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Sample records for paradoxically enhance gpvi-induced

  1. Paradoxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partis, M.

    1972-01-01

    Examples of logical paradoxes, including the square root of two paradox, Achilles and the tortoise paradox, author paradox, Russell paradox, bibliomaniac paradox, and Berry paradox, are presented; some are resolved. (DT)

  2. Instability-Enhanced Collisional Effects and Langmuir's Paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Baalrud, S. D.; Callen, J. D.; Hegna, C. C.

    2009-06-19

    Anomalously fast equilibration of the electron distribution function to a Maxwellian in gas-discharge plasmas with low temperature and pressure, i.e., Langmuir's paradox, may be explained by electron scattering via an instability-enhanced collective response and hence fluctuations arising from convective ion-acoustic instabilities near the discharge boundaries.

  3. Moral enhancement, gnosticism, and some philosophical paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Barilan, Y M

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the concept of moral enhancement from two different perspectives. The first is a bottom-up approach, which aims at identifying fundamental moral traits and subcapacities as targets for enhancement. The second perspective, a top-down approach, is holistic and in line with virtue ethics. Both perspectives lead to the observation that alterations of material and social conditions are the most reliable means to improve prosocial behavior overall. Moral enhancement as a preventive measure invokes Gnostic narratives on the allegedly fallen status of human nature, its search for salvation, and the dependence of the laity on heteronomous salvific interventions. The allure of the preventive kind of enhancement is attributable to its religious hues. Owing to the absence of clarity regarding moral enhancement and of metrics to evaluate its progress, humanity is at risk of prioritizing unclear and unsubstantiated measures of preventive diminishment at the expense of celebrating human capacities and joys. PMID:25473860

  4. Ethanol enhances neurosteroidogenesis in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by paradoxical NMDA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Zorumski, Charles F

    2011-07-01

    Using an antibody against 5α-reduced neurosteroids, predominantly allopregnanolone, we found that immunostaining in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices was confined to pyramidal neurons. This neurosteroid staining was increased following 15 min administration of 60 mm but not 20 mm ethanol, and the enhancement was blocked by finasteride and dutasteride, selective inhibitors of 5α-reductase, a key enzyme required for allopregnanolone synthesis. Consistent with a prior report indicating that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) activation can promote steroid production, we observed that D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV), a competitive NMDAR antagonist, blocked the effects of 60 mm ethanol on staining. We previously reported that 60 mm ethanol inhibits the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular model for memory formation, in the CA1 region. In the present study, LTP inhibition by 60 mm ethanol was also overcome by both the 5α-reductase inhibitors and by APV. Furthermore, the effects of ethanol on neurosteroid production and LTP were mimicked by a low concentration of NMDA (1 μm), and the ability of NMDA to inhibit LTP and to enhance neurosteroid staining was reversed by finasteride and dutasteride, as well as by APV. These results indicate that ethanol paradoxically enhances GABAergic neurosteroid production by activation of unblocked NMDARs and that acute LTP inhibition by ethanol represents a form of NMDAR-mediated metaplasticity. PMID:21734282

  5. Importance of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery imaging to detect paradoxical expansion of tuberculoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jin

    2014-07-01

    Tuberculosis is a significant public health problem that continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Tuberculous meningoencephalitis (TM) is the most common extrapulmonary lesion in tuberculosis. A 41-year-old female was thought to have TM. Tests to confirm the TM diagnosis were initially negative, including tuberculosis PCR and adenosine deaminase level in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Anti-tuberculous medication and intravenous steroids were administered to her on the basis of brain imaging and lactate dehydrogenase electrophoresis in CSF, suggestive of the diagnosis of TM. Her neurological problems improved rapidly following treatment. Serologic and CSF markers were positive in PCR and culture after 60 days. Radiological findings are often nonspecific and TM is difficult to diagnose without an increased index of suspicion. The detection of paradoxical expansion of tuberculoma is very important in the maintenance of medication. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to detect paradoxical expansion of the tuberculoma using various methods, such as contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (CE-FLAIR) imaging. CE-FLAIR imaging conspicuously showed paradoxical expansion of the tuberculoma. If patients present with clear meningitis, without any identified pathogen, there is a need to constantly and scrupulously check for TM, including with the use of CE-FLAIR brain imaging. PMID:24794323

  6. Paradox: increased blood perfusion to the face enhances protection against frostbite while it lowers wind chill equivalent temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2007-05-01

    A model of facial heat exchange in cold and windy environments is presented. The tissue is depicted as a hollow cylinder and the model includes heat conduction and heat transport by blood circulation from the warmer core. A steady-state solution facilitating the estimation of wind chill equivalent temperature (WCET) as a function of the effective wind velocity, air temperature and blood perfusion rate was obtained. The results quantify and demonstrate the elevation of skin temperatures caused by increased flow of warmer blood from the inner core to the face. Elevated facial temperatures, while enhancing protection against frostbite and other cold-related injuries, also increase heat loss to the colder environment. Paradoxically, such elevated facial temperatures cause WCETs, as estimated by the prevailing definition, to attain lower rather than higher values, indicating, in fact, increased risk of frostbite. The results of this study should be useful in understanding and quantifying the effects of blood perfusion in protection against cold-related injuries. They should also be considered in the re-evaluation and re-formulation of the concept of wind chill, which has been a useful cold weather indicator for decades.

  7. Paradox: increased blood perfusion to the face enhances protection against frostbite while it lowers wind chill equivalent temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shitzer, Avraham

    2007-05-01

    A model of facial heat exchange in cold and windy environments is presented. The tissue is depicted as a hollow cylinder and the model includes heat conduction and heat transport by blood circulation from the warmer core. A steady-state solution facilitating the estimation of wind chill equivalent temperature (WCET) as a function of the effective wind velocity, air temperature and blood perfusion rate was obtained. The results quantify and demonstrate the elevation of skin temperatures caused by increased flow of warmer blood from the inner core to the face. Elevated facial temperatures, while enhancing protection against frostbite and other cold-related injuries, also increase heat loss to the colder environment. Paradoxically, such elevated facial temperatures cause WCETs, as estimated by the prevailing definition, to attain lower rather than higher values, indicating, in fact, increased risk of frostbite. The results of this study should be useful in understanding and quantifying the effects of blood perfusion in protection against cold-related injuries. They should also be considered in the re-evaluation and re-formulation of the concept of wind chill, which has been a useful cold weather indicator for decades. PMID:17333290

  8. Paradoxical Effects of Testing: Retrieval Enhances Both Accurate Recall and Suggestibility in Eyewitnesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Jason C. K.; Langley, Moses M.

    2011-01-01

    Although retrieval practice typically enhances memory retention, it can also impair subsequent eyewitness memory accuracy (Chan, Thomas, & Bulevich, 2009). Specifically, participants who had taken an initial test about a witnessed event were more likely than nontested participants to recall subsequently encountered misinformation--an effect we…

  9. Paradoxical effects of testing: retrieval enhances both accurate recall and suggestibility in eyewitnesses.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jason C K; Langley, Moses M

    2011-01-01

    Although retrieval practice typically enhances memory retention, it can also impair subsequent eyewitness memory accuracy (Chan, Thomas, & Bulevich, 2009). Specifically, participants who had taken an initial test about a witnessed event were more likely than nontested participants to recall subsequently encountered misinformation—an effect we called retrieval-enhanced suggestibility (RES). Here, we sought to test the generality of RES and to further elucidate its underlying mechanisms. To that end, we tested a dual mechanism account, which suggests that RES occurs because initial testing (a) enhances learning of the later misinformation by reducing proactive interference and (b) causes the reactivated memory trace to be more susceptible to later interference (i.e., a reconsolidation account). Three major findings emerged. First, RES was found after a 1-week delay, where a robust testing benefit occurred for event details that were not contradicted by later misinformation. Second, blockage of reconsolidation was unnecessary for RES to occur. Third, initial testing enhanced learning of the misinformation even when proactive interference played a minimal role. PMID:20919785

  10. Paradoxical reversal learning enhancement by stress or prefrontal cortical damage: rescue with BDNF

    PubMed Central

    Graybeal, Carolyn; Feyder, Michael; Schulman, Emily; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Brigman, Jonathan L.; Holmes, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Stress often has deleterious effects on cognition. We show that moderate stress enhanced late reversal learning in a mouse touchscreen-based choice task. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) lesions mimicked the effects of stress, while orbitofrontal (OFC) and dorsolateral striatal (DLS) lesions impaired reversal. Stress-facilitation of reversal was prevented by BDNF infusion into the vmPFC. These findings suggest a mechanism in which stress-induced vmPFC dysfunction disinhibits learning by alternate (e.g., striatal) systems. PMID:22057192

  11. Peripheral Attentional Targets under Covert Attention Lead to Paradoxically Enhanced Alpha Desynchronization in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gilberto; Ribeiro, Maria J.; Costa, Gabriel N.; Violante, Inês; Ramos, Fabiana; Saraiva, Jorge; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The limited capacity of the human brain to process the full extent of visual information reaching the visual cortex requires the recruitment of mechanisms of information selection through attention. Neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1) is a neurodevelopmental disease often exhibiting attentional deficits and learning disabilities, and is considered to model similar impairments common in other neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. In a previous study, we found that patients with NF1 are more prone to miss targets under overt attention conditions. This finding was interpreted as a result of increased occipito-parietal alpha oscillations. In the present study, we used electroencephalography (EEG) to study alpha power modulations and the performance of patients with NF1 in a covert attention task. Covert attention was required in order to perceive changes (target offset) of a peripherally presented stimulus. Interestingly, alpha oscillations were found to undergo greater desynchronization under this task in the NF1 group compared with control subjects. A similar pattern of desynchronization was found for beta frequencies while no changes in gamma oscillations could be identified. These results are consistent with the notion that different attentional states and task demands generate different patterns of abnormal modulation of alpha oscillatory processes in NF1. Under covert attention conditions and while target offset was reported with relatively high accuracy (over 90% correct responses), excessive desynchronization was found. These findings suggest an abnormal modulation of oscillatory activity and attentional processes in NF1. Given the known role of alpha in modulating attention, we suggest that alpha patterns can show both abnormal increases and decreases that are task and performance dependent, in a way that enhanced alpha desynchronization may reflect a compensatory mechanism to keep performance at normal levels. These results suggest that dysregulation of

  12. A direct thrombin inhibitor suppresses protein C activation and factor Va degradation in human plasma: Possible mechanisms of paradoxical enhancement of thrombin generation.

    PubMed

    Kamisato, Chikako; Furugohri, Taketoshi; Morishima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated that antithrombin (AT)-independent thrombin inhibitors paradoxically increase thrombin generation (TG) in human plasma in a thrombomodulin (TM)- and protein C (PC)-dependent manner. We determined the effects of AT-independent thrombin inhibitors on the negative-feedback system, activation of PC and production and degradation of factor Va (FVa), as possible mechanisms underlying the paradoxical enhancement of TG. TG in human plasma containing 10nM TM was assayed by means of the calibrated automated thrombography. As an index of PC activation, plasma concentration of activated PC-PC inhibitor complex (aPC-PCI) was measured. The amounts of FVa heavy chain and its degradation product (FVa(307-506)) were examined by western blotting. AT-independent thrombin inhibitors, melagatran and dabigatran (both at 25-600nM) and 3-30μg/ml active site-blocked thrombin (IIai), increased peak levels of TG. Melagatran, dabigatran and IIai significantly decreased plasma concentration of aPC-PCI complex at 25nM or more, 75nM or more, and 10 and 30μg/ml, respectively. Melagatran (300nM) significantly increased FVa and decreased FVa(307-506). In contrast, a direct factor Xa inhibitor edoxaban preferentially inhibited thrombin generation (≥25nM), and higher concentrations were required to inhibit PC activation (≥150nM) and FVa degradation (300nM). The present study suggests that the inhibitions of protein C activation and subsequent degradation of FVa and increase in FVa by antithrombin-independent thrombin inhibitors may contribute to the paradoxical TG enhancement, and edoxaban may inhibit PC activation and FVa degradation as a result of TG suppression. PMID:26974491

  13. Space Curvature and the "Heavy Banana 'Paradox.'"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruber, Ronald P.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Two ways to visually enhance the concept of space curvature are described. Viewing space curvature as a meterstick contraction and the heavy banana "paradox" are discussed. The meterstick contraction is mathematically explained. (KR)

  14. Paradoxical Enhancement of the Power Factor of Polycrystalline Silicon as a Result of the Formation of Nanovoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzi, B.; Narducci, D.; Tonini, R.; Frabboni, S.; Gazzadi, G. C.; Ottaviani, G.; Neophytou, N.; Zianni, X.

    2014-10-01

    Hole-containing silicon has been regarded as a viable candidate thermoelectric material because of its low thermal conductivity. However, because voids are efficient scattering centers not just for phonons but also for charge carriers, achievable power factors (PFs) are normally too low for its most common form, i.e. porous silicon, to be of practical interest. In this communication we report that high PFs can, indeed, be achieved with nanoporous structures obtained from highly doped silicon. High PFs, up to a huge 22 mW K-2 m-1 (more than six times higher than values for the bulk material), were observed for heavily boron-doped nanocrystalline silicon films in which nanovoids (NVs) were generated by He+ ion implantation. In contrast with single-crystalline silicon in which He+ implantation leads to large voids, in polycrystalline films implantation followed by annealing at 1000°C results in homogeneous distribution of NVs with final diameters of approximately 2 nm and densities of the order of 1019 cm-3 with average spacing of 10 nm. Study of its morphology revealed silicon nanograins 50 nm in diameter coated with 5-nm precipitates of SiB x . We recently reported that PFs up to 15 mW K-2 m-1 could be achieved for silicon-boron nanocomposites (without NVs) because of a simultaneous increase of electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient. In that case, the high Seebeck coefficient was achieved as a result of potential barriers on the grain boundaries, and high electrical conductivity was achieved as a result of extremely high levels of doping. The additional increase in the PF observed in the presence of NVs (which also include SiB x precipitates) might have several possible explanations; these are currently under investigation. Experimental results are reported which might clarify the reason for this paradoxical effect of NVs on silicon PF.

  15. The Integration Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Verkuyten, Maykel

    2016-01-01

    The integration paradox refers to the phenomenon of the more highly educated and structurally integrated immigrants turning away from the host society, rather than becoming more oriented toward it. This article provides an overview of the empirical evidence documenting this paradox in the Netherlands. In addition, the theoretical arguments and the available findings about the social psychological processes involved in this paradox are considered. The existing evidence for the integration paradox and what might explain it form the basis for making suggestion for future theoretical work and empirical research, and for discussing possible policy implications. PMID:27152028

  16. Aharonov-bohm paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trammel, G. T.

    1964-01-01

    Aharonov-bohm paradox involving charge particle interaction with stationary current distribution showing that vector potential term in canonical momenta expression represents electromagnetic field momentum

  17. Paradoxes in dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Adya, Keshavmurthy A.; Inamadar, Arun C.; Palit, Aparna

    2013-01-01

    Many paradoxical phenomena related to clinical, immunological, and therapeutic dermatology have been described. While some of them can be explained logically, the cause for others can only be speculated. Whenever encountered in clinical practice, background knowledge of such paradoxes may be useful to the clinician. PMID:23741675

  18. Quantum Quasi-Paradoxes and Quantum Sorites Paradoxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2009-03-01

    There can be generated many paradoxes or quasi-paradoxes that may occur from the combination of quantum and non-quantum worlds in physics. Even the passage from the micro-cosmos to the macro-cosmos, and reciprocally, can generate unsolved questions or counter-intuitive ideas. We define a quasi-paradox as a statement which has a prima facie self-contradictory support or an explicit contradiction, but which is not completely proven as a paradox. We present herein four elementary quantum quasi-paradoxes and their corresponding quantum Sorites paradoxes, which form a class of quantum quasi-paradoxes.

  19. Paradoxical response to levalbuterol.

    PubMed

    Broski, Sarah E; Amundson, Dennis E

    2008-04-01

    Asthma is a common condition that can substantially affect patients' quality of life. Although several drugs, most commonly beta-adrenergic agonists, alleviate symptoms of asthma, they may cause paradoxical bronchospasm or paradoxical bronchoconstriction. Levalbuterol hydrochloride-a pure form of the (R)-stereoisomer in racemic albuterol-eliminates the adrenergic properties that can cause such adverse effects. However, we report a case of paradoxical bronchoconstriction in a 36-year-old man who was recently diagnosed as having new-onset asthma and was treated with levalbuterol. PMID:18443029

  20. Counsellor Education: A Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, William L.; Marks, Stephen E.

    1972-01-01

    This article examines the nature and impact of paradoxical situations in counsellor education. The counsellor educator and trainee are the focus for defining and then examining these dilemmas. (Author)

  1. Thermal Expansion "Paradox."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fakhruddin, Hasan

    1993-01-01

    Describes a paradox in the equation for thermal expansion. If the calculations for heating a rod and subsequently cooling a rod are determined, the new length of the cool rod is shorter than expected. (PR)

  2. Length Paradox in Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Roberto de A.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a thought experiment using a general analysis approach with Lorentz transformations to show that the apparent self-contradictions of special relativity concerning the length-paradox are really non-existant. (GA)

  3. Paradoxes of geoelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savin, M. G.

    2016-03-01

    The problem of energy paradoxes revealed in geoelectrics are discussed. The experimental facts illustrating the anomalous energy characteristics of the magnetotelluric (MT) field are presented. An attempt is made to interpret these anomalies from the standpoint of directional analysis. Two three-layer models corresponding to the situation | Q| > 1 and widetilde {{S_z}} < 0 are found by the numerical modeling. The possibility of accounting for the observed paradoxes within the resonance model "heterogeneous plane wave—layered medium" is discussed.

  4. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  5. The quercetin paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Boots, Agnes W. . E-mail: a.boots@farmaco.unimaas.nl; Li, Hui; Schins, Roel P.F.; Duffin, Rodger; Heemskerk, Johan W.M.; Bast, Aalt; Haenen, Guido R.M.M.

    2007-07-01

    Free radical scavenging antioxidants, such as quercetin, are chemically converted into oxidation products when they protect against free radicals. The main oxidation product of quercetin, however, displays a high reactivity towards thiols, which can lead to the loss of protein function. The quercetin paradox is that in the process of offering protection, quercetin is converted into a potential toxic product. In the present study, this paradox is evaluated using rat lung epithelial (RLE) cells. It was found that quercetin efficiently protects against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced DNA damage in RLE cells, but this damage is swapped for a reduction in GSH level, an increase in LDH leakage as well as an increase of the cytosolic free calcium concentration. To our knowledge, this is the first study that indicates that the quercetin paradox, i.e. the exchange of damage caused by quercetin and its metabolites, also occurs in living lung cells. Following depletion of GSH in the cells by BSO pre-treatment, this quercetin paradox becomes more pronounced, confirming that the formation of thiol reactive quercetin metabolites is involved in the quercetin paradox. The quercetin paradox in living cells implies that the anti-oxidant directs oxidative damage selectively to thiol arylation. Apparently, the potential toxicity of metabolites formed during the actual antioxidant activity of free radical scavengers should be considered in antioxidant supplementation.

  6. Paradoxical Manifestation is Common in HIV-negative Tuberculous Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tai, Mei-Ling Sharon; Nor, Hazman Mohd; Kadir, Khairul Azmi Abdul; Viswanathan, Shanthi; Rahmat, Kartini; Zain, Norzaini Rose Mohd; Ong, Kuo Ghee; Rafia, Mohd Hanip; Tan, Chong Tin

    2016-01-01

    Paradoxical manifestation is worsening of pre-existing tuberculous lesion or appearance of new lesions in patients whose condition initially improved with antituberculous treatment. Our hypothesis was that paradoxical manifestation in non-HIV tuberculous meningitis (TBM) patients was underestimated and this could contribute to patients' prognosis. This was the first systemic study of paradoxical manifestation in HIV-negative TBM patients. Between 2009 and 2014, TBM patients were studied prospectively in 2 hospitals. Clinical features, cerebrospinal fluid, and radiological findings were monitored. Paradoxical manifestation was divided into definite (4 weeks or more) and probable (between 14 and 27 d) after commencement of antituberculous treatment. Forty-one non-HIV TBM patients were recruited. Definite paradoxical manifestation occurred in 23/41 (56%) of the patients. Time to onset of paradoxical manifestation was between 28 days and 9 months, and majority was between 28 and 50 days. Neuroimaging manifestation in the brain (22/41 patients, 54%) and clinical manifestation (22/41 patients, 54%) were most commonly seen, followed by cerebrospinal fluid manifestation (7/41 patients, 17%). Neuroimaging changes most commonly seen were worsening of leptomeningeal enhancement, new infarcts, new tuberculomas, and enlargement of tuberculoma. Initial Computed Tomography Angiography/magnetic resonance angiography brain showed vasculitis in 14 patients, with 2 (12.5%) showing paradoxical vasculitis during follow-up. Recurrence of the paradoxical manifestation was seen in 7/23 (30%) of the patients. More than half (14/23, 61%) of the patients improved, 6 (26%) patients died, and 3 (13%) patients had persistent neurological deficit. Paradoxical manifestation was very common in non-HIV TBM patients. Neuroimaging paradoxical manifestation of 2-4 weeks may not be paradoxical manifestation but could be delayed treatment response. PMID:26735523

  7. Paradoxical Manifestation is Common in HIV-negative Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Mei-Ling Sharon; Nor, Hazman Mohd; Kadir, Khairul Azmi Abdul; Viswanathan, Shanthi; Rahmat, Kartini; Zain, Norzaini Rose Mohd; Ong, Kuo Ghee; Rafia, Mohd Hanip; Tan, Chong Tin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Paradoxical manifestation is worsening of pre-existing tuberculous lesion or appearance of new lesions in patients whose condition initially improved with antituberculous treatment. Our hypothesis was that paradoxical manifestation in non-HIV tuberculous meningitis (TBM) patients was underestimated and this could contribute to patients’ prognosis. This was the first systemic study of paradoxical manifestation in HIV-negative TBM patients. Between 2009 and 2014, TBM patients were studied prospectively in 2 hospitals. Clinical features, cerebrospinal fluid, and radiological findings were monitored. Paradoxical manifestation was divided into definite (4 weeks or more) and probable (between 14 and 27 d) after commencement of antituberculous treatment. Forty-one non-HIV TBM patients were recruited. Definite paradoxical manifestation occurred in 23/41 (56%) of the patients. Time to onset of paradoxical manifestation was between 28 days and 9 months, and majority was between 28 and 50 days. Neuroimaging manifestation in the brain (22/41 patients, 54%) and clinical manifestation (22/41 patients, 54%) were most commonly seen, followed by cerebrospinal fluid manifestation (7/41 patients, 17%). Neuroimaging changes most commonly seen were worsening of leptomeningeal enhancement, new infarcts, new tuberculomas, and enlargement of tuberculoma. Initial Computed Tomography Angiography/magnetic resonance angiography brain showed vasculitis in 14 patients, with 2 (12.5%) showing paradoxical vasculitis during follow-up. Recurrence of the paradoxical manifestation was seen in 7/23 (30%) of the patients. More than half (14/23, 61%) of the patients improved, 6 (26%) patients died, and 3 (13%) patients had persistent neurological deficit. Paradoxical manifestation was very common in non-HIV TBM patients. Neuroimaging paradoxical manifestation of 2-4 weeks may not be paradoxical manifestation but could be delayed treatment response. PMID:26735523

  8. Some irreverent thoughts on paradox.

    PubMed

    Dell, P F

    1981-03-01

    There is currently great interest in the use of paradox in psychotherapy. Unfortunately, there is also considerable confusion and misunderstanding of paradox, owing, in part, to the lack of a comprehensive theory that explains the role of paradox in human problems. This paper does not address itself to such theory but explores some cultural and epistemological components of therapists' misperceptions and misattributions of "paradox." PMID:7215523

  9. Paradoxical Interventions in Counseling Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowd, E. Thomas; Milne, Christopher R.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the use of paradoxical interventions in counseling psychology and surveys the research literature to date. After a description of the historical background of paradoxical interventions, current schools of therapy using paradox are presented. Discusses theoretical and definitional underpinnings, with particular attention paid to the…

  10. A Hydrostatic Paradox Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganci, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    This paper revisits a well-known hydrostatic paradox, observed when turning upside down a glass partially filled with water and covered with a sheet of light material. The phenomenon is studied in its most general form by including the mass of the cover. A historical survey of this experiment shows that a common misunderstanding of the phenomenon…

  11. Behind the Mpemba paradox.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chang Qing

    2015-01-01

    Mpemba paradox results from hydrogen-bond anomalous relaxation. Heating stretches the O:H nonbond and shortens the H-O bond via Coulomb coupling; cooling reverses this process to emit heat at a rate depending on its initial storage. Skin ultra-low mass density raises the thermal diffusivity and favors outward heat flow from the liquid. PMID:27227000

  12. A Magnetic Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Ebe

    2006-11-01

    Two recent articles1,2 in this journal described how an air core solenoid connected to an ac power source may restore the magnetization of a bar magnet with an alternating magnetic field (see Figs. 1 and 2). Although we are quite accustomed to using a constant magnetic field in an air core solenoid to remagnetize a ferromagnet, it is puzzling that we can also use an alternating magnetic field to realign the magnetic domains of a ferromagnet. To make the puzzle even more intriguing, the very same setup may be used to degauss a TV screen; that is, the alternating magnetic field of an air core solenoid can also "scramble" the magnetic domains of a ferromagnet! Although the latter phenomenon intuitively makes more sense, we are still left with a confusing paradox: How can an alternating magnetic field align the magnetic domains in one ferromagnet and scramble the magnetic domains in another? Paradoxes like these are ideal for student investigations because they create a natural interest. In fact, since the two articles mentioned above were unable to explain the magnetic paradox, my students and I were intrigued enough to investigate the phenomenon and then try to understand it theoretically. This paper describes how we used the paradoxical phenomenon for a student investigation into nonlinear systems. In order to be successful, students should be familiar with calculus, preferably at the level of an advanced-placement class.

  13. The Hydrostatic Paradox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Alpha E.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an example demonstrating the quantitative resolution of the hydrostatic paradox which is the realization that the force due to fluid pressure on the bottom of a vessel can be considerably greater or considerably less than the weight of the fluid in the vessel. (JRH)

  14. Paramagnetism Paradoxes: Projectable Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Frederick C.; Vitz, Ed

    2008-01-01

    Drops of oil in Mn(SO[subscript 4])(aq) and drops of the solution in oil show opposite effects when brought near a rare earth magnet. Oxygen, nitrogen, and air bubbles atop water show expected attraction, repulsion, and null behavior, respectively. Air bubbles atop aqueous Mn(SO[subscript 4]) show paradoxical behavior because the magnet's…

  15. Adventures in Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Pip; Moore, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    The popularity of adventure recreation and adventure education has arisen, in part, from an assumption that adventure experiences are radically different from those of everyday life in modern societies. A paradox previously pointed out is that those seeking adventurous experiences often make use of technical and technological prosthetics, thus…

  16. The lanolin paradox.

    PubMed

    Wolf, R

    1996-01-01

    Several puzzling aspects of the use of lanolin are discussed as "lanolin paradoxes', in analogy with the 'paraben paradoxes'. Lanolin in topical therapeutic agents sensitizes a high proportion of patients, whereas the same lanolin is 'safe' in cosmetics so widely used by millions of individuals. Patients with an allergic contact dermatitis to lanolin in a medication applied to a stasis ulcer can nevertheless use lanolin-containing cosmetics and not experience a reaction. Lanolin-sensitive individuals often show false-negative patch test reactions to unaltered lanolin. Patch testing with 30% wool wax alcohols used in the standard patch test tray cannot be considered a reliable method for detecting and confirming lanolin allergies. There are too many false-positive and false-negative results using the standard patch test tray. PMID:8726630

  17. The Information Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amati, D.

    The incompatibility between gravity and quantum coherence represented by black holes should be solved by a consistent quantum theory that contains gravity as superstring theory. Despite many encouraging results in that sense, I question here the general feeling of a na"ive resolution of the paradox. And indicate non-trivial physical possibilities towards its solution that are suggested by string theory and may be further investigated in its context.

  18. The Bohr paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2008-05-01

    In his book Niels Bohr's Times, the physicist Abraham Pais captures a paradox in his subject's legacy by quoting three conflicting assessments. Pais cites Max Born, of the first generation of quantum physics, and Werner Heisenberg, of the second, as saying that Bohr had a greater influence on physics and physicists than any other scientist. Yet Pais also reports a distinguished younger colleague asking with puzzlement and scepticism "What did Bohr really do?".

  19. The paradox of Schrodinger's cat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villars, C. N.

    1986-07-01

    Erwin Schrodinger first described the thought-experiment which has since become known as 'the paradox of Schrodinger's cat' 51 years ago. In recent years, popular accounts of quantum mechanics have tended to adopt one or other of the philosophically most extreme solutions to this paradox, i.e. the consciousness hypothesis or the many worlds interpretation. The author attempts to redress the balance by describing what he takes to be the orthodox solution to the paradox which explains the paradox, without recourse to such counterintuitive notions as a cat simultaneously dead and alive or a universe continually splitting into multiple worlds, as being due to a misapplication of the quantum formalism.

  20. Comment on the extinct paradox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The extinction paradox is a contradiction between geometrical optics results which predict that at high frequencies the scattering cross section of an object should equal its geometrical cross section and rigorous scattering theory which shows that at high frequencies the scattering cross section approaches twice the geometrical cross section of the object. Confusion about the reason for this paradox persists today even though the nature of the paradox was correctly identified many years ago by Brillouin. The resolution of the paradox is restated and illustrated with an example, and then the implications to the interpretation of scattering cross sections are identified.

  1. Paradoxical Vocal Fold Movement (PVFM)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careers Certification Publications Events Advocacy Continuing Education Practice Management Research Home / Information for the Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Paradoxical Vocal Fold ...

  2. Zermelo, Boltzmann, and the recurrence paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckline, Vincent S.

    1983-10-01

    The papers exchanged by Ludwig Boltzmann and Ernst Zermelo concerning the recurrence paradox are summarized. The historical context of the paradox, Zermelo's proof of the paradox, his opinions of its consequences, Boltzmann's reply, and the ensuing discussion are described.

  3. The paradox of enrichment in phytoplankton by induced competitive interactions.

    PubMed

    Tubay, Jerrold M; Ito, Hiromu; Uehara, Takashi; Kakishima, Satoshi; Morita, Satoru; Togashi, Tatsuya; Tainaka, Kei-ichi; Niraula, Mohan P; Casareto, Beatriz E; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Yoshimura, Jin

    2013-01-01

    The biodiversity loss of phytoplankton with eutrophication has been reported in many aquatic ecosystems, e.g., water pollution and red tides. This phenomenon seems similar, but different from the paradox of enrichment via trophic interactions, e.g., predator-prey systems. We here propose the paradox of enrichment by induced competitive interactions using multiple contact process (a lattice Lotka-Volterra competition model). Simulation results demonstrate how eutrophication invokes more competitions in a competitive ecosystem resulting in the loss of phytoplankton diversity in ecological time. The paradox is enhanced under local interactions, indicating that the limited dispersal of phytoplankton reduces interspecific competition greatly. Thus, the paradox of enrichment appears when eutrophication destroys an ecosystem either by elevated interspecific competition within a trophic level and/or destabilization by trophic interactions. Unless eutrophication due to human activities is ceased, the world's aquatic ecosystems will be at risk. PMID:24089056

  4. The Easterlin paradox revisited.

    PubMed

    Frank, Robert H

    2012-12-01

    The traditional view that well-being depends on both absolute and relative income was challenged in a 1974 paper by Richard Easterlin (Does economic growth improve the human lot? In P. David and M. Reder (Eds.), Nations and households in economic growth: Essays in honor of Moses Abramovitz (pp. 89-125), New York: Academic Press). He noted that although individual well-being is strongly positively associated with income within any country at a given point in time, the average level of measured well-being for a country changes little over time, even in the face of substantial growth in average incomes. For decades, social scientists have struggled to explain this "Easterlin Paradox." In a 2008 paper, Betsey Stephenson and Justin Wolfers (Economic growth and subjective well-being: Reassessing the Easterlin Paradox, Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Vol. 39, pp. 1-87) argued that the Easterlin Paradox was a statistical illusion. Using richer data sets that facilitate more precise estimates of the various links between income and well-being, they assert that average well-being in a country does, in fact, rise as average income rises over time, and that rich countries are happier than slightly poorer ones. They also suggest that the link between income and well-being may run through absolute income alone-that is, that individual well-being may be completely independent of relative income. In this article, I argue that there have always been good reasons to believe that well-being is positively linked to absolute income. I also argue, however, that there is no reason to believe that individual well-being is independent of relative income. PMID:23088778

  5. The Floating Ball Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wente, Henry C.

    2008-11-01

    In capillary theory there are two kinds of surface tension. There is the surface tension at the interface between two immiscible fluids. Thomas Young [9] also allowed for there to be a surface tension associated with a liquid-solid interface. He proceeded to use a balance of forces argument to derive the well-known contact angle condition along a liquid-liquid-solid intersection. The validity of this argument has recently been called into question by R. Finn [6]. A floating ball experiment discussed in that paper leads to an apparent paradox. We address this issue.

  6. Confronting Twin Paradox Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Thomas W.

    2016-05-01

    The resolution to the classic twin paradox in special relativity rests on the asymmetry of acceleration. Yet most students are not exposed to a satisfactory analysis of what exactly happens during the acceleration phase that results in the nonaccelerated observer's more rapid aging. The simple treatment presented here offers both graphical and quantitative solutions to the problem, leading to the correct result that the acceleration-induced age gap is 2Lβ years when the one-way distance L is expressed in light-years and velocity β ≡v/c .

  7. From Paradox to Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrlich, Fritz

    1989-08-01

    Preface; Part I. At the Roof of the Endeavor: 1. Human limitations; 2. Theory and the role of mathematics; 3. Scientific objectivity; 4. The aim of scientific theory; Part II. The World of Relativity: 5. Space and time: from absolute to relative; 6. Imposed consistency: special relativity; 7. Gravitation as geometry: general relativity; 8. Revolutions without revolutions; Part III. The Quantum World: 9. The limits of the classical world; 10. Concepts of the quantum world; 11. From apparent paradox to a new reality; 12. The present state of the art; Epilogue; Notes; Glossary of technical terms; Name index; Subject index.

  8. The Teacher's Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilyquist, J. Gary

    1998-06-01

    New findings suggest that the way in which schools conduct their business is blocking our educational system from improving at a rate required to meet society's needs. A ground theory developed by exploring six organizational dimensions: external and internal environment cultures, leadership, strategy, structure, and results, verified the existence of the teacher's paradox. Implications suggest educational reformers must rethink approaches to school improvement by work within cultural boundaries. The forth coming book, "Are schools really like this?" presents "The Balance Alignment Model and Theory" to improve our schools using system thinking.

  9. Barn and Pole Paradox: Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacioppo, Robert; Gangopadhyaya, Asim

    2012-01-01

    Paradoxes have played great instructive roles in many cultures. They provide an excellent paradigm for teaching concepts that require deep reflection. In this article, the authors present two different paradoxes related to the length contraction in special relativity and explain their resolution. They hope that these two Gedanken experiments and…

  10. Mathematical background of Parrondo's paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrends, Ehrhard

    2004-05-01

    Parrondo's paradox states that there are losing gambling games which, when being combined stochastically or in a suitable deterministic way, give rise to winning games. Here we investigate the probabilistic background. We show how the properties of the equilibrium distributions of the Markov chains under consideration give rise to the paradoxical behavior, and we provide methods how to find the best a priori strategies.

  11. The Paradox in Institutional Renewal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Kim

    The renewal of institutions and maintenance of excellence in the uncertain future are discussed, based on research with 335 four-year universities and colleges. In examining the function of paradox in adaptation and renewal, it was found that individuals who can simultaneously focus on opposites, or paradoxes, are tolerant and flexible.…

  12. The lunar apatite paradox.

    PubMed

    Boyce, J W; Tomlinson, S M; McCubbin, F M; Greenwood, J P; Treiman, A H

    2014-04-25

    Recent discoveries of water-rich lunar apatite are more consistent with the hydrous magmas of Earth than the otherwise volatile-depleted rocks of the Moon. Paradoxically, this requires H-rich minerals to form in rocks that are otherwise nearly anhydrous. We modeled existing data from the literature, finding that nominally anhydrous minerals do not sufficiently fractionate H from F and Cl to generate H-rich apatite. Hydrous apatites are explained as the products of apatite-induced low magmatic fluorine, which increases the H/F ratio in melt and apatite. Mare basalts may contain hydrogen-rich apatite, but lunar magmas were most likely poor in hydrogen, in agreement with the volatile depletion that is both observed in lunar rocks and required for canonical giant-impact models of the formation of the Moon. PMID:24652938

  13. Resveratrol: French Paradox Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Catalgol, Betul; Batirel, Saime; Taga, Yavuz; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal

    2012-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol that plays a potentially important role in many disorders and has been studied in different diseases. The research on this chemical started through the “French paradox,” which describes improved cardiovascular outcomes despite a high-fat diet in French people. Since then, resveratrol has been broadly studied and shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, and anti-angiogenic effects, with those on oxidative stress possibly being most important and underlying some of the others, but many signaling pathways are among the molecular targets of resveratrol. In concert they may be beneficial in many disorders, particularly in diseases where oxidative stress plays an important role. The main focus of this review will be the pathways affected by resveratrol. Based on these mechanistic considerations, the involvement of resveratrol especially in cardiovascular diseases, cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and possibly in longevity will be is addressed. PMID:22822401

  14. Paradoxes of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, E. Kh.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2009-08-15

    Despite the theory of neutrino oscillations being rather old, some of its basic issues are still being debated in the literature. We discuss a number of such issues, including the relevance of the 'same energy' and 'same momentum' assumptions, the role of quantum-mechanical uncertainty relations in neutrino oscillations, the dependence of the coherence and localization conditions that ensure the observability of neutrino oscillations on neutrino energy and momentum uncertainties, the question of (in)dependence of the oscillation probabilities on the neutrino production and detection processes, and the applicability limits of the stationary-source approximation. We also develop a novel approach to calculation of the oscillation probability in the wave-packet approach, based on the summation/integration conventions different from the standard one, which allows a new insight into the 'same energy' vs. 'same momentum' problem. We also discuss a number of apparently paradoxical features of the theory of neutrino oscillations.

  15. Reconsideration of the Paradox of Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Kunimasa

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the Meno presents the argument called "the paradox of inquiry." This paper has two purposes. First, I analyze the paradox of inquiry and reformulate the argument as the "renewed paradox of inquiry." Second, I clarify that the problem of inquiry posed by this paradox concerns the necessary conditions for a…

  16. Enhancing Visitors' Interest in Science--A Possibility or a Paradox? A Study of What Scientific Content Staff Members Focus on when Planning a New Exhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidsson, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Within the enterprise of science and technology centres there exists explicit aims and ambitions to enhance visitors' interest in and knowledge about science. Meanwhile, several researchers question the choice of the scientific content in exhibitions when arguing that a too unproblematic view of science commonly is presented. But how do staff…

  17. Unveiling the Mobile Learning Paradox.

    PubMed

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    A mobile learning paradox exists in Australian healthcare settings. Although it is increasingly acknowledged that timely, easy, and convenient access to health information using mobile learning technologies can enhance care and improve patient outcomes, currently there is an inability for nurses to access information at the point of care. Rapid growth in the use of mobile technology has created challenges for learning and teaching in the workplace. Easy access to educational resources via mobile devices challenges traditional strategies of knowledge and skill acquisition. Redesign of learning and teaching in the undergraduate curriculum and the development of policies to support the use of mobile learning at point of care is overdue. This study explored mobile learning opportunities used by clinical supervisors in tertiary and community-based facilities in two Australian States. Individual, organisation and systems level governance were sub-themes of professionalism that emerged as the main theme and impacts on learning and teaching in situ in healthcare environments. It is imperative healthcare work redesign includes learning and teaching that supports professional identity formation of students during work integrated learning. PMID:26262539

  18. Paradoxical activation of MEK/ERK signaling induced by B-Raf inhibition enhances DR5 expression and DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, You-Take; Deng, Jiusheng; Yue, Ping; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    B-Raf inhibitors have been used for the treatment of some B-Raf–mutated cancers. They effectively inhibit B-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling in cancers harboring mutant B-Raf, but paradoxically activates MEK/ERK in Ras-mutated cancers. Death receptor 5 (DR5), a cell surface pro-apoptotic protein, triggers apoptosis upon ligation with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or aggregation. This study focused on determining the effects of B-Raf inhibition on DR5 expression and DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells. Using chemical and genetic approaches, we have demonstrated that the B-Raf inhibitor PLX4032 induces DR5 upregulation exclusively in Ras-mutant cancer cells; this effect is dependent on Ras/c-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling activation. PLX4032 induces DR5 expression at transcriptional levels, largely due to enhancing CHOP/Elk1-mediated DR5 transcription. Pre-exposure of Ras-mutated cancer cells to PLX4032 sensitizes them to TRAIL-induced apoptosis; this is also a c-Raf/MEK/ERK-dependent event. Collectively, our findings highlight a previously undiscovered effect of B-Raf inhibition on the induction of DR5 expression and the enhancement of DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells and hence may suggest a novel therapeutic strategy against Ras-mutated cancer cells by driving their death due to DR5-dependent apoptosis through B-Raf inhibition. PMID:27222248

  19. Paradoxical activation of MEK/ERK signaling induced by B-Raf inhibition enhances DR5 expression and DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, You-Take; Deng, Jiusheng; Yue, Ping; Sun, Shi-Yong

    2016-01-01

    B-Raf inhibitors have been used for the treatment of some B-Raf-mutated cancers. They effectively inhibit B-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling in cancers harboring mutant B-Raf, but paradoxically activates MEK/ERK in Ras-mutated cancers. Death receptor 5 (DR5), a cell surface pro-apoptotic protein, triggers apoptosis upon ligation with tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) or aggregation. This study focused on determining the effects of B-Raf inhibition on DR5 expression and DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells. Using chemical and genetic approaches, we have demonstrated that the B-Raf inhibitor PLX4032 induces DR5 upregulation exclusively in Ras-mutant cancer cells; this effect is dependent on Ras/c-Raf/MEK/ERK signaling activation. PLX4032 induces DR5 expression at transcriptional levels, largely due to enhancing CHOP/Elk1-mediated DR5 transcription. Pre-exposure of Ras-mutated cancer cells to PLX4032 sensitizes them to TRAIL-induced apoptosis; this is also a c-Raf/MEK/ERK-dependent event. Collectively, our findings highlight a previously undiscovered effect of B-Raf inhibition on the induction of DR5 expression and the enhancement of DR5 activation-induced apoptosis in Ras-mutant cancer cells and hence may suggest a novel therapeutic strategy against Ras-mutated cancer cells by driving their death due to DR5-dependent apoptosis through B-Raf inhibition. PMID:27222248

  20. The Statistical Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, C.

    In this paper is provided the statistical generalization of the Fermi paradox. The statistics of habitable planets may be based on a set of ten (and possibly more) astrobiological requirements first pointed out by Stephen H. Dole in his book Habitable planets for man (1964). The statistical generalization of the original and by now too simplistic Dole equation is provided by replacing a product of ten positive numbers by the product of ten positive random variables. This is denoted the SEH, an acronym standing for “Statistical Equation for Habitables”. The proof in this paper is based on the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) of Statistics, stating that the sum of any number of independent random variables, each of which may be ARBITRARILY distributed, approaches a Gaussian (i.e. normal) random variable (Lyapunov form of the CLT). It is then shown that: 1. The new random variable NHab, yielding the number of habitables (i.e. habitable planets) in the Galaxy, follows the log- normal distribution. By construction, the mean value of this log-normal distribution is the total number of habitable planets as given by the statistical Dole equation. 2. The ten (or more) astrobiological factors are now positive random variables. The probability distribution of each random variable may be arbitrary. The CLT in the so-called Lyapunov or Lindeberg forms (that both do not assume the factors to be identically distributed) allows for that. In other words, the CLT "translates" into the SEH by allowing an arbitrary probability distribution for each factor. This is both astrobiologically realistic and useful for any further investigations. 3. By applying the SEH it is shown that the (average) distance between any two nearby habitable planets in the Galaxy may be shown to be inversely proportional to the cubic root of NHab. This distance is denoted by new random variable D. The relevant probability density function is derived, which was named the "Maccone distribution" by Paul Davies in

  1. Enhancing Visitors' Interest in Science - A Possibility or A Paradox?. A Study of What Scientific Content Staff Members Focus on When Planning a New Exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsson, Eva

    2009-03-01

    Within the enterprise of science and technology centres there exists explicit aims and ambitions to enhance visitors’ interest in and knowledge about science. Meanwhile, several researchers question the choice of the scientific content in exhibitions when arguing that a too unproblematic view of science commonly is presented. But how do staff members consider what scientific content to include and how this content can be organised in exhibitions? The results from interviews of staff members, responsible for planning and creating new exhibitions, suggest that they consider the scientific content of their exhibitions to a high extent in terms of organizational matters. This means that the staff members tend to not consider discussions about what aspects of science to include or exclude. Further on, the results imply that the relation between science and society risk being implicit to the visitors, whereas the aspect of scientific processes tend to be overlooked when constructing new exhibitions. The staff members express an anxiety in displaying scientific uncertainties or different models of explanations when arguing that this risks confusing the visitors. However, these aspects of science are, in the field of science education, considered crucial in order to create curiosity and interest in science. Does this mean that science and technology centres, through their eagerness to enhance young visitors’ scientific literacy, risk contributing to their detachment from or unconcern for scientific issues?

  2. The Bicyclist's Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Randy

    2008-05-01

    It's a situation every avid cyclist knows only too well. If you cycle up a hill and then back down with no net change in elevation, it seems as if your slower uphill speed and faster downhill speed should offset each other. But they don't. Your average speed is less than it would have been had you cycled the same distance on a level road. Similarly, cycling into a headwind for half your trip and returning home with a tailwind yields an average speed less than you would have achieved on a windless day. The faster part of the ride doesn't compensate for the slower part. It seems unjust. Most cyclists expect the uphill and downhill, or the headwind and tailwind, to more or less cancel and are surprised (and frustrated!) when they don't. The purpose of this paper is to resolve this paradox. Doing so involves some nice real-world applications of Newton's laws, numerical problem solving, and exercise physiology. There's a lot to learn from analyzing this problem, and it's readily accessible to introductory physics students.

  3. A relativistic trolley paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvejev, Vadim N.; Matvejev, Oleg V.; Grøn, Ø.

    2016-06-01

    We present an apparent paradox within the special theory of relativity, involving a trolley with relativistic velocity and its rolling wheels. Two solutions are given, both making clear the physical reality of the Lorentz contraction, and that the distance on the rails between each time a specific point on the rim touches the rail is not equal to 2 π R , where R is the radius of the wheel, but 2 π R / √{ 1 - R 2 Ω 2 / c 2 } , where Ω is the angular velocity of the wheels. In one solution, the wheel radius is constant as the velocity of the trolley increases, and in the other the wheels contract in the radial direction. We also explain two surprising facts. First that the shape of a rolling wheel is elliptical in spite of the fact that the upper part of the wheel moves faster than the lower part, and thus is more Lorentz contracted, and second that a Lorentz contracted wheel with relativistic velocity rolls out a larger distance between two successive touches of a point of the wheel on the rails than the length of a circle with the same radius as the wheels.

  4. THE PARADOX OF THE PLANKTON: COMMUNITY STRUCTURE PROMOTES BLOOMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: The 'paradox of the plankton' refers to commensalism as well as symbiosis, predation, and impacts of non equilibrium conditions between two planktonic

    competitors. In regards to commensalism, phytoplankton can release organic carbon that enhances growth of its ba...

  5. The fermi paradox is neither Fermi's nor a paradox.

    PubMed

    Gray, Robert H

    2015-03-01

    The so-called Fermi paradox claims that if technological life existed anywhere else, we would see evidence of its visits to Earth--and since we do not, such life does not exist, or some special explanation is needed. Enrico Fermi, however, never published anything on this topic. On the one occasion he is known to have mentioned it, he asked "Where is everybody?"--apparently suggesting that we do not see extraterrestrials on Earth because interstellar travel may not be feasible, but not suggesting that intelligent extraterrestrial life does not exist or suggesting its absence is paradoxical. The claim "they are not here; therefore they do not exist" was first published by Michael Hart, claiming that interstellar travel and colonization of the Galaxy would be inevitable if intelligent extraterrestrial life existed, and taking its absence here as proof that it does not exist anywhere. The Fermi paradox appears to originate in Hart's argument, not Fermi's question. Clarifying the origin of these ideas is important, because the Fermi paradox is seen by some as an authoritative objection to searching for evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence--cited in the U.S. Congress as a reason for killing NASA's SETI program on one occasion. But evidence indicates that it misrepresents Fermi's views, misappropriates his authority, deprives the actual authors of credit, and is not a valid paradox. PMID:25719510

  6. Is "healthy dying" a paradox? revisiting an early Kastenbaum challenge.

    PubMed

    Kellehear, Allan

    This article is a review of Robert Kastenbaum's 1979 essay entitled "Healthy dying: A paradoxical quest continues." It begins with a summary of the arguments and challenges in the original essay. This is followed by an evaluation of his original claims in the light of contemporary insights in modern public health history and empirical studies of near-death experiences and death bed visions. The recent development of health promotion in palliative care is described in relation to these developments and Kastenbaum's early question about the paradoxical quest for health while dying is again posed against this background. Given our modern understanding of "health" in current global health policy and debates, it is argued that "healthy dying" is no paradox. Instead, the pursuit of health at the end of life represents a realistic modern desire to compress morbidity, minimize unnecessary suffering, and enhance quality of life at this time. PMID:25351589

  7. The helium paradoxes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Don L.

    1998-01-01

    The ratio 3He/4He (R) plays a central role in models of mantle evolution that propose an undegassed lower mantle, rich in the primordial isotope 3He. A large primordial volatile-rich reservoir, a feature of recent models, is inconsistent with high-temperature accretion and with estimates of crustal and bulk Earth chemistry. High R can alternatively reflect high integrated 3He/(U+Th) ratios or low 4He abundances, as expected in refractory portions of the upper mantle. I show that high R materials are gas-poor and are deficient in radiogenic 4He compared with midocean ridge basalts. The seemingly primitive (i.e., high R) signatures in “hotspot” magmas may be secondary, derived from CO2-rich gases, or residual peridotite, a result of differential partitioning of U and He into magmas. A shallow and low 3He source explains the spatial variability and the temporal trends of R in ocean islands and is consistent with a volatile-poor planet. A shallow origin for the “primitive” He signature in ocean island basalts, such as at Loihi, reconciles the paradoxical juxtaposition of crustal, seawater, and atmospheric signatures with inferred “primitive” characteristics. High 238U/204Pb components in ocean island basalts are generally attributed to recycled altered oceanic crust. The low 238U/3He component may be in the associated depleted refractory mantle. High 3He/4He ratios are due to low 4He, not excess 3He, and do not imply or require a deep or primordial or undegassed reservoir. 40Ar in the atmosphere also argues against such models. PMID:9560186

  8. The helium paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1998-04-28

    The ratio 3He/4He (R) plays a central role in models of mantle evolution that propose an undegassed lower mantle, rich in the primordial isotope 3He. A large primordial volatile-rich reservoir, a feature of recent models, is inconsistent with high-temperature accretion and with estimates of crustal and bulk Earth chemistry. High R can alternatively reflect high integrated 3He/(U+Th) ratios or low 4He abundances, as expected in refractory portions of the upper mantle. I show that high R materials are gas-poor and are deficient in radiogenic 4He compared with midocean ridge basalts. The seemingly primitive (i.e., high R) signatures in "hotspot" magmas may be secondary, derived from CO2-rich gases, or residual peridotite, a result of differential partitioning of U and He into magmas. A shallow and low 3He source explains the spatial variability and the temporal trends of R in ocean islands and is consistent with a volatile-poor planet. A shallow origin for the "primitive" He signature in ocean island basalts, such as at Loihi, reconciles the paradoxical juxtaposition of crustal, seawater, and atmospheric signatures with inferred "primitive" characteristics. High 238U/204Pb components in ocean island basalts are generally attributed to recycled altered oceanic crust. The low 238U/3He component may be in the associated depleted refractory mantle. High 3He/4He ratios are due to low 4He, not excess 3He, and do not imply or require a deep or primordial or undegassed reservoir. 40Ar in the atmosphere also argues against such models. PMID:9560186

  9. A general circulation model study of the effects of faster rotation rate, enhanced CO2 concentration, and reduced solar forcing: Implications for the faint young sun paradox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Gregory S.

    1993-01-01

    Solar energy at the top of the atmosphere (solar constant), rotation rate, and carbon dioxide (CO2) may have varied significantly over Earth's history, especially during the earliest times. The sensitivity of a general circulation model to faster rotation, enhanced CO2 concentration, and reduced solar constant is presented. The control simulation of this study has a solar constant reduced by 10% the present amount, zero land fraction using a swamp ocean surface, CO2 concentrations of 330 ppmv, present-day rotation rate, and is integrated under mean diurnal and seasonal solar forcing. Four sensitivity test are performed under zero land fraction and reduced solar constant conditions by varying the earth's rotation rate atmospheric CO2 concentration and solar constant. The global mean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) compared to the control simulation: were 6.6 K to 12 K higher than the control's global mean temperature of 264.7 K. Sea ice is confined to higher latitudes in each experiment compared to the control, with ice-free areas equatorward of the subtropics. The warm SSTs are associated with a 20% reduction in clouds for the rotation rate experiments and higher CO2 concentrations in the other experiments. These results are in contrast to previous studies that have used energy balance and radiative convective models. Previous studies required a much larger atmospheric CO2 increase to prevent an ice-covered Earth. The results of the study, suggest that because of its possible feedback with clouds, the general circulation of the atmosphere should be taken into account in understanding the climate of early Earth. While higher CO2 concentrations are likely in view of the results, very large atmospheric CO2 concentrations may not be necessary to counterbalance the lower solar constant that existed early in Earth's history.

  10. Biochemical pharmacology of paradoxical sleep

    PubMed Central

    Gaillard, J. -M.

    1983-01-01

    1 The role of noradrenergic cells in the regulation of paradoxical sleep is still controversial, and experimental data have given rise to contradictory interpretations. 2 Early investigations focused primarily on chemical neurotransmissions. However, the process of information transmission between cells involves many other factors, and the cell surface is an important site for transduction of messages into modifications of the activity of postsynaptic cells. 3 α-adrenoceptors are believed to play an important role in the control of wakefulness and paradoxical sleep. Experimental evidence suggests that physiological modulation of receptor sensitivity, possibly by specific neuro-modulators, may be a key mechanism in synaptic transmission. 4 In the investigation of the mechanisms involved in paradoxical sleep regulation, lesions of the locus coeruleus have given equivocal results. Collateral inhibition, probably mediated by α2-adrenoceptors, appears to be a powerful mechanism. The exact temporal relationship between noradrenergic cell activation and paradoxical sleep production is not established, but 5-HT appears to be involved. Differences between paradoxical sleep and waking may be related to a physiological modulation of α2-adrenoceptor sensitivity. PMID:6140943

  11. The Experiential Paradoxes of Pain.

    PubMed

    Leder, Drew

    2016-10-01

    Pain is far more than an aversive sensation. Chronic pain, in particular, involves the sufferer in a complex experience filled with ambiguity and paradox. The tensions thereby established, the unknowns, pressures, and oscillations, form a significant part of the painfulness of pain. This paper uses a phenomenological method to examine nine such paradoxes. For example, pain can be both immediate sensation and mediated by complex interpretations. It is a certainty for the experiencer, yet highly uncertain in character. It pulls one to the present but also projects one outward to a feared or desired future. Chronic pain can seem located in the body and/or mind; interior to the self, or an alien other; confined to a particular point and/or radiating everywhere. Such fundamental paradoxes, existential and epistemological, can challenge those living with long-term pain. PMID:27476188

  12. An Acid Hydrocarbon: A Chemical Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Jeffrey T.

    2004-01-01

    The chemical paradox of cyclopentadiene, a hydrocarbon, producing bubbles like a Bronsted acid is observed. The explanation that it is the comparative thermodynamic constancy of the fragrant cyclopentadienyl anion, which produces the powerful effect, resolves the paradox.

  13. Paradoxical effects of antioxidants on cancer.

    PubMed

    Mendelsohn, Andrew R; Larrick, James W

    2014-06-01

    Antioxidants have had a checkered history concerning their reported ability to prevent or treat cancer. Early studies that showed ascorbate had benefit in cancer were followed by more definitive studies that demonstrated no benefit. Recent work suggests that biological context may be key to predicting whether antioxidants impede or even promote tumorigenesis. In a recent report, the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and vitamin E accelerated tumorigenesis of lung cancer in mice. antioxidants decrease reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, which paradoxically increase the proliferation rate of lung cancer cells, resulting in greater tumor burdens and reduced survival. Increased proliferation rates result from decreased expression of the genomic watchdog protein p53. In mice lacking p53, neither anti-oxidant affects tumor growth. But antioxidants can be used to kill cancer, at least in rodents. High concentrations of the "antioxidant" ascorbate, achievable only by injection in vivo, result in the production of ascorbate radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the extracellular fluid that kills cancer cells, but not normal cells. In preliminary human trials, ascorbate reduced the toxicity of chemotherapy, but showed no statistical benefit on disease progression. Vitamin C is beneficial when it acts as an oxidant. These studies are consistent with others that suggest that even tumor suppressor genes, such as Nrf2, which stimulate innate cellular stress protection pathways that reduce ROS, can promote cancer progression. Nrf2 is required for the cancer preventive effects of compounds such as sulforaphane, but Nrf2 can help maintain an aggressive tumor phenotype by stimulating proliferation and offering protection from chemotherapy. Context determines whether a specific gene is a tumor enhancer or a suppressor. Such paradoxical behavior creates difficult problems for the development of conventional therapeutics to fight cancer. Personal genomic analysis may provide the means to

  14. The boundary paradox in the Bithorax complex.

    PubMed

    Kyrchanova, Olga; Mogila, Vladic; Wolle, Daniel; Magbanua, Jose Paolo; White, Robert; Georgiev, Pavel; Schedl, Paul

    2015-11-01

    The parasegment-specific expression of the three Drosophila Bithorax complex homeotic genes is orchestrated by nine functionally autonomous regulatory domains. Functional autonomy depends upon special elements called boundaries or insulators that are located between each domain. The boundaries ensure the independent activity of each domain by blocking adventitious interactions with initiators, enhancers and silencers in the neighboring domains. However, this blocking activity poses a regulatory paradox--the Bithorax boundaries are also able to insulate promoters from regulatory interactions with enhancers and silencers and six of the nine Bithorax regulatory domains are separated from their target genes by at least one boundary element. Here we consider several mechanisms that have been suggested for how the Bithorax regulatory domains are able to bypass intervening boundary elements and direct the appropriate parasegment-specific temporal and spatial expression of their target gene. PMID:26215349

  15. CCC and the Fermi paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadyan, V. G.; Penrose, R.

    2016-01-01

    Within the scheme of conformal cyclic cosmology (CCC), information can be transmitted from aeon to aeon. Accordingly, the "Fermi paradox" and the SETI programme --of communication by remote civilizations-- may be examined from a novel perspective: such information could, in principle, be encoded in the cosmic microwave background. The current empirical status of CCC is also discussed.

  16. Mechanical Paradox: The Uphill Roller

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Emilio; Cortes-Poza, D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse in detail the dynamics of a mechanical system which is a rigid body with the geometry of a double cone. This double cone is apparently able to spontaneously roll uphill along inclined rails. The experiment has been known for some centuries, and because of its peculiar behaviour, it has been named "mechanical paradox". Although this…

  17. The Paradox of Painful Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smuts, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    Many of the most popular genres of narrative art are designed to elicit negative emotions: emotions that are experienced as painful or involving some degree of pain, which people generally avoid in their daily lives. Traditionally, the question of why people seek out such experiences of painful art has been presented as the paradox of tragedy, and…

  18. Teaching Quantum Physics without Paradoxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Art

    2007-01-01

    Although the resolution to the wave-particle paradox has been known for 80 years, it is seldom presented. Briefly, the resolution is that material particles and photons are the quanta of extended spatially continuous but energetically quantized fields. But because the resolution resides in quantum field theory and is not usually spelled out in…

  19. Gene networks and liar paradoxes

    PubMed Central

    Isalan, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Network motifs are small patterns of connections, found over-represented in gene regulatory networks. An example is the negative feedback loop (e.g. factor A represses itself). This opposes its own state so that when ‘on’ it tends towards ‘off’ – and vice versa. Here, we argue that such self-opposition, if considered dimensionlessly, is analogous to the liar paradox: ‘This statement is false’. When ‘true’ it implies ‘false’ – and vice versa. Such logical constructs have provided philosophical consternation for over 2000 years. Extending the analogy, other network topologies give strikingly varying outputs over different dimensions. For example, the motif ‘A activates B and A. B inhibits A’ can give switches or oscillators with time only, or can lead to Turing-type patterns with both space and time (spots, stripes or waves). It is argued here that the dimensionless form reduces to a variant of ‘The following statement is true. The preceding statement is false’. Thus, merely having a static topological description of a gene network can lead to a liar paradox. Network diagrams are only snapshots of dynamic biological processes and apparent paradoxes can reveal important biological mechanisms that are far from paradoxical when considered explicitly in time and space. PMID:19722183

  20. Paradoxical Results and Item Bundles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Giles; Finkelman, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Hooker, Finkelman, and Schwartzman ("Psychometrika," 2009, in press) defined a paradoxical result as the attainment of a higher test score by changing answers from correct to incorrect and demonstrated that such results are unavoidable for maximum likelihood estimates in multidimensional item response theory. The potential for these results to…

  1. Gene networks and liar paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Isalan, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Network motifs are small patterns of connections, found over-represented in gene regulatory networks. An example is the negative feedback loop (e.g. factor A represses itself). This opposes its own state so that when 'on' it tends towards 'off' - and vice versa. Here, we argue that such self-opposition, if considered dimensionlessly, is analogous to the liar paradox: 'This statement is false'. When 'true' it implies 'false' - and vice versa. Such logical constructs have provided philosophical consternation for over 2000 years. Extending the analogy, other network topologies give strikingly varying outputs over different dimensions. For example, the motif 'A activates B and A. B inhibits A' can give switches or oscillators with time only, or can lead to Turing-type patterns with both space and time (spots, stripes or waves). It is argued here that the dimensionless form reduces to a variant of 'The following statement is true. The preceding statement is false'. Thus, merely having a static topological description of a gene network can lead to a liar paradox. Network diagrams are only snapshots of dynamic biological processes and apparent paradoxes can reveal important biological mechanisms that are far from paradoxical when considered explicitly in time and space. PMID:19722183

  2. Cell size and cancer: a new solution to Peto's paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Maciak, Sebastian; Michalak, Pawel

    2015-01-01

    Cancer, one of the leading health concerns for humans, is by no means a human-unique malady. Accumulating evidence shows that cancer kills domestic and wild animals at a similar rate to humans and can even pose a conservation threat to certain species. Assuming that each physiologically active and proliferating cell is at risk of malignant transformation, any evolutionary increase in the number of cells (and thus body mass) will lead to a higher cancer frequency, all else being equal. However, available data fail to support the prediction that bigger animals are affected by cancer more than smaller ones. The unexpected lack of correlation between body size (and life span) and cancer risk across taxa was dubbed Peto's paradox. In this perspective, several plausible explanations of Peto's paradox are presented, with the emphasis on a largely underappreciated relation of cell size to both metabolism and cell division rates across species, which we believe are key factors underlying the paradox. We conclude that larger organisms have bigger and slowly dividing cells with lower energy turnover, all significantly reducing the risk of cancer initiation. Solving Peto's paradox will enhance our understanding the evolution of cancer and may provide new implications for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:25667599

  3. Mechanical paradox: the uphill roller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, Emilio; Cortés-Poza, D.

    2011-11-01

    We analyse in detail the dynamics of a mechanical system which is a rigid body with the geometry of a double cone. This double cone is apparently able to spontaneously roll uphill along inclined rails. The experiment has been known for some centuries, and because of its peculiar behaviour, it has been named 'mechanical paradox'. Although this instrument is well known today, we have not found in the literature a dynamical study like the one we are presenting. A deeper analysis of this mechanical object will allow us to go further than explaining the apparent paradox in the system; it will show interesting features of the dynamics that are not evident or intuitive. In this work, we follow a complete study of the geometry, the kinematic variables and the Lagrangian dynamics of the problem for any set of the angular parameters and initial values, and obtain as a result a full description of the dynamic variables of this mechanical device. In addition to studying the dynamics of the system with the angles that yield the typical paradoxical behaviour, we study carefully what we call the constant potential geometry regime, where the centre of mass maintains its height, and found in this particular case some features of the dynamics which are not common in rolling objects. We believe that this work can offer the student good material to review some fundamental concepts of analytical mechanics.

  4. The MedDRA paradox.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Gary H

    2008-01-01

    MedDRA (the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Terminology) is a controlled vocabulary widely used as a medical coding scheme. However, MedDRA's characterization of its structural hierarchy exhibits some confusing and paradoxical features. The goal of this paper is to examine these features, determine whether there is a coherent view of the MedDRA hierarchy that emerges, and explore what lessons are to be learned from this for using MedDRA and similar terminologies in a broad medical informatics context that includes relations among multiple disparate terminologies, thesauri, and ontologies. PMID:18998828

  5. Paradoxic vocal fold movement disorder.

    PubMed

    Matrka, Laura

    2014-02-01

    Paradoxical Vocal Fold Movement Disorder (PVFMD) is a cause of dyspnea that can mimic or occur alongside asthma or other pulmonary disease. Treatment with Laryngeal Control Therapy is very effective once the entity is properly diagnosed and contributing comorbidities are managed appropriately. In understanding the etiology of PVFMD, focus has broadened beyond psychiatric factors alone to include the spectrum of laryngeal irritants (laryngopharyngeal reflux, allergic and sinus disease, sicca, and possibly obstructive sleep apnea). The following is a discussion of the history, terminology, epidemiology, diagnosis, comorbid conditions, and treatment of this entity. PMID:24286687

  6. Bioterrorism and the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Joshua

    2013-04-01

    We proffer a contemporary solution to the so-called Fermi Paradox, which is concerned with conflict between Copernicanism and the apparent paucity of evidence for intelligent alien civilizations. In particular, we argue that every community of organisms that reaches its space-faring age will (1) almost immediately use its rocket-building computers to reverse-engineer its genetic chemistry and (2) self-destruct when some individual uses said technology to design an omnicidal pathogen. We discuss some of the possible approaches to prevention with regard to Homo sapiens' vulnerability to bioterrorism, particularly on a short-term basis.

  7. The paradoxes ofMTBE.

    PubMed

    Davis, J M; Farland, W H

    2001-06-01

    A widely used gasoline additive, methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), has been controversial, in part because of concerns about potential inhalation health effects and more recently because of added concerns about water contamination. Although many of the issues related to MTBE have not been fully resolved, several apparent paradoxes can be discerned, including the fact that something intended to improve air quality is now seen as a threat to water quality. Among the lessons that can be derived from the MTBE experience is the value of a comprehensive understanding of the potential risk-benefit tradeoffs of different fuels and fuel additives. PMID:11353129

  8. How river rocks round: resolving the shape-size paradox.

    PubMed

    Domokos, Gabor; Jerolmack, Douglas J; Sipos, Andras Á; Török, Akos

    2014-01-01

    River-bed sediments display two universal downstream trends: fining, in which particle size decreases; and rounding, where pebble shapes evolve toward ellipsoids. Rounding is known to result from transport-induced abrasion; however many researchers argue that the contribution of abrasion to downstream fining is negligible. This presents a paradox: downstream shape change indicates substantial abrasion, while size change apparently rules it out. Here we use laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to show quantitatively that pebble abrasion is a curvature-driven flow problem. As a consequence, abrasion occurs in two well-separated phases: first, pebble edges rapidly round without any change in axis dimensions until the shape becomes entirely convex; and second, axis dimensions are then slowly reduced while the particle remains convex. Explicit study of pebble shape evolution helps resolve the shape-size paradox by reconciling discrepancies between laboratory and field studies, and enhances our ability to decipher the transport history of a river rock. PMID:24533132

  9. How River Rocks Round: Resolving the Shape-Size Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Domokos, Gabor; Jerolmack, Douglas J.; Sipos, Andras Á.; Török, Ákos

    2014-01-01

    River-bed sediments display two universal downstream trends: fining, in which particle size decreases; and rounding, where pebble shapes evolve toward ellipsoids. Rounding is known to result from transport-induced abrasion; however many researchers argue that the contribution of abrasion to downstream fining is negligible. This presents a paradox: downstream shape change indicates substantial abrasion, while size change apparently rules it out. Here we use laboratory experiments and numerical modeling to show quantitatively that pebble abrasion is a curvature-driven flow problem. As a consequence, abrasion occurs in two well-separated phases: first, pebble edges rapidly round without any change in axis dimensions until the shape becomes entirely convex; and second, axis dimensions are then slowly reduced while the particle remains convex. Explicit study of pebble shape evolution helps resolve the shape-size paradox by reconciling discrepancies between laboratory and field studies, and enhances our ability to decipher the transport history of a river rock. PMID:24533132

  10. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Terriary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    1998-04-08

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO -) 2 flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of productive carbonate buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) diagenetic characterization of project field reservoirs, and (2) technology transfer.

  11. Virtue Acquisition: The Paradox of Striving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Aristotelian-inspired accounts of virtue acquisition stress guided practice and habituated action to develop virtue. This emphasis on action can lead to the "paradox of striving". The paradox occurs when we try too hard to act well and thereby spoil our efforts. I identify four forms of striving--forcing, impulsivity, overthinking, and…

  12. Yule-Simpson's Paradox in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goltz, Heather Honore; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2010-01-01

    Yule (1903) and Simpson (1951) described a statistical paradox that occurs when data is aggregated. In such situations, aggregated data may reveal a trend that directly contrasts those of sub-groups trends. In fact, the aggregate data trends may even be opposite in direction of sub-group trends. To reveal Yule-Simpson's paradox (YSP)-type…

  13. Differential Effectiveness of Theoretical Accounts for Paradox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsyth, Nancy M.; Strong, Stanley R.

    Paradoxical techniques in counseling consist of directing clients to practice the symptom which is causing them psychological distress. Both impression management theory and reactance theory have been advanced to explain the efficacy of such techniques. To examine the effectiveness of paradoxical techniques according to impression management and…

  14. New Paradoxes of Risky Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    During the last 25 years, prospect theory and its successor, cumulative prospect theory, replaced expected utility as the dominant descriptive theories of risky decision making. Although these models account for the original Allais paradoxes, 11 new paradoxes show where prospect theories lead to self-contradiction or systematic false predictions.…

  15. Three paradoxes of habitat conservation plans.

    PubMed

    Wilhere, George F

    2009-12-01

    Habitat conservation plans (HCPs) are enabled under section 10(a) of the Endangered Species Act. The substantial increase since 1994 in the number of HCPs has motivated numerous critiques of nearly every aspect of HCPs. These critiques have overlooked several paradoxes that expose fundamental shortcomings of section 10(a) or its implementation. I refer to them as: the Trainwreck Paradox, the Jeopardy Paradox, and the Maximum Mitigation Paradox. The Trainwreck Paradox states that HCPs are needed to avert the listing of species as threatened or endangered, but federal listings are needed to motivate landowners to develop HCPs. The Jeopardy Paradox stems from the vague language of section 10(a) which allows an HCP to reduce the likelihood of a species' survival and recovery but establishes no objective limit on the magnitude of reduction. The Maximum Mitigation Paradox argues that if a landowner provides maximum mitigation at the onset of an HCP, then there will be no financial resources for adaptive management in the future, but if resources are reserved for adaptive management, then the landowner is not mitigating to the maximum extent practicable as required by section 10(a). The purpose of this article is to explain these paradoxes of HCPs and discuss potential remedies. PMID:19902294

  16. Upwelling off Namibia: Approaches to Solving the Walvis Opal Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, W. H.; Paul, A.; Wefer, G.

    2002-12-01

    Upwelling off Namibia was enhanced during glacial time in the coastal ocean off southwestern Africa, as documented in a number of productivity proxies. However, the deposition of diatoms and other siliceous plankton remains was diminished. This discrepancy is known as the "Walvis Opal Paradox." Understanding this paradox is fundamental to the understanding of glacial-interglacial productivity fluctuations. Several conceptual approaches to solving this paradox have been offered. We consider two of these: (1) The suggestion that the thermocline was impoverished in silicate during glacial time, and (2) the suggestion that the change in topography that results from a drop in sea level has important implications for the rate of deposition of diatoms on the upper slope. The first approach focuses on changes in circulation and changes in overall nutrient supply. The second emphasizes regional factors affecting the position of upwelling centers and the role of recycling and redeposition of siliceous materials. Simple models incorporating the relevant processes are presented, models that can suggest observations allowing a choice between these alternatives.

  17. Paradoxical ratcheting in cornstarch suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbrot, Troy; Siu, Theo; Rutala, Matthew

    2014-11-01

    Cornstarch suspensions are well known to exhibit strong shear thickening, and we show as a result that they must - and do - climb vertically vibrating rods and plates. This occurs because when the rod moves upward, it shears the suspension against gravity, and so the fluid stiffens, but when the rod moves downward, the suspension moves with gravity, and so the fluid is more compliant. This causes the fluid to be dragged up by the upstroke more than it is dragged down by the downstroke, effectively ratcheting the fluid up the rod every cycle. We show experimentally and computationally that this effect is paradoxically caused by gravity - and so goes away when gravity is removed - and we show that the suspension can be made to balance on the uphill side of an inclined rod in an analog of the inverted ``Kapitza pendulum,'' closely related to the recent report by Ramachandran & Nosonovsky, Soft Matter 10, 4633 (2014).

  18. Paradoxical Behavior of Granger Causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witt, Annette; Battaglia, Demian; Gail, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Granger causality is a standard tool for the description of directed interaction of network components and is popular in many scientific fields including econometrics, neuroscience and climate science. For time series that can be modeled as bivariate auto-regressive processes we analytically derive an expression for spectrally decomposed Granger Causality (SDGC) and show that this quantity depends only on two out of four groups of model parameters. Then we present examples of such processes whose SDGC expose paradoxical behavior in the sense that causality is high for frequency ranges with low spectral power. For avoiding misinterpretations of Granger causality analysis we propose to complement it by partial spectral analysis. Our findings are illustrated by an example from brain electrophysiology. Finally, we draw implications for the conventional definition of Granger causality. Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience Goettingen

  19. Investigations on the Aridity Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, R. J.; Roderick, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    How global aridity might change in the immediate future is an important question. Several recent analyses have concluded that aridity will, in general, increase over land primarily because of increasing vapour pressure deficit. Taken at face value that result is difficult to understand because a warmer world is also anticipated to be a moister world. For example, at the global scale, climate model projections are for increasing rainfall and runoff. In this presentation we investigate this seeming paradox. We find that the previous analyses have not accounted for the biological impacts of elevated CO2 and when that is incorporated, the climate model projections are for a modest reduction in meteorological and hydrologic aridity and for larger reductions in biological aridity.

  20. Resolving thermoelectric "paradox" in superconductors.

    PubMed

    Shelly, Connor D; Matrozova, Ekaterina A; Petrashov, Victor T

    2016-02-01

    For almost a century, thermoelectricity in superconductors has been one of the most intriguing topics in physics. During its early stages in the 1920s, the mere existence of thermoelectric effects in superconductors was questioned. In 1944, it was demonstrated that the effects may occur in inhomogeneous superconductors. Theoretical breakthrough followed in the 1970s, when the generation of a measurable thermoelectric magnetic flux in superconducting loops was predicted; however, a major crisis developed when experiments showed puzzling discrepancies with the theory. Moreover, different experiments were inconsistent with each other. This led to a stalemate in bringing theory and experiment into agreement. With this work, we resolve this stalemate, thus solving this long-standing "paradox," and open prospects for exploration of novel thermoelectric phenomena predicted recently. PMID:26933688

  1. Gray's paradox: A fluid mechanical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, Rahul; Hao, Max; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Patel, Namrata; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2014-07-01

    Nearly eighty years ago, Gray reported that the drag power experienced by a dolphin was larger than the estimated muscle power - this is termed as Gray's paradox. We provide a fluid mechanical perspective of this paradox. The viewpoint that swimmers necessarily spend muscle energy to overcome drag in the direction of swimming needs revision. For example, in undulatory swimming most of the muscle energy is directly expended to generate lateral undulations of the body, and the drag power is balanced not by the muscle power but by the thrust power. Depending on drag model utilized, the drag power may be greater than muscle power without being paradoxical.

  2. Gray's paradox: A fluid mechanical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Rahul; Hao, Max; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Patel, Namrata; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly eighty years ago, Gray reported that the drag power experienced by a dolphin was larger than the estimated muscle power – this is termed as Gray's paradox. We provide a fluid mechanical perspective of this paradox. The viewpoint that swimmers necessarily spend muscle energy to overcome drag in the direction of swimming needs revision. For example, in undulatory swimming most of the muscle energy is directly expended to generate lateral undulations of the body, and the drag power is balanced not by the muscle power but by the thrust power. Depending on drag model utilized, the drag power may be greater than muscle power without being paradoxical. PMID:25082341

  3. Bosonic analog of the Klein paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R. E.; Ware, M. R.; Su, Q.; Grobe, R.

    2010-02-15

    The standard Klein paradox describes how an incoming electron scatters off a supercritical electrostatic barrier that is so strong that it can generate electron-positron pairs. This fermionic system has been widely discussed in textbooks to illustrate some of the discrepancies between quantum mechanical and quantum field theoretical descriptions for the pair creation process. We compare the fermionic dynamics with that of the corresponding bosonic system. We point out that the direct counterpart of the Pauli exclusion principle (the central mechanism to resolve the fermionic Klein paradox) is stimulated emission, which leads to the resolution of the analogous bosonic paradox.

  4. The autophagic paradox in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, W K K; Coffelt, S B; Cho, C H; Wang, X J; Lee, C W; Chan, F K L; Yu, J; Sung, J J Y

    2012-02-23

    Autophagy, hallmarked by the formation of double-membrane bound organelles known as autophagosomes, is a lysosome-dependent pathway for protein degradation. The role of autophagy in carcinogenesis is context dependent. As a tumor-suppressing mechanism in early-stage carcinogenesis, autophagy inhibits inflammation and promotes genomic stability. Moreover, disruption of autophagy-related genes accelerates tumorigenesis in animals. However, autophagy may also act as a pro-survival mechanism to protect cancer cells from various forms of cellular stress. In cancer therapy, adaptive autophagy in cancer cells sustains tumor growth and survival in face of the toxicity of cancer therapy. To this end, inhibition of autophagy may sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents and ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, in certain circumstances, autophagy mediates the therapeutic effects of some anticancer agents. Data from recent studies are beginning to unveil the apparently paradoxical nature of autophagy as a cell-fate decision machinery. Taken together, modulation of autophagy is a novel approach for enhancing the efficacy of existing cancer therapy, but its Janus-faced nature may complicate the clinical development of autophagy modulators as anticancer therapeutics. PMID:21765470

  5. The Obesity Paradox in Cancer: a Review.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Hannah; Sperrin, Matthew; Badrick, Ellena; Renehan, Andrew G

    2016-09-01

    There is a common perception that excess adiposity, commonly approximated by body mass index (BMI), is associated with reduced cancer survival. A number of studies have emerged challenging this by demonstrating that overweight and early obese states are associated with improved survival. This finding is termed the "obesity paradox" and is well recognized in the cardio-metabolic literature but less so in oncology. Here, we summarize the epidemiological findings related to the obesity paradox in cancer. Our review highlights that many observations of the obesity paradox in cancer reflect methodological mechanisms including the crudeness of BMI as an obesity measure, confounding, detection bias, reverse causality, and a specific form of the selection bias, known as collider bias. It is imperative for the oncologist to interpret the observation of the obesity paradox against the above methodological framework and avoid the misinterpretation that being obese might be "good" or "protective" for cancer patients. PMID:27475805

  6. Barrier paradox in the Klein zone

    SciTech Connect

    De Leo, Stefano; Rotelli, Pietro P.

    2006-04-15

    We study the solutions for a one-dimensional electrostatic potential in the Dirac equation when the incoming wave packet exhibits the Klein paradox (pair production). With a barrier potential we demonstrate the existence of multiple reflections (and transmissions). The antiparticle solutions which are necessarily localized within the barrier region create new pairs with each reflection at the potential walls. Consequently we encounter a new 'paradox' for the barrier because successive outgoing wave amplitudes grow geometrically.

  7. The Lindley paradox in optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauri, Camillo; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2016-02-01

    The so-called Lindley paradox is a counterintuitive statistical effect where the Bayesian and frequentist approaches to hypothesis testing give radically different answers, depending on the choice of the prior distribution. In this paper we address the occurrence of the Lindley paradox in optical interferometry and discuss its implications for high-precision measurements. In particular, we focus on phase estimation by Mach-Zehnder interferometers and show how to mitigate the conflict between the two approaches by using suitable priors.

  8. Paradoxical response to anti-tubercular treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Syed Ahmed; Shenoy, Prithi

    2011-01-01

    We report a 5-year-old boy who developed optic neuritis as a paradoxical reaction to anti-tuberculous therapy. Steroids were re-started in the patient with gradual recovery of his vision. The case emphasizes the importance of recognizing paradoxical reactions in patients on anti-tuberculous therapy. Prompt recognition and treatment of such reactions will reduce the associated morbidity. PMID:21572663

  9. Simple games to illustrate Parrondo's paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Hal; von Baeyer, Hans Christian

    2004-05-01

    Parrondo's paradox is the proposition that two losing strategies can, by alternating randomly, produce a winner. R. D. Astumian has recently created a simple board game to illustrate this counterintuitive phenomenon. We prove that the inherent symmetry of Astumian's game prevents it from achieving its purpose, and suggest amended versions that do. We also display the additional paradoxical effect of two slow, losing games combining into a fast, winning one.

  10. Experimental Implementations of Quantum Paradoxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, G. A. D.

    Remarkable progress is being made in experiments that highlight the distinctive predictions of quantum mechanics. The Leggett-Garg inequality was devised to test for macrorealism (Leggett and Garg in Phys. Rev. Lett. 54:857-860, 1985). Various experiments have been performed, including one with non-invasive measurements in the kind of way that was originally envisaged, using spins in phosphorous impurities in silicon (Knee et al. in Nat. Commun. 3:606, 2012). This has led to fresh understanding of what kind of realism is excluded by the result. The quantum three-box paradox (Aharonov and Vaidman in J. Phys. A, Math. Gen. 24:2315-2328, 1991) provides a further test, which can be re-expressed in terms of the Leggett-Garg inequality. This has been experimentally implemented with projective measurements using an NV- centre in diamond, yielding results 7.8 standard deviations beyond a classical bound (George et al. in Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 110:3777-3781, 2013). [Editor's note: for a video of the talk given by Prof. Briggs at the Aharonov-80 conference in 2012 at Chapman University, see http://quantum.chapman.edu/talk-18.

  11. Phosphorus and Water Quality Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, H. K.

    2008-12-01

    Paradoxically, phosphorus (P) is one of the major nutrients for higher agricultural production, as well as it causes eutrophication/algal blooms in aquatic and semi-aquatic systems. Phosphorus loadings from agricultural/urban runoffs into lakes and rivers are becoming a global concern for the protection of water quality. Artificial wetlands are considered as a low cost alternative for treating wastewater including removal of P from sources such as agricultural and urban runoffs. However, the selection of the construction site may well determine the effectiveness of these wetlands. Studies show that P transformations in sediments/ soils are crucial for P sequestration in a wetland rather than the amounts of native P. Using 31Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (31P NMR), previously unreported an active organic P form, phosphoarginine, was identified, and the study indicates that abandonment of P impacted sites may not solve the P loading problem to the water bodies as the organic P compounds would not be as stable as they were thought, thus, can play a detrimental role in eutrophication of water bodies, after all.

  12. Personal Interaction with Researchers or Detached Synthesis of the Evidence: Modelling the Health Policy Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanney, Steve

    2004-01-01

    Personal interaction between health policy makers and researchers is widely seen as the key to enhancing research use, but there are also increasing demands that policies be based on syntheses of the available evidence. A potential paradox arises in that whilst interaction may result in greater use of the evidence it might also lead to a partial…

  13. Paradoxes, puzzles and passing time.

    PubMed

    Rankin-Box, D

    1999-12-01

    Whilst technology and our understanding about the world has improved, I suspect that in many ways, the hopes, fears, worries, joy and love we feel are not so different from that of our ancestors of 500 or 700 years ago, though the social circumstances may have altered. We have beliefs and dreams and daily routines in our lives and many people hang onto age old superstitions without really knowing their origins, e.g. crossing our fingers for luck, touching wood, throwing salt over a shoulder or reading about star signs. The night sky also looks different to 1000 years ago. When we look up at the stars we see an image of the past in the present: the light we see set off from its origin long before the advent of antibiotics, the Russian Revolution or the first man on the moon. As we move forwards, the benefits of modern medicine and improvements in social and environmental issues (compared to just 100 years ago) have, paradoxically, provided us with a quality of life that allows us to live longer and gain a greater insight into the world around us. There is an opportunity to reflect and wonder at the healers of the early middle ages and of the way in which we wish medicine to develop. When reflecting about the past 1000 years, patterns begin to emerge of times past, epochs of healing and revolutions in the way we perceive myriad aspects of health and healing. I am sure there are ways of combining ancient ways with modern thinking, of blending art and science, of balancing logic and rationality with love, fun, humour and empathy. Of building on experience, so that caring is spiritually therapeutic, freeing our patients and ourselves as we move into the future and the new millennium. PMID:10887877

  14. Clouds and the Faint Young Sun Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldblatt, C.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the role which clouds could play in resolving the Faint Young Sun Paradox (FYSP). Lower solar luminosity in the past means that less energy was absorbed on Earth (a forcing of -50 W m-2 during the late Archean), but geological evidence points to the Earth having been at least as warm as it is today, with only very occasional glaciations. We perform radiative calculations on a single global mean atmospheric column. We select a nominal set of three layered, randomly overlapping clouds, which are both consistent with observed cloud climatologies and reproduced the observed global mean energy budget of Earth. By varying the fraction, thickness, height and particle size of these clouds we conduct a wide exploration of how changed clouds could affect climate, thus constraining how clouds could contribute to resolving the FYSP. Low clouds reflect sunlight but have little greenhouse effect. Removing them entirely gives a forcing of +25 W m-2 whilst more modest reduction in their efficacy gives a forcing of +10 to +15 W m-2. For high clouds, the greenhouse effect dominates. It is possible to generate +50 W m-2 forcing from enhancing these, but this requires making them 3.5 times thicker and 14 K colder than the standard high cloud in our nominal set and expanding their coverage to 100% of the sky. Such changes are not credible. More plausible changes would generate no more than +15 W m-2 forcing. Thus neither fewer low clouds nor more high clouds can provide enough forcing to resolve the FYSP. Decreased surface albedo can contribute no more than +5 W m-2 forcing. Some models which have been applied to the FYSP do not include clouds at all. These overestimate the forcing due to increased CO2 by 20 to 25% when pCO2 is 0.01 to 0.1 bar.

  15. Universal Braess paradox in open quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, A L R; Bazeia, D; Ramos, J G G S

    2014-10-01

    We present analytical and numerical results that demonstrate the presence of the Braess paradox in chaotic quantum dots. The paradox that we identify, originally perceived in classical networks, shows that the addition of more capacity to the network can suppress the current flow in the universal regime. We investigate the weak localization term, showing that it presents the paradox encoded in a saturation minimum of the conductance, under the presence of hyperflow in the external leads. In addition, we demonstrate that the weak localization suffers a transition signal depending on the overcapacity lead and presents an echo on the magnetic crossover before going to zero due to the full time-reversal symmetry breaking. We also show that the quantum interference contribution can dominate the Ohm term in the presence of constrictions and that the corresponding Fano factor engenders an anomalous behavior. PMID:25375575

  16. Universal Braess paradox in open quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, A. L. R.; Bazeia, D.; Ramos, J. G. G. S.

    2014-10-01

    We present analytical and numerical results that demonstrate the presence of the Braess paradox in chaotic quantum dots. The paradox that we identify, originally perceived in classical networks, shows that the addition of more capacity to the network can suppress the current flow in the universal regime. We investigate the weak localization term, showing that it presents the paradox encoded in a saturation minimum of the conductance, under the presence of hyperflow in the external leads. In addition, we demonstrate that the weak localization suffers a transition signal depending on the overcapacity lead and presents an echo on the magnetic crossover before going to zero due to the full time-reversal symmetry breaking. We also show that the quantum interference contribution can dominate the Ohm term in the presence of constrictions and that the corresponding Fano factor engenders an anomalous behavior.

  17. Information-driven societies and Fermi's paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampton, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Fermi's paradox is founded on the idea that one or more Galactic extraterrestrial civilizations (ETCs) existed long ago and sustained exploration for millions of years, but in spite of their advanced knowledge, they could not find a way to explore the Galaxy other than with fleets of starships or self replicating probes. Here, I question this second assumption: if advanced technology generally allows long-distance remote sensing, and if ETCs were motivated by gaining information rather than conquest or commerce, then such voyages would be unnecessary, thereby resolving Fermi's paradox.

  18. Congenital Malformations Leading to Paradoxical Embolism.

    PubMed

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan

    2016-05-01

    The absolute separation of the right and left circulations and the filtration of blood by the pulmonary circulation are essential to prevent the passage of thrombotic material from the venous system into the systemic arterial circulation. Any breach of the intracardiac septae or circumvention of the pulmonary capillary network may cause a paradoxical embolus. The most common causes are atrial septal defects and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. This article discusses unusual connections and pathways related to congenital malformations. Although anticoagulation is necessary to prevent paradoxical emboli, the hematologic disturbances and the most appropriate therapy in these patients warrant further investigation. PMID:27150173

  19. Another paradox involving the second law of thermodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sheehan, D.P.

    1996-01-01

    Recently a paradox has been posed that appears to challenge the second law of thermodynamics in a plasma blackbody environment [D. P. Sheehan, Phys. Plasmas {bold 2}, 1893 (1995)]. In this paper another, related paradox is posed in an unmagnetized Q plasma. Laboratory experiments simulating some necessary conditions for the paradoxical system corroborate theoretical predictions and fail to resolve the paradox in favor of the second law. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. The paradox prescription: leading the medical group of the future.

    PubMed

    Blair, J D; Payne, G T

    2000-01-01

    Leaders of health care organizations must constantly deal with paradox in and around their organizations. The paradox profile is a modeling technique for examining how organizations prioritize their dealings with the eight competing issues from which the four paradoxes are derived. This article demonstrates the leadership challenges that exist when a paradox is present and how these tensions differ when the integrative status of the medical group--as either part of an integrated system or not--is considered. PMID:10710728

  1. Evaluating paradox walnut rootstocks for resistance to Armillaria root disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The most common Juglans regia (English walnut) rootstock in California is Paradox, a hybrid between J. hindsii (Northern California black walnut) and J. regia. Unfortuntely, Paradox rootstock is highly susceptible to Armillaria root disease. The relative resistance of new clonal, Paradox rootstock...

  2. Paradox Lost: Toward a Robust Test of the Chinese Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Keith

    2006-01-01

    This article suggests that attempts to date to unravel the paradox of the Chinese learner are incomplete and inadequately modeled, and that the complexities of the paradox have not yet been fittingly operationalized or alternative explanations of research data investigated. It contends that attempts either to state or to unravel the paradox are…

  3. The Policy Maker's Anguish: Regulating Personal Data Behavior Between Paradoxes and Dilemmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compañó, Ramón; Lusoli, Wainer

    Regulators in Europe and elsewhere are paying great attention to identity, privacy and trust in online and converging environments. Appropriate regulation of identity in a ubiquitous information environment is seen as one of the major drivers of the future Internet economy. Regulation of personal identity data has come to the fore including mapping conducted on digital personhood by the OECD; work on human rights and profiling by the Council of Europe andmajor studies by the European Commission with regard to self-regulation in the privacy market, electronic identity technical interoperability and enhanced safety for young people. These domains overlap onto an increasingly complex model of regulation of individuals' identity management, online and offline. This chapter argues that policy makers struggle to deal with issues concerning electronic identity, due to the apparently irrational and unpredictable behavior of users when engaging in online interactions involving identity management. Building on empirical survey evidence from four EU countries, we examine the first aspect in detail - citizens' management of identity in a digital environment. We build on data from a large scale (n = 5,265) online survey of attitudes to electronic identity among young Europeans (France, Germany, Spain, UK) conducted in August 2008. The survey asked questions about perceptions and acceptance of risks, general motivations, attitudes and behaviors concerning electronic identity. Four behavioral paradoxes are identified in the analysis: a privacy paradox (to date well known), but also a control paradox, a responsibility paradox and an awareness paradox. The chapter then examines the paradoxes in relation of three main policy dilemmas framing the debate on digital identity. The paper concludes by arguing for an expanded identity debate spanning policy circles and the engineering community.

  4. ID in Higher Education: A Paradox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, William R.; Shrock, Sharon A.

    This chapter examines, within the higher education context, the difficulties which instructional developers often encounter in gaining cooperation to achieve their goals. It is argued that instructional development in the university involves a paradox in that a great deal of money is provided for the improvement of instruction, but an environment…

  5. A Developmental Perspective on the Imperfective Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanina, Nina; Phillips, Colin

    2007-01-01

    Imperfective or progressive verb morphology makes it possible to use the name of a whole event to refer to an activity that is clearly not a complete instance of that event, leading to what is known as the Imperfective Paradox. For example, a sentence like "John was building a house" does not entail that a house ever got built. The Imperfective…

  6. The Free Rider and Voter Paradox "Games."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulock, Joseph M.

    1990-01-01

    Presents several time-effective classroom games that can be used to help students discover the consequences of two important concepts in public finance: the free rider problem and the voting paradox. Maintains that these games encourage student involvement and stimulate class discussion. (DB)

  7. Jack London: The Paradox of Individualism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deane, Paul

    1968-01-01

    Because of their interest in naturalism and socialism, critics often overlook the major intellectual conflict in Jack London's work: the paradox of individualism. London regards society as affecting the individual in two ways: it either promotes individuality or it demands a conformity that undermines individualism. When society fails Buck in "The…

  8. The Paradox of the Excluded Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    A paradox seems to exist where a child, of compulsory schooling age, is excluded from a school. The practice of exclusion has evolved over the almost two centuries of compulsory schooling. Abolition of corporal punishment in Western Australia and elsewhere has tended to focus attention on exclusion and the grounds justifying such action by school…

  9. A resolution of the paradox of enrichment.

    PubMed

    Mougi, Akihiko; Nishimura, Kinya

    2007-09-01

    Theoretical studies have shown a paradoxical destabilizing response of predator-prey ecosystems to enrichment, but there is the gap between the intuitive view of nature and this theoretical prediction. We studied a minimal predator-prey system (a two predator-two prey system) in which the paradox of enrichment pattern can vanish; the destabilization with enrichment is reversed, leading to stabilization (a decrease in the amplitude of oscillation of population densities). For resolution of the paradox, two conditions must be met: (1) the same prey species must be preferred as a dietary item by both predator species, creating the potential for high exploitative competition between the predator species, and (2), while both predators are assumed to select their diet in accordance with optimal diet utilization theory, one predator must be a specialist and the other a generalist. In this system, the presence of a less profitable prey species can cause the increase in population oscillation amplitudes associated with increasing enrichment to be suppressed via the optimal diet utilization of the generalist predator. The resulting stabilization is explained by the mitigating effect of the less profitable prey showing better population growth with increasing enrichment on the destabilization underlying the specialist predator and prey relation, thus resolving the paradox of enrichment. PMID:17543997

  10. The Paradox of Being a Woman Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamboukou, Maria

    2000-01-01

    Examines discourses that interweave women's position in education today, theorizing education as a nexus of created paradoxical spaces, where the female self attempts to surpass closed boundaries, questioning the dichotomy of the feminized private and/or masculine public. Considers the importance of time restrictions upon women's lives. Discusses…

  11. Bell's Paradox under Different Capital Market Regimes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Johan Moonwon

    1993-01-01

    In 1984 "Economics of Education Review" paper, E. Bell indicates that, when capital markets are imperfect in a certain sense, demand for education may not always be directly related with present net value of education. This study shows Bell's paradox is possible under the alternative definitions of capital market imperfections and specifies…

  12. An alternative resolution to the Mansuripur paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfern, Francis

    2016-04-01

    In 2013 an article published online by the journal Science declared that the paradox proposed by Masud Mansuripur was resolved. This paradox concerns a point charge-Amperian magnetic dipole system as seen in a frame of reference where they are at rest and one in which they are moving. In the latter frame an electric dipole appears on the magnetic dipole. A torque is then exerted upon the electric dipole by the point charge, a torque that is not observed in the at-rest frame. Mansuripur points out this violates the relativity principle and suggests the Lorentz force responsible for the torque be replaced by the Einstein-Laub force. The resolution of the paradox reported by Science, based on numerous papers in the physics literature, preserves the Lorentz force but depends on the concept of hidden momentum. Here I propose a different resolution based on the overlooked fact that the charge-magnetic dipole system contains linear and angular electromagnetic field momentum. The time rate of change of the field angular-momentum in the frame through which the system is moving cancels that due to the charge-electric dipole interaction. From this point of view hidden momentum is not needed in the resolution of the paradox.

  13. Negotiating Social Change: The Paradox of Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Johanna; White, Rob

    2000-01-01

    Explores paradoxical elements in the relationship between youth and society, arguing that researchers must consider both the distinctive circumstances of the post-1970 generation and the new approaches they are developing to make a life. Argues that questions about how social structures and social divisions affect young people's life patterns must…

  14. Consistent resolution of some relativistic quantum paradoxes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2002-12-01

    A relativistic version of the (consistent or decoherent) histories approach to quantum theory is developed on the basis of earlier work by Hartle, and used to discuss relativistic forms of the paradoxes of spherical wave packet collapse, Bohm's formulation of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox, and Hardy's paradox. It is argued that wave function collapse is not needed for introducing probabilities into relativistic quantum mechanics, and in any case should never be thought of as a physical process. Alternative approaches to stochastic time dependence can be used to construct a physical picture of the measurement process that is less misleading than collapse models. In particular, one can employ a coarse-grained but fully quantum-mechanical description in which particles move along trajectories, with behavior under Lorentz transformations the same as in classical relativistic physics, and detectors are triggered by particles reaching them along such trajectories. States entangled between spacelike separate regions are also legitimate quantum descriptions, and can be consistently handled by the formalism presented here. The paradoxes in question arise because of using modes of reasoning which, while correct for classical physics, are inconsistent with the mathematical structure of quantum theory, and are resolved (or tamed) by using a proper quantum analysis. In particular, there is no need to invoke, nor any evidence for, mysterious long-range superluminal influences, and thus no incompatibility, at least from this source, between relativity theory and quantum mechanics.

  15. Paradox lost. The latah problem revisited.

    PubMed

    Kenny, M G

    1983-03-01

    This paper examines the validity of Dr. R. C. Simons' resolution (Simons, R. C. The resolution of the latah paradox. J. Nerv. Ment. Dis., 168: 195-206, 1980) of the so-called latah paradox. Latah, a Malay condition precipitated by sudden fright and involving compulsive obscenity and mimesis, was found to be closely related to local cultural values; yet a paradox seems to arise from the fact that analogous conditions are reported from unrelated cultures. Simons accounts for this by proposing that latah and its kindred states are based on the universal human startle reflex and that latah is merely a culture-specific exploitation of a neurophysiological potential shared by humans and other animals. It is here argued that the evidence does not support such a view and that latah-like conditions are best considered in terms of their local meaning within their societies of origin; ethnographic material from Siberia is examined as a case in point. It is concluded that the "latah paradox" is illusory and that biomedical approaches to the question have seriously misread the nature of the phenomenon and potentially distort clinical practice in relation to it. PMID:6827254

  16. Art's Pedagogical Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalin, Nadine M.

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to conversations concerning art education futures through engaging alternative relations between art, education, and democracy that mobilize education as art projects associated with the "pedagogical turn" as sites of liminality and paradox. An analysis of the art project, Pedagogical Factory, is used to outline…

  17. Sustainable Development: Paradoxes, Misunderstandings and Learning Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Gabriel A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability is, in itself, the idea of a harmonic answer to the dual nature of the most pressing problem for global society. Most of the problems dealing with sustainability concern its dual and contradictory nature. That paradoxical reality is in no way a unique feature of sustainability; its universal pervasiveness is demonstrated by…

  18. The vista paradox: Framing or contrast?

    PubMed

    Daum, S Oliver; Both, Bernhard S; Bertamini, Marco; Hecht, Heiko

    2015-12-01

    The vista paradox is the illusion in which an object seen through a window appears to shrink in apparent size (and appears farther away) as the observer approaches the window. Paradoxically, the distal object appears smaller as its visual angle increases. We investigated the effect in four experiments varying object size, distance, point of fixation, and texture of the frame and of the object. In the first experiment, we tried to confirm the illusion and to test the robustness of the phenomenon. In the second experiment, we manipulated where subjects fixated (on the frame or on the object) as well as the texture of the object and the frame. Fixation was essential for the illusion: fixating the frame led to an apparent shrinking of the object, whereas fixation on the object did not. Texture of the frame intensified the apparent shrinking of the object. In a third experiment, we separated the point of fixation from the frame in a between-subjects design. Finally, in Experiment 4, we showed that the paradox does not require a frame, but it requires a fixation on a location different from the object. That is, the window or frame is dispensable for the vista paradox, but fixation is critical. PMID:26280259

  19. The Paradox of National Language Movements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Penelope

    1983-01-01

    The paradox inherent in a situation in which the need for political unification requires submersion of authentic local or subregional differences is illustrated by the case of Occitania (southern France), where a community is culturally and linguistically removed from the center of a movement intending to represent it. (MSE)

  20. Twin Paradox in de Sitter Spacetime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boblest, Sebastian; Muller, Thomas; Wunner, Gunter

    2011-01-01

    The "twin paradox" of special relativity offers the possibility of making interstellar flights within a lifetime. For very long journeys with velocities close to the speed of light, however, we have to take into account the expansion of the universe. Inspired by the work of Rindler on hyperbolic motion in curved spacetime, we study the worldline…

  1. Toward a Theory of Coaching Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnson, Steven C.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple tensions exist as part of the coaching process. How a coach responds to these tensions is a fundamental determinant of an athlete or team's fate. In today's highly competitive, socially demanding, and ever-changing sports environment, and as the expectations on coaches become more complex, the paradox becomes a critical lens to…

  2. Secure Communication in the Twin Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    The amount of information that can be transmitted through a noisy channel is affected by relativistic effects. Under the presence of a fixed noise at the receiver, there appears an asymmetry between "slowly aging" and "fast aging" observers which can be used to have private information transmission. We discuss some models for users inside gravitational wells and in the twin paradox scenario.

  3. Challenges and Paradoxes of Human Factors in Health Technology Design

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Usability testing allows human factors professionals to identify and mitigate issues with the design and use of medical technology. The test results, however, can be paradoxical and therefore be misinterpreted, limiting their usefulness. The paradoxical findings can lead to products that are not aligned with the needs and constraints of their users. We herein report on our observations of the paradox of expertise, the paradox of preference versus performance, and the paradox of choice. Each paradox explored is in the perspective of the design of medical technology, the issues that need to be considered in the interpretation of the test results, as well as suggestions on how to avoid the pitfalls in the design of medical technology. Because these paradoxes can influence product design at various stages of product development, it is important to be aware of the effects to interpret the findings properly. PMID:27025862

  4. Challenges and Paradoxes of Human Factors in Health Technology Design.

    PubMed

    Morita, Plinio P; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Usability testing allows human factors professionals to identify and mitigate issues with the design and use of medical technology. The test results, however, can be paradoxical and therefore be misinterpreted, limiting their usefulness. The paradoxical findings can lead to products that are not aligned with the needs and constraints of their users. We herein report on our observations of the paradox of expertise, the paradox of preference versus performance, and the paradox of choice. Each paradox explored is in the perspective of the design of medical technology, the issues that need to be considered in the interpretation of the test results, as well as suggestions on how to avoid the pitfalls in the design of medical technology. Because these paradoxes can influence product design at various stages of product development, it is important to be aware of the effects to interpret the findings properly. PMID:27025862

  5. A Resolution of the Paradox of Enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Z. C.; Li, Y. Charles

    2015-06-01

    The paradox of enrichment was observed by Rosenzweig [1971] in a class of predator-prey models. Two of the parameters in the models are crucial for the paradox. These two parameters are the prey's carrying capacity and prey's half-saturation for predation. Intuitively, increasing the carrying capacity due to enrichment of the prey's environment should lead to a more stable predator-prey system. Analytically, it turns out that increasing the carrying capacity always leads to an unstable predator-prey system that is susceptible to extinction from environmental random perturbations. This is the so-called paradox of enrichment. Our resolution here rests upon a closer investigation on a dimensionless number H formed from the carrying capacity and the prey's half-saturation. By recasting the models into dimensionless forms, the models are in fact governed by a few dimensionless numbers including H. The effects of the two parameters: carrying capacity and half-saturation are incorporated into the number H. In fact, increasing the carrying capacity is equivalent (i.e. has the same effect on H) to decreasing the half-saturation which implies more aggressive predation. Since there is no paradox between more aggressive predation and instability of the predator-prey system, the paradox of enrichment is resolved. The so-called instability of the predator-prey system is characterized by the existence of a stable limit cycle in the phase plane, which gets closer and closer to the predator axis and prey axis. Due to random environmental perturbations, this can lead to extinction. We also further explore spatially dependent models for which the phase space is infinite-dimensional. The spatially independent limit cycle which is generated by a Hopf bifurcation from an unstable steady state, is linearly stable in the infinite-dimensional phase space. Numerical simulations indicate that the basin of attraction of the limit cycle is riddled. This shows that spatial perturbations can

  6. Mercury Toxicity on Sodium Pump and Organoseleniums Intervention: A Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Kade, Ige Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is an environmental poison, and the damage to living system is generally severe. The severity of mercury poisoning is consequent from the fact that it targets the thiol-containing enzymes, irreversibly oxidizing their critical thiol groups, consequently leading to an inactivation of the enzyme. The Na+/K+-ATPase is a sulfhydryl protein that is sensitive to Hg2+ assault. On the other hand, organoseleniums are a class of pharmacologically promising compounds with potent antioxidant effects. While Hg2+ oxidizes sulfhydryl groups of Na+/K+-ATPase under in vitro and in vivo conditions, the organoselenium compounds inhibit Na+/K+-ATPase in vitro but enhance its activities under in vivo conditions with concomitant increase in the level of endogenous thiols. Paradoxically, it appears that these two thiol oxidants can be used to counteract one another under in vivo conditions, and this hypothesis serves as the basis for this paper. PMID:22927724

  7. Optimal GHZ Paradox for Three Qubits.

    PubMed

    Ren, Changliang; Su, Hong-Yi; Xu, Zhen-Peng; Wu, Chunfeng; Chen, Jing-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Quatum nonlocality as a valuable resource is of vital importance in quantum information processing. The characterization of the resource has been extensively investigated mainly for pure states, while relatively less is know for mixed states. Here we prove the existence of the optimal GHZ paradox by using a novel and simple method to extract an optimal state that can saturate the tradeoff relation between quantum nonlocality and the state purity. In this paradox, the logical inequality which is formulated by the GHZ-typed event probabilities can be violated maximally by the optimal state for any fixed amount of purity (or mixedness). Moreover, the optimal state can be described as a standard GHZ state suffering flipped color noise. The maximal amount of noise that the optimal state can resist is 50%. We suggest our result to be a step toward deeper understanding of the role played by the AVN proof of quantum nonlocality as a useful physical resource. PMID:26272658

  8. Optimal GHZ Paradox for Three Qubits

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changliang; Su, Hong-Yi; Xu, Zhen-Peng; Wu, Chunfeng; Chen, Jing-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Quatum nonlocality as a valuable resource is of vital importance in quantum information processing. The characterization of the resource has been extensively investigated mainly for pure states, while relatively less is know for mixed states. Here we prove the existence of the optimal GHZ paradox by using a novel and simple method to extract an optimal state that can saturate the tradeoff relation between quantum nonlocality and the state purity. In this paradox, the logical inequality which is formulated by the GHZ-typed event probabilities can be violated maximally by the optimal state for any fixed amount of purity (or mixedness). Moreover, the optimal state can be described as a standard GHZ state suffering flipped color noise. The maximal amount of noise that the optimal state can resist is 50%. We suggest our result to be a step toward deeper understanding of the role played by the AVN proof of quantum nonlocality as a useful physical resource. PMID:26272658

  9. Optimal GHZ Paradox for Three Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Changliang; Su, Hong-Yi; Xu, Zhen-Peng; Wu, Chunfeng; Chen, Jing-Ling

    2015-08-01

    Quatum nonlocality as a valuable resource is of vital importance in quantum information processing. The characterization of the resource has been extensively investigated mainly for pure states, while relatively less is know for mixed states. Here we prove the existence of the optimal GHZ paradox by using a novel and simple method to extract an optimal state that can saturate the tradeoff relation between quantum nonlocality and the state purity. In this paradox, the logical inequality which is formulated by the GHZ-typed event probabilities can be violated maximally by the optimal state for any fixed amount of purity (or mixedness). Moreover, the optimal state can be described as a standard GHZ state suffering flipped color noise. The maximal amount of noise that the optimal state can resist is 50%. We suggest our result to be a step toward deeper understanding of the role played by the AVN proof of quantum nonlocality as a useful physical resource.

  10. The happiness–income paradox revisited

    PubMed Central

    Easterlin, Richard A.; McVey, Laura Angelescu; Switek, Malgorzata; Sawangfa, Onnicha; Zweig, Jacqueline Smith

    2010-01-01

    The striking thing about the happiness–income paradox is that over the long-term —usually a period of 10 y or more—happiness does not increase as a country's income rises. Heretofore the evidence for this was limited to developed countries. This article presents evidence that the long term nil relationship between happiness and income holds also for a number of developing countries, the eastern European countries transitioning from socialism to capitalism, and an even wider sample of developed countries than previously studied. It also finds that in the short-term in all three groups of countries, happiness and income go together, i.e., happiness tends to fall in economic contractions and rise in expansions. Recent critiques of the paradox, claiming the time series relationship between happiness and income is positive, are the result either of a statistical artifact or a confusion of the short-term relationship with the long-term one. PMID:21149705

  11. A history of the Allais paradox.

    PubMed

    Heukelom, Floris

    2015-03-01

    This article documents the history of the Allais paradox, and shows that underneath the many discussions of the various protagonists lay different, irreconcilable epistemological positions. Savage, like his mentor von Neumann and similar to economist Friedman, worked from an epistemology of generalized characterizations. Allais, on the other hand, like economists Samuelson and Baumol, started from an epistemology of exact descriptions in which every axiom was an empirical claim that could be refuted directly by observations. As a result, the two sides failed to find a common ground. Only a few decades later was the now so-called Allais paradox rediscovered as an important precursor when a new behavioural economic subdiscipline started to adopt the epistemology of exact descriptions and its accompanying falsifications of rational choice theory. PMID:25833801

  12. The South Ray Crater age paradox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, D. S.; Heiken, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Relative exposure ages based on agglutinate content are calculated for 26 Apollo 16 surface and core samples. These ages increase from the northern part of the traverse to the southern part and are in general agreement with cosmogenic gas ages and particle track ages. An apparent paradox exists in which presumed ray soil from South Ray Crater is much older than the age of South Ray Crater itself as determined by a variety of methods. The most likely explanation for the paradox is that the presumed South Ray Crater soil is not ejecta from South Ray Crater but is pre-existing regolith upon which blocks and fragments from South Ray Crater are scattered.

  13. Adaptationism Fails to Resolve Fermi's Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirkovic, M. M.; Dragicevic, I.; Beric-Bjedov, T.

    2005-06-01

    One of the most interesting problems in the nascent discipline of astrobiology is more than half-century old Fermi's paradox: why, considering extraordinary young age of Earth and the Solar System in the Galactic context, don't we perceive much older intelligent communities or signposts of their activity? In spite of a vigorous research activity in recent years, especially bolstered by successes of astrobiology in finding extrasolar planets and extremophiles, this problem (also known as the "Great Silence" or "astrosociological" paradox) remains as open as ever. In a previous paper, we have discussed a particular evolutionary solution suggested by Karl Schroeder based on the currently dominant evolutionary doctrine of adaptationism. Here, we extend that discussion with emphasis on the problems such a solution is bound to face, and conclude that it is ultimately quite unlikely.

  14. "Permanence" - An Adaptationist Solution to Fermi's Paradox?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirkovic, Milan M.

    A new solution of Fermi's paradox sketched by SF writer Karl Schroeder in his 2002. novel Permanence is investigated. It is argued that this solution is tightly connected with adaptationism - a widely discussed working hypothesis in evolutionary biology. Schroeder's hypothesis has important ramifications for astrobiology, SETI projects, and future studies. Its weaknesses should be explored without succumbing to the emotional reactions often accompanying adaptationist explanations.

  15. Enjoying Sad Music: Paradox or Parallel Processes?

    PubMed

    Schubert, Emery

    2016-01-01

    Enjoyment of negative emotions in music is seen by many as a paradox. This article argues that the paradox exists because it is difficult to view the process that generates enjoyment as being part of the same system that also generates the subjective negative feeling. Compensation theories explain the paradox as the compensation of a negative emotion by the concomitant presence of one or more positive emotions. But compensation brings us no closer to explaining the paradox because it does not explain how experiencing sadness itself is enjoyed. The solution proposed is that an emotion is determined by three critical processes-labeled motivational action tendency (MAT), subjective feeling (SF) and Appraisal. For many emotions the MAT and SF processes are coupled in valence. For example, happiness has positive MAT and positive SF, annoyance has negative MAT and negative SF. However, it is argued that in an aesthetic context, such as listening to music, emotion processes can become decoupled. The decoupling is controlled by the Appraisal process, which can assess if the context of the sadness is real-life (where coupling occurs) or aesthetic (where decoupling can occur). In an aesthetic context sadness retains its negative SF but the aversive, negative MAT is inhibited, leaving sadness to still be experienced as a negative valanced emotion, while contributing to the overall positive MAT. Individual differences, mood and previous experiences mediate the degree to which the aversive aspects of MAT are inhibited according to this Parallel Processing Hypothesis (PPH). The reason for hesitancy in considering or testing PPH, as well as the preponderance of research on sadness at the exclusion of other negative emotions, are discussed. PMID:27445752

  16. Obesity paradox in patients on maintenance dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kopple, Joel D

    2006-01-01

    Overweight (body mass index [BMI]=25-30 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI>30 kg/m2) have become mass phenomena with a pronounced upward trend in prevalence in most countries throughout the world and are associated with increased cardiovascular risk and poor survival. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing maintenance hemodialysis an 'obesity paradox' has been consistently reported, i.e., a high BMI is incrementally associated with better survival. While this 'reverse epidemiology' of obesity is relatively consistent in maintenance hemodialysis patients, studies in peritoneal dialysis patients have yielded mixed results. A similar obesity paradox has been described in patients with chronic heart failure as well as in 20 million members of other distinct medically 'at risk' populations in the USA. Possible causes of the reverse epidemiology of obesity include: (1) time-discrepancies between the competing risks for the adverse events that are associated with overnutrition and undernutrition; (2) sequestration of uremic toxins in adipose tissue; (3) selection of a gene pool favorable to longer survival in dialysis patients during the course of CKD progression, which eliminates over 95% of the CKD population before they commence maintenance dialysis therapy; (4) a more stable hemodynamic status; (5) alterations in circulating cytokines; (6) unique neurohormonal constellations; (7) endotoxin-lipoprotein interactions; and (8) reverse causation. Examining the causes and consequences of the obesity paradox in dialysis patients can improve our understanding of similar paradoxes observed both for other conventional risk factors in chronic dialysis patients, such as blood pressure and serum cholesterol, and in other populations, such as patients with heart failure, cancer or AIDS or geriatric populations. PMID:16929133

  17. Enjoying Sad Music: Paradox or Parallel Processes?

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Emery

    2016-01-01

    Enjoyment of negative emotions in music is seen by many as a paradox. This article argues that the paradox exists because it is difficult to view the process that generates enjoyment as being part of the same system that also generates the subjective negative feeling. Compensation theories explain the paradox as the compensation of a negative emotion by the concomitant presence of one or more positive emotions. But compensation brings us no closer to explaining the paradox because it does not explain how experiencing sadness itself is enjoyed. The solution proposed is that an emotion is determined by three critical processes—labeled motivational action tendency (MAT), subjective feeling (SF) and Appraisal. For many emotions the MAT and SF processes are coupled in valence. For example, happiness has positive MAT and positive SF, annoyance has negative MAT and negative SF. However, it is argued that in an aesthetic context, such as listening to music, emotion processes can become decoupled. The decoupling is controlled by the Appraisal process, which can assess if the context of the sadness is real-life (where coupling occurs) or aesthetic (where decoupling can occur). In an aesthetic context sadness retains its negative SF but the aversive, negative MAT is inhibited, leaving sadness to still be experienced as a negative valanced emotion, while contributing to the overall positive MAT. Individual differences, mood and previous experiences mediate the degree to which the aversive aspects of MAT are inhibited according to this Parallel Processing Hypothesis (PPH). The reason for hesitancy in considering or testing PPH, as well as the preponderance of research on sadness at the exclusion of other negative emotions, are discussed. PMID:27445752

  18. Quantum structure in economics: The Ellsberg paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Diederik; Sozzo, Sandro

    2012-03-01

    The expected utility hypothesis and Savage's Sure-Thing Principle are violated in real life decisions, as shown by the Allais and Ellsberg paradoxes. The popular explanation in terms of ambiguity aversion is not completely accepted. As a consequence, uncertainty is still problematical in economics. To overcome these difficulties a distinction between risk and ambiguity has been introduced which depends on the existence of a Kolmogorovian probabilistic structure modeling these uncertainties. On the other hand, evidence of everyday life suggests that context plays a fundamental role in human decisions under uncertainty. Moreover, it is well known from physics that any probabilistic structure modeling contextual interactions between entities structurally needs a non-Kolmogorovian framework admitting a quantum-like representation. For this reason, we have recently introduced a notion of contextual risk to mathematically capture situations in which ambiguity occurs. We prove in this paper that the contextual risk approach can be applied to the Ellsberg paradox, and elaborate a sphere model within our hidden measurement formalism which reveals that it is the overall conceptual landscape that is responsible of the disagreement between actual human decisions and the predictions of expected utility theory, which generates the paradox. This result points to the presence of a quantum conceptual layer in human thought which is superposed to the usually assumed classical logical layer, and conceptually supports the thesis of several authors suggesting the presence of quantum structure in economics and decision theory.

  19. Solving the hard problem of Bertrand's paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Aerts, Diederik; Sassoli de Bianchi, Massimiliano

    2014-08-15

    Bertrand's paradox is a famous problem of probability theory, pointing to a possible inconsistency in Laplace's principle of insufficient reason. In this article, we show that Bertrand's paradox contains two different problems: an “easy” problem and a “hard” problem. The easy problem can be solved by formulating Bertrand's question in sufficiently precise terms, so allowing for a non-ambiguous modelization of the entity subjected to the randomization. We then show that once the easy problem is settled, also the hard problem becomes solvable, provided Laplace's principle of insufficient reason is applied not to the outcomes of the experiment, but to the different possible “ways of selecting” an interaction between the entity under investigation and that producing the randomization. This consists in evaluating a huge average over all possible “ways of selecting” an interaction, which we call a universal average. Following a strategy similar to that used in the definition of the Wiener measure, we calculate such universal average and therefore solve the hard problem of Bertrand's paradox. The link between Bertrand's problem of probability theory and the measurement problem of quantum mechanics is also briefly discussed.

  20. A Probabilistic Analysis of the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonides, Evan; Terzian, Yervant

    2016-06-01

    The Fermi paradox uses an appeal to the mediocrity principle to make it seem counterintuitive that humanity has not been contacted by extraterrestrial intelligence. A numerical, statistical analysis was conducted to determine whether this apparent loneliness is, in fact, unexpected. An inequality was derived to relate the frequency of life arising and developing technology on a suitable planet in the galaxy; the average length of time since the first broadcast of such a civilization; and a constant term. An analysis of the sphere reached thus far by human communication was also conducted, considering our local neighborhood and planets of particular interest. These analyses both conclude that the Fermi paradox is not, in fact, unexpected. By the mediocrity principle and numerical modeling, it is actually unlikely that the Earth would have been reached by extraterrestrial communication at this point. We predict that under 1% of the galaxy has been reached at all thus far, and we do not anticipate to be reached until approximately 50% of stars/planets have been reached. We offer a prediction that we should not expect this until at least 1,500 years in the future. Thus the Fermi paradox is not a shocking observation- or lack thereof- and humanity may very well be contacted within our species’ lifespan (we can begin to expect to be contacted 1,500 years in the future).

  1. Obesity and poverty paradox in developed countries.

    PubMed

    Żukiewicz-Sobczak, Wioletta; Wróblewska, Paula; Zwoliński, Jacek; Chmielewska-Badora, Jolanta; Adamczuk, Piotr; Krasowska, Ewelina; Zagórski, Jerzy; Oniszczuk, Anna; Piątek, Jacek; Silny, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a civilization disease and the proportion of people suffering from it continues to grow, especially in the developed countries. Number of obese people in Europe has increased threefold over the last 20 years. The paradox of obesity and poverty relationship is observed especially in the developed and developing countries. In developing countries, along with economic development and income growth, the number of people with overweight and obesity is increasing. This paradox has a relationship with both the easy availability and low cost of highly processed foods containing 'empty calories' and no nutritional value. To date, this paradox has been described in the United States and the United Kingdom, although many European countries are also experiencing high percentages of obese people. Among the reasons for the growing obesity in the population of poor people are: higher unemployment, lower education level, and irregular meals. Another cause of obesity is low physical activity, which among the poor is associated with a lack of money for sports equipment. Due to the large rate of deaths caused by diseases directly linked to obesity, the governments of many countries implement prevention programmes of overweight and obesity. These programmes are based primarily on educating the public about a healthy lifestyle based on healthy eating, daily physical activity and avoiding alcohol and cigarettes. PMID:25292135

  2. Fermi's Paradox - The Last Challenge For Copernicanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirkovic, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    We review Fermi's paradox (or the "Great Silence" problem), not only arguably the oldest and crucial problem for the Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI), but also a conundrum of profound scientific, philosophical and cultural importance. By a simple analysis of observation selection effects, the correct resolution of Fermi's paradox is certain to tell us something about the future of humanity. Already more than three quarters of century old puzzle -- and a quarter of century since the last major review paper in the field by G. David Brin -- has generated many ingenious discussions and hypotheses. We analyze the often tacit methodological assumptions built in various answers to this puzzle and attempt a new classification of the numerous solutions proposed in an already huge literature on the subject. Finally, we consider the ramifications of various classes of hypotheses for the practical SETI projects. Somewhat paradoxically, it seems that the class of (neo)catastrophic hypotheses gives, on the balance, the strongest justification to optimism regarding our current and near-future SETI efforts.

  3. Paradoxical Herniation following Decompressive Craniectomy in the Subacute Setting

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy is reserved for extreme cases of intracranial hypertension. An uncommon complication known as paradoxical herniation has been documented within weeks to months following surgery. Here we present a unique case within days of surgery. Since standard medical treatment for intracranial hypertension will exacerbate paradoxical herniation, any abrupt neurological changes following decompressive craniectomy should be carefully investigated. Immediate treatment for paradoxical herniation is placement of the patient in the supine position with adequate hydration. Cranioplasty is the ultimate treatment option. PMID:27446619

  4. Paradoxical Herniation following Decompressive Craniectomy in the Subacute Setting.

    PubMed

    Michael, Alex P; Espinosa, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy is reserved for extreme cases of intracranial hypertension. An uncommon complication known as paradoxical herniation has been documented within weeks to months following surgery. Here we present a unique case within days of surgery. Since standard medical treatment for intracranial hypertension will exacerbate paradoxical herniation, any abrupt neurological changes following decompressive craniectomy should be carefully investigated. Immediate treatment for paradoxical herniation is placement of the patient in the supine position with adequate hydration. Cranioplasty is the ultimate treatment option. PMID:27446619

  5. Towards a Resolution of the New Core Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, P. E.; Davies, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Paleomagnetic observations that indicate a geodynamo as old as 4.2 Gyr are at odds with the "new core paradox", which claims insufficient energy to drive the ancient geodynamo prior to inner core nucleation. Recent upward revisions to the thermal conductivity of iron in the core strain the energy budget by increasing the conductive heat flow that must be overcome in order to drive thermal convection and maintain an ancient geodynamo. We address this paradox by computing thermal-magnetic evolutions of the Earth using a 1-D model with parameterizations for heat sources and sinks in the mantle and core. This model includes a number of important new features that have not been previous coupled in a single model. New features in the mantle model include enhanced mantle heat loss to due extrusive volcanism, crust formation and insolation, and latent heating due to magma ocean solidification. New features in the core model include realistic iron conductivities, time-dependent partitioning of light elements (O, S, and Si) between solid and liquid and their effect on the liquidus depression and gravitational energy release. Core evolutions derived from an energy model are compared to an energy-entropy model, which accounts for ohmic dissipation. We identify the conditions necessary to avoid shut-down of the geodynamo prior to inner core nucleation and to maintain a strong magnetic field over the last 4.2 Gyr. Using a dipole field scaling law derived from numerical dynamo models we compare the predicted paleo-dipole intensity to the paleointensity record and speculate on possible observational evidence for the inner core nucleation event.

  6. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey Jr., Thomas C.

    2003-02-06

    The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox Basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  7. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

    1999-11-02

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  8. Learning through Paradox: A Pedagogical Strategy for Exploring Contradictions and Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Marianne W.; Dehler, Gordon E.

    2000-01-01

    Paradox is composed of contradictions or polarities, provoking responses of anxiety or defensiveness. It can stimulate creative thinking. Strategies for learning through paradox include constructing complexity from simplicity, discovering inner paradoxes, and learning to read complexity. (SK)

  9. Effect of Paradoxical and Non-Paradoxical Self-Disclosure on Counselor Social Influence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Deborah K.; Dowd, E. Thomas

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of counselor self-disclosure and paradoxical and nonparadoxical homework directives on subjects' reactions to the homework directive and on perceived counselor social influence. It was hypothesized that counselor self-disclosure would reduce potentially negative perceptions of paradoxical…

  10. The paradox of strategic environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Bidstrup, Morten Hansen, Anne Merrild

    2014-07-01

    Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is a tool that can facilitate sustainable development and improve decision-making by introducing environmental concern early in planning processes. However, various international studies conclude that current planning practice is not taking full advantage of the tool, and we therefore define the paradox of SEA as the methodological ambiguity of non-strategic SEA. This article explores causality through at three-step case study on aggregates extraction planning in Denmark, which consists of a document analysis; a questionnaire survey and follow-up communication with key planners. Though the environmental reports on one hand largely lack strategic considerations, practitioners express an inherent will for strategy and reveal that their SEAs in fact have been an integrated part of the planning process. Institutional context is found to be the most significant barrier for a strategy and this suggests that non-strategic planning setups can prove more important than non-strategic planning in SEA practice. Planners may try to execute strategy within the confinements of SEA-restricted planning contexts; however, such efforts can be overlooked if evaluated by a narrow criterion for strategy formation. Consequently, the paradox may also spark from challenged documentation. These findings contribute to the common understanding of SEA quality; however, further research is needed on how to communicate and influence the strategic options which arguably remain inside non-strategic planning realities. - Highlights: • International studies conclude that SEAs are not strategic. = The paradox of SEA. • Even on the highest managerial level, some contexts do not leave room for strategy. • Non-strategic SEA can derive from challenged documentation. • Descriptive and emergent strategy formation can, in practice, be deemed non-strategic.

  11. Vitamin paradox in obesity: Deficiency or excess?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shi-Sheng; Li, Da; Chen, Na-Na; Zhou, Yiming

    2015-08-25

    Since synthetic vitamins were used to fortify food and as supplements in the late 1930s, vitamin intake has significantly increased. This has been accompanied by an increased prevalence of obesity, a condition associated with diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, asthma and cancer. Paradoxically, obesity is often associated with low levels of fasting serum vitamins, such as folate and vitamin D. Recent studies on folic acid fortification have revealed another paradoxical phenomenon: obesity exhibits low fasting serum but high erythrocyte folate concentrations, with high levels of serum folate oxidation products. High erythrocyte folate status is known to reflect long-term excess folic acid intake, while increased folate oxidation products suggest an increased folate degradation because obesity shows an increased activity of cytochrome P450 2E1, a monooxygenase enzyme that can use folic acid as a substrate. There is also evidence that obesity increases niacin degradation, manifested by increased activity/expression of niacin-degrading enzymes and high levels of niacin metabolites. Moreover, obesity most commonly occurs in those with a low excretory reserve capacity (e.g., due to low birth weight/preterm birth) and/or a low sweat gland activity (black race and physical inactivity). These lines of evidence raise the possibility that low fasting serum vitamin status in obesity may be a compensatory response to chronic excess vitamin intake, rather than vitamin deficiency, and that obesity could be one of the manifestations of chronic vitamin poisoning. In this article, we discuss vitamin paradox in obesity from the perspective of vitamin homeostasis. PMID:26322161

  12. On radar time and the twin ``paradox''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolby, Carl E.; Gull, Stephen F.

    2001-12-01

    In this paper we apply the concept of radar time (popularized by Bondi in his work on k calculus) to the well-known relativistic twin "paradox." Radar time is used to define hypersurfaces of simultaneity for a class of traveling twins, from the "immediate turn-around" case, through the "gradual turn-around" case, to the "uniformly accelerating" case. We show that this definition of simultaneity is independent of choice of coordinates, and assigns a unique time to any event (with which the traveling twin can send and receive signals), resolving some common misconceptions.

  13. Nuclear proliferation and the stability-instability paradox. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Barretta, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    This thesis tests the theory that nuclear proliferation might enhance strategic stability by making the use of military force between possessors of nuclear weapons unlikely. It discusses the existing literature on deterrence and nonproliferation, emphasizing the stability-instability paradox. The stability-instability paradox offers an alternative to the optimism of deterrence logic, which views nuclear weapons as a beneficial and stabilizing force, and the pessimism of nonproliferation, which foresees dire consequences in the spread of nuclear weapons. The paradox is a synthesis of deterrence and nonproliferation logic because it allows for the coexistence of nuclear peace and lower levels of conventional war. Three cases of nuclear rivalry are examined. They are the United States and the Soviet Union, the Soviet Union and the People`s Republic of China, and India and Pakistan. These cases provide evidence that challenges the Waltzian argument that nuclear weapons enhance international stability by forbidding violent response to confrontations between nuclear-armed states. Nuclear powers that have employable conventional forces at their disposal, a territorial interest at stake, and exist in a condition of nuclear stalemate can, and do, engage in conventional warfare.

  14. Boxfish swimming paradox resolved: forces by the flow of water around the body promote manoeuvrability

    PubMed Central

    Van Wassenbergh, S.; van Manen, K.; Marcroft, T. A.; Alfaro, M. E.; Stamhuis, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    The shape of the carapace protecting the body of boxfishes has been attributed an important hydrodynamic role in drag reduction and in providing automatic, flow-direction realignment and is therefore used in bioinspired design of cars. However, tight swimming-course stabilization is paradoxical given the frequent, high-performance manoeuvring that boxfishes display in their spatially complex, coral reef territories. Here, by performing flow-tank measurements of hydrodynamic drag and yaw moments together with computational fluid dynamics simulations, we reverse several assumptions about the hydrodynamic role of the boxfish carapace. Firstly, despite serving as a model system in aerodynamic design, drag-reduction performance was relatively low compared with more generalized fish morphologies. Secondly, the current theory of course stabilization owing to flow over the boxfish carapace was rejected, as destabilizing moments were found consistently. This solves the boxfish swimming paradox: destabilizing moments enhance manoeuvrability, which is in accordance with the ecological demands for efficient turning and tilting. PMID:25505133

  15. Boxfish swimming paradox resolved: forces by the flow of water around the body promote manoeuvrability.

    PubMed

    Van Wassenbergh, S; van Manen, K; Marcroft, T A; Alfaro, M E; Stamhuis, E J

    2015-02-01

    The shape of the carapace protecting the body of boxfishes has been attributed an important hydrodynamic role in drag reduction and in providing automatic, flow-direction realignment and is therefore used in bioinspired design of cars. However, tight swimming-course stabilization is paradoxical given the frequent, high-performance manoeuvring that boxfishes display in their spatially complex, coral reef territories. Here, by performing flow-tank measurements of hydrodynamic drag and yaw moments together with computational fluid dynamics simulations, we reverse several assumptions about the hydrodynamic role of the boxfish carapace. Firstly, despite serving as a model system in aerodynamic design, drag-reduction performance was relatively low compared with more generalized fish morphologies. Secondly, the current theory of course stabilization owing to flow over the boxfish carapace was rejected, as destabilizing moments were found consistently. This solves the boxfish swimming paradox: destabilizing moments enhance manoeuvrability, which is in accordance with the ecological demands for efficient turning and tilting. PMID:25505133

  16. Induced Seismicity of the Paradox Valley Brine Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, C. E.; Foxall, W.; Daley, T. M.

    2013-12-01

    for such a long time. We aim to get more insight of long-term processes so it can be applied to the study of Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS), where large volumes of carbon are injected into the underground for long-term storage. A first step is to understand the frequency magnitude distributions (FMD) of the ongoing seismicity at Paradox Valley better. We divide the events into sub-clusters and examine them individually. We find that the b-Values of the Gutenberg-Richter relationship change substantially within the different clusters from values of 0.7 to 1.2. Comparing the b-Values from this study with earlier studies of induced seismicity in from an Enhanced Geothermal System in Basel, Switzerland, we find that while the values are smaller, the overall pattern is surprisingly similar. We find the largest b-Values closest to the injection well and early on during the injections. Unlike in Basel, we can't compare co-injection and post-injection seismicity, as the injection is still ongoing. However, there are biannual 20-day shutdowns of the injection since 1999, which were implemented to reduce the risk of large magnitude events. We investigate the different behavior of the seismicity during this shut-in compared to the seismicity during the active injection.

  17. Killing Mosquitoes and Keeping Practice: Teacher Education as Sustaining Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keiser, David Lee

    2013-01-01

    The moral and ethical charge of teaching and teacher education includes sustaining equanimity and paradox, and maintaining poise amongst contradicting policies and interests. This paper draws upon the wisdom of the Tao Te Ching to address some paradoxes in education and teacher preparation. Specifically, the article looks at four chapters of the…

  18. Bolzano's Approach to the Paradoxes of Infinity: Implications for Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldegg, Guillermina

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we analyze excerpts of "Paradoxes of the Infinite", the posthumous work of Bernard Bolzano (1781-1848), in order to show that Georg Cantor's (1845-1918) approach to the problem of defining actual mathematical infinity is not the most natural. In fact, Bolzano's approach to the paradoxes of infinity is more intuitive, while remaining…

  19. Paradox and Double Binds in Adventure-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Stephen Barcia

    Paradox and therapeutic double bind techniques are used to overcome resistance in students with a history of success avoidance. Predictions of failure, restraining comments, and the use of paradox in the midst of an activity are defended theoretically by presenting historical roots and a rationale of effectiveness. A skill-building approach…

  20. The Use of Paradoxical Intention: Self-Management through Laughter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, C. Sue

    1980-01-01

    Paradoxical intention helps clients separate themselves from their neurotic symptoms. The client is instructed to exaggerate the symptom and finds, paradoxically, the symptom occurs less. In provocative exaggeration symptoms are described so as to evoke laughter at the very symptom that causes anxiety. (Author)

  1. The "Paradox of Interdisciplinarity" in Australian Research Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woelert, Peter; Millar, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This paper identifies what can be called the "paradox of interdisciplinarity" (Weingart 2000) in Australian higher education research governance and explores some of its constitutive dimensions. In the Australian context, the paradox of interdisciplinarity primarily concerns the proliferation of a programmatic discourse of…

  2. Feynman's Relativistic Electrodynamics Paradox and the Aharonov-Bohm Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caprez, Adam; Batelaan, Herman

    2009-03-01

    An analysis is done of a relativistic paradox posed in the Feynman Lectures of Physics involving two interacting charges. The physical system presented is compared with similar systems that also lead to relativistic paradoxes. The momentum conservation problem for these systems is presented. The relation between the presented analysis and the ongoing debates on momentum conservation in the Aharonov-Bohm problem is discussed.

  3. A Simple Explanation of the Classic Hydrostatic Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontomaris, Stylianos-Vasileios; Malamou, Anna

    2016-01-01

    An interesting problem in fluid mechanics, with significant educational importance, is the classic hydrostatic paradox. The hydrostatic paradox states the fact that in different shaped containers, with the same base area, which are filled with a liquid of the same height, the applied force by the liquid on the base of each container is exactly the…

  4. Paradoxical bronchospasm: a potentially life threatening adverse effect of albuterol.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Kalpana; Nagajothi, Nagapradeep

    2006-03-01

    We report a case of paradoxical bronchospasm to both levalbuterol and albuterol. While the exact mechanism for this known adverse effect of albuterol is not known, awareness of this adverse effect can be life saving to the patient. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of paradoxical bronchospasm to levalbuterol inhalation solution. PMID:16553105

  5. THE EVAPORATION PARADOX: AN ENHANCED HYDROLOGIC CYCLE? (R824995)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  6. Linear stability and the Braess paradox in coupled-oscillator networks and electric power grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletta, Tommaso; Jacquod, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the influence that adding a new coupling has on the linear stability of the synchronous state in coupled-oscillator networks. Using a simple model, we show that, depending on its location, the new coupling can lead to enhanced or reduced stability. We extend these results to electric power grids where a new line can lead to four different scenarios corresponding to enhanced or reduced grid stability as well as increased or decreased power flows. Our analysis shows that the Braess paradox may occur in any complex coupled system, where the synchronous state may be weakened and sometimes even destroyed by additional couplings.

  7. The Hispanic paradox in cardiovascular disease and total mortality.

    PubMed

    Medina-Inojosa, Jose; Jean, Nathalie; Cortes-Bergoderi, Mery; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Health statistics and epidemiologic studies have shown that Hispanics live longer than Non Hispanic Whites, despite a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and an average low socioeconomic status, both strong predictors of CVD and mortality. This phenomenon has been dubbed "The Hispanic paradox" and has been demonstrated in old and contemporary cohorts. To date, no factor has been identified that could explain this phenomenon, but socio demographic factors, dietary intake and genetic predisposition have been proposed as possible explanations for the Hispanic paradox. As with the French paradox, where French were found to have a lower rate of coronary heart disease (CHD), helped to identify the role of the Mediterranean diet and wine consumption in the prevention of CHD, the Hispanic paradox could help identify protective factors against CHD. This article describes the current evidence supporting the existence of the Hispanic paradox and provides a brief review on the possible explanations. PMID:25246267

  8. Resolution of a paradox in classical electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    2006-05-15

    It is an early result of electrostatics in curved space that the gravitational mass of a charge distribution changes by an amount equal to U{sub es}/c{sup 2}, where U{sub es} is the internal electrostatic potential energy and c is the speed of light, if the system is supported at rest by external forces. This fact, independently rediscovered in recent years in the case of a simple dipole, confirms a very reasonable expectation grounded in the mass-energy equivalency equation. However, it is an unsolved paradox of classical electrodynamics that the renormalized mass of an accelerated dipole calculated from the self-forces due to the distortion of the Coulomb field differs in general from that expected from the energy correction, U{sub es}/c{sup 2}, unless the acceleration is transversal to the orientation of the dipole. Here we show that this apparent paradox disappears for any dipole orientation if the self-force is evaluated by means of Whittaker's exact solution for the field of the single charge in a homogeneous gravitational field described in the Rindler metric. The discussion is supported by computer algebra results, diagrams of the electric fields distorted by gravitation, and a brief analysis of the prospects for realistic experimentation. The gravitational correction to dipole-dipole interactions is also discussed.

  9. Birthday Paradox for Multi-Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Tonien, Dongvu; Kurosawa, Kaoru; Toyota, Koji

    In this paper, we study multi-collision probability. For a hash function H:D→R with |R|=n, it has been believed that we can find an s-collision by hashing Q=n(s-1)/s times. We first show that this probability is at most 1/s! for any s, which is very small for large s. (for example, s=n(s-1)/s) Thus the above folklore is wrong for large s. We next show that if s is small, so that we can assume Q-s≈Q, then this probability is at least 1/s!-1/2(s!)2, which is very high for small s (for example, s is a constant). Thus the above folklore is true for small s. Moreover, we show that by hashing (s!)1/s×Q+s-1(≤n) times, an s-collision is found with probability approximately 0.5 for any n and s such that (s!/n)1/s≈0. Note that if s=2, it coincides with the usual birthday paradox. Hence it is a generalization of the birthday paradox to multi-collisions.

  10. Perspectives on the quantum Zeno paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itano, Wayne M.

    2009-11-01

    As of October 2006, there were approximately 535 citations to the seminal 1977 paper of Misra and Sudarshan that pointed out the quantum Zeno paradox (more often called the quantum Zeno effect). In simple terms, the quantum Zeno effect refers to a slowing down of the evolution of a quantum state in the limit that the state is observed continuously. There has been much disagreement as to how the quantum Zeno effect should be defined and as to whether it is really a paradox, requiring new physics, or merely a consequence of "ordinary" quantum mechanics. The experiment of Itano, Heinzen, Bollinger, and Wineland, published in 1990, has been cited around 347 times and seems to be the one most often called a demonstration of the quantum Zeno effect. Given that there is disagreement as to what the quantum Zeno effect is, there naturally is disagreement as to whether that experiment demonstrated the quantum Zeno effect. Some differing perspectives regarding the quantum Zeno effect and what would constitute an experimental demonstration are discussed.

  11. Paradoxical muscle movement in human standing

    PubMed Central

    Loram, Ian D; Maganaris, Constantinos N; Lakie, Martin

    2004-01-01

    In human standing, gravity causes forward toppling about the ankle joint which is prevented by activity in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. It has long been assumed that when people sway forwards the calf muscles are stretched and conversely that they shorten with backward sway. Consequently, for many years, two explanations for standing stabilization have flourished. First, tonic muscle activity itself may generate adequate intrinsic ankle stiffness. Second, if intrinsic ankle stiffness is inadequate, the resistance to stretch of the calf muscles may be augmented by stretch reflexes or by central control. These explanations require that the passive tissue (Achilles' tendon, foot) transmitting the calf muscle tension is stiff. However, our recent measurements have indicated that this passive tissue is not stiff during standing. Accordingly, we predicted a counterintuitive mode of control where the muscles and body must, on average, move in opposite directions (paradoxical movements). Here we use dynamic ultrasound imaging in vivo with novel automated tracking of muscle length to test our hypothesis. We show that soleus and gastrocnemius do indeed move paradoxically, shortening when the body sways forward and lengthening when the body returns. This confirms that intrinsic ankle stiffness is too low to stabilize human standing. Moreover, it shows that the increase in active tension is associated with muscle shortening. This pattern cannot be produced by muscle stretch reflexes and can only arise from the anticipatory neural control of muscle length that is necessary for balance. PMID:15047776

  12. The von Neumann Triple Point Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Richard; Tesdall, Allen M.

    We describe the problem of weak shock reflection off a wedge and discuss the triple point paradox that arises. When the shock is sufficiently weak and the wedge is thin, Mach reflection appears to be observed but is impossible according to what von Neumann originally showed in 1943. We summarize some recent numerical results for weak shock reflection problems for the unsteady transonic small disturbance equations, the nonlinear wave system, and the Euler equations. Rather than finding a standard but mathematically inadmissible Mach reflection with a shock triple point, the solutions contain a complex structure: there is a sequence of triple points and supersonic patches in a tiny region behind the leading triple point, with an expansion fan originating at each triple point. The sequence of patches may be infinite, and we refer to this structure as Guderley Mach reflection. The presence of the expansion fans at the triple points resolves the paradox. We describe some recent experimental evidence which is consistent with these numerical findings.

  13. Magma chamber paradox: decompression upon replenishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papale, Paolo; Longo, Antonella; Montagna, Chiara Paola

    2013-04-01

    The invasion of active magma chambers by fresh magma of deeper provenance is invariably assumed to cause chamber pressurization. Pressure increase thus stands as an intuitive consequence of magma chamber replenishment. However, new numerical simulations demonstrate that pressure evolution is highly non-linear, and that decompression dominates when large density contrasts exist between injected and resident magmas. This apparent paradox originates from the compressible nature of volatile-rich magma and the dynamics of convection associated with injections of buoyant magma. While decompression can dominate in a shallow chamber, pressure increase develops in the connected deep regions of magma provenance. These results contradict classical views adopted to interpret observations at active as well as fossil magma chambers, and demonstrate that a simple reliance on intuition is insufficient: what may be perceived as a paradox - magma chamber decompression upon replenishment - is instead likely, and rooted in the complex physics that governs the multiphase, multi-component dynamics of magma transport in geometrically composite, spatially extended magmatic systems.

  14. Simpson's paradox in psychological science: a practical guide

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Rogier A.; Frankenhuis, Willem E.; Waldorp, Lourens J.; Borsboom, Denny

    2013-01-01

    The direction of an association at the population-level may be reversed within the subgroups comprising that population—a striking observation called Simpson's paradox. When facing this pattern, psychologists often view it as anomalous. Here, we argue that Simpson's paradox is more common than conventionally thought, and typically results in incorrect interpretations—potentially with harmful consequences. We support this claim by reviewing results from cognitive neuroscience, behavior genetics, clinical psychology, personality psychology, educational psychology, intelligence research, and simulation studies. We show that Simpson's paradox is most likely to occur when inferences are drawn across different levels of explanation (e.g., from populations to subgroups, or subgroups to individuals). We propose a set of statistical markers indicative of the paradox, and offer psychometric solutions for dealing with the paradox when encountered—including a toolbox in R for detecting Simpson's paradox. We show that explicit modeling of situations in which the paradox might occur not only prevents incorrect interpretations of data, but also results in a deeper understanding of what data tell us about the world. PMID:23964259

  15. Simpson's paradox in psychological science: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Kievit, Rogier A; Frankenhuis, Willem E; Waldorp, Lourens J; Borsboom, Denny

    2013-01-01

    The direction of an association at the population-level may be reversed within the subgroups comprising that population-a striking observation called Simpson's paradox. When facing this pattern, psychologists often view it as anomalous. Here, we argue that Simpson's paradox is more common than conventionally thought, and typically results in incorrect interpretations-potentially with harmful consequences. We support this claim by reviewing results from cognitive neuroscience, behavior genetics, clinical psychology, personality psychology, educational psychology, intelligence research, and simulation studies. We show that Simpson's paradox is most likely to occur when inferences are drawn across different levels of explanation (e.g., from populations to subgroups, or subgroups to individuals). We propose a set of statistical markers indicative of the paradox, and offer psychometric solutions for dealing with the paradox when encountered-including a toolbox in R for detecting Simpson's paradox. We show that explicit modeling of situations in which the paradox might occur not only prevents incorrect interpretations of data, but also results in a deeper understanding of what data tell us about the world. PMID:23964259

  16. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome: A Paradoxical Cannabis Effect.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-Rivera, Ivonne Marie; Estremera-Marcial, Rodolfo; Sierra-Mercado, Marielly; Gutiérrez-Núñez, José; Toro, Doris H

    2015-01-01

    Despite well-established antiemetic properties of marijuana, there has been increasing evidence of a paradoxical effect in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system, given rise to a new and underrecognized clinical entity called the Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome. Reported cases in the medical literature have established a series of patients exhibiting a classical triad of symptoms: cyclic vomiting, chronic marijuana use, and compulsive bathing. We present a case of a 29-year-old man whose clinical presentation strongly correlates with cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome. Despite a diagnosis of exclusion, this syndrome should be considered plausible in the setting of a patient with recurrent intractable vomiting and a strong history of cannabis use as presented in this case. PMID:26266060

  17. Principles, problems, and paradoxes of cosmogony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treder, H.-J.

    The historical development of scientific theories of cosmogony since Newton and Kant is traced, with emphases on the inherent problems and paradoxes and on the evolution of the solar system. The basic conflict between the Newtonian concept of ahistorical physical processes in reversible time and the thermodynamic principle of irreversible entropy increase is seen as only partially resolved by the modern view that microscale events are reversible while macroscale events are not. It is shown that the theory of an adiabatic isentropic expansion of the universe cannot yet explain the genesis of galaxies of 10 billion stars. Kant's cosmogony of the solar system by condensation from a gas cloud is considered qualitatively valid; quantitative corrections, especially for the planets and their satellites, are discussed and related to the hypotheses of La Place. The observations of Barnard's star by van de Kamp, indicating the existence of Jupiter-like planets in almost circular orbits around it, are considered.

  18. Job engagement's paradoxical role in nurse burnout.

    PubMed

    Vinje, Hege F; Mittelmark, Maurice B

    2007-06-01

    Interviews were undertaken with 11 community health nurses and qualitative analysis sought to illuminate the ways in which job engagement was connected to their health and functioning. High job engagement followed from the nurses' deep feeling of calling to the nursing profession and contributed to a strong sense of duty and strict self-demand regarding one's own and other's levels of performance. In nine cases, perceived failures to live up to their own performance demands contributed to the nurses' near-burnout. This triggered extensive introspection and reflection, leading to positive coping and avoidance of burnout. The nurses coped by using their well-honed skills in introspection and reflection, which they had practiced habitually all their careers, to help them determine which personal and professional changes were required to maintain job engagement and satisfaction. Paradoxically, job engagement can not only promote thriving on the job, but also contribute to negative processes leading to poor functioning. PMID:17470184

  19. An epigenetic resolution of the lek paradox.

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Melvin M; Zeh, Jeanne A; Zeh, David W

    2016-04-01

    Female choice for traits signaling male genetic quality is expected to erode heritable variation in fitness, undermining the benefits of choice. Known as the lek paradox, this contradiction has motivated extensive population genetic theory, yet remains unresolved. Recent modeling by Bonduriansky and Day concludes that costly female preference is best maintained when male condition is determined by environmentally induced factors transmitted across single generations. Here, we reformulate their model in explicitly epigenetic terms, and review evidence that environmentally induced paternal effects are mediated through epigenetic changes in sperm. Noncoding RNA expression, DNA methylation and histone modifications are highly sensitive to diet, stress, toxicants and stochastic events. Epigenetic variation renews each generation and cannot be exhausted by selection. By choosing well-endowed males that produce gametes in epigenetically good states, females can increase their fitness directly through increased fertilization success or indirectly through epigenetic effects on the fitness of offspring and potentially subsequent generations. Also watch the video abstract. PMID:26928130

  20. Zeno's paradox in decision-making.

    PubMed

    Yearsley, James M; Pothos, Emmanuel M

    2016-04-13

    Classical probability theory has been influential in modelling decision processes, despite empirical findings that have been persistently paradoxical from classical perspectives. For such findings, some researchers have been successfully pursuing decision models based on quantum theory (QT). One unique feature of QT is the collapse postulate, which entails that measurements (or in decision-making, judgements) reset the state to be consistent with the measured outcome. If there is quantum structure in cognition, then there has to be evidence for the collapse postulate. A striking, a prioriprediction, is that opinion change will be slowed down (under idealized conditions frozen) by continuous judgements. In physics, this is the quantum Zeno effect. We demonstrate a quantum Zeno effect in decision-making in humans and so provide evidence that advocates the use of quantum principles in decision theory, at least in some cases. PMID:27053743

  1. Water conservation--whole effluent toxicity paradox.

    PubMed

    Fort, Douglas J; Meyers, Jeffrey D; Page, Michael W; Hercyk, Neta L

    2013-06-01

    Total dissolved solids (TDS) management in water has become an increasingly important topic as competition for water supply sources and the intensity of use both increase. Regulatory failure of National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests is one of several potential factors in managing TDS concentrations in effluent. Consequently, WET tests have become a de facto concentration standard that sets the limit for the intensity of water use and the amount of water conservation feasibly obtained for a facility. Conflicting regulations dealing with the application of mixing zones and antidegradation policies can prevent water conservation and actually result in the unintended consequence of causing more water use. The impact of TDS on NPDES-required WET tests, conflicting regulations dealing with the application of mixing zones that are counter-productive to water conservation, alternative practices currently being used, and other means of rectifying this paradox are discussed. PMID:23833811

  2. The information paradox: Conflicts and resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Samir D.

    2012-11-01

    Many relativists have been long convinced that black hole evaporation leads to information loss or remnants. String theorists have however not been too worried about the issue, largely due to a belief that the Hawking argument for information loss is flawed in its details. A recently derived inequality shows that the Hawking argument for black holes with horizon can in fact be made rigorous. What happens instead is that in string theory black hole microstates have no horizons. Thus the evolution of radiation quanta with E ~ kT is modified by order unity at the horizon, and we resolve the information paradox. We discuss how it is still possible for E >> kT objects to see an approximate black hole like geometry. We also note some possible implications of this physics for the early Universe.

  3. The paradox of evil/homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Woo, Juhyun

    2015-01-01

    In this article, I analyze "personal experience stories around the homosexual" that entered into the parliamentary debates on the Sexual Offences Act in Britain in the 1950s and 1960s and shaped understandings of sexual citizenship in particular ways. Specific attention is paid to the effects of political storytelling involved in the making of British sexual citizens. I explore how the paradoxical figure of the evil homosexual emerges and how politicians, in telling stories of the evil homosexuality, police the border that can effectively separate sexual outsiders from sexual citizens. I conclude with an analysis of these stories, and how their telling is closely linked to the postwar social welfare thinking in Britain. PMID:25264568

  4. The St. Petersburg paradox: An experimental solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, Sergio; Matsushita, Raul

    2016-03-01

    The St. Petersburg paradox refers to a gamble of infinite expected value, where people are likely to spend only a small entrance fee for it. There is a huge volume of literature that mostly concentrates on the psychophysics of the game; experiments are scant. Here, rather than focusing on the psychophysics, we offer an experimental, "physical" solution as if robots played the game. After examining the time series formed by one billion plays, we: confirm that there is no characteristic scale for this game; explicitly formulate the implied power law; and identify the type of α-stable distribution associated with the game. We find an α = 1 and, thus, the underlying distribution of the game is a Cauchy flight, as hinted by Paul Samuelson.

  5. EPR paradox, quantum nonlocality and physical reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupczynski, M.

    2016-03-01

    Eighty years ago Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen demonstrated that instantaneous reduction of wave function, believed to describe completely a pair of entangled physical systems, led to EPR paradox. The paradox disappears in statistical interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM) according to which a wave function describes only an ensemble of identically prepared physical systems. QM predicts strong correlations between outcomes of measurements performed on different members of EPR pairs in far-away locations. Searching for an intuitive explanation of these correlations John Bell analysed so called local realistic hidden variable models and proved that correlations consistent with these models satisfy Bell inequalities which are violated by some predictions of QM and by experimental data. Several different local models were constructed and inequalities proven. Some eminent physicists concluded that Nature is definitely nonlocal and that it is acting according to a law of nonlocal randomness. According to these law perfectly random, but strongly correlated events, can be produced at the same time in far away locations and a local and causal explanation of their occurrence cannot be given. We strongly disagree with this conclusion and we prove the contrary by analysing in detail some influential finite sample proofs of Bell and CHSH inequalities and so called Quantum Randi Challenges. We also show how one can win so called Bell's game without violating locality of Nature. Nonlocal randomness is inconsistent with local quantum field theory, with standard model in elementary particle physics and with causal laws and adaptive dynamics prevailing in the surrounding us world. The experimental violation of Bell-type inequalities does not prove the nonlocality of Nature but it only confirms a contextual character of quantum observables and gives a strong argument against counterfactual definiteness and against a point of view according to which experimental outcomes are produced

  6. Avoiding Braess' Paradox Through Collective Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert , David H.; Tumer, Kagan

    1999-01-01

    In an Ideal Shortest Path Algorithm (ISPA), at each moment each router in a network sends all of its traffic down the path that will incur the lowest cost to that traffic. In the limit of an infinitesimally small amount of traffic for a particular router, its routing that traffic via an ISPA is optimal, as far as cost incurred by that traffic is concerned. We demonstrate though that in many cases, due to the side-effects of one router's actions on another routers performance, having routers use ISPA's is suboptimal as far as global aggregate cost is concerned, even when only used to route infinitesimally small amounts of traffic. As a particular example of this we present an instance of Braess' paradox for ISPA'S, in which adding new links to a network decreases overall throughput. We also demonstrate that load-balancing, in which the routing decisions are made to optimize the global cost incurred by all traffic currently being routed, is suboptimal as far as global cost averaged across time is concerned. This is also due to "side-effects", in this case of current routing decision on future traffic. The theory of COllective INtelligence (COIN) is concerned precisely with the issue of avoiding such deleterious side-effects. We present key concepts from that theory and use them to derive an idealized algorithm whose performance is better than that of the ISPA, even in the infinitesimal limit. We present experiments verifying this, and also showing that a machine-learning-based version of this COIN algorithm in which costs are only imprecisely estimated (a version potentially applicable in the real world) also outperforms the ISPA, despite having access to less information than does the ISPA. In particular, this COIN algorithm avoids Braess' paradox.

  7. Paradoxical proepileptic response to NMDA receptor blockade linked to cortical interneuron defect in stargazer mice.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Atul; Nahm, Walter K; Noebels, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    Paradoxical seizure exacerbation by anti-epileptic medication is a well-known clinical phenomenon in epilepsy, but the cellular mechanisms remain unclear. One possibility is enhanced network disinhibition by unintended suppression of inhibitory interneurons. We investigated this hypothesis in the stargazer mouse model of absence epilepsy, which bears a mutation in stargazin, an AMPA receptor trafficking protein. If AMPA signaling onto inhibitory GABAergic neurons is impaired, their activation by glutamate depends critically upon NMDA receptors. Indeed, we find that stargazer seizures are exacerbated by NMDA receptor blockade with CPP (3-[(R)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl]-prop-2-enyl-1-phosphonic acid) and MK-801, whereas other genetic absence epilepsy models are sensitive to these antagonists. To determine how an AMPA receptor trafficking defect could lead to paradoxical network activation, we analyzed stargazin and AMPA receptor localization and found that stargazin is detected exclusively in parvalbumin-positive (PV (+)) fast-spiking interneurons in somatosensory cortex, where it is co-expressed with the AMPA receptor subunit GluA4. PV (+) cortical interneurons in stargazer show a near twofold decrease in the dendrite:soma GluA4 expression ratio compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. We explored the functional consequence of this trafficking defect on network excitability in neocortical slices. Both NMDA receptor antagonists suppressed 0 Mg (2) (+)-induced network discharges in WT but augmented bursting in stargazer cortex. Interneurons mediate this paradoxical response, since the difference between genotypes was masked by GABA receptor blockade. Our findings provide a cellular locus for AMPA receptor-dependent signaling defects in stargazer cortex and define an interneuron-dependent mechanism for paradoxical seizure exacerbation in absence epilepsy. PMID:24065886

  8. A simple explanation of the classic hydrostatic paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontomaris, Stylianos-Vasileios; Malamou, Anna

    2016-07-01

    An interesting problem in fluid mechanics, with significant educational importance, is the classic hydrostatic paradox. The hydrostatic paradox states the fact that in different shaped containers, with the same base area, which are filled with a liquid of the same height, the applied force by the liquid on the base of each container is exactly the same. However, if the shape of the container is different, the amount of the liquid (and as a consequence the weight) can greatly vary. In this paper, a simple explanation of the hydrostatic paradox, specifically designed and implemented for educational purposes regarding secondary education, is provided.

  9. Linear optics implementation of weak values in Hardy's paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Ahnert, S.E.; Payne, M.C.

    2004-10-01

    We propose an experimental setup for the implementation of weak measurements in the context of the gedanken experiment known as Hardy's paradox. As Aharonov et al. [Y. Aharonov, A. Botero, S. Popescu, B. Reznik, and J. Tollaksen, Phys. Lett. A301, 130 (2002)] showed, these weak values form a language with which the paradox can be resolved. Our analysis shows that this language is indeed consistent and experimentally testable. It also reveals exactly how a combination of weak values can give rise to an apparently paradoxical result.

  10. The relativistic velocity composition paradox and the Thomas rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungar, Abraham A.

    1989-11-01

    The relativistic velocity composition paradox of Mocanu and its resolution are presented. The paradox, which rests on the bizarre and counterintuitive non-communtativity of the relativistic velocity composition operation, when applied to noncollinear admissible velocities, led Mocanu to claim that there are “some difficulties within the framework of relativistic electrodynamics.” The paradox is resolved in this article by means of the Thomas rotation, shedding light on the role played by composite velocities in special relativity, as opposed to the role they play in Galilean relativity.

  11. The food-insecurity obesity paradox: A resource scarcity hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Dhurandhar, Emily J

    2016-08-01

    Food insecurity is paradoxically associated with obesity in the United States. Current hypotheses to explain this phenomenon are descriptive regarding the low food security population's dietary and physical activity habits, but are not mechanistic. Herein it is proposed that a resource scarcity hypothesis may explain this paradox, such that fattening is a physiologically regulated response to threatened food supply that occurs specifically in low social status individuals. Evidence that this may be occurring, the implications for addressing the food insecurity-obesity paradox, and future areas of research, are reviewed and discussed. PMID:27126969

  12. Towards a Nonviolent Alternative for the Black Hole Information Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yinbo

    In the semiclassical approximation, quantum field theory suggests that black holes eventually evaporate in a manner largely independent of their internal structure. Doing so, however, leads to a violation of unitarity of quantum mechanics, rendering the system inconsistent. One possible resolution is soft violations of locality in the near horizon region. The first consistency check is whether such a proposal can actually get the information out. Using quantum information techniques, a large class of evolutions into paired states is ruled out. More generally, information transfer can be characterized by the mutual information of a specially prepared state. Minimizing this quantity saturates a subadditivity inequality, leading to "subspace transfer"; maximizing it generically leads to an enhanced particle flux. Using the tools of effective field theory, one can then try to model the nonlocality as arising from an effective source localized near the horizon. To get information out at the right rate, this source must have a characteristic size. The horizon is altered, but nonviolent. This model also naturally accommodates black hole mining, avoiding a potential flaw. Having passed important consistency checks, nonviolent nonlocality is a viable solution to the information paradox.

  13. Maximal Parrondo's Paradox for Classical and Quantum Markov Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünbaum, F. Alberto; Pejic, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Parrondo's paradox refers to the situation where two, multi-round games with a fixed winning criteria, both with probability greater than one-half for one player to win, are combined. Using a possibly biased coin to determine the rule to employ for each round, paradoxically, the previously losing player now wins the combined game with probability greater than one-half. In this paper, we will analyze classical observed, classical hidden, and quantum versions of a game that displays this paradox. The game we have utilized is simpler than games for which this behavior has been previously noted in the classical and quantum cases. We will show that in certain situations the paradox can occur to a greater degree in the quantum version than is possible in the classical versions.

  14. Patent foramen ovale and paradoxical embolization: a historical perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, H.; Rafferty, T.

    1993-01-01

    The use of transesophageal echocardiography for intraoperative management of critically ill patients allows for routine evaluation of foramen ovale patency. The high prevalence of preoperatively unrecognized flow-patency of this structure has led investigators to emphasize the potential for paradoxical embolization in any patient undergoing anesthesia. This perspective led us to research earliest documentation of paradoxical embolization through a patent foramen ovale as a historical issue with present day relevance. This report examines the 1877 text of Julius Cohnheim in which he described a fatal case of paradoxical embolization to the middle meningeal artery. The 1880 manuscript of Moritz Litten documenting paradoxical embolization to the lower extremity is also presented. Both translations, to our knowledge, represent the first such representations of both the original 1877 edition of Cohnheim's work and Litten's journal article. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:8256459

  15. Intimate partner violence against women and the Nordic paradox.

    PubMed

    Gracia, Enrique; Merlo, Juan

    2016-05-01

    Nordic countries are the most gender equal countries in the world, but at the same time they have disproportionally high prevalence rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) against women. High prevalence of IPV against women, and high levels of gender equality would appear contradictory, but these apparently opposite statements appear to be true in Nordic countries, producing what could be called the 'Nordic paradox'. Despite this paradox being one of the most puzzling issues in the field, this is a research question rarely asked, and one that remains unanswered. This paper explores a number of theoretical and methodological issues that may help to understand this paradox. Efforts to understand the Nordic paradox may provide an avenue to guide new research on IPV and to respond to this major public health problem in a more effective way. PMID:27058634

  16. One-Piece Faraday Generator: A Paradoxical Experiment from 1851

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crooks, M. J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Describes an experiment based on Faraday's one-piece generator, where the rotating disk is replaced by a cylindrical permanent magnet. Explains the apparent paradox that an observer in an inertial frame could measure his absolute velocity. (GA)

  17. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah.

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Lorenz, D.M.; Culham, W.E.

    1997-10-15

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide- (CO{sub 2}-) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  18. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M. Lee; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas

    1999-11-03

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million bbl of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO-) flood 2 project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  19. Unitary solution to a quantum gravity information paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, T. C.

    2007-07-15

    We consider a toy model of the interaction of a qubit with an exotic space-time containing a timelike curve. Consistency seems to require that the global evolution of the qubit be nonunitary. Given that quantum mechanics is globally unitary, this then is an example of a quantum gravity information paradox. However, we show that a careful analysis of the problem in the Heisenberg picture reveals an underlying unitarity, thus resolving the paradox.

  20. Brownian motion and gambling: from ratchets to paradoxical games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrondo, J. M. R.; Dinís, Luis

    2004-02-01

    Two losing gambling games, when alternated in a periodic or random fashion, can produce a winning game. This paradox has been inspired by certain physical systems capable of rectifying fluctuations: the so-called Brownian ratchets. In this paper we review this paradox, from Brownian ratchets to the most recent studies on collective games, providing some intuitive explanations of the unexpected phenomena that we will find along the way.

  1. Paradoxical Cerebral Fat Embolism in Revision Hip Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Piuzzi, Nicolás S.; Zanotti, Gerardo; Comba, Fernando M.; Buttaro, Martin A.; Piccaluga, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of clinical fat embolism syndrome (FES) is low (<1%) whilst fat embolism (FE) of marrow fat appears to occur more often (Mellor and Soni (2001)). Paradoxical brain FE may occur in patients undergoing hip orthopedic surgery who have an undocumented patent foramen ovale (PFO). We report a case of an eighty-year-old male patient, who underwent a scheduled revision hip surgery suffering a paradoxical cerebral FE. PMID:25184065

  2. A photochemical answer to the 'xenon paradox'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébrard; Marty, B.

    2012-12-01

    Xenon is depleted by one order of magnitude relative to other volatile elements when normalized to the chondritic composition. Furthermore, atmospheric xenon is far more enriched in the heavy isotopes relatively to chondritic and solar compositions (3-4%.amu-1) than atmospheric krypton (< 1%.amu-1). This discrepancy, known as the 'xenon paradox', has led to sophisticated models of atmospheric evolution coupled with mantle geodynamics (Pepin, 1991; Tolstikhin and Marty, 1998) and cometary contributions (Dauphas, 2003; Owen et al., 1992) that could explain terrestrial noble gas patterns under ad hoc conditions during the building stages of the Earth, no more than ~200 Ma following the beginning of solar system formation. Yet, xenon having an isotopic composition intermediate between the atmospheric and the chondritic ones has been recently documented in Archean (≤3 Ga-old) sedimentary rocks (Pujol et al., 2011), suggesting that isotopic fractionation of Xe occurred over a much longer period of time than previously thought, during the Hadean and the Archean eons. In that case, assuming a Rayleigh type isotope evolution for atmospheric Xe requires an enrichment fractionation factor of 1.3% in heavy isotopes for Xe remaining in the atmosphere. This is clearly within the range of values observed in laboratory experiments aimed at trapping and fractionating Xe isotopes in solids, which is only effective upon ionization (Marrocchi et al., 2011; Kuga et al., 2012). We report here a possibility for explaining the 'xenon paradox' through interaction of the Hadean/Archean atmosphere with EUV light from the young Sun. By using a new photochemical model, we have found out that atmospheric Xe depletion and enrichment in heavy Xe isotopes could be achieved by EUV photoionization deep enough in the atmosphere to allow the preferential implantation of the heavier Xe isotopes in organic aerosols, the formation of which is itself triggered by UV photochemistry. Most of the ionized

  3. Is the faint young Sun paradox solved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, E. T.; Toon, O. B.

    2013-12-01

    How did the early Earth remain warm despite weak solar luminosity? The faint young Sun paradox has stubbornly resisted a self-consistent solution since it was first introduced by Sagan and Mullen [1] over four decades ago. However, recent revisions to expected paleo-ocean temperatures [2, 3] along with new results from three-dimensional climate models [4] may allow this long standing problem to be finally put to rest. Here we use a modified version of the Community Atmosphere Model version 3 from the National Center for Atmospheric Research to study early climate. We find that resolving the faint young Sun paradox becomes less problematic when viewing a full representation of the climate system. For the late Archean climate (80% solar constant), relatively modest amounts of CO2 (≤0.02 bar) and CH4 (0.001 bar) yield surface temperatures equal to the present day with no other alterations to climate. Cooler climates with large ice caps but with temperate tropical regions can be supported with considerably smaller greenhouse gas burdens. The incorporation of systematic climate system elements expected for the Archean such as fewer cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) [5], reduced land albedos [5], and an increased atmospheric inventory of N2 [6], can provide a combined 10 to 20 K of additional surface warming given reasonable assumptions. With the inclusion of 0.001 bar of CH4, 2 PAL of N2, reduced land albedos, and reduced CCN, present day mean surface temperatures can be maintained for the earliest Archean (75% solar constant) with only ~0.01 bar of CO2. However, lower requirements for atmospheric CO2 may imply that photochemical hazes were frequent during the Archean. [1] Sagan, C., & Mullen, G. Science 177, 52 (1972) [2] Hren, M.T., Tice, M.M., & Chamberlin, C.P. Nature 462, 205 (2009) [3] Blake. R.E., Chang, S.J., & Lepland, A. Nature 464, 1029 (2010) [4] Wolf, E.T., & Toon, O.B. Astrobiology 13(7), 1 (2013) [5] Rosing, M.T., Bird, D.K., Sleep, N.H., & Bjerrum, C

  4. Conscious processing and the process goal paradox.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Richard; Hardy, Lew

    2010-06-01

    The three experiments reported here examined the process goal paradox, which has emerged from the literature on goal setting and conscious processing. We predicted that skilled but anxious performers who adopted a global movement focus using holistic process goals would outperform those who used part-oriented process goals. In line with the conscious processing hypothesis, we also predicted that performers using part process goals would experience performance impairment in test compared with baseline conditions. In all three experiments, participants performed motor tasks in baseline and test conditions. Cognitive state anxiety increased in all of the test conditions. The results confirmed our first prediction; however, we failed to find unequivocal evidence to support our second prediction. The consistent pattern of the results lends support to the suggestion that, for skilled athletes who perform under competitive pressure, using a holistic process goal that focuses attention on global aspects of a motor skill is a more effective attentional focus strategy than using a part process goal. PMID:20587818

  5. Resolving the paradox of suboptimal choice.

    PubMed

    Zentall, Thomas R

    2016-01-01

    When humans engage in commercial (totally probabilistic) gambling they are making suboptimal choices because the return is generally less than the investment. This review (a) examines the literature on pigeon suboptimal choice, (b) describes the conditions under which it occurs, (c) identifies the mechanisms that appear to be responsible for the effect, and (d) suggests that similar processes may be able to account for analogous suboptimal choice when humans engage in commercial gambling. Pigeons show suboptimal choice when they choose between 1 alternative that 20% of the time provides them with a signal that they will always get fed or 80% of the time with a signal that they will not get fed (overall 20% reinforcement) and a second alternative that 100% of the time provides them with a signal that they will get fed 50% of the time (overall 50% reinforcement). The pigeons' strong preference for the suboptimal choice was investigated in a series of experiments that found the preference for the suboptimal alternative was determined by the value of the signal that predicted reinforcement, rather its frequency and that the frequency of the signal that predicted nonreinforcement had little effect on the suboptimal choice. Paradoxically, this account makes the prediction that pigeons will be indifferent between an alternative that 50% of the time provides a fully predictive stimulus for reinforcement and an alternative that 100% of the time provides a fully predictive stimulus for reinforcement. The similarities and differences of this suboptimal choice task to human gambling are discussed. PMID:26640967

  6. Paradoxical sleep as a programming system.

    PubMed

    Jouvet, M

    1998-01-01

    The concept of 'psychological individuation' i.e 'intraspecific variability' is essential for evolution as stated by Mayr (1958). It has been recently revived by the study of Bouchard (1990) in homozygous twins separated at birth and reared in different environments. These twins still retain identical psychological idiosyncratic reactions. Even if their brains are almost identical at birth, it is most likely that the different epigenetic stimuli from the external world have differently altered many cerebral synaptic circuitry due to the plasticity of the brain. Therefore, in order to maintain an identical psychological profile, there should be a mechanism which would reinforce the genetic programmation of the central nervous system either in reinforcing or erasing special genetic circuitry which would be stimulated during previous and/or subsequent waking periods. In ectothermic vertebrates, in immature mammals or sometimes in mature birds, this programming can be effectuated by neurogenesis. After neurogenesis has stopped in mammals, paradoxical sleep would be well suited for reinforcing the genetic programming during sleep. The patterns of portogeniculo-occipital (PGO) activity (which depend upon genetic factors) would be responsible for this function, together with the theta activity of the hippocampus (read out of previous waking events) and fast cortical EEG. This programming would activate all the brain including the pyramidal motor system while movements would be suppressed by the system controlling muscle atonia. PMID:9682187

  7. A paradoxical teratogenic mechanism for retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Leo M Y; Leung, Chun-Yin; Tang, Walfred W C; Choi, Heung-Ling; Leung, Yun-Chung; McCaffery, Peter J; Wang, Chi-Chiu; Woolf, Adrian S; Shum, Alisa S W

    2012-08-21

    Retinoic acid, an active metabolite of vitamin A, plays essential signaling roles in mammalian embryogenesis. Nevertheless, it has long been recognized that overexposure to vitamin A or retinoic acid causes widespread teratogenesis in rodents as well as humans. Although it has a short half-life, exposure to high levels of retinoic acid can disrupt development of yet-to-be formed organs, including the metanephros, the embryonic organ which normally differentiates into the mature kidney. Paradoxically, it is known that either an excess or a deficiency of retinoic acid results in similar malformations in some organs, including the mammalian kidney. Accordingly, we hypothesized that excess retinoic acid is teratogenic by inducing a longer lasting, local retinoic acid deficiency. This idea was tested in an established in vivo mouse model in which exposure to excess retinoic acid well before metanephric rudiments exist leads to failure of kidney formation several days later. Results showed that teratogen exposure was followed by decreased levels of Raldh transcripts encoding retinoic acid-synthesizing enzymes and increased levels of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1 mRNAs encoding enzymes that catabolize retinoic acid. Concomitantly, there was significant reduction in retinoic acid levels in whole embryos and kidney rudiments. Restoration of retinoic acid levels by maternal supplementation with low doses of retinoic acid following the teratogenic insult rescued metanephric kidney development and abrogated several extrarenal developmental defects. This previously undescribed and unsuspected mechanism provides insight into the molecular pathway of retinoic acid-induced teratogenesis. PMID:22869719

  8. Paradoxical Vocal Cord Motion in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Palla, John; Friedman, Aaron D

    2016-05-01

    Paradoxical vocal cord motion (PVCM), also termed vocal cord dysfunction, is a poorly understood disorder of episodic dyspnea characterized by inappropriate vocal cord adduction during inspiration and potentially during expiration. It can coexist or be confused with asthma, so appropriate diagnosis is key to optimizing treatment success. Although many patients with PVCM may have underlying psychologic issues, there is emerging evidence to suggest that this entity is not psychogenic in every patient. Both laryngeal irritants and exercise have been identified as additional contributing factors in PVCM. Diagnosis of PVCM requires awake laryngoscopic confirmation. However, many patients do not exhibit signs of PVCM during this examination, despite provocation during testing. Therefore, clinical history remains key in determining which patients should proceed with behavioral therapy under the guidance of a speech pathologist. In addition, treatment may include limiting patient exposure to potential sources of laryngeal irritation. Refractory patients may benefit from psychologic assessment and treatment. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(5):e184-e188.]. PMID:27171808

  9. Mad about Physics: Braintwisters, Paradoxes, and Curiosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jargodzki, Christopher; Potter, Franklin

    2000-11-01

    Why is there eight times more ice in Antarctica than in the Arctic? Why can you warm your hands by blowing gently, and cool your hands by blowing hard? Why would a pitcher scuff a baseball?Which weighs more-a pound of feathers or a pound of iron? Let science experts Christopher Jargodzki and Franklin Potter guide you through the curiosities of physics and you'll find the answers to these and hundreds of other quirky conundrums. You'll discover why sounds carry well over water (especially in the summer), how a mouse can be levitated in a magnetic field, why backspin is so important when shooting a basketball, and whether women are indeed as strong as men. With nearly 400 questions and answers on everything from race cars to jumping fleas to vanishing elephants, Mad about Physics presents a comprehensive collection of braintwisters and paradoxes that will challenge and entertain even the brainiest of science lovers. Whether you're a physicist by trade or just want to give your brain a power workout, this collection of intriguing and unusual physics challenges will send you on a highly entertaining ride that reveals the relevance of physics in our everyday lives.

  10. Senescence and cancer: An evolving inflammatory paradox.

    PubMed

    Ruhland, Megan K; Coussens, Lisa M; Stewart, Sheila A

    2016-01-01

    The senescent phenotype was first described in 1961 as a phenomenon characterized by the cessation of cellular division. After years of debate as to whether it represented a tissue culture artifact or an important biological process, it is now appreciated that senescence plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Further, senescence is integral to normal biological processes such as embryogenesis and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Now with defined roles in development, wound healing, tumor promotion and tumor suppression, it is not surprising that attention has turned to refining our understanding of the mechanisms behind, and consequences of, the induction of senescence. One emerging role for senescence lies in the ability of senescence to orchestrate an inflammatory response: factors secreted by senescent cells have been identified in multiple contexts to modulate various aspects of the immune response. As with many of the previously described roles for senescence, the type of inflammation established by the senescence phenotype is varied and dependent on context. In this review, we discuss the current state of the field with a focus on the paradoxical outcomes of the senescence-induced inflammatory responses in the context of cancer. A more complete understanding of senescence and an appreciation for its complexities will be important for eventual development of senescence-targeted therapies. PMID:26453912

  11. The paradox of enrichment in metaecosystems.

    PubMed

    Gounand, Isabelle; Mouquet, Nicolas; Canard, Elsa; Guichard, Frédéric; Hauzy, Céline; Gravel, Dominique

    2014-12-01

    The paradox of enrichment has been studied almost exclusively within communities or metacommunities, without explicit nutrient dynamics. Yet local recycling of materials from enriched ecosystems may affect the stability of connected ecosystems. Here we study the effect of nutrient, detritus, producer, and consumer spatial flows-combined with changes in regional enrichment-on the stability of a metaecosystem model. We considered both spatially homogeneous and heterogeneous enrichment. We found that nutrient and detritus spatial flows are destabilizing, whereas producer or consumer spatial flows are either neutral or stabilizing. We noticed that detritus spatial flows have only a weak impact on stability. Our study reveals that heterogeneity no longer stabilizes well-connected systems when accounting for explicit representation of nutrient dynamics. We also found that intermediate consumer diffusion could lead to multiple equilibria in strongly enriched metaecosystems. Stability can emerge from a top-down control allowing the storage of materials into inorganic form, a mechanism never documented before. In conclusion, local enrichment can be stabilized if spatial flows are strong enough to efficiently redistribute the local excess of enrichment to unfertile ecosystems. However, high regional enrichment can be dampened only by intermediate consumer diffusion rates. PMID:25438175

  12. Variational Principles, Occam Razor and Simplicity Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2004-05-01

    Variational minimum principles (VMP) refer to energy (statics, Thomson and Earnshaw theorems in electrostatics), action (Maupertuis, Euler, Lagrange, Hamilton), light (Fermat), quantum paths (Feynman), etc. Historically, VMP appeal to some economy in nature, similarly to Occam Razor Parsimony (ORP) principle. Version of ORP are "best world" (Leibniz), Panglossianism (Voltaire), and "most interesting world" (Dyson). Conceptually, VMP exemplify curious fact that infinite set is often simpler than its subsets (e.g., set of all integers is simpler than set of primes). Algorithmically very simple number 0.1234567... (Champernowne constant) contains Library of Babel of "all books" (Borges) and codes (infinitely many times) everything countably possible. Likewise, full Megaverse (Everett, Deutsch, Guth, Linde) is simpler than our specific ("Big Bang") universe. Dynamically, VMP imply memory effects akin to hysteresis. Similar ideas are "water memory" (Benveniste, Josephson) and isotopic biology (Berezin). Paradoxically, while ORP calls for economy (simplicity), unfolding of ORP in VMP seemingly works in the opposite direction allowing for complexity emergence (e.g., symmetry breaking in Jahn-Teller effect). Metaphysical extrapolation of this complimentarity may lead to "it-from-bit" (Wheeler) reflection of why there is something rather than nothing.

  13. Paradox in South Asian summer monsoon circulation change: Lower tropospheric strengthening and upper tropospheric weakening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2014-04-01

    In the literature, there exist contradictory conclusions on the South Asian summer monsoon (SASM) precipitation and circulation changes: whether the circulation change contributes positively by strengthening or negatively by weakening to the rainfall enhancement, on a background of moisture content increase. Based on Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 simulations by 18 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 models, this study explains these puzzles by illustrating that the SASM circulation changes oppositely between the lower and upper troposphere, with tipping point at 450 hPa. However, this indicates a new paradox, created by competing mechanisms. By analyzing the intermodel variability, we determine that the mean advection of stratification change mechanism weakens the upper tropospheric circulation, while the enhanced surface land-sea thermal contrast strengthens the lower level and surface winds. Our moisture budget analysis shows that the SASM precipitation enhancement (8% K-1) attributes to moisture increase (5% K-1) and lower tropospheric circulation strengthening (3% K-1).

  14. Genetic Susceptibility and Predictors of Paradoxical Reactions in Buruli Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Roch Christian; Phillips, Richard O.; van der Veer, Eveline; van Diemen, Cleo; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Buruli ulcer (BU) is the third most frequent mycobacterial disease in immunocompetent persons after tuberculosis and leprosy. During the last decade, eight weeks of antimicrobial treatment has become the standard of care. This treatment may be accompanied by transient clinical deterioration, known as paradoxical reaction. We investigate the incidence and the risks factors associated with paradoxical reaction in BU. Methods The lesion size of participants was assessed by careful palpation and recorded by serial acetate sheet tracings. For every time point, surface area was compared with the previous assessment. All patients received antimicrobial treatment for 8 weeks. Serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, the primary indicator of vitamin D status, was determined in duplex for blood samples at baseline by a radioimmunoassay. We genotyped four polymorphisms in the SLC11A1 gene, previously associated with susceptibility to BU. For testing the association of genetic variants with paradoxical responses, we used a binary logistic regression analysis with the occurrence of a paradoxical response as the dependent variable. Results Paradoxical reaction occurred in 22% of the patients; the reaction was significantly associated with trunk localization (p = .039 by Χ2), larger lesions (p = .021 by Χ2) and genetic factors. The polymorphisms 3’UTR TGTG ins/ins (OR 7.19, p < .001) had a higher risk for developing paradoxical reaction compared to ins/del or del/del polymorphisms. Conclusions Paradoxical reactions are common in BU. They are associated with trunk localization, larger lesions and polymorphisms in the SLC11A1 gene. PMID:27097163

  15. Quantum Bayesian networks with application to games displaying Parrondo's paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejic, Michael

    Bayesian networks and their accompanying graphical models are widely used for prediction and analysis across many disciplines. We will reformulate these in terms of linear maps. This reformulation will suggest a natural extension, which we will show is equivalent to standard textbook quantum mechanics. Therefore, this extension will be termed quantum. However, the term quantum should not be taken to imply this extension is necessarily only of utility in situations traditionally thought of as in the domain of quantum mechanics. In principle, it may be employed in any modelling situation, say forecasting the weather or the stock market---it is up to experiment to determine if this extension is useful in practice. Even restricting to the domain of quantum mechanics, with this new formulation the advantages of Bayesian networks can be maintained for models incorporating quantum and mixed classical-quantum behavior. The use of these will be illustrated by various basic examples. Parrondo's paradox refers to the situation where two, multi-round games with a fixed winning criteria, both with probability greater than one-half for one player to win, are combined. Using a possibly biased coin to determine the rule to employ for each round, paradoxically, the previously losing player now wins the combined game with probabilitygreater than one-half. Using the extended Bayesian networks, we will formulate and analyze classical observed, classical hidden, and quantum versions of a game that displays this paradox, finding bounds for the discrepancy from naive expectations for the occurrence of the paradox. A quantum paradox inspired by Parrondo's paradox will also be analyzed. We will prove a bound for the discrepancy from naive expectations for this paradox as well. Games involving quantum walks that achieve this bound will be presented.

  16. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1997-02-01

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO{sub 2}) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals. Three activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of productive carbonate buidups in the Paradox basin: (1) interpretation of new seismic data in the Mule field area, (2) reservoir engineering analysis of the Anasazi field, and (3) technology transfer.

  17. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Final technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-01-15

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO{sub 2}) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meeting, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals. Five activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of carbonate mound buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) regional facies evaluation, (2) evaluation of outcrop analogues, (3) field-scale geologic analysis, (4) reservoir analysis, and (5) technology transfer.

  18. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-12-01

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO{sub 2}-) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals. Four activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of carbonate mound buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) field studies, (2) development well completion operations, (3) reservoir analysis and modeling, and (4) technology transfer. This paper reviews the status.

  19. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Class II

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, Thomas C.

    2000-07-28

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m{sup 3}) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  20. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laural L.

    2001-11-26

    The project's primary objective was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (4-8 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performance(s), and report associated validation activities.

  1. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laura L.

    2001-04-19

    The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (40-80 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvania (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performances, and report associated validation activities.

  2. Bevacizumab and intraocular tumors: an intriguing paradox

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Long V.; Luyten, Gregorius P.M.; Versluis, Mieke; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; van der Velden, Pieter A.; Jager, Martine J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A), was originally developed as an anti-tumor treatment. In ocular oncology, it is being used to treat macular edema due to radiation retinopathy, but it may also be useful for the treatment of primary uveal melanoma (UM) or its metastases. We determined the effect of bevacizumab on the growth of B16F10 cells inside the eye and on B16F10 and UM cells cultured in vitro. Methods B16F10 melanoma cells were placed into the anterior chamber of the eye of C57Bl/6 mice and tumor growth was monitored after injection of different doses of bevacizumab or mock injection. In addition, the effect of bevacizumab on in vitro growth of B16F10 and human UM cells and on the expression of VEGF-A, GLUT-1, and HIF-1α was evaluated. Results Following intraocular injection of bevacizumab into murine B16 tumor-containing eyes, an acceleration of tumor growth was observed, with the occurrence of anterior chamber hemorrhages. Bevacizumab did not affect proliferation of B16F10 cells in vitro, while it inhibited UM cell proliferation. Expression analysis demonstrated that addition of bevacizumab under hypoxic conditions induced VEGF-A, GLUT-1 and HIF-1α in B16F10 cells as well as in UM cell lines and two of four primary UM tumor cultures. Conclusions In contrast with expectations, intraocular injection of bevacizumab stimulated B16F10 melanoma growth in murine eyes. In vitro exposure of B16 and human UM cells to bevacizumab led to paradoxical VEGF-A upregulation. The use of VEGF inhibitors for treatment of macular edema (due to radiation retinopathy) after irradiation of UM should be considered carefully, because of the possible adverse effects on residual UM cells. PMID:23077404

  3. Paradoxical monocular stereopsis and perspective vergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enright, J. T.

    1989-01-01

    The question of how to most effectively convey depth in a picture is a multifaceted problem, both because of potential limitations of the chosen medium (stereopsis, image motion), and because effectiveness can be defined in various ways. Practical applications usually focus on information transfer, i.e., effective techniques for evoking recognition of implied depth relationships, but this issue depends on subjective judgements which are difficult to scale when stimuli are above threshold. Two new approaches to this question are proposed here which are based on alternative criteria for effectiveness. Paradoxical monocular stereopsis is a remarkably compelling impression of depth which is evoked during one-eyed viewing of only certain illustrations; it can be unequivocally recognized because the feeling of depth collapses when one shifts to binocular viewing. An exploration of the stimulus properties which are effective for this phenomenon may contribute useful answers for the more general perceptual problem. Positive vergence is an eye-movement response associated with changes of fixation point within a picture which implies depth; it also arises only during monocular viewing. The response is directionally appropriate (i.e., apparently nearer objects evoke convergence, and vice versa), but the magnitude of the response can be altered consistently by making relatively minor changes in the illustration. The cross-subject agreement in changes of response magnitude would permit systematic exploration to determine which stimulus configurations are most effective in evoking perspective vergence, with quantitative answers based upon this involuntary reflex. It may well be that most effective pictures in this context will embody features which would increase effectiveness of pictures in a more general sense.

  4. Thermal Heterogeneity in the Solar Nebula: Paradox?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, A. P.

    1995-09-01

    Chondritic meteorites contain components which have experienced widely varying degrees of thermal processing, yet eventually accumulated into the same planetesimal. The strong correlation of the depletion of volatile elements in the bulk compositions of CV3 carbonaceous chondrites with condensation temperature implies that either evaporation or incomplete condensation was responsible for volatile depletion [1]. The absence of any evidence for isotopic fraction of potassium in chondrites rules out evaporation of solids in a cool nebula, as nearly any conceivable evaporative process would have led to isotopic fractionation [2]. Survival of solids condensed during a relatively hot (about 1200 K) phase of nebular evolution seems to be required [1]. Flash heating to much higher temperatures (about 2000 K) is required to melt and thermally process chondrules [3]. Fluffy Type A calcium, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) appear to have condensed from a hot (about 1400 K) nebular gas [4], while Type B CAIs seem to have been flash heated [5]. However, chondrules contain FeS, possibly implying that the ambient nebula temperature was less than 700 K during the flash heating event [3]. The retention of noble gases in presolar grains found in chondrite matrices similarly limits ambient temperatures to less than about 700 K at the time of their addition [6]. Regardless of the requirements of CAI and chondrule flash heating processes, we see that chondrites contain components that appear to have been formed when the ambient nebula temperature was about 700 K, 1200 K, and 1400 K -- hence the paradox. Two types of solutions to this thermal heterogeneity paradox are possible, namely spatial or temporal thermal variations. Provided that the midplane is hot enough [7,8,9], nebular temperatures spanning the range of 1400 K to 700 K (and considerably lower temperatures) could occur at increasing altitude at fixed orbital radius and at a given time. Considering that small dust grains may

  5. Radiological Follow-up of a Cerebral Tuberculoma with a Paradoxical Response Mimicking a Brain Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Kwon; Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Seul-Kee

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a paradoxical response of a tuberculoma in the brain mimicking a brain tumor. A 76-year-old woman presented with a 2 week history of headache, dysarthia, and orthopnea. Brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) revealed two rim-enhancing lesions on the pons and occipital lobe, and chest computed tomography showed randomly distributed miliary nodules. The tentative diagnosis was tuberculosis (TB) of the brain and lung. She complained of right hemiparesis and worsening general weakness after taking the anti-TB medication. On the monthly follow-up images, the enhanced lesions were enlarged with increased perfusion and choline/creatinine ratio, suggesting a high grade glioma. A surgical resection was completed to diagnose the occipital lesion, and the tuberculoma was pathologically confirmed by a positive TB-polymerase chain reaction. The anti-TB medication was continued for 13 months. A follow-up MRI showed decreased size of the brain lesions associated with perilesional edema, and the clinical symptoms had improved. Brain tuberculoma could be aggravated mimicking brain malignancy during administration of anti-TB medication. This paradoxical response can be effectively managed by continuing the anti-TB drugs. PMID:25932302

  6. The archaeal molecular chaperone machine: peculiarities and paradoxes.

    PubMed Central

    Macario, A J; de Macario, E C

    1999-01-01

    A major finding within the field of archaea and molecular chaperones has been the demonstration that, while some species have the stress (heat-shock) gene hsp70(dnaK), others do not. This gene encodes Hsp70(DnaK), an essential molecular chaperone in bacteria and eukaryotes. Due to the physiological importance and the high degree of conservation of this protein, its absence in archaeal organisms has raised intriguing questions pertaining to the evolution of the chaperone machine as a whole and that of its components in particular, namely, Hsp70(DnaK), Hsp40(DnaJ), and GrpE. Another archaeal paradox is that the proteins coded by these genes are very similar to bacterial homologs, as if the genes had been received via lateral transfer from bacteria, whereas the upstream flanking regions have no bacterial markers, but instead have typical archaeal promoters, which are like those of eukaryotes. Furthermore, the chaperonin system in all archaea studied to the present, including those that possess a bacterial-like chaperone machine, is similar to that of the eukaryotic-cell cytosol. Thus, two chaperoning systems that are designed to interact with a compatible partner, e.g., the bacterial chaperone machine physiologically interacts with the bacterial but not with the eucaryal chaperonins, coexist in archaeal cells in spite of their apparent functional incompatibility. It is difficult to understand how these hybrid characteristics of the archaeal chaperoning system became established and work, if one bears in mind the classical ideas learned from studying bacteria and eukaryotes. No doubt, archaea are intriguing organisms that offer an opportunity to find novel molecules and mechanisms that will, most likely, enhance our understanding of the stress response and the protein folding and refolding processes in the three phylogenetic domains. PMID:10430558

  7. Paradoxic effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dallaglio, Katiuscia; Bruno, Antonino; Cantelmo, Anna R; Esposito, Alessia I; Ruggiero, Luca; Orecchioni, Stefania; Calleri, Angelica; Bertolini, Francesco; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Noonan, Douglas M; Albini, Adriana

    2014-05-01

    The biguanide metformin is used in type 2 diabetes management and has gained significant attention as a potential cancer preventive agent. Angioprevention represents a mechanism of chemoprevention, yet conflicting data concerning the antiangiogenic action of metformin have emerged. Here, we clarify some of the contradictory effects of metformin on endothelial cells and angiogenesis, using in vitro and in vivo assays combined with transcriptomic and protein array approaches. Metformin inhibits formation of capillary-like networks by endothelial cells; this effect is partially dependent on the energy sensor adenosine-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as shown by small interfering RNA knockdown. Gene expression profiling of human umbilical vein endothelial cells revealed a paradoxical modulation of several angiogenesis-associated genes and proteins by metformin, with short-term induction of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclooxygenase 2 and CXC chemokine receptor 4 at the messenger RNA level and downregulation of ADAMTS1. Antibody array analysis shows an essentially opposite regulation of numerous angiogenesis-associated proteins in endothelial and breast cancer cells including interleukin-8, angiogenin and TIMP-1, as well as selective regulation of angiopioetin-1, -2, endoglin and others. Endothelial cell production of the cytochrome P450 member CYP1B1 is upregulated by tumor cell supernatants in an AMPK-dependent manner, metformin blocks this effect. Metformin inhibits VEGF-dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and the inhibition of AMPK activity abrogates this event. Metformin hinders angiogenesis in matrigel pellets in vivo, prevents the microvessel density increase observed in obese mice on a high-fat diet, downregulating the number of white adipose tissue endothelial precursor cells. Our data show that metformin has an antiangiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo associated with a contradictory short

  8. Where Was Everybody? Olaf Stapledon and the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, S.

    In 1948 Olaf Stapledon gave an address to the BIS in which he summarised his vision of mankind's cosmic future: `One can imagine some sort of cosmical community of worlds ...' One might ask, however, since the universe is vastly older than mankind, why races on other worlds have not already built such a community. This is a `Fermi Paradox' question. The Paradox is based on the observation that there has been time for extraterrestrial intelligence to arise and colonise the Galaxy many times over, yet we see no sign of such endeavours. In this paper Stapledon's novels are retrospectively analysed from the point of view of the Fermi Paradox. In Last and First Men (1930) humanity is forever isolated because life and mind are rare in the Galaxy, and interstellar distances are too large ever to be traversed. These are classic candidate Fermi `solutions'. The `solution' implicit in Star Maker (1937) might be criticised in that it posits that humanity lives at a special epoch, with the cosmically transforming development of interstellar travel occurring a `mere' ten billion years after mankind, in a universe supposedly ~200bn years old. Stapledon died in 1950, the year the Paradox was formulated, and was probably unaware of the Paradox. However to apply retrospectively Fermi thinking to Stapledon's cosmologies is to gain a new insight into the author's philosophy.

  9. RAF inhibitors that evade paradoxical MAPK pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Spevak, Wayne; Zhang, Ying; Burton, Elizabeth A; Ma, Yan; Habets, Gaston; Zhang, Jiazhong; Lin, Jack; Ewing, Todd; Matusow, Bernice; Tsang, Garson; Marimuthu, Adhirai; Cho, Hanna; Wu, Guoxian; Wang, Weiru; Fong, Daniel; Nguyen, Hoa; Shi, Songyuan; Womack, Patrick; Nespi, Marika; Shellooe, Rafe; Carias, Heidi; Powell, Ben; Light, Emily; Sanftner, Laura; Walters, Jason; Tsai, James; West, Brian L; Visor, Gary; Rezaei, Hamid; Lin, Paul S; Nolop, Keith; Ibrahim, Prabha N; Hirth, Peter; Bollag, Gideon

    2015-10-22

    Oncogenic activation of BRAF fuels cancer growth by constitutively promoting RAS-independent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway signalling. Accordingly, RAF inhibitors have brought substantially improved personalized treatment of metastatic melanoma. However, these targeted agents have also revealed an unexpected consequence: stimulated growth of certain cancers. Structurally diverse ATP-competitive RAF inhibitors can either inhibit or paradoxically activate the MAPK pathway, depending whether activation is by BRAF mutation or by an upstream event, such as RAS mutation or receptor tyrosine kinase activation. Here we have identified next-generation RAF inhibitors (dubbed 'paradox breakers') that suppress mutant BRAF cells without activating the MAPK pathway in cells bearing upstream activation. In cells that express the same HRAS mutation prevalent in squamous tumours from patients treated with RAF inhibitors, the first-generation RAF inhibitor vemurafenib stimulated in vitro and in vivo growth and induced expression of MAPK pathway response genes; by contrast the paradox breakers PLX7904 and PLX8394 had no effect. Paradox breakers also overcame several known mechanisms of resistance to first-generation RAF inhibitors. Dissociating MAPK pathway inhibition from paradoxical activation might yield both improved safety and more durable efficacy than first-generation RAF inhibitors, a concept currently undergoing human clinical evaluation with PLX8394. PMID:26466569

  10. Pennsylvanian carbonate buildups, Paradox basin: Increasing reserves in heterogeneous, shallow-shelf reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, S.L.; Chidsey, T.C., Jr.; Eby, D.E.; Lorenz, D.M.; Culham, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    Productive carbonate buildups of Pennsylvanian age in the southern Paradox basin, Utah, contain up to 200 million bbl remaining oil potentially recoverable by enhanced recovery methods. These buildups comprise over 100 satellite fields to the giant Greater Aneth field, where secondary recovery operations thus far have been concentrated. Several types of satellite buildups exist and produce oil from the Desert Creek zone of the Paradox Formation. Many of the relevant fields have undergone early abandonment; wells in Desert Creek carbonate mounds commonly produce at very high initial rates (>1000 bbl/day) and then suffer precipitous declines. An important new study focused on the detailed characterization of five separate reservoirs has resulted in significant information relevant to their future redevelopment. Completed assessment of Anasazi field suggests that phylloid algal mounds, the major productive buildup type in this area, consist of ten separate lithotypes and can be described in terms of a two-level reservoir system with an underlying high-permeability mound-core interval overlain by a lower permeability but volumetrically larger supramound (mound capping) interval. Reservoir simulations and related performance predictions indicate that CO2 flooding of these reservoirs should have considerable success in recovering remaining oil reserves.Productive carbonate buildups of Pennsylvanian age in the southern Paradox basin, Utah, contain up to 200 million bbl remaining oil potentially recoverable by enhanced recovery methods. These buildups comprise over 100 satellite fields to the giant Greater Aneth field, where secondary recovery operations thus far have been concentrated. Several types of satellite buildups exist and produce oil from the Desert Creek zone of the Paradox Formation. Many of the relevant fields have undergone early abandonment; wells in Desert Creek carbonate mounds commonly produce at very high initial rates (>1000 bbl/day) and then suffer

  11. Clinical management of paradoxical psoriasiform reactions during TNF- α therapy.

    PubMed

    Navarro, R; Daudén, E

    2014-10-01

    There have been reports of paradoxical induction or worsening of psoriasis during treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α agents (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, and certolizumab). It has been hypothesized that an imbalance between TNF-α and interferon α might have a role in the etiology and pathogenesis of these reactions. Paradoxical psoriasiform reactions can be divided clinically into de novo psoriasis and exacerbation of preexisting psoriasis. The first, which is more common and more extensively described in the literature, occurs in patients without a history of psoriasis who are receiving TNF-α therapy for another inflammatory disorder. The second can occur with or without changes in the morphology of the lesions. In this article, we review the literature on the clinical and histologic features of paradoxical psoriasiform reactions, analyze their clinical course and treatment, and propose a clinical management model for use in routine practice. PMID:23938073

  12. Traversing boundaries: thrombus in transit with paradoxical embolism.

    PubMed

    Miriyala, Varun; Awan, Muhammad Umer; Faraj, Kirmanj; Nagra, Bipinpreet

    2016-01-01

    A 72-year-old male is diagnosed with paradoxical embolus after he presented with concurrent deep vein thrombosis, stroke, and multiple arterial emboli in the presence of a patent foramen ovale (PFO). Paradoxical embolus requires the passage of a thrombus from the venous into the arterial circulation through a right-to-left shunt leading to systemic embolism. But, despite the high incidence of PFO (27.3% across all age groups by autopsy), paradoxical embolism (PDE) is uncommon, representing <2% of all arterial emboli. We present a case report where a thrombus has been directly observed passing through the PFO during an echocardiogram study; thus, clearly delineating the true cause of multiple thromboemboli and stoke in our patient. Subsequent Transesophageal Echocardiography (TEE) also interestingly showed the thrombus in transit in the aorta and pulmonary artery. PMID:27609716

  13. Conversion to Paradox 4.02 ATP`s for MAC and mass balance programs

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, V.K.

    1994-10-17

    The K Basins Materials Accounting (MAC) and Material Balance (MBA) database system were converted from Paradox 3.5 to Paradox 4.0. The ATP describes how the code was to be tested to verify its corrections.

  14. Four twins for a paradox: On ``sensitive'' twins and the biological counterpart of the ``twin paradox''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascioti, Fortunato A.

    2009-03-01

    Monozygotic twin (MZT) epigenetic development, i.e., aging, diverges largely in time despite the initially very small genetic differences between MZTs. This fact is interpreted as a "sensitivity to initial conditions" phenomenon, a common property of either deterministic or stochastic chaotic systems. Some of the biotheoretical implications stemming from this empirical observation are briefly discussed here, while an actual measure of MZT epigenetic time divergence is given through an estimate of the (Stochastic) Lyapunov exponents (LEs) (i.e., the rate of exponential time divergence). These results suggest a reconsideration of the Langevin-Einstein thought experiment known as the "twin paradox." At least four twins are necessary in order to take into account the inertially independent divergent aging described here. Alternatively, LE estimates, like those given here, should be used. Finally suggested in the actual special-relativity experiments is the replacement of clocks with some nonlinear (chaotic) forced oscillator.

  15. Four twins for a paradox: on "sensitive" twins and the biological counterpart of the "twin paradox".

    PubMed

    Ascioti, Fortunato A

    2009-03-01

    Monozygotic twin (MZT) epigenetic development, i.e., aging, diverges largely in time despite the initially very small genetic differences between MZTs. This fact is interpreted as a "sensitivity to initial conditions" phenomenon, a common property of either deterministic or stochastic chaotic systems. Some of the biotheoretical implications stemming from this empirical observation are briefly discussed here, while an actual measure of MZT epigenetic time divergence is given through an estimate of the (Stochastic) Lyapunov exponents (LEs) (i.e., the rate of exponential time divergence). These results suggest a reconsideration of the Langevin-Einstein thought experiment known as the "twin paradox." At least four twins are necessary in order to take into account the inertially independent divergent aging described here. Alternatively, LE estimates, like those given here, should be used. Finally suggested in the actual special-relativity experiments is the replacement of clocks with some nonlinear (chaotic) forced oscillator. PMID:19334992

  16. Obesity Paradox in End-Stage Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jongha; Ahmadi, Seyed-Foad; Streja, Elani; Molnar, Miklos Z; Flegal, Katherine M.; Gillen, Daniel; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    In the general population, obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular risk and decreased survival. In patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), however, an “obesity paradox” or “reverse epidemiology” (to include lipid and hypertension paradoxes) has been consistently reported, i.e. a higher body mass index (BMI) is paradoxically associated with better survival. This survival advantage of large body size is relatively consistent for hemodialysis patients across racial and regional differences, although published results are mixed for peritoneal dialysis patients.. Recent data indicate that both higher skeletal muscle mass and increased total body fat are protective, although there are mixed data on visceral (intra-abdominal) fat. The obesity paradox in ESRD is unlikely to be due to residual confounding alone and has biologic plausibility. Possible causes of the obesity paradox include protein-energy wasting and inflammation, time discrepancy among competitive risk factors (undernutrition versus overnutrition), hemodynamic stability, alteration of circulatory cytokines, sequestration of uremic toxin in adipose tissue, and endotoxin-lipoprotein interaction. The obesity paradox may have significant clinical implications in the management of ESRD patients especially if obese dialysis patients are forced to lose weight upon transplant wait-listing. Well-designed studies exploring the causes and consequences of the reverse epidemiology of cardiovascular risk factors, including the obesity paradox, among ESRD patients could provide more information on mechanisms. These could include controlled trials of nutritional and pharmacologic interventions to examine whether gain in lean body mass or even body fat can improve survival and quality of life in these patients. PMID:24438733

  17. The calcium paradox - what should we have to fear?

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza de; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; Dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseni; Cortez, José Luís Lasso; Goissis, Gilberto; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    The calcium paradox was first mentioned in 1966 by Zimmerman et al. Thereafter gained great interest from the scientific community due to the fact of the absence of calcium ions in heart muscle cells produce damage similar to ischemia-reperfusion. Although not all known mechanisms involved in cellular injury in the calcium paradox intercellular connection maintained only by nexus seems to have a key role in cellular fragmentation. The addition of small concentrations of calcium, calcium channel blockers, and hyponatraemia hypothermia are important to prevent any cellular damage during reperfusion solutions with physiological concentration of calcium. PMID:25140476

  18. Paradoxical coronary artery embolism - a rare cause of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Fayaz A; Kransdorf, Evan P; Abudiab, Muaz M; Sweeney, John P

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxical coronary artery embolism is a rare, but often an underdiagnosed cause of acute myocardial infarction. It should be considered in patient who presents with chest pain and otherwise having a low risk profile for atherosclerosis coronary artery disease. We describe a case of paradoxical coronary artery embolism causing ST segment elevation myocardial infarction in a patient with upper extremity venous thrombosis. Echocardiography demonstrated a patent foramen ovale (PFO) with bidirectional shunt. In addition to treatment of acute coronary event closure of the PFO should be considered to prevent a recurrence. PMID:25774255

  19. Paradoxical Coronary Artery Embolism - A Rare Cause of Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Fayaz A.; Kransdorf, Evan P.; Abudiab, Muaz M.; Sweeney, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxical coronary artery embolism is a rare, but often an underdiagnosed cause of acute myocardial infarction. It should be considered in patient who presents with chest pain and otherwise having a low risk profile for atherosclerosis coronary artery disease. We describe a case of paradoxical coronary artery embolism causing ST segment elevation myocardial infarction in a patient with upper extremity venous thrombosis. Echocardiography demonstrated a patent foramen ovale (PFO) with bidirectional shunt. In addition to treatment of acute coronary event closure of the PFO should be considered to prevent a recurrence. PMID:25774255

  20. Paradoxical Growth of Optochiasmatic Tuberculoma during the Treatment of Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    AHMETGJEKAJ, ILIR; KABASHI-MUÇAJ, SERBEZE; LASCU, LUANA CORINA; BONDARI, SIMONA; BONDARI, A.

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial brain parenchymal tuberculomas may form paradoxically, days to months after starting antituberculous drug therapy. They may develop in and around optic chiasm and optic nerves after antituberculous treatment as a quite rare occurrence in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) this may lead to severe visual loss if not treated properly. We describe a 5 year-old child with documented TBM being treated with first line antituberculous drugs which developed visual impairment 3 months after starting the treatment. MRI after gadolinium administration revealed multiple perichiasmatic ring enhancing lesions due to tuberculomas. Visual impairment developing in a patient on treatment with antituberculous drugs should give rise to a suspicion of rare optochiasmatic tuberculomas; this necessitates urgent contrast-enhanced MRI of the brain and prompt treatment with steroids. PMID:25729611

  1. Creative Paradoxical Thinking and Its Implications for Teaching and Learning Motor Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, David

    2011-01-01

    A paradox is a statement or situation that involves two or more contradictory, mutually exclusive elements that operate at the same time. This article examines a number of findings in motor-learning and motor-control research and categorizes them into six paradoxes. Based on those research findings, the concept of creative paradoxical thinking is…

  2. The hierarchical model of stem cell genesis explains the man mouse paradox, Peto's paradox, the red cell paradox and Wright's enigma.

    PubMed

    Morris, James A

    2014-12-01

    The central dogma of carcinogenesis is that deleterious mutations accumulate in regularly cycling stem cells and eventually one of the cells will acquire a specific set of mutations which leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation. Each mutation is rare and the specific set is extremely rare so that even though there are millions of stem cells in a small area of mucosa the specific set of mutations to initiate the process of malignancy will only arise in one stem cell at most; hence neoplasia is clonal. But this model predicts that men, who are 1000 times larger than mice and live 30 times as long, should have a vastly increased risk of cancer compared with mice, but they don't (man-mouse paradox). The model also predicts that the prevalence of cancer in men should rise as power function of age and mutagen dose, the former is correct but not the latter (Peto's paradox). Furthermore there are more mitotic divisions in red cell precursors than in all other stem cells combined and yet erythroleukaemia is rare (red cell paradox). The central dogma is also challenged by Wright's enigma; the observation that some gastro-intestinal neoplasms are polyclonal in origin. The problem with the central dogma is the concept of a regularly cycling stem cell. In fact it is possible to produce all the cells that arise in a human lifetime with fewer than 60 rounds of DNA replication separating the zygote from mature differentiated cells in extreme old age. This hierarchical model of stem cell genesis leads to a very low prevalence of cancer, unless the orderly progression of the hierarchy is disturbed by inflammation, ulceration or trauma. This model explains the paradoxes and Wright's enigma. It is suggested that the number of cell divisions that separate the zygote from stem cells is a key variable in carcinogenesis. PMID:25459141

  3. Managing Polarity, Paradox, and Dilemma during Leader Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manderscheid, Steven V.; Freeman, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to review literature relevant to leader transition and the navigation of polarities, paradoxes, and dilemmas that exist in organizations. Furthermore, the researchers aim to critique the literature and provide suggestions for practitioners and researchers interested in leader transition through the lens of…

  4. Understanding Persistent Food Insecurity: A Paradox of Place and Circumstance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mammen, Sheila; Bauer, Jean W.; Richards, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Survey data from a U.S. Department of Agriculture funded multi-state longitudinal project revealed a paradox where rural low-income families from states considered prosperous were persistently more food insecure than similar families from less prosperous states. An examination of quantitative and qualitative data found that families in the food…

  5. Edifying Violence: Peter Elbow and the Pedagogical Paradox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, John Channing

    1995-01-01

    Presents a critique of the common practice of writing instruction advocated by the well-known theorist Peter Elbow. Focuses on the paradox of pedagogical authority in writing classrooms. Reviews Elbow's writings in light of the problem of pedagogical authority. (HB)

  6. MCM Paradox: Abundance of Eukaryotic Replicative Helicases and Genomic Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Das, Mitali; Singh, Sunita; Pradhan, Satyajit

    2014-01-01

    As a crucial component of DNA replication licensing system, minichromosome maintenance (MCM) 2–7 complex acts as the eukaryotic DNA replicative helicase. The six related MCM proteins form a heterohexamer and bind with ORC, CDC6, and Cdt1 to form the prereplication complex. Although the MCMs are well known as replicative helicases, their overabundance and distribution patterns on chromatin present a paradox called the “MCM paradox.” Several approaches had been taken to solve the MCM paradox and describe the purpose of excess MCMs distributed beyond the replication origins. Alternative functions of these MCMs rather than a helicase had also been proposed. This review focuses on several models and concepts generated to solve the MCM paradox coinciding with their helicase function and provides insight into the concept that excess MCMs are meant for licensing dormant origins as a backup during replication stress. Finally, we extend our view towards the effect of alteration of MCM level. Though an excess MCM constituent is needed for normal cells to withstand stress, there must be a delineation of the threshold level in normal and malignant cells. This review also outlooks the future prospects to better understand the MCM biology. PMID:25386362

  7. A Powerful Theory and a Paradox: Ecological Psychologists after Barker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, M. M.

    2005-01-01

    Roger Barker, influenced by Lewin, developed a powerful theory in psychology, behavior setting theory. Paradoxically, this theory is still not widely known or understood in mainstream American psychology. Oral histories of the core group who worked with Barker were collected and examined to determine influences on them and subsequent directions in…

  8. A Psychological Taxonomy of Organizational Innovation: Resolving the Paradoxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cropley, David; Cropley, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    The process of innovation involves numerous contradictions not adequately addressed by business-oriented approaches, in particular the problem that what seem to be mutually antagonistic factors are involved. Psychological research on creativity, especially the 4 "Ps" (process, person, product, and press) and the paradoxes of creativity…

  9. The mean, the median, and the St. Petersburg paradox.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Benjamin Y; Platt, Michael L

    2009-06-01

    The St. Petersburg Paradox is a famous economic and philosophical puzzle that has generated numerous conflicting explanations. To shed empirical light on this phenomenon, we examined subjects' bids for one St. Petersburg gamble with a real monetary payment. We found that bids were typically lower than twice the smallest payoff, and thus much lower than is generally supposed. We also examined bids offered for several hypothetical variants of the St. Petersburg Paradox. We found that bids were weakly affected by truncating the gamble, were strongly affected by repeats of the gamble, and depended linearly on the initial "seed" value of the gamble. One explanation, which we call the median heuristic, strongly predicts these data. Subjects following this strategy evaluate a gamble as if they were taking the median rather than the mean of the payoff distribution. Finally, we argue that the distribution of outcomes embodied in the St. Petersburg paradox is so divergent from the Gaussian form that the statistical mean is a poor estimator of expected value, so that the expected value of the St. Petersburg gamble is undefined. These results suggest that this classic paradox has a straightforward explanation rooted in the use of a statistical heuristic. PMID:24179560

  10. Paradoxes of Privilege: The Humanistic Act of Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Donald

    1968-01-01

    Although a writer ideally may wish "to help man endure by lifting his heart," paradoxically his immediate concerns must focus on the technical problems of his craft. The compulsion to write and the creative process itself are difficult to analyze. The gifted writer takes all experience to himself and imaginatively transforms the real world into…

  11. The Double Cone: A Mechanical Paradox or a Geometrical Constraint?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallitto, Aurelio Agliolo; Fiordilino, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the Italian National Plan "Lauree Scientifiche" (PLS) in collaboration with secondary schools, we have investigated the mechanical paradox of the double cone. We have calculated the geometric condition for obtaining an upward movement. Based on this result, we have built a mechanical model with a double cone made of aluminum…

  12. The Paradox of Reducing Class Size and Improving Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hattie, John

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses four questions: What are the effects of reducing class size? How important are these effects? How can we explain these effects? and How can we improve the outcomes when class sizes are reduced? A major aim is to provide directions for resolving the paradox as to "Why reducing class size has not led to major improvements in…

  13. The Power of Paradox in Learning to Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noordhoff, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This chapter makes the case for engaging teacher candidates with matters of personal identity and integrity, using explorations of the paradox of self and role, in teacher education programs dominated by a focus on professional knowledge and skills, based on the analysis of interviews with novice teachers. The author argues that both teacher…

  14. Linearization of Schwarzschild's line element - Application to the clock paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broucke, R.

    1971-01-01

    This article studies the relativistic theory of the motion of a particle in the presence of a uniform acceleration field. The problem is introduced as a linearization of the fundamental line element of general relativity. The linearized line element is a solution of Einstein's field equations. The equations of geodesics corresponding to this line element are solved and applied to the clock paradox problem.-

  15. Generalizations of Paradoxical Results in Multidimensional Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Pascal; Spiess, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Maximum likelihood and Bayesian ability estimation in multidimensional item response models can lead to paradoxical results as proven by Hooker, Finkelman, and Schwartzman ("Psychometrika" 74(3): 419-442, 2009): Changing a correct response on one item into an incorrect response may produce a higher ability estimate in one dimension. Furthermore,…

  16. The paradox of age: Tectites and tectite showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izokh, E. P.

    1987-01-01

    When discussing the problem of tectite origin, the age of the tectites themselves (actual glasses) must be distinguished from the date of their fall on the earth's surface, i.e., the geological age of tectite fields. The considerable difference between their two ages is the essence of the paradox which will be discussed here.

  17. Rethinking the Attitude-Achievement Paradox among Blacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Douglas B.; Ainsworth, James W.; Qian, Zhenchao

    2009-01-01

    Blacks offer positive responses to a wide range of survey questions gauging attitudes toward schooling, yet perform less well in school than do whites. The credibility of blacks' attitudes is a central issue among competing explanations for this paradox. In this article, the authors assess questions about the validity of blacks' pro-school…

  18. Design principles of paradoxical signaling in the immune system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Yuval

    A widespread feature of cell-cell signaling systems is paradoxical pleiotropy: the same secreted signaling molecule can induce opposite effects in the responding cells. For example, the cytokine IL-2 can promote proliferation and death of T-cells. The role of such paradoxical signaling remains unclear. We suggest that this mechanism provides homeostatic concentration of cells, independent of initial conditions. The crux of the paradoxical mechanism is the combination of a positive and a negative feedback loops creating two stable states - an OFF state and an ON state. Experimentally, we found that CD4 + cells grown in culture with a 30-fold difference in initial concentrations reached a homeostatic concentration nearly independent of initial cell levels (ON-state). Below an initial threshold, cell density decayed to extinction (OFF-state). Mathematical modeling explained the observed cell and cytokine dynamics and predicted conditions that shifted cell fate from homeostasis to the OFF-state. We suggest that paradoxical signaling provides cell circuits with specific dynamical features that are robust to environmental perturbations.

  19. Reflections on a Feminist Psychology of Women: Paradoxes and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Michelle

    1985-01-01

    Reports an analysis of the methods and conclusions of articles published in Psychology of Women Quarterly from 1978 through 1981. Three paradoxes emerge from feminist psychology's commitent to contextual validity: the presumption of "progressive progress"; the implications of internal causes for social conditions; and the advancement of…

  20. The Resolution of Some Paradoxes Related to Reliability and Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Heng

    2003-01-01

    Attention is brought to the existence of incongruity in the definition of reliability in the literature, and some unnecessary controversies and confusions which result. A conventionalization of the meaning of reliability at a conceptual, model-free level is proposed. Through the exploration of two paradoxes, this article attempts to address some…

  1. Keeping Public Officials Accountable through Dialogue: Resolving the Accountability Paradox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Nancy C.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses Harmon's Accountability Paradox in relation to the accountability of public officials. Promotes the use of dialogue because its advantage outweighs its cost as a mechanism of accountability when officials confront problems that defy definition and solution and when traditional solution methods have failed. (Contains 54 references.) (JOW)

  2. Danburite in evaporites of the Paradox basin, Utah.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raup, O.B.; Madsen, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Danburite (CaB2Si2O8) has been found as nodules in Pennsylvanian age marine evaporites. The occurrence of danburite and its relation to the host rock in the Paradox basin evaporites indicates that it most likely formed by diagenetic reaction of boron-rich, high-salinity brines with constituents in the anhydrite host rock.-from Authors

  3. Confucius Institutes and China's Soft Power: Practices and Paradoxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Joe Tin-yau; Pan, Suyan

    2016-01-01

    Since China's implementation of the Confucius Institute (CI) project in 2004, most academic works have been written on its objectives, nature, features, development, problems and challenges, especially in terms of soft power projection. Though some of them could unravel the tensions and paradoxes in the CI project, there is a paucity of in-depth…

  4. A Paradoxical Academic Identity: Fate, Utopia and Critical Hope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Using a dialectical mode of exposition, I offer a reflexive sociological theorisation of the paradox that characterises my academic identity: a fatalistic disenchantment concerning the colonisation of Higher Education (HE) by neoliberalism co-exists with a utopianism concerning HE's emancipatory possibilities. I begin with a discussion of…

  5. The Paradox of Self-Efficacy: Research with Diverse Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Lori D.

    2006-01-01

    Since its earliest applications to vocational psychology, self-efficacy has been recognized for its utility with diverse populations, attributable to its attention to environmental influences. Somewhat paradoxically, then, it has also been criticized as being limited in its applicability with people from other cultures, because of its focus on…

  6. Achievement Data in IEA Studies and Simpson's Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuzovsky, Ruth; Steinberg, David M.; Libman, Zipi

    2011-01-01

    This paper is meant to highlight the occurrence of Simpson's Paradox when using aggregated data obtained from two IEA studies in Israel, while ignoring the effect of a powerful intervening variable in the local context--the ethnicity factor. It will demonstrate faulty conclusions regarding either the absence of relationships between a contextual…

  7. Resolving the Paradoxes of Creativity: An Extended Phase Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cropley, Arthur; Cropley, David

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers are interested in fostering creativity, and there are good reasons for doing so. However, the question of how to do it is made difficult by the paradoxes of creativity: mutually contradictory findings that are, nonetheless, simultaneously true (e.g. convergent thinking hampers creativity but is also necessary for it). These paradoxes…

  8. The Content-Provider Paradox: Universities in the Information Ecosystem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaidhyanathan, Siva

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that universities' rush to abandon their role as "national parks" in the information ecosystem in favor of becoming profitable "content providers" has led to a paradox: to generate new knowledge, researchers and teachers need broad content freedom, but the role of content provider requires highly restrictive policies to create information…

  9. An Apparent Paradox: Catt's Anomaly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieraccini, M.; Selleri, S.

    2013-01-01

    Catt's anomaly is a sort of "thought experiment" (a "gedankenexperiment") where electrons seem to travel at the speed of light. Although its author argued with conviction for many years, it has a clear and satisfactory solution and it can be considered indubitably just an apparent paradox. Nevertheless, it is curious and…

  10. On a Simple Formulation of the Golf Ball Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pujol, O.; Perez, J. Ph.

    2007-01-01

    The motion of a ball rolling without slipping on the lateral section inside a fixed vertical cylinder is analysed in the Earth referential frame which is assumed to be Galilean. Equations of motion are rapidly obtained and the golf ball paradox is understood: these equations describe a motion consisting of a vertical harmonic oscillation related…

  11. Paradoxes in Higher Education: Universities versus Academic Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Sinuany-Stern, Zilla; Iram, Yaacov

    2013-01-01

    This article deals with paradoxical relationships between Israeli universities and colleges and their effect on the system of higher education. The article analyzes the history of the higher-education discourse, ranging from patronizing and domineering relations to collaboration based on the recognition that Israel's entire system of higher…

  12. One Paradox in District Accountability and Site-Based Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shellman, David W.

    The paradox of site-based school management with use of standardized tests or instructional management systems that restrict teacher choices was evident in one school district in North Carolina in which measurement of student success has centered on student performance on state-mandated tests. A study was conducted to see if students whose…

  13. Apparent Paradoxes in Classical Electrodynamics: Relativistic Transformation of Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kholmetskii, A. L.; Yarman, T.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse a number of paradoxical teaching problems of classical electrodynamics, dealing with the relativistic transformation of force for complex macro systems, consisting of a number of subsystems with nonzero relative velocities such as electric circuits that change their shape in the course of time. (Contains 7 figures.)

  14. Paradox in Paradise: The Black Image in Revolutionary America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Eugenia

    1991-01-01

    Examines the literature and explores the portrayal of African Americansin creative writings of revolutionary America. The literature of the period reveals the paradox of African-American life in America, where prosperity for some was based on exploitation of others. Works of Benjamin Banneker, Thomas Jefferson, and Phyllis Wheatley are cited. (SLD)

  15. The Use of Paradoxes as an Instructional Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rastovac, John J.; Slavsky, David B.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a study in which paradoxes about seasons, hemispheres, and altitude were used to teach concepts in climatology. The misconceptions commonly held about the earth-sun distance relationship were used as an instructional strategy with an experimental group, which outgained the control group on an achievement test. (TW)

  16. Salary Discrimination: A Test of the Paradoxical Female Hypothesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, I. Phillip

    1999-01-01

    To test the paradoxical female hypothesis (satisfaction with salary underpayment), researchers surveyed a random sample of school chief finance officers. Female officers (unlike their male counterparts) receiving less than their entitled salaries enjoyed the same level of pay satisfaction as female and male officers receiving more than their…

  17. How do we solve the Faint Young Sun Paradox? Examining diverse proposed atmospheres for Early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldblatt, C.

    2010-12-01

    The canonical problem in Early Earth climatology is the Faint Young Sun Paradox (FYSP): despite receiving much less energy from the Sun than today, the Earth was at least as warm during the Archean Eon as it is today. Clearly, Early Earth had stronger greenhouse effect or lower albedo, yet despite four decades of study, there is no consensus on the solution. The FYSP requires consideration of very different climate regimes to the present day, so provides a great learning tool for diverse and undiscovered climates in Earth's past and future. I will discuss old and new ideas of enhanced greenhouse gas solutions, present a recent proposal that pressure broadening by a thicker nitrogen atmosphere contributed to the solution [1], and a new analysis of what role clouds could have in resolving the FYSP [2]. Various strong greenhouse gas enhancements have been suggested, but all are subject to some problems. A nitrogen inventory greater than the present level was likely in the Archean atmosphere. This would have given a temperature increase of 3 to 8°C by pressure broadening the absorption lines of greenhouse gases. Cloud changes are evaluated relative to the required radiative forcing of +50 Wm-2 to resolve the FYSP. Plausible changes to low clouds (reducing albedo) or high cloud (strengthening the greenhouse effect) could both contribute at most +15Wm-2, so neither fewer low clouds nor more high clouds can provide enough forcing to resolve the FYSP. Decreased surface albedo can contribute no more than +5 Wm-2 forcing. [1] Goldblatt, C. et al., 2009, Nitrogen-enhanced greenhouse warming on early Earth, Nature Geosci., 2, 891 - 896. doi:10.1038/ngeo692 [2] Goldblatt, C. and Zahnle, K. J., 2010, Clouds and the Faint Young Sun Paradox, Clim. Past Discuss., 6, 1337-1350. doi:10.5194/cpd-6-1337-2010

  18. Multistage epidermal carcinogenesis in transgenic mice: cooperativity and paradox.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, D A; Wang, X J; Roop, D R

    1996-04-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most prevalent forms of human neoplasia with a frequency approaching that of all other neoplasms combined. Given this alarming statistic, which may be further exacerbated by increased ultraviolet B irradiation from ozone depletion, it is vital that realistic, relevant model systems are developed to increase our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis that result in or evaluate new treatment modalities. Toward this goal, the ability to stably introduce genes into the germline of mice has greatly enhanced prospects for generation of transgenic animal models of multistage molecular carcinogenesis. Moreover, when genes are combined with regulatory sequences that target their expression to specific tissues, investigators are able to study neoplasia both in the context of living organisms and in the tissues suspected of being the targets of these genes. The epidermis is an attractive tissue for targeted gene expression; not only is it a model for epithelial diseases in general, but the accessibility of the epidermis allows easy detection of progressive pathological changes that result from transgene expression and facilitates assessment of the potential role played by environmental factors. We have developed a targeting vector based on the human keratin gene (HK1), which is expressed exclusively in the epidermis of transgenic mice, at a late stage in development and in both basal and differentiated cells. Through the use of this targeting ability, rasHa, fos, and TGF alpha transgenic mice have been developed that exhibit preneoplastic epidermal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis, and later benign, regression prone papillomas. Together, coexpression of two oncogenes cooperated to give autonomous papillomas, which possessed the phenotypic stability to allow assessment of a third genetic event, namely loss of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, via mating with p53 knockout mice. Loss of p53 expression, however, identified a

  19. Tackling a Hot Paradox: Laminar Soot Processes-2 (LSP-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faeth, Gerard M.; Urban, David L.; Over, Ann (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The last place you want to be in traffic is behind the bus or truck that is belching large clouds of soot onto your freshly washed car. Besides looking and smelling bad, soot is a health hazard. Particles range from big enough to see to microscopic and can accumulate in the lungs, potentially leading to debilitating or fatal lung diseases. Soot is wasted energy, and therein lies an interesting paradox: Soot forms in a flame's hottest regions where you would expect complete combustion and no waste. Soot enhances the emissions of other pollutants (carbon monoxide and polyaromatic hydrocarbons, etc.) from flames and radiates unwanted heat to combustion chambers (a candle's yellowish glow is soot radiating heat), among other effects. The mechanisms of soot formation are among the most important unresolved problems of combustion science because soot affects contemporary life in so many ways. Although we have used fire for centuries, many fundamental aspects of combustion remain elusive, in part because of limits imposed by the effects of gravity on Earth. Hot or warm air rises quickly and draws in fresh cold air behind it, thus giving flames the classical teardrop shape. Reactions occur in a very small zone, too fast for scientists to observe, in detail, what is happening inside the flame. The Laminar Soot Processes (LSP-2) experiments aboard STS-107 will use the microgravity environment of space to eliminate buoyancy effects and thus slow the reactions inside a flame so they can be more readily studied. 'Laminar' means a simple, smooth fuel jet burning in air, somewhat like a butane lighter. This classical flame approximates combustion in diesel engines, aircraft jet propulsion engines, and furnaces and other devices. LSP-2 will expand on surprising results developed from its first two flights in 1997. The data suggest the existence of a universal relationship, the soot paradigm, that, if proven, will be used to model and control combustion systems on Earth. STS-107

  20. Non-invasive brain stimulation can induce paradoxical facilitation. Are these neuroenhancements transferable and meaningful to security services?

    PubMed Central

    Levasseur-Moreau, Jean; Brunelin, Jerome; Fecteau, Shirley

    2013-01-01

    For ages, we have been looking for ways to enhance our physical and cognitive capacities in order to augment our security. One potential way to enhance our capacities may be to externally stimulate the brain. Methods of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS), such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial electrical stimulation (tES), have been recently developed to modulate brain activity. Both techniques are relatively safe and can transiently modify motor and cognitive functions outlasting the stimulation period. The purpose of this paper is to review data suggesting that NIBS can enhance motor and cognitive performance in healthy volunteers. We frame these findings in the context of whether they may serve security purposes. Specifically, we review studies reporting that NIBS induces paradoxical facilitation in motor (precision, speed, strength, acceleration endurance, and execution of daily motor task) and cognitive functions (attention, impulsive behavior, risk-taking, working memory, planning, and deceptive capacities). Although transferability and meaningfulness of these NIBS-induced paradoxical facilitations into real-life situations are not clear yet, NIBS may contribute at improving training of motor and cognitive functions relevant for military, civil, and forensic security services. This is an enthusiastic perspective that also calls for fair and open debates on the ethics of using NIBS in healthy individuals to enhance normal functions. PMID:23966923

  1. ASA's Chandra Neon Discovery Solves Solar Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-07-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory survey of nearby sun-like stars suggests there is nearly three times more neon in the sun and local universe than previously believed. If true, this would solve a critical problem with understanding how the sun works. "We use the sun to test how well we understand stars and, to some extent, the rest of the universe," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. "But in order to understand the sun, we need to know exactly what it is made of," he added. It is not well known how much neon the sun contains. This is critical information for creating theoretical models of the sun. Neon atoms, along with carbon, oxygen and nitrogen, play an important role in how quickly energy flows from nuclear reactions in the sun's core to its edge, where it then radiates into space. Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi Chandra X-ray Spectrum of II Pegasi The rate of this energy flow determines the location and size of a crucial stellar region called the convection zone. The zone extends from near the sun's surface inward approximately 125,000 miles. The zone is where the gas undergoes a rolling, convective motion much like the unstable air in a thunderstorm. "This turbulent gas has an extremely important job, because nearly all of the energy emitted at the surface of the sun is transported there by convection," Drake said. The accepted amount of neon in the sun has led to a paradox. The predicted location and size of the solar convection zone disagree with those deduced from solar oscillations. Solar oscillations is a technique astronomers previously relied on to probe the sun's interior. Several scientists have noted the problem could be fixed if the abundance of neon is in fact about three times larger than currently accepted. Attempts to measure the precise amount of neon in the Sun have been frustrated by a quirk of nature; neon atoms in the Sun give off no signatures in visible light. However, in a gas

  2. Reconciling AGN-Star Formation, the Soltan Argument, and Meier’s Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garofalo, David; Kim, Matthew I.; Christian, Damian J.; Hollingworth, Emily; Lowery, Aaron; Harmon, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    We provide a theoretical context for understanding the recent work of Kalfountzou et al. showing that star formation is enhanced at lower optical luminosity in radio-loud quasars. Our proposal for coupling the assumption of collimated FRII quasar-jet-induced star formation with lower accretion optical luminosity also explains the observed jet power peak in active galaxies at higher redshift compared to the peak in accretion power, doing so in a way that predicts the existence of a family of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei associated with rapidly spinning supermassive black holes at low redshift, as mounting observations suggest. The relevance of this work lies in its promise to explain the observed cosmological evolution of accretion power, jet power, and star formation in a way that is both compatible with the Soltan argument and resolves the so-called “Meier Paradox.”

  3. Does Exercise Improve Cognitive Performance? A Conservative Message from Lord's Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sicong; Lebeau, Jean-Charles; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2016-01-01

    Although extant meta-analyses support the notion that exercise results in cognitive performance enhancement, methodology shortcomings are noted among primary evidence. The present study examined relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the past 20 years (1996–2015) for methodological concerns arise from Lord's paradox. Our analysis revealed that RCTs supporting the positive effect of exercise on cognition are likely to include Type I Error(s). This result can be attributed to the use of gain score analysis on pretest-posttest data as well as the presence of control group superiority over the exercise group on baseline cognitive measures. To improve accuracy of causal inferences in this area, analysis of covariance on pretest-posttest data is recommended under the assumption of group equivalence. Important experimental procedures are discussed to maintain group equivalence. PMID:27493637

  4. Does Exercise Improve Cognitive Performance? A Conservative Message from Lord's Paradox.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sicong; Lebeau, Jean-Charles; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2016-01-01

    Although extant meta-analyses support the notion that exercise results in cognitive performance enhancement, methodology shortcomings are noted among primary evidence. The present study examined relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the past 20 years (1996-2015) for methodological concerns arise from Lord's paradox. Our analysis revealed that RCTs supporting the positive effect of exercise on cognition are likely to include Type I Error(s). This result can be attributed to the use of gain score analysis on pretest-posttest data as well as the presence of control group superiority over the exercise group on baseline cognitive measures. To improve accuracy of causal inferences in this area, analysis of covariance on pretest-posttest data is recommended under the assumption of group equivalence. Important experimental procedures are discussed to maintain group equivalence. PMID:27493637

  5. Enhanced parasympathetic activity of sportive women is paradoxically associated to enhanced resting energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Messina, G; Vicidomini, C; Viggiano, An; Tafuri, D; Cozza, V; Cibelli, G; Devastato, A; De Luca, B; Monda, M

    2012-08-16

    The resting energy expenditure and the adaptation of the autonomic nervous system induced by sport activities in sedentary women and in female professional basketball players have been studied. Resting energy expenditure, body composition and the level of activity of the autonomic nervous system were measured before and after a period of six months. The physical activity induced an increase in resting energy expenditure and free fat mass without variations in body weight. Basketball players showed a significant increase in the parasympathetic activity, measured by the power spectral analysis of the heart rate variability. These findings demonstrate that resting energy expenditure is higher in the athletes than in sedentary women, despite the augmented parasympathetic activity that is usually related to lower energy expenditure. PMID:22682704

  6. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah. Technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-04-30

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO{sub 2}-)flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  7. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Technical progress report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-07-14

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  8. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-05-30

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  9. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/teritiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meeting, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals. Four activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization: (1) interpretation of outcrop analogues; (2) reservoir mapping, (3) reservoir engineering analysis of the five project fields; and (4) technology transfer.

  10. Optimal experience among teachers: new insights into the work paradox.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Marta; Delle Fave, Antonella

    2012-01-01

    Several studies highlighted that individuals perceive work as an opportunity for flow or optimal experience, but not as desirable and pleasant. This finding was defined as the work paradox. The present study addressed this issue among teachers from the perspective of self-determination theory, investigating work-related intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, as well as autonomous and controlled behavior regulation. In Study 1, 14 teachers were longitudinally monitored with Experience Sampling Method for one work week. In Study 2, 184 teachers were administered Flow Questionnaire and Work Preference Inventory, respectively investigating opportunities for optimal experience, and motivational orientations at work. Results showed that work-related optimal experiences were associated with both autonomous regulation and with controlled regulation. Moreover, teachers reported both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation at work, with a prevailing intrinsic orientation. Findings provide novel insights on the work paradox, and suggestions for teachers' well-being promotion. PMID:22931008

  11. Crystallization Age of NWA 1460 Shergottite: Paradox Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C-Y.; Reese, Y. D.; Irving, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    We have determined the Rb-Sr age of basaltic shergottite NWA 1460 to be 312 +/- 3 Ma, and the Sm-Nd age to be 352 +/- 30 Ma. The initial Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of NWA 1460 suggest it is an earlier melting product of a Martian mantle source region similar to those of the Iherzolitic shergottites and basaltic shergottite EETA79001, lithology B. The new ages of NWA 1460 and other recently analyzed Martian meteorites leads us to reexamine the paradox that most of the Martian meteorites appear to be younger from the majority of the Martian surface. This paradox continues to pose a challenge to determining a reliable Martian chronology.

  12. Ribosomopathies and the paradox of cellular hypo- to hyperproliferation.

    PubMed

    De Keersmaecker, Kim; Sulima, Sergey O; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-02-26

    Ribosomopathies are largely congenital diseases linked to defects in ribosomal proteins or biogenesis factors. Some of these disorders are characterized by hypoproliferative phenotypes such as bone marrow failure and anemia early in life, followed by elevated cancer risks later in life. This transition from hypo- to hyperproliferation presents an intriguing paradox in the field of hematology known as "Dameshek's riddle." Recent cancer sequencing studies also revealed somatically acquired mutations and deletions in ribosomal proteins in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and solid tumors, further extending the list of ribosomopathies and strengthening the association between ribosomal defects and oncogenesis. In this perspective, we summarize and comment on recent findings in the field of ribosomopathies. We explain how ribosomopathies may provide clues to help explain Dameshek's paradox and highlight some of the open questions and challenges in the field. PMID:25575543

  13. Ribosomopathies and the paradox of cellular hypo- to hyperproliferation

    PubMed Central

    Sulima, Sergey O.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomopathies are largely congenital diseases linked to defects in ribosomal proteins or biogenesis factors. Some of these disorders are characterized by hypoproliferative phenotypes such as bone marrow failure and anemia early in life, followed by elevated cancer risks later in life. This transition from hypo- to hyperproliferation presents an intriguing paradox in the field of hematology known as “Dameshek’s riddle.” Recent cancer sequencing studies also revealed somatically acquired mutations and deletions in ribosomal proteins in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and solid tumors, further extending the list of ribosomopathies and strengthening the association between ribosomal defects and oncogenesis. In this perspective, we summarize and comment on recent findings in the field of ribosomopathies. We explain how ribosomopathies may provide clues to help explain Dameshek’s paradox and highlight some of the open questions and challenges in the field. PMID:25575543

  14. Correlation properties of entangled multiphoton states and Bernstein's paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Chirkin, A. S. Belyaeva, O. V. Belinsky, A. V.

    2013-01-15

    A normally ordered characteristic function (NOCF) of Bose operators is calculated for a number of discrete-variable entangled states (Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) and Werner (W) qubit states and a cluster state). It is shown that such NOCFs contain visual information on two types of correlations: pseudoclassical and quantum correlations. The latter manifest themselves in the interference terms of the NOCFs and lead to quantum paradoxes, whereas the pseudoclassical correlations of photons and their cumulants satisfy the relations for classical random variables. Three- and four-qubit states are analyzed in detail. An implementation of an analog of Bernstein's paradox on discrete quantum variables is discussed. A measure of quantumness of an entangled state is introduced that is not related to the entropy approach. It is established that the maximum of the degree of quantumness substantiates the numerical values of the coefficients in multiqubit vector states derived from intuitive considerations.

  15. Privacy Awareness: A Means to Solve the Privacy Paradox?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pötzsch, Stefanie

    People are limited in their resources, i.e. they have limited memory capabilities, cannot pay attention to too many things at the same time, and forget much information after a while; computers do not suffer from these limitations. Thus, revealing personal data in electronic communication environments and being completely unaware of the impact of privacy might cause a lot of privacy issues later. Even if people are privacy aware in general, the so-called privacy paradox shows that they do not behave according to their stated attitudes. This paper discusses explanations for the existing dichotomy between the intentions of people towards disclosure of personal data and their behaviour. We present requirements on tools for privacy-awareness support in order to counteract the privacy paradox.

  16. Energy absorption in cold inhomogeneous plasmas - The Herlofson paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, F. W.; Harker, K. J.

    1972-01-01

    Confirmation of Barston's (1964) conclusions regarding the underlying mechanism of the Herlofson paradox by examining in detail several analytically tractable cases of delta-function and sinusoidal excitation. The effects of collisions and nonzero electron temperature in determining the steady state fields and dissipation are considered. Energy absorption without dissipation in plasmas is shown to be analogous to that occurring after application of a signal to a network of lossless resonant circuits. This analogy is pursued and is extended to cover Landau damping in a warm homogeneous plasma in which the resonating elements are the electron streams making up the velocity distribution. Some of the practical consequences of resonant absorption are discussed, together with a number of paradoxical plasma phenomena which can also be elucidated by considering a superposition of normal modes rather than a single Fourier component.

  17. Geologic appraisal of Paradox basin salt deposits for water emplacement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hite, R.J.; Lohman, Stanley William

    1973-01-01

    Thick salt deposits of Middle Pennsylvanian age are present in an area of 12,000 square miles in the Paradox basin of southeast Utah and southwest Colorado. The deposits are in the Paradox Member of the Hermosa Formation. The greatest thickness of this evaporite sequence is in a troughlike depression adjacent to the Uncompahgre uplift on the northeast side of the basin. The salt deposits consist of a cyclical sequence of thick halite units separated by thin units of black shale, dolomite, and anhydrite. Many halite units are several hundred feet thick and locally contain economically valuable potash deposits. Over much of the Paradox basin the salt deposits occur at depths of more than 5,000 feet. Only in a series of salt anticlines located along the northeastern side of the basin do the salt deposits rise to relatively shallow depths. The salt anticlines can be divided geographically and structurally into five major systems. Each system consists of a long undulating welt of thickened salt over which younger rocks are arched in anticlinal form. Locally there are areas along the axes of the anticlines where the Paradox Member was never covered by younger sediments. This allowed large-scale migration of Paradox strata toward and up through these holes in the sediment cover forming diapiric anticlines. The central or salt-bearing cores of tthe anticlines range in thickness from about 2,500 to 14,000 feet. Structure in the central core of the salt anticlines is the result of both regional-compression and flowage of the Paradox Member into the anticlines from adjacent synclines. Structure in the central cores of the salt anticlines ranges from relatively undeformed beds to complexly folded and faulted masses, in which stratigraphic continuity is undemonstrable. The presence of thick cap rock .over many of the salt anticlines is evidence of removal of large volumes of halite by groundwater. Available geologic and hydrologic information suggests that this is a relatively

  18. The Critical Care Obesity Paradox and Implications for Nutrition Support.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jayshil J; Rosenthal, Martin D; Miller, Keith R; Codner, Panna; Kiraly, Laszlo; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a leading cause of preventable death worldwide. The prevalence of obesity has been increasing and is associated with an increased risk for other co-morbidities. In the critical care setting, nearly one third of patients are obese. Obese critically ill patients pose significant physical and on-physical challenges to providers, including optimization of nutrition therapy. Intuitively, obese patients would have worse critical care-related outcome. On the contrary, emerging data suggests that critically ill obese patients have improved outcomes, and this phenomenon has been coined "the obesity paradox." The purposes of this review will be to outline the historical views and pathophysiology of obesity and epidemiology of obesity, describe the challenges associated with obesity in the intensive care unit setting, review critical care outcomes in the obese, define the obesity-critical care paradox, and identify the challenges and role of nutrition support in the critically ill obese patient. PMID:27422122

  19. Resolution of the Klein Paradox within Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Alhaidari, A. D.

    2011-10-27

    We present a resolution of the Klein paradox within the framework of one-particle relativistic quantum mechanics (no pair production). Not only reflection becomes total but the vacuum remains neutral as well. This is accomplished by replacing the pair production process with virtual negative energy ''incidence'' within the barrier in a process analogous to the introduction of image charges in electrostatic and virtual sources in optics.

  20. Klein paradox with spin-resolved electrons and positrons

    SciTech Connect

    Krekora, P.; Su, Q.; Grobe, R.

    2005-12-15

    Using numerical solutions to relativistic quantum field theory with space-time resolution, we illustrate how an incoming electron wave packet with a definite spin scatters off a supercritical potential step. We show that the production rate is reduced of only those electrons that have the same spin as the incoming electron is reduced. This spin-resolved result further clarifies the importance of the Pauli-exclusion principle for the Klein paradox.

  1. Lyapunov exponents, noise-induced synchronization, and Parrondo's paradox.

    PubMed

    Kocarev, Ljupco; Tasev, Zarko

    2002-04-01

    We show that Lyapunov exponents of a stochastic system, when computed for a specific realization of the noise process, are related to conditional Lyapunov exponents in deterministic systems. We propose to use the term stochastically induced regularity instead of noise-induced synchronization and explain the reason why. The nature of stochastically induced regularity is discussed: in some instances, it is a dynamical analog of Parrondo's paradox. PMID:12005984

  2. Paradoxes in medicine: an access to new knowledge?

    PubMed

    Ginter, E; Simko, V; Dolinska, S

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of health and nutrition data from various countries shows many surprising and seemingly incomprehensible facts and paradoxical relationships. Health status of a country is the result of long-term factors and therefore it cannot be changed from day to day. For example in Central European countries there was a sudden increase in life expectancy after the fall of Soviet hegemony. French paradox is the oldest example of apparent contrast between "unhealthy" nutrition and low cardiovascular mortality. Although, the consumption of animal fat and milk and milk products in Switzerland is very high, but premature cardiovascular mortality of Swiss men and women is the lowest in Europe. In USA there is concominant increase of obesity and decrease in cardiovascular mortality. In Cuba, in spite of great economic problems its relatively high male and female life expectancy is very similar to the rich USA. The life expectancy in Albania is significantly higher than in many countries in Central Europe and in the Balkan region, in spite of the fact that Albania remains the poorest European country. Analysis of these unexpected and paradoxical relations indicate the importance of the quality of medical care, control of cardiovascular risk factors (USA) and the influence of modest but biologically balanced diet on low prevalence of cardiovascular disease in Cuba and Albania. The experience from former communist Central European countries suggests important influence of chronic stress and psychosocial factors on heart diseases and life expectancy. These paradoxes open the door to new information (Fig. 5, Ref. 11). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk. PMID:19408844

  3. The time resolution of the St Petersburg paradox

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Ole

    2011-01-01

    A resolution of the St Petersburg paradox is presented. In contrast to the standard resolution, utility is not required. Instead, the time-average performance of the lottery is computed. The final result can be phrased mathematically identically to Daniel Bernoulli's resolution, which uses logarithmic utility, but is derived using a conceptually different argument. The advantage of the time resolution is the elimination of arbitrary utility functions. PMID:22042904

  4. A metabolic perspective of Peto's paradox and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Chi V.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of cancer is postulated to be proportional to the number of cells an animal possesses, as each cell is similarly exposed to mutagens with every cell division. Larger animals result from more cell divisions with more mutagenic exposure, and hence are expected to have higher frequencies of cancer. Yet, as stipulated by Peto's paradox, larger animals do not have the higher rates of cancers seen in smaller animals despite the significant differences in cell numbers and a longer lifetime that would expose larger animals to more mutagens. The rates of cancer appear to be inversely proportional to animal body size, which scales inversely with specific metabolic rates of mammals. Studies over the past 20 years have linked oncogenes and tumour suppressors to alterations in cancer metabolism, and conversely, mutations in metabolic genes have been documented to trigger tumorigenesis. The by-products and intermediates of metabolism, such as reactive oxygen species, oxoglutarate, citrate and acetate, all have the potential to mutate and alter the genome or epigenome. On the basis of these general observations, it is proposed that metabolic rates correlate with mutagenic rates, which are higher in small animals and give the mechanistic basis for Peto's paradox. The observations discussed in this overview collectively indicate that specific metabolic rate varies inversely with body size, which seems to support the hypothesis that metabolism drives tumorigenesis and accounts for Peto's paradox. PMID:26056367

  5. Cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation by BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Li, Shuoran; Xie, Michael W; Sun, Lu; Hugo, Willy; Huang, Rong Rong; Jiao, Jing; de-Faria, Felipe Meira; Realegeno, Susan; Krystofinski, Paige; Azhdam, Ariel; Komenan, Sara Marie D; Atefi, Mohammad; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Pellegrini, Matteo; Cochran, Alistair J; Modlin, Robert L; Herschman, Harvey R; Lo, Roger S; McBride, William H; Segura, Tatiana; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors are highly effective therapies for the treatment of BRAF(V600)-mutated melanoma, with the main toxicity being a variety of hyperproliferative skin conditions due to paradoxical activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in BRAF wild-type cells. Most of these hyperproliferative skin changes improve when a MEK inhibitor is co-administered, as it blocks paradoxical MAPK activation. Here we show how the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib accelerates skin wound healing by inducing the proliferation and migration of human keratinocytes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. Topical treatment with vemurafenib in two wound-healing mice models accelerates cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation; addition of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor reverses the benefit of vemurafenib-accelerated wound healing. The same dosing regimen of topical BRAF inhibitor does not increase the incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in mice. Therefore, topical BRAF inhibitors may have clinical applications in accelerating the healing of skin wounds. PMID:27476449

  6. Implications of Stein's Paradox for Environmental Standard Compliance Assessment.

    PubMed

    Qian, Song S; Stow, Craig A; Cha, YoonKyung

    2015-05-19

    The implications of Stein's paradox stirred considerable debate in statistical circles when the concept was first introduced in the 1950s. The paradox arises when we are interested in estimating the means of several variables simultaneously. In this situation, the best estimator for an individual mean, the sample average, is no longer the best. Rather, a shrinkage estimator, which shrinks individual sample averages toward the overall average is shown to have improved overall accuracy. Although controversial at the time, the concept of shrinking toward overall average is now widely accepted as a good practice for improving statistical stability and reducing error, not only in simple estimation problems, but also in complicated modeling problems. However, the utility of Stein's insights are not widely recognized in the environmental management community, where mean pollutant concentrations of multiple waters are routinely estimated for management decision-making. In this essay, we introduce Stein's paradox and its modern generalization, the Bayesian hierarchical model, in the context of environmental standard compliance assessment. Using simulated data and nutrient monitoring data from wadeable streams around the Great Lakes, we show that a Bayesian hierarchical model can improve overall estimation accuracy, thereby improving our confidence in the assessment results, especially for standard compliance assessment of waters with small sample sizes. PMID:25867542

  7. Patent Foramen Ovale: Is Stroke Due to Paradoxical Embolism?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranoux, D.; Cohen, A.; Cabanes, L.; Amarenco, P.; Bousser, M. G.; Mas, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    Background and Purpose: A patent foramen ovale has been reported to be significantly more frequent in young stroke patients than in matched control subjects, and paradoxical embolism has been suggested as the main mechanism of stroke in-this situation. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis. Methods: Sixty-eight consecutive patients under 55 years of age presenting with an ischemic stroke had an extensive workup, including transesophageal echocardiography with contrast. We compared the prevalence of criteria for the diagnosis of paradoxical embolism in patients with and without a patent foramen ovale. Results: A patent foramen ovale was found in 32 patients (47%). A Valsalva-provoking activity was present at stroke onset in six patients with a patent foramen ovale and in eight patients with no patent foramen ovale (X(sup 2)=0.1, nonsignificant). Clinical/radiological features suggestive of an embolic mechanism were not more frequent in patients with a patent foramen ovale. Clinical evidence of deep vein thrombosis was present in one patient with a patent foramen ovale and in none of the others. No occult venous thrombosis was found in a subgroup of patients with a patent foramen ovale and no definite cause for stroke who underwent venography (n=13). Conclusions. Our results do not support the hypothesis that paradoxical embolism is the primary mechanism of stroke in patients with a patent foramen ovale. (Stroke 1993;24:31-34) KEY WORDS e cerebral ischemia e embolism foramen ovale, patent

  8. Paradoxical Signaling Regulates Structural Plasticity in Dendritic Spines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-02-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3-5 min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium-influx due to NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks and their role is to control both the activation and inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion including CaMKII, RhoA, and Cdc42 and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics.

  9. Visualized Characterization for Cerebral Response of Acupuncture Deqi: Paradox Underway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Xiao; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Xi; Chen, Jiao; Liu, Yan-Qin; Feng, Yue; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture as an oriental natural healing therapy with prolonged history has been extensively utilized in the management of great numbers of disorders. Deqi, a renowned acupuncture needling sensation, is profoundly regarded as the predictor and also the prerequisite of a preferable acupuncture treatment efficacy. Till now, there is still no consistency being reached towards the mechanism of acupuncture Deqi as a result of the discrepancy for publicly acknowledged evidence. Recent visualized research on Deqi using modern technologies has demonstrated possible central mechanism towards it. However, there is a conspicuous paradox underway in the research of cerebral response to acupuncture Deqi. This paper provided a view of up-to-date studies using visualized tools to characterize the brain response to acupuncture Deqi, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). The paradox was extruded to highlight certain reasons from a TCM view. It is hypothesized that acupoints located at different dermal sites, state of participant, and needling manipulation can all contribute to the current paradox. Hence, further studies on acupuncture Deqi should pay more attention to the strategy of experiment design with generalized measurement, valid sham control methods, and more to subjects in diseased condition. PMID:23935686

  10. Cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation by BRAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Li, Shuoran; Xie, Michael W.; Sun, Lu; Hugo, Willy; Huang, Rong Rong; Jiao, Jing; de-Faria, Felipe Meira; Realegeno, Susan; Krystofinski, Paige; Azhdam, Ariel; Komenan, Sara Marie D.; Atefi, Mohammad; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Pellegrini, Matteo; Cochran, Alistair J.; Modlin, Robert L.; Herschman, Harvey R.; Lo, Roger S.; McBride, William H.; Segura, Tatiana; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors are highly effective therapies for the treatment of BRAFV600-mutated melanoma, with the main toxicity being a variety of hyperproliferative skin conditions due to paradoxical activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in BRAF wild-type cells. Most of these hyperproliferative skin changes improve when a MEK inhibitor is co-administered, as it blocks paradoxical MAPK activation. Here we show how the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib accelerates skin wound healing by inducing the proliferation and migration of human keratinocytes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. Topical treatment with vemurafenib in two wound-healing mice models accelerates cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation; addition of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor reverses the benefit of vemurafenib-accelerated wound healing. The same dosing regimen of topical BRAF inhibitor does not increase the incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in mice. Therefore, topical BRAF inhibitors may have clinical applications in accelerating the healing of skin wounds. PMID:27476449

  11. Paradoxical signaling regulates structural plasticity in dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael G; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-09-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3- to 5-min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium influx caused by NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks, and their role is to control both the activation and the inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion, including calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), RhoA, and Cdc42, and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics. PMID:27551076

  12. Revealing the paradox of drug reward in human evolution

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Roger J; Hagen, Edward H; Hammerstein, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Neurobiological models of drug abuse propose that drug use is initiated and maintained by rewarding feedback mechanisms. However, the most commonly used drugs are plant neurotoxins that evolved to punish, not reward, consumption by animal herbivores. Reward models therefore implicitly assume an evolutionary mismatch between recent drug-profligate environments and a relatively drug-free past in which a reward centre, incidentally vulnerable to neurotoxins, could evolve. By contrast, emerging insights from plant evolutionary ecology and the genetics of hepatic enzymes, particularly cytochrome P450, indicate that animal and hominid taxa have been exposed to plant toxins throughout their evolution. Specifically, evidence of conserved function, stabilizing selection, and population-specific selection of human cytochrome P450 genes indicate recent evolutionary exposure to plant toxins, including those that affect animal nervous systems. Thus, the human propensity to seek out and consume plant neurotoxins is a paradox with far-reaching implications for current drug-reward theory. We sketch some potential resolutions of the paradox, including the possibility that humans may have evolved to counter-exploit plant neurotoxins. Resolving the paradox of drug reward will require a synthesis of ecological and neurobiological perspectives of drug seeking and use. PMID:18353749

  13. Paradoxical pharmacology: turning our pharmacological models upside down.

    PubMed

    Page, Clive

    2011-04-01

    Paradoxical pharmacology is a term first suggested by Richard Bond to refer to intriguing observations that chronic use of some drug types can have the opposite biological effect(s) to those seen following acute administration of the same drug. A good example of 'paradoxical pharmacology' is the research Richard has pioneered showing that whereas acute administration of β-blockers is contraindicated in the treatment of asthma, chronic use of certain β-blockers can have therapeutic benefit. It would appear that those β-blockers that can act as inverse agonists at the β2 receptor particularly show this paradoxical effect and the findings of Richard's research not only challenge the dogma of the treatment of asthma but also challenge many of the pharmacological principles of ligand/receptor interactions established by Sir James Black and others. In this paper, I discuss Richard's efforts to evaluate the chronic effects of β-blockers in the airways and how this research caught the imagination of Sir James Black. PMID:21458081

  14. Battling Arrow's Paradox to Discover Robust Water Management Alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasprzyk, J. R.; Reed, P. M.; Hadka, D.

    2013-12-01

    This study explores whether or not Arrow's Impossibility Theorem, a theory of social choice, affects the formulation of water resources systems planning problems. The theorem discusses creating an aggregation function for voters choosing from more than three alternatives for society. The Impossibility Theorem is also called Arrow's Paradox, because when trying to add more voters, a single individual's preference will dictate the optimal group decision. In the context of water resources planning, our study is motivated by recent theoretical work that has generalized the insights for Arrow's Paradox to the design of complex engineered systems. In this framing of the paradox, states of society are equivalent to water planning or design alternatives, and the voters are equivalent to multiple planning objectives (e.g. minimizing cost or maximizing performance). Seen from this point of view, multi-objective water planning problems are functionally equivalent to the social choice problem described above. Traditional solutions to such multi-objective problems aggregate multiple performance measures into a single mathematical objective. The Theorem implies that a subset of performance concerns will inadvertently dictate the overall design evaluations in unpredictable ways using such an aggregation. We suggest that instead of aggregation, an explicit many-objective approach to water planning can help overcome the challenges posed by Arrow's Paradox. Many-objective planning explicitly disaggregates measures of performance while supporting the discovery of the planning tradeoffs, employing multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs) to find solutions. Using MOEA-based search to address Arrow's Paradox requires that the MOEAs perform robustly with increasing problem complexity, such as adding additional objectives and/or decisions. This study uses comprehensive diagnostic evaluation of MOEA search performance across multiple problem formulations (both aggregated and many

  15. Landsat investigations of the northern Paradox basin, Utah and Colorado: implications for radioactive waste emplacement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, Jules D.; Simpson, Shirley L.

    1978-01-01

    The first stages of a remote-sensing project on the Paradox basin, part of the USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) radioactive waste-emplacement program, consisted of a review and selection of the best available satellite scanner images to use in geomorphologic and tectonic investigations of the region. High-quality Landsat images in several spectral bands (E-2260-17124 and E-5165-17030), taken under low sun angle October 9 and 10, 1975, were processed via computer for planimetric rectification, histogram analysis, linear transformation of radiance values, and edge enhancement. A lineament map of the northern Paradox basin was subsequently compiled at 1:400,000 using the enhanced Landsat base. Numerous previously unmapped northeast-trending lineaments between the Green River and Yellowcat dome; confirmatory detail on the structural control of major segments of the Colorado, Gunnison, and Dolores Rivers; and new evidence for late Phanerozoic reactivation of Precambrian basement structures are among the new contributions to the tectonics of the region. Lineament trends appear to be compatible with the postulated Colorado lineament zone, with geophysical potential-field anomalies, and with a northeast-trending basement fault pattern. Combined Landsat, geologic, and geophysical field evidence for this interpretation includes the sinuousity of the composite Salt Valley anticline, the transection of the Moab-Spanish Valley anticline on its southeastern end by northeast-striking faults, and possible transection (?) of the Moab diapir. Similarly, northeast-trending lineaments in Cottonwood Canyon and elsewhere are interpreted as manifestations of structures associated with northeasterly trends in the magnetic and gravity fields of the La Sal Mountains region. Other long northwesterly lineaments near the western termination of the Ryan Creek fault zone. may be associated with the fault zone separating the Uncompahgre horst uplift from the Paradox basin. Implications of the

  16. Paradoxical Benzodiazepine Response: A Rationale for Bumetanide in Neurodevelopmental Disorders?

    PubMed

    Bruining, Hilgo; Passtoors, Laurien; Goriounova, Natalia; Jansen, Floor; Hakvoort, Britt; de Jonge, Maretha; Poil, Simon-Shlomo

    2015-08-01

    The diuretic agent bumetanide has recently been put forward as a novel, promising treatment of behavioral symptoms in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and related conditions. Bumetanide can decrease neuronal chloride concentrations and may thereby reinstate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibition in patients with neurodevelopmental disorders. However, strategies to select appropriate candidates for bumetanide treatment are lacking. We hypothesized that a paradoxical response to GABA-enforcing agents such as benzodiazepines may predict the efficacy of bumetanide treatment in neurodevelopmental disorders. We describe a case of a 10-year-old girl with ASD, epilepsy, cortical dysplasia, and a 15q11.2 duplication who had exhibited marked behavioral arousal after previous treatment with clobazam, a benzodiazepine. We hypothesized that this response indicated the presence of depolarizing excitatory GABA and started bumetanide treatment with monitoring of behavior, cognition, and EEG. The treatment resulted in a marked clinical improvement in sensory behaviors, rigidity, and memory performance, which was substantiated by questionnaires and cognitive assessments. At baseline, the girl's EEG showed a depression in absolute α power, an electrographic sign previously related to ASD, which was normalized with bumetanide treatment. The effects of bumetanide on cognition and EEG seemed to mirror the "nonparadoxical" responses to benzodiazepines in healthy subjects. In addition, temporal lobe epilepsy and cortical dysplasia have both been linked to disturbed chloride homeostasis and seem to support our assumption that the observed paradoxical response was due to GABA-mediated excitation. This case highlights that a paradoxical behavioral response to GABA-enforcing drugs may constitute a framework for targeted treatment with bumetanide. PMID:26216321

  17. Diverse diseases from a ubiquitous process: the ribosomopathy paradox.

    PubMed

    Armistead, Joy; Triggs-Raine, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Collectively, the ribosomopathies are caused by defects in ribosome biogenesis. Although these disorders encompass deficiencies in a ubiquitous and fundamental process, the clinical manifestations are extremely variable and typically display tissue specificity. Research into this paradox has offered fascinating new insights into the role of the ribosome in the regulation of mRNA translation, cell cycle control, and signaling pathways involving TP53, MYC and mTOR. Several common features of ribosomopathies such as small stature, cancer predisposition, and hematological defects, point to how these diverse diseases may be related at a molecular level. PMID:24657617

  18. Paradoxical vocal cord motion disorder: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Wanis H; Gheriani, Heitham A; Almohamed, Ahmed A; Raza, Tasleem

    2007-03-01

    Paradoxical vocal cord motion disorder (PVCM), also called vocal cord dysfunction, is an important differential diagnosis for asthma. The disorder is often misdiagnosed as asthma leading to unnecessary drug use, very high medical utilisation and occasionally tracheal intubation or tracheostomy. Laryngoscopy is the gold standard for diagnosis of PVCM. Speech therapy and psychotherapy are considered the cornerstone of management of this disorder. The aim of this article is to increase the awareness of PVCM among doctors, highlighting the main characteristics that distinguish it from asthma and discuss the recent medical achievements and the possible future perspectives related to this disorder. PMID:17344570

  19. ysteries, Puzzles, and Paradoxes in Quantum Mechanics. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Rodolfo, B.

    1999-02-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Mysteries, Puzzles, and Paradoxes in Quantum Mechanics Workshop held in Italy, in August 1998. The Workshop was devoted to recent experimental and theoretical advances such as new interference, effects, the quantum eraser, non{minus}disturbing and Schroedinger{minus}cat{minus}like states, experiments, EPR correlations, teleportation, superluminal effects, quantum information and computing, locality and causality, decoherence and measurement theory. Tachyonic information transfer was also discussed. There were 45 papers presented at the conference,out of which 2 have been abstracted for the Energy,Science and Technology database.(AIP)

  20. Microscopic time-reversibility and macroscopic irreversibility: Still a paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Posch, H.A.; Dellago, Ch.; Hoover, W.G.; Kum, O. |

    1995-09-13

    Microscopic time reversibility and macroscopic irreversibility are a paradoxical combination. This was first observed by J. Loschmidt in 1876 and was explained, for conservative systems, by L. Boltzmann the following year. Both these features are also present in modern simulations of classic many-body systems in steady nonequilibrium states. We illustrate them here for the simplest possible models, a continuous one-dimensional model of field-driven diffusion, the so-called driven Lorentz gas or Galton Board, and an ergodic time reversible dissipative map.

  1. Mixing properties of growing networks and Simpson's paradox.

    PubMed

    Capocci, Andrea; Colaiori, Francesca

    2006-08-01

    The mixing properties of networks are usually inferred by comparing the degree of a node with the average degree of its neighbors. This kind of analysis often leads to incorrect conclusions: Assortative patterns may appear reversed by a mechanism known as Simpson's paradox. We prove this fact by analytical calculations and simulations on three classes of growing networks based on preferential attachment and fitness, where the disassortative behavior observed is a spurious effect. Our results give a crucial contribution to the debate about the origin of disassortative mixing, since networks previously classified as disassortative reveal instead assortative behavior to a careful analysis. PMID:17025518

  2. The nicotine paradox: effect of smoking on autonomic discrimination.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, T W; Epstein, L H

    1986-01-01

    Smoking reduces negative affect while it increases sympathetic nervous system activity. However, theories of emotion predict that increased autonomic arousal should increase rather than reduce negative affect. One explanation for this paradox is that nicotine interferes with perception of autonomic activity. We evaluated the effect of smoking on autonomic activity perception by measuring performance on a heartbeat detection task after a high or low dose of nicotine or not smoking. A group of nonsmokers also completed the task. Results failed to support the hypothesis. In light of previous research, the results suggest EMG perception may be more important to the negative affect reduction phenomenon than perception of autonomic activity. PMID:3739820

  3. Paradoxical darkening and removal of pink tattoo ink.

    PubMed

    Kirby, William; Kaur, Ravneet Ruby; Desai, Alpesh

    2010-06-01

    It is widely accepted that Q-switched lasers are the gold-standard treatment for the resolution of unwanted tattoo ink. Although much safer than other tattoo removal modalities, the treatment of tattoo ink with Q-switched devices may be associated with long-term adverse effects including undesired pigmentary alterations such as tattoo ink darkening. Darkening of tattoo ink is most often reported in cosmetic, flesh-toned, white, peach, and pink tattoos. In this paper, we briefly review a case of pink tattoo ink that initially darkened paradoxically but eventually resolved with continued Q-switched laser treatments. PMID:20618561

  4. Fermi Paradox and C.E.T.I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, T. B.

    1982-05-01

    Extraterrestrial civilisations are expected to be abundant and yet no real evidence of any visit to our Solar System exists. An explanation of this so-called Fermi Paradox is put forward here. It is argued that most of them have attempted communication before extrasolar exploration and there is therefore a galactic network of inter-communicating cultures which undertake space travel only infrequently. First-time contacts with them should be achievable via radio. Interstellar interaction may lead to convergent mental evolution as the influence of boundary conditions for individual societies is reduced.

  5. The Fermi paradox: an approach based on percolation theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, G. A.

    1998-05-01

    If even a very small fraction of the hundred billion stars on the galaxy are home to technological civilisations which colonise over interstellar distances, the entire galaxy could be completely colonised in a few million years. The absence of such extraterrestrial civilisations visiting Earth is the Fermi paradox. A model for interstellar colonisation is proposed using the assumption that there is a maximum distance over which direct interstellar colonisation is feasible. Due to the time lag involved in interstellar communications, it is assumed that an interstellar colony will rapidly develop a culture independent of the civilisation that originally settled it.

  6. The Planetarium Hypothesis - A Resolution of the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, S.

    A possible resolution to the Fermi Paradox is that we are living in an artificial universe, perhaps a form of virtual- reality `planetarium', designed to give us the illusion that the universe is empty. Quantum-physical and thermo- dynamic considerations inform estimates of the energy required to generate such simulations of varying sizes and quality. The perfect simulation of a world containing our present civilisation is within the scope of a Type K3 extraterrestrial culture. However the containment of a coherent human culture spanning ~100 light years within a perfect simulation would exceed the capacities of any conceivable virtual-reality generator.

  7. The paradox of physicians and administrators in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Peirce, J C

    2000-01-01

    Rapidly changing times in health care challenge both physicians and health care administrators to manage the paradox of providing orderly, high quality, and efficient care while bringing forth innovations to address present unmet problems and surprises that emerge. Health care has grown throughout the past several centuries through differentiation and integration, becoming a highly complex biological system with the hospital as the central attractive force--or "strange attractor"--during this century. The theoretical model of complex adaptive systems promises more effective strategic direction in addressing these chaotic times where the new strange attractor moves beyond the hospital. PMID:10710724

  8. Paradoxical empowerment of produsers in the context of informational capitalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proulx, Serge; Heaton, Lorna; Kwok Choon, Mary Jane; Millette, Mélanie

    2011-04-01

    This article develops a critical perspective on how online contribution practices participate in the creation of economic value under informational capitalism. It discusses the theoretical relevance of the concept of empowerment for exploring online contribution practices. We argue that produsage practices are paradoxical insofar as they can be simultaneously alienating and emancipatory. This theoretical lens allows us to take a fresh look at the collective intelligence of produsers and the role of communities in the collective production of content. We illustrate the fruitfulness of this conceptual approach with two case studies: Facebook and TelaBotanica, a platform for the collaborative production of scientific knowledge.

  9. CROWN GALL INCIDENCE: SEEDLING PARADOX WALNUT ROOTSTOCK VERSUS OWN-ROOTED ENGLISH WALNUT TREES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seedling Paradox (Juglans hindsii x J. regia) has been the rootstock of choice for English walnut in California because of its vigor and greater tolerance of wet soil conditions. However, seedling Paradox rootstock is highly susceptible to crown gall, a disease caused by the soil-borne bacterium Agr...

  10. Social Capital and Human Mortality: Explaining the Rural Paradox with County-Level Mortality Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Tse-Chuan; Jensen, Leif; Haran, Murali

    2011-01-01

    The "rural paradox" refers to standardized mortality rates in rural areas that are unexpectedly low in view of well-known economic and infrastructural disadvantages there. We explore this paradox by incorporating social capital, a promising explanatory factor that has seldom been incorporated into residential mortality research. We do so while…

  11. Continuous-variable Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox with traveling-wave second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, M.K.

    2004-09-01

    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox and quantum entanglement are at the heart of quantum mechanics. Here we show that single-pass traveling-wave second-harmonic generation can be used to demonstrate both entanglement and the paradox with continuous variables that are analogous to the position and momentum of the original proposal.

  12. Introducing the Levinthal's Protein Folding Paradox and Its Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez, Leandro

    2014-01-01

    The protein folding (Levinthal's) paradox states that it would not be possible in a physically meaningful time to a protein to reach the native (functional) conformation by a random search of the enormously large number of possible structures. This paradox has been solved: it was shown that small biases toward the native conformation result…

  13. Can Virtue Be Taught and How? Confucius on the Paradox of Moral Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yong

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I shall first examine an apparent paradox in Confucius' view on whether everyone is perfectible through education: on the one hand, he states that education should be provided to all, on the other hand, he says that common people cannot be made to know things. To understand this apparent paradox, I shall argue that education for…

  14. The Use of Paradoxical Intention in the Treatment of Panic Attacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dattilio, Frank M.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the counseling use of paradoxical intention, in which clients are told to perform responses that seem incompatible with the goal for which they are seeking help. The use of paradoxical intention in the treatment of panic attacks is described and a case example is included. The nature and implementation of the technique are discussed.…

  15. Resolving Paradoxical Criteria for the Expansion and Replication of Early Childhood Care and Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Rosman, Elisa Altman; Hsueh, JoAnn

    2002-01-01

    Identifies underlying paradoxical bases for expansion and replication of early childhood care and education (ECCE) programs. Presents history of ECCE in the United States. Proposes typology of expansion and replication processes, and considers paradoxes associated with replication process. Offers recommendations for funders, policymakers, and…

  16. An Applet for the Investigation of Simpson's Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneiter, Kady; Symanzik, Jurgen

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an applet that facilitates investigation of Simpson's Paradox in the context of a number of real and hypothetical data sets. The applet builds on the Baker-Kramer graphical representation for Simpson's Paradox. The implementation and use of the applet are explained. This is followed by a description of how the…

  17. Three Abductive Solutions to the Meno Paradox--with Instinct, Inference, and Distributed Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paavola, Sami; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2005-01-01

    This article analyzes three approaches to resolving the classical Meno paradox, or its variant, the learning paradox, emphasizing Charles S. Peirce's notion of abduction. Abduction provides a way of dissecting those processes where something new, or conceptually more complex than before, is discovered or learned. In its basic form, abduction is a…

  18. The Age Prospective Memory Paradox: Young Adults May Not Give Their Best outside of the Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aberle, Ingo; Rendell, Peter G.; Rose, Nathan S.; McDaniel, Mark A.; Kliegel, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has identified the age prospective memory paradox of age-related declines in laboratory settings in contrast to age benefits in naturalistic settings. Various factors are assumed to account for this paradox, yet empirical evidence on this issue is scarce. In 2 experiments, the present study examined the effect of task setting in…

  19. The Chinese Classroom Paradox: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Teacher Controlling Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Ning; Lam, Shui-Fong; Chan, Kam Chi

    2012-01-01

    Chinese classrooms present an intriguing paradox to the claim of self-determination theory that autonomy facilitates learning. Chinese teachers appear to be controlling, but Chinese students do not have poor academic performance in international comparisons. The present study addressed this paradox by examining the cultural differences in…

  20. Patent foramen ovale and paradoxical systemic embolism: a bibliographic review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, Philip P.; Boriek, Aladin M.; Butler, Bruce D.; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Bove, Alfred A.

    2003-01-01

    A patent foramen ovale (PFO) has been reported to be an important risk factor for cardioembolic cerebrovascular accidents through paradoxical systemic embolization, and it provides one potential mechanism for the paradoxical systemic embolization of venous gas bubbles produced after altitude or hyperbaric decompressions. Here, we present in a single document a summary of the original findings and views from authors in this field. It is a comprehensive review of 145 peer-reviewed journal articles related to PFO that is intended to encourage reflection on PFO detection methods and on the possible association between PFO and stroke. There is a heightened debate on whether aviators, astronauts, and scuba divers should go through screening for PFO. Because it is a source of an important controversy, we prefer to present the findings in the format of a neutral bibliographic review independent of our own opinions. Each cited peer-reviewed article includes a short summary in which we attempt to present potential parallels with the pathophysiology of decompression bubbles. Two types of articles are summarized, as follows. First, we report the original clinical and physiological findings which focus on PFO. The consistent reporting sequence begins by describing the method of detection of PFO and goal of the study, followed by bulleted results, and finally the discussion and conclusion. Second, we summarize from review papers the issues related only to PFO. At the end of each section, an abstract with concluding remarks based on the cited articles provides guidelines.

  1. [Age-prospective memory-paradox: explanatory hypotheses].

    PubMed

    Azzopardi, Barbara; Auffray, Caroline; Juhel, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    Prospective memory is a complex cognitive function requiring to remember a planned action. For example, this function is particularly important for elderly people to remember taking medication at the appropriate time. The comparison of the performance of old and young peoples on different prospective memory tasks led to two contradictory results, a configuration that has been dubbed "age-prospective memory-paradox". The first set of results of the age-prospective memory-paradox configuration is in keeping with the effects of aging on cognitive functioning, older peoples generally performing less well than younger peoples on laboratory prospective memory tasks. The second set of results is at odds with the first one, as older peoples generally perform better than younger peoples on naturalistic prospective memory tasks. The aim of the present paper is to expose the main explanatory hypotheses of the age related deficit on laboratory prospective memory tasks in one hand and on the age related benefit on naturalistic prospective memory tasks on the other hand. Concerning laboratory prospective memory tasks, the main hypothesis is that the detrimental effect of age would be principally due to negative influence of age on executive control processes and retrospective memory processes involved in this kind of tasks. With respect to naturalistic prospective memory tasks, a higher motivational level and the fact that older people have more frequently recourse to external memory aids and to compensation strategies could explain the better results of older people. PMID:25786425

  2. Patient autonomy in chronic care: solving a paradox

    PubMed Central

    Reach, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    The application of the principle of autonomy, which is considered a cornerstone of contemporary bioethics, is sometimes in obvious contradiction with the principle of beneficence. Indeed, it may happen in chronic care that the preferences of the health care provider (HCP), who is largely focused on the prevention of long term complications of diseases, differ from those, more present oriented, preferences of the patient. The aims of this narrative review are as follows: 1) to show that the exercise of autonomy by the patient is not always possible; 2) where the latter is not possible, to examine how, in the context of the autonomy principle, someone (a HCP) can decide what is good (a treatment) for someone else (a patient) without falling into paternalism. Actually this analysis leads to a paradox: not only is the principle of beneficence sometimes conflicting with the principle of autonomy, but physician’s beneficence may enter into conflict with the mere respect of the patient; and 3) to propose a solution to this paradox by revisiting the very concepts of the autonomous person, patient education, and trust in the patient–physician relationship: this article provides an ethical definition of patient education. PMID:24376345

  3. Paradox of enrichment: A fractional differential approach with memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Sourav; Bhattacharya, Sabyasachi; Pal, Joydeep; N'Guérékata, Gaston M.; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2013-09-01

    The paradox of enrichment (PoE) proposed by Rosenzweig [M. Rosenzweig, The paradox of enrichment, Science 171 (1971) 385-387] is still a fundamental problem in ecology. Most of the solutions have been proposed at an individual species level of organization and solutions at community level are lacking. Knowledge of how learning and memory modify behavioral responses to species is a key factor in making a crucial link between species and community levels. PoE resolution via these two organizational levels can be interpreted as a microscopic- and macroscopic-level solution. Fractional derivatives provide an excellent tool for describing this memory and the hereditary properties of various materials and processes. The derivatives can be physically interpreted via two time scales that are considered simultaneously: the ideal, equably flowing homogeneous local time, and the cosmic (inhomogeneous) non-local time. Several mechanisms and theories have been proposed to resolve the PoE problem, but a universally accepted theory is still lacking because most studies have focused on local effects and ignored non-local effects, which capture memory. Here we formulate the fractional counterpart of the Rosenzweig model and analyze the stability behavior of a system. We conclude that there is a threshold for the memory effect parameter beyond which the Rosenzweig model is stable and may be used as a potential agent to resolve PoE from a new perspective via fractional differential equations.

  4. Black hole remnants and the information loss paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P.; Ong, Y. C.; Yeom, D.-h.

    2015-11-01

    Forty years after the discovery of Hawking radiation, its exact nature remains elusive. If Hawking radiation does not carry any information out from the ever shrinking black hole, it seems that unitarity is violated once the black hole completely evaporates. On the other hand, attempts to recover information via quantum entanglement lead to the firewall controversy. Amid the confusions, the possibility that black hole evaporation stops with a "remnant" has remained unpopular and is often dismissed due to some "undesired properties" of such an object. Nevertheless, as in any scientific debate, the pros and cons of any proposal must be carefully scrutinized. We fill in the void of the literature by providing a timely review of various types of black hole remnants, and provide some new thoughts regarding the challenges that black hole remnants face in the context of the information loss paradox and its latest incarnation, namely the firewall controversy. The importance of understanding the role of curvature singularity is also emphasized, after all there remains a possibility that the singularity cannot be cured even by quantum gravity. In this context a black hole remnant conveniently serves as a cosmic censor. We conclude that a remnant remains a possible end state of Hawking evaporation, and if it contains large interior geometry, may help to ameliorate the information loss paradox and the firewall controversy. We hope that this will raise some interests in the community to investigate remnants more critically but also more thoroughly.

  5. Policy on synthetic biology: deliberation, probability, and the precautionary paradox.

    PubMed

    Wareham, Christopher; Nardini, Cecilia

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic biology is a cutting-edge area of research that holds the promise of unprecedented health benefits. However, in tandem with these large prospective benefits, synthetic biology projects entail a risk of catastrophic consequences whose severity may exceed that of most ordinary human undertakings. This is due to the peculiar nature of synthetic biology as a 'threshold technology' which opens doors to opportunities and applications that are essentially unpredictable. Fears about these potentially unstoppable consequences have led to declarations from civil society groups calling for the use of a precautionary principle to regulate the field. Moreover, the principle is prevalent in law and international agreements. Despite widespread political recognition of a need for caution, the precautionary principle has been extensively criticized as a guide for regulatory policy. We examine a central objection to the principle: that its application entails crippling inaction and incoherence, since whatever action one takes there is always a chance that some highly improbable cataclysm will occur. In response to this difficulty, which we call the 'precautionary paradox,' we outline a deliberative means for arriving at threshold of probability below which potential dangers can be disregarded. In addition, we describe a Bayesian mechanism with which to assign probabilities to harmful outcomes. We argue that these steps resolve the paradox. The rehabilitated PP can thus provide a viable policy option to confront the uncharted waters of synthetic biology research. PMID:24602164

  6. A Resolution to the Blue Whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) Population Paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Pointin, Fabien; Payne, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    We provide the strongest evidence to date supporting the existence of two independent blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou (Risso, 1827)) populations in the North Atlantic. In spite of extensive data collected in conjunction with the fishery, the population structure of blue whiting is poorly understood. On one hand, genetic, morphometric, otolith and drift modelling studies point towards the existence of two populations, but, on the other hand, observations of adult distributions point towards a single population. A paradox therefore arises in attempting to reconcile these two sets of information. Here we analyse 1100 observations of blue whiting larvae from the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) from 1948–2005 using modern statistical techniques. We show a clear spatial separation between a northern spawning area, in the Rockall Trough, and a southern one, off the Porcupine Seabight. We further show a difference in the timing of spawning between these sites of at least a month, and meaningful differences in interannual variability. The results therefore support the two-population hypothesis. Furthermore, we resolve the paradox by showing that the acoustic observations cited in support of the single-population model are not capable of resolving both populations, as they occur too late in the year and do not extend sufficiently far south to cover the southern population: the confusion is the result of a simple observational artefact. We conclude that blue whiting in the North Atlantic comprises two populations. PMID:25184302

  7. Paradoxical Truths and Persistent Myths: Reframing the Team Competence Conversation.

    PubMed

    Lingard, Lorelei

    2016-01-01

    Medicine has conventionally had an individualist orientation to competence. Individual competence is conceptualized as a stable possession that, once acquired, holds across contexts. Individual competence is necessary; however, it is insufficient for quality health care. We also need to attend to collective competence in order to grapple with paradoxical truths about teamwork, such as: competent individuals can form incompetent teams. Collective competence is conceptualized as a distributed capacity of a system, an evolving, relational phenomenon that emerges from the resources and constraints of particular contexts. This article outlines a set of paradoxical truths about teamwork in health care and uses the concept of collective competence to explain how they can hold true. It then considers a set of persistent myths about teamwork which have their roots in an individualist orientation, exploring how they hold us back from meaningful change in how we educate for, and practice as, health care teams. Finally, the article briefly considers the implications of these truths and myths for educational issues such as interprofessional education and competency-based health professional education. PMID:27584064

  8. Conception through a looking glass: the paradox of IVF.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Sarah

    2013-12-01

    As we enter the fifth decade of human IVF, this technique presents a paradox. On the one hand, IVF has become more regular and ordinary, even a new norm of social life. On the other hand, it has arguably become, as Alice might have said, 'curiouser and curiouser', with the development of its applications such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection, preimplantation genetic diagnosis and gestational surrogacy, as well as human embryonic stem cell derivation. Five million miracle babies later, in the midst of 'the age of biological control', IVF can be seen as the source of important changes in how reproductive biology is understood - socially, ethically, medically and in terms of basic science. This article reviews three decades of social scientific research into IVF and suggests that, while the passage of time may have allowed IVF to become more 'routine', the opposite is also true. With hindsight, some of the more radical changes to the understandings of parenthood, kinship, fertility and technology to which IVF has contributed can be appreciated. Learning from this paradox must be part of the legacy of IVF's first half-century if its future evolution is to be directed wisely, safely and conscientiously. PMID:24139598

  9. Paradoxical Herniation in the Postcraniectomy Syndrome: Report and Literature Update

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Zúñiga, Rodrigo; Mares-Pais, Roberto; Gutiérrez-Avila, Oscar; Saldaña-Koppel, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The decompressive craniectomy is a surgical strategy widely used with specific criteria to control the refractory intracranial pressure (ICP). However, it is important to warn about the presence of a postcraniectomy syndrome and analyze the risk-benefit on a long term. Case Report A 72-year-old male patient diagnosed with a subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to the rupture of an anterior circulation aneurysm that develops vasospasm, secondary ischemia, and edema with signs of herniation that required a decompressive craniectomy on a first step. Afterwards, the aneurysm was approached and he consequently developed hydrocephaly. A ventriculoperitoneal shunt is installed, contralateral to the craniectomy, and progressive sinking of the skin flap, there is neurological deterioration and paradoxical herniation. Its association with the clinical deterioration by bronchoaspiration did not allow the cranioplasty to resolve the ICP decompensation. Conclusions The paradoxical herniation as part of the postcraniectomy syndrome is an increasingly common condition identified in adult patients with cortical atrophy, and who have also been treated with ventricular shunt systems. Timely cranioplasty represents the ideal therapeutic plan once the compromise from the mass effect has resolved to avoid complications derived from the decompressive craniectomy per se. PMID:26929899

  10. Paradoxes of professionalism and error in complex systems.

    PubMed

    Holtman, Matthew C

    2011-06-01

    Professionalism is at the heart of risk management in complex, dangerous work such as medicine, aviation, and military operations. Professionalism is closely connected to expertise and is therefore closely connected to the ability to prevent and mitigate errors. But there are two paradoxes in this connection. First, professionalism can increase, rather than reduce, the risk of errors and accidents by promoting practitioners' tendency to break procedural rules. This is because professional expertise tends to favor adaptation to local circumstances over standardized approaches to problem-solving. Second, professionalism can create blind spots within organizations, blocking the flow of critical information about unsafe conditions. This is because professional groups develop unique subcultures, specialized language, and communication habits that tend to separate them from other professional groups, even when those groups work within the same organization. I illustrate these paradoxes using case studies from several different professional domains. I then outline some methodological challenges for research on safety and professionalism. Finally, I argue that the kind of professionalism that can prevent errors is rooted in organizational practices that reduce the social separation between professional groups and promote the maintenance of adequate margins of safety. This requires the acceptance of safety as a central value that is at least as important as productivity. PMID:19671447

  11. The Paradox Role of Regulatory T Cells in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Jiang, Yongjun

    2013-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of ischemic stroke is not completely known. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), a subset of T cells, play a pivotal role in the pathophysiological process of ischemic stroke. However, there is also controversy over the role of Tregs in stroke. Hence, the function of Tregs in ischemic stroke has triggered a heated discussion recently. In this paper, we reviewed the current lines of evidence to describe the full view of Tregs in stroke. We would like to introduce the basic concepts of Tregs and then discuss their paradox function in ischemic stroke. On one side, Tregs could protect brain against ischemic injury via modulating the inflammation process. On the other side, they exaggerated the insult by causing microvascular dysfunction. They also interfered with the neurological function recovery. In addition, the reasons for this paradox role would be discussed in the review and the prospective of the clinical application of Tregs was also included. In conclusion, Tregs contributed to the outcome of ischemic stroke, while more lines of evidence are needed to understand how Tregs regulate the immune system and influence the outcome of stroke. PMID:24288462

  12. Paradoxical reactions and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Lucy C K; Breen, Ronan; Miller, Robert F; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Lipman, Marc

    2015-03-01

    The coalescence of the HIV-1 and tuberculosis (TB) epidemics in Sub-Saharan Africa has had a significant and negative impact on global health. The availability of effective antimicrobial treatment for both HIV-1 (in the form of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)) and TB (with antimycobacterial agents) has the potential to mitigate the associated morbidity and mortality. However, the use of both HAART and antimycobacterial therapy is associated with the development of inflammatory paradoxical syndromes after commencement of therapy. These include paradoxical reactions (PR) and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndromes (IRIS), conditions that complicate mycobacterial disease in HIV seronegative and seropositive individuals. Here, we discuss case definitions for PR and IRIS, and explore how advances in identifying the risk factors and immunopathogenesis of these conditions informs our understanding of their shared underlying pathogenesis. We propose that both PR and IRIS are characterized by the triggering of exaggerated inflammation in a setting of immunocompromise and antigen loading, via the reversal of immunosuppression by HAART and/or antimycobacterials. Further understanding of the molecular basis of this pathogenesis may pave the way for effective immunotherapies for the treatment of PR and IRIS. PMID:25809754

  13. Pitch jnd and the tritone paradox: The linguistic nexus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, Kourosh

    2002-11-01

    Previous research has shown a connection between absolute pitch (the ability to name a specific pitch in the absence of any reference) and native competence in a tone language (Deutsch, 1990). In tone languages, tone is one of the features which determines the lexical meaning of a word. This study investigates the relationship between native competence in a tone language and the just noticeable difference of pitch. Furthermore, the tritone paradox studies have shown that subjects hear two tritones (with bell-shaped spectral envelopes) as either ascending or descending depending on their linguistic backgrounds (Deutsch, 1987). It is hypothesized that the native speakers of tone languages have a higher JND for pitch, and hear the two tones of the tritone paradox as ascending, whereas, native speakers of nontone languages hear them as descending. This study will indicate the importance of early musical training for the development of acute tone sensitivity. It will also underline the importance of language and culture in the way it shapes our musical understanding. The significance of this study will be in the areas of music education and pedagogy.

  14. The Bangladesh paradox: exceptional health achievement despite economic poverty.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, A Mushtaque R; Bhuiya, Abbas; Chowdhury, Mahbub Elahi; Rasheed, Sabrina; Hussain, Zakir; Chen, Lincoln C

    2013-11-23

    Bangladesh, the eighth most populous country in the world with about 153 million people, has recently been applauded as an exceptional health performer. In the first paper in this Series, we present evidence to show that Bangladesh has achieved substantial health advances, but the country's success cannot be captured simplistically because health in Bangladesh has the paradox of steep and sustained reductions in birth rate and mortality alongside continued burdens of morbidity. Exceptional performance might be attributed to a pluralistic health system that has many stakeholders pursuing women-centred, gender-equity-oriented, highly focused health programmes in family planning, immunisation, oral rehydration therapy, maternal and child health, tuberculosis, vitamin A supplementation, and other activities, through the work of widely deployed community health workers reaching all households. Government and non-governmental organisations have pioneered many innovations that have been scaled up nationally. However, these remarkable achievements in equity and coverage are counterbalanced by the persistence of child and maternal malnutrition and the low use of maternity-related services. The Bangladesh paradox shows the net outcome of successful direct health action in both positive and negative social determinants of health--ie, positives such as women's empowerment, widespread education, and mitigation of the effect of natural disasters; and negatives such as low gross domestic product, pervasive poverty, and the persistence of income inequality. Bangladesh offers lessons such as how gender equity can improve health outcomes, how health innovations can be scaled up, and how direct health interventions can partly overcome socioeconomic constraints. PMID:24268002

  15. Extending the core paradox posed by an early dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, J. A.; Cottrell, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    New, higher values of core thermal conductivity, together with the reliance of any early geodynamo on thermal convection, represent a paradox (Olson, 2013). These factors suggest either early Earth lacked an internally-generated magnetic field or novel mechanisms for driving an early dynamo. The oldest record of past field strength from in situ igneous rocks comes from 3.4 to 3.45 Ga dacites of the Barberton and Nondweni Greenstone belts of South Africa. These analyses, based on single silicate crystals containing magnetic inclusions with ideal recording characteristics, indicate a field strength within 50 to 70% of the present-day field (Tarduno et al., 2010). Much older igneous rocks are generally not viable as paleomagnetic recorders because of their high metamorphic state (amphibolite grade or higher). Here we discuss extending Earth's magnetic field history further back in time using Archean and Hadean zircons hosting magnetic inclusions that are now found in younger sedimentary units of low metamorphic grade. Thellier-Coe paleointensity data passing reliability checks from zircons of the Jack Hills belt (Western Australia) suggest the presence of a magnetic field at 3.55 Ga, thereby extending the core paradox by 100 million years. We will discuss our continuing efforts to test for the presence/absence of a dynamo field between 3.55 Ga and 4.2 Ga.

  16. Perfect mirrors and the self-accelerating box paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marolf, Donald; Sorkin, Rafael D.

    2002-11-01

    We consider the question raised by Unruh and Wald of whether mirrored boxes can self-accelerate in flat spacetime (the ``self-accelerating box paradox''). From the point of view of the box, which perceives the acceleration as an impressed gravitational field, this is equivalent to asking whether the box can be supported by the buoyant force arising from its immersion in a perceived bath of thermal (Unruh) radiation. The perfect mirrors we study are of the type that rely on light internal degrees of freedom which adjust to and reflect impinging radiation. We suggest that a minimum of one internal mirror degree of freedom is required for each bulk field degree of freedom reflected. A short calculation then shows that such mirrors necessarily absorb enough heat from the thermal bath that their increased mass prevents them from floating on the thermal radiation. For this type of mirror the paradox is therefore resolved. We also observe that this failure of boxes to ``float'' invalidates one of the assumptions going into the Unruh-Wald analysis of entropy balances involving boxes lowered adiabatically toward black holes. Nevertheless, their broad argument can be maintained until the box reaches a new regime in which box-antibox pairs dominate over massless fields as contributions to thermal radiation.

  17. The Healthy Immigrant Paradox and Child Maltreatment: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Millett, Lina S

    2016-10-01

    Prior studies suggest that foreign-born individuals have a health advantage, referred to as the Healthy Immigrant Paradox, when compared to native-born persons of the same socio-economic status. This systematic review examined whether the immigrant advantage found in health literature is mirrored by child maltreatment in general and its forms in particular. The author searched Academic Search Premier, CINAHL, CINAHL PLUS, Family and Society Studies Worldwide, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, Social Work Abstracts, and SocINdex for published literature through December 2015. The review followed an evidence-based Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist. The author identified 822 unique articles, of which 19 met the inclusion criteria. The reviewed data showed strong support for the healthy immigrant paradox for a general form of maltreatment and physical abuse. The evidence for emotional and sexual abuse was also suggestive of immigrant advantage though relatively small sample size and lack of multivariate controls make these findings tentative. The evidence for neglect was mixed: immigrants were less likely to be reported to Child Protective Services; however, they had higher rates of physical neglect and lack of supervision in the community data. The study results warrant confirmation with newer data possessing strong external validity for immigrant samples. PMID:26914837

  18. The Paradox and Fog of Supervision: Site for the Encounters and Growth of Praxis, Persons and Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Nita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Several paradoxes have been presented in the literature as inherent in supervision of doctoral students. The purpose of this paper is to explore these paradoxes and offer the concept of praxis as a way of effectively engaging with complex and paradoxical dimensions of supervision, rather than denying or avoiding them.…

  19. Qualities and Inequalities in Online Social Networks through the Lens of the Generalized Friendship Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Naghmeh; Rabbat, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The friendship paradox is the phenomenon that in social networks, people on average have fewer friends than their friends do. The generalized friendship paradox is an extension to attributes other than the number of friends. The friendship paradox and its generalized version have gathered recent attention due to the information they provide about network structure and local inequalities. In this paper, we propose several measures of nodal qualities which capture different aspects of their activities and influence in online social networks. Using these measures we analyse the prevalence of the generalized friendship paradox over Twitter and we report high levels of prevalence (up to over 90% of nodes). We contend that this prevalence of the friendship paradox and its generalized version arise because of the hierarchical nature of the connections in the network. This hierarchy is nested as opposed to being star-like. We conclude that these paradoxes are collective phenomena not created merely by a minority of well-connected or high-attribute nodes. Moreover, our results show that a large fraction of individuals can experience the generalized friendship paradox even in the absence of a significant correlation between degrees and attributes. PMID:26863225

  20. Chronic cough and laryngeal dysfunction improve with specific treatment of cough and paradoxical vocal fold movement

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Nicole M; Vertigan, Anne E; Gibson, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Chronic persistent cough can be associated with laryngeal dysfunction that leads to symptoms such as dysphonia, sensory hyperresponsiveness to capsaicin, and motor dysfunction with paradoxical vocal fold movement and variable extrathoracic airflow obstruction (reduced inspiratory airflow). Successful therapy of chronic persistent cough improves symptoms and sensory hyperresponsiveness. The effects of treatment for chronic cough on laryngeal dysfunction are not known. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate effects of therapy for chronic cough and paradoxical vocal fold movement. Methods Adults with chronic cough (n = 24) were assessed before and after treatment for chronic persistent cough by measuring quality of life, extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness to hypertonic saline provocation, capsaicin cough reflex hypersensitivity and fibreoptic laryngoscopy to observe paradoxical vocal fold movement. Subjects with chronic cough were classified into those with (n = 14) or without (n = 10) paradoxical vocal fold movement based on direct observation at laryngoscopy. Results Following treatment there was a significant improvement in cough related quality of life and cough reflex sensitivity in both groups. Subjects with chronic cough and paradoxical vocal fold movement also had additional improvements in extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness and paradoxical vocal fold movement. The degree of improvement in cough reflex sensitivity correlated with the improvement in extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness. Conclusion Laryngeal dysfunction is common in chronic persistent cough, where it is manifest as paradoxical vocal fold movement and extrathoracic airway hyperresponsiveness. Successful treatment for chronic persistent cough leads to improvements in these features of laryngeal dysfunction. PMID:19292930

  1. Qualities and Inequalities in Online Social Networks through the Lens of the Generalized Friendship Paradox.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Naghmeh; Rabbat, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The friendship paradox is the phenomenon that in social networks, people on average have fewer friends than their friends do. The generalized friendship paradox is an extension to attributes other than the number of friends. The friendship paradox and its generalized version have gathered recent attention due to the information they provide about network structure and local inequalities. In this paper, we propose several measures of nodal qualities which capture different aspects of their activities and influence in online social networks. Using these measures we analyse the prevalence of the generalized friendship paradox over Twitter and we report high levels of prevalence (up to over 90% of nodes). We contend that this prevalence of the friendship paradox and its generalized version arise because of the hierarchical nature of the connections in the network. This hierarchy is nested as opposed to being star-like. We conclude that these paradoxes are collective phenomena not created merely by a minority of well-connected or high-attribute nodes. Moreover, our results show that a large fraction of individuals can experience the generalized friendship paradox even in the absence of a significant correlation between degrees and attributes. PMID:26863225

  2. K2P potassium channels, mysterious and paradoxically exciting.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Steve A N

    2011-08-01

    New evidence reveals that the common electrolyte disorder hypokalemia can induce K2P1 channels that are normally selective for K+ to break the rules and conduct Na+. This defiant behavior leads to paradoxical depolarization of many cells in the heart, increasing the risk for lethal arrhythmia. The new research resolves a mystery uncovered 50 years ago and bestows an array of new riddles. Here, I discuss how K2P1 might achieve this alchemy--through stable residence of the K+ selectivity filter in a Na+-conductive state between its open and C-inactive configurations--and predict that other K+ channels and environmental stimuli will be discovered to produce the same excitatory misconduct. PMID:21868351

  3. Retinal vasculitis: a novel paradoxical effect of anti-TNFα?

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelghani, Kaouther; Slouma, Maroua; Ben Jalel, Wady; Zakraoui, Leith

    2014-01-01

    Retinal vasculitis (RV) is extremely rare in spondyloarthritis associated with Crohn's disease. Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody to tumour necrosis factor (TNF) α, is efficient in spondyloarthritis, Crohn's disease and RV. We present the case of a 41-year-old man with a known history of spondyloarthritis associated with Crohn's disease. He was under treatment with infliximab. Four days after his 12th infusion of infliximab, he presented with sudden blurred vision. Although his disease was in remission, ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral peripheral retinal occlusive vasculitis. The patient responded positively to the treatment by laser photocoagulation and peribulbar corticosteroid injection. Infliximab was not stopped. There was improvement in his eye disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of new onset of RV occurring under infliximab in a patient with Crohn's related spondyloarthritis. This case illustrates the possibility of a paradoxical effect of this kind of therapy. PMID:25143312

  4. Coping with paradoxes of risk communication: Observations and suggestions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, B.B. )

    1993-06-01

    The maturation of the field of risk communication has resulted in several manuals, a National Research Council review, a Society for Risk Analysis subgroup, and critics. Critics Pieter-Jan Stalen and Rob Coppock, and Harry Otway and Brian Wynne, have pointed out that much risk communication is impractical or paradoxical. In this letter, the author supports many of the criticisms of these critics, but also discusses errors and omissions in their viewpoints that he feels will inhibit progress in effective risk communication. Topics discussed are motivations for risk communication, the practicality of advice, the audience for risk communication, credibility, and whose interests are best served by risk communication. The purpose of this essay is therefore to spur further debate on the issue of risk communication. 13 refs.

  5. Too similar, too different: the paradoxical dualism of psychiatric stigma.

    PubMed

    Gergel, Tania Louise

    2014-08-01

    Challenges to psychiatric stigma fall between a rock and a hard place. Decreasing one prejudice may inadvertently increase another. Emphasising similarities between mental illness and 'ordinary' experience to escape the fear-related prejudices associated with the imagined 'otherness' of persons with mental illness risks conclusions that mental illness indicates moral weakness and the loss of any benefits of a medical model. An emphasis on illness and difference from normal experience risks a response of fear of the alien. Thus, a 'likeness-based' and 'unlikeness-based' conception of psychiatric stigma can lead to prejudices stemming from paradoxically opposing assumptions about mental illness. This may create a troubling impasse for anti-stigma campaigns. PMID:25237534

  6. An Apparent Paradox in Verification of Rainfall Estimates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciach, G. J.

    2009-05-01

    A problem that is a source of permanent cognitive confusion in comprehensive evaluations of different rainfall estimates is presented. The problem stems from the existence of two conditional biases (CB) inherent to the uncertainties of the estimates. The two CBs, called "CB type 1" and "CB type 2," are recognized by researchers familiar with the distribution-oriented framework for complete verification of hydrological and meteorological products. Although the mathematical definitions of the two CBs are clear, a reality check reveals that their meaningful interpretation is problematic. It can even result in self-contradictory conclusions suggesting both systematic overestimation and underestimation of strong rainfall by the same rainfall estimation products. A solution to this apparent paradox is discussed. This investigation is based on large data samples of different radar rainfall estimates and the corresponding highly accurate ground reference. Understanding the two CBs, their physical consequences and the fundamental inter-relations between them is essential for informed usage of these uncertainty characteristics.

  7. The constructivist paradox: Teachers' knowledge and constructivist science teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louden, William; Wallace, John

    1990-01-01

    Advocates of constructivist science recommend that school science begins with children’s own constructions of reality. This notion of the way in which students’ knowledge of science grows is closely paralleled by recent research on teachers’ knowledge. This paper draws on case study evidence of teachers’ work to show how two experienced teachers’ attempts to develop alternative ways of teaching science involved reframing their previous patterns of understanding and practice. Two alternative interpretations of the case study evidence are offered. One interpretation, which focuses on identifying gaps in the teachers’ knowledge of science teaching, leads to the constructivist paradox. The second interpretation explores the constructivist parallel, an approach which treats the process of teachers’ knowledge growth with the same respect as constructivists treat students’ learning of science. This approach, the authors argue, is not only more epistemologically consistent but also opens up the possibilities of helping teachers lead students towards a constructivist school science.

  8. Perfectionism and anxiety: a paradox in intellectual giftedness?

    PubMed

    Guignard, Jacques-Henri; Jacquet, Anne-Yvonne; Lubart, Todd I

    2012-01-01

    Numerous authors reported a prevalence of perfectionism in gifted populations. In addition, an unhealthy form of perfectionism that leads to anxiety disorder has been described. Using self-report measures (CAPS and R-CMAS) with 132 children, we hypothesized that intellectually gifted children express a higher level of perfectionism and anxiety. Our results pointed out a paradox: the gifted group obtained a higher self-oriented perfectionism score than the control group in 6th grade, but present the same level of anxiety. In contrast, the gifted group showed the same level of perfectionism than non-gifted 5(th) graders, but reported a higher anxiety level. Thus, the interplay between perfectionism and anxiety appears to be more complex than a simple linear relationship in giftedness. PMID:22859964

  9. [Paradoxical transtentorial herniation, extreme trephined syndrome sign: A case report].

    PubMed

    Narro-Donate, Jose Maria; Huete-Allut, Antonio; Escribano-Mesa, Jose A; Rodríguez-Martínez, Virginia; Contreras-Jiménez, Ascensión; Masegosa-González, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The current increasing use of decompressive craniectomy carries the implicit appearance of complications due to alterations in both intracranial pressure and in the hydrostatic-hemodynamic equilibrium. Paradoxical transtentorial herniation represents a rare manifestation, included in "trephine syndrome", extremely critical but with relatively simple treatment. We present the case of a 56-year-old woman with no interesting medical history, who, after an olfactory groove meningioma surgery, presented a haemorrhage located in the surgical area with an important oedema. The patient required a second emergency surgery without any chance of conserving the cranial vault. During the post-operational period, great neurological deterioration in orthostatic position was noticed, which resolved spontaneously in decubitus. This deficit was resolved with bone replacement afterwards. We discuss possible predisposing factors and aetiologies of this pathology. PMID:25455761

  10. Paradoxical brain embolism associated with Kimura disease mimics watershed infarction.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yasutaka; Ueno, Yuji; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Yamashiro, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ryota; Urabe, Takao; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2015-02-01

    Kimura disease (KD) is an uncommon chronic inflammatory disease presenting as subcutaneous lymphadenopathy with eosinophilia. To date, only a single case of brain embolism caused by fibroblastic endocarditis associated with KD has been reported. Watershed infarction was seen in patients with episodes of severe hypotension or cardiac surgery. We here report a young case of KD who developed ischemic stroke and showed multiple small infarcts in the border zones between the territories of major cerebral arteries, mimicking watershed infarction. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed patent foramen ovale and atrial septal aneurysm. Concurrently, deep venous thrombus in the femoral vein was found on duplex ultrasonography. Our case supports the notion that paradoxical brain embolism associated with KD can cause multiple small embolisms and mimic watershed infarction. PMID:25447210

  11. A computational approach to the twin paradox in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Kenneth K. H.; Clark, Hamish A.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Despite being a major component in the teaching of special relativity, the twin ‘paradox’ is generally not examined in courses on general relativity. Due to the complexity of analytical solutions to the problem, the paradox is often neglected entirely, and students are left with an incomplete understanding of the relativistic behaviour of time. This article outlines a project, undertaken by undergraduate physics students at the University of Sydney, in which a novel computational method was derived in order to predict the time experienced by a twin following a number of paths between two given spacetime coordinates. By utilising this method, it is possible to make clear to students that following a geodesic in curved spacetime does not always result in the greatest experienced proper time.

  12. Paradoxical pop-ups: Why are they difficult to catch?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Michael K.; Nathan, Alan M.; Bahill, A. Terry; Baldwin, David G.

    2008-08-01

    Professional baseball players occasionally find it difficult to gracefully approach seemingly routine pop-ups. We describe a set of towering pop-ups with trajectories that exhibit cusps and loops near the apex. For a normal fly ball the horizontal velocity continuously decreases due to drag caused by air resistance. For pop-ups the Magnus force is larger than the drag force. In these cases the horizontal velocity initially decreases like a normal fly ball, but after the apex, the Magnus force accelerates the horizontal motion. We refer to this class of pop-ups as paradoxical because they appear to misinform the typically robust optical control strategies used by fielders and lead to systematic vacillation in running paths, especially when a trajectory terminates near the fielder. Former major league infielders confirm that our model agrees with their experiences.

  13. Braess's paradox in oscillator networks, desynchronization and power outage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witthaut, Dirk; Timme, Marc

    2012-08-01

    Robust synchronization is essential to ensure the stable operation of many complex networked systems such as electric power grids. Increasing energy demands and more strongly distributing power sources raise the question of where to add new connection lines to the already existing grid. Here we study how the addition of individual links impacts the emergence of synchrony in oscillator networks that model power grids on coarse scales. We reveal that adding new links may not only promote but also destroy synchrony and link this counter-intuitive phenomenon to Braess's paradox known for traffic networks. We analytically uncover its underlying mechanism in an elementary grid example, trace its origin to geometric frustration in phase oscillators, and show that it generically occurs across a wide range of systems. As an important consequence, upgrading the grid requires particular care when adding new connections because some may destabilize the synchronization of the grid—and thus induce power outages.

  14. On the twin paradox in static spacetimes: I. Schwarzschild metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokołowski, Leszek M.

    2012-05-01

    Motivated by a conjecture put forward by Abramowicz and Bajtlik we reconsider the twin paradox in static spacetimes. According to a well known theorem in Lorentzian geometry the longest timelike worldline between two given points is the unique geodesic line without points conjugate to the initial point on the segment joining the two points. We calculate the proper times for static twins, for twins moving on a circular orbit (if it is a geodesic) around a centre of symmetry and for twins travelling on outgoing and ingoing radial timelike geodesics. We show that the twins on the radial geodesic worldlines are always the oldest ones and we explicitly find the the conjugate points (if they exist) outside the relevant segments. As it is of its own mathematical interest, we find general Jacobi vector fields on the geodesic lines under consideration. In the first part of the work we investigate Schwarzschild geometry.

  15. The earth as a planet - Paradigms and paradoxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The independent growth of the various branches of the earth sciences in the past two decades has led to a divergence of geophysical, geochemical, geological, and planetological models for the composition and evolution of a terrestrial planet. Evidence for differentiation and volcanism on small planets and a magma ocean on the moon contrasts with hypotheses for a mostly primitive, still undifferentiated, and homogeneous terrestrial mantle. In comparison with the moon, the earth has an extraordinarily thin crust. The geoid, which should reflect convection in the mantle, is apparently unrelated to the current distribution of continents and oceanic ridges. If the earth is deformable, the whole mantle should wander relative to the axis of rotation, but the implications of this are seldom discussed. The proposal of a mantle rich in olivine violates expectations based on evidence from extraterrestrial sources. These and other paradoxes force a reexamination of some long-held assumptions.

  16. Too similar, too different: the paradoxical dualism of psychiatric stigma

    PubMed Central

    Gergel, Tania Louise

    2014-01-01

    Challenges to psychiatric stigma fall between a rock and a hard place. Decreasing one prejudice may inadvertently increase another. Emphasising similarities between mental illness and ‘ordinary’ experience to escape the fear-related prejudices associated with the imagined ‘otherness’ of persons with mental illness risks conclusions that mental illness indicates moral weakness and the loss of any benefits of a medical model. An emphasis on illness and difference from normal experience risks a response of fear of the alien. Thus, a ‘likeness-based’ and ‘unlikeness-based’ conception of psychiatric stigma can lead to prejudices stemming from paradoxically opposing assumptions about mental illness. This may create a troubling impasse for anti-stigma campaigns. PMID:25237534

  17. Freshwater ecosystems and aquatic insects: a paradox in biological invasions.

    PubMed

    Fenoglio, Stefano; Bonada, Núria; Guareschi, Simone; López-Rodríguez, Manuel J; Millán, Andrés; Tierno de Figueroa, J Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Biological invasions have increased significantly in response to global change and constitute one of the major causes of biodiversity loss. Insects make up a large fraction of invasive species, in general, and freshwaters are among the most invaded ecosystems on our planet. However, even though aquatic insects dominate most inland waters, have unparalleled taxonomic diversity and occupy nearly all trophic niches, there are almost no invasive insects in freshwaters. We present some hypotheses regarding why aquatic insects are not common among aquatic invasive organisms, suggesting that it may be the result of a suite of biological, ecological and anthropogenic factors. Such specific knowledge introduces a paradox in the current scientific discussion on invasive species; therefore, a more in-depth understanding could be an invaluable aid to disentangling how and why biological invasions occur. PMID:27072403

  18. A proposed new approach and unified solution to old Pb paradoxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Paterno R.

    2016-05-01

    One of the most remarkable features of many and, perhaps, all oceanic basalts is that their Pb isotopic ratios (206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb) are too radiogenic to be coming from the undifferentiated mantle or bulk silicate Earth. This has created three major concerns in the behavior of U, Th and Pb in the Earth's mantle that have been termed the Pb paradoxes. These are the unexpectedly long time-integrated high U/Pb (1st paradox), long time-integrated low Th/U (2nd paradox) and constant Ce/Pb and Nb/U (3rd paradox) in the mantle sources of oceanic basalts. The origins of such unexpected ratios have been the object of intense studies that produced several highly significant, but generally individualized results during the last four decades. Detailed analysis of available data shows that the paradoxes are closely interrelated as they all pertain to the mantle and have many common characteristic features. Thus, the Pb paradoxes constitute a system of equations that must be solved all together as each solution must satisfy every equation in the system. For example, compositional data for the voluminous mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) show that the 1st and 2nd paradoxes exhibit a long time-integrated enrichment of U and the Th/U and Nb/Th ratios are also constant. A single solution to simultaneously explain the paradoxes in MORB is possible if recycled materials with variable enrichments in incompatible trace elements, particularly U and its daughter Pb* plus Nb, Ce, and Th are added to or mixed with the depleted upper mantle. Significantly, a similar binary mixing solution has been proposed for the Pb paradoxes in ocean island basalts.

  19. Ca2+ paradox injury mediated through TRPC channels in mouse ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Akiko; Kitagawa, Hirotoshi; Omatsu-Kanbe, Mariko; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Nosaka, Shuichi

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The Ca2+ paradox is an important phenomenon associated with Ca2+ overload-mediated cellular injury in myocardium. The present study was undertaken to elucidate molecular and cellular mechanisms for the development of the Ca2+ paradox. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Fluorescence imaging was performed on fluo-3 loaded quiescent mouse ventricular myocytes using confocal laser scanning microscope. KEY RESULTS The Ca2+ paradox was readily evoked by restoration of the extracellular Ca2+ following 10–20 min of nominally Ca2+-free superfusion. The Ca2+ paradox was significantly reduced by blockers of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, Gd3+, La3+) and anti-TRPC1 antibody. The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content, assessed by caffeine application, gradually declined during Ca2+-free superfusion, which was further accelerated by metabolic inhibition. Block of SR Ca2+ leak by tetracaine prevented Ca2+ paradox. The Na+/Ca2+ exchange (NCX) blocker KB-R7943 significantly inhibited Ca2+ paradox when applied throughout superfusion period, but had little effect when added for a period of 3 min before and during Ca2+ restoration. The SR Ca2+ content was better preserved during Ca2+ depletion by KB-R7943. Immunocytochemistry confirmed the expression of TRPC1, in addition to TRPC3 and TRPC4, in mouse ventricular myocytes. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These results provide evidence that (i) the Ca2+ paradox is primarily mediated by Ca2+ entry through TRPC (probably TRPC1) channels that are presumably activated by SR Ca2+ depletion; and (ii) reverse mode NCX contributes little to the Ca2+ paradox, whereas inhibition of NCX during Ca2+ depletion improves SR Ca2+ loading, and is associated with reduced incidence of Ca2+ paradox in mouse ventricular myocytes. PMID:20718730

  20. Inflammation and the paradox of racial differences in dialysis survival.

    PubMed

    Crews, Deidra C; Sozio, Stephen M; Liu, Yongmei; Coresh, Josef; Powe, Neil R

    2011-12-01

    African Americans experience a higher mortality rate and an excess burden of ESRD compared with Caucasians in the general population, but among those treated with dialysis, African Americans typically survive longer than Caucasians. We examined whether differences in inflammation may explain this paradox. We prospectively followed a national cohort of incident dialysis patients in 81 clinics for a median of 3 years (range 4 months to 9.5 years). Among 554 Caucasians and 262 African Americans, we did not detect a significant difference in median CRP between African Americans and Caucasians (3.4 versus 3.9 mg/L). Mortality was significantly lower for African Americans versus Caucasians (34% versus 56% at 5 years); the relative hazard was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.5 to 0.9) after adjusting for age, gender, dialysis modality, smoking, body mass index, diabetes, BP, cholesterol, cardiovascular disease, congestive heart failure, comorbid disease, hemoglobin, albumin, CRP, and IL-6. However, the risk varied by CRP tertile: the relative hazards for African Americans compared with Caucasians were 1.0 (95% CI, 0.7 to 1.4), 0.7 (95% CI, 0.4 to 1.3), and 0.5 (95% CI, 0.3 to 0.8) in the lowest, middle, and highest tertiles, respectively. We obtained similar results when we accounted for transplantation as a competing event, and we examined mortality across tertiles of IL-6. In summary, racial differences in survival among dialysis patients are not present at low levels of inflammation but are large at higher levels. Differences in inflammation may explain, in part, the racial paradox of ESRD survival. PMID:22021717

  1. The plea against annual influenza vaccination? 'The Hoskins' Paradox' revisited.

    PubMed

    Beyer, W E; de Bruijn, I A; Palache, A M; Westendorp, R G; Osterhaus, A D

    1998-12-01

    Three papers by Hoskins and collaborators published in The Lancet in the 70s, have been challenging the common policy to annually vaccinate people at risk with inactivated influenza virus vaccine. From an analysis of a vaccination campaign in adolescent pupils of a boarding school and four influenza outbreaks in the period 1970-76, Hoskins et al. concluded that annually repeated vaccinations would not confer protection against epidemic influenza in the long-term ('Hoskins' Paradox'). A review of the papers revealed, however, that most of the study subjects were not consequently vaccinated every year and that most of the presented data were, therefore, not relevant for the problem of annually repeated influenza vaccination. When applying strict definitions of single vaccination (immunised immediately prior to the epidemic, but not in the years before) and multiple vaccination (immunised immediately prior to the epidemic, and also in the year(s) before), only two of four epidemics (A/England/42/72 (H3N2) in 1972/73 and A/Port Chalmers/1/73 (H3N2) in 1973/74) could be evaluated: in one case, no negative effect of repeated vaccination could be detected, in the second case, the attack rate difference between groups with single and multiple vaccination was of borderline significance. Data on two other epidemics (B/Hong Kong/8/73 in 1973/74 and A/Victoria/3/75 (H3N2) in 1975/76) could not be interpreted because of incomplete vaccination strategies. In conclusion, Hoskins' Paradox cannot be substantiated by Hoskins' own data. Considering other published data on the subject, it is suggested that no negative effect of annually repeated vaccination on protection against epidemic influenza exists. PMID:9796045

  2. Water-Nafion equilibria. absence of Schroeder's paradox.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Lisa M; Prausnitz, John M; Newman, John

    2007-08-30

    Water-Nafion phase equilibria and proton conductivities were measured in two ways. First, Nafion was in contact with saturated water vapor. Second, Nafion was in contact with liquid water at the same temperature. At 29 degrees C, for preboiled, vapor-equilibrated Nafion exposed to water with an activity = 1 and air pressures ranging from 0 to 0.96 bar, the water content was lambda = 23 +/- 1 mol H(2)O/mol SO3-. For the preboiled, liquid-equilibrated membrane, lambda = 24 +/- 2. At 100% relative humidity (RH), the water content of preboiled Nafion decreased as the temperature rose from 30 to 80 degrees C but did not recover its initial water content when the temperature returned to 30 degrees C. The water content of predried Nafion at 1 atm and 30 degrees C was lambda = 13.7 +/- 0.2 when vapor-equilibrated and lambda = 13.1 +/- 0.5 when liquid-equilibrated. A Nafion membrane originally boiled in water had much higher liquid- and 100% RH vapor-equilibrated proton conductivities than the same membrane originally dried at 110 degrees C with a RH less than 2%. The liquid-equilibrated and 100% RH vapor-equilibrated membrane conductivities were the same when the membrane had the same thermal history. The conductivity data was fit to a model, and the water content was determined at different temperatures. The predried membrane water content increased with temperature, and the preboiled membrane's water content changed slightly with temperature. Both water sorption and proton-conductivity data do not exhibit Schroeder's paradox. These studies and previous results suggest that Schroeder's paradox is resolved when attention is given to the thermal history of the absorbing polymer. PMID:17685645

  3. Astrobiological Phase Transition: Towards Resolution of Fermi's Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćirković, Milan M.; Vukotić, Branislav

    2008-12-01

    Can astrophysics explain Fermi’s paradox or the “Great Silence” problem? If available, such explanation would be advantageous over most of those suggested in literature which rely on unverifiable cultural and/or sociological assumptions. We suggest, instead, a general astrobiological paradigm which might offer a physical and empirically testable paradox resolution. Based on the idea of James Annis, we develop a model of an astrobiological phase transition of the Milky Way, based on the concept of the global regulation mechanism(s). The dominant regulation mechanisms, arguably, are γ-ray bursts, whose properties and cosmological evolution are becoming well-understood. Secular evolution of regulation mechanisms leads to the brief epoch of phase transition: from an essentially dead place, with pockets of low-complexity life restricted to planetary surfaces, it will, on a short (Fermi-Hart) timescale, become filled with high-complexity life. An observation selection effect explains why we are not, in spite of the very small prior probability, to be surprised at being located in that brief phase of disequilibrium. In addition, we show that, although the phase-transition model may explain the “Great Silence”, it is not supportive of the “contact pessimist” position. To the contrary, the phase-transition model offers a rational motivation for continuation and extension of our present-day Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI) endeavours. Some of the unequivocal and testable predictions of our model include the decrease of extinction risk in the history of terrestrial life, the absence of any traces of Galactic societies significantly older than human society, complete lack of any extragalactic intelligent signals or phenomena, and the presence of ubiquitous low-complexity life in the Milky Way.

  4. Paradoxical Roles of Antioxidant Enzymes: Basic Mechanisms and Health Implications.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xin Gen; Zhu, Jian-Hong; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Bao, Yongping; Ho, Ye-Shih; Reddi, Amit R; Holmgren, Arne; Arnér, Elias S J

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are generated from aerobic metabolism, as a result of accidental electron leakage as well as regulated enzymatic processes. Because ROS/RNS can induce oxidative injury and act in redox signaling, enzymes metabolizing them will inherently promote either health or disease, depending on the physiological context. It is thus misleading to consider conventionally called antioxidant enzymes to be largely, if not exclusively, health protective. Because such a notion is nonetheless common, we herein attempt to rationalize why this simplistic view should be avoided. First we give an updated summary of physiological phenotypes triggered in mouse models of overexpression or knockout of major antioxidant enzymes. Subsequently, we focus on a series of striking cases that demonstrate "paradoxical" outcomes, i.e., increased fitness upon deletion of antioxidant enzymes or disease triggered by their overexpression. We elaborate mechanisms by which these phenotypes are mediated via chemical, biological, and metabolic interactions of the antioxidant enzymes with their substrates, downstream events, and cellular context. Furthermore, we propose that novel treatments of antioxidant enzyme-related human diseases may be enabled by deliberate targeting of dual roles of the pertaining enzymes. We also discuss the potential of "antioxidant" nutrients and phytochemicals, via regulating the expression or function of antioxidant enzymes, in preventing, treating, or aggravating chronic diseases. We conclude that "paradoxical" roles of antioxidant enzymes in physiology, health, and disease derive from sophisticated molecular mechanisms of redox biology and metabolic homeostasis. Simply viewing antioxidant enzymes as always being beneficial is not only conceptually misleading but also clinically hazardous if such notions underpin medical treatment protocols based on modulation of redox pathways. PMID:26681794

  5. Confronting the Paradox of Enrichment to the Metacommunity Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hauzy, Céline; Nadin, Grégoire; Canard, Elsa; Gounand, Isabelle; Mouquet, Nicolas; Ebenman, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Resource enrichment can potentially destabilize predator-prey dynamics. This phenomenon historically referred as the "paradox of enrichment" has mostly been explored in spatially homogenous environments. However, many predator-prey communities exchange organisms within spatially heterogeneous networks called metacommunities. This heterogeneity can result from uneven distribution of resources among communities and thus can lead to the spreading of local enrichment within metacommunities. Here, we adapted the original Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey model, built to study the paradox of enrichment, to investigate the effect of regional enrichment and of its spatial distribution on predator-prey dynamics in metacommunities. We found that the potential for destabilization was depending on the connectivity among communities and the spatial distribution of enrichment. In one hand, we found that at low dispersal regional enrichment led to the destabilization of predator-prey dynamics. This destabilizing effect was more pronounced when the enrichment was uneven among communities. In the other hand, we found that high dispersal could stabilize the predator-prey dynamics when the enrichment was spatially heterogeneous. Our results illustrate that the destabilizing effect of enrichment can be dampened when the spatial scale of resource enrichment is lower than that of organismss movements (heterogeneous enrichment). From a conservation perspective, our results illustrate that spatial heterogeneity could decrease the regional extinction risk of species involved in specialized trophic interactions. From the perspective of biological control, our results show that the heterogeneous distribution of pest resource could favor or dampen outbreaks of pests and of their natural enemies, depending on the spatial scale of heterogeneity. PMID:24358242

  6. Confronting the paradox of enrichment to the metacommunity perspective.

    PubMed

    Hauzy, Céline; Nadin, Grégoire; Canard, Elsa; Gounand, Isabelle; Mouquet, Nicolas; Ebenman, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Resource enrichment can potentially destabilize predator-prey dynamics. This phenomenon historically referred as the "paradox of enrichment" has mostly been explored in spatially homogenous environments. However, many predator-prey communities exchange organisms within spatially heterogeneous networks called metacommunities. This heterogeneity can result from uneven distribution of resources among communities and thus can lead to the spreading of local enrichment within metacommunities. Here, we adapted the original Rosenzweig-MacArthur predator-prey model, built to study the paradox of enrichment, to investigate the effect of regional enrichment and of its spatial distribution on predator-prey dynamics in metacommunities. We found that the potential for destabilization was depending on the connectivity among communities and the spatial distribution of enrichment. In one hand, we found that at low dispersal regional enrichment led to the destabilization of predator-prey dynamics. This destabilizing effect was more pronounced when the enrichment was uneven among communities. In the other hand, we found that high dispersal could stabilize the predator-prey dynamics when the enrichment was spatially heterogeneous. Our results illustrate that the destabilizing effect of enrichment can be dampened when the spatial scale of resource enrichment is lower than that of organismss movements (heterogeneous enrichment). From a conservation perspective, our results illustrate that spatial heterogeneity could decrease the regional extinction risk of species involved in specialized trophic interactions. From the perspective of biological control, our results show that the heterogeneous distribution of pest resource could favor or dampen outbreaks of pests and of their natural enemies, depending on the spatial scale of heterogeneity. PMID:24358242

  7. The noradrenergic paradox: implications in the management of depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Alonso; Bruins, Robert; Katzman, Martin A; Blier, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Both major depressive disorder and the anxiety disorders are major causes of disability and markedly contribute to a significant global burden of the disease worldwide. In part because of the significant socioeconomic burden associated with these disorders, theories have been developed to specifically build clinical treatment approaches. One such theory, the monoaminergic hypothesis, has led to the development of several generations of selective and nonselective inhibitors of transporters of serotonin and norepinephrine, with the goal of augmenting monoaminergic transmission. These efforts have led to considerable success in the development of antidepressant therapeutics. However, there is a strong correlation between enhanced noradrenergic activity and fear and anxiety. Consequently, some physicians have expressed concerns that the same enhanced noradrenergic activity that alleviates depression could also promote anxiety. The fact that the serotonergic and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors are successfully used in the treatment of anxiety and panic disorders seems paradoxical. This review was undertaken to determine if any clinical evidence exists to show that serotonergic and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors can cause anxiety. The PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, and the results limited to randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies performed in nongeriatric adults and with clear outcome measures were reported. Based on these criteria, a total of 52 studies were examined. Patients in these studies suffered from depression or anxiety disorders (generalized and social anxiety disorders, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder). The large majority of these studies employed venlafaxine or duloxetine, and the remainder used tri-cyclic antidepressants, atomoxetine, or reboxetine. All the studies reported clinically significant alleviation of depressive and/or anxious symptoms by these therapeutics. In none of these

  8. The noradrenergic paradox: implications in the management of depression and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Alonso; Bruins, Robert; Katzman, Martin A; Blier, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Both major depressive disorder and the anxiety disorders are major causes of disability and markedly contribute to a significant global burden of the disease worldwide. In part because of the significant socioeconomic burden associated with these disorders, theories have been developed to specifically build clinical treatment approaches. One such theory, the monoaminergic hypothesis, has led to the development of several generations of selective and nonselective inhibitors of transporters of serotonin and norepinephrine, with the goal of augmenting monoaminergic transmission. These efforts have led to considerable success in the development of antidepressant therapeutics. However, there is a strong correlation between enhanced noradrenergic activity and fear and anxiety. Consequently, some physicians have expressed concerns that the same enhanced noradrenergic activity that alleviates depression could also promote anxiety. The fact that the serotonergic and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors are successfully used in the treatment of anxiety and panic disorders seems paradoxical. This review was undertaken to determine if any clinical evidence exists to show that serotonergic and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors can cause anxiety. The PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, and the results limited to randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies performed in nongeriatric adults and with clear outcome measures were reported. Based on these criteria, a total of 52 studies were examined. Patients in these studies suffered from depression or anxiety disorders (generalized and social anxiety disorders, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder). The large majority of these studies employed venlafaxine or duloxetine, and the remainder used tri-cyclic antidepressants, atomoxetine, or reboxetine. All the studies reported clinically significant alleviation of depressive and/or anxious symptoms by these therapeutics. In none of these

  9. e-Health in the Age of Paradox: A Position Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIver, William

    This position paper examines a critical paradox in e-health: there is a striking gap between critical information services for health care that can be implemented today using existing in information and communication technologies and those services that are actually available. Facets of this paradox are examined in the context of Canadian analyses and policy, advanced research on health care reform, and current technological developments. Hypothetical scenarios are employed as a means of discussing the paradox and, ultimately, of describing potential solutions that are feasible now.

  10. A joint analysis of the Drake equation and the Fermi paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prantzos, Nikos

    2013-07-01

    I propose a unified framework for a joint analysis of the Drake equation and the Fermi paradox, which enables a simultaneous, quantitative study of both of them. The analysis is based on a simplified form of the Drake equation and on a fairly simple scheme for the colonization of the Milky Way. It appears that for sufficiently long-lived civilizations, colonization of the Galaxy is the only reasonable option to gain knowledge about other life forms. This argument allows one to define a region in the parameter space of the Drake equation, where the Fermi paradox definitely holds (`Strong Fermi paradox').

  11. 'Obesity paradox' misunderstands the biology of optimal weight throughout the life cycle.

    PubMed

    Dixon, J B; Egger, G J; Finkelstein, E A; Kral, J G; Lambert, G W

    2015-01-01

    The 'obesity paradox' refers to observations that run counter to the thesis that normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 g/m(2)) provides the lowest mortality and higher weight is associated with greater mortality. We argue that the weight of lowest mortality is influenced by aging and chronic disease, with mortality advantage extending into the overweight and even class I obese ranges under some circumstances. A focus on quality nutrition, physical activity, fitness, and maintaining function in these weight ranges may be preferable to a focus on intentional weight loss, which has uncertain effects. The 'obesity paradox' is no 'paradox' if one defines and interprets 'ideal' weight appropriately. PMID:24732145

  12. The faint young Sun paradox: an observational test of an alternative solar model.

    PubMed

    Gaidos, E J; Gudel, M; Blake, G A

    2000-02-15

    We report the results of deep observations at radio (3.6 cm) wavelengths of the nearby solar-type star pi 01 Ursa Majoris with the Very Large Array (VLA) intended to test an alternative theory of solar luminosity evolution. The standard model predicts a solar luminosity only 75% of the present value and surface temperatures below freezing on Earth and Mars at 4 Ga, seemingly in conflict with geologic evidence for liquid water on these planets. An alternative model invokes a compensatory mass loss through a declining solar wind that results in a more consistent early luminosity. The free-free emission from an enhanced wind around nearby young Sun-like stars should be detectable at microwave frequencies. Our observations of pi 01 UMa, a 300 million year-old solar-mass star, place an upper limit on the mass loss rate of 4-5 x 10(-11) M(solar) yr-1. Total mass loss from such a star over 4 Gyr would be less than 6%. If this star is indeed an analog of the early Sun, it casts doubt on the alternative model as a solution to the faint young Sun paradox, particularly for Mars. PMID:11543273

  13. Paradox of the drinking-straw model of the butterfly proboscis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chen-Chih; Monaenkova, Daria; Beard, Charles E; Adler, Peter H; Kornev, Konstantin G

    2014-06-15

    Fluid-feeding Lepidoptera use an elongated proboscis, conventionally modeled as a drinking straw, to feed from pools and films of liquid. Using the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus (Linnaeus), we show that the inherent structural features of the lepidopteran proboscis contradict the basic assumptions of the drinking-straw model. By experimentally characterizing permeability and flow in the proboscis, we show that tapering of the food canal in the drinking region increases resistance, significantly hindering the flow of fluid. The calculated pressure differential required for a suction pump to support flow along the entire proboscis is greater than 1 atm (~101 kPa) when the butterfly feeds from a pool of liquid. We suggest that behavioral strategies employed by butterflies and moths can resolve this paradoxical pressure anomaly. Butterflies can alter the taper, the interlegular spacing and the terminal opening of the food canal, thereby controlling fluid entry and flow, by splaying the galeal tips apart, sliding the galeae along one another, pulsing hemolymph into each galeal lumen, and pressing the proboscis against a substrate. Thus, although physical construction of the proboscis limits its mechanical capabilities, its functionality can be modified and enhanced by behavioral strategies. PMID:24920837

  14. The faint young Sun paradox: an observational test of an alternative solar model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaidos, E. J.; Gudel, M.; Blake, G. A.

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of deep observations at radio (3.6 cm) wavelengths of the nearby solar-type star pi 01 Ursa Majoris with the Very Large Array (VLA) intended to test an alternative theory of solar luminosity evolution. The standard model predicts a solar luminosity only 75% of the present value and surface temperatures below freezing on Earth and Mars at 4 Ga, seemingly in conflict with geologic evidence for liquid water on these planets. An alternative model invokes a compensatory mass loss through a declining solar wind that results in a more consistent early luminosity. The free-free emission from an enhanced wind around nearby young Sun-like stars should be detectable at microwave frequencies. Our observations of pi 01 UMa, a 300 million year-old solar-mass star, place an upper limit on the mass loss rate of 4-5 x 10(-11) M(solar) yr-1. Total mass loss from such a star over 4 Gyr would be less than 6%. If this star is indeed an analog of the early Sun, it casts doubt on the alternative model as a solution to the faint young Sun paradox, particularly for Mars.

  15. The effectiveness of conservation interventions to overcome the urban-environmental paradox.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Robert I

    2015-10-01

    Globally, urbanization is rapidly growing cities and towns at a historically unprecedented rate, and this rapid urban growth is influencing many facets of the environment. This paper reviews the effectiveness of conservation interventions that are designed to increase urban sustainability. It presents evidence for an apparent urban-environmental paradox: while the process of urban growth converts natural habitat to other land covers and degrades natural resources and ecosystem function, the increase in human population can increase demand for natural resources and ecosystem services. The fundamental problem that many conservation interventions try to address is that most facets of the environment are common or public goods, and are hence undervalued in decision making (market failure). The paper presents a threefold classification of conservation interventions in cities: conservation in the city (protecting biodiversity), conservation by the city (reducing per capita resource and energy use), and conservation for cities (projects that maintain or enhance ecosystem services). It ends by discussing methods for spatially targeting conservation interventions of all three types and for quantifying the effectiveness of interventions retrospectively. PMID:25845289

  16. The paradox of chronic neuroinflammation, systemic immune suppression, autoimmunity after traumatic chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Jan M; Zhang, Yi; Kopp, Marcel A; Brommer, Benedikt; Popovich, Phillip G

    2014-08-01

    During the transition from acute to chronic stages of recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), there is an evolving state of immunologic dysfunction that exacerbates the problems associated with the more clinically obvious neurologic deficits. Since injury directly affects cells embedded within the "immune privileged/specialized" milieu of the spinal cord, maladaptive or inefficient responses are likely to occur. Collectively, these responses qualify as part of the continuum of "SCI disease" and are important therapeutic targets to improve neural repair and neurological outcome. Generic immune suppressive therapies have been largely unsuccessful, mostly because inflammation and immunity exert both beneficial (plasticity enhancing) and detrimental (e.g. glia- and neurodegenerative; secondary damage) effects and these functions change over time. Moreover, "compartimentalized" investigations, limited to only intraspinal inflammation and associated cellular or molecular changes in the spinal cord, neglect the reality that the structure and function of the CNS are influenced by systemic immune challenges and that the immune system is 'hardwired' into the nervous system. Here, we consider this interplay during the progression from acute to chronic SCI. Specifically, we survey impaired/non-resolving intraspinal inflammation and the paradox of systemic inflammatory responses in the context of ongoing chronic immune suppression and autoimmunity. The concepts of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) and "neurogenic" spinal cord injury-induced immune depression syndrome (SCI-IDS) are discussed as determinants of impaired "host-defense" and trauma-induced autoimmunity. PMID:25017893

  17. Paradoxical Contribution of SK3 and GIRK Channels to the Activation of Mouse Vomeronasal Organ

    PubMed Central

    Kim, SangSeong; Ma, Limei; Jensen, Kristi L.; Kim, Michelle M.; Bond, Chris T.; Adelman, John P.; Yu, C. Ron

    2012-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) plays an essential role in intraspecies communication for terrestrial vertebrates. The ionic mechanisms of VNO activation remain unclear. We find that the calcium–activated potassium channel SK3 and G–protein activated potassium channel GIRK are part of an independent pathway for VNO activation. In slice preparations, the potassium channels attenuate inward currents carried by TRPC2 and calcium–activated chloride channels (CACCs). In intact tissue preparations, paradoxically, the potassium channels enhance urine–evoked inward currents. This discrepancy results from the loss of a high concentration of lumenal potassium, which enables the influx of potassium ions to depolarize the VNO neurons in vivo. SK3−/− and GIRK1−/− mice show deficits in both mating and aggressive behaviors and deficiency in SK3−/− is exacerbated by TRPC2 knockout. Our results suggest a model of VNO activation that is mediated by TRPC2, CACCs and two potassium channels, all contributing to the in vivo depolarization of VNO neurons. PMID:22842147

  18. Hydrogen-bond memory and water-skin supersolidity resolving the Mpemba paradox.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Huang, Yongli; Ma, Zengsheng; Zhou, Yichun; Zhou, Ji; Zheng, Weitao; Jiang, Qing; Sun, Chang Q

    2014-11-14

    The Mpemba paradox, that is, hotter water freezes faster than colder water, has baffled thinkers like Francis Bacon, René Descartes, and Aristotle since B.C. 350. However, a commonly accepted understanding or theoretical reproduction of this effect remains challenging. Numerical reproduction of observations, shown herewith, confirms that water skin supersolidity [Zhang et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., DOI: ] enhances the local thermal diffusivity favoring heat flowing outwardly in the liquid path. Analysis of experimental database reveals that the hydrogen bond (O:H-O) possesses memory to emit energy at a rate depending on its initial storage. Unlike other usual materials that lengthen and soften all bonds when they absorb thermal energy, water performs abnormally under heating to lengthen the O:H nonbond and shorten the H-O covalent bond through inter-oxygen Coulomb coupling [Sun et al., J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 2013, 4, 3238]. Cooling does the opposite to release energy, like releasing a coupled pair of bungees, at a rate of history dependence. Being sensitive to the source volume, skin radiation, and the drain temperature, the Mpemba effect proceeds only in the strictly non-adiabatic 'source-path-drain' cycling system for the heat "emission-conduction-dissipation" dynamics with a relaxation time that drops exponentially with the rise of the initial temperature of the liquid source. PMID:25253165

  19. Paradoxical contribution of SK3 and GIRK channels to the activation of mouse vomeronasal organ.

    PubMed

    Kim, SangSeong; Ma, Limei; Jensen, Kristi L; Kim, Michelle M; Bond, Chris T; Adelman, John P; Yu, C Ron

    2012-09-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is essential for intraspecies communication in many terrestrial vertebrates. The ionic mechanisms of VNO activation remain unclear. We found that the calcium-activated potassium channel SK3 and the G protein-activated potassium channel GIRK are part of an independent pathway for VNO activation. In slice preparations, the potassium channels attenuated inward currents carried by TRPC2 and calcium-activated chloride channels (CACCs). In intact tissue preparations, paradoxically, the potassium channels enhanced urine-evoked inward currents. This discrepancy resulted from the loss of a high concentration of lumenal potassium, which enabled the influx of potassium ions to depolarize the VNO neurons in vivo. Both Sk3 (also known as Kcnn3) and Girk1 (also known as Kcnj3) homozygous null mice showed deficits in mating and aggressive behaviors, and the deficiencies in Sk3(-/-) mice were exacerbated by Trpc2 knockout. Our results suggest that VNO activation is mediated by TRPC2, CACCs and two potassium channels, all of which contributed to the in vivo depolarization of VNO neurons. PMID:22842147

  20. Carotid artery free-floating thrombus caused by paradoxical embolization from greater saphenous vein ascending thrombophlebitis.

    PubMed

    Irace, Luigi; Gabrielli, Roberto; Rosati, Maria Sofia; Giannoni, Maria Fabrizia; Castiglione, Anna; Laurito, Antonella; Gossetti, Bruno

    2013-05-01

    Stroke of unknown origin in young patients is seen to be closely correlated with patent foramen ovale (PFO) than stroke in patients with established stroke mechanisms. We report a case of a young woman without cardiovascular risk factors who was admitted to our emergency department with listlessness and altered mental status. The clinical examination revealed right lower limb swelling. Magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scans revealed a free floating thrombus of the left internal carotid artery (ICA) with a large bilateral frontal ischemic lesion. The diagnosis of a medium-sized PFO with moderate right-to-left contrast shunting was made after transesophageal echocardiography. No other cardiac sources for embolization were detected, while an ascending thrombophlebitis of the right greater saphenous vein was detected by venous Doppler ultrasonography. These findings support the diagnosis of ICA free-floating thrombus caused by paradoxical embolization (via the PFO) of clot from the greater saphenous vein. The patient underwent emergency saphenofemoral disconnection with femoral vein thrombectomy and subsequently carotid artery thrombectomy under general anesthesia. No carotid atheromatous wall lesions were detected at surgical exploration; no immunologic pathology, hypercoagulable status, or malignancy were recorded. No hemorrhagic cerebral complications were observed in the postoperative period, and the patient had an improvement of her neurologic status (a reduction of the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score from 7 to 3). Her recovery was uneventful. The patient was transferred for rehabilitation on postoperative day 5 with oral anticoagulation. Six-month ultrasound follow-up revealed deep and superficial venous system and carotid artery patency. The patient was asymptomatic and anticoagulation was discontinued. Paradoxical cerebral embolization through a PFO is a rare phenomenon that, in our patient, appeared to have

  1. Moderate red wine consumption and cardiovascular disease risk: beyond the "French paradox".

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Targher, Giovanni

    2010-02-01

    The term FRENCH PARADOX was coined in 1992 to describe the relatively low incidence of cardiovascular disease in the French population, despite a relatively high dietary intake of saturated fats, and potentially attributable to the consumption of red wine. After nearly 20 years, several studies have investigated the fascinating, overwhelmingly positive biological and clinical associations of red wine consumption with cardiovascular disease and mortality. Light to moderate intake of red wine produces a kaleidoscope of potentially beneficial effects that target all phases of the atherosclerotic process, from atherogenesis (early plaque development and growth) to vessel occlusion (flow-mediated dilatation, thrombosis). Such beneficial effects involve cellular signaling mechanisms, interactions at the genomic level, and biochemical modifications of cellular and plasma components. Red wine components, especially alcohol, resveratrol, and other polyphenolic compounds, may decrease oxidative stress, enhance cholesterol efflux from vessel walls (mainly by increasing levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), and inhibit lipoproteins oxidation, macrophage cholesterol accumulation, and foam-cell formation. These components may also increase nitric oxide bioavailability, thereby antagonizing the development of endothelial dysfunction, decrease blood viscosity, improve insulin sensitivity, counteract platelet hyperactivity, inhibit platelet adhesion to fibrinogen-coated surfaces, and decrease plasma levels of von Willebrand factor, fibrinogen, and coagulation factor VII. Light to moderate red wine consumption is also associated with a favorable genetic modulation of fibrinolytic proteins, ultimately increasing the surface-localized endothelial cell fibrinolysis. Overall, therefore, the "French paradox" may have its basis within a milieu containing several key molecules, so that favorable cardiovascular benefits might be primarily attributable to combined, additive, or

  2. [Meta-cognitive beliefs about thought suppression and associated paradoxical effects].

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yosuke; Honma, Yoshiko; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the contents of meta-cognitive beliefs about thought suppression and to investigate the relationship between these beliefs and the paradoxical effects of thought suppression. In Study 1, we developed a scale measuring the endorsement of meta-cognitive beliefs about thought suppression. This measure, the Meta-cognitive Beliefs about Thought Suppression Questionnaire (BTQ, has four subscales: Distraction, Paradoxical Effect, Regret, and Promotion of Concentration. In Study 2 and Study 3, the BTQ showed sufficient criterion-related validity and test-retest reliability. In Study 4, we conducted an experiment to investigate the relationship between meta-cognitive beliefs about thought suppression and its paradoxical eftects. Results showed that the Paradoxical Effect subscale score significantly predicted the number of intrusive thoughts during thought suppression. The development process of meta-cognitive beliefs about thought suppression and implications for research about cognitive control are discussed. PMID:25486842

  3. [Meta-cognitive beliefs about thought suppression and associated paradoxical effects].

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yosuke; Honma, Yoshiko; Tanno, Yoshihiko

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the contents of meta-cognitive beliefs about thought suppression and to investigate the relationship between these beliefs and the paradoxical effects of thought suppression. In Study 1, we developed a scale measuring the endorsement of meta-cognitive beliefs about thought suppression. This measure, the Meta-cognitive Beliefs about Thought Suppression Questionnaire (BTQ, has four subscales: Distraction, Paradoxical Effect, Regret, and Promotion of Concentration. In Study 2 and Study 3, the BTQ showed sufficient criterion-related validity and test-retest reliability. In Study 4, we conducted an experiment to investigate the relationship between meta-cognitive beliefs about thought suppression and its paradoxical eftects. Results showed that the Paradoxical Effect subscale score significantly predicted the number of intrusive thoughts during thought suppression. The development process of meta-cognitive beliefs about thought suppression and implications for research about cognitive control are discussed. PMID:25508973

  4. Vavilov's Paradox: On Paper, It's a Violation of the Energy Conservation Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabrikant, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the energy flux-density of two beams of light of equal energy that are intersected at a given angle. Examines an apparent contradiction to the physics law of conservation of energy known as Vavilov's paradox. (MDH)

  5. Quantum measurements and macrophysical reality: Epistemological implications of a proposed paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarozzi, G.

    1996-07-01

    After an outline of the macrorealistic solutions to the difficulties of the measurement theory, a new paradox is proposed and then discussed in the light of three different interpretations of quantum mechanics.

  6. Paradoxical response preceding control of Scedosporium apiospermum mycetoma with posaconazole treatment.

    PubMed

    Béraud, Guillaume; Desbois, Nicole; Coyo, Caroline; Quist, Danièle; Rozé, Benoit; Savorit, Luc; Cabié, André

    2015-01-01

    Mycetoma is a chronic granulomatous infection that is difficult to treat, notably when due to fungi such as Scedosporium apiospermum. Recent antifungal agents could be an option, but cases are rarely reported, and none with posaconazole. Paradoxical responses, defined as initial clinical worsening despite appropriate treatment, are common in tuberculosis but rare in deep mycoses in non-immunocompromised hosts. Hence, paradoxical responses in context other than mycobacterial infection in an immunocompromised host could provide insights into the pathophysiology and the optimal strategy for treatment. We report the first case of a mycetoma caused by S. apiospermum with bone involvement treated with posaconazole, and the paradoxical response observed at the beginning of the treatment. As with mycobacterial infections, a paradoxical response in deep mycosis could represent the earliest marker of therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26114987

  7. Paradoxical Personality and Academic Achievement in College Students From Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Freiberg Hoffmann, Agustín; Fernández Liporace, María Mercedes

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a study on paradoxical personality, defined as a distinctive feature in creative persons, developed with 350 college students from Buenos Aires. Goals aimed at describing and analysing possible significant differences of paradoxical traits in students from diverse majors representing seven different fields of study, and examining the relationship between each bipolar trait and academic achievement. The sample was composed of 7 groups (n = 50 by group) representing fields of study typically offered in public universities, Biology, Computer Science, Engineering, Law, Nutrition, Psychology, and History of Art. Analyses by career provided descriptive information about students of these majors, concerning their paradoxical personality profiles. Correlational studies verified significant associations between academic achievement and most paradoxical traits in majors such as Computer Science, Nutrition and Psychology. Results are discussed regarding practical outcomes and teaching programs. PMID:27247680

  8. The paradox of the contented working woman in intercollegiate athletics administration.

    PubMed

    Parks, J B; Russell, R L; Wood, P H; Roberton, M A; Shewokis, P A

    1995-03-01

    We investigated the paradox of the contented working woman among middle and first-line intercollegiate athletics administrators. In this paradox, women report lower salaries than men but express comparable job satisfaction. The sample comprised 143 women and 371 men in 106 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I-A institutions. Job satisfaction was measured with the Job Descriptive Index (Smith, Kendall & Hulin, 1969) and Job in General (Ironson, Smith, Brannick, Gibson & Paul, 1989) scales. Analyses revealed the existence of the paradox: Women were paid significantly less, but were equally satisfied with their jobs. Neither gender was satisfied with promotion opportunities or pay, but both were highly satisfied with their jobs in general--another apparent paradox. The disproportionate number of male respondents raised questions about gender equity in athletics administration. PMID:7777698

  9. Generalized friendship paradox in complex networks: The case of scientific collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Jo, Hang-Hyun

    2014-04-01

    The friendship paradox states that your friends have on average more friends than you have. Does the paradox ``hold'' for other individual characteristics like income or happiness? To address this question, we generalize the friendship paradox for arbitrary node characteristics in complex networks. By analyzing two coauthorship networks of Physical Review journals and Google Scholar profiles, we find that the generalized friendship paradox (GFP) holds at the individual and network levels for various characteristics, including the number of coauthors, the number of citations, and the number of publications. The origin of the GFP is shown to be rooted in positive correlations between degree and characteristics. As a fruitful application of the GFP, we suggest effective and efficient sampling methods for identifying high characteristic nodes in large-scale networks. Our study on the GFP can shed lights on understanding the interplay between network structure and node characteristics in complex networks.

  10. Paradoxical signaling by a secreted molecule leads to homeostasis of cell levels.

    PubMed

    Hart, Yuval; Reich-Zeliger, Shlomit; Antebi, Yaron E; Zaretsky, Irina; Mayo, Avraham E; Alon, Uri; Friedman, Nir

    2014-08-28

    A widespread feature of extracellular signaling in cell circuits is paradoxical pleiotropy: the same secreted signaling molecule can induce opposite effects in the responding cells. For example, the cytokine IL-2 can promote proliferation and death of T cells. The role of such paradoxical signaling remains unclear. To address this, we studied CD4(+) T cell expansion in culture. We found that cells with a 30-fold difference in initial concentrations reached a homeostatic concentration nearly independent of initial cell levels. Below an initial threshold, cell density decayed to extinction (OFF-state). We show that these dynamics relate to the paradoxical effect of IL-2, which increases the proliferation rate cooperatively and the death rate linearly. Mathematical modeling explained the observed cell and cytokine dynamics and predicted conditions that shifted cell fate from homeostasis to the OFF-state. We suggest that paradoxical signaling provides cell circuits with specific dynamical features that are robust to environmental perturbations. PMID:25171404

  11. Paradoxical Personality and Academic Achievement in College Students From Buenos Aires

    PubMed Central

    Freiberg Hoffmann, Agustín; Fernández Liporace, María Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study on paradoxical personality, defined as a distinctive feature in creative persons, developed with 350 college students from Buenos Aires. Goals aimed at describing and analysing possible significant differences of paradoxical traits in students from diverse majors representing seven different fields of study, and examining the relationship between each bipolar trait and academic achievement. The sample was composed of 7 groups (n = 50 by group) representing fields of study typically offered in public universities, Biology, Computer Science, Engineering, Law, Nutrition, Psychology, and History of Art. Analyses by career provided descriptive information about students of these majors, concerning their paradoxical personality profiles. Correlational studies verified significant associations between academic achievement and most paradoxical traits in majors such as Computer Science, Nutrition and Psychology. Results are discussed regarding practical outcomes and teaching programs. PMID:27247680

  12. Self-awareness, deindividuation, and social identity: unraveling theoretical paradoxes by filling empirical lacunae.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Brian; Migdal, Michael J; Rozell, Drew

    2003-09-01

    In an effort to examine paradoxes involving self-awareness, deindividuation, and social identity, this article reports the results of a study that examines the effects of a range of manipulation operationalizations of self and social identity on a complement of measurement operationalizations of self and social identity. Specifically, participants completed measures of self-awareness and ethnic social identity while confronted with their mirror image, while wearing a mask, or while exposed to a family tree delineating their ethnicity. Patterns of mean levels of self-awareness and ethnic social identity are used to examine the paradox of depersonalization and deindividuation, the paradox of (a)symmetrical activation of components of identity, and the paradox of deindividuation and the search for identity. Discussion considers the limitations of this approach and considers the implications of these results for the long-standing study of the interplay between self and social identity. PMID:15189604

  13. Stishovite paradox in genesis of the superdeep diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvin, Yuriy

    2013-04-01

    Stishovite was experimentally discovered [1] as high-density polymorph of SiO2 stable at 9 - 50 GPa. A paradoxical paragenesis of stishovite and magnesiowustite (Mg,Fe)O was disclosed among primary inclusions in lower-mantle superdeep diamonds [2]. This contradicts to a common knowledge that SiO2 and MgO paragenesis is forbidden for low-pressure SiO2 polymorphs - quartz and coesite. The "stishovite paradox" does not manifest itself in the lower mantle ultrabasic compositions as is seen from experimental pyrolite assembly magnesiowustite+Mg-perovskite+Ca-perovskite at 50 GPa. In basic basalt composition stishovite is formed together with Ca-perovskite, Mg-perovskite and Al-bearing phases under the lower mantle PT-parameters [3]. In this case stishovite is taken as product of oceanic basalt subducted into lower mantle, but not in situ lower-mantle primary mineral. Paragenesis of stishovite and superdeep diamond has opened up fresh opportunity for detailed study. Magnesiowustite (Mg,Fe)O inclusions in superdeep diamonds are characterized by a wide variation of FeO content between 10 and 64 mol. % [2]. It is interesting that ringwoodite (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 solid solutions are decomposed into Mg-perovskite (Mg,Fe)SiO3 + magnesiowustite (Mg,Fe)O + SiO2 (within 30 - 42 mol. % Fe2SiO4) and magnesiowustite + stishovite (within 42 - 100 mol. % Fe2SiO4). Based on experimental data, melting phase diagram of MgO - SiO2 - FeO system at 30 GPa is constructed [4]. Subsolidus assembly includes solid solutions of (Mg,Fe)-perovskite and (Mg,Fe)O. With increase in FeO content in the system, liquidus relations are determined by two univariant cotectics L + (Mg,Fe)O + (Mg,Fe)SiO3 and L + SiO2 + (Mg,Fe)SiO3 having come to invariant peritectic L + (Mg,Fe)O + SiO2 + (Mg,Fe)SiO3. Mg-perovskite is eliminated by peritectic reaction L + (Mg,Fe)SiO3 = (Mg,Fe)O + SiO2 that gives rise to third univariant cotectic L + (Mg,Fe)O + SiO2. The physicochemical peritectic mechanism is also operating in the Mg

  14. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, M.L.

    1996-08-01

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}-)flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  15. Evaluation of hydrogeologic aspects of proposed salinity control in Paradox Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, Leonard F.; Bedinger, M.S.

    1978-01-01

    The salt load in the Dolores River increases by about 200,000 tons per year where it crosses Paradox Valley, Colorado, because of the discharge of a sodium chloride brine from an underlying aquifer. A ground-water management program to nearly eliminate this major source of salt, which eventually enters the Colorado River, can be designed on the basis of an accurate description of the hydrogeologic framework of Paradox Valley.

  16. Paradoxes of photoconductive target and optical control of secondary ion yield

    SciTech Connect

    Rokakh, A. G. Matasov, M. D.

    2010-01-15

    This study of the photoconductivity of semiconductors, in particular, cadmium chalcogenides as materials for targets of vacuum image converters followed the path of overcoming paradoxes. The concepts developed by the classics of photoelectricity also help to understand the paradoxes of the new secondary-ion photoelectric effect, especially, its spectral characteristic. The optical channel of secondary ion yield control via a photoconductive target opens the way to a new branch of nanotechnology, i.e., optoionics.

  17. Fuzzy spaces topology change as a possible solution to the black hole information loss paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C. A. S.

    2009-06-01

    The black hole information loss paradox is one of the most intricate problems in modern theoretical physics. A proposal to solve this is one related with topology change. However it has found some obstacles related to unitarity and cluster decomposition (locality). In this Letter we argue that modelling the black hole's event horizon as a noncommutative manifold - the fuzzy sphere - we can solve the problems with topology change, getting a possible solution to the black hole information loss paradox.

  18. Making Games Not Work: Paradoxes Embedded in Game-Based Training and Concepts for Overcoming Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Phillip N.; Cuper, Taryn

    2010-01-01

    An interest in game-based training solutions is natural. All one has to do is watch someone fully engaged in a modern game to see the potential of harnessing that attention for training. However, the reality of game-based training has not fully satisfied these expectations. This paper explains two paradoxes that must be overcome for games to support training. These paradoxes are a result of the realities of the basic human condition clashing with the requirements of learning theory. 80th paradoxes arise from the concept of "engagement" that is central to games. The first comes from a more robust definition of engagement, which is the condition of Flow or Optimal Experience. Flow is the state game developers want to see in users. One aspect of Flow is loss of sense of self as the individual becomes immersed in the experience. The paradox arises because this loss of self directly contradicts the learning requirement of self-reflection. The second paradox comes from theories of play, which state in part that play requires a level of individual freedom. The contradiction arises when game-based play must be harnessed to an organizational training program or regimen. The paper will discuss these paradoxes in the context of an effort to design a game-based training modality to train combat medics and will close with a review of compensating strategies identified by the designers. The paper will provide information important to anyone interested in conceptualizing and designing game-based training.

  19. Parrondo’s Games Based on Complex Networks and the Paradoxical Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ye; Wang, Lu; Xie, Nenggang

    2013-01-01

    Parrondo’s games were first constructed using a simple tossing scenario, which demonstrates the following paradoxical situation: in sequences of games, a winning expectation may be obtained by playing the games in a random order, although each game (game A or game B) in the sequence may result in losing when played individually. The available Parrondo’s games based on the spatial niche (the neighboring environment) are applied in the regular networks. The neighbors of each node are the same in the regular graphs, whereas they are different in the complex networks. Here, Parrondo’s model based on complex networks is proposed, and a structure of game B applied in arbitrary topologies is constructed. The results confirm that Parrondo’s paradox occurs. Moreover, the size of the region of the parameter space that elicits Parrondo’s paradox depends on the heterogeneity of the degree distributions of the networks. The higher heterogeneity yields a larger region of the parameter space where the strong paradox occurs. In addition, we use scale-free networks to show that the network size has no significant influence on the region of the parameter space where the strong or weak Parrondo’s paradox occurs. The region of the parameter space where the strong Parrondo’s paradox occurs reduces slightly when the average degree of the network increases. PMID:23844131

  20. Does "smoker's paradox" exist in clopidogrel-treated Turkish patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Edem, Efe; Kirdök, Ali Hikmet; Kınay, Ahmet Ozan; Tekin, Ümit İlker; Taş, Sedat; Alpaslan, Erkan; Pabuccu, Mustafa Türker; Akdeniz, Bahri

    2016-01-01

    Previously conducted studies revealed that smoking enhanced the efficacy of clopidogrel by increasing formation of the active metabolite (AM) from the prodrug through induction of the cytochrome CYP1A2. The expression of cytochrome enzymes depends on genotype and no data exists in literature conducted in Turkish patients comparing the clopidogrel responsiveness between active smokers and non-active smokers treated with clopidogrel. In this study, our aim was to investigate the clopidogrel responsiveness in clopidogrel-treated Turkish acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients according to their smoking status. We retrospectively enrolled 258 patients who were hospitalized due to ACS. Clinical variables of the patients, especially smoking status were recorded. Clopidogrel resistance was evaluated by using adenosine diphosphate (ADP) induced platelet aggregometry. Clopidogrel resistance was detected as a change in maximal aggregation ≤20% from baseline. A total of 139 patients were active smokers while 12 were former smokers. 107 patients did not have a history of smoking. Ten of the smokers were hyporesponsive to clopidogrel, whereas 36 of non-smokers were hyporesponsive to clopidogrel (p < 0.001). Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that Au-min value >612.5 predicted the clopidogrel resistance with a sensitivity of 60% (OR: 100.65, %95 CI = 19.996-506.615 p < 0.001). Results of this study demonstrated that ADP responses were lower in smokers receiving clopidogrel and aspirin than in non-smokers receiving the same drug regimen. This finding indicates that smoking was related to an enhanced clopidogrel responsiveness in Turkish patients hospitalized due to ACS, suggesting that "smoker's paradox" probably exists in Turkish ACS patients. PMID:26367336

  1. Individual and Societal Wisdom: Explaining the Paradox of Human Aging and High Well-Being.

    PubMed

    Jeste, Dilip V; Oswald, Andrew J

    2014-03-26

    Objective: Although human aging is characterized by loss of fertility and progressive decline in physical abilities, later life is associated with better psychological health and well-being. Furthermore, there has been an unprecedented increase in average lifespan over the past century without corresponding extensions of fertile and healthy age spans. We propose a possible explanation for these paradoxical phenomena. Method: We reviewed the relevant literature on aging, well-being, and wisdom. Results: An increase in specific components of individual wisdom in later life may make up for the loss of fertility as well as declining physical health. However, current data on the relationship between aging and individual wisdom are not consistent and do not explain increased longevity in the general population during the past century. We propose that greater societal wisdom (including compassion) may account for the notable increase in average lifespan over the last century. Data in older adults with serious mental illnesses are limited, but suggest that many of them too experience improved psychosocial functioning, although their longevity has not yet increased, suggesting persistent stigma against mental illness and inadequate societal compassion. Conclusions: The proposed construct of societal wisdom needs more investigation. Research should also focus on the reasons for discrepant findings related to age-associated changes in different components of individual wisdom. Studies of wisdom and well-being are warranted in older people with serious mental illnesses, along with campaigns to enhance societal compassion for these disenfranchised individuals. Finally, effective interventions to enhance wisdom need to be developed and tested. PMID:24670225

  2. Paradox lost: silicon 32 and the global ocean silica cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, H.; Somayajulu, B. L. K.; Turekian, K. K.

    2000-02-01

    The 32Si Paradox is that the GEOSECS measurements of 32Si specific activity in silica collected on ferric hydroxide-coated fibers are essentially uniform throughout the deep water of the global oceans [Somayajulu et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 85 (1987) 329-342; 107 (1991) 197-216]. Peng, Maier-Reimer, and Broecker have argued that 32Si specific activities in Indian and Pacific deep water should be 3-5 times lower than in the deep Atlantic, because the dissolved SiO 2 concentrations are higher than in the Atlantic by this factor, and because cosmogenic 32Si should be essentially confined to the ocean basins in which it falls due to its short half-life relative to mixing times for water interchange between the oceans. Thus these authors proposed that the entire GEOSECS 32Si data set "may be flawed". The resolution of the 32Si Paradox is straightforward. Silica collected on the acrilan fibers is a two-phase mixture of biogenic particulate SiO 2 (opaline tests of diatoms and radiolaria) and silica scavenged chemically from dissolved SiO 2 in ocean water. Particulate silica is the high-activity component in this mixture, and dissolved SiO 2 is the low-activity end-member. Thus the mixing trajectories on 'Cornucopia plots' of specific activity vs. reciprocal SiO 2 recovered weights overlap in specific-activity range, regardless of the different concentrations and specific activities of dissolved silica in the deep waters. The specific activities of dissolved SiO 2 in the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic oceans, as deciphered from the two-component total activity data, are ˜0, 2.6, and 4.5 dpm/kg SiO 2. The atmospheric production rate of 32Si has been calculated and is found to be 0.72 atoms/m 2 s. This value is much lower than in previous calculations, which were based on the Lal and Peters plots of stratospheric fallout that incorrectly use geomagnetic latitude for scaling the fallout patterns. Correcting these curves to scale by geographic latitude, which controls the

  3. Motivational Modulation of Self-Initiated and Externally Triggered Movement Speed Induced by Threat of Shock: Experimental Evidence for Paradoxical Kinesis in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Louise M.; Griffin, Harry J.; Angeli, Aikaterini; Torkamani, Mariam; Georgiev, Dejan; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    paradoxical kinesis in the laboratory under both self-initiated and externally-triggered conditions has implications for motivational and attentional enhancement of movement speed in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26284366

  4. Democratic parenting: paradoxical messages in democratic parent education theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oryan, Shlomit; Gastil, John

    2013-06-01

    Some prominent parent education theories in the United States and other Western countries base their educational viewpoint explicitly on democratic values, such as mutual respect, equality and personal freedom. These democratic parenting theories advocate sharing power with children and including them in family decision making. This study presents a textual analysis of two such theories, the Adlerian model of parent education and the Parent Effectiveness Training (PET) model, as they are embodied in two original bestselling textbooks. Through content and argumentation analysis of these influential texts, this study examines the paradoxes inherent in these two theories when they articulate how to implement fully democratic principles within the parent-child relationship. We discover that in spite of their democratic rationale, both books offer communication practices that guide the child to modify misbehaviour, enforce parental power, and manipulate the child to make decisions that follow parental judgment, and thus do not endorse the use of a truly democratic parenting style. We suggest, as an alternative to the democratic parenting style, that parents be introduced to a guardianship management style, in which they do not share authority with children, but seek opportunities for enabling children to make more autonomous decisions and participate in more family decision making.

  5. Paradoxical acclimation responses in the thermal performance of insect immunity.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Laura V; Heinrichs, David E; Sinclair, Brent J

    2016-05-01

    Winter is accompanied by multiple stressors, and the interactions between cold and pathogen stress potentially determine the overwintering success of insects. Thus, it is necessary to explore the thermal performance of the insect immune system. We cold-acclimated spring field crickets, Gryllus veletis, to 6 °C for 7 days and measured the thermal performance of potential (lysozyme and phenoloxidase activity) and realised (bacterial clearance and melanisation) immune responses. Cold acclimation decreased the critical thermal minimum from -0.5 ± 0.25 to -2.1 ± 0.18 °C, and chill coma recovery time after 72 h at -2 °C from 16.8 ± 4.9 to 5.2 ± 2.0 min. Measures of both potential and realised immunity followed a typical thermal performance curve, decreasing with decreasing temperature. However, cold acclimation further decreased realised immunity at low, but not high, temperatures; effectively, immune activity became paradoxically specialised to higher temperatures. Thus, cold acclimation induced mismatched thermal responses between locomotor and immune systems, as well as within the immune system itself. We conclude that cold acclimation in insects appears to preferentially improve cold tolerance over whole-animal immune performance at low temperatures, and that the differential thermal performance of physiological responses to multiple pressures must be considered when predicting ectotherms' response to climate change. PMID:26846428

  6. The paradox of better subjective oral health in older age.

    PubMed

    Slade, G D; Sanders, A E

    2011-11-01

    We analyzed data from the 2004-06 Australian National Survey of Adult Oral Health to investigate the paradoxical relationship of better subjective oral health in older adults compared with young or middle-aged adults. In interviews with 14,092 adults, prevalence of problems with eating or appearance was not significantly associated with age among dentate people with no denture(s). In contrast, among dentate denture-wearers, prevalence ranged from 18.7% in ≥ 65-year-olds to 46.7% in 25- to 34-year-olds (p < 0.01). Dentate interviewees (n = 3,724) underwent oral epidemiological examinations and completed the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) questionnaire, evaluating adverse impacts of oral conditions. In multivariable analysis, mean OHIP-14 scores were only weakly associated with age among people who had none of 5 clinical conditions [≥ 5 missing teeth, denture(s), untreated decay, moderate/severe periodontitis, toothache]. However, for people with ≥ 2 clinical conditions, there was a three-fold, inverse association between age and mean OHIP-14 scores (p < 0.01). The findings show that experience of oral disease is more deleterious to subjective oral health when it occurs early in adulthood than when it occurs in old age, a pattern that likely reflects high expectations of young generations and, conversely, great resilience in Australia's oldest generation. PMID:21917599

  7. Paradoxical pseudotachylyte - Fault melt outside the seismogenic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Joseph Clancy

    2012-05-01

    Fault generated melt, pseudotachylyte, is an established indicator of palaeoseismic faulting. The existing consensus that frictionally induced melting occurs within the classic seismogenic zone contrast the contention over how pseudotachylyte forms within the ductile regime. Central to this issue is whether all pseudotachylyte originates as pressure-dependent frictional melt along slip surfaces, or if pressure-independent processes have roles in its formation. Propagation of high-velocity slip into deeper crustal levels provides a satisfactory explanation for pseudotachylyte at depth, but does not of itself rationalize earthquake nucleation outside the classic seismogenic zone. Pseudotachylyte from the Minas Fault Zone, Nova Scotia, Canada is used to demonstrate the formation and preservation of fault-related melt under lower crustal conditions. Microstructures retain evidence of intense dislocation glide with minimal climb, and ductile disaggregation of the host; the latter are consistent with intracrystalline deformation in the Peierls stress-controlled glide regime. It remains unclear whether the crystal plasticity serves only as a precursory stage to rupture and high-velocity slip or is itself responsible for both instability and the thermal transient. There are similarities between accelerating plastic slip leading to rupture and aseismic creep bursts (tremor) that emphasize the mechanistic complexity of deep faulting, and the need to extend consideration beyond that of a simple brittle-ductile response. The occurrence of tremor bursts fall within the depth range of "paradoxical" pseudotachylyte and provides a circumstantial link between active tectonics and the geologic record that merits examination.

  8. A semiclassical reversibility paradox in simple chaotic systems.

    PubMed

    Tomsovic, Steven

    2016-06-13

    Using semiclassical methods, it is possible to construct very accurate approximations in the short-wavelength limit of quantum dynamics that rely exclusively on classical dynamical input. For systems whose classical realization is strongly chaotic, there is an exceedingly short logarithmic Ehrenfest time scale, beyond which the quantum and classical dynamics of a system necessarily diverge, and yet the semiclassical construction remains valid far beyond that time. This fact leads to a paradox if one ponders the reversibility and predictability properties of quantum and classical mechanics. They behave very differently relative to each other, with classical dynamics being essentially irreversible/unpredictable, whereas quantum dynamics is reversible/stable. This begs the question: 'How can an accurate approximation to a reversible/stable dynamics be constructed from an irreversible/unpredictable one?' The resolution of this incongruity depends on a couple of key ingredients: a well-known, inherent, one-way structural stability of chaotic systems; and an overlap integral not being amenable to the saddle point method. PMID:27140974

  9. On the paradox of thermocapillary flow about a stationary bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yariv, Ehud; Shusser, Michael

    2006-11-01

    When a stationary bubble is exposed to an external temperature gradient, Marangoni stresses at the bubble surface result in fluid motion. A straight-forward attempt to calculate the influence of this thermocapillary flow upon the temperature distribution fails to provide well-behaved solution [Balasubramaniam & Subramanian, Phys. Fluids 16, 3131 (2004)]. This paradox is resolved here using regularization procedure which exploits the qualitative disparity in the long-range flow fields generated by stationary bubble and moving one. The regularization parameter is an (exponentially small) artificial bubble velocity U, which reflects the inability of any asymptotic expansion to satisfy the condition of exact bubble equilibrium. The solution is obtained using asymptotic matching of two separate Reynolds-number expansions: an inner expansion, valid at the bubble neighborhood, and remote outer expansion, valid far beyond the familiar Oseen region. This procedure provides well-behaved solution, which is subsequently used to evaluate the convection-induced correction to the hydrodynamic force exerted on the bubble. The independence of that correction upon U confirms the adequacy of the regularization procdure to descibe the stationary-bubble case. The ratio of the calculated force to that pertaining to the classical pure-conduction limit [Young, Goldstein Block, J. Fluid Mech. 6, 350 (1959)] is given by 1 - Ma/8+ o(Ma), where Ma is radius-based Marangoni number.

  10. Quaternary studies in the Paradox Basin, southeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Biggar, N.

    1987-08-01

    Studies have included paleoclimatic assessments and evaluation of the Needles Fault zone, and an assessment of geologic age dating results and techniques. Fossil pollen, snail shells, pack rat middens, and Holocene stratigraphic units have been examined as potential paleoclimatic indicators. Of these, the most definitive data have been an interpreted 13,000-year vegetation record found in the pack rat middens. This record defines the late Pleistocene-Holocene climatic transition at approximately 10,000 years ago, and indicates that temperature decreased and precipitation increased during the late Pleistocene relative to the present. In the Needles Fault zone, age dating results and geomorphic studies indicate that the northeastern grabens may be the youngest and that the system is at least 65,000 years old. Using this date and an assumed Colorado River incision rate, the maximum rate at which grabens have spread eastward from the river canyon can be estimated. The most useful age dating techniques for the Paradox Basin are the accumulation of pedogenic carbonate in the soil profile, radiocarbon dating, thermoluminescence dating, amino acid diagenesis of mollusk shells, paleomagnetic analysis of early Pleistocene deposits, and topographic position of deposits and surfaces. Method applicability depends on the datable materials present, the estimated age of the sample or deposit, and potential contaminants that could affect analysis. 108 refs., 64 figs., 35 tabs.

  11. Understanding Hawking's Paradox with a Dynamical Moving Mirror Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Tze-Dan

    A quantum mechanical model of N free scalar fields interacting with a dynamical moving mirror is formulated and shown to be equivalent to two-dimensional dilaton gravity. We derive the semi-classical dynamics of this system, by including the back reaction due to the quantum radiation. We develop a Hamiltonian formalism that describes the time evolution as seen by an asymptotic observer, and write a scattering equation that relates the in-falling and out-going modes at low energies. At higher incoming energy flux, it is found that the semi-classical model appears to become unstable and the mirror seems to accelerate forever along a trajectory that runs off to infinity. This instability provides a useful paradigm for black hole formation and introduces an analogous information paradox. Finally, we indicate a possible mechanism that may restore the stability of the system at the quantum level without destroying coherence. A new constrained Hamiltonian is written down and the exchange algebra is derived. We show that the non-commutativity may lead to a possible restoration of the apparent loss of information.

  12. The Fermi paradox: An approach based on percolation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    If even a very small fraction of the hundred billion stars in the galaxy are home to technological civilizations which colonize over interstellar distances, the entire galaxy could be completely colonized in a few million years. The absence of such extraterrestrial civilizations visiting Earth is the Fermi paradox. A model for interstellar colonization is proposed using the assumption that there is a maximum distance over which direct interstellar colonization is feasible. Due to the time lag involved in interstellar communications, it is assumed that an interstellar colony will rapidly develop a culture independent of the civilization that originally settled it. Any given colony will have a probability P of developing a colonizing civilization, and a probability (1-P) that it will develop a non-colonizing civilization. These assumptions lead to the colonization of the galaxy occuring as a percolation problem. In a percolation problem, there will be a critical value of percolation probability, P(sub c). For P less than P(sub c), colonization will always terminate after a finite number of colonies. Growth will occur in 'clusters', with the outside of each cluster consisting of non-colonizing civilizations. For P greater than P(sub c), small uncolonized voids will exist, bounded by non-colonizing civilizations. For P approximately = to P(sub c), arbitrarily large filled regions exist, and also arbitrarily large empty regions.

  13. Paradoxical impact of cholesterol on lipid packing and cell stiffness.

    PubMed

    Ayee, Manuela A; Levitan, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Cell stiffness or deformability is a fundamental property that is expected to play a major role in multiple cellular functions. It is well known that cell stiffness is dominated by the intracellular cytoskeleton that, together with the plasma membrane, forms a membrane-cytoskeleton envelope. However, our understanding of how lipid composition of plasma membrane regulates physical properties of the underlying cytoskeleton is only starting to emerge. In this review, we first briefly describe the impact of cholesterol on the physical properties of lipid bilayers in model membranes and in living cells, with the dominant effect of increasing the order of membrane lipids and decreasing membrane fluidity. Then, we discuss accumulating evidence that removal of cholesterol, paradoxically, decreases the mobility of membrane proteins and increases cellular stiffness, with both effects being dependent on the integrity of the cytoskeleton. Finally, we discuss emerging evidence that oxidized modifications of low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) have the same effects on endothelial biomechanical properties as cholesterol depletion, an effect that is mediated by the incorporation of oxysterols into the membrane. PMID:27100504

  14. Black hole evaporation: information loss but no paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modak, Sujoy K.; Ortíz, Leonardo; Peña, Igor; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    The process of black hole evaporation resulting from the Hawking effect has generated an intense controversy regarding its potential conflict with quantum mechanics' unitary evolution. A recent set of works by a collaboration involving one of us, have revised the controversy with the aims of, on one hand, clarifying some conceptual issues surrounding it, and, at the same time, arguing that collapse theories have the potential to offer a satisfactory resolution of the so-called paradox. Here we show an explicit calculation supporting this claim using a simplified model of black hole creation and evaporation, known as the CGHS model, together with a dynamical reduction theory, known as CSL, and some speculative, but seemingly natural ideas about the role of quantum gravity in connection with the would-be singularity. This work represents a specific realization of general ideas first discussed in Okon and Sudarsky (Found Phys 44:114-143, 2014 and a complete and detailed analysis of a model first considered in Modak et al. (Phys Rev D 91(12):124009, 2015.

  15. QCD at zero baryon density and the Polyakov loop paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Kratochvila, Slavo; Forcrand, Philippe de

    2006-06-01

    We compare the grand-canonical partition function at fixed chemical potential {mu} with the canonical partition function at fixed baryon number B, formally and by numerical simulations at {mu}=0 and B=0 with four flavors of staggered quarks. We verify that the free energy densities are equal in the thermodynamic limit, and show that they can be well described by the hadron resonance gas at TT{sub c}. Small differences between the two ensembles, for thermodynamic observables characterizing the deconfinement phase transition, vanish with increasing lattice size. These differences are solely caused by contributions of nonzero baryon density sectors, which are exponentially suppressed with increasing volume. The Polyakov loop shows a different behavior: for all temperatures and volumes, its expectation value is exactly zero in the canonical formulation, whereas it is always nonzero in the commonly used grand-canonical formulation. We clarify this paradoxical difference, and show that the nonvanishing Polyakov loop expectation value is due to contributions of nonzero triality states, which are not physical, because they give zero contribution to the partition function.

  16. A paradox in individual-based models of populations

    PubMed Central

    van der Meer, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    The standard dynamic energy budget model is widely used to describe the physiology of individual animals. It assumes that assimilation rate scales with body surface area, whereas maintenance rate scales with body volume. When the model is used as the building block of a population model, only limited dynamical behaviour, the so-called juvenile-driven cycles, emerges. The reason is that in the model juveniles are competitively superior over adults, because juveniles have a higher surface area-to-volume ratio. Maintenance requirements for adults are therefore relatively large, and a reduced assimilation rate as a result of lowered food levels will easily become insufficient. Here, an alternative dynamic energy budget model is introduced that gives rise to adult-driven cycles, which may be closer to what is often observed in reality. However, this comes at the price of a rather odd description of the individual, in that maintenance scales with body area and assimilation rate with body volume, resulting in unbounded exponential body growth. I make a plea to solve the paradox and come up with reliable descriptions at both the individual and the population level. PMID:27413533

  17. Can waterbelt climates resolve the faint young Sun paradox?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, E. T.; Toon, O. B.

    2012-12-01

    Ancient sediments indicate that liquid water and primitive life were ubiquitous on the Archean Earth despite the faint young Sun. However, energy balance and radiative-convective models require improbably high greenhouse gas abundances to obtain non-glacial climates, violating constraints from geochemical data. A self-consistent solution to the faint young Sun paradox has remained elusive. Here we use the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model version 3 with thermodynamic ocean and sea ice components to simulate the climate circa 2.8 billion years ago. To maintain present day surface temperatures, 0.06 bar of CO2 in a 1 bar atmosphere is required to compensate for a 20 percent reduction in the solar constant. However, waterbelt climates having stable low latitude sea ice margins can be maintained with as little as 500 ppm of CO2 and no additional trace greenhouse species. With 5000 ppm of CO2 nearly 60 percent of the planet remains free from ice. The early Earth is resistant to hard snowball glaciations instead favoring waterbelt climates. The coexistence of a faint young Sun and a weak greenhouse does not exclude the presence of liquid water at the Archean surface.

  18. Paradoxical Roles of IL-4 in Tumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiguang; Chen, Lin; Qin, Zhihai

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-4 is a crucial cytokine in tumor immunology. In the initial murine experiments, IL-4 exhibited potent anti-tumor ability. Tumors genetically modified to produce IL-4 were rejected, while parental tumors grew progressively. Mice rejected IL-4-producing tumors got long-lasting anti-tumor immunity. The comparative study showed that IL-4 induced the most effective immune response among several cytokines in both prophylactic and therapeutic models. All of these indicate IL-4 has strong potential as a tumor therapy agent. However, contrary evidence indeed exists, and is becoming more and more abundant which shows IL-4 is a tumor-promoting molecule. IL-4 amounts are usually elevated in human cancer patients. IL-4 knockout mice are more resistant to tumor challenge than IL-4 competent mice. Furthermore, tumor cells of various histological origins often express increased levels of IL-4 receptor in comparison to their normal counterparts. By carefully examining presently available data, we found the effects of IL-4 in tumor immunity are closely related to its sources, expressing time and dose, as well as the molecular and cellular environments. In this mini-review, we concentrate on illustrating the paradoxical roles and underlying mechanisms of IL-4 in tumor immunity and try to understand how one molecule has opposite effects. PMID:20003817

  19. Geology of the Paradox quadrangle, Montrose county, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Withington, C.F.

    1954-01-01

    The Paradox quadrangle is one of eighteen 7 1/2-minute quadrangles covering the principal carnotite-producing area of southwestern Colorado. The geology of these quadrangles was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Atomic Energy Commission as part of a comprehensive study of carnotite deposits. The rocks exposed in the eighteen quadrangles consist of crystalline rocks of pre-Cambrian age and sedimentary rocks that range in age from late Paleozoic to Quaternary. Over much of the area the sedimentary rocks are flat lying, but in places the rocks are disrupted by high-angle faults, and northwest-trending folds. Conspicuous among the folds are large anticlines having cores of intrusive salt and gypsum. Most of the carnotite deposits are confined to the Salt Wash sandstone member of the Jurassic Morrison formation, Within this sandstone, most of the deposits are spottily distributed through an arcuate zone known as the "Uravan Mineral Belt". Individual deposits range in size from irregular masses containing only a few tons of ore to large, tabular masses containing thousands of tons. The ore consists largely of sandstone selectively impregnated and in part replaced by uranium and vanadium minerals. Most of the deposits appear to be related to certain sedimentary structures in sandstones of favorable composition.

  20. The "normobaric oxygen paradox": a new tool for the anesthetist?

    PubMed

    Rocco, M; D'Itri, L; De Bels, D; Corazza, F; Balestra, C

    2014-03-01

    Hypoxia is the natural trigger for endogenous EPO production but recently the use of intermittent hyperoxia to stimulate EPO has been postulated and this phenomenon has been called the "normobaric oxygen paradox" (NOP). The "NOP" is a mechanism by which oxygen regulates the expression of the Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α). The HIF-1α-depending gene regulation is responsible for many different genetic expressions including EPO and VEGF. It has been proposed that relative changes of oxygen availability rather than steady state hypoxic or hyperoxic conditions, play an important role in HIF transcriptional effects. According to this hypothesis, the cell interprets the return to normoxia after a hyperoxic event as an oxygen shortage, and induces HIF-1-regulated gene synthesis, including EPO. Being both a hormone and a cytokine, the actual actions of EPO are complex; its clinical utility has been postulated for neuroprotection and cardioprotection. The precise level of inspired oxygen and the exact timeframe for its iterative administration are not totally known. N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC) supplementation has been shown to help. All the reported data demonstrate how hyperoxic and hypoxic states can potentially be manipulated if oxygen is been considered as a multifaceted molecule more than just a gas. PMID:24002459

  1. Infection, inflammation, and bone regeneration: a paradoxical relationship.

    PubMed

    Thomas, M V; Puleo, D A

    2011-09-01

    Various strategies have been developed to promote bone regeneration in the craniofacial region. Most of these interventions utilize implantable materials or devices. Infections resulting from colonization of these implants may result in local tissue destruction in a manner analogous to periodontitis. This destruction is mediated via the expression of various inflammatory mediators and tissue-destructive enzymes. Given the well-documented association among microbial biofilms, inflammatory mediators, and tissue destruction, it seems reasonable to assume that inflammation may interfere with bone healing and regeneration. Paradoxically, recent evidence also suggests that the presence of certain pro-inflammatory mediators is actually required for bone healing. Bone injury (e.g., subsequent to a fracture or surgical intervention) is followed by a choreographed cascade of events, some of which are dependent upon the presence of pro-inflammatory mediators. If inflammation resolves promptly, then proper bone healing may occur. However, if inflammation persists (which might occur in the presence of an infected implant or graft material), then the continued inflammatory response may result in suboptimal bone formation. Thus, the effect of a given mediator is dependent upon the temporal context in which it is expressed. Better understanding of this temporal sequence may be used to optimize regenerative outcomes. PMID:21248364

  2. Serotonergic modulation of zebrafish behavior: towards a paradox.

    PubMed

    Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Maximino, Caio

    2014-12-01

    Due to the fish-specific genome duplication event (~320-350 mya), some genes which code for serotonin proteins were duplicated in teleosts; this duplication event was preceded by a reorganization of the serotonergic system, with the appearance of the raphe nuclei (dependent on the isthmus organizer) and prosencephalic nuclei, including the paraventricular and pretectal complexes. With the appearance of amniotes, duplicated genes were lost, and the serotonergic system was reduced to a more complex raphe system. From a comparative point of view, then, the serotonergic system of zebrafish and that of mammals shows many important differences. However, many different behavioral functions of serotonin, as well as the effects of drugs which affect the serotonergic system, seem to be conserved among species. For example, in both zebrafish and rodents acute serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) seem to increase anxiety-like behavior, while chronic SSRIs decrease it; drugs which act at the 5-HT1A receptor seem to decrease anxiety-like behavior in both zebrafish and rodents. In this article, we will expose this paradox, reviewing the chemical neuroanatomy of the zebrafish serotonergic system, followed by an analysis of the role of serotonin in zebrafish fear/anxiety, stress, aggression and the effects of psychedelic drugs. PMID:24681196

  3. A paradox in individual-based models of populations.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    The standard dynamic energy budget model is widely used to describe the physiology of individual animals. It assumes that assimilation rate scales with body surface area, whereas maintenance rate scales with body volume. When the model is used as the building block of a population model, only limited dynamical behaviour, the so-called juvenile-driven cycles, emerges. The reason is that in the model juveniles are competitively superior over adults, because juveniles have a higher surface area-to-volume ratio. Maintenance requirements for adults are therefore relatively large, and a reduced assimilation rate as a result of lowered food levels will easily become insufficient. Here, an alternative dynamic energy budget model is introduced that gives rise to adult-driven cycles, which may be closer to what is often observed in reality. However, this comes at the price of a rather odd description of the individual, in that maintenance scales with body area and assimilation rate with body volume, resulting in unbounded exponential body growth. I make a plea to solve the paradox and come up with reliable descriptions at both the individual and the population level. PMID:27413533

  4. No climate paradox under the faint early Sun.

    PubMed

    Rosing, Minik T; Bird, Dennis K; Sleep, Norman H; Bjerrum, Christian J

    2010-04-01

    Environmental niches in which life first emerged and later evolved on the Earth have undergone dramatic changes in response to evolving tectonic/geochemical cycles and to biologic interventions, as well as increases in the Sun's luminosity of about 25 to 30 per cent over the Earth's history. It has been inferred that the greenhouse effect of atmospheric CO(2) and/or CH(4) compensated for the lower solar luminosity and dictated an Archaean climate in which liquid water was stable in the hydrosphere. Here we demonstrate, however, that the mineralogy of Archaean sediments, particularly the ubiquitous presence of mixed-valence Fe(II-III) oxides (magnetite) in banded iron formations is inconsistent with such high concentrations of greenhouse gases and the metabolic constraints of extant methanogens. Prompted by this, and the absence of geologic evidence for very high greenhouse-gas concentrations, we hypothesize that a lower albedo on the Earth, owing to considerably less continental area and to the lack of biologically induced cloud condensation nuclei, made an important contribution to moderating surface temperature in the Archaean eon. Our model calculations suggest that the lower albedo of the early Earth provided environmental conditions above the freezing point of water, thus alleviating the need for extreme greenhouse-gas concentrations to satisfy the faint early Sun paradox. PMID:20360739

  5. From Planck Constant to Isomorphicity Through Justice Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidajatullah-Maksoed, Widastra

    2015-05-01

    Robert E. Scott in his ``Chaos theory and the Justice Paradox'', William & Mary Law Review, v 35, I 1, 329 (1993) wrotes''...As we approach the 21-st Century, the signs of social disarray are everywhere. Social critics observe the breakdown of core structure - the nuclear family, schools, neighborhoods & political groups''. For completions for ``soliton'' first coined by Morikazu TODA, comparing the ``Soliton on Scott-Russell aqueduct on the Union Canal near Heriot-WATT University, July 12, 1995 to Michael Stock works: ``a Fine WATT-Balance: Determination of Planck constant & Redefinition of Kilogram'', January 2011, we can concludes the inherencies between `chaos' & `soliton'. Further through ``string theory'' from Michio KAKU sought statements from Peter Mayr: Stringy world brane & Exponential hierarchy'', JHEP 11 (2000): ``if the 5-brane is embedded in flat 10-D space time, the 6-D Planck mass on the brane is infinite'' who also describes the relation of isomorphicity & ``string theory'', from whom denotes the smart city. Replace this text with your abstract body. Incredible acknowledgments to HE. Mr. Drs. P. SWANTORO & HE. Mr. Dr-HC Jakob OETAMA.

  6. Racial science, geopolitics, and empires: paradoxes of power.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Helen

    2014-12-01

    Scholars interested in the history of racial science continue to puzzle over the ways in which such ideas endure. This essay takes up a variant on this theme by considering how critiques of ideas about racial purity and hierarchies, expressed at the Universal Races Congress of 1911, were part of a larger intellectual project that simultaneously under- mined ideas of fixed racial types and bolstered identity categories defined in racial terms. Efforts to destabilize racial science in the early decades of the twentieth century often went hand in glove with burgeoning critiques of "white" and European domination in different parts of the world. This essay shines the spotlight on the paradoxical nature of these processes. While anthropologists helped to spearhead attempts to deconstruct mainstream pillars of racial science, they also left the door open for its reconstitution by refusing to reject classificatory schemes by group. And though global conversations about race and science tended to generate more cosmopolitan and egalitarian views, the very act of bringing together people from different places had the unintended effect of reinforcing racial identities and idioms, especially in the context of challenges to colonial rule. Finally, even as state building within empires ensured that racial taxonomies proliferated on the ground, imperial bureaucrats often avoided promoting racial science and research because such endeavors were a divisive force in transnational management. PMID:25665384

  7. Paradoxical Effects of All-Trans-Retinoic Acid on Lupus-Like Disease in the MRL/lpr Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiaofeng; Ren, Jingjing; Wei, Cheng-Hsin; Ross, A. Catharine; Cecere, Thomas E.; Jortner, Bernard S.; Ahmed, S. Ansar; Luo, Xin M.

    2015-01-01

    Roles of all-trans-retinoic acid (tRA), a metabolite of vitamin A (VA), in both tolerogenic and immunogenic responses are documented. However, how tRA affects the development of systemic autoimmunity is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that tRA have paradoxical effects on the development of autoimmune lupus in the MRL/lpr mouse model. We administered, orally, tRA or VA mixed with 10% of tRA (referred to as VARA) to female mice starting from 6 weeks of age. At this age, the mice do not exhibit overt clinical signs of lupus. However, the immunogenic environment preceding disease onset has been established as evidenced by an increase of total IgM/IgG in the plasma and expansion of lymphocytes and dendritic cells in secondary lymphoid organs. After 8 weeks of tRA, but not VARA treatment, significantly higher pathological scores in the skin, brain and lung were observed. These were accompanied by a marked increase in B-cell responses that included autoantibody production and enhanced expression of plasma cell-promoting cytokines. Paradoxically, the number of lymphocytes in the mesenteric lymph node decreased with tRA that led to significantly reduced lymphadenopathy. In addition, tRA differentially affected renal pathology, increasing leukocyte infiltration of renal tubulointerstitium while restoring the size of glomeruli in the kidney cortex. In contrast, minimal induction of inflammation with tRA in the absence of an immunogenic environment in the control mice was observed. Altogether, our results suggest that under a predisposed immunogenic environment in autoimmune lupus, tRA may decrease inflammation in some organs while generating more severe disease in others. PMID:25775135

  8. Exciton Lifetime Paradoxically Enhanced by Dissipation and Decoherence: Toward Efficient Energy Conversion of a Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2015-11-01

    Energy dissipation and decoherence are at first glance harmful to acquiring the long exciton lifetime desired for efficient photovoltaics. In the presence of both optically forbidden (namely, dark) and allowed (bright) excitons, however, they can be instrumental, as suggested in photosynthesis. By simulating the quantum dynamics of exciton relaxations, we show that the optimized decoherence that imposes a quantum-to-classical crossover with the dissipation realizes a dramatically longer lifetime. In an example of a carbon nanotube, the exciton lifetime increases by nearly 2 orders of magnitude when the crossover triggers a stable high population in the dark excitons.

  9. Exciton Lifetime Paradoxically Enhanced by Dissipation and Decoherence: Toward Efficient Energy Conversion of a Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2015-11-01

    Energy dissipation and decoherence are at first glance harmful to acquiring the long exciton lifetime desired for efficient photovoltaics. In the presence of both optically forbidden (namely, dark) and allowed (bright) excitons, however, they can be instrumental, as suggested in photosynthesis. By simulating the quantum dynamics of exciton relaxations, we show that the optimized decoherence that imposes a quantum-to-classical crossover with the dissipation realizes a dramatically longer lifetime. In an example of a carbon nanotube, the exciton lifetime increases by nearly 2 orders of magnitude when the crossover triggers a stable high population in the dark excitons. PMID:26588415

  10. A Pb isotopic resolution to the Martian meteorite age paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, J. J.; Nemchin, A. A.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Snape, J. F.; Kielman, R. B.; Bland, P. A.; Benedix, G. K.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the chronology and quantifying various geochemical reservoirs on planetary bodies is fundamental to understanding planetary accretion, differentiation, and global mass transfer. The Pb isotope compositions of individual minerals in the Martian meteorite Chassigny have been measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). These measurements indicate that Chassigny has mixed with a Martian reservoir that evolved with a long-term 238U/204Pb (μ) value ˜ two times higher than those inferred from studies of all other Martian meteorites except 4.428 Ga clasts in NWA7533. Any significant mixing between this and an unradiogenic reservoir produces ambiguous trends in Pb isotope variation diagrams. The trend defined by our new Chassigny data can be used to calculate a crystallization age for Chassigny of 4.526 ± 0.027 Ga (2σ) that is clearly in error as it conflicts with all other isotope systems, which yield a widely accepted age of 1.39 Ga. Similar, trends have also been observed in the Shergottites and have been used to calculate a >4 Ga age or, alternatively, attributed to terrestrial contamination. Our new Chassigny data, however, argue that the radiogenic component is Martian, mixing occurred on the surface of Mars, and is therefore likely present in virtually every Martian meteorite. The presence of this radiogenic reservoir on Mars resolves the paradox between Pb isotope data and all other radiogenic isotope systems in Martian meteorites. Importantly, Chassigny and the Shergottites are likely derived from the northern hemisphere of Mars, while NWA 7533 originated from the Southern hemisphere, implying that the U-rich reservoir, which most likely represents some form of crust, must be widespread. The significant age difference between SNC meteorites and NWA 7533 is also consistent with an absence of tectonic recycling throughout Martian history.

  11. Paradoxical Facilitation of Working Memory after Basolateral Amygdala Damage

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Barak; Terburg, David; Thornton, Helena B.; Stein, Dan J.; van Honk, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Working memory is a vital cognitive capacity without which meaningful thinking and logical reasoning would be impossible. Working memory is integrally dependent upon prefrontal cortex and it has been suggested that voluntary control of working memory, enabling sustained emotion inhibition, was the crucial step in the evolution of modern humans. Consistent with this, recent fMRI studies suggest that working memory performance depends upon the capacity of prefrontal cortex to suppress bottom-up amygdala signals during emotional arousal. However fMRI is not well-suited to definitively resolve questions of causality. Moreover, the amygdala is neither structurally or functionally homogenous and fMRI studies do not resolve which amygdala sub-regions interfere with working memory. Lesion studies on the other hand can contribute unique causal evidence on aspects of brain-behaviour phenomena fMRI cannot “see”. To address these questions we investigated working memory performance in three adult female subjects with bilateral basolateral amygdala calcification consequent to Urbach-Wiethe Disease and ten healthy controls. Amygdala lesion extent and functionality was determined by structural and functional MRI methods. Working memory performance was assessed using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III digit span forward task. State and trait anxiety measures to control for possible emotional differences between patient and control groups were administered. Structural MRI showed bilateral selective basolateral amygdala damage in the three Urbach-Wiethe Disease subjects and fMRI confirmed intact functionality in the remaining amygdala sub-regions. The three Urbach-Wiethe Disease subjects showed significant working memory facilitation relative to controls. Control measures showed no group anxiety differences. Results are provisionally interpreted in terms of a ‘cooperation through competition’ networks model that may account for the observed paradoxical functional

  12. Quantifying the Fermi Paradox in the Local Solar Neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartin, D.

    The Fermi paradox highlights the dichotomy between the lack of physical contact with other civilizations and the expectation that technological civilizations are assumed likely to evolve in many locations in the Milky Way galaxy, given the large number of planetary systems within this galaxy. Work by Landis and others has modeled this question in terms of percolation theory and cellular automata, using this method to parametrize our ignorance about possible other civilizations as a function of the probability of one system to colonize another, and the maximum number of systems reachable from each starting location (i.e. the degree in the network used for percolation). These models used a fixed lattice of sites to represent a stellar region, so the degree of all sites were identical. In this paper, the question is examined again, but instead of using a pre-determined lattice, the actual physical positions of all known star systems within 40 parsecs of the Solar System are used as percolation sites; in addition, the number of sites accessible for further colonization from a given system is determined by a choice of maximum distance such efforts can travel across. The resulting simulations show that extraterrestrial colonization efforts may reach the Solar System, but only for certain values of the maximum travel distance and probability of an occupied system further colonizing other systems. Indeed, large numbers of systems may be colonized with either vessels that lack insufficient travel distance to reach the Solar System or else have a colonization probability where they are statistically unlikely to reach us.

  13. Habitat preference and the marine-speciation paradox.

    PubMed Central

    Bierne, Nicolas; Bonhomme, François; David, Patrice

    2003-01-01

    Marine organisms challenge the classical theories of local adaptation and speciation because their planktonic larvae have the potential to maintain high gene flow. The marine-speciation paradox is illustrated by contact zones between incipient species that are so large that allopatric divergence seems unlikely. For this reason any mechanism preventing sympatric larvae of two incipient species from coexisting in the same habitats can be a powerful promoter of speciation. The contact zone between two hybridizing taxa of mussel, Mytilus edulis and M. galloprovincialis, in Europe provides an excellent example. Although the zone itself extends over thousands of kilometres, the opportunities for interbreeding are considerably reduced by the small-scale mosaic structure of the zone, where local patches of each taxon alternate at scales of kilometres or less, in response to locally variable ecological factors. Habitat choice by settling larvae would be a less costly mechanism than post-settlement selection to maintain such a mosaic structure. Unfortunately the role of selective settlement has remained hypothetical because larvae could not be scored by classical genetic markers. PCR markers allowed us to study larvae and settlement in ecologically contrasting sites within the zone. We show that only a subset of the genotypes present in the plankton settle in some sites, and that the adults on these sites show the same genetic bias. Genetically based variation in pre-settlement processes therefore accounts for the ecological segregation observed, though it is not the only factor involved in limiting successful interbreeding. The present dataset also supports previous reports of partial spawning asynchrony. PMID:12965032

  14. Induced seismicity constraints on subsurface geological structure, Paradox Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Lisa V.; Wood, Christopher K.; Yeck, William L.; King, Vanessa M.

    2015-02-01

    Precise relative hypocentres of seismic events induced by long-term fluid injection at the Paradox Valley Unit (PVU) brine disposal well provide constraints on the subsurface geological structure and compliment information available from deep seismic reflection and well data. We use the 3-D spatial distribution of the hypocentres to refine the locations, strikes, and throws of subsurface faults interpre­ted previously from geophysical surveys and to infer the existence of previously unidentified subsurface faults. From distinct epicentre lineations and focal mechanism trends, we identify a set of conjugate fracture orientations consistent with shear-slip reactivation of late-Palaeozoic fractures over a widespread area, as well as an additional fracture orientation present only near the injection well. We propose simple Mohr-Coulomb fracture models to explain these observations. The observation that induced seismicity preferentially occurs along one of the identified conjugate fracture orientations can be explained by a rotation in the direction of the regional maximum compressive stress from the time when the fractures were formed to the present. Shear slip along the third fracture orientation observed near the injection well is inconsistent with the current regional stress field and suggests a local rotation of the horizontal stresses. The detailed subsurface model produced by this analysis provides important insights for anticipating spatial patterns of future induced seismicity and for evaluation of possible additional injection well sites that are likely to be seismically and hydrologically isolated from the current well. In addition, the interpreted fault patterns provide constraints for estimating the maximum magnitude earthquake that may be induced, and for building geomechanical models to simulate pore pressure diffusion, stress changes and earthquake triggering.

  15. The Inhabitance Paradox: how habitability and inhabitancy are inseparable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldblatt, C.

    2015-12-01

    The dominant paradigm in assigning "habitability" to terrestrial planets is to define a circumstellar habitable zone: the locus of orbital radii in which the planet is neither too hot nor too cold for life as we know it. One dimensional climate models have put theoretically impressive boundaries on this: a runaway greenhouse or water loss at the inner edge (Venus), and low-latitude glaciation followed by formation of CO2 clouds at the outer edge. A cottage industry now exists to "refine" the definition of these boundaries each year to the third decimal place of an AU. Using exactly that kind of model, I'll show that the different climate states can overlap very substantially and that "snowball Earth", temperate climate and a post-runaway climate can all be stable under the same solar flux. Furthermore, the radial extent of the temperature climate band is very narrow for pure water atmospheres. The width of the habitable zone is determined by the atmospheric inventories of di-nitrogen and carbon dioxide. Yet Earth teaches us that these abundances are very heavily influenced (perhaps even controlled) by biology. This is paradoxical: the habitable zone seeks to define the region a planet should be capable of harbouring life; yet whether the planet is inhabited will determine whether the climate may be habitable at any given distance from the star. This matters, because future life detection missions may use habitable zone boundaries in mission design. A historical view of solar system exploration helps frame the problem; robotic exploration of the outer solar system revealed the un-imagined nature of the Jovian and Saturnian moons, whilst showing that the Venusian jungle died long ago. Prediction will fall to data but the unexpected may emerge. To soften that fall we should revise the paradigm of habitability to acknowledge that habitability depends on inhabitance; for life as we know it is a planetary scale--and planet dominating--phenomenon.

  16. Interactions between HIV infection and leprosy: a paradox.

    PubMed

    Ustianowski, Andrew P; Lawn, Stephen D; Lockwood, Diana N J

    2006-06-01

    Early in the HIV epidemic it was feared that the disease would undermine leprosy control, as has occurred with tuberculosis. It was predicted that patients with leprosy and HIV coinfection would have an increased risk of lepromatous disease and a faster clinical evolution, and that the leprosy would be more difficult to treat. None of these concerns have materialised and the interaction between HIV and Mycobacterium leprae seems to be far more subtle than that between HIV and tuberculosis. We review the epidemiological, clinical, and pathological data relating to leprosy/HIV coinfection. The published epidemiological data are limited in quality but show neither an increased HIV prevalence among leprosy cases nor an alteration in clinical spectrum of leprosy among coinfected patients. Some data suggest that immune-mediated reactions that complicate leprosy occur at a higher frequency in coinfected patients. Leprosy has now been reported presenting as immune reconstitution disease among patients commencing highly active antiretroviral treatment. Histopathological observations reveal a normal spectrum of appearances in biopsies of leprosy lesions from coinfected patients, even among those with advanced immunodeficiency. These observations suggest that cell-mediated immune responses to M leprae are preserved at the site of disease despite evidence that these responses are abrogated systemically, by contrast with tuberculosis, in which the host granulomatous response is impaired by HIV coinfection. We speculate that this paradox may relate to differences between the activation state and rates of cell turnover within leprosy and tuberculosis granulomas that differentially affect the susceptibility of the granulomas to HIV. The interactions between leprosy and HIV have been little studied and further research on the clinical, pathological, and management aspects of this coinfection is warranted. PMID:16728321

  17. Paradoxical Herniation After Unilateral Decompressive Craniectomy Predicts Better Patient Survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqiang; Guo, Jingfang; Wu, Jin; Peng, Guoyi; Huang, Mindong; Cai, Chuwei; Yang, Yingming; Wang, Shousen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Paradoxical herniation (PH) is a life-threatening emergency after decompressive craniectomy. In the current study, we examined patient survival in patients who developed PH after decompressive craniectomy versus those who did not. Risk factors for, and management of, PH were also analyzed. This retrospective analysis included 429 consecutive patients receiving decompressive craniectomy during a period from January 2007 to December 2012. Mortality rate and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) were compared between those who developed PH (n = 13) versus those who did not (n = 416). A stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out to examine the risk factors for PH. The overall mortality in the entire sample was 22.8%, with a median follow-up of 6 months. Oddly enough, all 13 patients who developed PH survived beyond 6 months. Glasgow Coma Scale did not differ between the 2 groups upon admission, but GOS was significantly higher in subjects who developed PH. Both the disease type and coma degree were comparable between the 13 PH patients and the remaining 416 patients. In all PH episodes, patients responded to emergency treatments that included intravenous hydration, cerebral spinal fluid drainage discontinuation, and Trendelenburg position. A regression analysis indicated the following independent risk factors for PH: external ventriculostomy, lumbar puncture, and continuous external lumbar drainage. The rate of PH is approximately 3% after decompressive craniectomy. The most intriguing findings of the current study were the 0% mortality in those who developed PH versus 23.6% mortality in those who did not develop PH and significant difference of GOS score at 6-month follow-up between the 2 groups, suggesting that PH after decompressive craniectomy should be managed aggressively. The risk factors for PH include external ventriculostomy, ventriculoperitoneal shunt, lumbar puncture, and continuous external lumbar drainage. PMID:26945365

  18. ADHD, Multimodal Treatment, and Longitudinal Outcome: Evidence, Paradox, and Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, L. Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Given major increases in the diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and in rates of medication for this condition, we carefully examine evidence for effects of single versus multimodal (i.e., combined medication and psychosocial/behavioral) interventions for ADHD. Our primary data source is the Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with ADHD (MTA), a 14-month, randomized clinical trial in which intensive behavioral, medication, and multimodal treatment arms were contrasted with one another and with community intervention (treatment-as-usual), regarding outcome domains of ADHD symptoms, comorbidities, and core functional impairments. Although initial reports emphasized the superiority of well-monitored medication for symptomatic improvement, reanalyses and reappraisals have highlighted (a) the superiority of combination treatment for composite outcomes and for domains of functional impairment (e.g., academic achievement, social skills, parenting practices); (b) the importance of considering moderator and mediator processes underlying differential patterns of outcome, including comorbid subgroups and improvements in family discipline style during the intervention period; (c) the emergence of side effects (e.g., mild growth suppression) in youth treated with long-term medication; and (d) the diminution of medication’s initial superiority once the randomly assigned treatment phase turned into naturalistic follow-up. The key paradox is that whereas ADHD clearly responds to medication and behavioral treatment in the short term, evidence for long-term effectiveness remains elusive. We close with discussion of future directions and a call for greater understanding of relevant developmental processes in the attempt to promote optimal, generalized, and lasting treatments for this important and impairing neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:25558298

  19. Paradoxical function for the receptor for advanced glycation end products in mouse models of pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Judson M; Kliment, Corrine R; Ramsgaard, Lasse; Milutinovic, Pavle S; Crum, Lauren; Tobolewski, Jacob M; Oury, Tim D

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive disease with poor survival. The identification of therapeutic targets is essential to improving outcomes. Previous studies found that expression of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) in the lung is significantly decreased in human IPF lungs and in two animal models of pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, RAGE-null mice spontaneously develop pulmonary fibrosis with age and more severe fibrosis when challenged with asbestos. In contrast to the findings that the lack of RAGE enhanced pulmonary fibrosis, He et al. found that RAGE null mice were protected from bleomycin-induced fibrosis and suggested the effect was due to a lack of HMGB1 induced RAGE signaling. The current study further tests this hypothesis by blocking RAGE signaling via administration of soluble RAGE, a decoy receptor, to determine if this will also protect against pulmonary fibrosis. Wild-type, RAGE+/-, and RAGE-/- mice were treated with bleomycin and assessed for fibrosis. Wild-type mice were also treated with exogenous soluble RAGE or vehicle control. In addition, in vitro studies with primary alveolar epithelial cells from wild-type and RAGE null mice were used to investigate the effect of RAGE on cell viability and migration in response to injury. A lack of RAGE was found to be protective against bleomycin injury in both in vivo and in vitro studies. However, soluble RAGE administration was unable to ameliorate fibrosis. This study confirms paradoxical responses to two different models of pulmonary fibrosis and suggests a further role for RAGE in cellular migration. PMID:21487520

  20. Geologic characterization report for the Paradox Basin Study Region, Utah Study Areas. Volume 6. Salt Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    Surface landforms in the Salt Valley Area are generally a function of the Salt Valley anticline and are characterized by parallel and subparallel cuestaform ridges and hogbacks and flat valley floors. The most prominent structure in the Area is the Salt Valley anticline. Erosion resulting from the Tertiary uplift of the Colorado Plateau led to salt dissolution and subsequent collapse along the crest of the anticline. Continued erosion removed the collapse material, forming an axial valley along the crest of the anticline. Paleozoic rocks beneath the salt bearing Paradox Formation consist of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, siltstone and shale. The salt beds of the Paradox Formation occur in distinct cycles separated by an interbed sequence of anhydrite, carbonate, and clastic rocks. The Paradox Formation is overlain by Pennsylvanian limestone; Permian sandstone; and Mesozoic sandstone, mudstone, conglomerate and shale. No earthquakes have been reported in the Area during the period of the historic record and contemporary seismicity appears to be diffusely distributed, of low level and small magnitude. The upper unit includes the Permian strata and upper Honaker Trail Formation. The current data base is insufficient to estimate ground-water flow rates and directions in this unit. The middle unit includes the evaporites in the Paradox Formation and no laterally extensive flow systems are apparent. The lower unit consists of the rocks below the Paradox Formation where permeabilities vary widely, and the apparent flow direction is toward the west. 108 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Hormesis and Paradoxical Effects of Drooping Birch (Betula pendula Roth) Parameters Under Motor Traffic Pollution

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Various plant indexes are used or recommended for bioindication. However, the nonmonotonic dose–response dependences (hormesis and paradoxical effects) of these indexes are insufficiently explored upon exposure to pollution. We studied the dependences of these Betula pendula indexes on the intensity of motor traffic pollution. Regression analysis did not reveal any dependence of chlorophyll and carotenoid content on traffic intensity (in 2008 and 2010-2013). Lipid peroxidation rate had different versions of paradoxical effects in 2008 and 2010 to 2012 and increased in comparison with control under an increase in pollution level in 2013. In 2010 to 2012, all dose–response dependences for total protein and thiol group content were biphasic and multiphasic paradoxical effects. In 2013, an increase in traffic intensity induced a linear reduction in protein content and an increase in thiol group level in comparison with the control. In most cases, the studied phenological indexes and seed production decreased monotonically in comparison with the control following an increase in traffic intensity. Only in 2010 and 2013, share of fallen leaves had hormesis and paradoxical effect accordingly. Fluctuating asymmetry had a paradoxical effect and hormesis in 2008 and 2012, accordingly, and increased in comparison with the control under an increase in the level of pollution in 2010 to 2011. PMID:26676071

  2. The process of paradoxical autonomy and survival in the heroin careers of Mexican American women

    PubMed Central

    Valdez, Avelardo; Kaplan, Charles D.; Cepeda, Alice

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on the process of paradoxical autonomy and survival in the heroin careers of Mexican American women. We explore how gender roles among Mexican American female heroin users influence the emergence of a paradoxical autonomy. Five key subprocesses of this autonomy were identified from 14 life history narratives: sustaining employment, working the welfare system, illegal activities, emotional aloofness, and loss of family and children. Dependency on drugs did not lead simply to the reproduction of traditional gender dependency but, paradoxically, seemed to contribute to a new type of gender autonomy. This autonomy did not necessarily make the survival less arduous, only more independent from gendered responsibilities associated with men and often with family and children. We discuss how this paradoxical autonomy is not acquired without ambiguity by some of these women, who place a value on maintaining relationships with men and family. Our study makes a contribution to a better understanding of the diverse processes by which Mexican American female heroin users struggle to survive. Although this struggle leads to a paradoxical autonomy from their traditional gender roles, it does little to change other barriers to self-development originating from poverty, ethnic discrimination, and the severity of their drug addiction. PMID:21057594

  3. Burial and thermal history of the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado, and petroleum potential of the Middle Pennsylvanian Paradox Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nuccio, Vito F.; Condon, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    The Ismay?Desert Creek interval and Cane Creek cycle of the Alkali Gulch interval of the Middle Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin of Utah and Colorado contain excellent organic-rich source rocks having total organic carbon contents ranging from 0.5 to 11.0 percent. The source rocks in both intervals contain types I, II, and III organic matter and are potential source rocks for both oil and gas. Organic matter in the Ismay?Desert Creek interval and Cane Creek cycle of the Alkali Gulch interval (hereinafter referred to in this report as the ?Cane Creek cycle?) probably is more terrestrial in origin in the eastern part of the basin and is interpreted to have contributed to some of the gas produced there. Thermal maturity increases from southwest to northeast for both the Ismay?Desert Creek interval and Cane Creek cycle, following structural and burial trends throughout the basin. In the northernmost part of the basin, the combination of a relatively thick Tertiary sedimentary sequence and high basinal heat flow has produced very high thermal maturities. Although general thermal maturity trends are similar for both the Ismay?Desert Creek interval and Cane Creek cycle, actual maturity levels are higher for the Cane Creek due to the additional thickness (as much as several thousand feet) of Middle Pennsylvanian section. Throughout most of the basin, the Ismay?Desert Creek interval is mature and in the petroleum-generation window (0.10 to 0.50 production index (PI)), and both oil and gas are produced; in the south-central to southwestern part of the basin, however, the interval is marginally mature (0.10 PI) in the central part of the basin and is overmature (past the petroleum-generation window (>0.50 PI)) throughout most of the eastern part of the basin. The Cane Creek cycle generally produces oil and associated gas throughout the western and central parts of the basin and thermogenic gas in the eastern part of the basin. Burial and thermal

  4. Illusory shadow person causing paradoxical gaze deviations during temporal lobe seizures.

    PubMed

    Zijlmans, M; van Eijsden, P; Ferrier, C H; Kho, K H; van Rijen, P C; Leijten, F S S

    2009-06-01

    Generally, activation of the frontal eye field during seizures can cause versive (forced) gaze deviation, while non-versive head deviation is hypothesised to result from ictal neglect after inactivation of the ipsilateral temporo-parietal area. Almost all non-versive head deviations occurring during temporal lobe seizures are directed to the side of seizure onset, so in derogatory cases it is worth while explaining the paradoxical event. We present a patient with a paradoxical direction of gaze deviation during temporal lobe seizures with an unexpected explanation. Electrocortical stimulation of the temporo-parieto-occipital junction elicited an irrepressible urge to look towards an illusory shadow person besides the patient. Paradoxical non-versive gaze deviations in temporal lobe seizures may be due to illusory experiences masked by postictal amnesia. PMID:19448096

  5. Colloquium: The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox: From concepts to applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, M. D.; Drummond, P. D.; Bowen, W. P.; Cavalcanti, E. G.; Lam, P. K.; Bachor, H. A.; Andersen, U. L.; Leuchs, G.

    2009-10-15

    This Colloquium examines the field of the Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen (EPR) gedanken experiment, from the original paper of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen, through to modern theoretical proposals of how to realize both the continuous-variable and discrete versions of the EPR paradox. The relationship with entanglement and Bell's theorem are analyzed, and the progress to date towards experimental confirmation of the EPR paradox is summarized, with a detailed treatment of the continuous-variable paradox in laser-based experiments. Practical techniques covered include continuous-wave parametric amplifier and optical fiber quantum soliton experiments. Current proposals for extending EPR experiments to massive-particle systems are discussed, including spin squeezing, atomic position entanglement, and quadrature entanglement in ultracold atoms. Finally, applications of this technology to quantum key distribution, quantum teleportation, and entanglement swapping are examined.

  6. Perspectives on Games, Computers, and Mental Health: Questions about Paradoxes, Evidences, and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Desseilles, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In the field of mental health, games and computerized games present questions about paradoxes, evidences, and challenges. This perspective article offers perspectives and personal opinion about these questions, evidences, and challenges with an objective of presenting several ideas and issues in this rapidly developing field. First, games raise some questions in the sense of the paradox between a game and an issue, as well as the paradox of using an amusing game to treat a serious pathology. Second, games also present evidence in the sense that they involve relationships with others, as well as learning, communication, language, emotional regulation, and hedonism. Third, games present challenges, such as the risk of abuse, the critical temporal period that may be limited to childhood, their important influence on sociocognitive learning and the establishment of social norms, and the risk of misuse of games. PMID:27458390

  7. Overcoming the Pigou-Downs Paradox Using Advanced Traffic Signal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowdur, S. C.; Rughooputh, S. D. D. V.

    2013-06-01

    Expansion of a road network has often been observed to cause more congestion and has led researchers to the formulation of traffic paradoxes such as the Pigou-Downs and the Braess paradoxes. In this paper, we present an application of advanced traffic signal control (ATSC) to overcome the Pigou-Downs paradox. Port Louis, the capital city of Mauritius is used to investigate the effect of using a harbor bridge to by-pass the city center. Using traffic cellular automata (TCA) simulations it has been shown how, if traffic is only gradually deviated along the by-pass, an overall longer travel time and decreased flux would result. By making use of ATSC, which involves traffic lights that sense the number of vehicles accumulated in the queue, better travel times and fluxes are achieved.

  8. Perspectives on Games, Computers, and Mental Health: Questions about Paradoxes, Evidences, and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Desseilles, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In the field of mental health, games and computerized games present questions about paradoxes, evidences, and challenges. This perspective article offers perspectives and personal opinion about these questions, evidences, and challenges with an objective of presenting several ideas and issues in this rapidly developing field. First, games raise some questions in the sense of the paradox between a game and an issue, as well as the paradox of using an amusing game to treat a serious pathology. Second, games also present evidence in the sense that they involve relationships with others, as well as learning, communication, language, emotional regulation, and hedonism. Third, games present challenges, such as the risk of abuse, the critical temporal period that may be limited to childhood, their important influence on sociocognitive learning and the establishment of social norms, and the risk of misuse of games. PMID:27458390

  9. Paradoxical TB-IRIS in HIV-infected adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Namale, Phiona E; Abdullahi, Leila H; Fine, Stacey; Kamkuemah, Monika; Wilkinson, Robert J; Meintjes, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Paradoxical tuberculosis immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS) was first described almost two decades ago. We undertook this systematic review and meta-analysis to collate findings across studies that have reported the incidence, clinical features, management and outcomes of paradoxical TB-IRIS. Forty studies that cumulatively reported 1048 paradoxical TB-IRIS cases were included. The pooled estimated incidence among patients with HIV-associated TB initiating antiretroviral therapy was 18% (95% CI: 16-21%). Frequent features were pulmonary and lymph node involvement. Hospitalization occurred in 25% (95% CI: 19-30%). In studies that reported treatment, corticosteroids were prescribed more frequently (38%; 95% CI: 27-48%) than nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (28%; 95% CI: 2-53%). Case fatality was 7% (95% CI: 4-11%), but death attributed to TB-IRIS occurred in 2% of cases (95% CI: 1-3%). PMID:26059627

  10. The adaptation of non-western and Muslim immigrant adolescents in the Netherlands: An immigrant paradox?

    PubMed

    Van Geel, Mitch; Vedder, Paul

    2010-10-01

    This article addresses the possible existence of an immigrant paradox in a sample of immigrant adolescents attending vocational schools in the Netherlands. An immigrant paradox is the finding that first generation immigrants show a more positive pattern of adaptation than nationals despite poorer economic conditions. Second generation immigrants regress to the nationals in terms of adaptation. A sample of 152 first generation immigrant adolescents, 285 second generation immigrant adolescents and 406 national adolescents completed self-reports about socio-economic status, psychological problems, behavioral problems and self-esteem. The results supported the existence of an immigrant paradox in this sample. This indicates that further assimilation among immigrant adolescents does not necessarily lead to increased well being. PMID:20602739

  11. Paradoxes of the Cosmological Physics in the Beginning of the 21-st Century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshev, Yu. V.

    2015-06-01

    In the history of cosmology physical paradoxes played important role for development of contemporary world models. Within the modern standard cosmological model there are both observational and conceptual cosmological paradoxes which stimulate to search their solution. Confrontation of theoretical predictions of the standard cosmological model with the latest astrophysical observational data is considered. A review of conceptual problems of the Friedmann space expending models, which are in the bases of modern cosmological model, is discussed. The main paradoxes, which are discussed in modern literature, are the Newtonian character of the exact Friedmann equation, the violation of the energy conservation within any comoving local volume, violation of the limiting recession velocity of galaxies for the observed high redshift objects. Possible observational tests of the nature of the cosmological redshift are discussed.

  12. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium-heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth System Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Abernathey, R.; Pradal, M.-A.

    2014-11-20

    This paper uses a suite of Earth System models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science. The helium-heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in the earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedi that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a fewmore » hundred m2 s−1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Because helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere, but radiocarbon equilibrates slowly, it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the Southeast Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi in the deep ocean than is seen in theoretical parameterizations based on baroclinic growth rates. We argue that a key part of resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox is to abandon the idea that ARedi has a direct relationship to local baroclinic instability and to the so called "thickness" mixing coefficient AGM.« less

  13. Exploring the isopycnal mixing and helium-heat paradoxes in a suite of Earth System Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Abernathey, R.; Pradal, M.-A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper uses a suite of Earth System models which simulate the distribution of He isotopes and radiocarbon to examine two paradoxes in Earth science. The helium-heat paradox refers to the fact that helium emissions to the deep ocean are far lower than would be expected given the rate of geothermal heating, since both are thought to be the result of radioactive decay in the earth's interior. The isopycnal mixing paradox comes from the fact that many theoretical parameterizations of the isopycnal mixing coefficient ARedi that link it to baroclinic instability project it to be small (of order a few hundred m2 s-1) in the ocean interior away from boundary currents. However, direct observations using tracers and floats (largely in the upper ocean) suggest that values of this coefficient are an order of magnitude higher. Because helium isotopes equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere, but radiocarbon equilibrates slowly, it might be thought that resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox in favor of the higher observational estimates of ARedi might also solve the helium paradox. In this paper we show that this is not the case. In a suite of models with different spatially constant and spatially varying values of ARedi the distribution of radiocarbon and helium isotopes is sensitive to the value of ARedi. However, away from strong helium sources in the Southeast Pacific, the relationship between the two is not sensitive, indicating that large-scale advection is the limiting process for removing helium and radiocarbon from the deep ocean. The helium isotopes, in turn, suggest a higher value of ARedi in the deep ocean than is seen in theoretical parameterizations based on baroclinic growth rates. We argue that a key part of resolving the isopycnal mixing paradox is to abandon the idea that ARedi has a direct relationship to local baroclinic instability and to the so called "thickness" mixing coefficient AGM.

  14. The "smoker's paradox" in patients with acute coronary syndrome: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Smokers have been shown to have lower mortality after acute coronary syndrome than non-smokers. This has been attributed to the younger age, lower co-morbidity, more aggressive treatment and lower risk profile of the smoker. Some studies, however, have used multivariate analyses to show a residual survival benefit for smokers; that is, the "smoker's paradox". The aim of this study was, therefore, to perform a systematic review of the literature and evidence surrounding the existence of the "smoker's paradox". Methods Relevant studies published by September 2010 were identified through literature searches using EMBASE (from 1980), MEDLINE (from 1963) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, with a combination of text words and subject headings used. English-language original articles were included if they presented data on hospitalised patients with defined acute coronary syndrome, reported at least in-hospital mortality, had a clear definition of smoking status (including ex-smokers), presented crude and adjusted mortality data with effect estimates, and had a study sample of > 100 smokers and > 100 non-smokers. Two investigators independently reviewed all titles and abstracts in order to identify potentially relevant articles, with any discrepancies resolved by repeated review and discussion. Results A total of 978 citations were identified, with 18 citations from 17 studies included thereafter. Six studies (one observational study, three registries and two randomised controlled trials on thrombolytic treatment) observed a "smoker's paradox". Between the 1980s and 1990s these studies enrolled patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) according to criteria similar to the World Health Organisation criteria from 1979. Among the remaining 11 studies not supporting the existence of the paradox, five studies represented patients undergoing contemporary management. Conclusion The "smoker's paradox" was observed in some studies of AMI

  15. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah. Annual report, February 9, 1997--February 8, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31,800,000 m{sup 3}) of oil are at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. This study utilized representative core and modern geophysical logs to characterize and grade each of the five fields for suitability of enhanced recovery projects. The typical vertical sequence or cycle of lithofacies from each field, as determined from conventional core, was tied to its corresponding log response. The diagenetic fabrics and porosity types found in the various hydrocarbon-bearing rocks of each field can be an indicator of reservoir flow capacity, storage capacity, and potential for water- and/or CO{sub 2}-flooding. Diagenetic histories of the various Desert Creek reservoirs were determined from 50 representative samples selected from the conventional cores of each field. Thin sections were also made of each sample for petrographic description.

  16. Expression--An Experimental Field for Investigation and Management of the Paradox of Education (With Illustrations from Voice Education)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nohavová, Alena; Slavík, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces and explains the concept of the "paradox of education" for capturing the polarity between autonomy and heteronomy in education. The paradox of education is an essential part of the curriculum and, if not under control, manifests itself in the discrepancy between the teaching process, its objectives and evaluation…

  17. The Sound of One Hand Clapping: Counterintuitive Lessons Extracted from Paradoxes and Double Binds in Participative Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Ronald F.

    1998-01-01

    Examines a number of specific paradoxical situations found in participative organizations; compares them to the paradoxes found in select Zen stories or koans--each set of stories or examples focuses on one or more aspects of empowerment. Reveals, through narrative analysis, counterintuitive ideas on how to understand and cope with organizational…

  18. Investigating the Sociolinguistic Gender Paradox in a Multilingual Community: A Case Study from the Republic of Palau.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Kazuko; Britain, David

    2003-01-01

    Examines the supposed "Gender Paradox" proposed by Labov (1990, 2001), which suggests women are both sometimes conversative and sometimes innovative in terms of linguistic variation and change. Explores the paradox from two perspectives: its applicability to multilingual as opposed to multidialectal communities and whether it is methodological or…

  19. You're Changed if You Do and Changed if You Don't: Mechanisms Underlying Paradoxical Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoham-Salomon, Varda; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined two mechanisms of change under paradoxical interventions (reactance and increased sense of self-efficacy) with procrastinating college students (N=49 and N=58). Measured study time and perceived self-efficacy before and after treatment. Under paradoxical interventions, subjects higher on initial reactance benefited more from therapy than…

  20. Surrogacy marker paradox measures in meta-analytic settings

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Michael R.; Conlon, Anna S.C.; Li, Yun; Kaciroti, Nico; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Because of the time and expense required to obtain clinical outcomes of interest, such as functional limitations or death, clinical trials often focus the effects of treatment on earlier and more easily obtained surrogate markers. Preliminary work to define surrogates focused on the fraction of a treatment effect “explained” by a marker in a regression model, but as notions of causality have been formalized in the statistical setting, formal definitions of high-quality surrogate markers have been developed in the causal inference framework, using either the “causal effect” or “causal association” settings. In the causal effect setting, high-quality surrogate markers have a large fraction of the total treatment effect explained by the effect of the treatment on the marker net of the treatment on the outcome. In the causal association setting, high-quality surrogate markers have large treatment effects on the outcome when there are large treatment effects on the marker, and small effects on the outcome when there are small effects on the marker. A particularly important feature of a surrogate marker is that the direction of a treatment effect be the same for both the marker and the outcome. Settings in which the marker and outcome are positively associated but the marker and outcome have beneficial and harmful or harmful and beneficial treatment effects, respectively, have been referred to as “surrogate paradoxes”. If this outcome always occurs, it is not problematic; however, as correlations among the outcome, marker, and their treatment effects weaken, it may occur for some trials and not for others, leading to potentially incorrect conclusions, and real-life examples that shortened thousands of lives are unfortunately available. We propose measures for assessing the risk of the surrogate paradox using the meta-analytic causal association framework, which allows us to focus on the probability that a given treatment will yield treatment effect in