existing methods for obtaining yeast genomic DNA from liquid cultures or colonies on plates. Results Repeated freeze-thawing of cells in a lysis buffer was used to disrupt the cells and release genomic DNA. Cell lysis was followed by extraction with chloroform and ethanol precipitation of DNA. Two hundred ng – 3 ?g of genomic DNA could be isolated from a 1.5 ml overnight liquid culture or from a large colony. Samples were either resuspended directly in a restriction enzyme/RNase coctail mixture for Southern blot hybridization or used for several PCR reactions. We demonstrated the utility of this method by showing an analysis of yeast clones containing a mutagenized human ?-globin locus YAC. Conclusion An efficient, inexpensive method for obtaining yeast genomic DNA from liquid cultures or directly from colonies was developed. This protocol circumvents the use of enzymes or glass beads, and therefore is cheaper and easier to perform when processing large numbers of samples. PMID:15102338

  13. Yeast Biomass Production in Brewery's Spent Grains Hemicellulosic Hydrolyzate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Luís C.; Carvalheiro, Florbela; Lopes, Sónia; Neves, Ines; Gírio, Francisco M.

    Yeast single-cell protein and yeast extract, in particular, are two products which have many feed, food, pharmaceutical, and biotechnological applications. However, many of these applications are limited by their market price. Specifically, the yeast extract requirements for culture media are one of the major technical hurdles to be overcome for the development of low-cost fermentation routes for several top value chemicals in a biorefinery framework. A potential biotechnical solution is the production of yeast biomass from the hemicellulosic fraction stream. The growth of three pentose-assimilating yeast cell factories, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Pichia stipitis was compared using non-detoxified brewery's spent grains hemicellulosic hydrolyzate supplemented with mineral nutrients. The yeasts exhibited different specific growth rates, biomass productivities, and yields being D. hansenii as the yeast species that presented the best performance, assimilating all sugars and noteworthy consuming most of the hydrolyzate inhibitors. Under optimized conditions, D. hansenii displayed a maximum specific growth rate, biomass yield, and productivity of 0.34 h-1, 0.61 g g-1, and 0.56 g 1-1 h-1, respectively. The nutritional profile of D. hansenii was thoroughly evaluated, and it compares favorably to others reported in literature. It contains considerable amounts of some essential amino acids and a high ratio of unsaturated over saturated fatty acids.

  14. A1 toxicity in yeast. A role for Mg?

    PubMed Central

    MacDiarmid, C W; Gardner, R C

    1996-01-01

    We have established conditions in which soluble Al is toxic to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The major modifications to a standard synthetic medium were lowering the pH and the concentration of Mg ions. Alterations to the PO4, Ca, or K concentration had little effect on toxicity. Organic acids known to chelate Al reduced its toxicity, suggesting that Al3+ is the toxic Al species. The unique ability of Mg ions to ameliorate Al toxicity led us to investigate the hypothesis that Al inhibits Mg uptake by yeast. Yeast cells accumulate Mg, Co, Zn, Ni, and Mn ions via the same transport system (G.F. Fuhrmann, A. Rothstein [1968] Biochim Biophys Acta 163: 325-330). Al3+ inhibited the accumulation of 57Co2+ by yeast cells more effectively than Ga, La, or Mg. In addition, a mutant yeast strain with a defect in divalent cation uptake proved to be more sensitive to Al than a wild-type strain. Taken together, these results suggest that Al may cause Mg deficiency in yeast by blocking Mg transport. We discuss the relevance of yeast as a model for the study of Al toxicity in plant systems. PMID:8938412

  15. Accumulation and metabolism of selenium by yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Kieliszek, Marek; B?a?ejak, Stanis?aw; Gientka, Iwona; Bzducha-Wróbel, Anna

    2015-07-01

    This paper examines the process of selenium bioaccumulation and selenium metabolism in yeast cells. Yeast cells can bind elements in ionic from the environment and permanently integrate them into their cellular structure. Up to now, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida utilis, and Yarrowia lipolytica yeasts have been used primarily in biotechnological studies to evaluate binding of minerals. Yeast cells are able to bind selenium in the form of both organic and inorganic compounds. The process of bioaccumulation of selenium by microorganisms occurs through two mechanisms: extracellular binding by ligands of membrane assembly and intracellular accumulation associated with the transport of ions across the cytoplasmic membrane into the cell interior. During intracellular metabolism of selenium, oxidation, reduction, methylation, and selenoprotein synthesis processes are involved, as exemplified by detoxification processes that allow yeasts to survive under culture conditions involving the elevated selenium concentrations which were observed. Selenium yeasts represent probably the best absorbed form of this element. In turn, in terms of wide application, the inclusion of yeast with accumulated selenium may aid in lessening selenium deficiency in a diet. PMID:26003453

  16. Effect of wine yeast monoculture practice on the biodiversity of non-Saccharomyces yeasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Ganga; C. Martinez

    2004-01-01

    M.A. G ANGA A ND C. M ARTIN E Z. 2003. Aims: The objective of this work was to study the effect of the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae monocultures over the biodiversity of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in wine-producing areas in Chile. Methods and Results: Microvinifications were carried out with grape musts of two areas. In one of them, the fermentation is

  17. The yeast spectrum of the 'tea fungus Kombucha'.

    PubMed

    Mayser, P; Fromme, S; Leitzmann, C; Gründer, K

    1995-01-01

    The tea fungus 'Kombucha' is a symbiosis of Acetobacter, including Acetobacter xylinum as a characteristic species, and various yeasts. A characteristic yeast species or genus has not yet been identified. Kombucha is mainly cultivated in sugared black tea to produce a slightly acidulous effervescent beverage that is said to have several curative effects. In addition to sugar, the beverage contains small amounts of alcohol and various acids, including acetic acid, gluconic acid and lactic acid, as well as some antibiotic substances. To characterize the yeast spectrum with special consideration given to facultatively pathogenic yeasts, two commercially available specimens of tea fungus and 32 from private households in Germany were analysed by micromorphological and biochemical methods. Yeasts of the genera Brettanomyces, Zygosaccharomyces and Saccharomyces were identified in 56%, 29% and 26% respectively. The species Saccharomycodes ludwigii and Candida kefyr were only demonstrated in isolated cases. Furthermore, the tests revealed pellicle-forming yeasts such as Candida krusei or Issatchenkia orientalis/occidentalis as well as species of the apiculatus yeasts (Kloeckera, Hanseniaspora). Thus, the genus Brettanomyces may be a typical group of yeasts that are especially adapted to the environment of the tea fungus. However, to investigate further the beneficial effects of tea fungus, a spectrum of the other typical genera must be defined. Only three specimens showed definite contaminations. In one case, no yeasts could be isolated because of massive contamination with Penicillium spp. In the remaining two samples (from one household), Candida albicans was demonstrated. The low rate of contamination might be explained by protective mechanisms, such as formation of organic acids and antibiotic substances. Thus, subjects with a healthy metabolism do not need to be advised against cultivating Kombucha. However, those suffering from immunosuppression should preferably consume controlled commercial Kombucha beverages. PMID:8559192

  18. Plating Yeast Colonies 1. Swirl 1 colony (0.5 -2 mm diameter) into 1 ml sterile dH2O with toothpick (faintly turbid).

    E-print Network

    Aris, John P.

    78 Plating Yeast Colonies 1. Swirl 1 colony (0.5 - 2 mm diameter) into 1 ml sterile dH2O. Undiluted Cells (2nd column from left is best) Yeast Strain #1 Yeast Strain #2 Yeast Strain #3 Yeast Strain #4 Yeast Strain #5 Yeast Strain #6 10X Dilution Series Replica plating samples without serial

  19. Strain differentiation of pathogenic yeasts by the killer system.

    PubMed

    Morace, G; Archibusacci, C; Sestito, M; Polonelli, L

    1984-02-15

    High sensitivity rates to the activity of killer toxins produced by 25 species of yeasts belonging to the genera Candida, Hansenula, Pichia, Rhodotorula, Saccharomyces and Trichosporon have been observed among 112 yeast isolates (25 Cryptococcus neoformans, 29 C. glabrata 16 C. parapsilosis, 20 C. pseudotropicalis and 22 C. tropicalis). The highest sensitivity has been observed among the C. parapsilosis isolates, the lowest in C. glabrata strains. Genera Pichia and Hansenula proved to have the greatest killer activity. A killer system, formerly used for differentiating C. albicans isolates within the species, proved to be valid as epidemiological marker when applied to 112 strains of pathogenic yeasts. PMID:6371541

  20. Charcoal-Yeast Extract Agar: Primary Isolation Mediumfor Legionella pneumophila

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JAMES C. FEELEY; ROBERT J. GIBSON; GEORGE W. GORMAN; NANCY C. LANGFORD; J. KAMILE RASHEED; DON C. MACKEL; WILLIAM B. BAINE

    1979-01-01

    Charcoal-yeast extract agar isa new bacteriological mediumthatsupports excellent growth oftheLegionella pneumophila. Itresults frommodifications madeinan existing L.pneumophila medium,F-Gagar.Yeastextract, instead of an acidhydrolysate ofcasein, servesastheprotein source.Beefextractives and starch are notadded. Activated charcoal (Norit A or Norit SG)isincluded at 0.20%(wt\\/vol). Comparison ofcharcoal-yeast extract andF-Gagars showedthat a greater numberofcolony-forming units ofL.pneumophila was recovered from astandardized tissue inoculum on charcoal-yeast extract agar(4.35 x 106colony- forning

  1. Yeast biotechnology: teaching the old dog new tricks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts are regarded as the first microorganisms used by humans to process food and alcoholic beverages. The technology developed out of these ancient processes has been the basis for modern industrial biotechnology. Yeast biotechnology has gained great interest again in the last decades. Joining the potentials of genomics, metabolic engineering, systems and synthetic biology enables the production of numerous valuable products of primary and secondary metabolism, technical enzymes and biopharmaceutical proteins. An overview of emerging and established substrates and products of yeast biotechnology is provided and discussed in the light of the recent literature. PMID:24602262

  2. [Biodegradation of oil hydrocarbons by Candida yeast].

    PubMed

    Rusyn, I B; Moroz, O M; Karabyn, V V; Kulachkovs'ki?, O R; Hudz', S P

    2003-01-01

    Capability of 14 yeast species to utilize oil hydrocarbons has been analyzed. All strains utilized oil hydrocarbons as a single carbon source. Four strains-destructors that are characterized by higher growth in the presence oil in cultivation medium have been chosen among them. Peroxisomes participation in utilization of oil hydrocarbons by strains-destructors has been shown. Availability of peroxisome key enzymes are characteristic of these strains grown in cultivation medium with oil. Numerous peroxisomes available in the cells of some strains grown in oil cultivation medium have been demonstrated. Utilization of a wide spectrum of oil hydrocarbons has been revealed in all four strains. Two strains are promising to be used for environment purification from oil pollution. PMID:15077547

  3. Stable Stochastic Dynamics in Yeast Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Yurie; Sasai, Masaki

    2007-01-01

    Chemical reactions in cells are subject to intense stochastic fluctuations. An important question is how the fundamental physiological behavior of the cell is kept stable against those noisy perturbations. In this study, a stochastic model of the cell cycle of budding yeast was constructed to analyze the effects of noise on the cell-cycle oscillation. The model predicts intense noise in levels of mRNAs and proteins, and the simulated protein levels explain the observed statistical tendency of noise in populations of synchronous and asynchronous cells. Despite intense noise in levels of proteins and mRNAs, the cell cycle is stable enough to bring the largely perturbed cells back to the physiological cyclic oscillation. The model shows that consecutively appearing fixed points are the origin of this stability of the cell cycle. PMID:17704157

  4. Lipid droplet dynamics in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Eukaryotic cells store excess fatty acids as neutral lipids, predominantly triacylglycerols and sterol esters, in organelles termed lipid droplets (LDs) that bulge out from the endoplasmic reticulum. LDs are highly dynamic and contribute to diverse cellular functions. The catabolism of the storage lipids within LDs is channeled to multiple metabolic pathways, providing molecules for energy production, membrane building blocks, and lipid signaling. LDs have been implicated in a number of protein degradation and pathogen infection processes. LDs may be linked to prevalent human metabolic diseases and have marked potential for biofuel production. The knowledge accumulated on LDs in recent years provides a foundation for diverse, and even unexpected, future research. This review focuses on recent advances in LD research, emphasizing the diverse physiological roles of LDs in the model system of budding yeast. PMID:25894691

  5. Synthesis of Fatty Acids by Yeast Particles

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harold P.

    1966-01-01

    Klein, Harold P. (Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif.). Synthesis of fatty acids by yeast particles. J. Bacteriol. 92:130–135. 1966.—When a mitochondria-free homogenate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was centrifuged at 100,000 × g for 60 min, the sedimented crude particles incorporated acetate into fatty acids, but not into nonsaponifiable lipids. Degradation of the fatty acids formed indicated this to be de novo synthesis rather than chain elongation. Subfractions of the crude particles were obtained. The “ribosomal” fraction was unable to synthesize fatty acids, but had properties indicating the presence of acetokinase, fatty acid desaturase, and, probably, acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase. A “light” particle fraction with a high specific activity of fatty acid synthetase was also obtained. Fatty acid synthesis by the “soluble” supernatant fluid appeared to be the result of contamination by the “light” particles. The data suggested the presence of several particulate entities in mitochondria-free homogenates. PMID:5941271

  6. Biofilm/Mat Assays for Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Many microbial species form biofilms/mats under nutrient-limiting conditions, and fungal pathogens rely on this social behavior for virulence. In budding yeast, mat formation is dependent on the mucinlike flocculin Flo11, which promotes cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate adhesion in mats. The biofilm/ mat assays described here allow the evaluation of the role of Flo11 in the formation of mats. Cells are grown on surfaces with different degrees of rigidity to assess their expansion and three-dimensional architecture, and the cells are also exposed to plastic surfaces to quantify their adherence. These assays are broadly applicable to studying biofilm/mat formation in microbial species. PMID:25646504

  7. Biofuels. Engineering alcohol tolerance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Lam, Felix H; Ghaderi, Adel; Fink, Gerald R; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Ethanol toxicity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae limits titer and productivity in the industrial production of transportation bioethanol. We show that strengthening the opposing potassium and proton electrochemical membrane gradients is a mechanism that enhances general resistance to multiple alcohols. The elevation of extracellular potassium and pH physically bolsters these gradients, increasing tolerance to higher alcohols and ethanol fermentation in commercial and laboratory strains (including a xylose-fermenting strain) under industrial-like conditions. Production per cell remains largely unchanged, with improvements deriving from heightened population viability. Likewise, up-regulation of the potassium and proton pumps in the laboratory strain enhances performance to levels exceeding those of industrial strains. Although genetically complex, alcohol tolerance can thus be dominated by a single cellular process, one controlled by a major physicochemical component but amenable to biological augmentation. PMID:25278607

  8. Sporulation in the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Neiman, Aaron M.

    2011-01-01

    In response to nitrogen starvation in the presence of a poor carbon source, diploid cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo meiosis and package the haploid nuclei produced in meiosis into spores. The formation of spores requires an unusual cell division event in which daughter cells are formed within the cytoplasm of the mother cell. This process involves the de novo generation of two different cellular structures: novel membrane compartments within the cell cytoplasm that give rise to the spore plasma membrane and an extensive spore wall that protects the spore from environmental insults. This article summarizes what is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling spore assembly with particular attention to how constitutive cellular functions are modified to create novel behaviors during this developmental process. Key regulatory points on the sporulation pathway are also discussed as well as the possible role of sporulation in the natural ecology of S. cerevisiae. PMID:22084423

  9. A Single Templating RNA in Yeast Telomerase.

    PubMed

    Bajon, Emmanuel; Laterreur, Nancy; Wellinger, Raymund J

    2015-07-21

    The number of essential telomerase components in the active ribonucleoprotein (RNP) has important implications for its mechanism of action yet is by and large unknown. We report that two differentially tagged TLC1 RNAs endogenously expressed in a heterozygous diploid and simultaneously detected via multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments do not co-localize. Probabilistic calculations combined with direct quantification of FISH signals demonstrate that the TLC1 RNA indeed occurs as a single molecule in these RNPs. In addition, two differentially tagged reverse-transcriptase subunits could not be co-immunoprecipitated. These results therefore show that, in yeast cells, telomerase is assembled and matured and occurs as a monomer when not on telomeres. Finally, combining these findings with previous evidence leads us to propose that the enzyme also acts as a monomer when elongating telomeres. PMID:26166570

  10. Cyanohydrin reactions enhance glycolytic oscillations in yeast.

    PubMed

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Nielsen, Astrid Gram; Tortzen, Christian; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous metabolic oscillations can be induced in yeast by addition of glucose and removal of extracellular acetaldehyde (ACAx). Compared to other means of ACAx removal, cyanide robustly induces oscillations, indicating additional cyanide reactions besides ACA to lactonitrile conversion. Here, (13)C NMR is used to confirm our previous hypothesis, that cyanide directly affects glycolytic fluxes through reaction with carbonyl-containing compounds. Intracellularly, at least 3 cyanohydrins were identified. Extracellularly, all signals could be identified and lactonitrile was found to account for ~66% of total cyanide removal. Simulations of our updated computational model show that intracellular cyanide reactions increase the amplitude of oscillations and that cyanide addition lowers [ACA] instantaneously. We conclude that cyanide provides the following means of inducing global oscillations: a) by reducing [ACAx] relative to oscillation amplitude, b) by targeting multiple intracellular carbonyl compounds during fermentation, and c) by acting as a phase resetting stimulus. PMID:25863195

  11. Zebrafish Genomic Library in Yeast Artificial Chromosomes

    PubMed

    Zhong; Kaphingst; Akella; Haldi; Lander; Fishman

    1998-02-15

    We have constructed a zebrafish yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) library using genomic DNA isolated from the inbred AB zebrafish strain. The average insert size is 470 kb, estimated from analysis of 155 random selected YACs. The library consists of 17,000 clones, providing about a 4.7-fold coverage of zebrafish genome. The YAC clones have been arrayed in individual wells of 96-well microplates and also pooled to permit rapid polymerase chain reaction screening of the entire library. We have also found that the YAC ends can be easily rescued and sequenced from pRML1/pRML2-based mini-YAC clones. Copyright 1998 Academic Press. PMID:9514818

  12. Chromosome dynamics in the yeast interphase nucleus.

    PubMed

    Heun, P; Laroche, T; Shimada, K; Furrer, P; Gasser, S M

    2001-12-01

    Little is known about the dynamics of chromosomes in interphase nuclei. By tagging four chromosomal regions with a green fluorescent protein fusion to lac repressor, we monitored the movement and subnuclear position of specific sites in the yeast genome, sampling at short time intervals. We found that early and late origins of replication are highly mobile in G1 phase, frequently moving at or faster than 0.5 micrometers/10 seconds, in an energy-dependent fashion. The rapid diffusive movement of chromatin detected in G1 becomes constrained in S phase through a mechanism dependent on active DNA replication. In contrast, telomeres and centromeres provide replication-independent constraint on chromatin movement in both G1 and S phases. PMID:11739961

  13. Import of ribosomal proteins into yeast mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Woellhaf, Michael W; Hansen, Katja G; Garth, Christoph; Herrmann, Johannes M

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial ribosomes of baker's yeast contain at least 78 protein subunits. All but one of these proteins are nuclear-encoded, synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes, and imported into the matrix for biogenesis. The import of matrix proteins typically relies on N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequences that form positively charged amphipathic helices. Interestingly, the N-terminal regions of many ribosomal proteins do not closely match the characteristics of matrix targeting sequences, suggesting that the import processes of these proteins might deviate to some extent from the general import route. So far, the biogenesis of only two ribosomal proteins, Mrpl32 and Mrp10, was studied experimentally and indeed showed surprising differences to the import of other preproteins. In this review article we summarize the current knowledge on the transport of proteins into the mitochondrial matrix, and thereby specifically focus on proteins of the mitochondrial ribosome. PMID:24943357

  14. Brazilian Propolis: Correlation between Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kelly Salomão; Paulo Roberto S. Pereira; Leila C. Campos; Cintia M. Borba; Pedro H. Cabello; Maria Cristina Marcucci; Solange L. de Castro

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition of ethanol extracts from samples of Brazilian propolis (EEPs) determined by HPLC and their activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebisiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, Sporothrix schenckii and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were determined. Based on the predominant botanical origin in the region of samples' collection, the 10 extracts were separated into three groups: A( B. dracunculifolia þ

  15. Chronic Diarrhea and Pancolitis Caused by Paracoccidioidomycosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Eduar A.; Zegarra, Arturo J.; Piscoya, Alejandro; Pinto, José L.; de los Rios, Raúl E.; Prochazka, Ricardo A.; Huerta-Mercado, Jorge L.; Mayo, Nancy L.; Tagle, Martin

    2010-01-01

    South American blastomycosis is a systemic micosis caused by infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The most frequently affected sites are the lower lip buccal mucous membrane, palate, tongue, sublingual region, lymph glands, and lungs. However, colonic involvement is not a common expression of Paracoccidioidomycosis. We report a case of chronic diarrhea and pancolitis caused by Paracoccidioidomycosis with fatal outcome. PMID:20671977

  16. Co-existence of Integumentary Lesions and Lung X-ray Abnormalities in Patients with Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angela Restrepo; Angela M. Tobón; Carlos A. Agudelo; Juan E. Ochoa; David S. Rosero; Marta L. Osorio; Luz E. Cano; Diego L. Alvarez

    In paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), the primary lung infection remains silent. In this study, attempts were done to define the primary target organ by correlating lung radiographic abnormalities with the time course of mucosal\\/ skin lesions concurrently exhibited at diagnosis by 63 patients in whom microscopy and\\/or isolation of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis from respiratory secretions had been positive. Mucosal and skin lesions were

  17. Construction of new yeast vectors and cloning of the nif (nitrogen fixation) gene cluster of Klebsiella pneumoniae in yeast

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Claude Gerbaud; Claudine Elmerich; Nicole Tandeau de Marsac; Patrick Chocat; Nicole Charpin; Michel Guérineau; Jean-Paul Aubert

    1981-01-01

    Two vectors, termed pG63.11 (7.6 Kb) and pHCG3 (9.6 Kb), suitable for yeast transformation have been constructed. The pHCG3 vector has cosmid properties. Both vectors contain a single 3.3 Kb EcoRI-HindIII fragment of yeast origin which carries the yeast URA3 gene (1.1 Kb) and the origin of replication of the 2 µm plasmid (2.2 Kb). They confer ampicillin resistance and

  18. Production of a yeast artificial chromosome for stable expression of a synthetic xylose isomerase-xylulokinase polyprotein in a fuel ethanol yeast strain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercialization of fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass has focused on engineering the glucose-fermenting industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) was engineered to contain a polyprotein gene construct expressing xylos...

  19. Variable flocculation profiles of yeast strains isolated from cachaça distilleries.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Florencia; Correa, Lygia Fátima da Mata; Araújo, Thalita Macedo; Mota, Bruno Eduardo Fernandes; da Conceição, Luís Eduardo F Ribeiro; Castro, Ieso de Miranda; Brandão, Rogelio Lopes

    2014-11-01

    In cachaça production, the use of yeast cells as starters with predictable flocculation behavior facilitates the cell recovery at the end of each fermentation cycle. Therefore, the aim of this work was to explain the behavior of cachaça yeast strains in fermentation vats containing sugarcane through the determination of biochemical and molecular parameters associated with flocculation phenotypes. By analyzing thirteen cachaça yeast strains isolated from different distilleries, our results demonstrated that neither classic biochemical measurements (e.g., percentage of flocculation, EDTA sensitivity, cell surface hydrophobicity, and sugar residues on the cell wall) nor modern molecular approaches, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (q-PCR), were sufficient to distinctly classify the cachaça yeast strains according to their flocculation behavior. It seems that flocculation is indeed a strain-specific phenomenon that is difficult to explain and/or categorize by the available methodologies. PMID:25209588

  20. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...than 10,000 organisms/gram by aerobic plate count. (2) Less than 10 yeasts and molds/gram. (3) Negative for Salmonella, E. coli, coagulase positive Staphylococci, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinum, or any other...