Sample records for parallel blade-vortex interaction

  1. An experimental investigation of the parallel blade-vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caradonna, F. X.; Laub, G. H.; Tung, C.

    1984-01-01

    A scheme for investigating the parallel blade vortex interaction (BVI) has been designed and tested. The scheme involves setting a vortex generator upstream of a nonlifting rotor so that the vortex interacts with the blade at the forward azimuth. The method has revealed two propagation mechanisms: a type C shock propagation from the leading edge induced by the vortex at high tip speeds, and a rapid but continuous pressure pulse associated with the proximity of the vortex to the leading edge. The latter is thought to be the more important source. The effects of Mach number and vortex proximity are discussed.

  2. Large Eddy simulation of parallel blade-vortex interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felten, Frederic; Lund, Thomas

    2002-11-01

    Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) generally occurs under certain conditions of powered descent or during extreme maneuvering. The vibration and acoustic problems associated with the interaction of rotor tip vortices and the following blades is a major aerodynamic concern for the helicopter community. Numerous experimental and computational studies have been done over the last two decades in order to gain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in BVI. The most severe interaction, in terms of generated noise, happens when the vortex filament is parallel to the blade, thus affecting a great portion of it. The majority of the previous numerical studies of parallel BVI fall within a potential flow framework. Some Navier-Stokes approaches using dissipative numerical methods and RANS-type turbulence models have also been attempted, but with limited success. The current investigation makes use of an incompressible, non-dissipative, kinetic energy conserving collocated mesh scheme in conjunction with a dynamic subgrid-scale model. The concentrated tip vortex is not attenuated as it is convected downstream and over a NACA-0012 airfoil. The lift, drag, moment and pressure coefficients induced by the passage of the vortex are monitored in time and compared with experimental data.

  3. Head-on parallel blade-vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soogab; Bershader, Daniel

    1994-01-01

    An experimental and computational study was carried out to investigate the parallel head-on blade-vortex interaction (BVI) and its noise generation mechanism. A shock tube, with an enlarged test section, was used to generate a compressible starting vortex which interacted with a target airfoil. The dual-pulsed holographic interferometry (DPHI) technique and airfoil surface pressure measurements were employed to obtain quantitative flow data during the BVI. A thin-layer Navier-Stokes code (BV12D), with a high-order upwind-biased scheme and a multizonal grid, was also used to simulate numerically the phenomena occurring in the head-on BVI. The detailed structure of a convecting vortex was studied through independent measurements of density and pressure distributions across the vortex center. Results indicate that, in a strong head-on BVI, the opposite pressure peaks are generated on both sides of the leading edge as the vortex approaches. Then, as soon as the vortex passes by the leading edge, the high-pressure peak suddenly moves toward the low-peak-reducing in magnitude as it moves--simultaneously giving rise to the initial sound wave. In both experiment and computation, it is shown that the viscous effect plays a significant role in head-on BVIs.

  4. Strong parallel blade-vortex interaction and noise propagation in helicopter flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soogab

    Rotor impulsive noise is, of all the known sources of helicopter far-field noise radiation, the one which tends to dominate the acoustic spectrum generated by most helicopters. The helicopter generates a highly directional and rather unique form of impulsive noise which is thought to be generated by two source mechanisms: (1) high-speed impulsive noise due to formation of a shock on the advancing blade tip, and (2) Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise in low-powered descending flight or maneuvers, especially during an approach to a landing. As an experimental approach, a shock tube was built to generate a compressible viscous vortex which was being convected at a constant velocity in a quasi-uniform subsonic or transonic stream. The vortex then interacted with a target airfoil (NACA 0012 shape). In order to measure quantitatively the flow field, a DPHI (Dual Pulsed Holographic Interferometry) technique was utilized for both flow visualization and density field measurements, and fast-response Kulite transducers were used to obtain pressure histories at the surfaces of both the test section and the airfoil. Secondly, as a numerical approach, the Thin-Layer Navier-Stokes equations were solved not only to simulate the experimental measurements, but also to develop the fundamental understanding of flow field and sound generating mechanisms and, furthermore, to understand the effect of several important parameters on the sound generation due to blade-vortex interaction. The results indicate that the main noise generating mechanism in strong blade-vortex interactions is the severe pressure fluctuation near the leading-edge, caused by rapid oscillation of the stagnation point and formation of a suction peak. In strong parallel BVI, a secondary vortex may be generated by separation on the lower surface if the original vortex is clockwise. In that case, the induced vortex has an opposite rotation. The generated noise level is strongly dependent on Mach number, miss distance, angle of attack, and vortex structure (circulation and core size). The near-field acoustic behavior also depends on the leading-edge shape and thickness of the airfoil rather than the chord length. Results also indicate that transpiration on the leading-edge can suppress pressure fluctuation near the leading-edge and reduce the amplitude of propagating noise.

  5. Vortex dynamics during blade-vortex interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Di; Gregory, James W.

    2015-05-01

    Vortex dynamics during parallel blade-vortex interactions (BVIs) were investigated in a subsonic wind tunnel using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Vortices were generated by applying a rapid pitch-up motion to an airfoil through a pneumatic system, and the subsequent interactions with a downstream, unloaded target airfoil were studied. The blade-vortex interactions may be classified into three categories in terms of vortex behavior: close interaction, very close interaction, and collision. For each type of interaction, the vortex trajectory and strength variation were obtained from phase-averaged PIV data. The PIV results revealed the mechanisms of vortex decay and the effects of several key parameters on vortex dynamics, including separation distance (h/c), Reynolds number, and vortex sense. Generally, BVI has two main stages: interaction between vortex and leading edge (vortex-LE interaction) and interaction between vortex and boundary layer (vortex-BL interaction). Vortex-LE interaction, with its small separation distance, is dominated by inviscid decay of vortex strength due to pressure gradients near the leading edge. Therefore, the decay rate is determined by separation distance and vortex strength, but it is relatively insensitive to Reynolds number. Vortex-LE interaction will become a viscous-type interaction if there is enough separation distance. Vortex-BL interaction is inherently dominated by viscous effects, so the decay rate is dependent on Reynolds number. Vortex sense also has great impact on vortex-BL interaction because it changes the velocity field and shear stress near the surface.

  6. Rotorcraft Blade-Vortex Interaction Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Fredric H. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Blade-vortex interaction noises, sometimes referred to as 'blade slap', are avoided by increasing the absolute value of inflow to the rotor system of a rotorcraft. This is accomplished by creating a drag force which causes the angle of the tip-path plane of the rotor system to become more negative or more positive.

  7. Prediction of rotor blade-vortex interaction noise from 2-D aerodynamic calculations and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplot, M.; Haertig, J.

    The aerodynamic analysis used by the present numerical and experimental study of blade-vortex interactions is based on the computation of the velocity potential in a two-dimensional, incompressible, inviscid and unsteady flow. The pressure, lift, and drag coefficients deduced from theoretical instantaneous velocity field results obtained around a lifting Joukowski airfoil under the action of an incident vortex are compared with water tunnel measurements; good agreement is noted. Two-dimensional data are transformed in order to study the case of a helicopter rotor's parallel blade-vortex interaction.

  8. Helicopter tail rotor blade-vortex interaction noise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert R. George; S.-T. Chou

    1987-01-01

    A study is made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to the interactions with main rotor tip vortices. Summarized here are present analysis, the computer codes, and the results of several test cases. Amiet's unsteady thin airfoil theory is used to calculate the acoustics of blade-vortex interaction. The noise source is modelled as a force dipole resulting from

  9. An analysis of blade vortex interaction aerodynamics and acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The impulsive noise associated with helicopter flight due to Blade-Vortex Interaction, sometimes called blade slap is analyzed especially for the case of a close encounter of the blade-tip vortex with a following blade. Three parts of the phenomena are considered: the tip-vortex structure generated by the rotating blade, the unsteady pressure produced on the following blade during the interaction, and the acoustic radiation due to the unsteady pressure field. To simplify the problem, the analysis was confined to the situation where the vortex is aligned parallel to the blade span in which case the maximum acoustic pressure results. Acoustic radiation due to the interaction is analyzed in space-fixed coordinates and in the time domain with the unsteady pressure on the blade surface as the source of chordwise compact, but spanwise non-compact radiation. Maximum acoustic pressure is related to the vortex core size and Reynolds number which are in turn functions of the blade-tip aerodynamic parameters. Finally noise reduction and performance are considered.

  10. Blade-Vortex Interaction Airloads Prediction Using Multidisciplinary Coupling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joon Lim; Mark Potsdam; Roger Strawn; Ben Sim; Tor Nygaard

    2006-01-01

    Predictions of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise, using blade airloads obtained from a coupled aerodynamic, structural, and acoustics methodology, are presented. This methodology uses an iterative, loosely-coupled trim strategy for exchanging information between the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code OVERFLOW-2 and the computational structural dynamics (CSD) and rotorcraft comprehensive code CAMRAD-II. Results are compared to the HART-II rotor baseline conditions. It

  11. Blade vortex interaction noise reduction techniques for a rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Bruce D. (Inventor); Hassan, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Tadghighi, Hormoz (Inventor); JanakiRam, Ram D. (Inventor); Sankar, Lakshmi N. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An active control device for reducing blade-vortex interactions (BVI) noise generated by a rotorcraft, such as a helicopter, comprises a trailing edge flap located near the tip of each of the rotorcraft's rotor blades. The flap may be actuated in any conventional way, and is scheduled to be actuated to a deflected position during rotation of the rotor blade through predetermined regions of the rotor azimuth, and is further scheduled to be actuated to a retracted position through the remaining regions of the rotor azimuth. Through the careful azimuth-dependent deployment and retraction of the flap over the rotor disk, blade tip vortices which are the primary source for BVI noise are (a) made weaker and (b) pushed farther away from the rotor disk (that is, larger blade-vortex separation distances are achieved).

  12. Blade vortex interaction noise reduction techniques for a rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Bruce D. (Inventor); Hassan, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Tadghighi, Hormoz (Inventor); JanakiRam, Ram D. (Inventor); Sankar, Lakshmi N. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active control device for reducing blade-vortex interactions (BVI) noise generated by a rotorcraft, such as a helicopter, comprises a trailing edge flap located near the tip of each of the rotorcraft's rotor blades. The flap may be actuated in any conventional way, and is scheduled to be actuated to a deflected position during rotation of the rotor blade through predetermined regions of the rotor azimuth, and is further scheduled to be actuated to a retracted position through the remaining regions of the rotor azimuth. Through the careful azimuth-dependent deployment and retraction of the flap over the rotor disk, blade tip vortices which are the primary source for BVI noise are (a) made weaker and (b) pushed farther away from the rotor disk (that is, larger blade-vortex separation distances are achieved).

  13. A mechanism for mitigation of blade–vortex interaction using leading edge blowing flow control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris Weiland; Pavlos P. Vlachos

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of a vortical unsteady flow with structures is often encountered in engineering applications. Such flow structure\\u000a interactions (FSI) can be responsible for generating significant loads and can have many detrimental structural and acoustic\\u000a side effects, such as structural fatigue, radiated noise and even catastrophic results. Amongst the different types of FSI,\\u000a the parallel blade–vortex interaction (BVI) is the

  14. Rotating hot-wire investigation of the vortex responsible for blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontana, Richard Remo

    1988-01-01

    This distribution of the circumferential velocity of the vortex responsible for blade-vortex interaction noise was measured using a rotating hot-wire rake synchronously meshed with a model helicopter rotor at the blade passage frequency. Simultaneous far-field acoustic data and blade differential pressure measurements were obtained. Results show that the shape of the measured far-field acoustic blade-vortex interaction signature depends on the blade-vortex interaction geometry. The experimental results are compared with the Widnall-Wolf model for blade-vortex interaction noise.

  15. Influence of blade-to-blade dissimilarity on alleviation of helicopter blade-vortex interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Tauszig; F. Gandhi

    2001-01-01

    This paper numerically examines possible alleviation of parallel blade-vortex interaction (BVI), experienced by helicopters in low-speed descent, through the introduction of blade-to-blade dissimilarity. A four-bladed rotor with two sets of opposite blades is considered, and the radius of one set is reduced to 80% of the baseline radius. A free-wake analysis is developed for calculating the distorted wake geometry for

  16. Two- and three-dimensional blade vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davoudzadeh, F.; Liu, N.-S; Briley, W. R.; Buggeln, R. C.; Shamroth, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional time dependent Navier-Stokes analysis was applied to the rotor blade vortex interaction (BVI) problem. The numerical procedure is an iterative implicit procedure using three point central differences to represent spatial derivatives. A series of calculations were made to determine the time steps, pseudo-time steps, iterations, artificial dissipation level, etc. required to maintain a nondissipative vortex. Results show the chosen method to have excellent non-dissipative properties provided the correct parameters are chosen. This study was used to set parameters for both two- and three-dimensional blade vortex interaction studies. The two-dimensional study considered the interaction between a vortex and a NACA0012 airfoil. The results showed the detailed physics during the interaction including the pressure pulse propagating from the blade. The simulated flow physics was qualitatively similar to that experimentally observed. The 2-D BVI phenomena is the result of the buildup and violent collapse of the shock waves and local supersonic pockets on the blade surfaces. The resulting pressure pulse build-up appears to be centered at the blade leading edge. The three-dimensional interaction study considered the case of a vortex at 20 deg incidence to the blade leading edge. Although the qualitative results were similar to that of the two-dimensional interaction, details clearly showed the three-dimensional nature of the interaction process.

  17. A parametric study of transonic blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyrintzis, A. S.

    1991-01-01

    Several parameters of transonic blade-vortex interactions (BVI) are being studied and some ideas for noise reduction are introduced and tested using numerical simulation. The model used is the two-dimensional high frequency transonic small disturbance equation with regions of distributed vorticity (VTRAN2 code). The far-field noise signals are obtained by using the Kirchhoff method with extends the numerical 2-D near-field aerodynamic results to the linear acoustic 3-D far-field. The BVI noise mechanisms are explained and the effects of vortex type and strength, and angle of attack are studied. Particularly, airfoil shape modifications which lead to noise reduction are investigated. The results presented are expected to be helpful for better understanding of the nature of the BVI noise and better blade design.

  18. An experimental and computational study of 2-D blade-vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Soogab; Bershader, Daniel; Rai, Man M.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is carried out to investigate the dominant physical factors of 2D parallel blade-vortex interaction (BVI) and its noise generation. A shock tube was used to generate a starting vortex which interacted with a target airfoil. Double-exposed holographic interferometry and airfoil surface pressure measurements were employed to obtain quantitative data during the BVI. As a numerical approach, thin-layer Navier-Stokes code, with a multizonal grid, was also used to resolve the phenomena occuring in the BVI, especially in the head-on collision case.

  19. Helicopter tail rotor blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Albert R.; Chou, S.-T.

    1987-03-01

    A study is made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to the interactions with main rotor tip vortices. Summarized here are present analysis, the computer codes, and the results of several test cases. Amiet's unsteady thin airfoil theory is used to calculate the acoustics of blade-vortex interaction. The noise source is modelled as a force dipole resulting from an airfoil of infinite span chopping through a skewed line vortex. To analyze the interactions between helicopter tail rotor and main rotor tip vortices, we developed a two-step approach: (1) the main rotor tip vortex system is obtained through a free wake geometry calculation of the main rotor using CAMRAD code; (2) acoustic analysis takes the results from the aerodynamic interaction analysis and calculates the farfield pressure signatures for the interactions. It is found that under a wide range of helicopter flight conditions, acoustic pressure fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly on the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors. fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly upon the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors.

  20. Transonic blade-vortex interactions noise: A parametric study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyrintzis, A. S.; Xue, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Transonic Blade-Vortex Interactions (BVI) are simulated numerically and the noise mechanisms are investigated. The 2-D high frequency transonic small disturbance equation is solved numerically (VTRAN2 code). An Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) scheme with monotone switches is used; viscous effects are included on the boundary and the vortex is simulated by the cloud-in-cell method. The Kirchoff method is used for the extension of the numerical 2-D near field aerodynamic results to the linear acoustic 3-D far field. The viscous effect (shock/boundary layer interaction) on BVI is investigated. The different types of shock motion are identified and compared. Two important disturbances with different directivity exist in the pressure signal and are believed to be related to the fluctuating lift and drag forces. Noise directivity for different cases is shown. The maximum radiation occurs at an angle between 60 and 90 deg below the horizontal for an airfoil fixed coordinate system and depends on the details of the airfoil shape. Different airfoil shapes are studied and classified according to the BVI noise produced.

  1. HART-II: Prediction of Blade-Vortex Interaction Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Joon W.; Tung, Chee; Yu, Yung H.; Burley, Casey L.; Brooks, Thomas; Boyd, Doug; vanderWall, Berend; Schneider, Oliver; Richard, Hugues; Raffel, Markus

    2003-01-01

    During the HART-I data analysis, the need for comprehensive wake data was found including vortex creation and aging, and its re-development after blade-vortex interaction. In October 2001, US Army AFDD, NASA Langley, German DLR, French ONERA and Dutch DNW performed the HART-II test as an international joint effort. The main objective was to focus on rotor wake measurement using a PIV technique along with the comprehensive data of blade deflections, airloads, and acoustics. Three prediction teams made preliminary correlation efforts with HART-II data: a joint US team of US Army AFDD and NASA Langley, German DLR, and French ONERA. The predicted results showed significant improvements over the HART-I predicted results, computed about several years ago, which indicated that there has been better understanding of complicated wake modeling in the comprehensive rotorcraft analysis. All three teams demonstrated satisfactory prediction capabilities, in general, though there were slight deviations of prediction accuracies for various disciplines.

  2. Active twist smart rotor technology for blade-vortex interaction noise reduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter C. Chen; James D. Baeder; Robert A. Evans; Jack Niemczuk; Paul A. Ross

    1999-01-01

    The results of this feasibility study suggest that active blade twist technology is a viable means to reduce blade- vortex interaction (BVI) noise in rotorcraft systems. A linearized unsteady aerodynamics analysis was formulated and successfully validated with computation fluid dynamics analysis. A simple control scheme with three control points was found to be effective for active BVI noise reduction. Based

  3. Correlation of helicopter impulsive noise from blade-vortex interaction with rotor mean inflow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew B. Connor; R. M. Martin

    1987-01-01

    Data from a test made in the Langley 4 x 7 Meter Tunnel were parametrically studied with respect to the occurrence of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) as a function of tunnel speed and rotor angle of attack. Three microphones on the tunnel centerline forward of the model and one microphone forward and 45 degrees to the right provided the data. The

  4. The effects of vortex modeling on blade-vortex interaction noise prediction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith M. Gallman; Chee Tung; Scott L. Low

    1995-01-01

    The use of a blade vortex interaction noise prediction scheme, based on CAMRAD\\/JA, FPR and RAPP, quantifies the effects of errors and assumptions in the modeling of the helicopter's shed vortex on the acoustic predictions. CAMRAD\\/JA computes the wake geometry and inflow angles that are used in FPR to solve for the aerodynamic surface pressures. RAPP uses these surface pressures

  5. Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise with Comparisons to CFD Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCluer, Megan S.

    1996-01-01

    A comparison of experimental acoustics data and computational predictions was performed for a helicopter rotor blade interacting with a parallel vortex. The experiment was designed to examine the aerodynamics and acoustics of parallel Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) and was performed in the Ames Research Center (ARC) 80- by 120-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel. An independently generated vortex interacted with a small-scale, nonlifting helicopter rotor at the 180 deg azimuth angle to create the interaction in a controlled environment. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was used to calculate near-field pressure time histories. The CFD code, called Transonic Unsteady Rotor Navier-Stokes (TURNS), was used to make comparisons with the acoustic pressure measurement at two microphone locations and several test conditions. The test conditions examined included hover tip Mach numbers of 0.6 and 0.7, advance ratio of 0.2, positive and negative vortex rotation, and the vortex passing above and below the rotor blade by 0.25 rotor chords. The results show that the CFD qualitatively predicts the acoustic characteristics very well, but quantitatively overpredicts the peak-to-peak sound pressure level by 15 percent in most cases. There also exists a discrepancy in the phasing (about 4 deg) of the BVI event in some cases. Additional calculations were performed to examine the effects of vortex strength, thickness, time accuracy, and directionality. This study validates the TURNS code for prediction of near-field acoustic pressures of controlled parallel BVI.

  6. Reduction of blade-vortex interaction noise using higher harmonic pitch control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas F. Brooks; Earl R. Booth Jr.; J. Ralph Jolly Jr.; William T. Yeager Jr.; Matthew L. Wilbur

    1989-01-01

    An acoustics test using an aeroelastically scaled rotor was conducted to examine the effectiveness of higher harmonic blade pitch control for the reduction of impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. A four-bladed, 110 in. diameter, articulated rotor model was tested in a heavy gas (Freon-12) medium in Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Noise and vibration measurements were made for a range of

  7. Reduction of blade-vortex interaction noise through higher harmonic pitch control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas F. Brooks; Earl R. Booth Jr.; J. Ralph Jolly Jr.; William T. Yeager Jr.; Matthew L. Wilbur

    1990-01-01

    An acoustics test using an aeroelastically scaled rotor was conducted to examine the effectiveness of higher harmonic blade pitch control for the reduction of impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. A four-bladed, 110 in. diameter, articulated rotor model was tested in a heavy gas (Freon-12) medium in Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Noise and vibration measurements were made for a range of

  8. Flow structure generated by perpendicular blade vortex interaction and implications for helicopter noise predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devenport, William J.; Glegg, Stewart A. L.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes accomplishments and progress for the period ending April 1995. Much of the work during this period has concentrated on preparation for an analysis of data produced by an extensive wind tunnel test. Time has also been spent further developing an empirical theory to account for the effects of blade-vortex interaction upon the circulation distribution of the vortex and on preliminary measurements aimed at controlling the vortex core size.

  9. A note on the general scaling of helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. H. Schmitz; D. A. Boxwell; C. Dahan; S. Lewy

    1982-01-01

    A model-rotor acoustic experiment in a three meter open section anechoic wind tunnel (CEPRA-19) is described. The important scaling parameters are reviewed and some on-line acoustic data are presented for conditions known to produce blade-vortex interaction noise on a single rotor helicopter. Time averages of the model-scale acoustic pulses are compared with similar full-scale data taken in-flight under the same

  10. Flow structure generated by perpendicular blade vortex interaction and implications for helicopter noise predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devenport, William J.; Glegg, Stewart A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Activities carried out in support of research on flow structure generated by perpendicular blade vortex interaction and implications for helicopter noise prediction are summarized. Progress in the following areas is described: (1) construction of 8 inch-chord NACA 0012 full-span blade; (2) Acquisition of two full-span blades; (3) preparation for hot wire measurements; (4) related work on a modified Betz's theory; and (5) work related to helicopter noise prediction. In addition, a list of publications based on the results of prior experimentation is presented.

  11. An Euler code calculation of blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Lamkin, S. L.

    1987-01-01

    An Euler code has been developed for calculation of noise radiation due to the interaction of a distributed vortex with a Joukowski airfoil. THe time-dependent incompressible flow field is first determined and then integrated to yield the resulting sound production through use of the elegant low-frequency Green's function approach. This code has several interesting numerical features involved in the vortex motion and in continuous satisfaction of the Kutta condition. In addition, it removes the limitations on Reynolds number and is much more efficient than an earlier Navier-Stokes code. Results indicate that the noise production is due to the deceleration and subsequent acceleration of the vortex as it approaches and passes the airfoil. Predicted acoustic levels and frequencies agree with measured data although a precise comparison would require the strength, size, and position of the incoming vortex to be known.

  12. A new look at sound generation by blade/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Mason, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    As a preliminary attempt to understand the dynamics of blade/vortex interaction, the two-dimensional problem of a rectilinear vortex filament interacting with a Joukowski airfoil is analyzed in both the lifting and nonlifting cases. The vortex velocity components could be obtained analytically and integrated to determine the vortex trajectory. With this information, the aeroacoustic low-frequency Green's function approach could then be employed to calculate the sound produced during the encounter. The results indicate that the vortex path deviates considerably from simple convection due to the presence of the airfoil and that a reasonably sharp sound pulse is radiated during the interaction whose fundamental frequency is critically dependent upon whether the vortex passes above or below the airfoil. Determination of this gross parameter of the interaction is shown to be highly nonlinearly dependent upon airfoil circulation, vortex circulation, and initial position.

  13. Blade-vortex interaction noise reduction with active twist smart rotor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Baeder, James D.; Evans, Robert A. D.; Niemczuk, John

    2001-02-01

    The results of this analytical feasibility study suggest that active blade twist technology is a viable means to reduce blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise in rotorcraft systems. A linearized unsteady aerodynamics analysis was formulated and successfully validated with computation fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. A simple control scheme with three control points was found to be effective for active BVI noise reduction. Based on current-day actuation technology where one to two degrees of twist per blade activation span is expected, measurable noise reductions of 2-4 dB were predicted for the relatively strong, close vortex interactions. For weaker vortex interactions, reductions of 7-10 dB were predicted. The required twist actuation per blade span for complete unsteady loading cancellation, however, may be infeasible because of the large stroke and high-frequency activation requirements.

  14. Active twist smart rotor technology for blade-vortex interaction noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Baeder, James D.; Evans, Robert A. D.; Niemczuk, John B.; Ross, Paul A.

    1999-06-01

    The results of this feasibility study suggest that active blade twist technology is a viable means to reduce blade- vortex interaction (BVI) noise in rotorcraft systems. A linearized unsteady aerodynamics analysis was formulated and successfully validated with computation fluid dynamics analysis. A simple control scheme with three control points was found to be effective for active BVI noise reduction. Based on current-day actuation technology where 1 to 2 degrees of twist per blade activation span is expected, measurable noise reductions of 2 to 4 dB were predicted for the relatively strong, close vortex interactions. For weaker vortex interactions, reductions of 7 to 10 dB were predicted. The required twist actuation per blade span for complete unsteady loading cancellation, however, may be infeasible because of the large stroke and high frequency activation requirements.

  15. Lift distribution and velocity field measurements for a three-dimensional, steady blade/vortex interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.; Norman, Thomas R.

    1987-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment simulating a steady three-dimensional helicopter rotor blade/vortex interaction is reported. The experimental configuration consisted of a vertical semispan vortex-generating wing, mounted upstream of a horizontal semispan rotor blade airfoil. A three-dimensional laser velocimeter was used to measure the velocity field in the region of the blade. Sectional lift coefficients were calculated by integrating the velocity field to obtain the bound vorticity. Total lift values, obtained by using an internal strain-gauge balance, verified the laser velocimeter data. Parametric variations of vortex strength, rotor blade angle of attack, and vortex position relative to the rotor blade were explored. These data are reported (with attention to experimental limitations) to provide a dataset for the validation of analytical work.

  16. Effect of wake structure on blade-vortex interaction phenomena: Acoustic prediction and validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, Judith M.; Tung, Chee; Schultz, Klaus J.; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Buchholz, Heino

    1995-01-01

    During the Higher Harmonic Control Aeroacoustic Rotor Test, extensive measurements of the rotor aerodynamics, the far-field acoustics, the wake geometry, and the blade motion for powered, descent, flight conditions were made. These measurements have been used to validate and improve the prediction of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. The improvements made to the BVI modeling after the evaluation of the test data are discussed. The effects of these improvements on the acoustic-pressure predictions are shown. These improvements include restructuring the wake, modifying the core size, incorporating the measured blade motion into the calculations, and attempting to improve the dynamic blade response. A comparison of four different implementations of the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation is presented. A common set of aerodynamic input has been used for this comparison.

  17. Mach number scaling of helicopter rotor blade/vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighton, Kenneth P.; Harris, Wesley L.

    1985-01-01

    A parametric study of model helicopter rotor blade slap due to blade vortex interaction (BVI) was conducted in a 5 by 7.5-foot anechoic wind tunnel using model helicopter rotors with two, three, and four blades. The results were compared with a previously developed Mach number scaling theory. Three- and four-bladed rotor configurations were found to show very good agreement with the Mach number to the sixth power law for all conditions tested. A reduction of conditions for which BVI blade slap is detected was observed for three-bladed rotors when compared to the two-bladed baseline. The advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotor exhibited an angular dependence not present for the two-bladed configuration. The upper limits for the advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotors increased with increasing rotational speed.

  18. Reduction of Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise through X-force control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Fredric H.

    1995-01-01

    Momentum theory and the longitudinal force balance equations of a single rotor helicopter are used to develop simple expressions to describe tip-path-plane tilt and uniform inflow to the rotor. The uniform inflow is adjusted to represent the inflow at certain azimuthal locations where strong Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) is likely to occur. This theoretical model is then used to describe the flight conditions where BVI is likely to occur and to explore those flight variables that can be used to minimize BVI noise radiation. A new X-force control is introduced to help minimize BVI noise. Several methods of generating the X-force are presented that can be used to alter the inflow to the rotor and thus increasing the likelihood of avoiding BVI during approaches to a landing.

  19. Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) Noise and Airload Prediction Using Loose Aerodynamic/Structural Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, B. W.; Lim, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    Predictions of blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise, using blade airloads obtained from a coupled aerodynamic and structural methodology, are presented. This methodology uses an iterative, loosely-coupled trim strategy to cycle information between the OVERFLOW-2 (CFD) and CAMRAD-II (CSD) codes. Results are compared to the HART-II baseline, minimum noise and minimum vibration conditions. It is shown that this CFD/CSD state-of-the-art approach is able to capture blade airload and noise radiation characteristics associated with BVI. With the exception of the HART-II minimum noise condition, predicted advancing and retreating side BVI for the baseline and minimum vibration conditions agrees favorably with measured data. Although the BVI airloads and noise amplitudes are generally under-predicted, this CFD/CSD methodology provides an overall noteworthy improvement over the lifting line aerodynamics and free-wake models typically used in CSD comprehensive analysis codes.

  20. Studies of blade-vortex interaction noise reduction by rotor blade modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    Blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise is one of the most objectionable types of helicopter noise. This impulsive blade-slap noise can be particularly intense during low-speed landing approach and maneuvers. Over the years, a number of flight and model rotor tests have examined blade tip modification and other blade design changes to reduce this noise. Many times these tests have produced conflicting results. In the present paper, a number of these studies are reviewed in light of the current understanding of the BVI noise problem. Results from one study in particular are used to help establish the noise reduction potential and to shed light on the role of blade design. Current blade studies and some new concepts under development are also described.

  1. Wake Geometry Effects on Rotor Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise Directivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Marcolini, Michael A.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K.-J.

    1990-01-01

    Acoustic measurements from a model rotor wind tunnel test are presented which show that the directionality of rotor blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise is strongly dependent on the rotor advance ratio and disk attitude. A rotor free wake analysis is used to show that the general locus of interactions on the rotor disk is also strongly dependent on advance ratio and disk attitude. A comparison of the changing directionality of the BVI noise with changes in the interaction locations shows that the strongest noise radiation occurs in the direction of motion normal to the blade span at the time of interaction, for both advancing and retreating side BVI. For advancing side interactions, the BVI radiation angle down from the tip-path plane appears relatively insensitive to rotor operating condition and is typically between 40 and 55 deg below the disk. However, the azimuthal radiation direction shows a clear trend with descent speed, moving towards the right of the flight path with increasing descent speed. The movement of the strongest radiation direction is attributed to the movement of the interaction locations on the rotor disk with increasing descent speed.

  2. Calculation of Rotor Blade?Vortex Interaction Airloads Using a Multiple-Trailer Free-Wake Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wayne Johnson; Yung H. Yu

    2003-01-01

    Analytical results of rotor blade- vortex interaction airloads are presented with two different wake models in the comprehensive analysis CAMRAD II, and these calculated results are compared with the experimental data obtained from the higher-harmonic-control aeroacoustic rotor test (HART-I) program. The HART rotor was a 40%, Mach-scaled model of the hingeless BO-105 main rotor. Two wake models used in the

  3. A study of the noise mechanisms of transonic blade-vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.; Xue, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Transonic blade-vortex interactions (BVI) are simulated numerically and the noise mechanisms are investigated. The two-dimensional high frequency transonic small disturbance equation is solved numerically (VTRAN2 code). An ADI scheme with monotone switches is used; viscous effects are included on the boundary, and the vortex is simulated by the cloud in cell method. The Kirchhoff method is used for the extension of the numerical two-dimensional near-field aerodynamic results to the linear acoustic three dimensional far field. The viscous effects (shock/boundary layer interactions) on BVI is investigated. The different types of shock motion are identified and compared. Two important disturbances with different directivity exist in the pressure signal and are believed to be related to the fluctuating lift and drag forces. Noise directivity for different cases is shown. The maximum radiation occurs at an angle between 60 and 90 degrees below the horizontal for an airfoil-fixed coordinate system and depends on the details of the airfoil shape. Different airfoil shapes are studied and classified according to the BVI noise produced.

  4. Reduction of blade-vortex interaction noise through higher harmonic pitch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Jolly, J. Ralph, Jr.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1990-01-01

    An acoustics test using an aeroelastically scaled rotor was conducted to examine the effectiveness of higher harmonic blade pitch control for the reduction of impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. A four-bladed, 110 in. diameter, articulated rotor model was tested in a heavy gas (Freon-12) medium in Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Noise and vibration measurements were made for a range of matched flight conditions, where prescribed (open-loop) higher harmonic pitch was superimposed on the normal (baseline) collective and cyclic trim pitch. For the inflow-microphone noise measurements, advantage was taken of the reverberance in the hard walled tunnel by using a sound power determination approach. Initial findings from on-line data processing for three of the test microphones are reported for a 4/rev (4P) collective pitch control for a range of input amplitudes and phases. By comparing these results to corresponding baseline (no control) conditions, significant noise reductions (4 to 5 dB) were found for low-speed descent conditions, where helicopter BVI noise is most intense. For other rotor flight conditions, the overall noise was found to increase. All cases show increased vibration levels.

  5. Active control of blade vortex interaction noise on a helicopter blade element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyur, Kartik B.; Krstic, Miroslav

    1998-07-01

    Blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise has been recognized as the primary determinant of the helicopter's far field acoustic signature. Given the limitations of design in eliminating this dynamic phenomenon, there exists a need for control. In this paper, we present the application, first of feedback control strategies, and then of adaptive cancellation of Leishman and Hariharan's linear aerodynamic model of a trailing edge flap. Lift fluctuations caused by vortices are taken as output disturbance. The contribution of the vortices to lift is obtained from Leishman's indicial model for gusts. The use of an active structure for actuation is assumed, and the actuator is approximated as a lag element. To design an adaptive cancellation scheme that is applicable not only to BVI but also to general problems with periodic disturbances, we start with the sensitivity method but arrive at the same scheme derived by Sacks, Bodson, and Khosla who introduced a phase advance into a pseudo-gradient scheme. We discuss stability of the scheme via averaging.

  6. Helicopter model rotor-blade vortex interaction impulsive noise: Scalability and parametric variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Splettstoesser, W. R.; Schultz, K. J.; Boxwell, D. A.; Schmitz, F. H.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic data taken in the anechoic Deutsch-Niederlaendischer Windkanal (DNW) have documented the blade vortex interaction (BVI) impulsive noise radiated from a 1/7-scale model main rotor of the AH-1 series helicopter. Averaged model scale data were compared with averaged full scale, inflight acoustic data under similar nondimensional test conditions. At low advance ratios (mu = 0.164 to 0.194), the data scale remarkable well in level and waveform shape, and also duplicate the directivity pattern of BVI impulsive noise. At moderate advance ratios (mu = 0.224 to 0.270), the scaling deteriorates, suggesting that the model scale rotor is not adequately simulating the full scale BVI noise; presently, no proved explanation of this discrepancy exists. Carefully performed parametric variations over a complete matrix of testing conditions have shown that all of the four governing nondimensional parameters - tip Mach number at hover, advance ratio, local inflow ratio, and thrust coefficient - are highly sensitive to BVI noise radiation.

  7. Reduction of blade-vortex interaction noise using higher harmonic pitch control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Jolly, J. Ralph, Jr.; Yeager, William T., Jr.; Wilbur, Matthew L.

    1989-01-01

    An acoustics test using an aeroelastically scaled rotor was conducted to examine the effectiveness of higher harmonic blade pitch control for the reduction of impulsive blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. A four-bladed, 110 in. diameter, articulated rotor model was tested in a heavy gas (Freon-12) medium in Langley's Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. Noise and vibration measurements were made for a range of matched flight conditions, where prescribed (open-loop) higher harmonic pitch was superimposed on the normal (baseline) collective and cyclic trim pitch. For the inflow-microphone noise measurements, advantage was taken of the reverberance in the hard walled tunnel by using a sound power determination approach. Initial findings from on-line data processing for three of the test microphones are reported for a 4/rev (4P) collective pitch control for a range of input amplitudes and phases. By comparing these results to corresponding baseline (no control) conditions, significant noise reductions (4 to 5 dB) were found for low-speed descent conditions, where helicopter BVI noise is most intense. For other rotor flight conditions, the overall noise was found to increase. All cases show increased vibration levels.

  8. Advancing-side directivity and retreating-side interactions of model rotor blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. M.; Splettstoesser, W. R.; Elliott, J. W.; Schultz, K.-J.

    1988-01-01

    Acoustic data are presented from a 40 percent scale model of the four-bladed BO-105 helicopter main rotor, tested in a large aerodynamic wind tunnel. Rotor blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise data in the low-speed flight range were acquired using a traversing in-flow microphone array. Acoustic results presented are used to assess the acoustic far field of BVI noise, to map the directivity and temporal characteristics of BVI impulsive noise, and to show the existence of retreating-side BVI signals. The characterics of the acoustic radiation patterns, which can often be strongly focused, are found to be very dependent on rotor operating condition. The acoustic signals exhibit multiple blade-vortex interactions per blade with broad impulsive content at lower speeds, while at higher speeds, they exhibit fewer interactions per blade, with much sharper, higher amplitude acoustic signals. Moderate-amplitude BVI acoustic signals measured under the aft retreating quadrant of the rotor are shown to originate from the retreating side of the rotor.

  9. Rotorcraft acoustic radiation prediction based on a refined blade-vortex interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rule, John Allen

    1997-08-01

    The analysis of rotorcraft aerodynamics and acoustics is a challenging problem, primarily due to the fact that a rotorcraft continually flies through its own wake. The generation mechanism for a rotorcraft wake, which is dominated by strong, concentrated blade-tip trailing vortices, is similar to that in fixed wing aerodynamics. However, following blades encounter shed vortices from previous blades before they are swept downstream, resulting in sharp, impulsive loading on the blades. The blade/wake encounter, known as Blade-Vortex Interaction, or BVI, is responsible for a significant amount of vibratory loading and the characteristic rotorcraft acoustic signature in certain flight regimes. The present work addressed three different aspects of this interaction at a fundamental level. First, an analytical model for the prediction of trailing vortex structure is discussed. The model as presented is the culmination of a lengthy research effort to isolate the key physical mechanisms which govern vortex sheet rollup. Based on the Betz model, properties of the flow such as mass flux, axial momentum flux, and axial flux of angular momentum are conserved on either a differential or integral basis during the rollup process. The formation of a viscous central core was facilitated by the assumption of a turbulent mixing process with final vortex velocity profiles chosen to be consistent with a rotational flow mixing model and experimental observation. A general derivation of the method is outlined, followed by a comparison of model predictions with experimental vortex measurements, and finally a viscous blade drag model to account for additional effects of aerodynamic drag on vortex structure. The second phase of this program involved the development of a new formulation of lifting surface theory with the ultimate goal of an accurate, reduced order hybrid analytical/numerical model for fast rotorcraft load calculations. Currently, accurate rotorcraft airload analyses are limited by the massive computational power required to capture the small time scale events associated with BVI. This problem has two primary facets: accurate knowledge of the wake geometry, and accurate resolution of the impulsive loading imposed by a tip vortex on a blade. The present work addressed the second facet, providing a mathematical framework for solving the impulsive loading problem analytically, then asymptotically matching this solution to a low-resolution numerical calculation. A method was developed which uses continuous sheets of integrated boundary elements to model the lifting surface and wake. Special elements were developed to capture local behavior in high-gradient regions of the flow, thereby reducing the burden placed on the surrounding numerical method. Unsteady calculations for several classical cases were made in both frequency and time domain to demonstrate the performance of the method. Finally, a new unsteady, compressible boundary element method was applied to the problem of BVI acoustic radiation prediction. This numerical method, combined with the viscous core trailing vortex model, was used to duplicate the geometry and flight configuration of a detailed experimental BVI study carried out at NASA Ames Research Center. Blade surface pressure and near- and far-field acoustic radiation calculations were made. All calculations were shown to compare favorably with experimentally measured values. The linear boundary element method with non-linear corrections proved sufficient over most of the rotor azimuth, and particular in the region of the blade vortex interaction, suggesting that full non-linear CFD schemes are not necessary for rotorcraft noise prediction.

  10. The effects of vortex modeling on blade-vortex interaction noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, Judith M.; Tung, Chee; Low, Scott L.

    1995-01-01

    The use of a blade vortex interaction noise prediction scheme, based on CAMRAD/JA, FPR and RAPP, quantifies the effects of errors and assumptions in the modeling of the helicopter's shed vortex on the acoustic predictions. CAMRAD/JA computes the wake geometry and inflow angles that are used in FPR to solve for the aerodynamic surface pressures. RAPP uses these surface pressures to predict the acoustic pressure. Both CAMRAD/JA and FPR utilize the Biot-Savart Law to determine the influence of the vortical velocities on the blade loading and both codes use an algebraic vortex model for the solid body rotation of the vortex core. Large changes in the specification of the vortex core size do not change the inplane wake geometry calculated by CAMRAD/JA and only slightly affect the out-of-plane wake geometry. However, the aerodynamic surface pressure calculated by FPR changes in both magnitude and character with small changes to the core size used by the FPR calculations. This in turn affects the acoustic predictions. Shifting the CAMRAD/JA wake geometry away from the rotor plane by 1/4 chord produces drastic changes in the acoustic predictions indicating that the prediction of acoustic pressure is extremely sensitive to the miss distance between the vortex and the blade and that this distance must be calculated as accurately as possible for acceptable noise predictions. The inclusion or exclusion of a vortex in the FPR-RAPP calculation allows for the determination of the relative importance of that vortex as a BVI noise source.

  11. Signal Analysis of Helicopter Blade-Vortex-Interaction Acoustic Noise Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, James C.; Dai, Renshou

    1998-01-01

    Blade-Vortex-Interaction (BVI) produces annoying high-intensity impulsive noise. NASA Ames collected several sets of BVI noise data during in-flight and wind tunnel tests. The goal of this work is to extract the essential features of the BVI signals from the in-flight data and examine the feasibility of extracting those features from BVI noise recorded inside a large wind tunnel. BVI noise generating mechanisms and BVI radiation patterns an are considered and a simple mathematical-physical model is presented. It allows the construction of simple synthetic BVI events that are comparable to free flight data. The boundary effects of the wind tunnel floor and ceiling are identified and more complex synthetic BVI events are constructed to account for features observed in the wind tunnel data. It is demonstrated that improved recording of BVI events can be attained by changing the geometry of the rotor hub, floor, ceiling and microphone. The Euclidean distance measure is used to align BVI events from each blade and improved BVI signals are obtained by time-domain averaging the aligned data. The differences between BVI events for individual blades are then apparent. Removal of wind tunnel background noise by optimal Wiener-filtering is shown to be effective provided representative noise-only data have been recorded. Elimination of wind tunnel reflections by cepstral and optimal filtering deconvolution is examined. It is seen that the cepstral method is not applicable but that a pragmatic optimal filtering approach gives encouraging results. Recommendations for further work include: altering measurement geometry, real-time data observation and evaluation, examining reflection signals (particularly those from the ceiling) and performing further analysis of expected BVI signals for flight conditions of interest so that microphone placement can be optimized for each condition.

  12. The effects of vortex modeling on blade-vortex interaction noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallman, Judith M.; Tung, Chee; Low, Scott L.

    The use of a blade vortex interaction noise prediction scheme, based on CAMRAD/JA, FPR and RAPP, quantifies the effects of errors and assumptions in the modeling of the helicopter's shed vortex on the acoustic predictions. CAMRAD/JA computes the wake geometry and inflow angles that are used in FPR to solve for the aerodynamic surface pressures. RAPP uses these surface pressures to predict the acoustic pressure. Both CAMRAD/JA and FPR utilize the Biot-Savart Law to determine the influence of the vortical velocities on the blade loading and both codes use an algebraic vortex model for the solid body rotation of the vortex core. Large changes in the specification of the vortex core size do not change the inplane wake geometry calculated by CAMRAD/JA and only slightly affect the out-of-plane wake geometry. However, the aerodynamic surface pressure calculated by FPR changes in both magnitude and character with small changes to the core size used by the FPR calculations. This in turn affects the acoustic predictions. Shifting the CAMRAD/JA wake geometry away from the rotor plane by 1/4 chord produces drastic changes in the acoustic predictions indicating that the prediction of acoustic pressure is extremely sensitive to the miss distance between the vortex and the blade and that this distance must be calculated as accurately as possible for acceptable noise predictions. The inclusion or exclusion of a vortex in the FPR-RAPP calculation allows for the determination of the relative importance of that vortex as a BVI noise source.

  13. The location of acoustic blade-vortex interaction - A further step toward an understanding of helicopter noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Hanno; Splettstoesser, Wolf; Schultz, Klaus J.

    1991-02-01

    An ongoing DLR program to determine the sites of helicopter-rotor blade-vortex interactions (BVIs) by means of wind-tunnel experiments is described, and typical results are presented in graphs. A 40-percent-scale model of the BO-105 main rotor is mounted in the main test section of the German-Dutch Wind Tunnel so as to permit undisturbed measurements of the downward-directed acoustic field with a microphone array, and a novel iterative procedure is used to estimate the BVI source regions. This procedure has been validated by comparing the predicted source regions with (1) direct measurements using a rotor model equipped with pressure sensors and (2) the predictions of a three-dimensional aerodynamic blade-tip-vortex wake model.

  14. Effects of a trailing edge flap on the aerodynamics and acoustics of rotor blade-vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, B. D.; Tadghighi, H.; Hassan, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    The use of a trailing edge flap on a helicopter rotor has been numerically simulated to determine if such a device can mitigate the acoustics of blade vortex interactions (BVI). The numerical procedure employs CAMRAD/JA, a lifting-line helicopter rotor trim code, in conjunction with RFS2, an unsteady transonic full-potential flow solver, and WOPWOP, an acoustic model based on Farassat's formulation 1A. The codes were modified to simulate trailing edge flap effects. The CAMRAD/JA code was used to compute the far wake inflow effects and the vortex wake trajectories and strengths which are utilized by RFS2 to predict the blade surface pressure variations. These pressures were then analyzed using WOPWOP to determine the high frequency acoustic response at several fixed observer locations below the rotor disk. Comparisons were made with different flap deflection amplitudes and rates to assess flap effects on BVI. Numerical experiments were carried out using a one-seventh scale AH-1G rotor system for flight conditions simulating BVI encountered during low speed descending flight with and without flaps. Predicted blade surface pressures and acoustic sound pressure levels obtained have shown good agreement with the baseline no-flap test data obtained in the DNW wind tunnel. Numerical results indicate that the use of flaps is beneficial in reducing BVI noise.

  15. Comparison of Full-Scale XV-15 Wind Tunnel and In-Flight Blade-Vortex Interaction Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitaplioglu, Cahit; McCluer, M.; Acree, C. W., Jr.; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    An isolated full-scale XV-15 rotor was tested in helicopter mode in the NASA Ames 80 by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. Extensive acoustic data were obtained to define the rotor operating condition for maximum blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. Additional data were obtained at operating conditions simulating flight up to 80 knots. An XV-15 aircraft was also tested under operating conditions corresponding to landing approaches for which BVI is expected to be a maximum. In-flight acoustic data were obtained using the YO-3A acoustic research aircraft. An attempt was made to closely match wind tunnel and flight test operating conditions. Details of the two tests are described and some representative acoustic results are presented. Comparisons are shown between the wind tunnel data and corresponding flight test data. Preliminary results indicate very good correlation of the BVI-related features. However, some differences between flight test and wind tunnel results exist away from the BVI event, thought to arise from differences in the two flow environments.

  16. Flow structure generated by perpendicular blade-vortex interaction and implications for helicopter noise prediction. Volume 1: Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittmer, Kenneth S.; Devenport, William J.

    1996-01-01

    The perpendicular interaction of a streamwise vortex with an infinite span helicopter blade was modeled experimentally in incompressible flow. Three-component velocity and turbulence measurements were made using a sub-miniature four sensor hot-wire probe. Vortex core parameters (radius, peak tangential velocity, circulation, and centerline axial velocity deficit) were determined as functions of blade-vortex separation, streamwise position, blade angle of attack, vortex strength, and vortex size. The downstream development of the flow shows that the interaction of the vortex with the blade wake is the primary cause of the changes in the core parameters. The blade sheds negative vorticity into its wake as a result of the induced angle of attack generated by the passing vortex. Instability in the vortex core due to its interaction with this negative vorticity region appears to be the catalyst for the magnification of the size and intensity of the turbulent flowfield downstream of the interaction. In general, the core radius increases while peak tangential velocity decreases with the effect being greater for smaller separations. These effects are largely independent of blade angle of attack; and if these parameters are normalized on their undisturbed values, then the effects of the vortex strength appear much weaker. Two theoretical models were developed to aid in extending the results to other flow conditions. An empirical model was developed for core parameter prediction which has some rudimentary physical basis, implying usefulness beyond a simple curve fit. An inviscid flow model was also created to estimate the vorticity shed by the interaction blade, and to predict the early stages of its incorporation into the interacting vortex.

  17. Prediction of blade-vortex interaction noise from measured blade pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The impulsive nature of noise due to the interaction of a rotor blade with a tip vortex is studied. The time signature of this noise is calculated theoretically based on the measured blade surface pressure fluctuation of an operational load survey rotor in slow descending flight and is compared with the simultaneous microphone measurement. Particularly, the physical understanding of the characteristic features of a waveform is extensively studied in order to understand the generating mechanism and to identify the important parameters. The interaction trajectory of a tip vortex on an acoustic planform is shown to be a very important parameter for the impulsive shape of the noise. The unsteady nature of the pressure distribution at the very leading edge is also important to the pulse shape. The theoretical model using noncompact liner acoustics predicts the general shape of interaction impulse pretty well except for peak amplitude which requires more continuous information along the span at the leading edge.

  18. A parametric study of blade vortex interaction noise for two, three, and four-bladed model rotors at moderate tip speeds Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, K. P.; Harris, W. L.

    An investigation of blade slap due to blade vortex interaction (BVI) has been conducted. This investigation consisted of an examination of BVI blade slap for two, three, and four-bladed model rotors at tip Mach numbers ranging from 0.20 to 0.50. Blade slap contours have been obtained for each configuration tested. Differences in blade slap contours, peak sound pressure level, and directivity for each configuration tested are noted. Additional fundamental differences, such as multiple interaction BVI, are observed and occur for only specific rotor blade configurations. The effect of increasing the Mach number on the BVI blade slap for various rotor blade combinations has been quantified. A peak blade slap Mach number scaling law is proposed. Comparison of measured BVI blade slap with theory is made.

  19. Numerical simulation and validation of helicopter blade-vortex interaction using coupled CFD/CSD and three levels of aerodynamic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiraux, Mathieu

    Rotorcraft Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) remains one of the most challenging flow phenomenon to simulate numerically. Over the past decade, the HART-II rotor test and its extensive experimental dataset has been a major database for validation of CFD codes. Its strong BVI signature, with high levels of intrusive noise and vibrations, makes it a difficult test for computational methods. The main challenge is to accurately capture and preserve the vortices which interact with the rotor, while predicting correct blade deformations and loading. This doctoral dissertation presents the application of a coupled CFD/CSD methodology to the problem of helicopter BVI and compares three levels of fidelity for aerodynamic modeling: a hybrid lifting-line/free-wake (wake coupling) method, with modified compressible unsteady model; a hybrid URANS/free-wake method; and a URANS-based wake capturing method, using multiple overset meshes to capture the entire flow field. To further increase numerical correlation, three helicopter fuselage models are implemented in the framework. The first is a high resolution 3D GPU panel code; the second is an immersed boundary based method, with 3D elliptic grid adaption; the last one uses a body-fitted, curvilinear fuselage mesh. The main contribution of this work is the implementation and systematic comparison of multiple numerical methods to perform BVI modeling. The trade-offs between solution accuracy and computational cost are highlighted for the different approaches. Various improvements have been made to each code to enhance physical fidelity, while advanced technologies, such as GPU computing, have been employed to increase efficiency. The resulting numerical setup covers all aspects of the simulation creating a truly multi-fidelity and multi-physics framework. Overall, the wake capturing approach showed the best BVI phasing correlation and good blade deflection predictions, with slightly under-predicted aerodynamic loading magnitudes. However, it proved to be much more expensive than the other two methods. Wake coupling with RANS solver had very good loading magnitude predictions, and therefore good acoustic intensities, with acceptable computational cost. The lifting-line based technique often had over-predicted aerodynamic levels, due to the degree of empiricism of the model, but its very short run-times, thanks to GPU technology, makes it a very attractive approach.

  20. A reduced Blade-Vortex Interaction rotor 

    E-print Network

    Mani, Somnath

    1996-01-01

    This research work aims at mapping the BVI azimuthal locations using a model rotor. A model rotor was first developed. An experimental investigation was then carried out to determine the possible BVI locations. The results of the mapping...

  1. Aerodynamic loads and blade vortex interaction noise prediction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Schaffar; J. Haertig; P. Gnemmi

    1990-01-01

    The vortex lattice method is described and applied in order to predict the aerodynamic loads on a thin two-bladed rotor. A local conformal mapping for each position in span is used to transform the thin rotor into a thick one. The pressure coefficients obtained for the thick rotor are fed into an acoustic code which is based on the Ffowcs-Williams-Hawkings

  2. Numerical investigation of parallel airfoil-vortex interaction using large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felten, Frederic N.

    Helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) occurs under certain conditions of powered descent or during extreme maneuvering. The vibration and acoustic problems associated with the interaction of rotor tip vortices and the following blades are major aerodynamic concerns for the helicopter community. Researchers have performed numerous experimental and computational studies over the last two decades in order to gain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in BVI. The most severe interaction, in terms of generated noise, happens when the vortex filament is parallel to the blade, thus affecting a great portion of it. The majority of the previous numerical studies of parallel BVI fall within a potential flow framework, therefore excluding all viscous phenomena. Some Navier-Stokes approaches using dissipative numerical methods in conjunction with RANS-type turbulence models have also been attempted, but with limited success. In this work, the situation is improved by increasing the fidelity of both the numerical method and the turbulence model. A kinetic-energy conserving finite-volume scheme using a collocated-mesh arrangement, specially designed for simulation of turbulence in complex geometries, was implemented. For the turbulence model, a cost-effective zonal hybrid RANS/LES technique is used. A BANS zone covers the boundary layers on the airfoil and the wake region behind, while the remainder of the flow field, including the region occupied by the vortex makes up the dynamic LES zone. The concentrated tip vortex is not attenuated as it is convected downstream and over a NACA 0012 airfoil. The lift, drag, moment and friction coefficients induced by the passage of the vortex are monitored in time and compared with experimental data.

  3. Effects of trailing edge flap dynamic deployment on blade-vortex interactions 

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Carter T.

    1997-01-01

    code based on potential flow theory with provisions for deformable geometry to incorporate a trailing edge flap. Experimental tests were conducted using a 2-D wind tunnel setup incorporating a pressure instrumented airfoil section with a deployable 20...

  4. Rotor system having alternating length rotor blades for reducing blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, Robert C. (Inventor); Visintainer, Joseph A. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotor system (4) having odd and even blade assemblies (O.sub.b, E.sub.b) mounting to and rotating with a rotor hub assembly (6) wherein the odd blade assemblies (O.sub.b) define a radial length R.sub.O, and the even blade assemblies (E.sub.b) define a radial length R.sub.E and wherein the radial length R.sub.E is between about 70% to about 95% of the radial length R.sub.O. Other embodiments of the invention are directed to a Variable Diameter Rotor system (4) which may be configured for operating in various operating modes for optimizing aerodynamic and acoustic performance. The Variable Diameter Rotor system (4) includes odd and even blade assemblies (O.sub.b, E.sub.b) having inboard and outboard blade sections (10, 12) wherein the outboard blade sections (12) telescopically mount to the inboard blade sections (10). The outboard blade sections (12) are positioned with respect to the inboard blade sections (10 such that the radial length R.sub.E of the even blade assemblies (E.sub.b) is equal to the radial length R.sub.O of the odd blade assemblies (O.sub.b) in a first operating mode, and such that the radial length R.sub.E is between about 70% to about 95% of the length R.sub.O in a second operating mode.

  5. Effects of trailing edge flap dynamic deployment on blade-vortex interactions

    E-print Network

    Nelson, Carter T.

    1997-01-01

    of annoyance to the general public, Further, reducing the noise levels produced during maneuvering has military significance in minimizing rotorcrafl detectability. NAIN ROTOR TAIL ROTOR INTERFERENCE ENGINE NOISE gC e e STALL EFFECTS o GLACE. VORTEX...

  6. Parallel interacting edge cracks under pure bending 

    E-print Network

    Moran, Ivan

    1991-01-01

    PARALLEL INTERACTING EDGE CRACKS UNDER PURE BENDING A Thesis by IVAN MORAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991.... Bradley (Head of the Department) December 1991 11' ABSTBACT Parallel Interactive Edge Cracks Under Pure Bending. (December 1991) Ivan Moran, B. S. , U. T. P. (Colombia) Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Christian P. Burger The applicability...

  7. Parallel Vegetation Stripe Formation Through Hydrologic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yiwei; Stieglitz, Marc; Turk, Greg; Engel, Victor

    2010-05-01

    It has long been a challenge to theoretical ecologists to describe vegetation pattern formations such as the "tiger bush" stripes and "leopard bush" spots in Niger, and the regular maze patterns often observed in bogs in North America and Eurasia. To date, most of simulation models focus on reproducing the spot and labyrinthine patterns, and on the vegetation bands which form perpendicular to surface and groundwater flow directions. Various hypotheses have been invoked to explain the formation of vegetation patterns: selective grazing by herbivores, fire, and anisotropic environmental conditions such as slope. Recently, short distance facilitation and long distance competition between vegetation (a.k.a scale dependent feedback) has been proposed as a generic mechanism for vegetation pattern formation. In this paper, we test the generality of this mechanism by employing an existing, spatially explicit, advection-reaction-diffusion type model to describe the formation of regularly spaced vegetation bands, including those that are parallel to flow direction. Such vegetation patterns are, for example, characteristic of the ridge and slough habitat in the Florida Everglades and which are thought to have formed parallel to the prevailing surface water flow direction. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a simple model encompassing a nutrient accumulation mechanism along with biomass development and flow is used to demonstrate the formation of parallel stripes. We also explore the interactive effects of plant transpiration, slope and anisotropic hydraulic conductivity on the resulting vegetation pattern. Our results highlight the ability of the short distance facilitation and long distance competition mechanism to explain the formation of the different vegetation patterns beyond semi-arid regions. Therefore, we propose that the parallel stripes, like the other periodic patterns observed in both isotropic and anisotropic environments, are self-organized and form as a result of scale dependent feedback. Results from this study improve upon the current understanding on the formation of parallel stripes and provide a more general theoretical framework for future empirical and modeling efforts.

  8. COMPARISON OF FULL-SCALE XV-15 BLADE-VORTEX INTERACTION NOISE CALCULATIONS WITH WIND TUNNEL DATA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cahit Kitaplioglu; Wayne Johnson

    2002-01-01

    Results from the TRAC acoustic prediction system were correlated with data from a test of an isolated full-scale XV-15 rotor in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. The airloads calculation provided by the original CAMRAD.Mod1 code in the standard TRAC system was exercised with several high resolution options, including the FPXBVI CFD code. In addition, the more recent

  9. Parallel Vegetation Stripe Formation Through Hydrologic Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Stieglitz, M.; Engel, V.; Turk, G.

    2009-12-01

    Vegetation in many parts of the world display intriguing patterns: from the regularly spaced stripes on hillsides to the irregular mosaics. However, it has long been a challenge to describe how these patterns develop. Recently, there have been successes in describing pattern development mathematically. The Klausmeir model (Klausmeir., 1999), which simulates vegetation stripes perpendicular to flow field, consists of two partial differential equations that describe plant and surface water dynamics on a gently sloping landscape. More recently, Rietkerk et al (2004) proposed a simple 2D advection-diffusion model which differs from earlier models in that it includes for hydraulic head interactions. The Rietkerk model simulates plant-water and plant-nutrient dynamics and generates vegetation patterns of reasonable scales: 'maze patterns' on flat ground and stripes perpendicular to flow on slopes. However, to date none of these theoretical studies have been able to simulate the development of regularly spaced vegetation stripes parallel to flow direction. Such vegetation patterns are, for example, characteristic of the ridge and slough system (S&R) in the Everglades. We employ the Rietkerk model to describe for the first time to our knowledge, the formation of parallel stripes from hydrologic interactions. To simulate the perpendicular stripes, Rietkerk et al only allowed for the local advection of water and nutrient in one direction. To simulate parallel stripes, we retain the basic equations of the Rietkerk model but allow for constant advection of water and nutrient in one direction to simulate slope conditions, with evapotranspiration driven advection of water and nutrient perpendicular to the downhill flow direction. In this model, the relatively higher rates of evapotranspiration on the vegetation patches compared to the non-vegetated areas create hydraulic gradients, which then drive the convergence of dissolved nutrients from the downhill flow to the growing vegetation. With time, the patches aggregate and spread laterally in the direction of the downhill flow. To enhance understanding of fundamental processes that govern parallel stripe formation, we employ advanced visualization techniques to improve simulation: Line Integral Convolution for flow visualization and Voronoi Tesselation Algorithm for tracer visualization. We have applied the model to examine ecosystems that are characterized by parallel stripes such as the S&R system in the Everglades (See Engel et al, session H64).

  10. Aeroacoustic interaction of a distributed vortex with a lifting Joukowski airfoil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Hardin; S. L. Lamkin

    1984-01-01

    A first principles computational aeroacoustics calculation of the flow and noise fields produced by the interaction of a distributed vortex with a lifting Joukowski airfoil is accomplished at the Reynolds number of 200. The case considered is that where the circulations of the vortex and the airfoil are of opposite sign, corresponding to blade vortex interaction on the retreating side

  11. A Parallel Engine for Graphical Interactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduardo Rocha Rodrigues; Airam Jonatas Preto; Stephan Stephany

    2004-01-01

    The current work proposes a parallel implementation for interactive molecular dynamics simulations (MD). The interactive capability is modeled by finite automata that are executed in the processing nodes. Any interaction implies in a communication between the user interface and the finite automata. The ADKS, an interactive sequential MD code that provides graphical output was chosen as a case study. A

  12. Prediction of BVI noise patterns and correlation with wake interaction locations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael A. Marcolini; Ruth M. Martin; Peter F. Lorber; T. A. Egolf

    1992-01-01

    High resolution fluctuating airloads data were acquired during a test of a contemporary design United Technologies model rotor in the Duits-Nederlandse Windtunnel (DNW). The airloads are used as input to the noise prediction program WOPWOP, in order to predict the blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise field on a large plane below the rotor. Trends of predicted advancing and retreating side BVI

  13. Parallel predatorprey interaction for evolutionary multi-objective optimization

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Parallel predator­prey interaction for evolutionary multi-objective optimization Christian Grimme decade, the predator­prey model (PPM) has emerged as an alternative algorithmic approach to multi parallelization potential for the model. Keywords Multi-objective optimization Á Predator prey model Á

  14. Parallelized Stochastic Cutoff Method for Long-Range Interacting Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Eishin; Toga, Yuta; Sasaki, Munetaka

    2015-07-01

    We present a method of parallelizing the stochastic cutoff (SCO) method, which is a Monte-Carlo method for long-range interacting systems. After interactions are eliminated by the SCO method, we subdivide a lattice into noninteracting interpenetrating sublattices. This subdivision enables us to parallelize the Monte-Carlo calculation in the SCO method. Such subdivision is found by numerically solving the vertex coloring of a graph created by the SCO method. We use an algorithm proposed by Kuhn and Wattenhofer to solve the vertex coloring by parallel computation. This method was applied to a two-dimensional magnetic dipolar system on an L × L square lattice to examine its parallelization efficiency. The result showed that, in the case of L = 2304, the speed of computation increased about 102 times by parallel computation with 288 processors.

  15. Interaction of the Past of parallel universes

    E-print Network

    Alexander K. Guts

    1999-10-26

    We constructed a model of five-dimensional Lorentz manifold with foliation of codimension 1 the leaves of which are four-dimensional space-times. The Past of these space-times can interact in macroscopic scale by means of large quantum fluctuations. Hence, it is possible that our Human History consists of "somebody else's" (alien) events.

  16. Hydrogen and electricity: Parallels, interactions, and convergence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher Yanga

    A future hydrogen economy would interact with and influence the electricity grid in numerous ways. This paper presents several concepts for understanding a hydrogen economy in the context of the co-evolution with the electricity sector and lays out some of the opportunities and challenges. H2 and electricity are complementary energy carriers that have distinct characteristics, which lead to more or

  17. Rotating-blade vortex noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheiman, J.; Letko, W.; Shivers, J. P.; Hilton, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made of the Langley full-scale tunnel and outdoors to investigate some of the characteristics of vortex noise generated on a rotating-blade system. Acoustic measurements were made at several microphone positions for two different blade sections with several tip shapes and spoiler configurations. The blades were operated only at zero lift at each radial station, both for operating in their own wake and for operating with the wake blown downstream. Rotors with cylindrical blades generally created more noise throughout the noise spectrum than the rotor with NACA 0012 blades. Blowing the shed wake from the rotor with cylindrical blades did not have an appreciable effect on the frequency-amplitude spectrum. The tip shape changes had very little effect on the frequency-amplitude spectrum of the noise. Spoilers applied to the rotor with NACA 0012 blades increased the amplitude of the spectrum and decreased the number of harmonics of blade passage frequency.

  18. Interaction of the Past of parallel universes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander K. Guts

    1999-01-01

    We constructed a model of five-dimensional Lorentz manifold with foliation of\\u000acodimension 1 the leaves of which are four-dimensional space-times. The Past of\\u000athese space-times can interact in macroscopic scale by means of large quantum\\u000afluctuations. Hence, it is possible that our Human History consists of\\u000a\\

  19. An interactive parallel programming environment applied in atmospheric science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vonLaszewski, G.

    1996-01-01

    This article introduces an interactive parallel programming environment (IPPE) that simplifies the generation and execution of parallel programs. One of the tasks of the environment is to generate message-passing parallel programs for homogeneous and heterogeneous computing platforms. The parallel programs are represented by using visual objects. This is accomplished with the help of a graphical programming editor that is implemented in Java and enables portability to a wide variety of computer platforms. In contrast to other graphical programming systems, reusable parts of the programs can be stored in a program library to support rapid prototyping. In addition, runtime performance data on different computing platforms is collected in a database. A selection process determines dynamically the software and the hardware platform to be used to solve the problem in minimal wall-clock time. The environment is currently being tested on a Grand Challenge problem, the NASA four-dimensional data assimilation system.

  20. An interactive parallel programming environment applied in atmospheric science

    SciTech Connect

    Laszewski, G. von

    1996-12-31

    This article introduces an interactive parallel programming environment (IPPE) that simplifies the generation and execution of parallel programs. One of the tasks of the environment is to generate message-passing parallel programs for homogeneous and heterogeneous computing platforms. The parallel programs are represented by using visual objects. This is accomplished with the help of a graphical programming editor that is implemented in Java and enables portability to a wide variety of computer platforms. In contrast to other graphical programming systems, reusable parts of the programs can be stored in a program library to support rapid prototyping. In addition, runtime performance data on different computing platforms is collected in a database. A selection process determines dynamically the software and the hardware platform to be used to solve the problem in minimal wall-clock time. The environment is currently being tested on a Grand Challenge problem, the NASA four-dimensional data assimilation system.

  1. Parallel Simulation of a Stochastic Agent/Environment Interaction Model

    E-print Network

    Vialle, Stéphane

    interest for simulating complex systems (such as social ones, e.g. [14, 12], biological ones, e.g. [30 of such a model in case of simulating a set of mobile autonomous robots evolving in a structured environment1 Parallel Simulation of a Stochastic Agent/Environment Interaction Model Makram BOUZID 1 , Vincent

  2. Analysis of the interaction of two parallel surface cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Jeeyeon

    The objective of this research is to analyze and predict the interaction of surface cracks that occur in parallel planes. Multiple cracks may form in aging aircraft that forms at stress concentrations such as fastener holes and notched components by stress corrosion and fatigue cracking. The lifetime of the structures are significantly affected by the interaction between these cracks. Depending on relative positions and orientations of neighboring cracks, local stress fields and crack driving forces can be affected by the presence of adjacent cracks. Even small subcritical cracks may rapidly grow to a size that will cause failure in service due to interaction and coalescence with other cracks. The interaction behavior and crack propagation direction of two parallel surface cracks is studied using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). FEA models with wide range of crack configurations in a finite plate under tension are evaluated to investigate the correlation between the crack shapes and the separation distance between two cracks. The relative distance (vertical and horizontal) between two cracks and size and shape of these cracks are varied to create different stress interaction fields. Stress intensity factors (SIF) along the crack fronts are obtained from FEA, and then, cracking behaviors of the cracks are predicted by considering the influence of the interaction on the SIF and the coalescence of two cracks. The results obtained are then compared with existing experimental and analytical data for validation. All of the data analyses are presented in tabular forms and figures.

  3. Framework for Interactive Parallel Dataset Analysis on the Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, David A.; Ananthan, Balamurali; /Tech-X Corp.; Johnson, Tony; Serbo, Victor; /SLAC

    2007-01-10

    We present a framework for use at a typical Grid site to facilitate custom interactive parallel dataset analysis targeting terabyte-scale datasets of the type typically produced by large multi-institutional science experiments. We summarize the needs for interactive analysis and show a prototype solution that satisfies those needs. The solution consists of desktop client tool and a set of Web Services that allow scientists to sign onto a Grid site, compose analysis script code to carry out physics analysis on datasets, distribute the code and datasets to worker nodes, collect the results back to the client, and to construct professional-quality visualizations of the results.

  4. Interaction of a Vortex Ring Parallel to a Plane Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Mitchell; Bohl, Douglas

    2013-11-01

    In this work, Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is used to investigate the motion of a vortex ring parallel to a plane wall. When the wall is more than 1.75 generator diameters (Dgen) away from the center of the generator, there is no observed effect on the path of the vortex ring. When the wall is closer, the vortex ring initially convects parallel to the wall and then turns towards the wall. The location at which the ring begins to turn towards the wall is a function of the wall location. This motion is consistent with inviscid theory. For moderate distance (1.75 Dgen to 0.75 Dgen) both legs of the vortex ring break up before interacting with the wall. When the wall is very close to the vortex ring (<0.75 Dgen) , the leg of the vortex ring closest to the wall first moves towards, then bounces and moves away from the wall. Meanwhile, the leg farthest from the wall continues towards the wall and interacts, forming boundary layer and new shed structures. This process is qualitatively similar to the interaction of a vortex ring normal to a plane wall. In this work, Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is used to investigate the motion of a vortex ring parallel to a plane wall. When the wall is more than 1.75 generator diameters (Dgen) away from the center of the generator, there is no observed effect on the path of the vortex ring. When the wall is closer, the vortex ring initially convects parallel to the wall and then turns towards the wall. The location at which the ring begins to turn towards the wall is a function of the wall location. This motion is consistent with inviscid theory. For moderate distance (1.75 Dgen to 0.75 Dgen) both legs of the vortex ring break up before interacting with the wall. When the wall is very close to the vortex ring (<0.75 Dgen) , the leg of the vortex ring closest to the wall first moves towards, then bounces and moves away from the wall. Meanwhile, the leg farthest from the wall continues towards the wall and interacts, forming boundary layer and new shed structures. This process is qualitatively similar to the interaction of a vortex ring normal to a plane wall. This work supported by NSF Grant # 0845882.

  5. Parallel Force Assay for Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aschenbrenner, Daniela; Pippig, Diana A.; Klamecka, Kamila; Limmer, Katja; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative proteome research is greatly promoted by high-resolution parallel format assays. A characterization of protein complexes based on binding forces offers an unparalleled dynamic range and allows for the effective discrimination of non-specific interactions. Here we present a DNA-based Molecular Force Assay to quantify protein-protein interactions, namely the bond between different variants of GFP and GFP-binding nanobodies. We present different strategies to adjust the maximum sensitivity window of the assay by influencing the binding strength of the DNA reference duplexes. The binding of the nanobody Enhancer to the different GFP constructs is compared at high sensitivity of the assay. Whereas the binding strength to wild type and enhanced GFP are equal within experimental error, stronger binding to superfolder GFP is observed. This difference in binding strength is attributed to alterations in the amino acids that form contacts according to the crystal structure of the initial wild type GFP-Enhancer complex. Moreover, we outline the potential for large-scale parallelization of the assay. PMID:25546146

  6. Parallel force assay for protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrenner, Daniela; Pippig, Diana A; Klamecka, Kamila; Limmer, Katja; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Gaub, Hermann E

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative proteome research is greatly promoted by high-resolution parallel format assays. A characterization of protein complexes based on binding forces offers an unparalleled dynamic range and allows for the effective discrimination of non-specific interactions. Here we present a DNA-based Molecular Force Assay to quantify protein-protein interactions, namely the bond between different variants of GFP and GFP-binding nanobodies. We present different strategies to adjust the maximum sensitivity window of the assay by influencing the binding strength of the DNA reference duplexes. The binding of the nanobody Enhancer to the different GFP constructs is compared at high sensitivity of the assay. Whereas the binding strength to wild type and enhanced GFP are equal within experimental error, stronger binding to superfolder GFP is observed. This difference in binding strength is attributed to alterations in the amino acids that form contacts according to the crystal structure of the initial wild type GFP-Enhancer complex. Moreover, we outline the potential for large-scale parallelization of the assay. PMID:25546146

  7. ParaLearn: A Massively Parallel, Scalable System for Learning Interaction Networks on FPGAs

    E-print Network

    Wong, Wing Hung

    , parallel FPGA-based system for learning interaction networks using Bayesian statistics. Par- a, parallel FPGA-based system for learning interaction networks using Bayesian statistics. In- teraction and Subject Descriptors C.3 [Computer Systems Organization]: Special-Purpose and Application-Based Systems

  8. VisIt: Interactive Parallel Visualization and Graphical Analysis Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Department Of Energy (DOE) Advanced Simulation; Computing Initiative (ASCI)

    2011-03-01

    VisIt is a free interactive parallel visualization and graphical analysis tool for viewing scientific data on Unix and PC platforms. Users can quickly generate visualizations from their data, animate them through time, manipulate them, and save the resulting images for presentations. VisIt contains a rich set of visualization features so that you can view your data in a variety of ways. It can be used to visualize scalar and vector fields defined on two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) structured and unstructured meshes. VisIt was designed to handle very large data set sizes in the terascale range and yet can also handle small data sets in the kilobyte range. See the table below for more details about the tool’s features. VisIt was developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Simulation and Computing Initiative (ASCI) to visualize and analyze the results of terascale simulations. It was developed as a framework for adding custom capabilities and rapidly deploying new visualization technologies. Although the primary driving force behind the development of VisIt was for visualizing terascale data, it is also well suited for visualizing data from typical simulations on desktop systems.

  9. ParaLearn: a massively parallel, scalable system for learning interaction networks on FPGAs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Narges Bani Asadi; Christopher W. Fletcher; Greg Gibeling; John Wawrzynek; Wing H. Wong; Garry P. Nolan; Zoey Zhou

    2010-01-01

    ParaLearn is a scalable, parallel FPGA-based system for learning interaction networks using Bayesian statistics. ParaLearn includes problem specific parallel\\/scalable algorithms, system software and hardware architecture to address this complex problem. Learning interaction networks from data uncovers causal relationships and allows scientists to predict and explain a system's behavior. Interaction networks have applications in many fields, though we will discuss them

  10. Combined Series and Parallel Circuits: Interactive Lecture Demonstrations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bruce Mason

    Three in-class lecture demonstration questions to test and build understanding of DC circuits are presented. These questions cover simple series and parallel circuits, and a more complicated circuit that is fundamental for understanding this topic.

  11. A new parallel environment for interactive simulations implementing safe multithreading with MPI

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduardo Rocha Rodrigues; Airam Jonatas Preto; Stephan Stephany

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a new parallel environment for interactive simulations. This environment integrates a MPI-based parallel simulation engine, a visualization module, and a user interface that supports modification of simulation parameters and visualization at runtime. This requires multiple threads, one to execute the simulation or the visualization, and other to receive user input. Since many MPI implementations are not thread-safe,

  12. Far-field approximation for hydrodynamic interactions in parallel-wall geometry

    E-print Network

    Gelfond, Michael

    [Physica A 356 (2005) 294] for evaluating many-body hydrodynamic interactions in a suspension of sphericalFar-field approximation for hydrodynamic interactions in parallel-wall geometry S. Bhattacharya, J reserved. Keywords: Hydrodynamic interactions; Confined systems; Stokes flow; Suspensions; Hele­Shaw flow 1

  13. The displacement field characterization of two interacting parallel edge cracks in a finite body 

    E-print Network

    Keener, Todd Whitney

    1996-01-01

    The goals of this research were to: (1) develop a model to represent the displacement field surrounding two interacting, parallel edge cracks; and (2) use this model to investigate the influence of crack separation and relative crack length...

  14. Two-dimensional interaction of vortices with a blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poling, David R.; Telionis, Demetri P.; Wilder, Michael C.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of blade-vortex interaction is studied experimentally and numerically. Vortices are generated in the laboratory by pitching an airfoil upstream of the model. LDV measurements are obtained in the neighborhood of the leading edge of the airfoil. Ensemble-averaged velocity vector fields and vorticity contours are thus constructed. A vortex is modeled numerically by a cloud of discrete ideal point vortices. The problem is solved via a Joukowski transformation. The interaction of distributed vorticity with the leading edge of the airfoil is examined.

  15. Interactive animation of fault-tolerant parallel algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Apgar, S.W.

    1992-02-01

    Animation of algorithms makes understanding them intuitively easier. This paper describes the software tool Raft (Robust Animator of Fault Tolerant Algorithms). The Raft system allows the user to animate a number of parallel algorithms which achieve fault tolerant execution. In particular, we use it to illustrate the key Write-All problem. It has an extensive user-interface which allows a choice of the number of processors, the number of elements in the Write-All array, and the adversary to control the processor failures. The novelty of the system is that the interface allows the user to create new on-line adversaries as the algorithm executes.

  16. Highly parallel measurements of interaction kinetic constants with a microfabricated optomechanical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Steven R.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2009-08-01

    We used mechanical trapping of molecular interactions to demonstrate a highly parallel approach to measure the kinetics of biomolecular interactions. This approach consumes 25 fmol of material per measurement and permits 320 measurements in a single experiment. We measured association and dissociation curves for the interactions of 6-His and T7 epitope tags with their antibodies, from which we determined the off rates, on rates, and dissociation constants.

  17. Modeling household activity–travel interactions as parallel constrained choices

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John P. Gliebe; Frank S. Koppelman

    2005-01-01

    The daily activity-travel patterns of individuals often include interactions with other household members, which we observe in the form of joint activity participation and shared rides. Explicit representation of joint activity patterns is a widespread deficiency in extant travel forecasting models and remains a relatively under-developed area of travel behavior research. In this paper, we identify several spatially defined tour

  18. Convective-radiative interaction in a parallel plate channel - Application to air-operated solar collectors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. H. Liu; E. M. Sparrow

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is made for simultaneously developing laminar velocity and temperature fields in a parallel plate channel in which convective and radiative heat transfer interact. One wall of the channel is externally heated and the other is externally insulated; air is the heat transfer fluid. These conditions are similar to those in an air-operated flat-plate solar collector. The results show

  19. STAR/MPI: Binding a Parallel Library to Interactive Symbolic Algebra Systems

    E-print Network

    Cooperman, Gene

    STAR/MPI: Binding a Parallel Library to Interactive-users need not learn any of the details o* *f the MPI function calls. Many users of symbolic algebra systems. Since MPI has been ported an effort. In an attempt to remedy that situation,ttheopar-a wide variety

  20. Result Reuse in Design Space Exploration: A Study in System Support for Interactive Parallel Computing

    E-print Network

    Mohri, Mehryar

    management using the specific con- text of Design Space Exploration (DSE) compu- tational studies. DSEs, usedResult Reuse in Design Space Exploration: A Study in System Support for Interactive Parallel of such studies range from exploration of design spaces in engineering to molecular simulations for drug design

  1. A parallel iterative partitioned coupling analysis system for large-scale acoustic fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Shunji; Minami, Satsuki; Kawai, Hiroshi; Yamada, Tomonori; Yoshimura, Shinobu

    2014-06-01

    In many engineering fields, dynamic response in fluid-structure interaction (FSI) is important, and some of the FSI phenomena are treated as acoustic FSI (AFSI) problems. Dynamic interactions between fluids and structures may change dynamic characteristics of the structure and its response to external excitation parameters such as seismic loading. This paper describes a parallel coupling analysis system for large-scale AFSI problems using iterative partitioned coupling techniques. We employ an open source parallel finite element analysis system called ADVENTURE, which adopts an efficient preconditioned iterative linear algebraic solver. In addition, we have recently developed a parallel coupling tool called ADVENTURE_Coupler to efficiently handle interface variables in various parallel computing environments. We also employ the Broyden method for updating interface variables to attain robust and fast convergence of fixed-point iterations. This paper describes key features of the coupling analysis system developed, and we perform tests to validate its performance for several AFSI problems. The system runs efficiently in a parallel environment, and it is capable of analyzing three-dimensional-complex-shaped structures with more than 20 million degrees-of-freedom (DOFs). Its numerical results also show good agreement with experimental results.

  2. Solar wind interaction with Venus and Mars in a parallel hybrid code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvinen, Riku; Sandroos, Arto

    2013-04-01

    We discuss the development and applications of a new parallel hybrid simulation, where ions are treated as particles and electrons as a charge-neutralizing fluid, for the interaction between the solar wind and Venus and Mars. The new simulation code under construction is based on the algorithm of the sequential global planetary hybrid model developed at the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) and on the Corsair parallel simulation platform also developed at the FMI. The FMI's sequential hybrid model has been used for studies of plasma interactions of several unmagnetized and weakly magnetized celestial bodies for more than a decade. Especially, the model has been used to interpret in situ particle and magnetic field observations from plasma environments of Mars, Venus and Titan. Further, Corsair is an open source MPI (Message Passing Interface) particle and mesh simulation platform, mainly aimed for simulations of diffusive shock acceleration in solar corona and interplanetary space, but which is now also being extended for global planetary hybrid simulations. In this presentation we discuss challenges and strategies of parallelizing a legacy simulation code as well as possible applications and prospects of a scalable parallel hybrid model for the solar wind interactions of Venus and Mars.

  3. Interactions between glide dislocations and parallel interfacial dislocations in nanoscale strained layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasheh, F.; Zbib, H. M.; Hirth, J. P.; Hoagland, R. G.; Misra, A.

    2007-08-01

    Plastic deformation in nanoscale multilayered structures is thought to proceed by the successive propagation of single dislocation loops at the interfaces. Based on this view, we simulate the effect of predeposited interfacial dislocation on the stress (channeling stress) needed to propagate a new loop parallel to existing loops. Single interfacial dislocations as well as finite parallel arrays are considered in the computation. When the gliding dislocation and the predeposited interfacial array have collinear Burgers vectors, the channeling stress increases monotonically as the density of dislocations in the array increases. In the case when their Burgers vectors are inclined at 60°, a regime of perfect plasticity is observed which can be traced back to an instability in the flow stress arising from the interaction between the glide dislocation and a single interfacial dislocation dipole. This interaction leads to a tendency for dislocations of alternating Burgers vectors to propagate during deformation leading to nonuniform arrays. Inclusion of these parallel interactions in the analysis improves the strength predictions as compared with the measured strength of a Cu-Ni multilayered system in the regime where isolated glide dislocation motion controls flow, but does not help to explain the observed strength saturation when the individual layer thickness is in the few nanometer range.

  4. Interactions between glide dislocations and parallel interfacial dislocations in nanoscale strained layers

    SciTech Connect

    Akasheh, F.; Zbib, H. M.; Hirth, J. P.; Hoagland, R. G.; Misra, A. [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2920 (United States); MST Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Plastic deformation in nanoscale multilayered structures is thought to proceed by the successive propagation of single dislocation loops at the interfaces. Based on this view, we simulate the effect of predeposited interfacial dislocation on the stress (channeling stress) needed to propagate a new loop parallel to existing loops. Single interfacial dislocations as well as finite parallel arrays are considered in the computation. When the gliding dislocation and the predeposited interfacial array have collinear Burgers vectors, the channeling stress increases monotonically as the density of dislocations in the array increases. In the case when their Burgers vectors are inclined at 60 deg. , a regime of perfect plasticity is observed which can be traced back to an instability in the flow stress arising from the interaction between the glide dislocation and a single interfacial dislocation dipole. This interaction leads to a tendency for dislocations of alternating Burgers vectors to propagate during deformation leading to nonuniform arrays. Inclusion of these parallel interactions in the analysis improves the strength predictions as compared with the measured strength of a Cu-Ni multilayered system in the regime where isolated glide dislocation motion controls flow, but does not help to explain the observed strength saturation when the individual layer thickness is in the few nanometer range.

  5. Engineering of parallel plasmonic-photonic interactions for on-chip refractive index sensors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Linhan; Zheng, Yuebing

    2015-07-28

    Ultra-narrow linewidth in the extinction spectrum of noble metal nanoparticle arrays induced by the lattice plasmon resonances (LPRs) is of great significance for applications in plasmonic lasers and plasmonic sensors. However, the challenge of sustaining LPRs in an asymmetric environment greatly restricts their practical applications, especially for high-performance on-chip plasmonic sensors. Herein, we fully study the parallel plasmonic-photonic interactions in both the Au nanodisk arrays (NDAs) and the core/shell SiO2/Au nanocylinder arrays (NCAs). Different from the dipolar interactions in the conventionally studied orthogonal coupling, the horizontal propagating electric field introduces the out-of-plane "hot spots" and results in electric field delocalization. Through controlling the aspect ratio to manipulate the "hot spot" distributions of the localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the NCAs, we demonstrate a high-performance refractive index sensor with a wide dynamic range of refractive indexes ranging from 1.0 to 1.5. Both high figure of merit (FOM) and high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be maintained under these detectable refractive indices. Furthermore, the electromagnetic field distributions confirm that the high FOM in the wide dynamic range is attributed to the parallel coupling between the superstrate diffraction orders and the height-induced LSPR modes. Our study on the near-field "hot-spot" engineering and far-field parallel coupling paves the way towards improved understanding of the parallel LPRs and the design of high-performance on-chip refractive index sensors. PMID:26133011

  6. Nice Guys Finish Fast and Bad Guys Finish Last: Facilitatory vs. Inhibitory Interaction in Parallel Systems

    PubMed Central

    Eidels, Ami; Houpt, Joseph W.; Altieri, Nicholas; Pei, Lei; Townsend, James T.

    2011-01-01

    Systems Factorial Technology is a powerful framework for investigating the fundamental properties of human information processing such as architecture (i.e., serial or parallel processing) and capacity (how processing efficiency is affected by increased workload). The Survivor Interaction Contrast (SIC) and the Capacity Coefficient are effective measures in determining these underlying properties, based on response-time data. Each of the different architectures, under the assumption of independent processing, predicts a specific form of the SIC along with some range of capacity. In this study, we explored SIC predictions of discrete-state (Markov process) and continuous-state (Linear Dynamic) models that allow for certain types of cross-channel interaction. The interaction can be facilitatory or inhibitory: one channel can either facilitate, or slow down processing in its counterpart. Despite the relative generality of these models, the combination of the architecture-oriented plus the capacity oriented analyses provide for precise identification of the underlying system. PMID:21516183

  7. Expression Profiles Reveal Parallel Evolution of Epistatic Interactions Involving the CRP Regulon in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Tim F; Remold, Susanna K; Lenski, Richard E; Schneider, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    The extent and nature of epistatic interactions between mutations are issues of fundamental importance in evolutionary biology. However, they are difficult to study and their influence on adaptation remains poorly understood. Here, we use a systems-level approach to examine epistatic interactions that arose during the evolution of Escherichia coli in a defined environment. We used expression arrays to compare the effect on global patterns of gene expression of deleting a central regulatory gene, crp. Effects were measured in two lineages that had independently evolved for 20,000 generations and in their common ancestor. We found that deleting crp had a much more dramatic effect on the expression profile of the two evolved lines than on the ancestor. Because the sequence of the crp gene was unchanged during evolution, these differences indicate epistatic interactions between crp and mutations at other loci that accumulated during evolution. Moreover, a striking degree of parallelism was observed between the two independently evolved lines; 115 genes that were not crp-dependent in the ancestor became dependent on crp in both evolved lines. An analysis of changes in crp dependence of well-characterized regulons identified a number of regulatory genes as candidates for harboring beneficial mutations that could account for these parallel expression changes. Mutations within three of these genes have previously been found and shown to contribute to fitness. Overall, these findings indicate that epistasis has been important in the adaptive evolution of these lines, and they provide new insight into the types of genetic changes through which epistasis can evolve. More generally, we demonstrate that expression profiles can be profitably used to investigate epistatic interactions. PMID:18282111

  8. A force-based, parallel assay for the quantification of protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Limmer, Katja; Pippig, Diana A; Aschenbrenner, Daniela; Gaub, Hermann E

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of transcription factor binding to DNA sequences is of utmost importance to understand the intricate regulatory mechanisms that underlie gene expression. Several techniques exist that quantify DNA-protein affinity, but they are either very time-consuming or suffer from possible misinterpretation due to complicated algorithms or approximations like many high-throughput techniques. We present a more direct method to quantify DNA-protein interaction in a force-based assay. In contrast to single-molecule force spectroscopy, our technique, the Molecular Force Assay (MFA), parallelizes force measurements so that it can test one or multiple proteins against several DNA sequences in a single experiment. The interaction strength is quantified by comparison to the well-defined rupture stability of different DNA duplexes. As a proof-of-principle, we measured the interaction of the zinc finger construct Zif268/NRE against six different DNA constructs. We could show the specificity of our approach and quantify the strength of the protein-DNA interaction. PMID:24586920

  9. A Force-Based, Parallel Assay for the Quantification of Protein-DNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, Katja; Pippig, Diana A.; Aschenbrenner, Daniela; Gaub, Hermann E.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of transcription factor binding to DNA sequences is of utmost importance to understand the intricate regulatory mechanisms that underlie gene expression. Several techniques exist that quantify DNA-protein affinity, but they are either very time-consuming or suffer from possible misinterpretation due to complicated algorithms or approximations like many high-throughput techniques. We present a more direct method to quantify DNA-protein interaction in a force-based assay. In contrast to single-molecule force spectroscopy, our technique, the Molecular Force Assay (MFA), parallelizes force measurements so that it can test one or multiple proteins against several DNA sequences in a single experiment. The interaction strength is quantified by comparison to the well-defined rupture stability of different DNA duplexes. As a proof-of-principle, we measured the interaction of the zinc finger construct Zif268/NRE against six different DNA constructs. We could show the specificity of our approach and quantify the strength of the protein-DNA interaction. PMID:24586920

  10. Determination of interaction forces between parallel dislocations by the evaluation of J integrals of plane elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubarda, Vlado A.

    2015-05-01

    The Peach-Koehler expressions for the glide and climb components of the force exerted on a straight dislocation in an infinite isotropic medium by another straight dislocation are derived by evaluating the plane and antiplane strain versions of J integrals around the center of the dislocation. After expressing the elastic fields as the sums of elastic fields of each dislocation, the energy momentum tensor is decomposed into three parts. It is shown that only one part, involving mixed products from the two dislocation fields, makes a nonvanishing contribution to J integrals and the corresponding dislocation forces. Three examples are considered, with dislocations on parallel or intersecting slip planes. For two edge dislocations on orthogonal slip planes, there are two equilibrium configurations in which the glide and climb components of the dislocation force simultaneously vanish. The interactions between two different types of screw dislocations and a nearby circular void, as well as between parallel line forces in an infinite or semi-infinite medium, are then evaluated.

  11. Discovery of protein interactions using parallel analysis of translated ORFs (PLATO).

    PubMed

    Larman, H Benjamin; Liang, Anthony C; Elledge, Stephen J; Zhu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Parallel analysis of translated open reading frames (ORFs) (PLATO) can be used for the unbiased discovery of interactions between full-length proteins encoded by a library of 'prey' ORFs and surface-immobilized 'bait' antibodies, polypeptides or small-molecular-weight compounds. PLATO uses ribosome display (RD) to link ORF-derived mRNA molecules to the proteins they encode, and recovered mRNA from affinity enrichment is subjected to analysis using massively parallel DNA sequencing. Compared with alternative in vitro methods, PLATO provides several advantages including library size and cost. A unique advantage of PLATO is that an alternative reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) protocol can be used to test binding of specific, individual proteins. To illustrate a typical experimental workflow, we demonstrate PLATO for the identification of the immune target of serum antibodies from patients with inclusion body myositis (IBM). Beginning with an ORFeome library in an RD vector, the protocol can produce samples for deep sequencing or RT-qPCR within 4 d. PMID:24336473

  12. Massively parallel measurements of molecular interaction kinetics on a microfluidic platform

    PubMed Central

    Geertz, Marcel; Shore, David; Maerkl, Sebastian J.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative biology requires quantitative data. No high-throughput technologies exist capable of obtaining several hundred independent kinetic binding measurements in a single experiment. We present an integrated microfluidic device (k-MITOMI) for the simultaneous kinetic characterization of 768 biomolecular interactions. We applied k-MITOMI to the kinetic analysis of transcription factor (TF)—DNA interactions, measuring the detailed kinetic landscapes of the mouse TF Zif268, and the yeast TFs Tye7p, Yox1p, and Tbf1p. We demonstrated the integrated nature of k-MITOMI by expressing, purifying, and characterizing 27 additional yeast transcription factors in parallel on a single device. Overall, we obtained 2,388 association and dissociation curves of 223 unique molecular interactions with equilibrium dissociation constants ranging from 2 × 10-6 M to 2 × 10-9 M, and dissociation rate constants of approximately 6 s-1 to 8.5 × 10-3 s-1. Association rate constants were uniform across 3 TF families, ranging from 3.7 × 106 M-1 s-1 to 9.6 × 107 M-1 s-1, and are well below the diffusion limit. We expect that k-MITOMI will contribute to our quantitative understanding of biological systems and accelerate the development and characterization of engineered systems. PMID:23012409

  13. Parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulation framework incorporating accurate models of adsorbate lateral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Jens; D’Avezac, Mayeul; Hetherington, James [Research Software Development Team, Research IT Services, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)] [Research Software Development Team, Research IT Services, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Stamatakis, Michail, E-mail: m.stamatakis@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-14

    Ab initio kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations have been successfully applied for over two decades to elucidate the underlying physico-chemical phenomena on the surfaces of heterogeneous catalysts. These simulations necessitate detailed knowledge of the kinetics of elementary reactions constituting the reaction mechanism, and the energetics of the species participating in the chemistry. The information about the energetics is encoded in the formation energies of gas and surface-bound species, and the lateral interactions between adsorbates on the catalytic surface, which can be modeled at different levels of detail. The majority of previous works accounted for only pairwise-additive first nearest-neighbor interactions. More recently, cluster-expansion Hamiltonians incorporating long-range interactions and many-body terms have been used for detailed estimations of catalytic rate [C. Wu, D. J. Schmidt, C. Wolverton, and W. F. Schneider, J. Catal. 286, 88 (2012)]. In view of the increasing interest in accurate predictions of catalytic performance, there is a need for general-purpose KMC approaches incorporating detailed cluster expansion models for the adlayer energetics. We have addressed this need by building on the previously introduced graph-theoretical KMC framework, and we have developed Zacros, a FORTRAN2003 KMC package for simulating catalytic chemistries. To tackle the high computational cost in the presence of long-range interactions we introduce parallelization with OpenMP. We further benchmark our framework by simulating a KMC analogue of the NO oxidation system established by Schneider and co-workers [J. Catal. 286, 88 (2012)]. We show that taking into account only first nearest-neighbor interactions may lead to large errors in the prediction of the catalytic rate, whereas for accurate estimates thereof, one needs to include long-range terms in the cluster expansion.

  14. Parallel kinetic Monte Carlo simulation framework incorporating accurate models of adsorbate lateral interactions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens; d'Avezac, Mayeul; Hetherington, James; Stamatakis, Michail

    2013-12-14

    Ab initio kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations have been successfully applied for over two decades to elucidate the underlying physico-chemical phenomena on the surfaces of heterogeneous catalysts. These simulations necessitate detailed knowledge of the kinetics of elementary reactions constituting the reaction mechanism, and the energetics of the species participating in the chemistry. The information about the energetics is encoded in the formation energies of gas and surface-bound species, and the lateral interactions between adsorbates on the catalytic surface, which can be modeled at different levels of detail. The majority of previous works accounted for only pairwise-additive first nearest-neighbor interactions. More recently, cluster-expansion Hamiltonians incorporating long-range interactions and many-body terms have been used for detailed estimations of catalytic rate [C. Wu, D. J. Schmidt, C. Wolverton, and W. F. Schneider, J. Catal. 286, 88 (2012)]. In view of the increasing interest in accurate predictions of catalytic performance, there is a need for general-purpose KMC approaches incorporating detailed cluster expansion models for the adlayer energetics. We have addressed this need by building on the previously introduced graph-theoretical KMC framework, and we have developed Zacros, a FORTRAN2003 KMC package for simulating catalytic chemistries. To tackle the high computational cost in the presence of long-range interactions we introduce parallelization with OpenMP. We further benchmark our framework by simulating a KMC analogue of the NO oxidation system established by Schneider and co-workers [J. Catal. 286, 88 (2012)]. We show that taking into account only first nearest-neighbor interactions may lead to large errors in the prediction of the catalytic rate, whereas for accurate estimates thereof, one needs to include long-range terms in the cluster expansion. PMID:24329081

  15. Mechanical Behavior of Collagen-Fibrin Co-Gels Reflects Transition From Series to Parallel Interactions With Increasing Collagen Content

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Victor K.; Lake, Spencer P.; Frey, Christina R.; Tranquillo, Robert T.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrin and collagen, biopolymers occurring naturally in the body, are commonly-used biomaterials as scaffolds for tissue engineering. How collagen and fibrin interact to confer macroscopic mechanical properties in collagen-fibrin composite systems remains poorly understood. In this study, we formulated collagen-fibrin co-gels at different collagen-to-fibrin ratios to observe changes in overall mechanical behavior and microstructure. A modeling framework of a two-network system was developed by modifying our micro-scale model, considering two forms of interaction between the networks: (a) two interpenetrating but non-interacting networks (“parallel”), and (b) a single network consisting of randomly alternating collagen and fibrin fibrils (“series”). Mechanical testing of our gels show that collagen-fibrin co-gels exhibit intermediate properties (UTS, strain at failure, tangent modulus) compared to those of pure collagen and fibrin. Comparison with model predictions show that the parallel and series model cases provide upper and lower bounds respectively for the experimental data, suggesting that a combination of such interactions exist between collagen and fibrin in co-gels. A transition from the series model to the parallel model occurs with increasing collagen content, with the series model best describing predominantly fibrin co-gels, and the parallel model best describing predominantly collagen co-gels. PMID:22482659

  16. Beowulf Analysis Symbolic INterface BASIN: Interactive Parallel Data Analysis for Everyone

    E-print Network

    Enrico Vesperini; David M. Goldberg; Stephen L. W. McMillan; James Dura; Douglas Jones

    2008-04-29

    The advent of affordable parallel computers such as Beowulf PC clusters and, more recently, of multi-core PCs has been highly beneficial for a large number of scientists and smaller institutions that might not otherwise have access to substantial computing facilities. However, there has not been an analogous progress in the development and dissemination of parallel software: scientists need the expertise to develop parallel codes and have to invest a significant amount of time in the development of tools even for the most common data analysis tasks. We describe the Beowulf Analysis Symbolic INterface (BASIN) a multi-user parallel data analysis and visualization framework. BASIN is aimed at providing scientists with a suite of parallel libraries for astrophysical data analysis along with general tools for data distribution and parallel operations on distributed data to allow them to easily develop new parallel libraries for their specific tasks.

  17. Experimental Studies of the Interaction Between a Parallel Shear Flow and a Directionally-Solidifying Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Meng; Maxworthy, Tony

    1999-01-01

    It has long been recognized that flow in the melt can have a profound influence on the dynamics of a solidifying interface and hence the quality of the solid material. In particular, flow affects the heat and mass transfer, and causes spatial and temporal variations in the flow and melt composition. This results in a crystal with nonuniform physical properties. Flow can be generated by buoyancy, expansion or contraction upon phase change, and thermo-soluto capillary effects. In general, these flows can not be avoided and can have an adverse effect on the stability of the crystal structures. This motivates crystal growth experiments in a microgravity environment, where buoyancy-driven convection is significantly suppressed. However, transient accelerations (g-jitter) caused by the acceleration of the spacecraft can affect the melt, while convection generated from the effects other than buoyancy remain important. Rather than bemoan the presence of convection as a source of interfacial instability, Hurle in the 1960s suggested that flow in the melt, either forced or natural convection, might be used to stabilize the interface. Delves considered the imposition of both a parabolic velocity profile and a Blasius boundary layer flow over the interface. He concluded that fast stirring could stabilize the interface to perturbations whose wave vector is in the direction of the fluid velocity. Forth and Wheeler considered the effect of the asymptotic suction boundary layer profile. They showed that the effect of the shear flow was to generate travelling waves parallel to the flow with a speed proportional to the Reynolds number. There have been few quantitative, experimental works reporting on the coupling effect of fluid flow and morphological instabilities. Huang studied plane Couette flow over cells and dendrites. It was found that this flow could greatly enhance the planar stability and even induce the cell-planar transition. A rotating impeller was buried inside the sample cell, driven by an outside rotating magnet, in order to generate the flow. However, it appears that this was not a well-controlled flow and may also have been unsteady. In the present experimental study, we want to study how a forced parallel shear flow in a Hele-Shaw cell interacts with the directionally solidifying crystal interface. The comparison of experimental data show that the parallel shear flow in a Hele-Shaw cell has a strong stabilizing effect on the planar interface by damping the existing initial perturbations. The flow also shows a stabilizing effect on the cellular interface by slightly reducing the exponential growth rate of cells. The left-right symmetry of cells is broken by the flow with cells tilting toward the incoming flow direction. The tilting angle increases with the velocity ratio. The experimental results are explained through the parallel flow effect on lateral solute transport. The phenomenon of cells tilting against the flow is consistent with the numerical result of Dantzig and Chao.

  18. A Tool for On-line Visualization and Interactive Steering of Parallel HPC Applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sabine Rathmayer; Michael Lenke

    1997-01-01

    Tools for parallel systems today range from specification over debugging to performance analysis and more. Typ- ically, they help the programmers of parallel algorithms from the early development stages to a certain level of pro- gram optimization. However, in HPC ( High Performance Computing) today the end-user of massively parallel CFD (ComputationalFluid Dynamics)-programs has little or no support in his

  19. Application of Parallel Hybrid Algorithm in Massively Parallel GPGPU—The Improved Effective and Efficient Method for Calculating Coulombic Interactions in Simulations of Many Ions with SIMION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Kenichiro; Koizumi, Eiko; Koizumi, Hideya

    2012-09-01

    In our previous study, we introduced a new hybrid approach to effectively approximate the total force on each ion during a trajectory calculation in mass spectrometry device simulations, and the algorithm worked successfully with SIMION. We took one step further and applied the method in massively parallel general-purpose computing with GPU (GPGPU) to test its performance in simulations with thousands to over a million ions. We took extra care to minimize the barrier synchronization and data transfer between the host (CPU) and the device (GPU) memory, and took full advantage of the latency hiding. Parallel codes were written in CUDA C++ and implemented to SIMION via the user-defined Lua program. In this study, we tested the parallel hybrid algorithm with a couple of basic models and analyzed the performance by comparing it to that of the original, fully-explicit method written in serial code. The Coulomb explosion simulation with 128,000 ions was completed in 309 s, over 700 times faster than the 63 h taken by the original explicit method in which we evaluated two-body Coulomb interactions explicitly on one ion with each of all the other ions. The simulation of 1,024,000 ions was completed in 2650 s. In another example, we applied the hybrid method on a simulation of ions in a simple quadrupole ion storage model with 100,000 ions, and it only took less than 10 d. Based on our estimate, the same simulation is expected to take 5-7 y by the explicit method in serial code.

  20. Far-field approximation for hydrodynamic interactions in parallel-wall geometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Bhattacharya; J. Blawzdziewicz; E. Wajnryb

    2006-01-01

    A complete analysis is presented for the far-field creeping flow produced by a multipolar force distribution in a fluid confined between two parallel planar walls. We show that at distances larger than several wall separations the flow field assumes the Hele–Shaw form, i.e. it is parallel to the walls and varies quadratically in the transverse direction. The associated pressure field

  1. Aeroacoustic interaction of a distributed vortex with a lifting Joukowski airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, J. C.; Lamkin, S. L.

    1984-01-01

    A first principles computational aeroacoustics calculation of the flow and noise fields produced by the interaction of a distributed vortex with a lifting Joukowski airfoil is accomplished at the Reynolds number of 200. The case considered is that where the circulations of the vortex and the airfoil are of opposite sign, corresponding to blade vortex interaction on the retreating side of a single helicopter rotor. The results show that the flow is unsteady, even in the absence of the incoming vortex, resulting in trailing edge noise generation. After the vortex is input, it initially experiences a quite rapid apparent diffusion rate produced by stretching in the airfoil velocity gradients. Consideration of the effects of finite vortex size and viscosity causes the noise radiation during the encounter to be much less impulsive than predicted by previous analyses.

  2. Parallel Finite Element Particle-In-Cell Code for Simulations of Space-charge Dominated Beam-Cavity Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Candel, A.E.; Kabel, A.C.; Ko, Yong-kyu; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Ng, C.K.; Prudencio, E.E.; Schussman, G.L.; Uplenchwar, R.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    Over the past years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel finite element (FE) particle-in-cell code Pic3P (Pic2P) for simulations of beam-cavity interactions dominated by space-charge effects. As opposed to standard space-charge dominated beam transport codes, which are based on the electrostatic approximation, Pic3P (Pic2P) includes space-charge, retardation and boundary effects as it self-consistently solves the complete set of Maxwell-Lorentz equations using higher-order FE methods on conformal meshes. Use of efficient, large-scale parallel processing allows for the modeling of photoinjectors with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design and operation of the next-generation of accelerator facilities. Applications to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) RF gun are presented.

  3. Computation of interactional aerodynamics for noise prediction of heavy lift rotorcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennes, Christopher C.

    Many computational tools are used when developing a modern helicopter. As the design space is narrowed, more accurate and time-intensive tools are brought to bear. These tools are used to determine the effect of a design decision on the performance, handling, stability and efficiency of the aircraft. One notable parameter left out of this process is acoustics. This is due in part to the difficulty in making useful acoustics calculations that reveal the differences between various design configurations. This thesis presents a new approach designed to bridge the gap in prediction capability between fast but low-fidelity Lagrangian particle methods, and slow but high-fidelity Eulerian computational fluid dynamics simulations. A multi-pronged approach is presented. First, a simple flow solver using well-understood and tested flow solution methodologies is developed specifically to handle bodies in arbitrary motion. To this basic flow solver two new technologies are added. The first is an Immersed Boundary technique designed to be tolerant of geometric degeneracies and low-resolution grids. This new technique allows easy inclusion of complex fuselage geometries at minimal computational cost, improving the ability of a solver to capture the complex interactional aerodynamic effects expected in modern rotorcraft design. The second new technique is an extension of a concept from flow visualization where the motion of tip vortices are tracked through the solution using massless particles convecting with the local flow. In this extension of that concept, the particles maintain knowledge of the expected and actual vortex strength. As a post-processing step, when the acoustic calculations are made, these particles are used to augment the loading noise calculation and reproduce the highly-impulsive character of blade-vortex interaction noise. In combination these new techniques yield a significant improvement to the state of the art in rotorcraft blade-vortex interaction noise prediction.

  4. Prediction of BVI noise patterns and correlation with wake interaction locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolini, Michael A.; Martin, Ruth M.; Lorber, Peter F.; Egolf, T. A.

    High resolution fluctuating airloads data were acquired during a test of a contemporary design United Technologies model rotor in the Duits-Nederlandse Windtunnel (DNW). The airloads are used as input to the noise prediction program WOPWOP, in order to predict the blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise field on a large plane below the rotor. Trends of predicted advancing and retreating side BVI noise levels and directionality as functions of flight condition are presented. The measured airloads have been analyzed to determine the BVI locations on the blade surface, and are used to interpret the predicted BVI noise radiation patterns. Predicted BVI locations are obtained using the free wake model in CAMRAD/JA, the UTRC Generalized Forward Flight Distorted Wake Model, and the UTRC FREEWAKE analysis. These predicted BVI locations are compared with those obtained from the measured pressure data.

  5. Study of the parallel-plate EMP simulator and the simulator-obstacle interaction. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gedney, S.D.

    1990-12-01

    The Parallel-Plate Bounded-Wave EMP Simulator is typically used to test the vulnerability of electronic systems to the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) produced by a high altitude nuclear burst by subjecting the systems to a simulated EMP environment. However, when large test objects are placed within the simulator for investigation, the desired EMP environment may be affected by the interaction between the simulator and the test object. This simulator/obstacle interaction can be attributed to the following phenomena: (1) mutual coupling between the test object and the simulator, (2) fringing effects due to the finite width of the conducting plates of the simulator, and (3) multiple reflections between the object and the simulator's tapered end-sections. When the interaction is significant, the measurement of currents coupled into the system may not accurately represent those induced by an actual EMP. To better understand the problem of simulator/obstacle interaction, a dynamic analysis of the fields within the parallel-plate simulator is presented. The fields are computed using a moment method solution based on a wire mesh approximation of the conducting surfaces of the simulator. The fields within an empty simulator are found to be predominately transversse electromagnetic (TEM) for frequencies within the simulator's bandwidth, properly simulating the properties of the EMP propagating in free space. However, when a large test object is placed within the simulator, it is found that the currents induced on the object can be quite different from those on an object situated in free space. A comprehensive study of the mechanisms contributing to this deviation is presented.

  6. DC Circuits: Parallel Resistances

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this interactive learning activity, students will learn about parallel circuits. They will measure and calculate the resistance of parallel circuits and answer several questions about the example circuit shown.

  7. RKKY Interaction and the Nature of the Ground State of Double Dots in Parallel

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, M.; Konik, R.

    2011-06-23

    We argue through a combination of slave-boson mean-field theory and the Bethe ansatz that the ground state of closely spaced double quantum dots in parallel coupled to a single effective channel are Fermi liquids. We do so by studying the dots conductance, impurity entropy, and spin correlation. In particular, we find that the zero-temperature conductance is characterized by the Friedel sum rule, a hallmark of Fermi-liquid physics, and that the impurity entropy vanishes in the limit of zero temperature, indicating that the ground state is a singlet. This conclusion is in opposition to a number of numerical renormalization-group studies. We suggest a possible reason for the discrepancy.

  8. Nonlinear fluid-structure interaction problem. Part II: space discretization, implementation aspects, nested parallelization and application examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassiotis, Christophe; Ibrahimbegovic, Adnan; Niekamp, Rainer; Matthies, Hermann G.

    2011-03-01

    The main focus of the present article is the development of a general solution framework for coupled and/or interaction multi-physics problems based upon re-using existing codes into software products. In particular, we discuss how to build this software tool for the case of fluid-structure interaction problem, from finite element code FEAP for structural and finite volume code OpenFOAM for fluid mechanics. This is achieved by using the Component Template Library (CTL) to provide the coupling between the existing codes into a single software product. The present CTL code-coupling procedure accepts not only different discretization schemes, but different languages, with the solid component written in Fortran and fluid component written in C++ . Moreover, the resulting CTL-based code also accepts the nested parallelization. The proposed coupling strategy is detailed for explicit and implicit fixed-point iteration solver presented in the Part I of this paper, referred to Direct Force-Motion Transfer/Block- Gauss-Seidel. However, the proposed code-coupling framework can easily accommodate other solution schemes. The selected application examples are chosen to confirm the capability of the code-coupling strategy to provide a quick development of advanced computational tools for demanding practical problems, such as 3D fluid models with free-surface flows interacting with structures.

  9. Parallel Three-Dimensional Computation of Fluid Dynamics and Fluid-Structure Interactions of Ram-Air Parachutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tezduyar, Tayfun E.

    1998-01-01

    This is a final report as far as our work at University of Minnesota is concerned. The report describes our research progress and accomplishments in development of high performance computing methods and tools for 3D finite element computation of aerodynamic characteristics and fluid-structure interactions (FSI) arising in airdrop systems, namely ram-air parachutes and round parachutes. This class of simulations involves complex geometries, flexible structural components, deforming fluid domains, and unsteady flow patterns. The key components of our simulation toolkit are a stabilized finite element flow solver, a nonlinear structural dynamics solver, an automatic mesh moving scheme, and an interface between the fluid and structural solvers; all of these have been developed within a parallel message-passing paradigm.

  10. Guided Analysis of Hurricane Trends Using Statistical Processes Integrated with Interactive Parallel Coordinates

    E-print Network

    Swan II, J. Edward

    Guided Analysis of Hurricane Trends Using Statistical Processes Integrated with Interactive. The system's utility is demonstrated with an extensive hurricane climate study that was conducted by a hurricane expert. In the study, the expert used a new data set of environmental weather data, composed of 28

  11. Fast parallel interferometric 3D tracking of numerous optically trapped particles and their hydrodynamic interaction.

    PubMed

    Ruh, Dominic; Tränkle, Benjamin; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2011-10-24

    Multi-dimensional, correlated particle tracking is a key technology to reveal dynamic processes in living and synthetic soft matter systems. In this paper we present a new method for tracking micron-sized beads in parallel and in all three dimensions - faster and more precise than existing techniques. Using an acousto-optic deflector and two quadrant-photo-diodes, we can track numerous optically trapped beads at up to tens of kHz with a precision of a few nanometers by back-focal plane interferometry. By time-multiplexing the laser focus, we can calibrate individually all traps and all tracking signals in a few seconds and in 3D. We show 3D histograms and calibration constants for nine beads in a quadratic arrangement, although trapping and tracking is easily possible for more beads also in arbitrary 2D arrangements. As an application, we investigate the hydrodynamic coupling and diffusion anomalies of spheres trapped in a 3 × 3 arrangement. PMID:22109012

  12. PARALLEL STRINGS - PARALLEL UNIVERSES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jim McDowall; Saft America

    Sometimes different parts of the battery community just don't seem to operate on the same level, and attitudes towards parallel battery strings are a prime example of this. Engineers at telephone company central offices are quite happy operating 20 or more parallel strings on the same dc bus, while many manufacturers warn against connecting more than four or five strings

  13. Wind tunnel tests of a two bladed model rotor to evaluate the TAMI system in descending forward flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. P., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A research investigation was conducted to assess the potential of the Tip Air Mass Injection system in reducing the noise output during blade vortex interaction in descending low speed flight. In general it was concluded that the noise output due to blade vortex interaction can be reduced by 4 to 6 db with an equivalent power expenditure of approximately 14 percent of installed power.

  14. A comparative analysis of control algorithms for three-phase line-interactive UPS systems with series-parallel active power-line conditioning using SRF method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. A. O. da Silva; P. F. Donoso-Garcia; P. C. Cortizo; P. F. Seixas

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents alternative control algorithms using synchronous reference frame (SRF) based controllers, which allow an effective power factor correction, load harmonic current suppression and output voltage regulation for three-phase line-interactive UPS systems with active series-parallel power-line conditioning capability. The proposed UPS systems are composed of two active power filter topologies. The first one works as a series active power

  15. Parallel Atomistic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    HEFFELFINGER,GRANT S.

    2000-01-18

    Algorithms developed to enable the use of atomistic molecular simulation methods with parallel computers are reviewed. Methods appropriate for bonded as well as non-bonded (and charged) interactions are included. While strategies for obtaining parallel molecular simulations have been developed for the full variety of atomistic simulation methods, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo have received the most attention. Three main types of parallel molecular dynamics simulations have been developed, the replicated data decomposition, the spatial decomposition, and the force decomposition. For Monte Carlo simulations, parallel algorithms have been developed which can be divided into two categories, those which require a modified Markov chain and those which do not. Parallel algorithms developed for other simulation methods such as Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo, grand canonical molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo methods for protein structure determination are also reviewed and issues such as how to measure parallel efficiency, especially in the case of parallel Monte Carlo algorithms with modified Markov chains are discussed.

  16. Parallel MATLAB: Parallel For Loops

    E-print Network

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Parallel MATLAB: Parallel For Loops John Burkardt (FSU) Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff Research Computing ICAM: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 69 #12;MATLAB Parallel Example ODE SWEEP Example FMINCON Example Conclusion 2 / 69 #12;INTRO: Parallel MATLAB Parallel MATLAB

  17. Aeroacoustic theory for noncompact wing-gust interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, R.; Widnall, S. E.

    1981-01-01

    Three aeroacoustic models for noncompact wing-gust interaction were developed for subsonic flow. The first is that for a two dimensional (infinite span) wing passing through an oblique gust. The unsteady pressure field was obtained by the Wiener-Hopf technique; the airfoil loading and the associated acoustic field were calculated, respectively, by allowing the field point down on the airfoil surface, or by letting it go to infinity. The second model is a simple spanwise superposition of two dimensional solutions to account for three dimensional acoustic effects of wing rotation (for a helicopter blade, or some other rotating planform) and of finiteness of wing span. A three dimensional theory for a single gust was applied to calculate the acoustic signature in closed form due to blade vortex interaction in helicopters. The third model is that of a quarter infinite plate with side edge through a gust at high subsonic speed. An approximate solution for the three dimensional loading and the associated three dimensional acoustic field in closed form was obtained. The results reflected the acoustic effect of satisfying the correct loading condition at the side edge.

  18. Interaction of an oblique shock wave with a pair of parallel vortices: Shock dynamics and mechanism of sound generation

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Yong-Tao

    and the mechanism of sound generation in the interaction between an oblique shock wave and a pair of vortices. We is related to the interaction of the reflected shock waves and sound waves. The first mechanism is dominating affected by the interaction of the reflected shock waves and sound waves. © 2006 American Institute

  19. Stochastic gyroresonant electron acceleration in a low-beta plasma. I - Interaction with parallel transverse cold plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinacker, Juergen; Miller, James A.

    1992-01-01

    The gyroresonance of electrons with parallel transverse cold plasma waves is considered, and the Fokker-Planck equation describing the evolution of the electron distribution function in the presence of a spectrum of turbulence is derived. A new resonance which produces a divergence in the Fokker-Planck coefficients is identified; it results when the electron is in gyroresonance with a wave that has a group velocity equal to the velocity of the electron along the magnetic field. Under the assumption of a power-law spectral density, the Fokker-Planck coefficients are calculated numerically, and their complicated momentum and pitch-angle dependence, as well as the influence of various approximations to the dispersion relation, gyroresonance condition, and spectral density are discussed. It is found that there is no resonance gap at any pitch angle as long as the full gyroresonance condition is used and waves propagating on both directions are present.

  20. Massively parallel multiple interacting continua formulation for modeling flow in fractured porous media using the subsurface reactive flow and transport code PFLOTRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, J.; Mills, R. T.; Lichtner, P. C.; Hammond, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    Fracture dominated flows occur in numerous subsurface geochemical processes and at many different scales in rock pore structures, micro-fractures, fracture networks and faults. Fractured porous media can be modeled as multiple interacting continua which are connected to each other through transfer terms that capture the flow of mass and energy in response to pressure, temperature and concentration gradients. However, the analysis of large-scale transient problems using the multiple interacting continuum approach presents an algorithmic and computational challenge for problems with very large numbers of degrees of freedom. A generalized dual porosity model based on the Dual Continuum Disconnected Matrix approach has been implemented within a massively parallel multiphysics-multicomponent-multiphase subsurface reactive flow and transport code PFLOTRAN. Developed as part of the Department of Energy's SciDAC-2 program, PFLOTRAN provides subsurface simulation capabilities that can scale from laptops to ultrascale supercomputers, and utilizes the PETSc framework to solve the large, sparse algebraic systems that arises in complex subsurface reactive flow and transport problems. It has been successfully applied to the solution of problems composed of more than two billions degrees of freedom, utilizing up to 131,072 processor cores on Jaguar, the Cray XT5 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is the world’s fastest supercomputer. Building upon the capabilities and computational efficiency of PFLOTRAN, we will present an implementation of the multiple interacting continua formulation for fractured porous media along with an application case study.

  1. Interaction of pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) ligands with parallel intermolecular G-quadruplex complex using spectroscopy and ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Raju, Gajjela; Srinivas, Ragampeta; Reddy, Vangala Santhosh; Idris, Mohammed M; Kamal, Ahmed; Nagesh, Narayana

    2012-01-01

    Studies on ligand interaction with quadruplex DNA, and their role in stabilizing the complex at concentration prevailing under physiological condition, has attained high interest. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and spectroscopic studies in solution were used to evaluate the interaction of PBD and TMPyP4 ligands, stoichiometry and selectivity to G-quadruplex DNA. Two synthetic ligands from PBD family, namely pyrene-linked pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine hybrid (PBD1), mixed imine-amide pyrrolobenzodiazepine dimer (PBD2) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (TMPyP4) were studied. G-rich single-stranded oligonucleotide d(5'GGGGTTGGGG3') designated as d(T(2)G(8)), from the telomeric region of Tetrahymena Glaucoma, was considered for the interaction with ligands. ESI-MS and spectroscopic methods viz., circular dichroism (CD), UV-Visible, and fluorescence were employed to investigate the G-quadruplex structures formed by d(T(2)G(8)) sequence and its interaction with PBD and TMPyP4 ligands. From ESI-MS spectra, it is evident that the majority of quadruplexes exist as d(T(2)G(8))(2) and d(T(2)G(8))(4) forms possessing two to ten cations in the centre, thereby stabilizing the complex. CD band of PBD1 and PBD2 showed hypo and hyperchromicity, on interaction with quadruplex DNA, indicating unfolding and stabilization of quadruplex DNA complex, respectively. UV-Visible and fluorescence experiments suggest that PBD1 bind externally where as PBD2 intercalate moderately and bind externally to G-quadruplex DNA. Further, melting experiments using SYBR Green indicate that PBD1 unfolds and PBD2 stabilizes the G-quadruplex complex. ITC experiments using d(T(2)G(8)) quadruplex with PBD ligands reveal that PBD1 and PBD2 prefer external/loop binding and external/intercalative binding to quadruplex DNA, respectively. From experimental results it is clear that the interaction of PBD2 and TMPyP4 impart higher stability to the quadruplex complex. PMID:22558271

  2. DC Circuits: Series-Parallel Resistances

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this interactive learning activity, students will learn more about series-parallel circuits. They will measure and calculate the resistance of series-parallel circuits and answer several questions about the example circuit shown.

  3. Parallel Operators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-marc Jézéquel; Jean-lin Pacherie

    1996-01-01

    : Encapsulating parallelism and synchronization code within object-oriented softwarecomponents is a promising avenue towards mastering the complexity of the distributedmemory supercomputer programming. However, in trying to give application programmersbenefit of supercomputer power, the library designer generally resorts to low level parallelconstructs, a time consuming and error prone process. To solve this problem we introducea new abstraction called Parallel Operators. A

  4. Parallel Optimisation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    An introduction to optimisation techniques that may improve parallel performance and scaling on HECToR. It assumes that the reader has some experience of parallel programming including basic MPI and OpenMP. Scaling is a measurement of the ability for a parallel code to use increasing numbers of cores efficiently. A scalable application is one that, when the number of processors is increased, performs better by a factor which justifies the additional resource employed. Making a parallel application scale to many thousands of processes requires not only careful attention to the communication, data and work distribution but also to the choice of the algorithms to use. Since the choice of algorithm is too broad a subject and very particular to application domain to include in this brief guide we concentrate on general good practices towards parallel optimisation on HECToR.

  5. IU parallel processing benchmark

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles Weems; Edward Riseman; Allen Hanson; Azriel Rosenfeld

    1988-01-01

    A benchmark is presented that was designed to evaluate the merits of various parallel architectures as applied to image understanding (IU). This benchmark exercise addresses the issue of system performance on an integrated set of tasks, where the task interactions that are typical of complex vision application are present. The goal of this exercise is to gain a better understanding

  6. Parallel LOCFES 

    E-print Network

    Shah, Ronak C.

    1991-01-01

    I'sge III. A Review III. B MasPar System Architecture 18 III. C MasPar FORTRAN 21 III. D MasPar Programming Environment IV MLOCFES: PARALLEL VERSION IV. A Potential Regions of Parallelism in LOCFES IV. B FORTRAN gg Adaptations IV. C Program... formulation for spherical geometry. I. C Problem Statement LOCFES is a computationally intense program written in FORTRAN 77. It exhibits some regions of fine-grained (i. e. , at the cell level) parallelism. The program and the algorithm can be modified...

  7. A comparison with theory of peak to peak sound level for a model helicopter rotor generating blade slap at low tip speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontana, R. R.; Hubbard, J. E., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Mini-tuft and smoke flow visualization techniques have been developed for the investigation of model helicopter rotor blade vortex interaction noise at low tip speeds. These techniques allow the parameters required for calculation of the blade vortex interaction noise using the Widnall/Wolf model to be determined. The measured acoustics are compared with the predicted acoustics for each test condition. Under the conditions tested it is determined that the dominating acoustic pulse results from the interaction of the blade with a vortex 1-1/4 revolutions old at an interaction angle of less than 8 deg. The Widnall/Wolf model predicts the peak sound pressure level within 3 dB for blade vortex separation distances greater than 1 semichord, but it generally over predicts the peak S.P.L. by over 10 dB for blade vortex separation distances of less than 1/4 semichord.

  8. Parallel LOCFES

    E-print Network

    Shah, Ronak C.

    1991-01-01

    I'sge III. A Review III. B MasPar System Architecture 18 III. C MasPar FORTRAN 21 III. D MasPar Programming Environment IV MLOCFES: PARALLEL VERSION IV. A Potential Regions of Parallelism in LOCFES IV. B FORTRAN gg Adaptations IV. C Program.... 2 MasPar MP-1 System Diagram (Adapted from MasPar System Overview). . . 19 3 The flow of control. 31 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page Analytical vs computational (MLOCFES) solution for I = 1, K = 1, and L=1 Analytical vs computational (MLOCFES...

  9. Parallel Resistors

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Horton

    2009-05-30

    Students will measure the resistance of resistors that they have drawn on paper with a graphite pencil. They will then connect two resistors in parallel and measure the resistance of the combination. In this activity, it is important that students color v

  10. Parallel Universes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Max Tegmark

    2003-01-01

    I survey physics theories involving parallel universes, which form a natural four-level hierarchy of multiverses allowing progressively greater diversity. Level I: A generic prediction of inflation is an infinite ergodic universe, which contains Hubble volumes realizing all initial conditions - including an identical copy of you about 10^{10^29} meters away. Level II: In chaotic inflation, other thermalized regions may have

  11. Getting a feel for parameters: using interactive parallel plots as a tool for parameter identification in the new rainfall-runoff model WALRUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Claudia; Torfs, Paul; Teuling, Ryan; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2015-04-01

    Recently, we developed the Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS) to fill the gap between complex, spatially distributed models often used in lowland catchments and simple, parametric models which have mostly been developed for mountainous catchments (Brauer et al., 2014ab). This parametric rainfall-runoff model can be used all over the world in both freely draining lowland catchments and polders with controlled water levels. The open source model code is implemented in R and can be downloaded from www.github.com/ClaudiaBrauer/WALRUS. The structure and code of WALRUS are simple, which facilitates detailed investigation of the effect of parameters on all model variables. WALRUS contains only four parameters requiring calibration; they are intended to have a strong, qualitative relation with catchment characteristics. Parameter estimation remains a challenge, however. The model structure contains three main feedbacks: (1) between groundwater and surface water; (2) between saturated and unsaturated zone; (3) between catchment wetness and (quick/slow) flowroute division. These feedbacks represent essential rainfall-runoff processes in lowland catchments, but increase the risk of parameter dependence and equifinality. Therefore, model performance should not only be judged based on a comparison between modelled and observed discharges, but also based on the plausibility of the internal modelled variables. Here, we present a method to analyse the effect of parameter values on internal model states and fluxes in a qualitative and intuitive way using interactive parallel plotting. We applied WALRUS to ten Dutch catchments with different sizes, slopes and soil types and both freely draining and polder areas. The model was run with a large number of parameter sets, which were created using Latin Hypercube Sampling. The model output was characterised in terms of several signatures, both measures of goodness of fit and statistics of internal model variables (such as the percentage of rain water travelling through the quickflow reservoir). End users can then eliminate parameter combinations with unrealistic outcomes based on expert knowledge using interactive parallel plots. In these plots, for instance, ranges can be selected for each signature and only model runs which yield signature values in these ranges are highlighted. The resulting selection of realistic parameter sets can be used for ensemble simulations. C.C. Brauer, A.J. Teuling, P.J.J.F. Torfs, R. Uijlenhoet (2014a): The Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS): a lumped rainfall-runoff model for catchments with shallow groundwater, Geoscientific Model Development, 7, 2313-2332, www.geosci-model-dev.net/7/2313/2014/gmd-7-2313-2014.pdf C.C. Brauer, P.J.J.F. Torfs, A.J. Teuling, R. Uijlenhoet (2014b): The Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS): application to the Hupsel Brook catchment and Cabauw polder, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 18, 4007-4028, www.hydrol-earth-syst-sci.net/18/4007/2014/hess-18-4007-2014.pdf

  12. Interactions Between Multiple Cell Types in Parallel Microfluidic Channels: Monitoring Platelet Adhesion to an Endothelium in the Presence of an Anti-Adhesion Drug

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Chia-Jui; Oblak, Teresa D'Amico; Spence, Dana M.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method for immobilizing endothelial cells in the channels of a microfluidic device fabricated with soft lithography is presented that requires no surface oxidation of the substrate material used in conjunction with the microfluidic device and is operable even with a reversible seal. Specifically, optimal conditions for culturing bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (bPAECs) to the surface of a Petri dish were investigated. The parameters investigated included fibronectin concentration, temperature, seeding density, and immobilization time. To enhance the utility of the device, all optimization studies, and studies involving platelet adhesion to the immobilized endothelium, were performed in parallel channels, thereby enabling improved throughput over a single channel device. The optimal conditions for cell immobilization included coating the petri dish with 100 ?g/mL fibronectin, a seeding cell density of 1.00 × 105 cells mL?1 and an immobilization time of 90 min at 37 °C. The device was then employed to monitor the physical interaction (adhesion) of platelets to the immobilized endothelium in the presence of a known platelet activator (ADP) and a drug inhibitor of platelet activation. The number of platelets adhering to the endothelial cells in the channels increased from 17.0 ± 2.3 in the absence of ADP to 63.2 ± 2.4 in the presence of 5.00 ?M ADP. Moreover, the data presented here also shows that inhibition of endothelium nitric oxide (NO) production, a recognized inhibitor of platelet adhesion to the endothelium, increased the number of platelets adhering to the surface to 35.4 ± 1.0. In the presence of NO inhibition and 5.00 ?M ADP, the affect on platelet adhesion was further increased to 127 ± 5.2. Finally, this device was employed to investigate the effect of a drug known to inhibit platelet adhesion (clopidogrel) and, in the presence of the drug, the platelet adhesion due to activation by 5.00 ?M ADP decreased to 24.0 ± 3.8. This work is the first representation of multiple cell types physically interacting in the channels of a microfluidic device and further demonstrates the potential of these devices in the drug discovery process and drug efficacy studies. PMID:18729474

  13. Parallel MATLAB at VT: Parallel For Loops

    E-print Network

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Parallel MATLAB at VT: Parallel For Loops John Burkardt (FSU) Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff Research Computing ICAM: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 72 #12;MATLAB Parallel Example ODE SWEEP Example FMINCON Example Conclusion 2 / 72 #12;INTRO: Parallel MATLAB Parallel MATLAB

  14. Parallel MATLAB at VT: Parallel For Loops

    E-print Network

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Parallel MATLAB at VT: Parallel For Loops John Burkardt (FSU) Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff Research Computing ICAM: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 71 #12;MATLAB Parallel Example ODE SWEEP Example FMINCON Example Conclusion 2 / 71 #12;INTRO: Parallel MATLAB Parallel MATLAB

  15. Parallel Hardware and Parallel Software: a Reconciliation

    E-print Network

    Zanibbi, Richard

    Parallel Hardware and Parallel Software: a Reconciliation Peter Welch Computing Laboratory University of Kent, Canterbury, UK Abstract Parallel hardware is commercially marketed today at all levels of gran- ularity - from

  16. Parallel Computing Explained

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NCSA

    Several tutorials on parallel computing. Overview of parallel computing. Porting and code parallelization. Scalar, cache, and parallel code tuning. Timing, profiling and performance analysis. Overview of IBM Regatta P690.

  17. Parallel Universes

    E-print Network

    Max Tegmark

    2003-02-07

    I survey physics theories involving parallel universes, which form a natural four-level hierarchy of multiverses allowing progressively greater diversity. Level I: A generic prediction of inflation is an infinite ergodic universe, which contains Hubble volumes realizing all initial conditions - including an identical copy of you about 10^{10^29} meters away. Level II: In chaotic inflation, other thermalized regions may have different effective physical constants, dimensionality and particle content. Level III: In unitary quantum mechanics, other branches of the wavefunction add nothing qualitatively new, which is ironic given that this level has historically been the most controversial. Level IV: Other mathematical structures give different fundamental equations of physics. The key question is not whether parallel universes exist (Level I is the uncontroversial cosmological concordance model), but how many levels there are. I discuss how multiverse models can be falsified and argue that there is a severe "measure problem" that must be solved to make testable predictions at levels II-IV.

  18. Parallel MATLAB at VT: Parallel For Loops

    E-print Network

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Parallel MATLAB at VT: Parallel For Loops John Burkardt (FSU) Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff Research Computing ICAM: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 56 #12;Matlab Parallel ODE SWEEP Example MD Example Conclusion 2 / 56 #12;INTRO: Parallel Matlab In a previous lecture we

  19. Insights into the Hendra virus NTAIL-XD complex: Evidence for a parallel organization of the helical MoRE at the XD surface stabilized by a combination of hydrophobic and polar interactions.

    PubMed

    Erales, Jenny; Beltrandi, Matilde; Roche, Jennifer; Maté, Maria; Longhi, Sonia

    2015-08-01

    The Hendra virus is a member of the Henipavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae family. The nucleoprotein, which consists of a structured core and of a C-terminal intrinsically disordered domain (NTAIL), encapsidates the viral genome within a helical nucleocapsid. NTAIL partly protrudes from the surface of the nucleocapsid being thus capable of interacting with the C-terminal X domain (XD) of the viral phosphoprotein. Interaction with XD implies a molecular recognition element (MoRE) that is located within NTAIL residues 470-490, and that undergoes ?-helical folding. The MoRE has been proposed to be embedded in the hydrophobic groove delimited by helices ?2 and ?3 of XD, although experimental data could not discriminate between a parallel and an antiparallel orientation of the MoRE. Previous studies also showed that if the binding interface is enriched in hydrophobic residues, charged residues located close to the interface might play a role in complex formation. Here, we targeted for site directed mutagenesis two acidic and two basic residues within XD and NTAIL. ITC studies showed that electrostatics plays a crucial role in complex formation and pointed a parallel orientation of the MoRE as more likely. Further support for a parallel orientation was afforded by SAXS studies that made use of two chimeric constructs in which XD and the MoRE were covalently linked to each other. Altogether, these studies unveiled the multiparametric nature of the interactions established within this complex and contribute to shed light onto the molecular features of protein interfaces involving intrinsically disordered regions. PMID:25960280

  20. Runtime volume visualization for parallel CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Kwan-Liu

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses some aspects of design of a data distributed, massively parallel volume rendering library for runtime visualization of parallel computational fluid dynamics simulations in a message-passing environment. Unlike the traditional scheme in which visualization is a postprocessing step, the rendering is done in place on each node processor. Computational scientists who run large-scale simulations on a massively parallel computer can thus perform interactive monitoring of their simulations. The current library provides an interface to handle volume data on rectilinear grids. The same design principles can be generalized to handle other types of grids. For demonstration, we run a parallel Navier-Stokes solver making use of this rendering library on the Intel Paragon XP/S. The interactive visual response achieved is found to be very useful. Performance studies show that the parallel rendering process is scalable with the size of the simulation as well as with the parallel computer.

  1. Computer-Aided Parallelizer and Optimizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Haoqiang

    2011-01-01

    The Computer-Aided Parallelizer and Optimizer (CAPO) automates the insertion of compiler directives (see figure) to facilitate parallel processing on Shared Memory Parallel (SMP) machines. While CAPO currently is integrated seamlessly into CAPTools (developed at the University of Greenwich, now marketed as ParaWise), CAPO was independently developed at Ames Research Center as one of the components for the Legacy Code Modernization (LCM) project. The current version takes serial FORTRAN programs, performs interprocedural data dependence analysis, and generates OpenMP directives. Due to the widely supported OpenMP standard, the generated OpenMP codes have the potential to run on a wide range of SMP machines. CAPO relies on accurate interprocedural data dependence information currently provided by CAPTools. Compiler directives are generated through identification of parallel loops in the outermost level, construction of parallel regions around parallel loops and optimization of parallel regions, and insertion of directives with automatic identification of private, reduction, induction, and shared variables. Attempts also have been made to identify potential pipeline parallelism (implemented with point-to-point synchronization). Although directives are generated automatically, user interaction with the tool is still important for producing good parallel codes. A comprehensive graphical user interface is included for users to interact with the parallelization process.

  2. Virtual Reality and Parallel Systems Performance Analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel A. Reed; Keith A. Shields; Will H. Scullin; Luis F. Tawera; Christopher L. Elford

    1995-01-01

    Recording and analyzing the dynamics of application program, system software, and hardware interactions are the keys to understanding and tuning the performance of massively parallel systems. Because massively parallel systems contain hundreds or thousands of processors, each potentially with many dynamic performance metrics, the performance data occupy a sparsely populated, high-dimensional space. These dynamic performance metrics for each processor define

  3. Two Fundamental Concepts in Skeletal Parallel Programming

    E-print Network

    Cole, Murray

    to be fundamental to the definition of any skeletal parallel programming system, but which have been addressed onlyTwo Fundamental Concepts in Skeletal Parallel Programming Anne Benoit and Murray Cole School define the concepts of nesting mode and interaction mode as they arise in the description of skeletal

  4. Parallel computations and control of adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alvin, Kenneth F.; Belvin, W. Keith; Chong, K. P. (editor); Liu, S. C. (editor); Li, J. C. (editor)

    1991-01-01

    The equations of motion for structures with adaptive elements for vibration control are presented for parallel computations to be used as a software package for real-time control of flexible space structures. A brief introduction of the state-of-the-art parallel computational capability is also presented. Time marching strategies are developed for an effective use of massive parallel mapping, partitioning, and the necessary arithmetic operations. An example is offered for the simulation of control-structure interaction on a parallel computer and the impact of the approach presented for applications in other disciplines than aerospace industry is assessed.

  5. Parallel Composition Communication and Allow Hiding Parallel Processes

    E-print Network

    Groote, Jan Friso

    Parallel Composition Communication and Allow Hiding Parallel Processes Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Requirement Analysis and Design Verification, 2008-2009 Mousavi: Parallel Processes #12;Parallel Composition Communication and Allow Hiding Overview Motivation Parallel

  6. Data parallel algorithms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Daniel Hillis; Guy L. Steele Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Parallel computers with tens of thousands of processors are typically programmed in a data parallel style, as opposed to the control parallel style used in multiprocessing. The success of data parallel algorithms—even on problems that at first glance seem inherently serial—suggests that this style of programming has much wider applicability than was previously thought.

  7. Introduction to Parallel Programming

    E-print Network

    Introduction to Parallel Programming 1Tuesday, April 17, 12 #12;Overview · Parallel programming allows the user to use multiple cpus concurrently · Reasons for parallel execution: · shorten execution expect as a function of the number of processors (N) used and the code fraction that is parallel (p). T(1

  8. Introduction to Parallel Programming

    E-print Network

    Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    Introduction to Parallel Programming Martin Cuma Center for High Performance Computing University of Utah mcuma@chpc.utah.edu #12;Overview · Types of parallel computers. · Parallel programming options. · How to write parallel applications. · How to compile. · How to debug/profile. · Summary, future

  9. Exploiting Visualization and Direct Manipulation to Make Parallel Tools More

    E-print Network

    Pancake, Cherri M.

    Exploiting Visualization and Direct Manipulation to Make Parallel Tools More Communicative Cherri M@cs.orst.edu http://www.cs.orst.edu/ pancake Abstract. Parallel tools rely on graphical techniques to improve be exploited in parallel tools, in order to improve the naturalness with which the user interacts

  10. Massively Parallel QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Soltz, R; Vranas, P; Blumrich, M; Chen, D; Gara, A; Giampap, M; Heidelberger, P; Salapura, V; Sexton, J; Bhanot, G

    2007-04-11

    The theory of the strong nuclear force, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), can be numerically simulated from first principles on massively-parallel supercomputers using the method of Lattice Gauge Theory. We describe the special programming requirements of lattice QCD (LQCD) as well as the optimal supercomputer hardware architectures that it suggests. We demonstrate these methods on the BlueGene massively-parallel supercomputer and argue that LQCD and the BlueGene architecture are a natural match. This can be traced to the simple fact that LQCD is a regular lattice discretization of space into lattice sites while the BlueGene supercomputer is a discretization of space into compute nodes, and that both are constrained by requirements of locality. This simple relation is both technologically important and theoretically intriguing. The main result of this paper is the speedup of LQCD using up to 131,072 CPUs on the largest BlueGene/L supercomputer. The speedup is perfect with sustained performance of about 20% of peak. This corresponds to a maximum of 70.5 sustained TFlop/s. At these speeds LQCD and BlueGene are poised to produce the next generation of strong interaction physics theoretical results.

  11. Visualization and Tracking of Parallel CFD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaziri, Arsi; Kremenetsky, Mark

    1995-01-01

    We describe a system for interactive visualization and tracking of a 3-D unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation on a parallel computer. CM/AVS, a distributed, parallel implementation of a visualization environment (AVS) runs on the CM-5 parallel supercomputer. A CFD solver is run as a CM/AVS module on the CM-5. Data communication between the solver, other parallel visualization modules, and a graphics workstation, which is running AVS, are handled by CM/AVS. Partitioning of the visualization task, between CM-5 and the workstation, can be done interactively in the visual programming environment provided by AVS. Flow solver parameters can also be altered by programmable interactive widgets. This system partially removes the requirement of storing large solution files at frequent time steps, a characteristic of the traditional 'simulate (yields) store (yields) visualize' post-processing approach.

  12. Parallel Distributed Processing Challenges the Strong Modularity Hypothesis, Not the Local-ity Assumption [Commentary on M. J. Farah, Neuropsychological inference with an interactive

    E-print Network

    Plaut, David C.

    Assumption [Commentary on M. J. Farah, Neuropsychological inference with an interactive brain: A critique explanations of a number of neuropsychological phenomena than do tra- ditional, modular accounts. She ascribes fundamental contribution of PDP modeling to neuropsychology is that it enables a principled expression

  13. Speculative parallelization of partially parallel loops

    E-print Network

    Dang, Francis Hoai Dinh

    2009-05-15

    , and applied a fully parallel data dependence test to determine if it had any cross–processor depen- dences. If the test failed, then the loop was re–executed serially. While this method exploits doall parallelism well, it can cause slowdowns for loops...

  14. Parallel I/O Systems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Amy Apon

    * Redundant disk array architectures,* Fault tolerance issues in parallel I/O systems,* Caching and prefetching,* Parallel file systems,* Parallel I/O systems, * Parallel I/O programming paradigms, * Parallel I/O applications and environments, * Parallel programming with parallel I/O

  15. Aerodynamic, aeroacoustic, and aeroelastic investigations of airfoil-vortex interaction using large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Marcel

    In helicopters, vortices (generated at the tip of the rotor blades) interact with the next advancing blades during certain flight and manoeuvring conditions, generating undesirable levels of acoustic noise and vibration. These Blade-Vortex Interactions (BVIs), which may cause the most disturbing acoustic noise, normally occur in descent or high-speed forward flight. Acoustic noise characterization (and potential reduction) is one the areas generating intensive research interest to the rotorcraft industry. Since experimental investigations of BVI are extremely costly, some insights into the BVI or AVI (2-D Airfoil-Vortex Interaction) can be gained using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations. Numerical simulation of BVI or AVI has been of interest to CFD for many years. There are still difficulties concerning an accurate numerical prediction of BVI. One of the main issues is the inherent dissipation of CFD turbulence models, which severely affects the preservation of the vortex characteristics. Moreover this is not an issue only for aerodynamic and aeroacoustic analysis but also for aeroelastic investigations as well, especially when the strong (two-way) aeroelastic coupling is of interest. The present investigation concentrates mainly on AVI simulations. The simulations are performed for Mach number, Ma = 0.3, resulting in a Reynolds number, Re = 1.3 x 106, which is based on the chord, c, of the airfoil (NACA0012). Extensive literature search has indicated that the present work represents the first comprehensive investigation of AVI using the LES numerical approach, in the rotorcraft research community. The major factor affecting the aerodynamic coefficients and aeroacoustic field as a result of airfoil-vortex interaction is observed to be the unsteady pressure generated at the location of the interaction. The present numerical results show that the aerodynamic coefficients (lift, moment, and drag) and aeroacoustic field are strongly dependent on the airfoil-vortex vertical miss-distance, airfoil angle of attack, vortex characteristics, and aeroelastic response of airfoil to airfoil-vortex interaction. A decay of airfoil-vortex interactions with the increase of vertical miss-distance and angle of attack was observed. Also, a decay of airfoil-vortex interactions is observed for the case of a flexible structure when compared with the case of a rigid structure. The decay of vortex core size produces a decrease in the aerodynamic coefficients.

  16. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  17. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi (Albuquerque, NM); Cheng, Yung-Sung (Albuquerque, NM)

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  18. Learning in Parallel Universes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael R. Berthold; Bernd Wiswedel

    2007-01-01

    This abstract summarizes a brief, preliminary formalization of learning in parallel universes. It also attempts to highlight a few neigh- boring learning paradigms to illustrate how parallel learning ts into the greater picture.

  19. Interaction Interaction

    E-print Network

    Hehner, Eric C.R.

    Interaction 1/54 #12;Interaction shared variables 2/54 #12;Interaction shared variables can be read and written by any process (most interaction) 3/54 #12;Interaction shared variables can be read and written by any process (most interaction) difficult to implement 4/54 #12;Interaction shared variables can

  20. Introduction to parallel programming

    SciTech Connect

    Brawer, S. (Encore Computer Corp., Marlborough, MA (US))

    1989-01-01

    This book describes parallel programming and all the basic concepts illustrated by examples in a simplified FORTRAN. Concepts covered include: The parallel programming model; The creation of multiple processes; Memory sharing; Scheduling; Data dependencies. In addition, a number of parallelized applications are presented, including a discrete-time, discrete-event simulator, numerical integration, Gaussian elimination, and parallelized versions of the traveling salesman problem and the exploration of a maze.

  1. Parallel processing ITS

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.C.; Halbleib, J.A. Sr.

    1996-09-01

    This report provides a users` guide for parallel processing ITS on a UNIX workstation network, a shared-memory multiprocessor or a massively-parallel processor. The parallelized version of ITS is based on a master/slave model with message passing. Parallel issues such as random number generation, load balancing, and communication software are briefly discussed. Timing results for example problems are presented for demonstration purposes.

  2. Pthreads for Dynamic Parallelism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Girija J. Narlikar; Guy E. Blelloch

    1998-01-01

    Expressing a large number of lightweight, parallel threads in a shared address space significantly eases the task of writing a parallel program. Threads can be dynamically created to execute individual parallel tasks; the implementation schedules these threads onto the processors and effectively balances the load. However, unless the threads scheduler is designed carefully, such a p arallel program may suffer

  3. Verbal and Visual Parallelism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahnestock, Jeanne

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the practice of presenting multiple supporting examples in parallel form. The elements of parallelism and its use in argument were first illustrated by Aristotle. Although real texts may depart from the ideal form for presenting multiple examples, rhetorical theory offers a rationale for minimal, parallel presentation. The…

  4. Special issue on parallelism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen A. Frenkel

    1986-01-01

    The articles presented in our Special Issue on parallel processing on the supercomputing scale reflect, to some extent, splits in the community developing these machines. There are several schools of thought on how best to implement parallel processing at both the hard- and software levels. Controversy exists over the wisdom of aiming for general- or special-purpose parallel machines, and what

  5. Component Specification for Parallel Coupling Infrastructure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jay Walter Larson; Boyana Norris

    2007-01-01

    \\u000a Coupled systems comprise multiple mutually interacting subsystems, and are an increasingly common computational science application, most\\u000a notably as multiscale and multiphysics models. Parallel computing, and in particular message-passing programming have spurred\\u000a the development of these models, but also present a parallel coupling problem (PCP) in the form of intermodel data dependencies. The PCP complicates model coupling through requirements for the

  6. Parallel algorithm development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.F.

    1996-06-01

    Rapid changes in parallel computing technology are causing significant changes in the strategies being used for parallel algorithm development. One approach is simply to write computer code in a standard language like FORTRAN 77 or with the expectation that the compiler will produce executable code that will run in parallel. The alternatives are: (1) to build explicit message passing directly into the source code; or (2) to write source code without explicit reference to message passing or parallelism, but use a general communications library to provide efficient parallel execution. Application of these strategies is illustrated with examples of codes currently under development.

  7. Fig. 1. Single line diagram of 3-phase distribution power system with five inverters in parallel.

    E-print Network

    Silva, Filipe Faria Da

    distribution power system with five inverters in parallel. Harmonic Stability Assessment for Multi- Paralleled@et.aau.dk Abstract--This paper investigates the dynamic interactions of current controllers for multi-paralleled Stability; Paralleled Inverters I. INTRODUCTION In these days, many alternative energy resources have been

  8. Genome-Wide Fitness and Genetic Interactions Determined by Tn-seq, a High-Throughput Massively Parallel Sequencing Method for Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    van Opijnen, Tim; Lazinski, David W; Camilli, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The lagging annotation of bacterial genomes and the inherent genetic complexity of many phenotypes is hindering the discovery of new drug targets and the development of new antimicrobial agents and vaccines. This unit presents Tn-seq, a method that has made it possible to quantitatively determine fitness for most genes in a microorganism and to screen for quantitative genetic interactions on a genome-wide scale and in a high-throughput fashion. Tn-seq can thus direct studies on the annotation of genes and untangle complex phenotypes. The method is based on the construction of a saturated transposon insertion library. After library selection, changes in the frequency of each insertion mutant are determined by sequencing flanking regions en masse. These changes are used to calculate each mutant's fitness. The method was originally developed for the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae, a causative agent of pneumonia and meningitis, but has now been applied to several different microbial species. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:25641100

  9. Mirror versus parallel bimanual reaching

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In spite of their importance to everyday function, tasks that require both hands to work together such as lifting and carrying large objects have not been well studied and the full potential of how new technology might facilitate recovery remains unknown. Methods To help identify the best modes for self-teleoperated bimanual training, we used an advanced haptic/graphic environment to compare several modes of practice. In a 2-by-2 study, we compared mirror vs. parallel reaching movements, and also compared veridical display to one that transforms the right hand’s cursor to the opposite side, reducing the area that the visual system has to monitor. Twenty healthy, right-handed subjects (5 in each group) practiced 200 movements. We hypothesized that parallel reaching movements would be the best performing, and attending to one visual area would reduce the task difficulty. Results The two-way comparison revealed that mirror movement times took an average 1.24 s longer to complete than parallel. Surprisingly, subjects’ movement times moving to one target (attending to one visual area) also took an average of 1.66 s longer than subjects moving to two targets. For both hands, there was also a significant interaction effect, revealing the lowest errors for parallel movements moving to two targets (p?parallel movements with a veridical display (moving to two separate targets). These results point to the expected levels of challenge for these bimanual training modes, which could be used to advise therapy choices in self-neurorehabilitation. PMID:23837908

  10. Method of moment solutions to scattering problems in a parallel processing environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom; Partee, Jonathan; Patterson, Jean

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a parallelized method of moments (MOM) code into an interactive workstation environment. The workstation allows interactive solid body modeling and mesh generation, MOM analysis, and the graphical display of results. After describing the parallel computing environment, the implementation and results of parallelizing a general MOM code are presented in detail.

  11. Parallel MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Deshmane, Anagha; Gulani, Vikas; Griswold, Mark A.; Seiberlich, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Parallel imaging is a robust method for accelerating the acquisition of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data, and has made possible many new applications of MR imaging. Parallel imaging works by acquiring a reduced amount of k-space data with an array of receiver coils. These undersampled data can be acquired more quickly, but the undersampling leads to aliased images. One of several parallel imaging algorithms can then be used to reconstruct artifact-free images from either the aliased images (SENSE-type reconstruction) or from the under-sampled data (GRAPPA-type reconstruction). The advantages of parallel imaging in a clinical setting include faster image acquisition, which can be used, for instance, to shorten breath-hold times resulting in fewer motion-corrupted examinations. In this article the basic concepts behind parallel imaging are introduced. The relationship between undersampling and aliasing is discussed and two commonly used parallel imaging methods, SENSE and GRAPPA, are explained in detail. Examples of artifacts arising from parallel imaging are shown and ways to detect and mitigate these artifacts are described. Finally, several current applications of parallel imaging are presented and recent advancements and promising research in parallel imaging are briefly reviewed. PMID:22696125

  12. Code Parallelization with CAPO: A User Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Hao-Qiang; Frumkin, Michael; Yan, Jerry; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A software tool has been developed to assist the parallelization of scientific codes. This tool, CAPO, extends an existing parallelization toolkit, CAPTools developed at the University of Greenwich, to generate OpenMP parallel codes for shared memory architectures. This is an interactive toolkit to transform a serial Fortran application code to an equivalent parallel version of the software - in a small fraction of the time normally required for a manual parallelization. We first discuss the way in which loop types are categorized and how efficient OpenMP directives can be defined and inserted into the existing code using the in-depth interprocedural analysis. The use of the toolkit on a number of application codes ranging from benchmark to real-world application codes is presented. This will demonstrate the great potential of using the toolkit to quickly parallelize serial programs as well as the good performance achievable on a large number of toolkit to quickly parallelize serial programs as well as the good performance achievable on a large number of processors. The second part of the document gives references to the parameters and the graphic user interface implemented in the toolkit. Finally a set of tutorials is included for hands-on experiences with this toolkit.

  13. Component specification for parallel coupling infrastructure.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, J. W.; Norris, B.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Australian National Univ.

    2007-01-01

    Coupled systems comprise multiple mutually interacting subsystems, and are an increasingly common computational science application, most notably as multiscale and multiphysics models. Parallel computing, and in particular message-passing programming have spurred the development of these models, but also present a parallel coupling problem (PCP) in the form of intermodel data dependencies. The PCP complicates model coupling through requirements for the description, transfer, and transformation of the distributed data that models in a parallel coupled system exchange. Component-based software engineering has been proposed as one means of conquering software complexity in scientific applications, and given the compound nature of coupled models, it is a natural approach to addressing the parallel coupling problem. We define a software component specification for solving the parallel coupling problem. This design draws from the already successful Common Component Architecture (CCA). We abstract the parallel coupling problem's elements and map them onto a set of CCA components, defining a parallel coupling infrastructure toolkit. We discuss a reference implementation based on the Model Coupling Toolkit. We demonstrate how these components might be deployed to solve a relevant coupling problems in climate modeling.

  14. Parallel symbolic computation in ACE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Enrico Pontelli; Gopal Gupta

    1997-01-01

    We present an overview of the ACE system, a sound and complete parallel implementation of Prolog that exploits parallelism\\u000a transparently (i.e., without any user intervention) from AI programs and symbolic applications coded in Prolog. ACE simultaneously\\u000a exploits all the major forms of parallelism – Or-parallelism, Independent And-parallelism, and Dependent And-parallelism –\\u000a found in Prolog programs. These three varieties of parallelism

  15. Parallel Programming and Parallel Abstractions in Fortress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guy L. Steele Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Summary form only given. The Programming Language Research Group at Sun Microsystems Laboratories seeks to apply lessons learned from the Java (TM) programming language to the next generation of programming languages. The Java language supports platform-independent parallel programming with explicit multithreading and explicit locks. As part of the DARPA program for High Productivity Computing Systems, we are developing Fortress, a

  16. Highly scalable parallel sorting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edgar Solomonik; Laxmikant V. Kalé

    2010-01-01

    Sorting is a commonly used process with a wide breadth of applications in the high performance computing field. Early research in parallel processing has provided us with comprehensive analysis and theory for parallel sorting algorithms. However, modern super- computers have advanced rapidly in size and changed significantly in architecture, forcing new adaptations to these algorithms. To fully utilize the potential

  17. Parallel Lisp simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, J.S.

    1988-05-01

    CSIM is a simulator for parallel Lisp, based on a continuation passing interpreter. It models a shared-memory multiprocessor executing programs written in Common Lisp, extended with several primitives for creating and controlling processes. This paper describes the structure of the simulator, measures its performance, and gives an example of its use with a parallel Lisp program.

  18. The Nas Parallel Benchmarks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Bailey; E. Barszcz; J. Barton; D. Browning; R. Carter; L. Dagum

    1994-01-01

    A new set of benchmarks has been developed for the performance evaluation of highly parallel supercomputers. These benchmarks consist of five parallel kernels and three simulated application benchmarks. Together theymimic the computation and data movement characteristics of large scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications.The principal distinguishing feature of these benchmarks is their penciland paper specification---all details of these benchmarks are

  19. Parallelizing quantum circuits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anne Broadbent; Elham Kashefi

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel automated technique for parallelizing quantum circuits via forward and backward translation to measurement-based quantum computing patterns and analyze the trade off in terms of depth and space complexity. As a result we distinguish a class of polynomial depth circuits that can be parallelized to logarithmic depth while adding only polynomial many auxiliary qubits. In particular, we

  20. Parallelization of thermochemical nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Keith M; Lu, Xi; Kim, Suenne; Gao, Yang; Kim, Hoe-Joon; Somnath, Suhas; Polloni, Laura; Sordan, Roman; King, William P; Curtis, Jennifer E; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    One of the most pressing technological challenges in the development of next generation nanoscale devices is the rapid, parallel, precise and robust fabrication of nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the possibility to parallelize thermochemical nanolithography (TCNL) by employing five nano-tips for the fabrication of conjugated polymer nanostructures and graphene-based nanoribbons. PMID:24337109

  1. Massively parallel mathematical sieves

    SciTech Connect

    Montry, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Sieve of Eratosthenes is a well-known algorithm for finding all prime numbers in a given subset of integers. A parallel version of the Sieve is described that produces computational speedups over 800 on a hypercube with 1,024 processing elements for problems of fixed size. Computational speedups as high as 980 are achieved when the problem size per processor is fixed. The method of parallelization generalizes to other sieves and will be efficient on any ensemble architecture. We investigate two highly parallel sieves using scattered decomposition and compare their performance on a hypercube multiprocessor. A comparison of different parallelization techniques for the sieve illustrates the trade-offs necessary in the design and implementation of massively parallel algorithms for large ensemble computers.

  2. Programming parallel architectures - The BLAZE family of languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush

    1989-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the various approaches to programming multiprocessor architectures that are currently being explored. It is argued that two of these approaches, interactive programming environments and functional parallel languages, are particularly attractive, since they remove much of the burden of exploiting parallel architectures from the user. This paper also describes recent work in the design of parallel languages. Research on languages for both shared and nonshared memory multiprocessors is described.

  3. Experiment versus theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. H.; Yu, Y. H.; Boxwell, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    High speed compressibility noise and vortex interaction noise, which are aerodynamically generated noise sources, were investigated. Noise generating mechanisms were identified. Linear and nonlinear theory were compared and are in agreement with data on amplitude and wave forms. The interaction area between the acoustic planform and blade/vortex interaction lines are examined.

  4. PVM: A Framework for Parallel Distributed Computing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vaidy S. Sunderam

    1990-01-01

    The PVM system is a programming environment for the development and execution of large concurrent or parallel applications that consist of many interacting, but relatively independent, components. It is intended to operate on a collection of heterogeneous computing elements interconnected by one or more networks. The participating processors may be scalar machines, multiprocessors, or special-purpose computers, enabling application components to

  5. Parallel Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    SciTech Connect

    Diachin, L; Hornung, R; Plassmann, P; WIssink, A

    2005-03-04

    As large-scale, parallel computers have become more widely available and numerical models and algorithms have advanced, the range of physical phenomena that can be simulated has expanded dramatically. Many important science and engineering problems exhibit solutions with localized behavior where highly-detailed salient features or large gradients appear in certain regions which are separated by much larger regions where the solution is smooth. Examples include chemically-reacting flows with radiative heat transfer, high Reynolds number flows interacting with solid objects, and combustion problems where the flame front is essentially a two-dimensional sheet occupying a small part of a three-dimensional domain. Modeling such problems numerically requires approximating the governing partial differential equations on a discrete domain, or grid. Grid spacing is an important factor in determining the accuracy and cost of a computation. A fine grid may be needed to resolve key local features while a much coarser grid may suffice elsewhere. Employing a fine grid everywhere may be inefficient at best and, at worst, may make an adequately resolved simulation impractical. Moreover, the location and resolution of fine grid required for an accurate solution is a dynamic property of a problem's transient features and may not be known a priori. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is a technique that can be used with both structured and unstructured meshes to adjust local grid spacing dynamically to capture solution features with an appropriate degree of resolution. Thus, computational resources can be focused where and when they are needed most to efficiently achieve an accurate solution without incurring the cost of a globally-fine grid. Figure 1.1 shows two example computations using AMR; on the left is a structured mesh calculation of a impulsively-sheared contact surface and on the right is the fuselage and volume discretization of an RAH-66 Comanche helicopter [35]. Note the ability of both meshing methods to resolve simulation details by varying the local grid spacing.

  6. Bilingual parallel programming

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Overbeek, R.

    1990-01-01

    Numerous experiments have demonstrated that computationally intensive algorithms support adequate parallelism to exploit the potential of large parallel machines. Yet successful parallel implementations of serious applications are rare. The limiting factor is clearly programming technology. None of the approaches to parallel programming that have been proposed to date -- whether parallelizing compilers, language extensions, or new concurrent languages -- seem to adequately address the central problems of portability, expressiveness, efficiency, and compatibility with existing software. In this paper, we advocate an alternative approach to parallel programming based on what we call bilingual programming. We present evidence that this approach provides and effective solution to parallel programming problems. The key idea in bilingual programming is to construct the upper levels of applications in a high-level language while coding selected low-level components in low-level languages. This approach permits the advantages of a high-level notation (expressiveness, elegance, conciseness) to be obtained without the cost in performance normally associated with high-level approaches. In addition, it provides a natural framework for reusing existing code.

  7. ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OPTIMIZATION OF IN-PARALLEL HAPTIC DEVICES

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OPTIMIZATION OF IN- PARALLEL HAPTIC DEVICES by LENG-FENG LEE DECEMBER 2010 in a haptic interactive virtual environment is the synthesis of the human user, the haptic user interface (HUI counterbalancing. Parallel-architecture haptic devices offer significant advantages over serial- architecture

  8. Parallelizing ListNet Training using Spark Shilpa Shukla

    E-print Network

    Lease, Matthew

    Parallelizing ListNet Training using Spark Shilpa Shukla School of Information University of Texas can benefit from parallel execution. We seek to draw the attention of the IR community to use Spark [7 to rank al- gorithms. Unlike MapReduce [4], Spark is especially suited for iterative and interactive

  9. Parallelization for geophysical waveform analysis 

    E-print Network

    Kurth, Derek Edward

    2013-02-22

    &M University to aid the parallel programmer by providing standard implementations of common parallel programming tasks. Our research involves using STAPL to apply parallel methods to a problem that has already been solved sequentially: Seismic ray tracing...

  10. Parallel Programming and Parallel Abstractions in Fortress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guy L. Steele Jr.

    2006-01-01

    \\u000a The Programming Language Research Group at Sun Microsystems Laboratories seeks to apply lessons learned from the Java (TM)\\u000a Programming Language to the next generation of programming languages. The Java language supports platform-independent parallel\\u000a programming with explicit multithreading and explicit locks. As part of the DARPA program for High Productivity Computing\\u000a Systems, we are developing Fortress, a language intended to support

  11. Parallel computing: at the interface of high school and industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert A. Chesebrough; Ivan Turner

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an experience report describing the interaction between parallel programmers from industry and a select group of 16 high school students and six faculty from a Technical High School during a three-day \\

  12. Series and Parallel Circuits

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-08-30

    In this activity, learners demonstrate and discuss simple circuits as well as the differences between parallel and serial circuit design and functions. Learners test two different circuit designs through the use of low voltage light bulbs.

  13. Parallelization of thermochemical nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Keith M.; Lu, Xi; Kim, Suenne; Gao, Yang; Kim, Hoe-Joon; Somnath, Suhas; Polloni, Laura; Sordan, Roman; King, William P.; Curtis, Jennifer E.; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    One of the most pressing technological challenges in the development of next generation nanoscale devices is the rapid, parallel, precise and robust fabrication of nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the possibility to parallelize thermochemical nanolithography (TCNL) by employing five nano-tips for the fabrication of conjugated polymer nanostructures and graphene-based nanoribbons.One of the most pressing technological challenges in the development of next generation nanoscale devices is the rapid, parallel, precise and robust fabrication of nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the possibility to parallelize thermochemical nanolithography (TCNL) by employing five nano-tips for the fabrication of conjugated polymer nanostructures and graphene-based nanoribbons. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details on the cantilevers array, on the sample preparation, and on the GO AFM experiments. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05696a

  14. The Parallel Axiom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Pat

    1972-01-01

    Criteria for a reasonable axiomatic system are discussed. A discussion of the historical attempts to prove the independence of Euclids parallel postulate introduces non-Euclidean geometries. Poincare's model for a non-Euclidean geometry is defined and analyzed. (LS)

  15. Parallel image compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reif, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A parallel compression algorithm for the 16,384 processor MPP machine was developed. The serial version of the algorithm can be viewed as a combination of on-line dynamic lossless test compression techniques (which employ simple learning strategies) and vector quantization. These concepts are described. How these concepts are combined to form a new strategy for performing dynamic on-line lossy compression is discussed. Finally, the implementation of this algorithm in a massively parallel fashion on the MPP is discussed.

  16. Parallel Composition Communication and Allow Hiding Parallel Processes

    E-print Network

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Parallel Composition Challenge (Dish1+Dish2) || Coke ? = (Dish1 || Coke)+(Dish2 || Coke) Mousavi: Parallel Composition Challenge (Dish1+Dish2) || Coke ? = (Dish1 || Coke)+(Dish2 || Coke) Faron Moller's Result Parallel Parallel Composition and |: Raisons d'^etre (Dish1 + Dish2) Coke (Dish1 Coke) + (Dish2 Coke) (Dish1 + Dish

  17. Strength of Multiple Parallel Biological Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Sulchek, T A; Friddle, R W; Noy, A

    2005-12-07

    Multivalent interactions play a critical role in a variety of biological processes on both molecular and cellular levels. We have used molecular force spectroscopy to investigate the strength of multiple parallel peptide-antibody bonds using a system that allowed us to determine the rupture forces and the number of ruptured bonds independently. In our experiments the interacting molecules were attached to the surfaces of the probe and sample of the atomic force microscope with flexible polymer tethers, and unique mechanical signature of the tethers determined the number of ruptured bonds. We show that the rupture forces increase with the number of interacting molecules and that the measured forces obey the predictions of a Markovian model for the strength of multiple parallel bonds. We also discuss the implications of our results to the interpretation of force spectroscopy measurements in multiple bond systems.

  18. Parallel molecular dynamics: Communication requirements for massively parallel machines

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, V.E. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; Stevens, R.L.; Arnold, K.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Molecular mechanics and dynamics are becoming widely used to perform simulations of molecular systems from large-scale computations of materials to the design and modeling of drug compounds. In this paper we address two major issues: a good decomposition method that can take advantage of future massively parallel processing systems for modest-sized problems in the range of 50,000 atoms and the communication requirements needed to achieve 30 to 40% efficiency on MPPs. We analyzed a scalable benchmark molecular dynamics program executing on the Intel Touchstone Deleta parallelized with an interaction decomposition method. Using a validated analytical performance model of the code, we determined that for an MPP with a four-dimensional mesh topology and 400 MHz processors the communication startup time must be at most 30 clock cycles and the network bandwidth must be at least 2.3 GB/s. This configuration results in 30 to 40% efficiency of the MPP for a problem with 50,000 atoms executing on 50,000 processors.

  19. Dynamic graphics using quasi parallelism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenneth M. Kahn; Carl Hewitt

    1978-01-01

    Dynamic computer graphics is best represented as several processes operating in parallel. Full parallel processing, however, entails much complex mechanism making it difficult to write simple, intuitive programs for generating computer animation. What is presented in this paper is a simple means of attaining the appearance of parallelism and the ability to program the graphics in a conceptually parallel fashion

  20. Parallel Processing in Amplitude Analysis

    E-print Network

    Evans, Hal

    Parallel Processing in Amplitude Analysis Lecture 2 of 2 on Parallel Processing Physics 411/610 March 31, 2011 Matt Shepherd #12;M. R. Shepherd Parallel Processing Lecture 2 March 31, 2011 Outline · Theoretical Background · Experimental Technique · Application of Parallel Computing · Method of Maximum

  1. Sublattice parallel replica dynamics.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Enrique; Uberuaga, Blas P; Voter, Arthur F

    2014-06-01

    Exascale computing presents a challenge for the scientific community as new algorithms must be developed to take full advantage of the new computing paradigm. Atomistic simulation methods that offer full fidelity to the underlying potential, i.e., molecular dynamics (MD) and parallel replica dynamics, fail to use the whole machine speedup, leaving a region in time and sample size space that is unattainable with current algorithms. In this paper, we present an extension of the parallel replica dynamics algorithm [A. F. Voter, Phys. Rev. B 57, R13985 (1998)] by combining it with the synchronous sublattice approach of Shim and Amar [ and , Phys. Rev. B 71, 125432 (2005)], thereby exploiting event locality to improve the algorithm scalability. This algorithm is based on a domain decomposition in which events happen independently in different regions in the sample. We develop an analytical expression for the speedup given by this sublattice parallel replica dynamics algorithm and compare it with parallel MD and traditional parallel replica dynamics. We demonstrate how this algorithm, which introduces a slight additional approximation of event locality, enables the study of physical systems unreachable with traditional methodologies and promises to better utilize the resources of current high performance and future exascale computers. PMID:25019913

  2. Sublattice parallel replica dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Enrique; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Voter, Arthur F.

    2014-06-01

    Exascale computing presents a challenge for the scientific community as new algorithms must be developed to take full advantage of the new computing paradigm. Atomistic simulation methods that offer full fidelity to the underlying potential, i.e., molecular dynamics (MD) and parallel replica dynamics, fail to use the whole machine speedup, leaving a region in time and sample size space that is unattainable with current algorithms. In this paper, we present an extension of the parallel replica dynamics algorithm [A. F. Voter, Phys. Rev. B 57, R13985 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevB.57.R13985] by combining it with the synchronous sublattice approach of Shim and Amar [Y. Shim and J. G. Amar, Phys. Rev. B 71, 125432 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevB.71.125432], thereby exploiting event locality to improve the algorithm scalability. This algorithm is based on a domain decomposition in which events happen independently in different regions in the sample. We develop an analytical expression for the speedup given by this sublattice parallel replica dynamics algorithm and compare it with parallel MD and traditional parallel replica dynamics. We demonstrate how this algorithm, which introduces a slight additional approximation of event locality, enables the study of physical systems unreachable with traditional methodologies and promises to better utilize the resources of current high performance and future exascale computers.

  3. Parallel channel flow excursions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.S.

    1990-01-01

    Among the many known types of vapor-liquid flow instability is the excursion which may occur in heated parallel channels. Under certain conditions, the pressure drop requirement in a heated channel may increase with decreases in flow rate. This leads to an excursive reduction in flow. For channels heated by electricity or nuclear fission, this can result in overheating and damage to the channel. In the design of any parallel channel device, flow excursion limits should be established. After a review of parallel channel behavior and analysis, a conservative criterion will be proposed for avoiding excursions. In support of this criterion, recent experimental work on boiling in downward flow will be described. 5 figs.

  4. Parallelizing Quantum Circuits

    E-print Network

    Anne Broadbent; Elham Kashefi

    2007-04-13

    We present a novel automated technique for parallelizing quantum circuits via forward and backward translation to measurement-based quantum computing patterns and analyze the trade off in terms of depth and space complexity. As a result we distinguish a class of polynomial depth circuits that can be parallelized to logarithmic depth while adding only polynomial many auxiliary qubits. In particular, we provide for the first time a full characterization of patterns with flow of arbitrary depth, based on the notion of influencing paths and a simple rewriting system on the angles of the measurement. Our method leads to insightful knowledge for constructing parallel circuits and as applications, we demonstrate several constant and logarithmic depth circuits. Furthermore, we prove a logarithmic separation in terms of quantum depth between the quantum circuit model and the measurement-based model.

  5. A Parallel Tree Code

    E-print Network

    John Dubinski

    1996-03-18

    We describe a new implementation of a parallel N-body tree code. The code is load-balanced using the method of orthogonal recursive bisection to subdivide the N-body system into independent rectangular volumes each of which is mapped to a processor on a parallel computer. On the Cray T3D, the load balance in the range of 70-90\\% depending on the problem size and number of processors. The code can handle simulations with $>$ 10 million particles roughly a factor of 10 greater than allowed in vectorized tree codes.

  6. Parallel signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWhirter, John G.

    1989-12-01

    The potential application of parallel computing techniques to digital signal processing for radar is discussed and two types of regular array processor are discussed. The first type of processor is the systolic or wavefront processor. The application of this type of processor to adaptive beamforming is discussed and the joint STL-RSRE adaptive antenna processor test-bed is reviewed. The second type of regular array processor is the SIMD parallel computer. One such processor, the Mil-DAP, is described, and its application to a varied range of radar signal processing tasks is discussed.

  7. Speeding up parallel processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    In 1967 Amdahl expressed doubts about the ultimate utility of multiprocessors. The formulation, now called Amdahl's law, became part of the computing folklore and has inspired much skepticism about the ability of the current generation of massively parallel processors to efficiently deliver all their computing power to programs. The widely publicized recent results of a group at Sandia National Laboratory, which showed speedup on a 1024 node hypercube of over 500 for three fixed size problems and over 1000 for three scalable problems, have convincingly challenged this bit of folklore and have given new impetus to parallel scientific computing.

  8. Adaptive parallel logic networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Tony R.; Vidal, Jacques J.

    1988-01-01

    Adaptive, self-organizing concurrent systems (ASOCS) that combine self-organization with massive parallelism for such applications as adaptive logic devices, robotics, process control, and system malfunction management, are presently discussed. In ASOCS, an adaptive network composed of many simple computing elements operating in combinational and asynchronous fashion is used and problems are specified by presenting if-then rules to the system in the form of Boolean conjunctions. During data processing, which is a different operational phase from adaptation, the network acts as a parallel hardware circuit.

  9. Parallelization of Thermochemical Nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Jennifer E.; Carroll, Keith; Lu, Xi; Kim, Suenne; Gao, Yang; Kim, Hoe-Joon; Somnath, Suhas; Polloni, Laura; Sordan, Roman; King, William; Riedo, Elisa

    2014-03-01

    One of the most pressing technological challenges in the development of next generation nanoscale devices is the rapid, parallel, precise and robust fabrication of nanostructures. We demonstrate the possibility to parallelize thermochemical nanolithography (TCNL) by employing five nano-tips for the fabrication of luminescent polymer nanostructures and graphene-based nanoribbons. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation PHYS 0848797 (J.E.C.), CMMI 1100290 (E.R., W.P.K), MRSEC program DMR 0820382 (E.R., J.E.C.), and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences DOE DE-FG02-06ER46293 (E.R.).

  10. Parallel computers and parallel algorithms for CFD: An introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roose, Dirk; Vandriessche, Rafael

    1995-10-01

    This text presents a tutorial on those aspects of parallel computing that are important for the development of efficient parallel algorithms and software for computational fluid dynamics. We first review the main architectural features of parallel computers and we briefly describe some parallel systems on the market today. We introduce some important concepts concerning the development and the performance evaluation of parallel algorithms. We discuss how work load imbalance and communication costs on distributed memory parallel computers can be minimized. We present performance results for some CFD test cases. We focus on applications using structured and block structured grids, but the concepts and techniques are also valid for unstructured grids.

  11. Exploiting Parallelism to Accelerate Keyword Search on Deep-Web Sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tantan Liu; Fan Wang; Gagan Agrawal

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly, biological data is being shared over the deep web. Many biological queries can only be answered by successively search- ing a number of distinct web-sites. This paper introduces a system that exploits parallelization for accelerating search over multiple deep web data sources. An interactive, two-stage multi-threading system is devel- oped to achieve task parallelization, thread parallelization, and pipelined parallelization.

  12. Parallel Traveling Salesman Problem

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Joiner

    The traveling salesman problem is a classic optimization problem in which one seeks to minimize the path taken by a salesman in traveling between N cities, where the salesman stops at each city one and only one time, never retracing his/her route. This implementation is designed to run on UNIX systems with X-Windows, and includes parallelization using MPI.

  13. Parallel Circuits Lab

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This in-class lab exercise will give students a familiarity with basic series and parallel circuits as well as measuring voltage, current and resistance. The worksheet provided leads students through the experiment step by step. Spaces for student measurements and conclusions are provided on the sheet. This document may be downloaded in PDF file format.

  14. Parallel programming with PCN

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

    1993-01-01

    PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and Cthat allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. It includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underlie PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous ftp from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs. ani.gov (cf. Appendix A). This version of this document describes PCN version 2.0, a major revision of the PCN programming system. It supersedes earlier versions of this report.

  15. Parallel and distributed computation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dimitri P. Bertsekas; John N. Tsitsiklis

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on numerical algorithms suited for parallelization for solving systems of equations and optimization problems. Emphasis on relaxation methods of the Jacobi and Gauss-Seidel type, and issues of communication and synchronization. Topics covered include: Algorithms for systems of linear equations and matrix inversion; Herative methods for nonlinear problems; and Shortest paths and dynamic programming.

  16. Parallel Spectral Numerical Methods

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Gong Chen

    This module teaches the principals of Fourier spectral methods, their utility in solving partial differential equation and how to implement them in code. Performance considerations for several Fourier spectral implementations are discussed and methods for effective scaling on parallel computers are explained.

  17. Note on parallel universes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Niall M. Adams; David J. Hand

    2007-01-01

    The parallel universes idea is an attempt to integrate several aspects of learning which share some common aspects. This is an inter- esting idea: if successful, insights could cross-fertilise, leading to advances in each area. The 'multi-view' perspective seems to us to have particular potential. We have investigated several aspects of this, including the following:

  18. High performance parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-09-01

    In this paper the author describes current high performance parallel computer architectures. A taxonomy is presented to show computer architecture from the user programmer's point-of-view. The effects of the taxonomy upon the programming model are described. Some current architectures are described with respect to the taxonomy. Finally, some predictions about future systems are presented. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Parallel-plate viscometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fearnehough, H. T.; Fedors, R. F.; Landel, R. F.; Sauer, T. H.

    1972-01-01

    Viscometer consists of movable vertical rod with one optical flat fixed to its lower end and centered over second optical flat held rigidly parallel to moveable flat. Two perforated diaphragms of thin metal permit limited amount of vertical movement of rod carrying movable flat, but resist lateral movement.

  20. Learning in Parallel

    E-print Network

    Vitter, Jeffrey Scott; Lin, Jyh-Han

    1992-01-01

    us an alternate characterization ofNC-learnable concept classes. It implies, for example, that allNC k -learnable problems are alsoAC k -learnable, sinceNC k -learning requires that 4 #2F Learning in Parallel the circuits have bounded fanin, andAC k...

  1. Parallel hierarchical global illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Q.O.

    1997-10-08

    Solving the global illumination problem is equivalent to determining the intensity of every wavelength of light in all directions at every point in a given scene. The complexity of the problem has led researchers to use approximation methods for solving the problem on serial computers. Rather than using an approximation method, such as backward ray tracing or radiosity, the authors have chosen to solve the Rendering Equation by direct simulation of light transport from the light sources. This paper presents an algorithm that solves the Rendering Equation to any desired accuracy, and can be run in parallel on distributed memory or shared memory computer systems with excellent scaling properties. It appears superior in both speed and physical correctness to recent published methods involving bidirectional ray tracing or hybrid treatments of diffuse and specular surfaces. Like progressive radiosity methods, it dynamically refines the geometry decomposition where required, but does so without the excessive storage requirements for ray histories. The algorithm, called Photon, produces a scene which converges to the global illumination solution. This amounts to a huge task for a 1997-vintage serial computer, but using the power of a parallel supercomputer significantly reduces the time required to generate a solution. Currently, Photon can be run on most parallel environments from a shared memory multiprocessor to a parallel supercomputer, as well as on clusters of heterogeneous workstations.

  2. Optimizing parallel reduction operations

    SciTech Connect

    Denton, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    A parallel program consists of sets of concurrent and sequential tasks. Often, a reduction (such as array sum) sequentially combines values produced by a parallel computation. Because reductions occur so frequently in otherwise parallel programs, they are good candidates for optimization. Since reductions may introduce dependencies, most languages separate computation and reduction. The Sisal functional language is unique in that reduction is a natural consequence of loop expressions; the parallelism is implicit in the language. Unfortunately, the original language supports only seven reduction operations. To generalize these expressions, the Sisal 90 definition adds user-defined reductions at the language level. Applicable optimizations depend upon the mathematical properties of the reduction. Compilation and execution speed, synchronization overhead, memory use and maximum size influence the final implementation. This paper (1) Defines reduction syntax and compares with traditional concurrent methods; (2) Defines classes of reduction operations; (3) Develops analysis of classes for optimized concurrency; (4) Incorporates reductions into Sisal 1.2 and Sisal 90; (5) Evaluates performance and size of the implementations.

  3. Massively parallel processor computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, L. W. (inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus for processing multidimensional data with strong spatial characteristics, such as raw image data, characterized by a large number of parallel data streams in an ordered array is described. It comprises a large number (e.g., 16,384 in a 128 x 128 array) of parallel processing elements operating simultaneously and independently on single bit slices of a corresponding array of incoming data streams under control of a single set of instructions. Each of the processing elements comprises a bidirectional data bus in communication with a register for storing single bit slices together with a random access memory unit and associated circuitry, including a binary counter/shift register device, for performing logical and arithmetical computations on the bit slices, and an I/O unit for interfacing the bidirectional data bus with the data stream source. The massively parallel processor architecture enables very high speed processing of large amounts of ordered parallel data, including spatial translation by shifting or sliding of bits vertically or horizontally to neighboring processing elements.

  4. Parallel fast gauss transform

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Rahul S [ORNL; Sundar, Hari [Siemens Corporate Research; Veerapaneni, Shravan [New York University

    2010-01-01

    We present fast adaptive parallel algorithms to compute the sum of N Gaussians at N points. Direct sequential computation of this sum would take O(N{sup 2}) time. The parallel time complexity estimates for our algorithms are O(N/n{sub p}) for uniform point distributions and O( (N/n{sub p}) log (N/n{sub p}) + n{sub p}log n{sub p}) for non-uniform distributions using n{sub p} CPUs. We incorporate a plane-wave representation of the Gaussian kernel which permits 'diagonal translation'. We use parallel octrees and a new scheme for translating the plane-waves to efficiently handle non-uniform distributions. Computing the transform to six-digit accuracy at 120 billion points took approximately 140 seconds using 4096 cores on the Jaguar supercomputer. Our implementation is 'kernel-independent' and can handle other 'Gaussian-type' kernels even when explicit analytic expression for the kernel is not known. These algorithms form a new class of core computational machinery for solving parabolic PDEs on massively parallel architectures.

  5. A parallel world in the dark

    SciTech Connect

    Higaki, Tetsutaro [Mathematical Physics Lab., RIKEN Nishina Center, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Jeong, Kwang Sik; Takahashi, Fuminobu, E-mail: tetsutaro.higaki@riken.jp, E-mail: ksjeong@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp, E-mail: fumi@tuhep.phys.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    The baryon-dark matter coincidence is a long-standing issue. Interestingly, the recent observations suggest the presence of dark radiation, which, if confirmed, would pose another coincidence problem of why the density of dark radiation is comparable to that of photons. These striking coincidences may be traced back to the dark sector with particle contents and interactions that are quite similar, if not identical, to the standard model: a dark parallel world. It naturally solves the coincidence problems of dark matter and dark radiation, and predicts a sterile neutrino(s) with mass of O(0.1?1) eV, as well as self-interacting dark matter made of the counterpart of ordinary baryons. We find a robust prediction for the relation between the abundance of dark radiation and the sterile neutrino, which can serve as the smoking-gun evidence of the dark parallel world.

  6. Mapping Unstructured Parallelism to Series-Parallel DAGs

    E-print Network

    Pan, Yan

    Many parallel programming languages allow programmers to describe parallelism by using constructs such as fork/join. When executed, such programs can be modeled as directed graphs, with nodes representing a computation and ...

  7. Effect of non-rectangular blade tips on BVI noise for a two-bladed rotor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Schaffar; J. Haertig; P. Gnemmi

    1990-01-01

    The vortex lattice method jointly used with local conformal mapping (to transform the thin blade into a thick one) is described. This method is applied to a two bladed rotor with several blade tips (rectangular, forward or backward swept, anhedral, progressive swept, progressive swept and anhedral). The effect of these blade tips on the emmitted Blade Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise

  8. Rotary wing aerodynamically generated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, F. J.; Morse, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The history and methodology of aerodynamic noise reduction in rotary wing aircraft are presented. Thickness noise during hover tests and blade vortex interaction noise are determined and predicted through the use of a variety of computer codes. The use of test facilities and scale models for data acquisition are discussed.

  9. Comprehensive Study on Tip Vortex with Lateral Jet Flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Choongmo Yang; Jehyun Baek; Shigeru Saito; Takashi Aoyama

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive numerical and experimental investigations of tip vortical characteristics were conducted for lateral tip jet flow over a fixed wing as a step to reduce blade vortex interaction noise. The tip vortex of a NACA0012 blade was measured and visualized for the fundamental study of tip vortical flow, and the results were compared with numerical data as a validation of

  10. Data Parallelism and Matrix Multiplication 1 Data Parallelism

    E-print Network

    Verschelde, Jan

    Data Parallelism and Matrix Multiplication 1 Data Parallelism matrix-matrix multiplication CUDA program structure 2 Code for Matrix-Matrix Multiplication linear address system for 2-dimensional array Verschelde, 31 March 2014 Introduction to Supercomputing (MCS 572) Data Parallelism & Matrix Multiplication L

  11. ZAMBEZI: a parallel pattern parallel fault sequential circuit fault simulator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Minesh B. Amin; Bapiraju Vinnakota

    1996-01-01

    Sequential circuit fault simulators use the multiple bits in a computer data word to accelerate simulation. We introduce, and implement, a new sequential circuit fault simulator, a parallel pattern parallel fault simulator, ZAMBEZI, which simultaneously simulates multiple faults with multiple vectors in one data word. ZAMBEZI is developed by enhancing the control flow, of existing parallel pattern algorithms. For a

  12. Hybrid Parallel Programming with MPI and Unified Parallel C

    E-print Network

    Balaji, Pavan

    Hybrid Parallel Programming with MPI and Unified Parallel C James Dinan Dept. Comp. Sci. and Eng (MPI) is one of the most widely used programming models for parallel computing. However, the amount of memory available to an MPI process is limited by the amount of local memory within a compute node

  13. Parallel Private-Cache Algorithms Parallel Private-Cache Algorithms

    E-print Network

    Arge, Lars

    -Cache Algorithms Multicores Parallel External Memory (PEM) Model PRAM Model Main Memory CPU 1 CPU 2 CPU P External External Memory (PEM) Model PRAM Model Main Memory CPU 1 CPU 2 CPU P External Memory (EM) Model Main Memory PEM Model Parallel External Memory (PEM) Model PEM ­ A simple model of combining parallelism

  14. Adaptive, multiresolution visualization of large data sets using parallel octrees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. A. Freitag; R. M. Loy

    1999-01-01

    The interactive visualization and exploration of large scientific data sets is a challenging and difficult task; their size often far exceeds the performance and memory capacity of even the most powerful graphics work-stations. To address this problem, we have created a technique that combines hierarchical data reduction methods with parallel computing to allow interactive exploration of large data sets while

  15. Using Motivational Interviewing Techniques to Address Parallel Process in Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giordano, Amanda; Clarke, Philip; Borders, L. DiAnne

    2013-01-01

    Supervision offers a distinct opportunity to experience the interconnection of counselor-client and counselor-supervisor interactions. One product of this network of interactions is parallel process, a phenomenon by which counselors unconsciously identify with their clients and subsequently present to their supervisors in a similar fashion…

  16. Resistor Combinations for Parallel Circuits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McTernan, James P.

    1978-01-01

    To help simplify both teaching and learning of parallel circuits, a high school electricity/electronics teacher presents and illustrates the use of tables of values for parallel resistive circuits in which total resistances are whole numbers. (MF)

  17. Standard Templates Adaptive Parallel Library

    E-print Network

    Arzu, Francisco Jose

    2000-01-01

    STAPL (Standard Templates Adaptive Parallel Library) is a parallel C++ library designed as a superset of the C++ Standard Template Library (STL), sequentially consistent for functions with the same name, and executed on uni- or multi- processor...

  18. Parallel multilevel preconditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.; Xu, Jinchao.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we shall report on some techniques for the development of preconditioners for the discrete systems which arise in the approximation of solutions to elliptic boundary value problems. Here we shall only state the resulting theorems. It has been demonstrated that preconditioned iteration techniques often lead to the most computationally effective algorithms for the solution of the large algebraic systems corresponding to boundary value problems in two and three dimensional Euclidean space. The use of preconditioned iteration will become even more important on computers with parallel architecture. This paper discusses an approach for developing completely parallel multilevel preconditioners. In order to illustrate the resulting algorithms, we shall describe the simplest application of the technique to a model elliptic problem.

  19. Parallel Subconvolution Filtering Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Andrew A.

    2003-01-01

    These architectures are based on methods of vector processing and the discrete-Fourier-transform/inverse-discrete- Fourier-transform (DFT-IDFT) overlap-and-save method, combined with time-block separation of digital filters into frequency-domain subfilters implemented by use of sub-convolutions. The parallel-processing method implemented in these architectures enables the use of relatively small DFT-IDFT pairs, while filter tap lengths are theoretically unlimited. The size of a DFT-IDFT pair is determined by the desired reduction in processing rate, rather than on the order of the filter that one seeks to implement. The emphasis in this report is on those aspects of the underlying theory and design rules that promote computational efficiency, parallel processing at reduced data rates, and simplification of the designs of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits needed to implement high-order filters and correlators.

  20. The massively parallel processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, D. H.; Fischer, J. R.; Wallgren, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    Future sensor systems will utilize massively parallel computing systems for rapid analysis of two-dimensional data. The Goddard Space Flight Center has an ongoing program to develop these systems. A single-instruction multiple data computer known as the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) is being fabricated for NASA by the Goodyear Aerospace Corporation. This processor contains 16,384 processing elements arranged in a 128 x 128 array. The MPP will be capable of adding more than 6 billion 8-bit numbers per second. Multiplication of eight-bit numbers can occur at a rate of 2 billion per second. Delivery of the MPP to Goddard Space Flight Center is scheduled for 1983.

  1. Predicting Performance of Parallel Computations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victor Wing-kit Mak; Stephen F. Lundstrom

    1990-01-01

    An accurate and computationally efficient method for predicting the performance of a class of parallel computations running on concurrent systems is described. A parallel computation is modeled as a task system with precedence relationships expressed as a series-parallel directed acyclic graph. Resources in a concurrent system are modeled as service centers in a queuing network model. Using these two models

  2. Parallel Sparse Solvers, Preconditioners, and

    E-print Network

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    i i Chapter 1 Parallel Sparse Solvers, Preconditioners, and Their Applications 1.1 Introduction them, it is essential to exploit sparsity. Moreover, parallel computing is an essential tool to reduce. This chapter will sample some of the most recent work on the parallel solution of large sparse linear systems

  3. Scha's Parallel Lines Bernhard Nickel

    E-print Network

    Nickel, Bernhard

    Scha's Parallel Lines Bernhard Nickel May 10, 2010 1 Introduction Scha (1981) has a famous example figure 1, sentence (2) is about figure 2. (1) The sides of R1 run parallel to the sides of R2. (2) The single lines run parallel to the double lines. 3 Code for Figure 1 \\begin{figure} \\centering \\setlength

  4. Loadflow analysis on parallel computers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chi-Pui Ng; Kamal Jabbour; Walter Meyer

    1989-01-01

    The speed performance of parallel computers in power system loadflow analysis is evaluated. Three commercial parallel computers, each of which has a fundamentally different architecture, are evaluated. A methodology for determining a suitable architecture for a given problem is developed. Major issues that cause performance degradation in parallel processing are discussed

  5. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Painter, J.; Hansen, C.

    1996-10-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the M.

  6. Parallel transports in webs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christian Fleischhack

    2004-01-01

    For connected reductive linear algebraic structure groups it is proven that\\u000aevery web is holonomically isolated. The possible tuples of parallel transports\\u000ain a web form a Lie subgroup of the corresponding power of the structure group.\\u000aThis Lie subgroup is explicitly calculated and turns out to be independent of\\u000athe chosen local trivializations. Moreover, explicit necessary and sufficient\\u000acriteria

  7. Parallelization: Infectious Disease

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Aaron Weeden

    Epidemiology is the study of infectious disease. Infectious diseases are said to be "contagious" among people if they are transmittable from one person to another. Epidemiologists can use models to assist them in predicting the behavior of infectious diseases. This module will develop a simple agent-based infectious disease model, develop a parallel algorithm based on the model, provide a coded implementation for the algorithm, and explore the scaling of the coded implementation on high performance cluster resources.

  8. Xyce parallel electronic simulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Keiter, Eric Richard; Mei, Ting; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Schiek, Richard Louis; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Fixel, Deborah A.; Coffey, Todd Stirling; Pawlowski, Roger Patrick; Santarelli, Keith R.

    2010-05-01

    This document is a reference guide to the Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator, and is a companion document to the Xyce Users' Guide. The focus of this document is (to the extent possible) exhaustively list device parameters, solver options, parser options, and other usage details of Xyce. This document is not intended to be a tutorial. Users who are new to circuit simulation are better served by the Xyce Users' Guide.

  9. Parallelized direct execution simulation of message-passing parallel programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickens, Phillip M.; Heidelberger, Philip; Nicol, David M.

    1994-01-01

    As massively parallel computers proliferate, there is growing interest in findings ways by which performance of massively parallel codes can be efficiently predicted. This problem arises in diverse contexts such as parallelizing computers, parallel performance monitoring, and parallel algorithm development. In this paper we describe one solution where one directly executes the application code, but uses a discrete-event simulator to model details of the presumed parallel machine such as operating system and communication network behavior. Because this approach is computationally expensive, we are interested in its own parallelization specifically the parallelization of the discrete-event simulator. We describe methods suitable for parallelized direct execution simulation of message-passing parallel programs, and report on the performance of such a system, Large Application Parallel Simulation Environment (LAPSE), we have built on the Intel Paragon. On all codes measured to date, LAPSE predicts performance well typically within 10 percent relative error. Depending on the nature of the application code, we have observed low slowdowns (relative to natively executing code) and high relative speedups using up to 64 processors.

  10. A graphical user interface for data-parallel programming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Darcy McCallum; Michael J. Quinn

    1993-01-01

    The authors have developed a graphical user interface that supports the development of data-parallel programs for distributed-memory multiple instruction multiple data (MIMD) computers. The name of the tool is Intercom, since it facilitates programmer interaction with the compiler. Intercom allows the programmer to edit data-parallel programs, invoke the compiler, and examine the places in the program where the compiler has

  11. Parallel flows with Soret effect in tilted cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacqmin, David

    1990-01-01

    Henry and Roux (1986, 1987, 1988) have conducted extensive numerical studies on the interaction of Soret separation with convection in cylindrical geometry. Many of their solutions exhibit parallel flow away from end walls. Their parallel flow results can be matched by closed-form solutions. Solutions are nonunique in some parameter regions. Disappearance of one branch of solutions correlates with a sudden transition of Henry and Roux's results from a separated to a well-mixed flow.

  12. Programming parallel architectures: The BLAZE family of languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush

    1988-01-01

    Programming multiprocessor architectures is a critical research issue. An overview is given of the various approaches to programming these architectures that are currently being explored. It is argued that two of these approaches, interactive programming environments and functional parallel languages, are particularly attractive since they remove much of the burden of exploiting parallel architectures from the user. Also described is recent work by the author in the design of parallel languages. Research on languages for both shared and nonshared memory multiprocessors is described, as well as the relations of this work to other current language research projects.

  13. DPL: a data parallel language for the expression and execution of general parallel algorithm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Gordon Willhoft

    1995-01-01

    THE NEED FOR a powerful, easy to use, parallel language continues despite very significant advances in the area of parallel processing. Many parallel languages are simply old sequential languages with parallel constructs added. This research describes the Data Parallel Language (DPL), a parallel language built from its foundations on parallel concepts. DPL bases much of its expression on data parallelism

  14. DPL: a data parallel language for the expression and execution of general parallel algorithm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Gordon Willhoft

    1995-01-01

    T a powerful, easy to use, parallel language continues despite very significant advances in the area of parallel processing. Many parallel languages are simply old sequential languages with parallel constructs added. This research describes the Data Parallel Language (DPL), a parallel language built from its foundations on parallel concepts. DPL bases much of its expression on data parallelism found in

  15. “Serial” effects in parallel models of reading

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya-Ning; Furber, Steve; Welbourne, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence showing that the time to read a word out loud is influenced by an interaction between orthographic length and lexicality. Given that length effects are interpreted by advocates of dual-route models as evidence of serial processing this would seem to pose a serious challenge to models of single word reading which postulate a common parallel processing mechanism for reading both words and nonwords (Coltheart, Rastle, Perry, Langdon, & Ziegler, 2001; Rastle, Havelka, Wydell, Coltheart, & Besner, 2009). However, an alternative explanation of these data is that visual processes outside the scope of existing parallel models are responsible for generating the word-length related phenomena (Seidenberg & Plaut, 1998). Here we demonstrate that a parallel model of single word reading can account for the differential word-length effects found in the naming latencies of words and nonwords, provided that it includes a mapping from visual to orthographic representations, and that the nature of those orthographic representations are not preconstrained. The model can also simulate other supposedly “serial” effects. The overall findings were consistent with the view that visual processing contributes substantially to the word-length effects in normal reading and provided evidence to support the single-route theory which assumes words and nonwords are processed in parallel by a common mechanism. PMID:22343366

  16. Computer Assisted Parallel Program Generation

    E-print Network

    Kawata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Parallel computation is widely employed in scientific researches, engineering activities and product development. Parallel program writing itself is not always a simple task depending on problems solved. Large-scale scientific computing, huge data analyses and precise visualizations, for example, would require parallel computations, and the parallel computing needs the parallelization techniques. In this Chapter a parallel program generation support is discussed, and a computer-assisted parallel program generation system P-NCAS is introduced. Computer assisted problem solving is one of key methods to promote innovations in science and engineering, and contributes to enrich our society and our life toward a programming-free environment in computing science. Problem solving environments (PSE) research activities had started to enhance the programming power in 1970's. The P-NCAS is one of the PSEs; The PSE concept provides an integrated human-friendly computational software and hardware system to solve a target ...

  17. The Computation and Analysis of Helicopter Impulsive Noise.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yu.

    1994-01-01

    Helicopters have been proven to be economical and convenient vehicles with their ability to land, take -off and maneuver in areas inaccessible to fixed-wing aircraft. However, the noise they generate can severely restrict their usage in both civilian and military operations. When it occurs, helicopter impulsive noise is the loudest and the most annoying. The noise usually can be broken down to high -speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction noise. The physical phenomena of helicopter blade-vortex interaction are especially complicated and include three-dimensional unsteady transonic flow and regions of vorticity. A computational and analytical study of the helicopter impulsive noise has been conducted herein, particularly of the blade-vortex interaction noise. The fundamental theory and noise mechanisms are introduced and discussed. The computational study includes two-dimensional and three -dimensional approaches. The two-dimensional unsteady transonic small disturbance model was extended to include viscous effects and monotone switches. The noise generation mechanisms due to the blade-vortex interaction are discussed. A rotating Kirchhoff method is developed to predict high-speed impulsive noise and blade-vortex interaction noise. A three-dimensional full potential CFD code was used for calculation of the nonlinear aerodynamic near-field, then a couple of extended Kirchhoff formulations with a rotational control surface are used to compute the far-field acoustic signals. The computed numerical results showed a good agreement with experimental results. The results also identify the important parameters for the impulsive noise control. This new rotating Kirchhoff method can be used to predict the helicopter impulsive noise accurately and is believed to be better in many ways than other existing methods.

  18. Parallel-distributed mobile robot simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Sekiguchi, Minoru; Watanabe, Nobuo

    1996-06-01

    The aim of this project is to achieve an autonomous learning and growth function based on active interaction with the real world. It should also be able to autonomically acquire knowledge about the context in which jobs take place, and how the jobs are executed. This article describes a parallel distributed movable robot system simulator with an autonomous learning and growth function. The autonomous learning and growth function which we are proposing is characterized by its ability to learn and grow through interaction with the real world. When the movable robot interacts with the real world, the system compares the virtual environment simulation with the interaction result in the real world. The system then improves the virtual environment to match the real-world result more closely. This the system learns and grows. It is very important that such a simulation is time- realistic. The parallel distributed movable robot simulator was developed to simulate the space of a movable robot system with an autonomous learning and growth function. The simulator constructs a virtual space faithful to the real world and also integrates the interfaces between the user, the actual movable robot and the virtual movable robot. Using an ultrafast CG (computer graphics) system (FUJITSU AG series), time-realistic 3D CG is displayed.

  19. Parallel sphere rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Painter, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); de Verdiere, G.C. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Limeil, 94 - Villeneuve-Saint-Georges (France)

    1995-05-01

    Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel divide-and-conquer algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the T3D.

  20. Parallel Kinematic Machines (PKM)

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, R.S.

    2000-03-17

    The purpose of this 3-year cooperative research project was to develop a parallel kinematic machining (PKM) capability for complex parts that normally require expensive multiple setups on conventional orthogonal machine tools. This non-conventional, non-orthogonal machining approach is based on a 6-axis positioning system commonly referred to as a hexapod. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) was the lead site responsible for a multitude of projects that defined the machining parameters and detailed the metrology of the hexapod. The role of the Kansas City Plant (KCP) in this project was limited to evaluating the application of this unique technology to production applications.

  1. Parallel Eclipse Project Checkout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Powell, Mark W.; Bachmann, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Parallel Eclipse Project Checkout (PEPC) is a program written to leverage parallelism and to automate the checkout process of plug-ins created in Eclipse RCP (Rich Client Platform). Eclipse plug-ins can be aggregated in a feature project. This innovation digests a feature description (xml file) and automatically checks out all of the plug-ins listed in the feature. This resolves the issue of manually checking out each plug-in required to work on the project. To minimize the amount of time necessary to checkout the plug-ins, this program makes the plug-in checkouts parallel. After parsing the feature, a request to checkout for each plug-in in the feature has been inserted. These requests are handled by a thread pool with a configurable number of threads. By checking out the plug-ins in parallel, the checkout process is streamlined before getting started on the project. For instance, projects that took 30 minutes to checkout now take less than 5 minutes. The effect is especially clear on a Mac, which has a network monitor displaying the bandwidth use. When running the client from a developer s home, the checkout process now saturates the bandwidth in order to get all the plug-ins checked out as fast as possible. For comparison, a checkout process that ranged from 8-200 Kbps from a developer s home is now able to saturate a pipe of 1.3 Mbps, resulting in significantly faster checkouts. Eclipse IDE (integrated development environment) tries to build a project as soon as it is downloaded. As part of another optimization, this innovation programmatically tells Eclipse to stop building while checkouts are happening, which dramatically reduces lock contention and enables plug-ins to continue downloading until all of them finish. Furthermore, the software re-enables automatic building, and forces Eclipse to do a clean build once it finishes checking out all of the plug-ins. This software is fully generic and does not contain any NASA-specific code. It can be applied to any Eclipse-based repository with a similar structure. It also can apply build parameters and preferences automatically at the end of the checkout.

  2. Parallel Lines and Transversals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Sonntag

    2010-10-07

    In this lab you will review the names of angles formed by transversals. In addition you will discover the unique relationship that these pairs of anlges have when the transversal cuts through two parallel lines. picture We have already discussed many angle relationships in class. For example, we have learned to identify vertical angles and linear pairs. Each of the angles have a special relationship. Vertical angles are congruent, and Linear angles are supplementary. In the following lesson you will review the names of angle pairs ...

  3. Adaptive, multiresolution visualization of large data sets using parallel octrees.

    SciTech Connect

    Freitag, L. A.; Loy, R. M.

    1999-06-10

    The interactive visualization and exploration of large scientific data sets is a challenging and difficult task; their size often far exceeds the performance and memory capacity of even the most powerful graphics work-stations. To address this problem, we have created a technique that combines hierarchical data reduction methods with parallel computing to allow interactive exploration of large data sets while retaining full-resolution capability. The hierarchical representation is built in parallel by strategically inserting field data into an octree data structure. We provide functionality that allows the user to interactively adapt the resolution of the reduced data sets so that resolution is increased in regions of interest without sacrificing local graphics performance. We describe the creation of the reduced data sets using a parallel octree, the software architecture of the system, and the performance of this system on the data from a Rayleigh-Taylor instability simulation.

  4. Mapping between parallel processor structures and programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngai, Tin-Fook; Yan, Jerry C.; Mak, Victor W. K.; Flynn, Michael J.; Lundstrom, Stephen F.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports some ongoing research efforts at Stanford in allocation of parallel processing resources. Both processor structures and program structures have their own characteristics. Resource allocation binds the two structures during program execution. The mapping problem determines what processor structure and program structure may be combined to obtain maximum speedup. Three approaches to this mapping problem are considered. Two important factors, granularity and interaction delay, are also considered. A new hierarchical approach to structure definition is outlined. Effective and efficient tools are necessary for the study of the mapping problem. A fast turn-around simulation environment developed for investigating partition strategies for distributed computations and a computationally efficient method to predict performance of parallel processor structures are described.

  5. Parallelization of irregularly coupled regular meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, Craig; Crowley, Kay; Saltz, Joel; Reeves, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Regular meshes are frequently used for modeling physical phenomena on both serial and parallel computers. One advantage of regular meshes is that efficient discretization schemes can be implemented in a straight forward manner. However, geometrically-complex objects, such as aircraft, cannot be easily described using a single regular mesh. Multiple interacting regular meshes are frequently used to describe complex geometries. Each mesh models a subregion of the physical domain. The meshes, or subdomains, can be processed in parallel, with periodic updates carried out to move information between the coupled meshes. In many cases, there are a relatively small number (one to a few dozen) subdomains, so that each subdomain may also be partitioned among several processors. We outline a composite run-time/compile-time approach for supporting these problems efficiently on distributed-memory machines. These methods are described in the context of a multiblock fluid dynamics problem developed at LaRC.

  6. Mass-loading and parallel magnetized shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zank, G. P.; Oughton, S.; Neubauer, F. M.; Webb, G. M.

    1991-01-01

    Recent observations at comets Giacobini-Zinner and Halley suggest that simple nonreacting gas dynamics or MHD is an inappropriate description for the bow shock. The thickness of the observed (sub)shock implies that mass-loading is an important dynamical process within the shock itself, thereby requiring that the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions possess source terms. This leads to shocks with properties similar to those of combustion shocks. The paper considers parallel magnetized shocks subjected to mass-loading, describes some properties which distinguish them from classical MHD parallel shocks, and establishes the existence of a new kind of MHD compound shock. These results will be of importance both to observations and numerical simulations of the comet-solar wind interaction.

  7. Tolerant (parallel) Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiNucci, David C.; Bailey, David H. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    In order to be truly portable, a program must be tolerant of a wide range of development and execution environments, and a parallel program is just one which must be tolerant of a very wide range. This paper first defines the term "tolerant programming", then describes many layers of tools to accomplish it. The primary focus is on F-Nets, a formal model for expressing computation as a folded partial-ordering of operations, thereby providing an architecture-independent expression of tolerant parallel algorithms. For implementing F-Nets, Cooperative Data Sharing (CDS) is a subroutine package for implementing communication efficiently in a large number of environments (e.g. shared memory and message passing). Software Cabling (SC), a very-high-level graphical programming language for building large F-Nets, possesses many of the features normally expected from today's computer languages (e.g. data abstraction, array operations). Finally, L2(sup 3) is a CASE tool which facilitates the construction, compilation, execution, and debugging of SC programs.

  8. Parallel Grid Manipulations in Earth Science Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, W.; Lucchesi, R.; daSilva, A.; Takacs, L. L.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Data Assimilation Office (DAO) at the Goddard Space Flight Center is moving its data assimilation system to massively parallel computing platforms. This parallel implementation of GEOS DAS will be used in the DAO's normal activities, which include reanalysis of data, and operational support for flight missions. Key components of GEOS DAS, including the gridpoint-based general circulation model and a data analysis system, are currently being parallelized. The parallelization of GEOS DAS is also one of the HPCC Grand Challenge Projects. The GEOS-DAS software employs several distinct grids. Some examples are: an observation grid- an unstructured grid of points at which observed or measured physical quantities from instruments or satellites are associated- a highly-structured latitude-longitude grid of points spanning the earth at given latitude-longitude coordinates at which prognostic quantities are determined, and a computational lat-lon grid in which the pole has been moved to a different location to avoid computational instabilities. Each of these grids has a different structure and number of constituent points. In spite of that, there are numerous interactions between the grids, e.g., values on one grid must be interpolated to another, or, in other cases, grids need to be redistributed on the underlying parallel platform. The DAO has designed a parallel integrated library for grid manipulations (PILGRIM) to support the needed grid interactions with maximum efficiency. It offers a flexible interface to generate new grids, define transformations between grids and apply them. Basic communication is currently MPI, however the interfaces defined here could conceivably be implemented with other message-passing libraries, e.g., Cray SHMEM, or with shared-memory constructs. The library is written in Fortran 90. First performance results indicate that even difficult problems, such as above-mentioned pole rotation- a sparse interpolation with little data locality between the physical lat-lon grid and a pole rotated computational grid- can be solved efficiently and at the GFlop/s rates needed to solve tomorrow's high resolution earth science models. In the subsequent presentation we will discuss the design and implementation of PILGRIM as well as a number of the problems it is required to solve. Some conclusions will be drawn about the potential performance of the overall earth science models on the supercomputer platforms foreseen for these problems.

  9. Parallel Computing in SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, Mark D [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The SCALE computational architecture has remained basically the same since its inception 30 years ago, although constituent modules and capabilities have changed significantly. This SCALE concept was intended to provide a framework whereby independent codes can be linked to provide a more comprehensive capability than possible with the individual programs - allowing flexibility to address a wide variety of applications. However, the current system was designed originally for mainframe computers with a single CPU and with significantly less memory than today's personal computers. It has been recognized that the present SCALE computation system could be restructured to take advantage of modern hardware and software capabilities, while retaining many of the modular features of the present system. Preliminary work is being done to define specifications and capabilities for a more advanced computational architecture. This paper describes the state of current SCALE development activities and plans for future development. With the release of SCALE 6.1 in 2010, a new phase of evolutionary development will be available to SCALE users within the TRITON and NEWT modules. The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a comprehensive and integrated package of codes and nuclear data for a wide range of applications in criticality safety, reactor physics, shielding, isotopic depletion and decay, and sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analysis. Over the last three years, since the release of version 5.1 in 2006, several important new codes have been introduced within SCALE, and significant advances applied to existing codes. Many of these new features became available with the release of SCALE 6.0 in early 2009. However, beginning with SCALE 6.1, a first generation of parallel computing is being introduced. In addition to near-term improvements, a plan for longer term SCALE enhancement activities has been developed to provide an integrated framework for future methods development. Some of the major components of the SCALE parallel computing development plan are parallelization and multithreading of computationally intensive modules and redesign of the fundamental SCALE computational architecture.

  10. Parallel processing and expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jerry C.; Lau, Sonie

    1991-01-01

    Whether it be monitoring the thermal subsystem of Space Station Freedom, or controlling the navigation of the autonomous rover on Mars, NASA missions in the 90's cannot enjoy an increased level of autonomy without the efficient use of expert systems. Merely increasing the computational speed of uniprocessors may not be able to guarantee that real time demands are met for large expert systems. Speed-up via parallel processing must be pursued alongside the optimization of sequential implementations. Prototypes of parallel expert systems have been built at universities and industrial labs in the U.S. and Japan. The state-of-the-art research in progress related to parallel execution of expert systems was surveyed. The survey is divided into three major sections: (1) multiprocessors for parallel expert systems; (2) parallel languages for symbolic computations; and (3) measurements of parallelism of expert system. Results to date indicate that the parallelism achieved for these systems is small. In order to obtain greater speed-ups, data parallelism and application parallelism must be exploited.

  11. Parallel algorithms in linear algebra

    E-print Network

    Brent, Richard P

    2010-01-01

    This report provides an introduction to algorithms for fundamental linear algebra problems on various parallel computer architectures, with the emphasis on distributed-memory MIMD machines. To illustrate the basic concepts and key issues, we consider the problem of parallel solution of a nonsingular linear system by Gaussian elimination with partial pivoting. This problem has come to be regarded as a benchmark for the performance of parallel machines. We consider its appropriateness as a benchmark, its communication requirements, and schemes for data distribution to facilitate communication and load balancing. In addition, we describe some parallel algorithms for orthogonal (QR) factorization and the singular value decomposition (SVD).

  12. Parallel processor engine model program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Parallel Processor Engine Model Program is a generalized engineering tool intended to aid in the design of parallel processing real-time simulations of turbofan engines. It is written in the FORTRAN programming language and executes as a subset of the SOAPP simulation system. Input/output and execution control are provided by SOAPP; however, the analysis, emulation and simulation functions are completely self-contained. A framework in which a wide variety of parallel processing architectures could be evaluated and tools with which the parallel implementation of a real-time simulation technique could be assessed are provided.

  13. The complexity of parallel search

    SciTech Connect

    Karp, R.M.; Upfal, E.; Wigderson, A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper studies parallel search algorithms within the framework of independence systems. It is motivated by earlier work on parallel algorithms for concrete problems such as determining a maximal independent set of vertices or a maximum matching in a graph, and by the general question of determining the parallel complexity of a search problem when an oracle is available to solve the associated decision problem. The results provide a parallel analogue of the self-reducibility process that is so useful in sequential computation.

  14. Series and Parallel Circuits

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kuphaldt, Tony R.

    Tony R. Kuphaldt is the creator of All About Circuits, a collection of online textbooks about circuits and electricity. The site is split into volumes, chapters, and topics to make finding and learning about these subjects convenient. Volume 1, Chapter 5: Series and Parallel Circuits begins by explaining the basic differences between the two types of circuits. The topics then progress to more difficult subject matter such as conductance, and Ohmâ??s law, with a section on building circuits for a more hands-on component. This website would be a great jumping off point for educators who want to teach circuits or a fantastic supplemental resource for students who want or need to learn more.

  15. Fast Parallel Particle Methods: Angstroms to Gigaparsecs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Fast multipole methods have become an ubiquitous tool for the simulation of physical systems with long-range interactions. Since their introduction they have been applied to a vast range of problems. Our own parallel hashed oct-tree code (HOT) has been applied to a number of physical systems with long-range interactions, including gravitational and smoothed particle hydrodynamic interactions in astrophysical systems, fluid flows with vortex-particle methods, electromagnetic scattering and aerodynamics. Several these simulations were recognized with Gordon Bell prizes for significant achievement in parallel processing. We will discuss some recent work which used a series of 1-billion particle dark matter simulations to accurately determine the mass function of galaxy halos. These simulations required over 4x10^18 floating point operations (4 exaflops). Another focus of our current research is extending the HOT framework to biological systems, with the goal of simulating systems using over ten times as many atoms as the current state-of-the-art. This requires addressing several issues with current multipole algorithms, such as spatially-correlated errors and the ability to handle disparate time scales efficiently.

  16. Parallel Bifold: Large-Scale Parallel Pattern Mining with Constraints

    E-print Network

    Zaiane, Osmar R.

    Parallel Bifold: Large-Scale Parallel Pattern Mining with Constraints Mohammad El-Hajj, Osmar R. Za size; not only the extent of the existing patterns, but mainly the magnitude of the search space. Many cost between $50 and $100. While discovering hidden knowledge in the available repositories of data

  17. Parallel Imaging Microfluidic Cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Daniel J.; McKenna, Brian K.; Evans, James G.; Belkina, Anna C.; Denis, Gerald V.; Sherr, David; Cheung, Man Ching

    2011-01-01

    By adding an additional degree of freedom from multichannel flow, the parallel microfluidic cytometer (PMC) combines some of the best features of flow cytometry (FACS) and microscope-based high-content screening (HCS). The PMC (i) lends itself to fast processing of large numbers of samples, (ii) adds a 1-D imaging capability for intracellular localization assays (HCS), (iii) has a high rare-cell sensitivity and, (iv) has an unusual capability for time-synchronized sampling. An inability to practically handle large sample numbers has restricted applications of conventional flow cytometers and microscopes in combinatorial cell assays, network biology, and drug discovery. The PMC promises to relieve a bottleneck in these previously constrained applications. The PMC may also be a powerful tool for finding rare primary cells in the clinic. The multichannel architecture of current PMC prototypes allows 384 unique samples for a cell-based screen to be read out in approximately 6–10 minutes, about 30-times the speed of most current FACS systems. In 1-D intracellular imaging, the PMC can obtain protein localization using HCS marker strategies at many times the sample throughput of CCD-based microscopes or CCD-based single-channel flow cytometers. The PMC also permits the signal integration time to be varied over a larger range than is practical in conventional flow cytometers. The signal-to-noise advantages are useful, for example, in counting rare positive cells in the most difficult early stages of genome-wide screening. We review the status of parallel microfluidic cytometry and discuss some of the directions the new technology may take. PMID:21704835

  18. Interference effects on scattering by parallel fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.; Kumar, Sunil

    1989-01-01

    The present examination of radiative heat transfer through fibrous materials gives attention to the interactions between radiation scattered from individual parallel fibers for the case of a normally-incident plane EM wave and different representative geometries. Experimental results are obtained for the specific case corresponding to fibers in one plane. Analytical models are developed for the radiative scattering behavior of fibrous media when the interference mechanism is accounted for; the results obtained indicate that interference decreases the scattering efficiency of fibrous media containing a large number of randomly positioned fibers.

  19. Parallel adaptive mobile web clipping

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Vrenios

    2003-01-01

    We describe a unique approach to improving the performance of a Web clipping portal by exploiting inherent parallelism in the syntax of widely used markup languages, and by employing a parallel computing platform as an in-line proxy between the handheld mobile device and a Web server on the Internet.

  20. Parallelizing Monte Carlo with PMC

    SciTech Connect

    Rathkopf, J.A.; Jones, T.R.; Nessett, D.M.; Stanberry, L.C.

    1994-11-01

    PMC (Parallel Monte Carlo) is a system of generic interface routines that allows easy porting of Monte Carlo packages of large-scale physics simulation codes to Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) computers. By loading various versions of PMC, simulation code developers can configure their codes to run in several modes: serial, Monte Carlo runs on the same processor as the rest of the code; parallel, Monte Carlo runs in parallel across many processors of the MPP with the rest of the code running on other MPP processor(s); distributed, Monte Carlo runs in parallel across many processors of the MPP with the rest of the code running on a different machine. This multi-mode approach allows maintenance of a single simulation code source regardless of the target machine. PMC handles passing of messages between nodes on the MPP, passing of messages between a different machine and the MPP, distributing work between nodes, and providing independent, reproducible sequences of random numbers. Several production codes have been parallelized under the PMC system. Excellent parallel efficiency in both the distributed and parallel modes results if sufficient workload is available per processor. Experiences with a Monte Carlo photonics demonstration code and a Monte Carlo neutronics package are described.

  1. Parallel Refinement of Unstructured Meshes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John E. Savage

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we describe a parallel -refinement al- gorithm for unstructured finite element meshes based on the longest-edge bisection of triangles and tetrahedrons. This algorithm is implemented inPARED, a system that supports the parallel adaptive solution of PDEs. We dis- cuss the design of such an algorithm for distributed mem- ory machines including the problem of propagating refine- ment

  2. Patterns for Parallel Application Programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Berna L. Massingill

    1999-01-01

    We are involved in an ongoing effort to design a pattern language for parallel application programs. The pattern language consists of a set of patterns that guide the programmer through the entire process of developing a parallel program, including patterns that help find the concurrency in the problem, patterns that help find the appropriate algorithm structure to exploit the concurrency

  3. Limited width parallel prefix circuits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Carlson; Binay Sugla

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, we present lower and upper bounds on the size of limited width, bounded and unbounded fan-out parallel prefix circuits. The lower bounds on the sizes of such circuits are a function of the depth, width, and number of inputs. The size requirement of an N input bounded fan-out parallel prefix circuit having limited width W and extra

  4. Fast data parallel polygon rendering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frank A. Ortega; Charles D. Hansen; James P. Ahrens

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a data parallel method for polygon rendering on a massively parallel machine. This method, based on a simple shading model, is targeted for applications which require very fast rendering for extremely large sets of polygons. Such sets are found in many scientific visualization applications. The renderer can handle arbitrarily complex polygons which need not be meshed. Issues

  5. Parallelism in random access machines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Fortune; James Wyllie

    1978-01-01

    A model of computation based on random access machines operating in parallel and sharing a common memory is presented. The computational power of this model is related to that of traditional models. In particular, deterministic parallel RAM's can accept in polynomial time exactly the sets accepted by polynomial tape bounded Turing machines; nondeterministic RAM's can accept in polynomial time exactly

  6. Formal verification of parallel programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert M. Keller

    1976-01-01

    Two formal models for parallel computation are presented: an abstract conceptual model and a parallel-program model. The former model does not distinguish between control and data states. The latter model includes the capability for the representation of an infinite set of control states by allowing there to be arbitrarily many instruction pointers (or processes) executing the program. An induction principle

  7. Parallel execution of logic programs

    SciTech Connect

    Conery, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This work is about the AND/OR Process Model, an abstract model for parallel execution of logic programs. This book defines a framework for implementing parallel interpreters. The research presented here provides an intermediate level of abstraction between hardware and semantics, a set of requirements for a parallel interpreter running on a multiprocessor architecture. Contents. LIST OF FIGURES. 1. INTRODUCTION. 2. LOGIC PROGRAMMING. 2.1 Syntax. 2.2 Semantics. 2.3 Control. 2.4 Prolog. 2.5 Alternate Control Strategies. 2.6 Chapter Summary. 3. PARALLELISM IN LOGIC PROGRAMS. 3.1 Models for OR Parallelism. 3.2 Models for AND Parallelism. 3.3 Low Level Parallelism 3.4 Chapter Summary. 4. THE AND/OR PROCESS MODEL. 4.1 Oracle. 4.2 Messages. 4.3 OR Processes. 4.4 AND Processes. 4.5 Interpreter. 4.6 Programming Language. 4.7 Chapter Summary. 5. PARALLEL OR PROCESSES. 5.1 Operating Modes. 5.2 Execution. 5.3 Example. 5.4 Chapter Summary.

  8. The Galley Parallel File System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieuwejaar, Nils; Kotz, David

    1996-01-01

    Most current multiprocessor file systems are designed to use multiple disks in parallel, using the high aggregate bandwidth to meet the growing I/0 requirements of parallel scientific applications. Many multiprocessor file systems provide applications with a conventional Unix-like interface, allowing the application to access multiple disks transparently. This interface conceals the parallelism within the file system, increasing the ease of programmability, but making it difficult or impossible for sophisticated programmers and libraries to use knowledge about their I/O needs to exploit that parallelism. In addition to providing an insufficient interface, most current multiprocessor file systems are optimized for a different workload than they are being asked to support. We introduce Galley, a new parallel file system that is intended to efficiently support realistic scientific multiprocessor workloads. We discuss Galley's file structure and application interface, as well as the performance advantages offered by that interface.

  9. Parallel contingency statistics with Titan.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2009-09-01

    This report summarizes existing statistical engines in VTK/Titan and presents the recently parallelized contingency statistics engine. It is a sequel to [PT08] and [BPRT09] which studied the parallel descriptive, correlative, multi-correlative, and principal component analysis engines. The ease of use of this new parallel engines is illustrated by the means of C++ code snippets. Furthermore, this report justifies the design of these engines with parallel scalability in mind; however, the very nature of contingency tables prevent this new engine from exhibiting optimal parallel speed-up as the aforementioned engines do. This report therefore discusses the design trade-offs we made and study performance with up to 200 processors.

  10. Optimal parallel quantum query algorithms

    E-print Network

    Stacey Jeffery; Frederic Magniez; Ronald de Wolf

    2015-02-20

    We study the complexity of quantum query algorithms that make p queries in parallel in each timestep. This model is in part motivated by the fact that decoherence times of qubits are typically small, so it makes sense to parallelize quantum algorithms as much as possible. We show tight bounds for a number of problems, specifically Theta((n/p)^{2/3}) p-parallel queries for element distinctness and Theta((n/p)^{k/(k+1)} for k-sum. Our upper bounds are obtained by parallelized quantum walk algorithms, and our lower bounds are based on a relatively small modification of the adversary lower bound method, combined with recent results of Belovs et al. on learning graphs. We also prove some general bounds, in particular that quantum and classical p-parallel complexity are polynomially related for all total functions f when p is small compared to f's block sensitivity.

  11. STALK : an interactive virtual molecular docking system.

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, D.; Facello, M.; Hallstrom, P.; Reeder, G.; Walenz, B.; Stevens, F.; Univ. of Illinois

    1997-04-01

    Several recent technologies-genetic algorithms, parallel and distributed computing, virtual reality, and high-speed networking-underlie a new approach to the computational study of how biomolecules interact or 'dock' together. With the Stalk system, a user in a virtual reality environment can interact with a genetic algorithm running on a parallel computer to help in the search for likely geometric configurations.

  12. Morphing Polyhedra with Parallel Faces: Counterexamples

    E-print Network

    Biedl, Therese

    Morphing Polyhedra with Parallel Faces: Counterexamples Therese Biedl and Anna Lubiw and Michael J-facing unit normal as the corresponding face in Q. Parallel polyhedra P and Q admit a parallel morph polyhedra that do not admit a parallel morph. Key words: morphing, parallel polyhedra, computational

  13. Efficient parallel string comparison Peter Krusche

    E-print Network

    Rand, David

    Efficient parallel string comparison Peter Krusche Department of Computer Science University of Warwick AFM Seminar, 23rd of April, 2007 #12;Outline 1 Introduction Parallel computation Basic BSP-and-conquer semi-local LCS 3 The parallel algorithm Parallel score-matrix multiplication Parallel LCS computation

  14. Properties of alternately charged coplanar parallel strips by conformal mappings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu Chin Lim; R. A. Moore

    1968-01-01

    Deposited electrodes with periodic geometries are beginning to attract attention in microwave integrated circuitry. In many cases where the interaction with the substrate materials is important, the grounded base may be sufficiently distant to be insignificant or absent altogether. In this paper, the equipotential surfaces and flux lines of alternately charged coplanar parallel strips most often encountered in these cases

  15. Implementation Principles of File Management System for Omega Parallel DBMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mikhail L. Zymbler; Leonid B. Sokolinsky

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes development principles and the program structure of the Omega File Management System (OFMS) for the Omega parallel DBMS engine. The paper gives requirements for OFMS and the description of its general structure and components. The paper gives some effective protocol for interaction with the Disk Subsystem Unit and describes architecture of the Disk Subsystem Emulator. The paper

  16. Is Monte Carlo embarrassingly parallel?

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogenboom, J. E. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Delft Nuclear Consultancy, IJsselzoom 2, 2902 LB Capelle aan den IJssel (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    Monte Carlo is often stated as being embarrassingly parallel. However, running a Monte Carlo calculation, especially a reactor criticality calculation, in parallel using tens of processors shows a serious limitation in speedup and the execution time may even increase beyond a certain number of processors. In this paper the main causes of the loss of efficiency when using many processors are analyzed using a simple Monte Carlo program for criticality. The basic mechanism for parallel execution is MPI. One of the bottlenecks turn out to be the rendez-vous points in the parallel calculation used for synchronization and exchange of data between processors. This happens at least at the end of each cycle for fission source generation in order to collect the full fission source distribution for the next cycle and to estimate the effective multiplication factor, which is not only part of the requested results, but also input to the next cycle for population control. Basic improvements to overcome this limitation are suggested and tested. Also other time losses in the parallel calculation are identified. Moreover, the threading mechanism, which allows the parallel execution of tasks based on shared memory using OpenMP, is analyzed in detail. Recommendations are given to get the maximum efficiency out of a parallel Monte Carlo calculation. (authors)

  17. Exploiting Parallelism to Accelerate Keyword Search On Deep-web Sources

    E-print Network

    Agrawal, Gagan

    Exploiting Parallelism to Accelerate Keyword Search On Deep-web Sources Tantan Liu Fan Wang Gagan,wangfa,agrawal}@cse.ohio-state.edu Abstract. Increasingly, biological data is being shared over the deep web. Many biological queries can only that exploits parallelization for accelerating search over multiple deep web data sources. An interactive, two

  18. Parallel Marker Based Image Segmentation with Watershed

    E-print Network

    Parallel Marker Based Image Segmentation with Watershed Transformation Alina N. Moga Albert; Parallel Marker Based Watershed Transformation Abstract. The parallel watershed transformation used homogeneity with the watershed transformation. Boundary­based region merging is then effected to condense non

  19. Automatic Generation of Parallel CRC Circuits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Sprachmann

    2001-01-01

    A parallel CRC circuit simultaneously processes multiple data bits. A generic VHDL description of parallel CRC circuits lets designers synthesize CRC circuits for any generator polynomial or required amount of parallelism

  20. Benchmarking Parallel Java Master's Project Report

    E-print Network

    Kaminsky, Alan

    ................................................................ 3 3.1. Core Parallel Java Constructs Benchmarking Parallel Java Master's Project Report Asma'u Sani Mohammed Java API by implementing the OpenMP version of the NAS Parallel Benchmark (NPB

  1. 17 CFR 12.24 - Parallel proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Parallel proceedings. 12.24 Section...Consideration of Pleadings § 12.24 Parallel proceedings. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a parallel proceeding shall...

  2. 17 CFR 12.24 - Parallel proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Parallel proceedings. 12.24 Section...Consideration of Pleadings § 12.24 Parallel proceedings. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a parallel proceeding shall...

  3. 17 CFR 12.24 - Parallel proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Parallel proceedings. 12.24 Section...Consideration of Pleadings § 12.24 Parallel proceedings. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a parallel proceeding shall...

  4. 17 CFR 12.24 - Parallel proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parallel proceedings. 12.24 Section...Consideration of Pleadings § 12.24 Parallel proceedings. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a parallel proceeding shall...

  5. 17 CFR 12.24 - Parallel proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Parallel proceedings. 12.24 Section...Consideration of Pleadings § 12.24 Parallel proceedings. (a) Definition. For purposes of this section, a parallel proceeding shall...

  6. Uhlmann's parallelism Nagaoka's quantum information geometry

    E-print Network

    Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    Uhlmann's parallelism and Nagaoka's quantum information geometry Keiji Matsumoto METR 97-09 October 1997 #12;Uhmann's parallelism and Nagaoka's quantum information geometry Keiji Matsumoto 1 Abstract: Uhlmann's parallelism and Nagaoka's quantum information geometry. In this paper, intrinsic relation

  7. Parallel Test Construction Using Classical Item Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Piet F.; Verschoor, Alfred J.

    1998-01-01

    Presents minimization and maximization models for parallel test construction under constraints. The minimization model constructs weakly and strongly parallel tests of minimum length, while the maximization model constructs weakly and strongly parallel tests with maximum test reliability. (Author/SLD)

  8. Instrumentation for parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    E-print Network

    Brown, David Gerald

    2007-04-25

    Parallel magnetic resonance (MR) imaging may be used to increase either the throughput or the speed of the MR imaging experiment. As such, parallel imaging may be accomplished either through a "parallelization" of the MR experiment, or by the use...

  9. Parallel stochastic systems biology in the cloud.

    PubMed

    Aldinucci, Marco; Torquati, Massimo; Spampinato, Concetto; Drocco, Maurizio; Misale, Claudia; Calcagno, Cristina; Coppo, Mario

    2014-09-01

    The stochastic modelling of biological systems, coupled with Monte Carlo simulation of models, is an increasingly popular technique in bioinformatics. The simulation-analysis workflow may result computationally expensive reducing the interactivity required in the model tuning. In this work, we advocate the high-level software design as a vehicle for building efficient and portable parallel simulators for the cloud. In particular, the Calculus of Wrapped Components (CWC) simulator for systems biology, which is designed according to the FastFlow pattern-based approach, is presented and discussed. Thanks to the FastFlow framework, the CWC simulator is designed as a high-level workflow that can simulate CWC models, merge simulation results and statistically analyse them in a single parallel workflow in the cloud. To improve interactivity, successive phases are pipelined in such a way that the workflow begins to output a stream of analysis results immediately after simulation is started. Performance and effectiveness of the CWC simulator are validated on the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud. PMID:23780997

  10. Copperhead: compiling an embedded data parallel language

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bryan C. Catanzaro; Michael Garland; Kurt Keutzer

    2011-01-01

    Modern parallel microprocessors deliver high performance on applications that expose substantial fine-grained data parallelism. Although data parallelism is widely available in many computations, implementing data parallel algorithms in low-level languages is often an unnecessarily difficult task. The characteristics of parallel microprocessors and the limitations of current programming methodologies motivate our design of Copperhead, a high-level data parallel language embedded in

  11. Compact Graph Representations and Parallel Connectivity Algorithms for Massive Dynamic Network Analysis

    E-print Network

    Bader, David A.

    circles, organizational hi- erarchies, online collaboration networks), and biological systems (food webs from socio- economic interactions, social networking web sites, commu- nication traffic, and scientific edges. We also design parallel implementations of fundamental dynamic graph kernels related

  12. Predicting performance of parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mak, Victor W.; Lundstrom, Stephen F.

    1990-01-01

    An accurate and computationally efficient method for predicting the performance of a class of parallel computations running on concurrent systems is described. A parallel computation is modeled as a task system with precedence relationships expressed as a series-parallel directed acyclic graph. Resources in a concurrent system are modeled as service centers in a queuing network model. Using these two models as inputs, the method outputs predictions of expected execution time of the parallel computation and the concurrent system utilization. The method is validated against both detailed simulation and actual execution on a commercial multiprocessor. Using 100 test cases, the average error of the prediction when compared to simulation statistics is 1.7 percent, with a standard deviation of 1.5 percent; the maximum error is about 10 percent.

  13. Predicting performance of parallel computations

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, V.W. (Distributed Software Research Group, Bell Communications Research, Morristown, NJ (US)); Lundstrom, S.F. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Computer Systems Lab.)

    1990-07-01

    This paper describes an accurate and computationally efficient method for predicting performance of a class of parallel computations running on concurrent systems. Earlier work either dealt with very restricted computation structures or used methods with exponential complexity. A parallel computation is modeled as a task system with precedence relationships expressed as a series-parallel directed acyclic graph. Resources in a concurrent system are modeled as service centers in a queueing network model. Using these two models as inputs, the method outputs predictions of expected execution time of the parallel computation and the concurrent system utilization. The method has been validated against both detailed simulation and actual execution on a commercial multiprocessor. Using one hundred test cases, the average error of the prediction when compared to simulation statistics was 1.7% with a standard deviation of 1.5%, and the maximum error was about 10%.

  14. Demonstrating Forces between Parallel Wires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Blane

    2000-01-01

    Describes a physics demonstration that dramatically illustrates the mutual repulsion (attraction) between parallel conductors using insulated copper wire, wooden dowels, a high direct current power supply, electrical tape, and an overhead projector. (WRM)

  15. "Feeling" Series and Parallel Resistances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    Equipped with drinking straws and stirring straws, a teacher can help students understand how resistances in electric circuits combine in series and in parallel. Follow-up suggestions are provided. (ZWH)

  16. Designing and Building Parallel Programs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Designing and Building Parallel Programs [Online] is an innovative traditional print and online resource publishing project. It incorporates the content of a textbook published by Addison-Wesley into an evolving online resource.

  17. Parallel algorithms for inductance extraction

    E-print Network

    Mahawar, Hemant

    2007-09-17

    of the iterative method becomes a challenging task. This work presents a class of parallel algorithms for fast and accurate inductance extraction of VLSI circuits. We use the solenoidal basis approach that converts the linear system into a reduced system...

  18. PARALLEL DATABASE MACHINES Kjell Bratbergsengen

    E-print Network

    and database servers for "new" data types, notably film and video. THE TRAUMATIC HISTORY OF DATABASE COMPUTERS and later, European Community supported developments. Also the massively parallel search system based

  19. The Gaussian parallel relay network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Schein; R. Gallager

    2000-01-01

    We introduce the real, discrete-time Gaussian parallel relay network. This simple network is theoretically important in the context of network information theory. We present upper and lower bounds to capacity and explain where they coincide

  20. Master\\/slave speculative parallelization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig B. Zilles; Gurindar S. Sohi

    2002-01-01

    Master\\/Slave Speculative Parallelization (MSSP) is an execution paradigm for improving the execution rate of sequential programs by parallelizing them speculatively for execution on a multiprocessor. In MSSP, one processor---the master---executes an approximate version of the program to compute selected values that the full program's execution is expected to compute. The master's results are checked by slave processors that execute the

  1. Address tracing for parallel machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stunkel, Craig B.; Janssens, Bob; Fuchs, W. Kent

    1991-01-01

    Recently implemented parallel system address-tracing methods based on several metrics are surveyed. The issues specific to collection of traces for both shared and distributed memory parallel computers are highlighted. Five general categories of address-trace collection methods are examined: hardware-captured, interrupt-based, simulation-based, altered microcode-based, and instrumented program-based traces. The problems unique to shared memory and distributed memory multiprocessors are examined separately.

  2. Application of the hypercube parallel processor to a large-scale moment method code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manshadi, Farzin; Liewer, Paulet C.; Patterson, Jean E.

    1988-01-01

    The applicability of a parallel computing architecture to the solution of a large-scale moment-method code is investigated. Specifically, the NEC (Numerical Electromagnetics Code) method-of-moments scattering program is implemented on a hypercube parallel processor. The accuracy and the increase in the speed of execution on this parallel architecture are demonstrated. The results show a very large reduction in execution time for large problems. The great potential of this parallel processor is shown for interactive solution of large NEC problems as well as other moment-method techniques such as the finite-element method.

  3. Architectures for reasoning in parallel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Lawrence O.

    1989-01-01

    The research conducted has dealt with rule-based expert systems. The algorithms that may lead to effective parallelization of them were investigated. Both the forward and backward chained control paradigms were investigated in the course of this work. The best computer architecture for the developed and investigated algorithms has been researched. Two experimental vehicles were developed to facilitate this research. They are Backpac, a parallel backward chained rule-based reasoning system and Datapac, a parallel forward chained rule-based reasoning system. Both systems have been written in Multilisp, a version of Lisp which contains the parallel construct, future. Applying the future function to a function causes the function to become a task parallel to the spawning task. Additionally, Backpac and Datapac have been run on several disparate parallel processors. The machines are an Encore Multimax with 10 processors, the Concert Multiprocessor with 64 processors, and a 32 processor BBN GP1000. Both the Concert and the GP1000 are switch-based machines. The Multimax has all its processors hung off a common bus. All are shared memory machines, but have different schemes for sharing the memory and different locales for the shared memory. The main results of the investigations come from experiments on the 10 processor Encore and the Concert with partitions of 32 or less processors. Additionally, experiments have been run with a stripped down version of EMYCIN.

  4. Efficiency of parallel direct optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janies, D. A.; Wheeler, W. C.

    2001-01-01

    Tremendous progress has been made at the level of sequential computation in phylogenetics. However, little attention has been paid to parallel computation. Parallel computing is particularly suited to phylogenetics because of the many ways large computational problems can be broken into parts that can be analyzed concurrently. In this paper, we investigate the scaling factors and efficiency of random addition and tree refinement strategies using the direct optimization software, POY, on a small (10 slave processors) and a large (256 slave processors) cluster of networked PCs running LINUX. These algorithms were tested on several data sets composed of DNA and morphology ranging from 40 to 500 taxa. Various algorithms in POY show fundamentally different properties within and between clusters. All algorithms are efficient on the small cluster for the 40-taxon data set. On the large cluster, multibuilding exhibits excellent parallel efficiency, whereas parallel building is inefficient. These results are independent of data set size. Branch swapping in parallel shows excellent speed-up for 16 slave processors on the large cluster. However, there is no appreciable speed-up for branch swapping with the further addition of slave processors (>16). This result is independent of data set size. Ratcheting in parallel is efficient with the addition of up to 32 processors in the large cluster. This result is independent of data set size. c2001 The Willi Hennig Society.

  5. Method for resource control in parallel environments using program organization and run-time support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekanadham, Kattamuri (Inventor); Moreira, Jose Eduardo (Inventor); Naik, Vijay Krishnarao (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A system and method for dynamic scheduling and allocation of resources to parallel applications during the course of their execution. By establishing well-defined interactions between an executing job and the parallel system, the system and method support dynamic reconfiguration of processor partitions, dynamic distribution and redistribution of data, communication among cooperating applications, and various other monitoring actions. The interactions occur only at specific points in the execution of the program where the aforementioned operations can be performed efficiently.

  6. Method for resource control in parallel environments using program organization and run-time support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekanadham, Kattamuri (Inventor); Moreira, Jose Eduardo (Inventor); Naik, Vijay Krishnarao (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A system and method for dynamic scheduling and allocation of resources to parallel applications during the course of their execution. By establishing well-defined interactions between an executing job and the parallel system, the system and method support dynamic reconfiguration of processor partitions, dynamic distribution and redistribution of data, communication among cooperating applications, and various other monitoring actions. The interactions occur only at specific points in the execution of the program where the aforementioned operations can be performed efficiently.

  7. Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2014-08-12

    Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including establishing a data communications geometry, the geometry specifying, for tasks representing processes of execution of the parallel application, a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI including a plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks; receiving in endpoints of the geometry an instruction for a collective operation; and executing the instruction for a collective operation through the endpoints in dependence upon the geometry, including dividing data communications operations among the plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks.

  8. Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael E; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-02-11

    Endpoint-based parallel data processing in a parallel active messaging interface ('PAMI') of a parallel computer, the PAMI composed of data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI, including establishing a data communications geometry, the geometry specifying, for tasks representing processes of execution of the parallel application, a set of endpoints that are used in collective operations of the PAMI including a plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks; receiving in endpoints of the geometry an instruction for a collective operation; and executing the instruction for a collective opeartion through the endpoints in dependence upon the geometry, including dividing data communications operations among the plurality of endpoints for one of the tasks.

  9. Parallel Volume Computation of Massive Polyhedron Union

    E-print Network

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    Parallel Volume Computation of Massive Polyhedron Union W. Randolph Franklin Rensselaer Polytechnic) Parallel Volume Computation of Massive Polyhedron Union 25 Oct 2013 1 / 25 #12;Large Geometric Datasets vs (RPI) Parallel Volume Computation of Massive Polyhedron Union 25 Oct 2013 2 / 25 #12;Parallel HW

  10. Towards Transparent Parallelization of Connectionist Systems

    E-print Network

    Song, Siang Wun

    for artificial neural networks have been discussed in general terms, but the actual parallel programs implement is proposed which allows for transparent training set parallelization. Keywords: artificial neural network deals with parallel implementation issues for artificial neural networks, but the actual parallel

  11. Refinement Transformation Using Abstract Parallel Machines

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Joy

    for circuit specification--- `concrete parallel machines'. #12; The ability to define Abstract ParallelRefinement Transformation Using Abstract Parallel Machines Joy Goodman 1 , John O'Donnell 1 and Gudula R¨unger 2 1 University of Glasgow 2 Universit¨at Leipzig Abstract. Abstract Parallel Machines

  12. Dynamic parallel complexity of computational circuits

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary L. Miller; Shang-Hua Teng

    1987-01-01

    The dynamic parallel complexity of general computational circuits (defined in introduction) is discussed. We exhibit some relationships between parallel circuit evaluation and some uniform closure properties of a certain class of unary functions and present a systematic method for the design of processor efficient parallel algorithms for circuit evaluation. Using this method: (1) we improve the algorithm for parallel Boolean

  13. Computing contingency statistics in parallel.

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Janine Camille; Thompson, David; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2010-09-01

    Statistical analysis is typically used to reduce the dimensionality of and infer meaning from data. A key challenge of any statistical analysis package aimed at large-scale, distributed data is to address the orthogonal issues of parallel scalability and numerical stability. Many statistical techniques, e.g., descriptive statistics or principal component analysis, are based on moments and co-moments and, using robust online update formulas, can be computed in an embarrassingly parallel manner, amenable to a map-reduce style implementation. In this paper we focus on contingency tables, through which numerous derived statistics such as joint and marginal probability, point-wise mutual information, information entropy, and {chi}{sup 2} independence statistics can be directly obtained. However, contingency tables can become large as data size increases, requiring a correspondingly large amount of communication between processors. This potential increase in communication prevents optimal parallel speedup and is the main difference with moment-based statistics where the amount of inter-processor communication is independent of data size. Here we present the design trade-offs which we made to implement the computation of contingency tables in parallel.We also study the parallel speedup and scalability properties of our open source implementation. In particular, we observe optimal speed-up and scalability when the contingency statistics are used in their appropriate context, namely, when the data input is not quasi-diffuse.

  14. Parallelizing Timed Petri Net simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1993-01-01

    The possibility of using parallel processing to accelerate the simulation of Timed Petri Nets (TPN's) was studied. It was recognized that complex system development tools often transform system descriptions into TPN's or TPN-like models, which are then simulated to obtain information about system behavior. Viewed this way, it was important that the parallelization of TPN's be as automatic as possible, to admit the possibility of the parallelization being embedded in the system design tool. Later years of the grant were devoted to examining the problem of joint performance and reliability analysis, to explore whether both types of analysis could be accomplished within a single framework. In this final report, the results of our studies are summarized. We believe that the problem of parallelizing TPN's automatically for MIMD architectures has been almost completely solved for a large and important class of problems. Our initial investigations into joint performance/reliability analysis are two-fold; it was shown that Monte Carlo simulation, with importance sampling, offers promise of joint analysis in the context of a single tool, and methods for the parallel simulation of general Continuous Time Markov Chains, a model framework within which joint performance/reliability models can be cast, were developed. However, very much more work is needed to determine the scope and generality of these approaches. The results obtained in our two studies, future directions for this type of work, and a list of publications are included.

  15. A vestibular prosthesis with highly-isolated parallel multichannel stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dai; Cirmirakis, Dominik; Demosthenous, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an implantable vestibular stimulation system capable of providing high flexibility independent parallel stimulation to the semicircular canals in the inner ear for restoring three-dimensional sensation of head movements. To minimize channel interaction during parallel stimulation, the system is implemented with a power isolation method for crosstalk reduction. Experimental results demonstrate that, with this method, electrodes for different stimulation channels located in close proximity ( mm) can deliver current pulses simultaneously with minimum inter-channel crosstalk. The design features a memory-based scheme that manages stimulation to the three canals in parallel. A vestibular evoked potential (VEP) recording unit is included for closed-loop adaptive stimulation control. The main components of the prototype vestibular prosthesis are three ASICs, all implemented in a 0.6- ?m high-voltage CMOS technology. The measured performance was verified using vestibular electrodes in vitro. PMID:25073175

  16. Improved Euler simulation of helicopter vortical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei

    A more accurate Euler solver and a hybrid grid redistribution method have been developed for the reduction of numerical diffusion of vorticity and used to investigate two representative helicopter vortical flows. The work presented here is towards the better capture and preservation of vortex structures. The more accurate Euler solver is based on a monotonicity-preserving piecewise quadratic reconstruction with the 6th-order compact schemes for the computation of the slope and curvature. Compared with a more popular higher-order power polynomial interpolation of the interface values, a piecewise quadratic reconstruction of the solution with higher-order accurate slope and curvature has been shown to be much more effective for the reduction of numerical diffusion of vorticity. Use of compact schemes for the computation of the slope and curvature is because the extension of the stencil size for the construction of a higher-order difference scheme leads to the accuracy deficiency in the high-frequency range. The construction of a monotonicity-preserving scheme based on the reconstruction of the solution rather than the interpolation of nodal derivatives, can minimize the perturbation to the baseline interpolation and thereby the introduced extra numerical diffusion. Instead of directly adapting a curvilinear grid in the physical domain, the hybrid grid redistribution method introduces an intermediate domain between the computational and physical domains. This intermediate domain results from the adaptation of the computational domain by an elliptic grid redistribution method and provides the new indices to the nodes of the baseline unadapted grid in the physical domain. With these new indices, a power polynomial interpolation is further used to modify the baseline grid in the physical domain. As a result, the grid adaptation in the computational domain is independent of the generation of the baseline grid in the physical domain. More importantly, the method allows for multilevel grid refinement. Based on the above algorithm developments, two representative helicopter vortical flows have been investigated. One is the parallel blade-vortex interaction, and the other is the tip vortex generation in hover. It has been shown that the use of the above improved Euler solver combined with the hybrid grid redistribution method is able to accurately predict parallel blade-vortex interaction. The approach has been used to further validate the perturbation method for closer airfoil-vortex interactions and investigate the effects of vortex distortion. The use of the above improved Euler solver alone for the simulation of hovering rotor tip vortices also produces significantly improved tip vortex structures and inner vortex sheet. However, a further improvement of grid resolution in the vortex region before the blade is required to accurately maintain the tip vortex structure until the first blade passage.

  17. A New Look at Parallel Computing in the Computer Science Lubomir Ivanov (moderator), Iona College, New Rochelle, NY, livanov@iona.edu

    E-print Network

    Ivanov, Lubomir

    .hoffman@quinnipiac.edu ABSTRACT Parallel computing is essential: From molecular biology, astrophysics and weather prediction of the interaction between software and hardware, the underlying principles of programming language design of a parallel algorithms/software engineer, a parallel hardware designer, scientific computing expert

  18. Sound Directivity Generated by Helicopter Rotors Using Wave Tracing Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leishman, J. G.

    1999-04-01

    Results are presented from a study of directivity and sound focusing effects generated by helicopter rotors encountering parallel and oblique blade vortex interactions (BVI). The primary analysis is performed by using wave tracing to determine ray cones and acoustic lines from source points on the rotor with supersonic trace (phase) velocities. The results are compared and contrasted to predictions made from a numerical solution of the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkins equation. Sample problems considered include parallel and oblique BVI with an isolated line vortex, and interactions with self-generated epicycloidal vortices in forward flight. It is confirmed that the BVI process can produce strong directivity and clusters of focused sound waves in the far field. The trace velocity and wave tracing technique is shown to have potential applications for studies in noise reduction and/or noise directivity modifications using passive devices such as blade tip sweep. It is also shown that the numerically efficient nature of determining the primary acoustic lines with the trace velocity method can allow regions with strong directivity to be efficiently mapped out using redistributive observer point techniques.

  19. Parallel-processing techniques for production systems

    SciTech Connect

    da Mota Tenorio, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    Production systems static and dynamic characteristics are modeled with the use of graph grammar, in order to create means to increase the processing efficiency and the use of parallel computation through compile-time analysis. The model is used to explicate rule interaction, so that proofs of equivalence between knowledge bases can be attempted. Solely relying on program static characteristics shown by the model, a series of observations are made to determine the system dynamic characteristics and modifications to the original knowledge base are suggested as a means of increasing efficiency and decreasing overall search and computational effort. Dependencies between the rules are analyzed and different approaches for automatic detection are presented. From rule dependences, tools for programming environments,logical evaluation of search spaces and Petri net models of production systems are shown. An algorithm for the allocation and partitioning of a production system into a multiprocessor system is also shown, and addresses the problems of communication and execution of these systems in parallel. Finally, the results of a simulator constructed to test several strategies, networks, and algorithms are presented.

  20. 1. Parallel Computations Course on "Scalable Computing". Vittorio Scarano 1: Parallel Computations

    E-print Network

    Scarano, Vittorio

    on "Scalable Computing". Vittorio Scarano Introduction The Universe is Parallel "Massively" parallel 9/91 11. Parallel Computations Course on "Scalable Computing". Vittorio Scarano 1: Parallel Computations 1/91 1. Parallel Computations Course on "Scalable Computing". Vittorio Scarano Plan 1 Course

  1. Massively parallel MRI detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Keil, Boris; Wald, Lawrence L

    2013-04-01

    Originally proposed as a method to increase sensitivity by extending the locally high-sensitivity of small surface coil elements to larger areas via reception, the term parallel imaging now includes the use of array coils to perform image encoding. This methodology has impacted clinical imaging to the point where many examinations are performed with an array comprising multiple smaller surface coil elements as the detector of the MR signal. This article reviews the theoretical and experimental basis for the trend towards higher channel counts relying on insights gained from modeling and experimental studies as well as the theoretical analysis of the so-called "ultimate" SNR and g-factor. We also review the methods for optimally combining array data and changes in RF methodology needed to construct massively parallel MRI detector arrays and show some examples of state-of-the-art for highly accelerated imaging with the resulting highly parallel arrays. PMID:23453758

  2. Fast data parallel polygon rendering

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, F.A.; Hansen, C.D.

    1993-09-01

    This paper describes a parallel method for polygonal rendering on a massively parallel SIMD machine. This method, based on a simple shading model, is targeted for applications which require very fast polygon rendering for extremely large sets of polygons such as is found in many scientific visualization applications. The algorithms described in this paper are incorporated into a library of 3D graphics routines written for the Connection Machine. The routines are implemented on both the CM-200 and the CM-5. This library enables a scientists to display 3D shaded polygons directly from a parallel machine without the need to transmit huge amounts of data to a post-processing rendering system.

  3. Parallel algorithms for mapping pipelined and parallel computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Many computational problems in image processing, signal processing, and scientific computing are naturally structured for either pipelined or parallel computation. When mapping such problems onto a parallel architecture it is often necessary to aggregate an obvious problem decomposition. Even in this context the general mapping problem is known to be computationally intractable, but recent advances have been made in identifying classes of problems and architectures for which optimal solutions can be found in polynomial time. Among these, the mapping of pipelined or parallel computations onto linear array, shared memory, and host-satellite systems figures prominently. This paper extends that work first by showing how to improve existing serial mapping algorithms. These improvements have significantly lower time and space complexities: in one case a published O(nm sup 3) time algorithm for mapping m modules onto n processors is reduced to an O(nm log m) time complexity, and its space requirements reduced from O(nm sup 2) to O(m). Run time complexity is further reduced with parallel mapping algorithms based on these improvements, which run on the architecture for which they create the mappings.

  4. A Parallel Differential Evolution Algorithm A Parallel Differential Evolution Algorithm

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wojciech Kwedlo; Krzysztof Bandurski

    2006-01-01

    In the paper the problem of using a differential evolution algorithm for feed-forward neural network training is considered. A new parallelization scheme for the computation of the fitness function is proposed. This scheme is based on data decomposition. Both the learning set and the population of the evolutionary algorithm are distributed among processors. The processors form a pipeline using the

  5. Parallelization with Automatic Parallelizing Compiler Generating Consumer Electronics Multicore API

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takamichi Miyamoto; Saori Asaka; Hiroki Mikami; Masayoshi Mase; Yasutaka Wada; Hirofumi Nakano; Keiji Kimura; Hironori Kasahara

    2008-01-01

    Multicore processors have been adopted for consumer electronics like portable electronics, mobile phones, car navigation systems, digital TVs and games to obtain high performance with low power consumption. The OSCAR automatic parallelizing compiler has been developed to utilize these multicores easily. Also, a new consumer electronics multicore application program interface (API) to use the OSCAR compiler with native sequential compilers

  6. Hybrid parallel programming with MPI and Unified Parallel C.

    SciTech Connect

    Dinan, J.; Balaji, P.; Lusk, E.; Sadayappan, P.; Thakur, R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; The Ohio State Univ.

    2010-01-01

    The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is one of the most widely used programming models for parallel computing. However, the amount of memory available to an MPI process is limited by the amount of local memory within a compute node. Partitioned Global Address Space (PGAS) models such as Unified Parallel C (UPC) are growing in popularity because of their ability to provide a shared global address space that spans the memories of multiple compute nodes. However, taking advantage of UPC can require a large recoding effort for existing parallel applications. In this paper, we explore a new hybrid parallel programming model that combines MPI and UPC. This model allows MPI programmers incremental access to a greater amount of memory, enabling memory-constrained MPI codes to process larger data sets. In addition, the hybrid model offers UPC programmers an opportunity to create static UPC groups that are connected over MPI. As we demonstrate, the use of such groups can significantly improve the scalability of locality-constrained UPC codes. This paper presents a detailed description of the hybrid model and demonstrates its effectiveness in two applications: a random access benchmark and the Barnes-Hut cosmological simulation. Experimental results indicate that the hybrid model can greatly enhance performance; using hybrid UPC groups that span two cluster nodes, RA performance increases by a factor of 1.33 and using groups that span four cluster nodes, Barnes-Hut experiences a twofold speedup at the expense of a 2% increase in code size.

  7. Bridging the Parallelization Gap: Automating Parallelism Discovery and Planning

    E-print Network

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    Multicore processors have forced mainstream program- mers to rethink the way they design software tools and method- ologies to gain full acceptance by everyday program- mers. As a step towards improved --as is often the case--the parallel programmer is not the original author of the pro- #12;gram

  8. PARLab Parallel Boot Camp Sources of Parallelism and Locality in

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Systems (Ordinary Differential Eqns ­ ODEs) ­ Structural Mechanics, Chemical kinetics, Circuits, Star Wars: Sharks and Fish Jim Demmel Sources: 68/20/2013 · Illustrates parallelization of these simulations · Basic idea: sharks and fish living in an ocean ­ rules for movement (discrete and continuous) ­ breeding

  9. Constructions: Parallel Through A Point

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Neubert

    2010-12-31

    After review of Construction Basics, the technique of constructing a parallel line through a point not on the line will be learned. Let's review the basics of Constructions in Geometry first: Constructions - General Rules Review of how to copy an angle is helpful; please review that here: Constructions: Copy a Line Segment and an Angle Now, using a paper, pencil, straight edge, and compass, you will learn how to construct a parallel through a point. A video demonstration is available to help you. (Windows Media ...

  10. Medipix2 parallel readout system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanti, V.; Marzeddu, R.; Randaccio, P.

    2003-08-01

    A fast parallel readout system based on a PCI board has been developed in the framework of the Medipix collaboration. The readout electronics consists of two boards: the motherboard directly interfacing the Medipix2 chip, and the PCI board with digital I/O ports 32 bits wide. The device driver and readout software have been developed at low level in Assembler to allow fast data transfer and image reconstruction. The parallel readout permits a transfer rate up to 64 Mbytes/s. http://medipix.web.cern ch/MEDIPIX/

  11. Gang scheduling a parallel machine

    SciTech Connect

    Gorda, B.C.; Brooks, E.D. III.

    1991-03-01

    Program development on parallel machines can be a nightmare of scheduling headaches. We have developed a portable time sharing mechanism to handle the problem of scheduling gangs of processors. User program and their gangs of processors are put to sleep and awakened by the gang scheduler to provide a time sharing environment. Time quantums are adjusted according to priority queues and a system of fair share accounting. The initial platform for this software is the 128 processor BBN TC2000 in use in the Massively Parallel Computing Initiative at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Gang scheduling a parallel machine

    SciTech Connect

    Gorda, B.C.; Brooks, E.D. III.

    1991-12-01

    Program development on parallel machines can be a nightmare of scheduling headaches. We have developed a portable time sharing mechanism to handle the problem of scheduling gangs of processes. User programs and their gangs of processes are put to sleep and awakened by the gang scheduler to provide a time sharing environment. Time quantum are adjusted according to priority queues and a system of fair share accounting. The initial platform for this software is the 128 processor BBN TC2000 in use in the Massively Parallel Computing Initiative at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  13. A polymorphic reconfigurable emulator for parallel simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, E. A., Jr.; Mcvey, E. S.; Cook, G.

    1980-01-01

    Microprocessor and arithmetic support chip technology was applied to the design of a reconfigurable emulator for real time flight simulation. The system developed consists of master control system to perform all man machine interactions and to configure the hardware to emulate a given aircraft, and numerous slave compute modules (SCM) which comprise the parallel computational units. It is shown that all parts of the state equations can be worked on simultaneously but that the algebraic equations cannot (unless they are slowly varying). Attempts to obtain algorithms that will allow parellel updates are reported. The word length and step size to be used in the SCM's is determined and the architecture of the hardware and software is described.

  14. Parallel processing of atmospheric chemistry calculations: Preliminary considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.; Jones, P.

    1995-01-01

    Global climate calculations are already saturating the class modern vector supercomputers with only a few central processing units. Increased resolution and inclusion of routines to deal with biogeochemical portions of the terrestrial climate system will soon demand massively parallel approaches. The atmospheric photochemistry ensemble is intimately linked to climate through the trace greenhouse gases ozone and methane and modules for representing it are being attached to global three dimensional transport and GCM frameworks. Atmospheric kinetics involve dozens of highly interactive tracers and so will accentuate the need for parallel processing of earth system simulations. In the present text we lay some of the groundwork for addition of atmospheric kinetics packages to GCM and global scale atmospheric models on multiply parallel computers. The discussion is tailored for consumption by the photochemical modelling community. After a review of numerical atmospheric chemistry methods, we examine how kinetics can be implemented on a parallel computer. We concentrate especially on data layout and flexibility and how these can be implemented in various programming models. We conclude that chemistry can be implemented rather easily within existing frameworks of several parallel atmospheric models. However, memory limitations may preclude high resolution studies of global chemistry.

  15. A brief parallel I/O tutorial.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, H. Lee

    2010-03-01

    This document provides common best practices for the efficient utilization of parallel file systems for analysts and application developers. A multi-program, parallel supercomputer is able to provide effective compute power by aggregating a host of lower-power processors using a network. The idea, in general, is that one either constructs the application to distribute parts to the different nodes and processors available and then collects the result (a parallel application), or one launches a large number of small jobs, each doing similar work on different subsets (a campaign). The I/O system on these machines is usually implemented as a tightly-coupled, parallel application itself. It is providing the concept of a 'file' to the host applications. The 'file' is an addressable store of bytes and that address space is global in nature. In essence, it is providing a global address space. Beyond the simple reality that the I/O system is normally composed of a small, less capable, collection of hardware, that concept of a global address space will cause problems if not very carefully utilized. How much of a problem and the ways in which those problems manifest will be different, but that it is problem prone has been well established. Worse, the file system is a shared resource on the machine - a system service. What an application does when it uses the file system impacts all users. It is not the case that some portion of the available resource is reserved. Instead, the I/O system responds to requests by scheduling and queuing based on instantaneous demand. Using the system well contributes to the overall throughput on the machine. From a solely self-centered perspective, using it well reduces the time that the application or campaign is subject to impact by others. The developer's goal should be to accomplish I/O in a way that minimizes interaction with the I/O system, maximizes the amount of data moved per call, and provides the I/O system the most information about the I/O transfer per request.

  16. Extensive Parallel Processing on Scale-Free Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sollich, Peter; Tantari, Daniele; Annibale, Alessia; Barra, Adriano

    2014-12-01

    We adapt belief-propagation techniques to study the equilibrium behavior of a bipartite spin glass, with interactions between two sets of N and P =? N spins each having an arbitrary degree, i.e., number of interaction partners in the opposite set. An equivalent view is then of a system of N neurons storing P diluted patterns via Hebbian learning, in the high storage regime. Our method allows analysis of parallel pattern processing on a broad class of graphs, including those with pattern asymmetry and heterogeneous dilution; previous replica approaches assumed homogeneity. We show that in a large part of the parameter space of noise, dilution, and storage load, delimited by a critical surface, the network behaves as an extensive parallel processor, retrieving all P patterns in parallel without falling into spurious states due to pattern cross talk, as would be typical of the structural glassiness built into the network. Parallel extensive retrieval is more robust for homogeneous degree distributions, and is not disrupted by asymmetric pattern distributions. For scale-free pattern degree distributions, Hebbian learning induces modularity in the neural network; thus, our Letter gives the first theoretical description for extensive information processing on modular and scale-free networks.

  17. Parallels between wind and crowd loading of bridges.

    PubMed

    McRobie, Allan; Morgenthal, Guido; Abrams, Danny; Prendergast, John

    2013-06-28

    Parallels between the dynamic response of flexible bridges under the action of wind and under the forces induced by crowds allow each field to inform the other. Wind-induced behaviour has been traditionally classified into categories such as flutter, galloping, vortex-induced vibration and buffeting. However, computational advances such as the vortex particle method have led to a more general picture where effects may occur simultaneously and interact, such that the simple semantic demarcations break down. Similarly, the modelling of individual pedestrians has progressed the understanding of human-structure interaction, particularly for large-amplitude lateral oscillations under crowd loading. In this paper, guided by the interaction of flutter and vortex-induced vibration in wind engineering, a framework is presented, which allows various human-structure interaction effects to coexist and interact, thereby providing a possible synthesis of previously disparate experimental and theoretical results. PMID:23690640

  18. A flight investigation of blade section aerodynamics for a helicopter main rotor having NLR-1T airfoil sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. E. K., Jr.; Stevens, D. D.; Tomaine, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A flight investigation was conducted using a teetering-rotor AH-1G helicopter to obtain data on the aerodynamic behavior of main-rotor blades with the NLR-1T blade section. The data system recorded blade-section aerodynamic pressures at 90 percent rotor radius as well as vehicle flight state, performance, and loads. The test envelope included hover, forward flight, and collective-fixed maneuvers. Data were obtained on apparent blade-vortex interactions, negative lift on the advancing blade in high-speed flight and wake interactions in hover. In many cases, good agreement was achieved between chordwise pressure distributions predicted by airfoil theory and flight data with no apparent indications of blade-vortex interactions.

  19. Portable Parallel Programming in HPC

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter H. Beckman; Dennis Gannon; Elizabeth Johnson

    1996-01-01

    HPC++ is a C++ library and language extension framework that is being developed by the HPC++ consortium as a standard model for portable parallel C++ programming. This paper provides a brief introduction to HPC++ style programming and outlines some of the unresolved issues

  20. HTDD based parallel fault simulator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanna Sapiecha; Krzysztof Sapiecha; Stanislaw Deniziak

    1998-01-01

    In this paper a new efficient approach to bit-parallel fault simulation for sequential circuits is introduced and evaluated with the help of ISCAS89 benchmarks. Digital systems are modelled using Hierarchical Ternary Decision Diagrams (HTDDs). It leads to substantial reduction of both the number of simulated faults and calculations needed for simulation. Moreover, an approach presented in this paper is able

  1. Parallel techniques for Virtual Cell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sanguthevar Rajasekaran; Reda Ammar; B. Cheriyan; L. Loew

    2004-01-01

    The Virtual Cell is a simulation package created by the National Resource for Cell Analysis and Modeling (NRCAM). It enables users to model cell biological processes [J.C. Schaff et al. (2001)]. The core of the Virtual Cell is solving a system of PDEs. Sequential runs of the Virtual Cell can take large amounts of time and hence parallelization is needed.

  2. Heterogeneous parallel programming in Jade

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin C. Rinard; Daniel J. Scales; Monica S. Lam

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents Jade, a high-level parallel pro- gramming language for managing coarse-grain concur- rency. Jade simplifles programming by providing the programmer with the abstractions of sequential exe- cution and a shared address space. Jade program- mers augment sequential, imperative programs with constructs that declare how parts of the program access data; the Jade implementation dynamically interprets this information to

  3. Team PARKAS Synchronous Kahn Parallelism

    E-print Network

    Gutkin, Boris

    .g., Simulink, LabView, Modelica). #12;SAO (Sp´ecification Assist´ee par Ordinateur) -- Airbus 80's Describe ? ­ Program/test/verify/simulate/compile before the system is implemented, the source code serving for : ­ static analysis and simulation ; ­ entry for the code generation of sequential and parallel code

  4. Parallel demodulation of multidimensional signals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ezio Biglieri

    1992-01-01

    The design of constellations that allow a high degree of parallelism in the staged decoder structure and in addition allow soft decoding of the component algebraic codes based on a systolic algorithm amenable to VLSI implementation is considered. Combination of these multidimensional constellations with trellis-coded modulation (TCM) is also considered. Set partitioning is based on the partition of a linear

  5. Parallel coprocessors speed graphics system

    SciTech Connect

    Mcewan, C.

    1983-05-26

    Up to five parallel coprocessors, a pipelined architecture and display-list data structures combine to create Ramtek Corporation's fast, modular/raster graphics system, which is upgradable with software. It is stated that the system meets the needs of most CAD/CAM and simulation graphics applications. A 32-bit Vmebus structure is used.

  6. Parallel Programming Rob van Nieuwpoort

    E-print Network

    Bal, Henri E.

    Processing Units (GPUs) also contain many simple cores and can be used for many parallel applications #12Gene/Q, 1572864 cores · Many machines use GPUs #12;Our DAS-4 cluster #12;Challenging Applications · Modeling ozone modeling · Handling use volumes of data from scientific instruments ­ Lofar (astronomy) ­ LHC (CERN, high

  7. Fuzzy clustering in parallel universes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Wiswedel; M. R. Berthold

    2005-01-01

    We propose a modified fuzzy c-means algorithm that operates on different feature spaces, so-called parallel universes, simultaneously. The method assigns membership values of patterns to different universes, which are then adopted throughout the training. This leads to better clustering results since patterns not contributing to clustering in a universe are (completely or partially) ignored. The outcome of the algorithm are

  8. Active learning in parallel universes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolas Cebron; Michael R. Berthold

    2010-01-01

    This work addresses two challenges in combination: learning with a very limited number of labeled training examples (active learning) and learning in the presence of multiple views for each object where the global model to be learned is spread out over some or all of these views (learning in parallel universes). We propose a new active learning approach which selects

  9. GRay: Massive parallel ODE integrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chi-kwan; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Ozel, Feryal

    2014-03-01

    GRay is a massive parallel ordinary differential equation integrator that employs the "stream processing paradigm." It is designed to efficiently integrate billions of photons in curved spacetime according to Einstein's general theory of relativity. The code is implemented in CUDA C/C++.

  10. Unparallel View of Parallel Economy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Partha Batabyal

    2009-01-01

    Despite the considerable media attention being given to the financial meltdown there has been little attention on why this happened. This paper investigates into this matter and takes a very unique point of view. Whenever we talk about this matter we thought of liquidity crunch, sub prime crisis, high fiscal and trade deficit etc but we never think about parallel

  11. Cloning Parallel Simulations MARIA HYBINETTE

    E-print Network

    Hybinette, Maria

    management among others. The goal of this research is to provide a simulation-based decision aid for managers decision aid includes three components: (1) a situation data base built from live data feeds memory mul- tiprocessor. A running parallel discrete event simulation is dynamically cloned at decision

  12. Fast Parallel Absolute Irreducibility Testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erich Kaltofen

    1985-01-01

    e present a fast parallel deterministic algorithm for testing multivariate integral polyno- - c mials for absolute irreducibility, that is irreducibility over the complex numbers. More pre isely, we establish that the set of absolutely irreducible integral polynomials belongs to the e i complexity class NC of Boolean circuits of polynomial size and logarithmic depth. Therefor t also belongs to

  13. The AIS-5000 parallel processor

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, L.A.; Wilson, S.S.

    1988-05-01

    The AIS-5000 is a commercially available massively parallel processor which has been designed to operate in an industrial environment. It has fine-grained parallelism with up to 1024 processing elements arranged in a single-instruction multiple-data (SIMD) architecture. The processing elements are arranged in a one-dimensional chain that, for computer vision applications, can be as wide as the image itself. This architecture has superior cost/performance characteristics than two-dimensional mesh-connected systems. The design of the processing elements and their interconnections as well as the software used to program the system allow a wide variety of algorithms and applications to be implemented. In this paper, the overall architecture of the system is described. Various components of the system are discussed, including details of the processing elements, data I/O pathways and parallel memory organization. A virtual two-dimensional model for programming image-based algorithms for the system is presented. This model is supported by the AIS-5000 hardware and software and allows the system to be treated as a full-image-size, two-dimensional, mesh-connected parallel processor. Performance bench marks are given for certain simple and complex functions.

  14. Parallel execution of LISP programs

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation considers several issues in the execution of Lisp programs on shared-memory multiprocessors. An overview of constructs for explicit parallelism in Lisp is first presented. The problems of partitioning a program into processes and scheduling these processes are then described, and a number of methods for performing these are proposed. These include cutting off process creation based on properties of the computation tree of the program, and basing partitioning decisions on the state of the system at runtime instead of the program. An experimental study of these methods has been performed using a simulator for parallel Lisp. The simulator, written in common Lisp using a continuation-passing style, is described in detail. This is followed by a description of the experiments that were performed and an analysis of the results. Two programs are used as illustrations-a Fast Fourier Transform, which has an abundance of parallelism, and the Cocke-Younger-Kasami parsing algorithm, for which good speedup is not as easy to obtain. The difficulty of using cutoff-based partitioning methods, and the differences between various scheduling methods, are shown. A combination of partitioning and scheduling methods which the author calls dynamic partitioning is analyzed in more detail. This method is based on examining the machine's runtime state; it requires that the programmer only identify parallelism in the program, without deciding which potential parallelism is actually useful. Several theorems are proved providing upper bounds on the amount of overhead produced by this method. He concludes that for programs whose computation trees have small height relative to their total size, dynamic partitioning can achieve asymptotically minimal overhead in the cost of process creation.

  15. A CS1 pedagogical approach to parallel thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rague, Brian William

    Almost all collegiate programs in Computer Science offer an introductory course in programming primarily devoted to communicating the foundational principles of software design and development. The ACM designates this introduction to computer programming course for first-year students as CS1, during which methodologies for solving problems within a discrete computational context are presented. Logical thinking is highlighted, guided primarily by a sequential approach to algorithm development and made manifest by typically using the latest, commercially successful programming language. In response to the most recent developments in accessible multicore computers, instructors of these introductory classes may wish to include training on how to design workable parallel code. Novel issues arise when programming concurrent applications which can make teaching these concepts to beginning programmers a seemingly formidable task. Student comprehension of design strategies related to parallel systems should be monitored to ensure an effective classroom experience. This research investigated the feasibility of integrating parallel computing concepts into the first-year CS classroom. To quantitatively assess student comprehension of parallel computing, an experimental educational study using a two-factor mixed group design was conducted to evaluate two instructional interventions in addition to a control group: (1) topic lecture only, and (2) topic lecture with laboratory work using a software visualization Parallel Analysis Tool (PAT) specifically designed for this project. A new evaluation instrument developed for this study, the Perceptions of Parallelism Survey (PoPS), was used to measure student learning regarding parallel systems. The results from this educational study show a statistically significant main effect among the repeated measures, implying that student comprehension levels of parallel concepts as measured by the PoPS improve immediately after the delivery of any initial three-week CS1 level module when compared with student comprehension levels just prior to starting the course. Survey results measured during the ninth week of the course reveal that performance levels remained high compared to pre-course performance scores. A second result produced by this study reveals no statistically significant interaction effect between the intervention method and student performance as measured by the evaluation instrument over three separate testing periods. However, visual inspection of survey score trends and the low p-value generated by the interaction analysis (0.062) indicate that further studies may verify improved concept retention levels for the lecture w/PAT group.

  16. Parallel Visualization Co-Processing of Overnight CFD Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David E.; Haimes, Robert

    1999-01-01

    An interactive visualization system pV3 is being developed for the investigation of advanced computational methodologies employing visualization and parallel processing for the extraction of information contained in large-scale transient engineering simulations. Visual techniques for extracting information from the data in terms of cutting planes, iso-surfaces, particle tracing and vector fields are included in this system. This paper discusses improvements to the pV3 system developed under NASA's Affordable High Performance Computing project.

  17. Segmented ray casting for data parallel volume rendering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William M. Hsu

    1993-01-01

    Interactive volume rendering is important for the timely analysis of three-dimensional data, but workstations take seconds to minutes to render data sets of a few megabytes. We have developed a parallel ray-casting technique. called Sepnenred Ray Cnsting, which can render a 128x128~128 data set at 2-3 frames per second on a 4K processor DECmpp 12OOO\\/Sx Model 100. Pixel values in

  18. Biomedical applications on the GRID: efficient management of parallel jobs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. T. Moscicki; H. C. Lee; S. Guatelli; S. C. Lin; M. G. Pia

    2004-01-01

    Distributed computing based on the Master-Worker and PULL interaction model is applicable to a number of applications in high energy physics, medical physics and bio-informatics. We demonstrate a realistic medical physics use-case of a dosimetric system for brachytherapy using distributed GRID resources. We present the efficient techniques for running parallel jobs in a case of the BLAST, a gene sequencing

  19. Beyond vector processing: parallel programming on the CRAY APP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas Miles

    1993-01-01

    The CRAY APP is a highly parallel network compute server designed to accelerate Fortran and C programs in a UNIX environment. It can run complete programs in a simple shared memory environment, including support for UNIX system calls. A very efficient HiPPI interface makes the CRAY APP cluster-capable and well-suited to interact with other programs running on a network in

  20. Automated Instrumentation and Monitoring of Data Movement for Parallel Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarukkai, Sekhar; Yan, Jerry C.; Schmidt, Melisa; Tucker, Deanne (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Writing efficient parallel programs is complicated by the need to select the right data structure alignments and distributions, which determine the nature and volume of inter-processor communications. A large number of performance tools for parallel programs have been developed recently to expose these inter-processor communications. However, none of them support performance views or provide statistics in terms of inter-processor data structure interactions. A performance tool that tracks the interaction between individual data structures and the context of these interactions is essential for understanding the performance of both explicit message passing programs and data-parallel languages such as HPF. In this paper we discuss the use of compiler front end tools for automatically tracking data structure movements in message passing programs, and low-overhead monitoring and postprocessing of such codes. We demonstrate that robust instrumentation and low overhead monitoring of inter-processor data structure movements is possible, with the use of a number of NAS benchmark codes, run on the i860 hypercube. We also show that the data so collected can be used effectively by post processing tools that expose performance bottlenecks using graphical displays and performance statistics.

  1. Parallel Rendering of Large Time-Varying Volume Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbutt, Alexander E.

    2005-01-01

    Interactive visualization of large time-varying 3D volume datasets has been and still is a great challenge to the modem computational world. It stretches the limits of the memory capacity, the disk space, the network bandwidth and the CPU speed of a conventional computer. In this SURF project, we propose to develop a parallel volume rendering program on SGI's Prism, a cluster computer equipped with state-of-the-art graphic hardware. The proposed program combines both parallel computing and hardware rendering in order to achieve an interactive rendering rate. We use 3D texture mapping and a hardware shader to implement 3D volume rendering on each workstation. We use SGI's VisServer to enable remote rendering using Prism's graphic hardware. And last, we will integrate this new program with ParVox, a parallel distributed visualization system developed at JPL. At the end of the project, we Will demonstrate remote interactive visualization using this new hardware volume renderer on JPL's Prism System using a time-varying dataset from selected JPL applications.

  2. MASSIVELY PARALLEL MICROFLUIDIC CELL-PAIRING PLATFORM FOR THE STATISTICAL STUDY OF IMMUNOLOGICAL CELL-CELL

    E-print Network

    Voldman, Joel

    MASSIVELY PARALLEL MICROFLUIDIC CELL-PAIRING PLATFORM FOR THE STATISTICAL STUDY OF IMMUNOLOGICAL in presumably homogeneous populations has been neglected in immunology due to the limitations of conventional to study immune cell-cell interactions A) Current methods to image cell-cell interactions in immunology

  3. A Semi-Empirical Noise Modeling Method for Helicopter Maneuvering Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric; Schmitz, Fredric; Sickenberger, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    A new model for Blade-Vortex Interaction noise generation during maneuvering flight is developed in this paper. Acoustic and performance data from both flight and wind tunnels are used to derive a non-dimensional and analytical performance/acoustic model that describes BVI noise in steady flight. The model is extended to transient maneuvering flight (pure pitch and roll transients) by using quasisteady assumptions throughout the prescribed maneuvers. Ground noise measurements, taken during maneuvering flight of a Bell 206B helicopter, show that many of the noise radiation details are captured. The result is a computationally efficient Blade-Vortex Interaction noise model with sufficient accuracy to account for transient maneuvering flight. The code can be run in real time to predict transient maneuver noise and is suitable for use in an acoustic mission-planning tool.

  4. Instrumentation for parallel magnetic resonance imaging 

    E-print Network

    Brown, David Gerald

    2007-04-25

    of small animal research and education. A 64-channel receiver for parallel MR imaging with arrays of sensors was also developed. The receiver prototype was characterized through both bench-top tests and phantom imaging. The parallel receiver is capable...

  5. A Parallel Graph Partitioner for STAPL 

    E-print Network

    Castet, Nicolas

    2013-04-26

    arbitrary graphs and meshes and to build customized partitioners. It includes the state of the art parallel k-way multilevel scheme to partition arbitrary graphs, a parallel mesh partitioner with parameterized partition shape, and a customized partitioner...

  6. On-the-fly pipeline parallelism

    E-print Network

    Lee, I-Ting Angelina

    Pipeline parallelism organizes a parallel program as a linear sequence of s stages. Each stage processes elements of a data stream, passing each processed data element to the next stage, and then taking on a new element ...

  7. Automatic Parallelization of Lazy Functional Programs

    E-print Network

    Loogen, Rita

    Automatic Parallelization of Lazy Functional Programs Guido Hogen, Andrea Kindler and Rita Loogen functional programs that uses strictness analysis to detect the implicit parallelism within programs. It generates an intermediate functional program, where a special syntactic construct `letpar', which

  8. Parallel Coupled Micro-Macro Actuators

    E-print Network

    Morrell, John Bryant

    1996-01-01

    This thesis presents a new actuator system consisting of a micro-actuator and a macro-actuator coupled in parallel via a compliant transmission. The system is called the Parallel Coupled Micro-Macro Actuator, or PaCMMA. ...

  9. Implementing clips on a parallel computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Gary

    1987-01-01

    The C language integrated production system (CLIPS) is a forward chaining rule based language to provide training and delivery for expert systems. Conceptually, rule based languages have great potential for benefiting from the inherent parallelism of the algorithms that they employ. During each cycle of execution, a knowledge base of information is compared against a set of rules to determine if any rules are applicable. Parallelism also can be employed for use with multiple cooperating expert systems. To investigate the potential benefits of using a parallel computer to speed up the comparison of facts to rules in expert systems, a parallel version of CLIPS was developed for the FLEX/32, a large grain parallel computer. The FLEX implementation takes a macroscopic approach in achieving parallelism by splitting whole sets of rules among several processors rather than by splitting the components of an individual rule among processors. The parallel CLIPS prototype demonstrates the potential advantages of integrating expert system tools with parallel computers.

  10. Parallelizing Sequential Programs with Statistical Accuracy Tests

    E-print Network

    Misailovic, Sasa

    We present QuickStep, a novel system for parallelizing sequential programs. Unlike standard parallelizing compilers (which are designed to preserve the semantics of the original sequential computation), QuickStep is instead ...

  11. The Parallel Grammar Project Miriam Butt

    E-print Network

    The Parallel Grammar Project Miriam Butt Cent. for Computational Linguistics UMIST Manchester M60 1 range of purposes. In this paper, we report on the Parallel Grammar (ParGram) project (Butt et al., 1999

  12. Adaptively Parallel Processor Allocation for Cilk Jobs

    E-print Network

    Sen, Siddhartha

    The problem of allocating processor resources fairly and efficiently to parallel jobs has been studied extensively in the past. Most of this work, however, assumes that the instantaneous parallelism of the jobs is known ...

  13. A Parallel Plug-in Programming Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Ronald [ORNL; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL; Geist, Al [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Software component architectures allow assembly of applications from individual software modules based on clearly defined programming interfaces, thus improving the reuse of existing solutions and simplifying application development. Furthermore, the plug-in programming paradigm additionally enables runtime reconfigurability, making it possible to adapt to changing application needs, such as different application phases, and system properties, like resource availability, by loading/unloading appropriate software modules. Similar to parallel programs, parallel plug-ins are an abstraction for a set of cooperating individual plug-ins within a parallel application utilizing a software component architecture. Parallel programming paradigms apply to parallel plug-ins in the same way they apply to parallel programs. The research presented in this paper targets the clear definition of parallel plug-ins and the development of a parallel plug-in programming paradigm.

  14. Modeling Service Interactions Using Kahn Process Network

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Weishi Zhang; Xiuguo Zhang

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposed a Kahn process network(KPN) based service interaction model which can dynamically establish links between computational service nodes. Three advantages of KPN make it adequate to model service interactions: (1) parallelism and communication mechanism in KPNs, which enable distributed service interaction on Internet; (2) KPNs are compositional, which corresponds to the possibility to build bigger behaviors from small

  15. From Term Rewriting to Generalised Interaction Nets

    E-print Network

    Fernández, Maribel

    computation in several nets in parallel and communication through a state. This framework allows us; they are free from strategies). Lafont's interaction nets are a graphical framework based on net rewriting which like to capture that are not in­ cluded in the interaction net framework. Since interaction nets only

  16. Parallel machine architecture and compiler design facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuck, David J.; Yew, Pen-Chung; Padua, David; Sameh, Ahmed; Veidenbaum, Alex

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to provide an integrated simulation environment for studying and evaluating various issues in designing parallel systems, including machine architectures, parallelizing compiler techniques, and parallel algorithms. The status of Delta project (which objective is to provide a facility to allow rapid prototyping of parallelized compilers that can target toward different machine architectures) is summarized. Included are the surveys of the program manipulation tools developed, the environmental software supporting Delta, and the compiler research projects in which Delta has played a role.

  17. Hybrid Parallel Programming on HPC Platforms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rolf Rabenseifner

    2003-01-01

    Summary Most HPC systems are clusters of shared memory nodes. Parallel programming must combine the distributed mem- ory parallelization on the node inter-connect with the shared memory parallelization inside of each node. Various hybrid MPI+OpenMP programming models are compared with pure MPI. Benchmark results of several platforms are presented. This paper analyzes the strength and weakness of several parallel programming

  18. Automatic Multilevel Parallelization Using OpenMP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Hao-Qiang; Jost, Gabriele; Yan, Jerry; Ayguade, Eduard; Gonzalez, Marc; Martorell, Xavier; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we describe the extension of the CAPO (CAPtools (Computer Aided Parallelization Toolkit) OpenMP) parallelization support tool to support multilevel parallelism based on OpenMP directives. CAPO generates OpenMP directives with extensions supported by the NanosCompiler to allow for directive nesting and definition of thread groups. We report some results for several benchmark codes and one full application that have been parallelized using our system.

  19. Parallel bundles in planar map geometries

    E-print Network

    Linfan Mao

    2005-06-20

    Parallel lines are very important objects in Euclid plane geometry and its behaviors can be gotten by one's intuition. But in a planar map geometry, a kind of the Smarandache geometries, the sutation is complex since it may contains elliptic or hyperbolic points. This paper concentrates on the behavior of parallel bundles, a generazation of parallel lines in plane geometry and obtains characteristics for for parallel bundles.

  20. Two efficient staggered algorithms for the serial and parallel solution of three-dimensional nonlinear transient aeroelastic problems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Farhat; M. Lesoinne

    2000-01-01

    Partitioned procedures and staggered algorithms are often adopted for the solution of coupled fluid\\/structure interaction problems in the time domain. In this paper, we overview two sequential and parallel partitioned procedures that are popular in computational nonlinear aeroelasticity, and address their limitation in terms of accuracy and numerical stability. We propose two alternative serial and parallel staggered algorithms for the

  1. Merlin - Massively parallel heterogeneous computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittie, Larry; Maples, Creve

    1989-01-01

    Hardware and software for Merlin, a new kind of massively parallel computing system, are described. Eight computers are linked as a 300-MIPS prototype to develop system software for a larger Merlin network with 16 to 64 nodes, totaling 600 to 3000 MIPS. These working prototypes help refine a mapped reflective memory technique that offers a new, very general way of linking many types of computer to form supercomputers. Processors share data selectively and rapidly on a word-by-word basis. Fast firmware virtual circuits are reconfigured to match topological needs of individual application programs. Merlin's low-latency memory-sharing interfaces solve many problems in the design of high-performance computing systems. The Merlin prototypes are intended to run parallel programs for scientific applications and to determine hardware and software needs for a future Teraflops Merlin network.

  2. Parallel supercomputing with commodity components

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, M.S.; Goda, M.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Becker, D.J. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    We have implemented a parallel computer architecture based entirely upon commodity personal computer components. Using 16 Intel Pentium Pro microprocessors and switched fast ethernet as a communication fabric, we have obtained sustained performance on scientific applications in excess of one Gigaflop. During one production astrophysics treecode simulation, we performed 1.2 x 10{sup 15} floating point operations (1.2 Petaflops) over a three week period, with one phase of that simulation running continuously for two weeks without interruption. We report on a variety of disk, memory and network benchmarks. We also present results from the NAS parallel benchmark suite, which indicate that this architecture is competitive with current commercial architectures. In addition, we describe some software written to support efficient message passing, as well as a Linux device driver interface to the Pentium hardware performance monitoring registers.

  3. Parallel processing spacecraft communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolotin, Gary S. (Inventor); Donaldson, James A. (Inventor); Luong, Huy H. (Inventor); Wood, Steven H. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An uplink controlling assembly speeds data processing using a special parallel codeblock technique. A correct start sequence initiates processing of a frame. Two possible start sequences can be used; and the one which is used determines whether data polarity is inverted or non-inverted. Processing continues until uncorrectable errors are found. The frame ends by intentionally sending a block with an uncorrectable error. Each of the codeblocks in the frame has a channel ID. Each channel ID can be separately processed in parallel. This obviates the problem of waiting for error correction processing. If that channel number is zero, however, it indicates that the frame of data represents a critical command only. That data is handled in a special way, independent of the software. Otherwise, the processed data further handled using special double buffering techniques to avoid problems from overrun. When overrun does occur, the system takes action to lose only the oldest data.

  4. Parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Song; Tan, Yidong; Zhang, Shulian, E-mail: zsl-dpi@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurements, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measurements, Department of Precision Instruments, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-12-15

    We present a parallel multiplex laser feedback interferometer based on spatial multiplexing which avoids the signal crosstalk in the former feedback interferometer. The interferometer outputs two close parallel laser beams, whose frequencies are shifted by two acousto-optic modulators by 2? simultaneously. A static reference mirror is inserted into one of the optical paths as the reference optical path. The other beam impinges on the target as the measurement optical path. Phase variations of the two feedback laser beams are simultaneously measured through heterodyne demodulation with two different detectors. Their subtraction accurately reflects the target displacement. Under typical room conditions, experimental results show a resolution of 1.6 nm and accuracy of 7.8 nm within the range of 100 ?m.

  5. Space-efficient scheduling of nested parallelism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Girija J. Narlikar; Guy E. Blelloch

    1999-01-01

    Many of today's high-level parallel languages support dynamic, fine-grained parallelism. These languages allow the user to expose all the parallelism in the program, which is typically of a much higher degree than the number of processors. Hence an efficient scheduling algorithm is required to assign computations to processors at runtime. Besides having low overheads and good load balancing, it is

  6. Perfect Pipelining: A New Loop Parallelization Technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexander Aiken; Alexandru Nicolau

    1988-01-01

    Parallelizing compilers do not handle loops in a satisfactory manner. Fine-grain transformationscapture irregular parallelism inside a loop body not amenable to coarser approaches but have limitedability to exploit parallelism across iterations. Coarse methods sacrifice irregular forms of parallelismin favor of pipelining (overlapping) iterations. In this paper we present a new transformation, PerfectPipelining, that bridges the gap between these fine- and

  7. An Approach To Portable Parallel Programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles C. Weems Jr

    1992-01-01

    Parallel architectures vary greatly in their organizations. These differences arise naturally from designing machines to fit different problem domains, and from different physical and cost constraints. Thus, the world is, and will continue to be, populated with parallel processors having significantly different organizations and hence, incompatible programming models: a program written specifically for one parallel processor does not transport directly

  8. Parallel Computing Using Web Servers and "Servlets".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Alfred; Bloor, Chris; Choi, Y. K.

    2000-01-01

    Describes parallel computing and presents inexpensive ways to implement a virtual parallel computer with multiple Web servers. Highlights include performance measurement of parallel systems; models for using Java and intranet technology including single server, multiple clients and multiple servers, single client; and a comparison of CGI (common…

  9. Hyperdimensional Data Analysis Using Parallel Coordinates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward J. Wegman

    1990-01-01

    This article presents the basic results of using the parallel coordinate representation as a high-dimensional data analysis tool. Several alternatives are reviewed. The basic algorithm for parallel coordinates is laid out and a discussion of its properties as a projective transformation is given. Several duality results are discussed along with their interpretations as data analysis tools. Permutations of the parallel

  10. Experimental Study of Multipopulation Parallel Genetic Programming.

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Experimental Study of Multipopulation Parallel Genetic Programming. Fernández F.1 , Tomassini M. 2. punch@cse.msu.edu Abstract. The parallel execution of several populations in Evolutionary Algorithms has using some of the Parallel Genetic Programming models. One aspect of the conflict is population size

  11. Parallel visualization of large data sets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rob Rosenberg; Marco O. Lanzagorta; Almadena Chtchelkanova; Alexei Khokhlov

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we describe our efforts towards the parallel visualization of large data sets. We describe the fully threaded tree (FTT) structure developed at NRL to tackle the problem of massive parallel calculations using adaptive mesh refinement methods. All operations with FTT are performed in parallel and require only a small memory overhead. The FTT can be viewed as

  12. Kismet: parallel speedup estimates for serial programs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donghwan Jeon; Saturnino Garcia; Chris Louie; Michael Bedford Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Software engineers now face the difficult task of refactoring serial programs for parallel execution on multicore processors. Currently, they are offered little guidance as to how much benefit may come from this task, or how close they are to the best possible parallelization. This paper presents Kismet, a tool that creates parallel speedup estimates for unparallelized serial programs. Kismet differs

  13. Structured Hardware Compilation of Parallel Programs

    E-print Network

    Luk, Wayne

    implementation. A circuit module is developed for each control structure, such as sequential or parallelStructured Hardware Compilation of Parallel Programs Wayne Luk, David Ferguson and Ian Page. The potential of this approach is evaluated. INTRODUCTION Recent work has shown how parallel programs

  14. MAPS: multi-algorithm parallel circuit simulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoji Ye; Wei Dong; Peng Li; Sani R. Nassif

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of multi-core and many-core processors has introduced new opportunities and challenges to EDA research and development. While the availability of increasing parallel computing power holds new promise to address many computing challenges in CAD, the leverage of hardware parallelism can only be possible with a new generation of parallel CAD applications. In this paper, we propose a novel

  15. Parallel Imports, Market Size and Investment Incentive

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alfons Palangkaraya; Jongsay Yong

    2006-01-01

    We use a vertical control model with a two-part tariff pricing and a leader-follower competition to investigate some conditions which may prevent the occurrence of parallel importing even when such activity is legally permitted and the effects of parallel importing on the incentive to invest in market development effort for an authorised distributor faced with competition from parallel imported products.

  16. Dataflow Analysis-Based Dynamic Parallel Monitoring

    E-print Network

    Dataflow Analysis-Based Dynamic Parallel Monitoring Michelle Leah Goodstein CMU-CS-14-132 August;Keywords: Dataflow Analysis-Based Dynamic Parallel Monitoring, Dynamic Analysis, Parallel Pro- gram Monitoring, Compiler Analysis, Computer Architecture #12;To my family. #12;iv #12;Abstract Despite the best

  17. Parallel MATLAB: Single Program Multiple Data

    E-print Network

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Parallel MATLAB: Single Program Multiple Data John Burkardt (FSU) Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff Research Computing ICAM: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 67 #12;MATLAB Parallel to use, but it only lets us do parallelism in terms of loops. The only choice we make is whether a loop

  18. Parallel MATLAB: Single Program Multiple Data

    E-print Network

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Parallel MATLAB: Single Program Multiple Data John Burkardt (FSU) Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff Research Computing ICAM: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 67 #12;Matlab Parallel to use, but it only lets us do parallelism in terms of loops. The only choice we make is whether a loop

  19. Applications Parallel PIC plasma simulation through particle

    E-print Network

    Vlad, Gregorio

    Applications Parallel PIC plasma simulation through particle decomposition techniques B. Di Martino 2000 Abstract Parallelization of a particle-in-cell (PIC) code has been accomplished through technique requires a moderate eort in porting the code in parallel form and results in intrinsic load

  20. Parallel MATLAB: Single Program Multiple Data

    E-print Network

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Parallel MATLAB: Single Program Multiple Data John Burkardt (FSU) Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff Parallel Computing SPMD: Single Program, Multiple Data QUAD Example Distributed Arrays LBVP & FEM 2D HEAT to use, but it only lets us do parallelism in terms of loops. The only choice we make is whether a loop

  1. Parallel MATLAB: Single Program Multiple Data

    E-print Network

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Parallel MATLAB: Single Program Multiple Data John Burkardt (FSU) Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff Research Computing ICAM: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 66 #12;MATLAB Parallel to use, but it only lets us do parallelism in terms of loops. The only choice we make is whether a loop

  2. Functional MRI Using Regularized Parallel Imaging Acquisition

    E-print Network

    Functional MRI Using Regularized Parallel Imaging Acquisition Fa-Hsuan Lin,1* Teng-Yi Huang,1,2 Nan. Kwong1 Parallel MRI techniques reconstruct full-FOV images from un- dersampled k-space data by using the uncorrelated information from RF array coil elements. One disadvantage of parallel MRI is that the image signal

  3. Parallel MRI Reconstruction Using Variance Partitioning Regularization

    E-print Network

    Parallel MRI Reconstruction Using Variance Partitioning Regularization Fa-Hsuan Lin,1,2* Fu be utilized to enhance the spatiotempo- ral resolution of MRI by employing the parallel imaging tech- nique set in parallel MRI data. The proposed Variance Partition- ing Regularization (VPR) method can improve

  4. Parallel MRI at microtesla fields

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vadim S. Zotev; Petr L. Volegov; Andrei N. Matlashov; Michelle A. Espy; John C. Mosher; Robert H. Kraus

    2008-01-01

    Parallel imaging techniques have been widely used in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multiple receiver coils have been shown to improve image quality and allow accelerated image acquisition. Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-low fields (ULF MRI) is a new imaging approach that uses SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensors to measure the spatially encoded precession of pre-polarized nuclear spin populations

  5. Middle Path Coarse Grain Parallelization

    E-print Network

    Kasahara, Hironori

    Backend OpenMP Fortran OpenMP Backend MPI Fortran MPI Backend ½ ÇË Ê BPA RB SB Program Near fine grain layer 3rd layer Near fine grain parallelism in loop body BPA RB SB BPA RB SB BPA RB SB BPA RB SB BPA RB SB BPA RB SB ¾ ¾º½º½ È Ç Á Ê Ë Ê ¾ Data Dependency Extended Contorol Dependency Conditional Branch

  6. Parallel Simulation of Multicomponent Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael T. Heath; Xiangmin Jiao

    2004-01-01

    \\u000a Simulation of multicomponent systems poses many critical challenges in science and engineering. We overview some software\\u000a and algorithmic issues in developing high-performance simulation tools for such systems, based on our experience in developing\\u000a a large-scale, fully-coupled code for detailed simulation of solid propellant rockets. We briefly sketch some of our solutions\\u000a to these issues, with focus on parallel and performance

  7. Universal schemes for parallel communication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leslie G. Valiant; Gordon J. Brebner

    1981-01-01

    In this paper we isolate a combinatorial problem that, we believe, lies at the heart of this question and provide some encouragingly positive solutions to it. We show that there exists an N-processor realistic computer that can simulate arbitrary idealistic N-processor parallel computations with only a factor of O(log N) loss of runtime efficiency. The main innovation is an O(log

  8. Fuzzy clustering in parallel universes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernd Wiswedel; Michael R. Berthold

    2007-01-01

    We present an extension of the fuzzy c-Means algorithm, which operates simultaneously on different feature spaces—so-called parallel universes—and also incorporates noise detection. The method assigns membership values of patterns to different universes, which are then adopted throughout the training. This leads to better clustering results since patterns not contributing to clus- tering in a universe are (completely or partially) ignored.

  9. Hybrid Parallel Part I. Preliminaries

    E-print Network

    Kaminsky, Alan

    ;13­2 BIG CPU, BIG DATA he massively parallel Bitcoin mining program in Chapter 11 doesn't nec essarily take each Bitcoin sequentially on a single core, I have to mine 40 or more Bitcoins to take full advantage of the cluster. If I mine fewer than 40 Bitcoins, some of the cores will be idle. That's not good. I want to put

  10. Parallel Computational Geometry of Rectangles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharat Chandran; Sung Kwon Kim; David M. Mount

    1992-01-01

    Rectangles in a plane provide a very useful abstraction for a number of problems in diverse fields. In this paper we consider\\u000a the problem of computing geometric properties of a set of rectangles in the plane. We give parallel algorithms for a number\\u000a of problems usingn processors wheren is the number of upright rectangles. Specifically, we present algorithms for computing

  11. Efficient, massively parallel eigenvalue computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Yan; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    In numerical simulations of disordered electronic systems, one of the most common approaches is to diagonalize random Hamiltonian matrices and to study the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of a single electron in the presence of a random potential. An effort to implement a matrix diagonalization routine for real symmetric dense matrices on massively parallel SIMD computers, the Maspar MP-1 and MP-2 systems, is described. Results of numerical tests and timings are also presented.

  12. UW Madison Libraries: Parallel Press

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    UW-Madison Libraries' Parallel Press combines book publishing traditions with new technology to provide print-on-demand books and a series of chapbooks (small, inexpensive books featuring the works of authors and poets with a Wisconsin connection). Print-on-demand books parallel the online editions created by the Libraries' digitizing initiatives. Currently, four titles, including David Hayman's A First-Draft Version of Finnegan's Wake (originally published in 1963) and The Book of Beasts (1954), by T.H. White, are available via Parallel Press print-on-demand service. The poetry chapbook series began in 1999 with the publication of four Wisconsin poets (Elizabeth Oness, Max Garland, Katharine Whitcomb, and Andrea Potos) and has continued with six chapbooks per year. A prose chapbook series began in 2002 with American Trilogy. This chapbook consists of historical reproductions of the American Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights, with introductory material by UW Professor Stephen E. Lucas, and an afterword by John P. Kaminski, Director of the Center for the Study of the American Constitution -- published as part of a one year later, university-wide reflection, on the impact of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

  13. Parallel Java: A Unified API for Shared Memory and Cluster Parallel Programming in 100% Java

    E-print Network

    Kaminsky, Alan

    Parallel Java: A Unified API for Shared Memory and Cluster Parallel Programming in 100% Java Alan@cs.rit.edu Abstract Parallel Java is a parallel programming API whose goals are (1) to support both shared memory capabilities as OpenMP and MPI in an object oriented, 100% Java API; and (3) to be easily de- ployed and run

  14. Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-005 Parallel Containers -A Tool for Applying Parallel Computing Applications on

    E-print Network

    Hawick, Ken

    -932415-86-6}, institution = {Information and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University}, keywords = {parallel computing0 Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-005 Parallel Containers - A Tool for Applying Parallel Computing Applications on Clusters M. Gan-El and K. A. Hawick 2006 Parallel and cluster computing remain

  15. Large-Scale Parallel Programming: Experience with the BBN Butterfly Parallel Processor

    E-print Network

    Scott, Michael L.

    Large-Scale Parallel Programming: Experience with the BBN Butterfly Parallel Processor Thomas J. Le of Rochester have used a collection of BBN Butterfly TM Parallel Processors to conduct research in parallel with the Butterfly we have ported three compilers, developed five major and several minor library packages, built two

  16. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multi-scale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier-Stokes solver ?? ?r. The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers ( ?? ?r and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in future work. PMID:23734066

  17. Parallel multiscale simulations of a brain aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Leopold; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular pathologies, such as a brain aneurysm, are affected by the global blood circulation as well as by the local microrheology. Hence, developing computational models for such cases requires the coupling of disparate spatial and temporal scales often governed by diverse mathematical descriptions, e.g., by partial differential equations (continuum) and ordinary differential equations for discrete particles (atomistic). However, interfacing atomistic-based with continuum-based domain discretizations is a challenging problem that requires both mathematical and computational advances. We present here a hybrid methodology that enabled us to perform the first multiscale simulations of platelet depositions on the wall of a brain aneurysm. The large scale flow features in the intracranial network are accurately resolved by using the high-order spectral element Navier-Stokes solver N??T?r. The blood rheology inside the aneurysm is modeled using a coarse-grained stochastic molecular dynamics approach (the dissipative particle dynamics method) implemented in the parallel code LAMMPS. The continuum and atomistic domains overlap with interface conditions provided by effective forces computed adaptively to ensure continuity of states across the interface boundary. A two-way interaction is allowed with the time-evolving boundary of the (deposited) platelet clusters tracked by an immersed boundary method. The corresponding heterogeneous solvers (N??T?r and LAMMPS) are linked together by a computational multilevel message passing interface that facilitates modularity and high parallel efficiency. Results of multiscale simulations of clot formation inside the aneurysm in a patient-specific arterial tree are presented. We also discuss the computational challenges involved and present scalability results of our coupled solver on up to 300 K computer processors. Validation of such coupled atomistic-continuum models is a main open issue that has to be addressed in future work.

  18. Automating parallel implementation of neural learning algorithms.

    PubMed

    Rana, O F

    2000-06-01

    Neural learning algorithms generally involve a number of identical processing units, which are fully or partially connected, and involve an update function, such as a ramp, a sigmoid or a Gaussian function for instance. Some variations also exist, where units can be heterogeneous, or where an alternative update technique is employed, such as a pulse stream generator. Associated with connections are numerical values that must be adjusted using a learning rule, and and dictated by parameters that are learning rule specific, such as momentum, a learning rate, a temperature, amongst others. Usually, neural learning algorithms involve local updates, and a global interaction between units is often discouraged, except in instances where units are fully connected, or involve synchronous updates. In all of these instances, concurrency within a neural algorithm cannot be fully exploited without a suitable implementation strategy. A design scheme is described for translating a neural learning algorithm from inception to implementation on a parallel machine using PVM or MPI libraries, or onto programmable logic such as FPGAs. A designer must first describe the algorithm using a specialised Neural Language, from which a Petri net (PN) model is constructed automatically for verification, and building a performance model. The PN model can be used to study issues such as synchronisation points, resource sharing and concurrency within a learning rule. Specialised constructs are provided to enable a designer to express various aspects of a learning rule, such as the number and connectivity of neural nodes, the interconnection strategies, and information flows required by the learning algorithm. A scheduling and mapping strategy is then used to translate this PN model onto a multiprocessor template. We demonstrate our technique using a Kohonen and backpropagation learning rules, implemented on a loosely coupled workstation cluster, and a dedicated parallel machine, with PVM libraries. PMID:11011794

  19. New developments in vibration reduction with actively controlled trailing edge flaps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. F. Myrtle

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes new developments in vibration reduction with actively controlled trailing edge flaps (ACF). This approach is applied to two different problems: 1.vibration reduction at high advance ratios, and2.alleviation of vibrations due to blade vortex interaction (BVI) at low advance ratios. For the first problem, a new aeroelastic model incorporating trailing edge flaps and a new two-dimensional unsteady aerodynamic

  20. Airloads, wakes, and aeroelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wayne

    1990-01-01

    Fundamental considerations regarding the theory of modeling of rotary wing airloads, wakes, and aeroelasticity are presented. The topics covered are: airloads and wakes, including lifting-line theory, wake models and nonuniform inflow, free wake geometry, and blade-vortex interaction; aerodynamic and wake models for aeroelasticity, including two-dimensional unsteady aerodynamics and dynamic inflow; and airloads and structural dynamics, including comprehensive airload prediction programs. Results of calculations and correlations are presented.

  1. Computational simulation and analysis of double-swept blade in BVI noise reduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hong Hu; Leon A. Jordan Jr.; James D. Baeder

    2005-01-01

    The TURNS computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code with the Beddoes prescribed wake and the WOPWOP computational acoustics code is used to study blade-sweep blade–vortex interaction (BVI) noise reduction design. The CFD three-dimensional unsteady solutions of blade surface pressure distributions are used as the input to WOPWOP acoustics computational code to produce the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) on a 3-rotor

  2. Evaluation of a doubly-swept blade tip for rotorcraft noise reduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brian E. Wake; T. Alan Egolf

    1992-01-01

    A computational study was performed for a doubly-swept rotor blade tip to determine its benefit for high-speed impulsive (HSI) and blade-vortex interaction (BVI) noise. This design consists of aft and forward sweep. For the HSI-noise computations, unsteady Euler calculations were performed for several variations to a rotor blade geometry. A doubly-swept planform was predicted to increase the delocalizing Mach number

  3. Acoustics of unsteady transonic flow

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. S. Lyrintzis; Y. Xue

    1990-01-01

    Investigation of noise mechanisms due to unsteady transonic flow is important for aircraft noise reduction. In this work, the near-field impulsive noise due to transonic Blade Vortex Interaction (BVI) and oscillating flap is simulated numerically. These problems are modeled by the two-dimensional high frequency transonic small disturbance equation (VTRAN2 code). The three types of unsteady shock wave motion have been

  4. Utilizing parallel optimization in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkolaras, Michael

    1998-12-01

    General problems of interest in computational fluid dynamics are investigated by means of optimization. Specifically, in the first part of the dissertation, a method of optimal incremental function approximation is developed for the adaptive solution of differential equations. Various concepts and ideas utilized by numerical techniques employed in computational mechanics and artificial neural networks (e.g. function approximation and error minimization, variational principles and weighted residuals, and adaptive grid optimization) are combined to formulate the proposed method. The basis functions and associated coefficients of a series expansion, representing the solution, are optimally selected by a parallel direct search technique at each step of the algorithm according to appropriate criteria; the solution is built sequentially. In this manner, the proposed method is adaptive in nature, although a grid is neither built nor adapted in the traditional sense using a-posteriori error estimates. Variational principles are utilized for the definition of the objective function to be extremized in the associated optimization problems, ensuring that the problem is well-posed. Complicated data structures and expensive remeshing algorithms and systems solvers are avoided. Computational efficiency is increased by using low-order basis functions and concurrent computing. Numerical results and convergence rates are reported for a range of steady-state problems, including linear and nonlinear differential equations associated with general boundary conditions, and illustrate the potential of the proposed method. Fluid dynamics applications are emphasized. Conclusions are drawn by discussing the method's limitations, advantages, and possible extensions. The second part of the dissertation is concerned with the optimization of the viscous-inviscid-interaction (VII) mechanism in an airfoil flow analysis code. The VII mechanism is based on the concept of a transpiration velocity boundary condition, whose convergence to steady state is accelerated. The number of variables in the associated optimization problem is reduced by means of function approximation concepts to ensure high number of parallel processors to number of necessary function evaluations ratio. Numerical results are presented for the NACA-0012 and the supercritical RAE-2822 airfoils subject to transonic flow conditions using a parallel direct search technique. They exhibit a satisfactory level of accuracy. Speed-up depends on the number of available computational units and increases for more challenging flow conditions and airfoil geometries. The enhanced code constitutes a useful tool for airfoil flow analysis and design and an acceptable alternative to computationally expensive high fidelity codes.

  5. NWChem: scalable parallel computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, Hubertus JJ; De Jong, Wibe A.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Straatsma, TP; Valiev, Marat

    2011-11-01

    NWChem is a general purpose computational chemistry code specifically designed to run on distributed memory parallel computers. The core functionality of the code focuses on molecular dynamics, Hartree-Fock and density functional theory methods for both plane-wave basis sets as well as Gaussian basis sets, tensor contraction engine based coupled cluster capabilities and combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics descriptions. It was realized from the beginning that scalable implementations of these methods required a programming paradigm inherently different from what message passing approaches could offer. In response a global address space library, the Global Array Toolkit, was developed. The programming model it offers is based on using predominantly one-sided communication. This model underpins most of the functionality in NWChem and the power of it is exemplified by the fact that the code scales to tens of thousands of processors. In this paper the core capabilities of NWChem are described as well as their implementation to achieve an efficient computational chemistry code with high parallel scalability. NWChem is a modern, open source, computational chemistry code1 specifically designed for large scale parallel applications2. To meet the challenges of developing efficient, scalable and portable programs of this nature a particular code design was adopted. This code design involved two main features. First of all, the code is build up in a modular fashion so that a large variety of functionality can be integrated easily. Secondly, to facilitate writing complex parallel algorithms the Global Array toolkit was developed. This toolkit allows one to write parallel applications in a shared memory like approach, but offers additional mechanisms to exploit data locality to lower communication overheads. This framework has proven to be very successful in computational chemistry but is applicable to any engineering domain. Within the context created by the features above NWChem has grown into a general purpose computational chemistry code that supports a wide variety of energy expressions and capabilities to calculate properties based there upon. The main energy expressions are classical mechanics force fields, Hartree-Fock and DFT both for finite systems and condensed phase systems, coupled cluster, as well as QM/MM. For most energy expressions single point calculations, geometry optimizations, excited states, and other properties are available. Below we briefly discuss each of the main energy expressions and the critical points involved in scalable implementations thereof.

  6. Hydrogen and electricity: Parallels, interactions,and convergence

    E-print Network

    Yang, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    biomass would occur through the primary step of producing a syngas.biomass, or steam reforming of natural gas can be used to produce syngas.biomass can be processed at high temperature to make a synthetic gas or ‘‘syngas’’,

  7. Interacting Parallel Constructions of Knowledge in a CAS Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidron, Ivy; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2010-01-01

    We consider the influence of a CAS context on a learner's process of constructing a justification for the bifurcations in a logistic dynamical process. We describe how instrumentation led to cognitive constructions and how the roles of the learner and the CAS intertwine, especially close to the branching and combining of constructing actions. The…

  8. S: Interactive compliant mechanisms with parallel state computation Sheldon Andrews

    E-print Network

    Kry, Paul

    e-mail:sheldon.andrews@mail.mcgill.ca e-mail:marek@cm-labs.com e-mail:kry@cs.mcgill.ca important attention must be paid to the parameters of both the system and simulation to ensure stability. Our for virtual humans following the equilibrium point hypothesis of motor control, and in simulated robots using

  9. Parametric Study on the Mixing Enhancement of Parallel Supersonic-subsonic Wakes Using Wall Cavities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seong-Mok Moon; Se-Myong Chang; Chongam Kim

    2008-01-01

    A series of computational studies on the enhancement of parallel supersonic-subsonic mixing wakes, where M1 = 1.78 and M2 = 0.30 at baseline, is conducted and compared with available experimental data. The mixing problem of this parallel flow is characterized by the interaction of “complex” turbulent shear flow with acoustic waves emitted from a wall-mounted cavity. The first aim of the present work is

  10. State-space analysis on time-varying correlations in parallel spike sequences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hideaki Shimazaki; Shun-ichi Amari; Emery N. Brown; Sonja Grün

    2009-01-01

    A state-space method for simultaneously estimating time-dependent rate and higher-order correlation underlying parallel spike sequences is proposed. Discretized parallel spike sequences are modeled by a conditionally independent multivariate Bernoulli process using a log-linear link function, which contains a state of higher-order interaction factors. A nonlinear recursive filtering formula is derived from a log-quadratic approximation to the posterior distribution of the

  11. Parallel Lines Cut By A Transversal

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Neubert

    2010-09-28

    This project will help you to understand the different angles created by a transversal cutting across two parallel lines. Please watch for alternate exterior, alternate interior, consecutive, and corresponding angles. Here is an overview of the concepts that will be discussed in this lesson. Take notes.... Parallel Lines and the Angles they Create See if you understand these concepts by completing the following online practice page: Practice with Parallel Lines and Angles This activity from Class Zone will help you to further understand parallel line and perpendicular line theorems. Parallel and Perpendicular Lines Explore this website: Please notice that when you ...

  12. Implementation and performance of parallelized elegant.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Borland, M.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

    2008-01-01

    The program elegant is widely used for design and modeling of linacs for free-electron lasers and energy recovery linacs, as well as storage rings and other applications. As part of a multi-year effort, we have parallelized many aspects of the code, including single-particle dynamics, wakefields, and coherent synchrotron radiation. We report on the approach used for gradual parallelization, which proved very beneficial in getting parallel features into the hands of users quickly. We also report details of parallelization of collective effects. Finally, we discuss performance of the parallelized code in various applications.

  13. Instant well-log inversion with a parallel computer

    SciTech Connect

    Kimminau, S.J.; Trivedi, H.

    1993-08-01

    Well-log analysis requires several vectors of input data to be inverted with a physical model that produces more vectors of output data. The problem is inherently suited to either vectorization or parallelization. PLATO (parallel log analysis, timely output) is a research prototype system that uses a parallel architecture computer with memory-mapped graphics to invert vector data and display the result rapidly. By combining this high-performance computing and display system with a graphical user interface, the analyst can interact with the system in real time'' and can visualize the result of changing parameters on up to 1,000 levels of computed volumes and reconstructed logs. It is expected that such instant'' inversion will remove the main disadvantages frequently cited for simultaneous analysis methods, namely difficulty in assessing sensitivity to different parameters and slow output response. Although the prototype system uses highly specific features of a parallel processor, a subsequent version has been implemented on a conventional (Serial) workstation with less performance but adequate functionality to preserve the apparently instant response. PLATO demonstrates the feasibility of petroleum computing applications combining an intuitive graphical interface, high-performance computing of physical models, and real-time output graphics.

  14. Performance prediction for complex parallel applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, J. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Rechnerstrukturen und Betriebssysteme; Worley, P.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Today`s massively parallel machines are typically message-passing systems consisting of hundreds or thousands of processors. Implementing parallel applications efficiently in this environment is a challenging task, and poor parallel design decisions can be expensive to correct. Tools and techniques that allow the fast and accurate evaluation of different parallelization strategies would significantly improve the productivity of application developers and increase throughput on parallel architectures. This paper investigates one of the major issues in building tools to compare parallelization strategies: determining what type of performance models of the application code and of the computer system are sufficient for a fast and accurate comparison of different strategies. The paper is built around a case study employing the Performance Prediction Tool (PerPreT) to predict performance of the Parallel Spectral Transform Shallow Water Model code (PSTSWM) on the Intel Paragon. 13 refs., 6 tabs.

  15. Parallel ecological networks in ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Olff, Han; Alonso, David; Berg, Matty P.; Eriksson, B. Klemens; Loreau, Michel; Piersma, Theunis; Rooney, Neil

    2009-01-01

    In ecosystems, species interact with other species directly and through abiotic factors in multiple ways, often forming complex networks of various types of ecological interaction. Out of this suite of interactions, predator–prey interactions have received most attention. The resulting food webs, however, will always operate simultaneously with networks based on other types of ecological interaction, such as through the activities of ecosystem engineers or mutualistic interactions. Little is known about how to classify, organize and quantify these other ecological networks and their mutual interplay. The aim of this paper is to provide new and testable ideas on how to understand and model ecosystems in which many different types of ecological interaction operate simultaneously. We approach this problem by first identifying six main types of interaction that operate within ecosystems, of which food web interactions are one. Then, we propose that food webs are structured among two main axes of organization: a vertical (classic) axis representing trophic position and a new horizontal ‘ecological stoichiometry’ axis representing decreasing palatability of plant parts and detritus for herbivores and detrivores and slower turnover times. The usefulness of these new ideas is then explored with three very different ecosystems as test cases: temperate intertidal mudflats; temperate short grass prairie; and tropical savannah. PMID:19451126

  16. Parallel Many--Body Simulations Without All--to--All Communication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce Hendrickson; Steve Plimpton Sandia

    1993-01-01

    Simulations of interacting particles are common in science and engineering, appearing insuch diverse disciplines as astrophysics, fluid dynamics, molecular physics, and materials science.These simulations are often computationally intensive and so natural candidates for massivelyparallel computing. Many--body simulations that directly compute interactions between pairsof particles, be they short--range or long--range interactions, have been parallelized in severalstandard ways. The...

  17. Parallel Many-Body Simulations without All-to-All Communication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce Hendrickson; Steve Plimpton

    1995-01-01

    Simulations of interacting particles are common in science and engineering, appearing insuch diverse disciplines as astrophysics, fluid dynamics, molecular physics, and materials science.These simulations are often computationally intensive and so natural candidates for massivelyparallel computing. Many--body simulations that directly compute interactions between pairsof particles, be they short--range or long--range interactions, have been parallelized in severalstandard ways. The...

  18. Use Computer-Aided Tools to Parallelize Large CFD Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, H.; Frumkin, M.; Yan, J.

    2000-01-01

    Porting applications to high performance parallel computers is always a challenging task. It is time consuming and costly. With rapid progressing in hardware architectures and increasing complexity of real applications in recent years, the problem becomes even more sever. Today, scalability and high performance are mostly involving handwritten parallel programs using message-passing libraries (e.g. MPI). However, this process is very difficult and often error-prone. The recent reemergence of shared memory parallel (SMP) architectures, such as the cache coherent Non-Uniform Memory Access (ccNUMA) architecture used in the SGI Origin 2000, show good prospects for scaling beyond hundreds of processors. Programming on an SMP is simplified by working in a globally accessible address space. The user can supply compiler directives, such as OpenMP, to parallelize the code. As an industry standard for portable implementation of parallel programs for SMPs, OpenMP is a set of compiler directives and callable runtime library routines that extend Fortran, C and C++ to express shared memory parallelism. It promises an incremental path for parallel conversion of existing software, as well as scalability and performance for a complete rewrite or an entirely new development. Perhaps the main disadvantage of programming with directives is that inserted directives may not necessarily enhance performance. In the worst cases, it can create erroneous results. While vendors have provided tools to perform error-checking and profiling, automation in directive insertion is very limited and often failed on large programs, primarily due to the lack of a thorough enough data dependence analysis. To overcome the deficiency, we have developed a toolkit, CAPO, to automatically insert OpenMP directives in Fortran programs and apply certain degrees of optimization. CAPO is aimed at taking advantage of detailed inter-procedural dependence analysis provided by CAPTools, developed by the University of Greenwich, to reduce potential errors made by users. Earlier tests on NAS Benchmarks and ARC3D have demonstrated good success of this tool. In this study, we have applied CAPO to parallelize three large applications in the area of computational fluid dynamics (CFD): OVERFLOW, TLNS3D and INS3D. These codes are widely used for solving Navier-Stokes equations with complicated boundary conditions and turbulence model in multiple zones. Each one comprises of from 50K to 1,00k lines of FORTRAN77. As an example, CAPO took 77 hours to complete the data dependence analysis of OVERFLOW on a workstation (SGI, 175MHz, R10K processor). A fair amount of effort was spent on correcting false dependencies due to lack of necessary knowledge during the analysis. Even so, CAPO provides an easy way for user to interact with the parallelization process. The OpenMP version was generated within a day after the analysis was completed. Due to sequential algorithms involved, code sections in TLNS3D and INS3D need to be restructured by hand to produce more efficient parallel codes. An included figure shows preliminary test results of the generated OVERFLOW with several test cases in single zone. The MPI data points for the small test case were taken from a handcoded MPI version. As we can see, CAPO's version has achieved 18 fold speed up on 32 nodes of the SGI O2K. For the small test case, it outperformed the MPI version. These results are very encouraging, but further work is needed. For example, although CAPO attempts to place directives on the outer- most parallel loops in an interprocedural framework, it does not insert directives based on the best manual strategy. In particular, it lacks the support of parallelization at the multi-zone level. Future work will emphasize on the development of methodology to work in a multi-zone level and with a hybrid approach. Development of tools to perform more complicated code transformation is also needed.

  19. The Uses and Abuses of the Acoustic Analogy in Helicopter Rotor Noise Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Brentner, Kenneth S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper is theoretical in nature and addresses applications of the acoustic analogy in helicopter rotor noise prediction. It is argued that in many instances the acoustic analogy has not been used with care in rotor noise studies. By this it is meant that approximate or inappropriate formulations have been used. By considering various mechanisms of noise generation, such abuses are identified and the remedy is suggested. The mechanisms discussed are thickness, loading, quadrupole, and blade-vortex interaction noise. The quadrupole term of the Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation is written in a new form which separates the contributions of regions of high gradients such as shock surfaces. It is shown by order of magnitude studies that such regions are capable of producing noise with the same directivity as the thickness noise. The inclusion of this part of quadrupole sources in current acoustic codes is quite practical. Some of the difficulties with the use of loading noise formulations of the first author in predictions of blade-vortex interaction noise are discussed. It appears that there is a need for development of new theoretical results based on the acoustic analogy in this area. Because of the impulsive character of the blade surface pressure, a time scale of integration different from that used in loading and thickness computations must he used in a computer code for prediction of blade-vortex interaction noise.

  20. Interactive epistemology I: Knowledge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Aumann

    1999-01-01

    .   Formal Interactive Epistemology deals with the logic of knowledge and belief when there is more than one agent or “player.”\\u000a One is interested not only in each person's knowledge about substantive matters, but also in his knowledge about the others'\\u000a knowledge. This paper examines two parallel approaches to the subject. The first is the semantic approach, in which knowledge

  1. Interactive epistemology II: Probability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Aumann

    1999-01-01

    .   Formal Interactive Epistemology deals with the logic of knowledge and belief when there is more than one agent or “player.”\\u000a One is interested not only in each person's knowledge and beliefs about substantive matters, but also in his knowledge and\\u000a beliefs about the others' knowledge and beliefs. This paper examines two parallel approaches to the subject. The first is

  2. Parallel MRI at microtesla fields

    PubMed Central

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Volegov, Petr L.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Espy, Michelle A.; Mosher, John C.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Parallel imaging techniques have been widely used in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multiple receiver coils have been shown to improve image quality and allow accelerated image acquisition. Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-low fields (ULF MRI) is a new imaging approach that uses SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensors to measure the spatially encoded precession of pre-polarized nuclear spin populations at microtesla-range measurement fields. In this work, parallel imaging at microtesla fields is systematically studied for the first time. A seven-channel SQUID system, designed for both ULF MRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG), is used to acquire 3D images of a human hand, as well as 2D images of a large water phantom. The imaging is performed at 46 microtesla measurement field with pre-polarization at 40 mT. It is shown how the use of seven channels increases imaging field of view and improves signal-to-noise ratio for the hand images. A simple procedure for approximate correction of concomitant gradient artifacts is described. Noise propagation is analyzed experimentally, and the main source of correlated noise is identified. Accelerated imaging based on one-dimensional undersampling and 1D SENSE (sensitivity encoding) image reconstruction is studied in the case of the 2D phantom. Actual 3-fold imaging acceleration in comparison to single-average fully encoded Fourier imaging is demonstrated. These results show that parallel imaging methods are efficient in ULF MRI, and that imaging performance of SQUID-based instruments improves substantially as the number of channels is increased. PMID:18328753

  3. Parallel MRI at microtesla fields.

    PubMed

    Zotev, Vadim S; Volegov, Petr L; Matlashov, Andrei N; Espy, Michelle A; Mosher, John C; Kraus, Robert H

    2008-06-01

    Parallel imaging techniques have been widely used in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multiple receiver coils have been shown to improve image quality and allow accelerated image acquisition. Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-low fields (ULF MRI) is a new imaging approach that uses SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensors to measure the spatially encoded precession of pre-polarized nuclear spin populations at microtesla-range measurement fields. In this work, parallel imaging at microtesla fields is systematically studied for the first time. A seven-channel SQUID system, designed for both ULF MRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG), is used to acquire 3D images of a human hand, as well as 2D images of a large water phantom. The imaging is performed at 46 mu T measurement field with pre-polarization at 40 mT. It is shown how the use of seven channels increases imaging field of view and improves signal-to-noise ratio for the hand images. A simple procedure for approximate correction of concomitant gradient artifacts is described. Noise propagation is analyzed experimentally, and the main source of correlated noise is identified. Accelerated imaging based on one-dimensional undersampling and 1D SENSE (sensitivity encoding) image reconstruction is studied in the case of the 2D phantom. Actual threefold imaging acceleration in comparison to single-average fully encoded Fourier imaging is demonstrated. These results show that parallel imaging methods are efficient in ULF MRI, and that imaging performance of SQUID-based instruments improves substantially as the number of channels is increased. PMID:18328753

  4. Parallel MRI at microtesla fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotev, Vadim S.; Volegov, Petr L.; Matlashov, Andrei N.; Espy, Michelle A.; Mosher, John C.; Kraus, Robert H.

    2008-06-01

    Parallel imaging techniques have been widely used in high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multiple receiver coils have been shown to improve image quality and allow accelerated image acquisition. Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-low fields (ULF MRI) is a new imaging approach that uses SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) sensors to measure the spatially encoded precession of pre-polarized nuclear spin populations at microtesla-range measurement fields. In this work, parallel imaging at microtesla fields is systematically studied for the first time. A seven-channel SQUID system, designed for both ULF MRI and magnetoencephalography (MEG), is used to acquire 3D images of a human hand, as well as 2D images of a large water phantom. The imaging is performed at 46 ?T measurement field with pre-polarization at 40 mT. It is shown how the use of seven channels increases imaging field of view and improves signal-to-noise ratio for the hand images. A simple procedure for approximate correction of concomitant gradient artifacts is described. Noise propagation is analyzed experimentally, and the main source of correlated noise is identified. Accelerated imaging based on one-dimensional undersampling and 1D SENSE (sensitivity encoding) image reconstruction is studied in the case of the 2D phantom. Actual threefold imaging acceleration in comparison to single-average fully encoded Fourier imaging is demonstrated. These results show that parallel imaging methods are efficient in ULF MRI, and that imaging performance of SQUID-based instruments improves substantially as the number of channels is increased.

  5. High Performance Parallel Computational Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Craw, James M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At a recent press conference, NASA Administrator Dan Goldin encouraged NASA Ames Research Center to take a lead role in promoting research and development of advanced, high-performance computer technology, including nanotechnology. Manufacturers of leading-edge microprocessors currently perform large-scale simulations in the design and verification of semiconductor devices and microprocessors. Recently, the need for this intensive simulation and modeling analysis has greatly increased, due in part to the ever-increasing complexity of these devices, as well as the lessons of experiences such as the Pentium fiasco. Simulation, modeling, testing, and validation will be even more important for designing molecular computers because of the complex specification of millions of atoms, thousands of assembly steps, as well as the simulation and modeling needed to ensure reliable, robust and efficient fabrication of the molecular devices. The software for this capacity does not exist today, but it can be extrapolated from the software currently used in molecular modeling for other applications: semi-empirical methods, ab initio methods, self-consistent field methods, Hartree-Fock methods, molecular mechanics; and simulation methods for diamondoid structures. In as much as it seems clear that the application of such methods in nanotechnology will require powerful, highly powerful systems, this talk will discuss techniques and issues for performing these types of computations on parallel systems. We will describe system design issues (memory, I/O, mass storage, operating system requirements, special user interface issues, interconnects, bandwidths, and programming languages) involved in parallel methods for scalable classical, semiclassical, quantum, molecular mechanics, and continuum models; molecular nanotechnology computer-aided designs (NanoCAD) techniques; visualization using virtual reality techniques of structural models and assembly sequences; software required to control mini robotic manipulators for positional control; scalable numerical algorithms for reliability, verifications and testability. There appears no fundamental obstacle to simulating molecular compilers and molecular computers on high performance parallel computers, just as the Boeing 777 was simulated on a computer before manufacturing it.

  6. Parallel execution of portfolio optimization

    E-print Network

    Nuriyev, R

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of asset liability management (ALM) strategies especially for long term horizon is a crucial issue for banks, funds and insurance companies. Modern economic models, investment strategies and optimization criteria make ALM studies computationally very intensive task. It attracts attention to multiprocessor system and especially to the cheapest one: multi core PCs and PC clusters. In this article we are analyzing problem of parallel organization of portfolio optimization, results of using clusters for optimization and the most efficient cluster architecture for these kinds of tasks.

  7. Series-Parallel Combination Circuits

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kuphaldt, Tony R.

    Tony R. Kuphaldt is the creator of All About Circuits, a collection of online textbooks about circuits and electricity. The site is split into volumes, chapters, and topics to make finding and learning about these subjects convenient. Volume 1, Chapter 7: Series-Parallel Combination Circuits digs deeper into these circuits than Chapter 5. This chapter offers a step-by-step analysis technique in order to identify all changes in voltage and current. It also offers a set of detailed instructions for component failure analysis. All in all, this is a great resource for educators or students.

  8. Parallel Assembly of LIGA Components

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, T.R.; Feddema, J.T.

    1999-03-04

    In this paper, a prototype robotic workcell for the parallel assembly of LIGA components is described. A Cartesian robot is used to press 386 and 485 micron diameter pins into a LIGA substrate and then place a 3-inch diameter wafer with LIGA gears onto the pins. Upward and downward looking microscopes are used to locate holes in the LIGA substrate, pins to be pressed in the holes, and gears to be placed on the pins. This vision system can locate parts within 3 microns, while the Cartesian manipulator can place the parts within 0.4 microns.

  9. True Shear Parallel Plate Viscometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin; Kaukler, William

    2010-01-01

    This viscometer (which can also be used as a rheometer) is designed for use with liquids over a large temperature range. The device consists of horizontally disposed, similarly sized, parallel plates with a precisely known gap. The lower plate is driven laterally with a motor to apply shear to the liquid in the gap. The upper plate is freely suspended from a double-arm pendulum with a sufficiently long radius to reduce height variations during the swing to negligible levels. A sensitive load cell measures the shear force applied by the liquid to the upper plate. Viscosity is measured by taking the ratio of shear stress to shear rate.

  10. Distributed memory parallel computers and computational fluid dynamics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Roose; R. Vandriessche

    1993-01-01

    A tutorial on aspects of parallel computing that are important for the development of efficient parallel algorithms and software for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is presented. Some important concepts concerning distributed memory parallel computers and parallel algorithms and the parallelization of CFD algorithms on structured grids are given. Many techniques used in CFD are shown to be suited for parallelization.

  11. Single-cell mechanics: the parallel plates technique.

    PubMed

    Bufi, Nathalie; Durand-Smet, Pauline; Asnacios, Atef

    2015-01-01

    We describe here the parallel plates technique which enables quantifying single-cell mechanics, either passive (cell deformability) or active (whole-cell traction forces). Based on the bending of glass microplates of calibrated stiffness, it is easy to implement on any microscope, and benefits from protocols and equipment already used in biology labs (coating of glass slides, pipette pullers, micromanipulators, etc.). We first present the principle of the technique, the design and calibration of the microplates, and various surface coatings corresponding to different cell-substrate interactions. Then we detail the specific cell preparation for the assays, and the different mechanical assays that can be carried out. Finally, we discuss the possible technical simplifications and the specificities of each mechanical protocol, as well as the possibility of extending the use of the parallel plates to investigate the mechanics of cell aggregates or tissues. PMID:25640430

  12. Parallel computation of electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.K.

    1997-05-21

    The DSI3D code is designed to numerically solve electromagnetics problems involving complex objects by solving Maxwell`s curl equations in the time-domain and in three space dimensions. The code has been designed to run on the new parallel processing computers as well as on conventional serial computers. The DSI3D code is unique for the following reasons: It runs efficiently on a variety of parallel computers, Allows the use of unstructured non-orthogonal grids, Allows a variety of cell or element types, Reduces to be the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDID) method when orthogonal grids are used, Preserves charge or divergence locally (and globally), Is non- dissipative, and Is accurate for non-orthogonal grids. This method is derived using a Discrete Surface Integration (DSI) technique. As formulated, the DSI technique can be used with essentially arbitrary unstructured grids composed of convex polyhedral cells. This implementation of the DSI algorithm allows the use of unstructured grids that are composed of combinations of non-orthogonal hexahedrons, tetrahedrons, triangular prisms and pyramids. This algorithm reduces to the conventional FDTD method when applied on a structured orthogonal hexahedral grid.

  13. Characterizations of parallel complexity classes

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswaran, H.

    1986-01-01

    A new two-person pebble game that abstracts the control structure of many parallel algorithms is defined and studied. This game extends the two-person pebble game defined by Dymond and Tompa (JCSS, Vol. 30, no.2, 1985, pp. 149-161) in two ways: (a) the game is played on a Boolean circuit rather than on an unlabeled graph, and takes into consideration the types of the gates in the circuit, and (b) the two players' roles are completely symmetric. The new game is used to study the relationship between two natural parallel complexity classes, namely LOGCFL and AC/sup 1/. LOGCFL is the class of languages log space reducible to context-free languages. AC/sup 1/ is the class of languages accepted by an alternating Turning machine in space O(log n) and alternation depth O(log n). LOGCFL is a subclass of AC/sup 1/, but it is not known whether the inclusion is proper. For many problems in LOGCFL the algorithms that show their membership in that class also show their membership in AC/sup 1/. However, these algorithms do not use the full power of AC/sup 1/ computations. The two-person game defined here provides a model of computation in which this perceived difference can be quantified. This is done by characterizing the two classes using the same measures of resources in the game model.

  14. Enabling parallel computing in CRASH

    E-print Network

    Partl, Adrian M; Ciardi, Benedetta; Ferrara, Andrea; Müller, Volker

    2011-01-01

    We present the new parallel version (pCRASH2) of the cosmological radiative transfer code CRASH2 for distributed memory supercomputing facilities. The code is based on a static domain decomposition strategy inspired by geometric dilution of photons in the optical thin case that ensures a favourable performance speed-up with increasing number of computational cores. Linear speed-up is ensured as long as the number of radiation sources is equal to the number of computational cores or larger. The propagation of rays is segmented and rays are only propagated through one sub-domain per time step to guarantee an optimal balance between communication and computation. We have extensively checked pCRASH2 with a standardised set of test cases to validate the parallelisation scheme. The parallel version of CRASH2 can easily handle the propagation of radiation from a large number of sources and is ready for the extension of the ionisation network to species other than hydrogen and helium.

  15. Xyce parallel electronic simulator design.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornquist, Heidi K.; Rankin, Eric Lamont; Mei, Ting; Schiek, Richard Louis; Keiter, Eric Richard; Russo, Thomas V.

    2010-09-01

    This document is the Xyce Circuit Simulator developer guide. Xyce has been designed from the 'ground up' to be a SPICE-compatible, distributed memory parallel circuit simulator. While it is in many respects a research code, Xyce is intended to be a production simulator. As such, having software quality engineering (SQE) procedures in place to insure a high level of code quality and robustness are essential. Version control, issue tracking customer support, C++ style guildlines and the Xyce release process are all described. The Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator has been under development at Sandia since 1999. Historically, Xyce has mostly been funded by ASC, the original focus of Xyce development has primarily been related to circuits for nuclear weapons. However, this has not been the only focus and it is expected that the project will diversify. Like many ASC projects, Xyce is a group development effort, which involves a number of researchers, engineers, scientists, mathmaticians and computer scientists. In addition to diversity of background, it is to be expected on long term projects for there to be a certain amount of staff turnover, as people move on to different projects. As a result, it is very important that the project maintain high software quality standards. The point of this document is to formally document a number of the software quality practices followed by the Xyce team in one place. Also, it is hoped that this document will be a good source of information for new developers.

  16. Conservation of writhe helicity under anti-parallel reconnection

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Christian E.; Ricca, Renzo L.; Sumners, De Witt L.

    2015-01-01

    Reconnection is a fundamental event in many areas of science, from the interaction of vortices in classical and quantum fluids, and magnetic flux tubes in magnetohydrodynamics and plasma physics, to the recombination in polymer physics and DNA biology. By using fundamental results in topological fluid mechanics, the helicity of a flux tube can be calculated in terms of writhe and twist contributions. Here we show that the writhe is conserved under anti-parallel reconnection. Hence, for a pair of interacting flux tubes of equal flux, if the twist of the reconnected tube is the sum of the original twists of the interacting tubes, then helicity is conserved during reconnection. Thus, any deviation from helicity conservation is entirely due to the intrinsic twist inserted or deleted locally at the reconnection site. This result has important implications for helicity and energy considerations in various physical contexts. PMID:25820408

  17. Virtual reality visualization of parallel molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Disz, T.; Papka, M.; Stevens, R.; Pellegrino, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Taylor, V. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    1995-12-31

    When performing communications mapping experiments for massively parallel processors, it is important to be able to visualize the mappings and resulting communications. In a molecular dynamics model, visualization of the atom to atom interaction and the processor mappings provides insight into the effectiveness of the communications algorithms. The basic quantities available for visualization in a model of this type are the number of molecules per unit volume, the mass, and velocity of each molecule. The computational information available for visualization is the atom to atom interaction within each time step, the atom to processor mapping, and the energy resealing events. We use the CAVE (CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment) to provide interactive, immersive visualization experiences.

  18. Towards Distributed Memory Parallel Program Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D; Barany, G; Panas, T

    2008-06-17

    This paper presents a parallel attribute evaluation for distributed memory parallel computer architectures where previously only shared memory parallel support for this technique has been developed. Attribute evaluation is a part of how attribute grammars are used for program analysis within modern compilers. Within this work, we have extended ROSE, a open compiler infrastructure, with a distributed memory parallel attribute evaluation mechanism to support user defined global program analysis required for some forms of security analysis which can not be addressed by a file by file view of large scale applications. As a result, user defined security analyses may now run in parallel without the user having to specify the way data is communicated between processors. The automation of communication enables an extensible open-source parallel program analysis infrastructure.

  19. Linearly exact parallel closures for slab geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Jeong-Young; Held, Eric D. [Department of Physics, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322 (United States); Jhang, Hogun [National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Yeoeun-dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)] [National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Yeoeun-dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-15

    Parallel closures are obtained by solving a linearized kinetic equation with a model collision operator using the Fourier transform method. The closures expressed in wave number space are exact for time-dependent linear problems to within the limits of the model collision operator. In the adiabatic, collisionless limit, an inverse Fourier transform is performed to obtain integral (nonlocal) parallel closures in real space; parallel heat flow and viscosity closures for density, temperature, and flow velocity equations replace Braginskii's parallel closure relations, and parallel flow velocity and heat flow closures for density and temperature equations replace Spitzer's parallel transport relations. It is verified that the closures reproduce the exact linear response function of Hammett and Perkins [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 3019 (1990)] for Landau damping given a temperature gradient. In contrast to their approximate closures where the vanishing viscosity coefficient numerically gives an exact response, our closures relate the heat flow and nonvanishing viscosity to temperature and flow velocity (gradients)

  20. Multipactor saturation in parallel-plate waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorolla, E.; Mattes, M.

    2012-07-01

    The saturation stage of a multipactor discharge is considered of interest, since it can guide towards a criterion to assess the multipactor onset. The electron cloud under multipactor regime within a parallel-plate waveguide is modeled by a thin continuous distribution of charge and the equations of motion are calculated taking into account the space charge effects. The saturation is identified by the interaction of the electron cloud with its image charge. The stability of the electron population growth is analyzed and two mechanisms of saturation to explain the steady-state multipactor for voltages near above the threshold onset are identified. The impact energy in the collision against the metal plates decreases during the electron population growth due to the attraction of the electron sheet on the image through the initial plate. When this growth remains stable till the impact energy reaches the first cross-over point, the electron surface density tends to a constant value. When the stability is broken before reaching the first cross-over point the surface charge density oscillates chaotically bounded within a certain range. In this case, an expression to calculate the maximum electron surface charge density is found whose predictions agree with the simulations when the voltage is not too high.