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1

Efficiency of parallel direct optimization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tremendous progress has been made at the level of sequential computation in phylogenetics. However, little attention has been paid to parallel computation. Parallel computing is particularly suited to phylogenetics because of the many ways large computational problems can be broken into parts that can be analyzed concurrently. In this paper, we investigate the scaling factors and efficiency of random addition and tree refinement strategies using the direct optimization software, POY, on a small (10 slave processors) and a large (256 slave processors) cluster of networked PCs running LINUX. These algorithms were tested on several data sets composed of DNA and morphology ranging from 40 to 500 taxa. Various algorithms in POY show fundamentally different properties within and between clusters. All algorithms are efficient on the small cluster for the 40-taxon data set. On the large cluster, multibuilding exhibits excellent parallel efficiency, whereas parallel building is inefficient. These results are independent of data set size. Branch swapping in parallel shows excellent speed-up for 16 slave processors on the large cluster. However, there is no appreciable speed-up for branch swapping with the further addition of slave processors (>16). This result is independent of data set size. Ratcheting in parallel is efficient with the addition of up to 32 processors in the large cluster. This result is independent of data set size. c2001 The Willi Hennig Society.

Janies, D. A.; Wheeler, W. C.

2001-01-01

2

Parallel Processing in Visual Search Asymmetry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The difficulty of visual search may depend on assignment of the same visual elements as targets and distractors-search asymmetry. Easy C-in-O searches and difficult O-in-C searches are often associated with parallel and serial search, respectively. Here, the time course of visual search was measured for both tasks with speed-accuracy methods. The…

Dosher, Barbara Anne; Han, Songmei; Lu, Zhong-Lin

2004-01-01

3

Parallelized direct execution simulation of message-passing parallel programs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As massively parallel computers proliferate, there is growing interest in findings ways by which performance of massively parallel codes can be efficiently predicted. This problem arises in diverse contexts such as parallelizing computers, parallel performance monitoring, and parallel algorithm development. In this paper we describe one solution where one directly executes the application code, but uses a discrete-event simulator to model details of the presumed parallel machine such as operating system and communication network behavior. Because this approach is computationally expensive, we are interested in its own parallelization specifically the parallelization of the discrete-event simulator. We describe methods suitable for parallelized direct execution simulation of message-passing parallel programs, and report on the performance of such a system, Large Application Parallel Simulation Environment (LAPSE), we have built on the Intel Paragon. On all codes measured to date, LAPSE predicts performance well typically within 10 percent relative error. Depending on the nature of the application code, we have observed low slowdowns (relative to natively executing code) and high relative speedups using up to 64 processors.

Dickens, Phillip M.; Heidelberger, Philip; Nicol, David M.

1994-01-01

4

PARALLEL GREEDY RANDOMIZED ADAPTIVE SEARCH ...  

E-print Network

Dec 6, 2004 ... up of those elements that can be added to the current solution under construction without ...... The execution times of the independent parallel program executing ... processing a finite set of jobs on a finite set of machines.

2004-12-06

5

Asynchronous parallel pattern search for nonlinear optimization  

SciTech Connect

Parallel pattern search (PPS) can be quite useful for engineering optimization problems characterized by a small number of variables (say 10--50) and by expensive objective function evaluations such as complex simulations that take from minutes to hours to run. However, PPS, which was originally designed for execution on homogeneous and tightly-coupled parallel machine, is not well suited to the more heterogeneous, loosely-coupled, and even fault-prone parallel systems available today. Specifically, PPS is hindered by synchronization penalties and cannot recover in the event of a failure. The authors introduce a new asynchronous and fault tolerant parallel pattern search (AAPS) method and demonstrate its effectiveness on both simple test problems as well as some engineering optimization problems

P. D. Hough; T. G. Kolda; V. J. Torczon

2000-01-01

6

HOPSPACK: Hybrid Optimization Parallel Search Package.  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we describe the technical details of HOPSPACK (Hybrid Optimization Parallel SearchPackage), a new software platform which facilitates combining multiple optimization routines into asingle, tightly-coupled, hybrid algorithm that supports parallel function evaluations. The frameworkis designed such that existing optimization source code can be easily incorporated with minimalcode modification. By maintaining the integrity of each individual solver, the strengths and codesophistication of the original optimization package are retained and exploited.4

Gray, Genetha A.; Kolda, Tamara G.; Griffin, Joshua; Taddy, Matt; Martinez-Canales, Monica

2008-12-01

7

Exploiting Hybrid Parallelism in Web Search Engines  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the emergence of multi-core CPU (or Chip-level Multi- Processor -CMP-), it is essential to develop techniques that capitalize on CMP's advantages to speed up very demanding applications of parallel computing such as Web search engines. In particular, for this application and given the huge amount of computational resources deployed at data centers, it is of paramount importance to come

Carolina Bonacic; Carlos García; Mauricio Marín; Manuel Prieto; Francisco Tirado

2008-01-01

8

Parallel Mechanisms for Visual Search in Zebrafish  

PubMed Central

Parallel visual search mechanisms have been reported previously only in mammals and birds, and not animals lacking an expanded telencephalon such as bees. Here we report the first evidence for parallel visual search in fish using a choice task where the fish had to find a target amongst an increasing number of distractors. Following two-choice discrimination training, zebrafish were presented with the original stimulus within an increasing array of distractor stimuli. We found that zebrafish exhibit no significant change in accuracy and approach latency as the number of distractors increased, providing evidence of parallel processing. This evidence challenges theories of vertebrate neural architecture and the importance of an expanded telencephalon for the evolution of executive function. PMID:25353168

Proulx, Michael J.; Parker, Matthew O.; Tahir, Yasser; Brennan, Caroline H.

2014-01-01

9

Parallel search of strongly ordered game trees  

SciTech Connect

The alpha-beta algorithm forms the basis of many programs that search game trees. A number of methods have been designed to improve the utility of the sequential version of this algorithm, especially for use in game-playing programs. These enhancements are based on the observation that alpha beta is most effective when the best move in each position is considered early in the search. Trees that have this so-called strong ordering property are not only of practical importance but possess characteristics that can be exploited in both sequential and parallel environments. This paper draws upon experiences gained during the development of programs which search chess game trees. Over the past decade major enhancements of the alpha beta algorithm have been developed by people building game-playing programs, and many of these methods will be surveyed and compared here. The balance of the paper contains a study of contemporary methods for searching chess game trees in parallel, using an arbitrary number of independent processors. To make efficient use of these processors, one must have a clear understanding of the basic properties of the trees actually traversed when alpha-beta cutoffs occur. This paper provides such insights and concludes with a brief description of a refinement to a standard parallel search algorithm for this problem. 33 references.

Marsland, T.A.; Campbell, M.

1982-12-01

10

Parallel depth first search. Part I. Implementation  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a parallel formation of depth-first search which retains the storage efficiency of sequential depth-first search and can be mapped on to any MIMD architecture. To study its effectiveness it has been implemented to solve the 15-puzzle problem on three commercially available multiprocessors - Sequent Balance 21,000, the Intel Hypercube and BBN Butterfly. The authors have been able to achieve fairly linear speedup on Sequent up to 30 processors (the maximum configuration available) and on the Intel Hypercube and BBN Butterfly up to 128 processors (the maximum configurations available). Many researchers considered the ring architecture to be quite suitable for parallel depth-first search. Their experimental results show that hypercube and shared-memory architectures are significantly better. At the heart of their parallel formulation is a dynamic work distribution scheme that divides the work between different processors. The effectiveness of the parallel formulation is strongly influenced by the work distribution scheme and architectural features such as presence/absence of shared memory, the diameter of the network, relative speed of the communication network, etc. In a companion paper, they analyze the effectiveness of different load-balancing schemes and architectures, and also present new improved work distribution schemes.

Rao, V.N.; Kumar, V.

1987-12-01

11

Toward a Taxonomy of Parallel Tabu Search Heuristics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present a classification of parallel tabu search metaheuristicsbased, on the one hand, on the control and communication strategies used in thedesign of the parallel tabu search procedures and, on the other hand, on how the searchspace is partitionned. These criteria are then used to review the parallel tabu searchimplementations described in the literature. The taxonomy is

Teodor Gabriel Crainic; Michel Toulouse; Michel Gendreau

1997-01-01

12

Massively Parallel Direct Simulation of Multiphase Flow  

SciTech Connect

The authors understanding of multiphase physics and the associated predictive capability for multi-phase systems are severely limited by current continuum modeling methods and experimental approaches. This research will deliver an unprecedented modeling capability to directly simulate three-dimensional multi-phase systems at the particle-scale. The model solves the fully coupled equations of motion governing the fluid phase and the individual particles comprising the solid phase using a newly discovered, highly efficient coupled numerical method based on the discrete-element method and the Lattice-Boltzmann method. A massively parallel implementation will enable the solution of large, physically realistic systems.

COOK,BENJAMIN K.; PREECE,DALE S.; WILLIAMS,J.R.

2000-08-10

13

Parallel Monte-Carlo Tree Search with Simulation Servers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monte-Carlo tree search is a new best-first tree search algorithm that triggered a revolution in the computer Go world. Developing good parallel Monte-Carlo tree search algorithms is importan because single processor's performance cannot be expected to increase as used to. A novel parallel Monte-Carlo tree search algorithm is proposed. A tree searcher runs on a client computer and multiple Monte-Carlo

Hideki Kato; Ikuo Takeuchi

2010-01-01

14

Generalized quantum search with parallelism Robert M. Gingrich,1  

E-print Network

computing. In tandem with these hardware developments, there has been a parallel development of new quantum that a hybrid use of quantum computing and classical computing techniques can yield a performance that is better that connects the degree of parallelism with the expected computation time for k-parallel quantum search

Cerf, Nicolas

15

Parallel programming with message passing and directives  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors discuss methods for expressing and tuning the performance of parallel programs, using two programming models in the same program: distributed and shared memory. Such methods are important for anyone who uses these large machines for parallel programs as well as for those who study combinations of the two programming models. The article outlines applications in hydrology, computational chemistry,

S. W. Bova; C. P. Breshears; HENRY GABB; BOB KUHN; BILL MAGRO; RUDOLF EIGENMANN; GREG GAERTNER; STEFANO SALVINI; HOWARD SCOTT

2001-01-01

16

Automatic Generation of Directive-Based Parallel Programs for Shared Memory Parallel Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The shared-memory programming model is a very effective way to achieve parallelism on shared memory parallel computers. As great progress was made in hardware and software technologies, performance of parallel programs with compiler directives has demonstrated large improvement. The introduction of OpenMP directives, the industrial standard for shared-memory programming, has minimized the issue of portability. Due to its ease of programming and its good performance, the technique has become very popular. In this study, we have extended CAPTools, a computer-aided parallelization toolkit, to automatically generate directive-based, OpenMP, parallel programs. We outline techniques used in the implementation of the tool and present test results on the NAS parallel benchmarks and ARC3D, a CFD application. This work demonstrates the great potential of using computer-aided tools to quickly port parallel programs and also achieve good performance.

Jin, Hao-Qiang; Yan, Jerry; Frumkin, Michael

2000-01-01

17

Definition sets for the Direct Kinematics of Parallel Manipulators  

E-print Network

Definition sets for the Direct Kinematics of Parallel Manipulators Philippe WENGER, Damien CHABLAT several solutions to the direct kinematic problem without meeting a singularity, thus meaning newly defined sets. This study is illustrated all along the paper with a 3-RPR planar parallel

Boyer, Edmond

18

Direct Kinematic Mapping for General Planar Parallel Manipulators  

Microsoft Academic Search

Planar kinematic mapping yields a highly compact general symbolic uni- variate polynomial solution to direct kine- matics problems for all three legged, three degree of freedom planar parallel manipula- tors. Direct kinematics solutions of planar parallel robots with arbitrary mixed leg ar- chitecture are exposed for the first time. Cir- cle and line constraints in both the moving frame as

P. J. Zsombor-Murray

2002-01-01

19

Direct Kinematic Mapping for General Planar Parallel Manipulators  

E-print Network

Direct Kinematic Mapping for General Planar Parallel Manipulators P.J. Zsombor-Murray Dept Abstract: Planar kinematic mapping yields a highly compact general symbolic uni- variate polynomial manipula- tors. Direct kinematics solutions of planar parallel robots with arbitrary mixed leg ar

Hayes, John

20

Circuit Optimization Using Efficient Parallel Pattern Search  

E-print Network

it is shown how such a method can lead to powerful parallel optimization of these complex problems with significant runtime and quality advantages over the traditional sequential quadratic programming (SQP) method. It is also shown how design...

Narasimhan, Srinath S.

2011-08-08

21

Parallel Randomized State-Space Search  

Microsoft Academic Search

Model checkers search the space of possible program be- haviors to detect errors and to demonstrate their absence. Despite major advances in reduction and optimization tech- niques, state-space search can still become cost-prohibitive as program size and complexity increase. In this paper, we present a technique for dramatically improving the cost- effectiveness of state-space search techniques for error de- tection

Matthew B. Dwyer; Sebastian G. Elbaum; Suzette Person; Rahul Purandare

2007-01-01

22

Rapid Acquisition for Direct Sequence Spread-Spectrum Communications Using Parallel SAW Convolvers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a technique is described which uses multiple surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices in parallel to reduce the acquisition time of a direct sequence spread-spectrum communication system. Analysis of system performance in both the search and lock modes is presented, and key quantities such as probability of false alarm, probability of correct detection, mean dwell time, and mean

L. B. Milstein; J. Gevargiz; P. K. Das

1985-01-01

23

Seth Lemons (UNH) Parallel Best-First Search: Optimal and Suboptimal Solutions 1 / 39 Parallel Best-First Search: Optimal and Suboptimal Solutions  

E-print Network

Seth Lemons (UNH) Parallel Best-First Search: Optimal and Suboptimal Solutions ­ 1 / 39 Parallel Best-First Search: Optimal and Suboptimal Solutions Ethan Burns, Seth Lemons, Wheeler Ruml Rong Zhou Lemons (UNH) Parallel Best-First Search: Optimal and Suboptimal Solutions ­ 2 / 39 Now we

Ruml, Wheeler

24

Multi-directional local search  

PubMed Central

This paper introduces multi-directional local search, a metaheuristic for multi-objective optimization. We first motivate the method and present an algorithmic framework for it. We then apply it to several known multi-objective problems such as the multi-objective multi-dimensional knapsack problem, the bi-objective set packing problem and the bi-objective orienteering problem. Experimental results show that our method systematically provides solution sets of comparable quality with state-of-the-art methods applied to benchmark instances of these problems, within reasonable CPU effort. We conclude that the proposed algorithmic framework is a viable option when solving multi-objective optimization problems. PMID:25140071

Tricoire, Fabien

2012-01-01

25

Direct search for WIMP dark matter  

E-print Network

We will review the experimental aspects of the direct search for WIMP dark matter. In thin search, one looks in a terrestrial target for nuclear recoils produced by the impacts with WIMPs from the galatic halo. After describing the different search strategies and review the currently running experiments and the prospects of future experiments

J. Gascon

2005-04-11

26

Directional Dark Matter Search and Velocity Distribution  

E-print Network

Directional detection of dark matter is the next generation experiment, which is expected to have better back ground rejection efficiency than conventional direct search. Another intriguing possibility of the experiment by means of the directional information is measurement the velocity distribution of dark matter. Especially, it will be potent to figure out whether the velocity distribution is anisotropic. Supposing three distribution models, we discuss the possibility in one of the directional dark matter searches, nuclear emulsion detector.

Nagao, Keiko I

2014-01-01

27

Series-parallel method of direct solar array regulation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A 40 watt experimental solar array was directly regulated by shorting out appropriate combinations of series and parallel segments of a solar array. Regulation switches were employed to control the array at various set-point voltages between 25 and 40 volts. Regulation to within + or - 0.5 volt was obtained over a range of solar array temperatures and illumination levels as an active load was varied from open circuit to maximum available power. A fourfold reduction in regulation switch power dissipation was achieved with series-parallel regulation as compared to the usual series-only switching for direct solar array regulation.

Gooder, S. T.

1976-01-01

28

APHID: Asynchronous Parallel Game-Tree Search Mark G. Brockington and Jonathan Schaeffer  

E-print Network

APHID: Asynchronous Parallel Game-Tree Search Mark G. Brockington and Jonathan Schaeffer Department Head: APHID: Asynchronous Parallel Game-Tree Search Send Proofs To: Jonathan Schaeffer 615 General in determining the minimax value. APHID, a new asynchronous parallel game-tree search algorithm, is presented

Schaeffer, Jonathan

29

Direct simulation Monte Carlo analysis on parallel processors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method is presented for executing a direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) analysis using parallel processing. The method is based on using domain decomposition to distribute the work load among multiple processors, and the DSMC analysis is performed completely in parallel. Message passing is used to transfer molecules between processors and to provide the synchronization necessary for the correct physical simulation. Benchmark problems are described for testing the method and results are presented which demonstrate the performance on two commercially available multicomputers. The results show that reasonable parallel speedup and efficiency can be obtained if the problem is properly sized to the number of processors. It is projected that with a massively parallel system, performance exceeding that of current supercomputers is possible.

Wilmoth, Richard G.

1989-01-01

30

A Merit Function Approach for Direct Search  

E-print Network

Apr 18, 2013 ... In this paper it is proposed to equip direct-search methods with a ... In the case where there are no unrelaxable constraints, one can use a penalty term by adding .... (In particular, one might enter Restoration in the search step.) ...

2013-04-18

31

Efficient Parallel Algorithm For Direct Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Flows  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A distributed algorithm for a high-order-accurate finite-difference approach to the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of transition and turbulence in compressible flows is described. This work has two major objectives. The first objective is to demonstrate that parallel and distributed-memory machines can be successfully and efficiently used to solve computationally intensive and input/output intensive algorithms of the DNS class. The second objective is to show that the computational complexity involved in solving the tridiagonal systems inherent in the DNS algorithm can be reduced by algorithm innovations that obviate the need to use a parallelized tridiagonal solver.

Moitra, Stuti; Gatski, Thomas B.

1997-01-01

32

Asynchronous parallel generating set search for linearly-constrained optimization.  

SciTech Connect

Generating set search (GSS) is a family of direct search methods that encompasses generalized pattern search and related methods. We describe an algorithm for asynchronous linearly-constrained GSS, which has some complexities that make it different from both the asynchronous bound-constrained case as well as the synchronous linearly-constrained case. The algorithm has been implemented in the APPSPACK software framework and we present results from an extensive numerical study using CUTEr test problems. We discuss the results, both positive and negative, and conclude that GSS is a reliable method for solving small-to-medium sized linearly-constrained optimization problems without derivatives.

Lewis, Robert Michael (; ); Griffin, Joshua D.; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

2006-08-01

33

Synchronous tabu search parallelization strategies for multicommodity location-allocation with balancing requirements  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study and compare synchronous parallelization strategies for tabu search. We identify the most promising parallelization approaches, and evaluate the impact on performance and solution quality of some important algorithmic design parameters: length of the synchronization steps, number of processors, handling of exchanged information, etc. Parallelization approaches are implemented and compared by using a tabu search algorithm for multicommodity location-allocation

Teodor Gabriel Crainic; Michel Toulouse; Michel Gendreau

1995-01-01

34

Parallelization of sequential Gaussian, indicator and direct simulation algorithms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Improving the performance and robustness of algorithms on new high-performance parallel computing architectures is a key issue in efficiently performing 2D and 3D studies with large amount of data. In geostatistics, sequential simulation algorithms are good candidates for parallelization. When compared with other computational applications in geosciences (such as fluid flow simulators), sequential simulation software is not extremely computationally intensive, but parallelization can make it more efficient and creates alternatives for its integration in inverse modelling approaches. This paper describes the implementation and benchmarking of a parallel version of the three classic sequential simulation algorithms: direct sequential simulation (DSS), sequential indicator simulation (SIS) and sequential Gaussian simulation (SGS). For this purpose, the source used was GSLIB, but the entire code was extensively modified to take into account the parallelization approach and was also rewritten in the C programming language. The paper also explains in detail the parallelization strategy and the main modifications. Regarding the integration of secondary information, the DSS algorithm is able to perform simple kriging with local means, kriging with an external drift and collocated cokriging with both local and global correlations. SIS includes a local correction of probabilities. Finally, a brief comparison is presented of simulation results using one, two and four processors. All performance tests were carried out on 2D soil data samples. The source code is completely open source and easy to read. It should be noted that the code is only fully compatible with Microsoft Visual C and should be adapted for other systems/compilers.

Nunes, Ruben; Almeida, José A.

2010-08-01

35

Information-Limited Parallel Processing in Difficult Heterogeneous Covert Visual Search  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Difficult visual search is often attributed to time-limited serial attention operations, although neural computations in the early visual system are parallel. Using probabilistic search models (Dosher, Han, & Lu, 2004) and a full time-course analysis of the dynamics of covert visual search, we distinguish unlimited capacity parallel versus serial…

Dosher, Barbara Anne; Han, Songmei; Lu, Zhong-Lin

2010-01-01

36

Panel on future directions in parallel computer architecture  

SciTech Connect

One of the program highlights of the 15th Annual International Symposium on Computer Architecture, held May 30 - June 2, 1988 in Honolulu, was a panel session on future directions in parallel computer architecture. The panel was organized and chaired by the author, and was comprised of Prof. Jack Dennis (NASA Ames Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science), Prof. H.T. Kung (Carnegie Mellon), and Dr. Burton Smith (Tera Computer Company). The objective of the panel was to identify the likely trajectory of future parallel computer system progress, particularly from the sandpoint of marketplace acceptance. Approximately 250 attendees participated in the session, in which each panelist began with a ten minute viewgraph explanation of his views, followed by an open and sometimes lively exchange with the audience and fellow panelists. The session ran for ninety minutes.

VanTilborg, A.M. (Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA (USA))

1989-06-01

37

Direct drive digital servo press with high parallel control  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Direct drive digital servo press has been developed as the university-industry joint research and development since 1998. On the basis of this result, 4-axes direct drive digital servo press has been developed and in the market on April of 2002. This servo press is composed of 1 slide supported by 4 ball screws and each axis has linearscale measuring the position of each axis with high accuracy less than ?m order level. Each axis is controlled independently by servo motor and feedback system. This system can keep high level parallelism and high accuracy even with high eccentric load. Furthermore the 'full stroke full power' is obtained by using ball screws. Using these features, new various types of press forming and stamping have been obtained by development and production. The new stamping and forming methods are introduced and 'manufacturing' need strategy of press forming with high added value and also the future direction of press forming are also introduced.

Murata, Chikara; Yabe, Jun; Endou, Junichi; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi

2013-12-01

38

Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer  

DOEpatents

Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

Blocksome, Michael A; Mamidala, Amith R

2014-02-11

39

Parallel processing of shape and texture in haptic search.  

PubMed

In a haptic search task, one has to determine the presence of a target among distractors. It has been shown that if the target differs from the distractors in two properties, shape and texture, performance is better than in both single-property conditions (Van Polanen, Bergmann Tiest, & Kappers, 2013). The search for a smooth sphere among rough cubical distractors was faster than both the searches for a rough sphere (shape information only) and for a smooth cube (texture information only). This effect was replicated in this study as a baseline. The main focus here was to further investigate the nature of this integration. It was shown that performance is better when the two properties are combined in a single target (smooth sphere), than when located in two separate targets (rough sphere and smooth cube) that are simultaneously present. A race model that assumes independent parallel processing of the two properties could explain the enhanced performance with two properties, but this could only take place effectively when the two properties were located in a single target. PMID:24816269

van Polanen, Vonne; Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M; Kappers, Astrid M L

2014-07-01

40

Direct Policy Search using Paired Statistical Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Direct policy search is a practical way to solve reinforcement learning problems involving continuous state and action spaces. The goal becomes finding policy parameters that maximize a noisy objective function. The Pegasus method converts this stochastic optimization problem into a deterministic one, by using fixed start states and fixed random number sequences for comparing policies (Ng & Jordan, 1999). We

Malcolm J. A. Strens; Andrew W. Moore

2001-01-01

41

Visual Motion-Detection Circuits in Flies: Parallel Direction-and Non-Direction-Sensitive Pathways between the Medulla and  

E-print Network

Visual Motion-Detection Circuits in Flies: Parallel Direction- and Non-Direction-Sensitive Pathways into parallel retinotopic pathways that subsequently are reunited at higher levels. In insects, achromatic to the lobula. Further parallel subdivisions of the retinotopic pathways to the lobula plate have been suggested

Bermingham, Eldredge

42

Exploiting Parallelism to Accelerate Keyword Search On Deep-web Sources  

E-print Network

Exploiting Parallelism to Accelerate Keyword Search On Deep-web Sources Tantan Liu Fan Wang Gagan,wangfa,agrawal}@cse.ohio-state.edu Abstract. Increasingly, biological data is being shared over the deep web. Many biological queries can only that exploits parallelization for accelerating search over multiple deep web data sources. An interactive, two

Agrawal, Gagan

43

Scalability study of parallel spatial direct numerical simulation code on IBM SP1 parallel supercomputer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation and the performance of a parallel spatial direct numerical simulation (PSDNS) code are reported for the IBM SP1 supercomputer. The spatially evolving disturbances that are associated with laminar-to-turbulent in three-dimensional boundary-layer flows are computed with the PS-DNS code. By remapping the distributed data structure during the course of the calculation, optimized serial library routines can be utilized that substantially increase the computational performance. Although the remapping incurs a high communication penalty, the parallel efficiency of the code remains above 40% for all performed calculations. By using appropriate compile options and optimized library routines, the serial code achieves 52-56 Mflops on a single node of the SP1 (45% of theoretical peak performance). The actual performance of the PSDNS code on the SP1 is evaluated with a 'real world' simulation that consists of 1.7 million grid points. One time step of this simulation is calculated on eight nodes of the SP1 in the same time as required by a Cray Y/MP for the same simulation. The scalability information provides estimated computational costs that match the actual costs relative to changes in the number of grid points.

Hanebutte, Ulf R.; Joslin, Ronald D.; Zubair, Mohammad

1994-01-01

44

The perfect search engine is not enough: a study of orienteering behavior in directed search  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a modified diary study that investigated how people performed personally motivated searches in their email, in their files, and on the Web. Although earlier studies of directed search focused on keyword search, most of the search behavior we observed did not involve keyword search. Instead of jumping directly to their information target using keywords, our participants navigated

Jaime Teevan; Christine Alvarado; Mark S. Ackerman; David R. Karger

2004-01-01

45

The LUX direct dark matter search experiment  

E-print Network

The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) experiment completed its first physics run in 2013, taking 85.3 live-days of WIMP-search data, and produced the world's most stringent constraints on spin-independent scattering of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) to date. A profile-likelihood analysis technique shows the data to be consistent with the background-only hypothesis. The LUX data are in strong disagreement with low-mass WIMP signal interpretations of the results from several recent direct detection experiments.

Ghag, Chamkaur

2014-01-01

46

A directed search for extraterrestrial laser signals  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The focus of NASA's Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Program is on microwave frequencies, where receivers have the best sensitivities for the detection of narrowband signals. Such receivers, when coupled to existing radio telescopes, form an optimal system for broad area searches over the sky. For a directed search, however, such as toward specific stars, calculations show that infrared wavelengths can be equally as effective as radio wavelengths for establishing an interstellar communication link. This is true because infrared telescopes have higher directivities (gains) that effectively compensate for the lower sensitivities of infrared receivers. The result is that, for a given level of transmitted power, the signal to noise ratio for communications is equally as good at infrared and radio wavelengths. It should also be noted that the overall sensitivities of both receiver systems are quite close to their respective fundamental limits: background thermal noise for the radio frequency system and quantum noise for the infrared receiver. Consequently, the choice of an optimum communication frequency may well be determined more by the achievable power levels of transmitters rather than the ultimate sensitivities of receivers at any specific frequency. In the infrared, CO2 laser transmitters with power levels greater than 1 MW can already be built on Earth. For a slightly more advanced civilization, a similar but enormously more powerful laser may be possible using a planetary atmosphere rich in CO2. Because of these possibilities and our own ignorance of what is really the optimum search frequency, a search for narrowband signals at infrared frequencies should be a part of a balanced SETI Program. Detection of narrowband infrared signals is best done with a heterodyne receiver functionally identical to a microwave spectral line receiver. We have built such a receiver for the detection of CO2 laser radiation at wavelengths near 10 microns. The spectrometer uses a high-speed HgCdTe diode as the photomixer and a small CO2 laser as the local oscillator. Output signals in the intermediate frequency range 0.1-2.6 GHz are processed by a 1000-channel acousto-optic signal processor. The receiver is being used on a 1.5-m telescope on Mt. Wilson to survey a selected sample of 150 nearby stars. The current status of the work is discussed along with future project plans.

Betz, A.

1991-01-01

47

Oriented modulation for watermarking in direct binary search halftone images.  

PubMed

In this paper, a halftoning-based watermarking method is presented. This method enables high pixel-depth watermark embedding, while maintaining high image quality. This technique is capable of embedding watermarks with pixel depths up to 3 bits without causing prominent degradation to the image quality. To achieve high image quality, the parallel oriented high-efficient direct binary search (DBS) halftoning is selected to be integrated with the proposed orientation modulation (OM) method. The OM method utilizes different halftone texture orientations to carry different watermark data. In the decoder, the least-mean-square-trained filters are applied for feature extraction from watermarked images in the frequency domain, and the naïve Bayes classifier is used to analyze the extracted features and ultimately to decode the watermark data. Experimental results show that the DBS-based OM encoding method maintains a high degree of image quality and realizes the processing efficiency and robustness to be adapted in printing applications. PMID:22581134

Guo, Jing-Ming; Su, Chang-Cheng; Liu, Yun-Fu; Lee, Hua; Lee, Jiann-Der

2012-09-01

48

Direct binary search (DBS) algorithm with constraints  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we describe adding constraints to the Direct Binary Search (DBS) algorithm. An example of a useful constraint, illustrated in this paper, is having only one dot per column and row. DBS with such constraints requires greater than two toggles during each trial operation. Implementations of the DBS algorithm traditionally limit operations to either one toggle or swap during each trial. The example case in this paper produces a wrap-around pattern with uniformly distributed ON pixels which will have a pleasing appearance with precisely one ON pixel per each column and row. The algorithm starts with an initial continuous tone image and an initial pattern having only one ON pixel per column and row. The auto correlation function of Human Visual System (HVS) model is determined along with an initial perceived error. Multiple operation pixel error processing during each iteration is used to enforce the one ON pixel per column and row constraint. The constraint of a single ON pixel per column and row is used as an example in this paper. Further modification of the DBS algorithm for other constraints is possible, based on the details given in the paper. A mathematical framework to extend the algorithm to the more general case of Direct Multi-bit Search (DMS) is presented.

Chandu, Kartheek; Stanich, Mikel; Wu, Chai Wah; Trager, Barry

2013-02-01

49

Parallel R-Point Explicit Block Method for Solving Second Order Ordinary Differential Equations Directly  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new parallel R-point explicit block method for solving second order ordinary differential equations (ODEs) directly is developed. The method computes the numerical solution of the equations at three points simultaneously. Each problem was tested on the shared memory parallel computer Sequent S27 using both the sequential and parallel implementations of the new method and the conventional 1-point method. Numerical

Z. Omar; Mohd Yazid Saman; David J. Evans

2002-01-01

50

Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies Direct and Indirect Search  

E-print Network

Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies Direct and Indirect Search for Dark Matter Piotr Direct and indirect searches for dark matter (DM) particles are discussed. The search for a diffuse of Abbreviations xi Acknowledgements xv Introduction 1 1 Dark Matter 4 1.1 Dark Matter in the Universe

Tokyo, University of

51

Dynamic resolution: A runtime technique for the parallelization of modifications to directed acyclic graphs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Static program analysis limits the performance improvements possible from compile-time parallelization.Dynamic parallelization shifts a portion of the analysis from compile-time to runtime, thereby enabling optimizations whose static detection is overly\\u000a expensive or impossible.Dynamic resolution is a dynamic-parallelization technique for finding loop and nonloop parallelism in imperative, sequential programs that destructively\\u000a manipulate dynamic directed acyclic graphs (DAGs). Dynamic resolution uses runtime

Lorenz Huelsbergen

1997-01-01

52

Mining query logs to optimize index partitioning in parallel web search engines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large-scale Parallel Web Search Engines (WSEs) needs to adopt a strategy for partitioning the inverted index among a set of parallel server nodes. In this paper we are interested in devising an eective term-partitioning strategy, according to which the global vo- cabulary of terms and the associated inverted lists are split into disjoint subsets, and assigned to distinct servers. Due

Claudio Lucchese; Salvatore Orlando; Raffaele Perego; Fabrizio Silvestri

2007-01-01

53

Nonlinearly-constrained optimization using asynchronous parallel generating set search.  

SciTech Connect

Many optimization problems in computational science and engineering (CS&E) are characterized by expensive objective and/or constraint function evaluations paired with a lack of derivative information. Direct search methods such as generating set search (GSS) are well understood and efficient for derivative-free optimization of unconstrained and linearly-constrained problems. This paper addresses the more difficult problem of general nonlinear programming where derivatives for objective or constraint functions are unavailable, which is the case for many CS&E applications. We focus on penalty methods that use GSS to solve the linearly-constrained problems, comparing different penalty functions. A classical choice for penalizing constraint violations is {ell}{sub 2}{sup 2}, the squared {ell}{sub 2} norm, which has advantages for derivative-based optimization methods. In our numerical tests, however, we show that exact penalty functions based on the {ell}{sub 1}, {ell}{sub 2}, and {ell}{sub {infinity}} norms converge to good approximate solutions more quickly and thus are attractive alternatives. Unfortunately, exact penalty functions are discontinuous and consequently introduce theoretical problems that degrade the final solution accuracy, so we also consider smoothed variants. Smoothed-exact penalty functions are theoretically attractive because they retain the differentiability of the original problem. Numerically, they are a compromise between exact and {ell}{sub 2}{sup 2}, i.e., they converge to a good solution somewhat quickly without sacrificing much solution accuracy. Moreover, the smoothing is parameterized and can potentially be adjusted to balance the two considerations. Since many CS&E optimization problems are characterized by expensive function evaluations, reducing the number of function evaluations is paramount, and the results of this paper show that exact and smoothed-exact penalty functions are well-suited to this task.

Griffin, Joshua D.; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

2007-05-01

54

Direct Dark Matter Search with XENON100  

E-print Network

The XENON100 experiment is the second phase of the XENON program for the direct detection of the dark matter in the universe. The XENON100 detector is a two-phase Time Projection Chamber filled with 161 kg of ultra pure liquid xenon. The results from 224.6 live days of dark matter search with XENON100 are presented. No evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs is found, excluding spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross sections above 2 $\\times$ 10$^{-45}$ cm$^2$ for a 55 GeV/c$^2$ WIMP at 90% confidence level (C.L.). The most stringent limit is established on the spin-dependent WIMP-neutron interaction for WIMP masses above 6 GeV/c$^2$, with a minimum cross section of 3.5 $\\times$ 10$^{-40}$ cm$^2$ (90% C.L.) for a 45 GeV/c$^2$ WIMP. The same dataset is used to search for axions and axion-like-particles. The best limits to date are set on the axion-electron coupling constant for solar axions, $g_{Ae}$ < 7.7 $\\times$ 10$^{-12}$ (90% C.L.), and for axion-like-particles, $g_{Ae}$ < 1 $\\times$ 10...

Orrigo, S E A

2015-01-01

55

Direct Dark Matter Search with XENON100  

E-print Network

The XENON100 experiment is the second phase of the XENON program for the direct detection of the dark matter in the universe. The XENON100 detector is a two-phase Time Projection Chamber filled with 161 kg of ultra pure liquid xenon. The results from 224.6 live days of dark matter search with XENON100 are presented. No evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs is found, excluding spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross sections above 2 $\\times$ 10$^{-45}$ cm$^2$ for a 55 GeV/c$^2$ WIMP at 90% confidence level (C.L.). The most stringent limit is established on the spin-dependent WIMP-neutron interaction for WIMP masses above 6 GeV/c$^2$, with a minimum cross section of 3.5 $\\times$ 10$^{-40}$ cm$^2$ (90% C.L.) for a 45 GeV/c$^2$ WIMP. The same dataset is used to search for axions and axion-like-particles. The best limits to date are set on the axion-electron coupling constant for solar axions, $g_{Ae}$ < 7.7 $\\times$ 10$^{-12}$ (90% C.L.), and for axion-like-particles, $g_{Ae}$ < 1 $\\times$ 10$^{-12}$ (90% C.L.) for masses between 5 and 10 keV/c$^2$.

S. E. A. Orrigo; for the XENON Collaboration

2015-01-14

56

DIRECT EMULATION OF CONTROL STRUCTURES BY A PARALLEL MICRO-COMPUTER  

E-print Network

SLAC-127 UC-32 W=C) DIRECT EMULATION OF CONTROL STRUCTURES BY A PARALLEL MICRO-COMPUTER VICTOR R is a preliminary investigation of the organization of a parallel micro-computer designed to emulate a wide variety of an emulator so that it directly emulates (mirrors) the control structure of the computer to be emulated

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

57

PNBA*: A Parallel Bidirectional Heuristic Search Algorithm Luis Henrique Oliveira Rios1  

E-print Network

PNBA*: A Parallel Bidirectional Heuristic Search Algorithm Luis Henrique Oliveira Rios1 , Luiz Chaimowicz1 1 Departamento de Ci^encia da Computac¸~ao Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG) ­ Belo Horizonte, MG ­ Brasil {lhrios,chaimo}@dcc.ufmg.br Abstract. A* (A-star) is a heuristic search algorithm

Chaimowicz, Luiz

58

The APHID Parallel Search Algorithm Mark G. Brockington and Jonathan Schaeffer  

E-print Network

The APHID Parallel Search Algorithm Mark G. Brockington and Jonathan Schaeffer Department@cs.ualberta.ca Abstract This paper introduces the APHID (Asynchronous Par- allel Hierarchical Iterative Deepening) game-tree search algorithm. APHID represents a departure from the ap- proaches used in practice. Instead

Schaeffer, Jonathan

59

Searching for an axis-parallel shoreline Elmar Langetepe  

E-print Network

path |Ol| O l pl l Dec. 19th 2010 Searching for a shoreline c Elmar Langetepe COCOA '10 2 #12;Searching at pl, shortest path |Ol| · Competitive ratio: Performance C := supl | pl O | |Ol| O l pl l | pl O| |Ol at pl, shortest path |Ol| · Competitive ratio: Performance C := supl | pl O | |Ol| worst-case! O l pl l

Eckmiller, Rolf

60

When the Lowest Energy Does Not Induce Native Structures: Parallel Minimization of Multi-Energy Values by Hybridizing Searching Intelligences  

PubMed Central

Background Protein structure prediction (PSP), which is usually modeled as a computational optimization problem, remains one of the biggest challenges in computational biology. PSP encounters two difficult obstacles: the inaccurate energy function problem and the searching problem. Even if the lowest energy has been luckily found by the searching procedure, the correct protein structures are not guaranteed to obtain. Results A general parallel metaheuristic approach is presented to tackle the above two problems. Multi-energy functions are employed to simultaneously guide the parallel searching threads. Searching trajectories are in fact controlled by the parameters of heuristic algorithms. The parallel approach allows the parameters to be perturbed during the searching threads are running in parallel, while each thread is searching the lowest energy value determined by an individual energy function. By hybridizing the intelligences of parallel ant colonies and Monte Carlo Metropolis search, this paper demonstrates an implementation of our parallel approach for PSP. 16 classical instances were tested to show that the parallel approach is competitive for solving PSP problem. Conclusions This parallel approach combines various sources of both searching intelligences and energy functions, and thus predicts protein conformations with good quality jointly determined by all the parallel searching threads and energy functions. It provides a framework to combine different searching intelligence embedded in heuristic algorithms. It also constructs a container to hybridize different not-so-accurate objective functions which are usually derived from the domain expertise. PMID:23028708

Lü, Qiang; Xia, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Rong; Miao, Da-Jun; Chen, Sha-Sha; Quan, Li-Jun; Li, Hai-Ou

2012-01-01

61

GRAPES: a software for parallel searching on biological graphs targeting multi-core architectures.  

PubMed

Biological applications, from genomics to ecology, deal with graphs that represents the structure of interactions. Analyzing such data requires searching for subgraphs in collections of graphs. This task is computationally expensive. Even though multicore architectures, from commodity computers to more advanced symmetric multiprocessing (SMP), offer scalable computing power, currently published software implementations for indexing and graph matching are fundamentally sequential. As a consequence, such software implementations (i) do not fully exploit available parallel computing power and (ii) they do not scale with respect to the size of graphs in the database. We present GRAPES, software for parallel searching on databases of large biological graphs. GRAPES implements a parallel version of well-established graph searching algorithms, and introduces new strategies which naturally lead to a faster parallel searching system especially for large graphs. GRAPES decomposes graphs into subcomponents that can be efficiently searched in parallel. We show the performance of GRAPES on representative biological datasets containing antiviral chemical compounds, DNA, RNA, proteins, protein contact maps and protein interactions networks. PMID:24167551

Giugno, Rosalba; Bonnici, Vincenzo; Bombieri, Nicola; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Ferro, Alfredo; Shasha, Dennis

2013-01-01

62

GRAPES: A Software for Parallel Searching on Biological Graphs Targeting Multi-Core Architectures  

PubMed Central

Biological applications, from genomics to ecology, deal with graphs that represents the structure of interactions. Analyzing such data requires searching for subgraphs in collections of graphs. This task is computationally expensive. Even though multicore architectures, from commodity computers to more advanced symmetric multiprocessing (SMP), offer scalable computing power, currently published software implementations for indexing and graph matching are fundamentally sequential. As a consequence, such software implementations (i) do not fully exploit available parallel computing power and (ii) they do not scale with respect to the size of graphs in the database. We present GRAPES, software for parallel searching on databases of large biological graphs. GRAPES implements a parallel version of well-established graph searching algorithms, and introduces new strategies which naturally lead to a faster parallel searching system especially for large graphs. GRAPES decomposes graphs into subcomponents that can be efficiently searched in parallel. We show the performance of GRAPES on representative biological datasets containing antiviral chemical compounds, DNA, RNA, proteins, protein contact maps and protein interactions networks. PMID:24167551

Bombieri, Nicola; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Ferro, Alfredo; Shasha, Dennis

2013-01-01

63

Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-162 Directions in Multiple Device Parallel Acceleration for High Performance  

E-print Network

0 Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-162 Directions in Multiple Device Parallel Acceleration) and other devices have proved a valuable mechanism to speed up many applica- tions using a data-parallel programming model that can accelerate a conventional CPU. It is becoming economically viable to host multiple

Hawick, Ken

64

Direct stereo radargrammetric processing using massively parallel processing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) offers many ways to reconstruct digital surface models (DSMs). The two most commonly used methods are SAR interferometry (InSAR) and stereo radargrammetry. Stereo radargrammetry is a very stable and reliable process and is far less affected by temporal decorrelation compared with InSAR. It is therefore often used for DSM generation in heavily vegetated areas. However, stereo radargrammetry often produces rather noisy DSMs, sometimes containing large outliers. In this manuscript, we present a new approach for stereo radargrammetric processing, where the homologous points between the images are found by geocoding large amount of points. This offers a very flexible approach, allowing the simultaneous processing of multiple images and of cross-heading image pairs. Our approach relies on a good initial geocoding accuracy of the data and on very fast processing using a massively parallel implementation. The approach is demonstrated using TerraSAR-X images from Mount Song, China, and from Trento, Italy.

Balz, Timo; Zhang, Lu; Liao, Mingsheng

2013-05-01

65

Parallel input parallel output high voltage bi-directional converters for driving dielectric electro active polymer actuators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dielectric electroactive polymer (DEAP) actuators are capacitive devices which provide mechanical motions when charged electrically. The charging characteristics of a DEAP actuator depends on its size, voltage applied to its electrodes, and its operating frequency. The main idea of this paper is to design and implement driving circuits for the DEAP actuators for their use in various applications. This paper presents implementation of parallel input, parallel output, high voltage (~2.5 kV) bi-directional DC-DC converters for driving the DEAP actuators. The topology is a bidirectional flyback DC-DC converter incorporating commercially available high voltage MOSFETs (4 kV) and high voltage diodes (5 kV). Although the average current of the aforementioned devices is limited to 300 mA and 150 mA, respectively, connecting the outputs of multiple converters in parallel can provide a scalable design. This enables operating the DEAP actuators in various static and dynamic applications e.g. positioning, vibration generation or damping, and pumps. The proposed idea is experimentally verified by connecting three high voltage converters in parallel to operate a single DEAP actuator. The experimental results with both film capacitive load and the DEAP actuator are shown for a maximum charging voltage of 2 kV.

Thummala, P.; Zhang, Z.; Andersen, M. A. E.; Rahimullah, S.

2014-03-01

66

Tree and local search for parallel machine scheduling problems with precedence constraints and setup times  

E-print Network

,artigues,lopez}@laas.fr Keywords: Parallel machine scheduling, setup times, precedence constraints, limited discrepancy search times, considered when dierents jobs are sequenced on the same machine, must be respected machine. The machine can process no more than one job at a time. The decision variables of the problem

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

67

Parallel Large-Neighborhood Search Techniques for LNG Inventory ...  

E-print Network

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is estimated to account for a growing portion of the ..... Eqs. (2)-(4) are network-flow conservation constraints for each ship. ... since it achieves better utilization of the computational resources which directly impacts.

2014-04-17

68

Architecture, implementation and parallelization of the software to search for periodic gravitational wave signals  

E-print Network

The parallelization, design and scalability of the \\sky code to search for periodic gravitational waves from rotating neutron stars is discussed. The code is based on an efficient implementation of the F-statistic using the Fast Fourier Transform algorithm. To perform an analysis of data from the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave detectors' network, which will start operating in 2015, hundreds of millions of CPU hours will be required - the code utilizing the potential of massively parallel supercomputers is therefore mandatory. We have parallelized the code using the Message Passing Interface standard, implemented a mechanism for combining the searches at different sky-positions and frequency bands into one extremely scalable program. The parallel I/O interface is used to escape bottlenecks, when writing the generated data into file system. This allowed to develop a highly scalable computation code, which would enable the data analysis at large scales on acceptable time scales. Benchmarking of the code on a Cray XE6 system was performed to show efficiency of our parallelization concept and to demonstrate scaling up to 50 thousand cores in parallel.

Gevorg Poghosyan; Sanchit Matta; Achim Streit; Micha? Bejger; Andrzej Królak

2014-10-14

69

Directed search for continuous gravitational waves from the Galactic center  

E-print Network

We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO’s fifth science run from two LIGO ...

Aggarwal, Nancy

70

Attentional Control via Parallel Target-Templates in Dual-Target Search  

PubMed Central

Simultaneous search for two targets has been shown to be slower and less accurate than independent searches for the same two targets. Recent research suggests this ‘dual-target cost’ may be attributable to a limit in the number of target-templates than can guide search at any one time. The current study investigated this possibility by comparing behavioural responses during single- and dual-target searches for targets defined by their orientation. The results revealed an increase in reaction times for dual- compared to single-target searches that was largely independent of the number of items in the display. Response accuracy also decreased on dual- compared to single-target searches: dual-target accuracy was higher than predicted by a model restricting search guidance to a single target-template and lower than predicted by a model simulating two independent single-target searches. These results are consistent with a parallel model of dual-target search in which attentional control is exerted by more than one target-template at a time. The requirement to maintain two target-templates simultaneously, however, appears to impose a reduction in the specificity of the memory representation that guides search for each target. PMID:24489793

Barrett, Doug J. K.; Zobay, Oliver

2014-01-01

71

A Parallel Framework for Multipoint Spiral Search in ab Initio Protein Structure Prediction  

PubMed Central

Protein structure prediction is computationally a very challenging problem. A large number of existing search algorithms attempt to solve the problem by exploring possible structures and finding the one with the minimum free energy. However, these algorithms perform poorly on large sized proteins due to an astronomically wide search space. In this paper, we present a multipoint spiral search framework that uses parallel processing techniques to expedite exploration by starting from different points. In our approach, a set of random initial solutions are generated and distributed to different threads. We allow each thread to run for a predefined period of time. The improved solutions are stored threadwise. When the threads finish, the solutions are merged together and the duplicates are removed. A selected distinct set of solutions are then split to different threads again. In our ab initio protein structure prediction method, we use the three-dimensional face-centred-cubic lattice for structure-backbone mapping. We use both the low resolution hydrophobic-polar energy model and the high-resolution 20 × 20 energy model for search guiding. The experimental results show that our new parallel framework significantly improves the results obtained by the state-of-the-art single-point search approaches for both energy models on three-dimensional face-centred-cubic lattice. We also experimentally show the effectiveness of mixing energy models within parallel threads. PMID:24744779

Rashid, Mahmood A.; Newton, M. A. Hakim; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Sattar, Abdul

2014-01-01

72

Target intersection probabilities for parallel-line and continuous-grid types of search  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The expressions for calculating the probability of intersection of hidden targets of different sizes and shapes for parallel-line and continuous-grid types of search can be formulated by vsing the concept of conditional probability. When the prior probability of the orientation of a widden target is represented by a uniform distribution, the calculated posterior probabilities are identical with the results obtained by the classic methods of probability. For hidden targets of different sizes and shapes, the following generalizations about the probability of intersection can be made: (1) to a first approximation, the probability of intersection of a hidden target is proportional to the ratio of the greatest dimension of the target (viewed in plane projection) to the minimum line spacing of the search pattern; (2) the shape of the hidden target does not greatly affect the probability of the intersection when the largest dimension of the target is small relative to the minimum spacing of the search pattern, (3) the probability of intersecting a target twice for a particular type of search can be used as a lower bound if there is an element of uncertainty of detection for a particular type of tool; (4) the geometry of the search pattern becomes more critical when the largest dimension of the target equals or exceeds the minimum spacing of the search pattern; (5) for elongate targets, the probability of intersection is greater for parallel-line search than for an equivalent continuous square-grid search when the largest dimension of the target is less than the minimum spacing of the search pattern, whereas the opposite is true when the largest dimension exceeds the minimum spacing; (6) the probability of intersection for nonorthogonal continuous-grid search patterns is not greatly different from the probability of intersection for the equivalent orthogonal continuous-grid pattern when the orientation of the target is unknown. The probability of intersection for an elliptically shaped target can be approximated by treating the ellipse as intermediate between a circle and a line. A search conducted along a continuous rectangular grid can be represented as intermediate between a search along parallel lines and along a continuous square grid. On this basis, an upper and lower bound for the probability of intersection of an elliptically shaped target for a continuous rectangular grid can be calculated. Charts have been constructed that permit the values for these probabilities to be obtained graphically. The use of conditional probability allows the explorationist greater flexibility in considering alternate search strategies for locating hidden targets. ?? 1977 Plenum Publishing Corp.

McCammon, R.B.

1977-01-01

73

iPRIDE: a parallel integrated circuit simulator using direct method  

Microsoft Academic Search

A parallel circuit simulator, iPRIDE, which uses a direct solution method and runs on a shared-memory multiprocessor is described. The simulator is based on a multilevel node tearing approach which produces a nested bordered-block-diagonal (BBD) form of the circuit equation matrix. The parallel solution of the nested BBD matrix is described. Its efficiency is shown to depend on how the

Mi-Chang Chang; I. N. Hajj

1988-01-01

74

Rapid parallel attentional target selection in single-color and multiple-color visual search.  

PubMed

Previous work has demonstrated that when targets are defined by a constant feature, attention can be directed rapidly and in parallel to sequentially presented target objects at different locations. We assessed how fast attention is allocated to multiple objects when this process cannot be controlled by a unique color-specific attentional template. N2pc components were measured as temporal markers of the attentional selection of 2 color-defined targets that were presented in rapid succession. Both targets either had the same color (one color task) or differed in color (two color task). Although there were small but systematic delays of target selection in the two color task relative to the one color task, attention was allocated extremely rapidly to both target objects in the two color task, which is inconsistent with the hypothesis that their selection was based on a slow switch between different color templates. Two follow-up experiments demonstrated that these delays did not reflect template switch costs, but were the result of competitive interactions between simultaneously active attentional templates. These results show that the control of focal attention during multiple-feature search operates much faster and more flexibly than is usually assumed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25485665

Grubert, Anna; Eimer, Martin

2015-02-01

75

A GPU based implementation of direct multi-bit search (DMS) screen algorithm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we study the feasibility for using programmable Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) technology for image halftoning, in particular implementing the computationally intense Direct Multi-bit Search (DMS) Screen algorithm. Multi-bit screening is an extension of binary screening, in which every pixel in continuoustone image can be rendered to one among multiple output states. For example, a 2 bit printer is capable of printing with four different drop sizes. In our previous work, we have extended the Direct Binary Search (DBS) to the multi-bit case using Direct Multi-bit Search (DMS) where at every pixel the algorithm chooses the best drop output state to create a visually pleasing halftone pattern without any user defined guidance. This process is repeated throughout the entire range of gray levels while satisfying the stacking constraint to create a high quality multi-bit screen (dither mask). In this paper, we illustrate how employing Graphics Processing Units (GPU) can speed-up intensive DMS image processing operations. Particularly, we illustrate how different modules can be been parallelized. The main goal of many of the previous articles regarding DBS is to decrease the execution time of the algorithm. One of the most common approaches is to decrease the neighborhood size or filter size. The proposed parallel approach allows us to use a large neighborhood and filter size, to achieve the highest halftone quality, while having minimal impact on performance. In addition, we also demonstrate processing several non-overlapping neighborhoods in parallel, by utilizing the GPU's parallel architecture, to further improve the computational efficiency.

Trager, Barry; Chandu, Kartheek; Wu, Chai Wah; Stanich, Mikel

2013-02-01

76

Search for Directed Networks by Different Random Walk Strategies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A comparative study is carried out on the efficiency of five different random walk strategies searching on directed networks constructed based on several typical complex networks. Due to the difference in search efficiency of the strategies rooted in network clustering, the clustering coefficient in a random walker's eye on directed networks is defined and computed to be half of the corresponding undirected networks. The search processes are performed on the directed networks based on Erdös—Rényi model, Watts—Strogatz model, Barabási—Albert model and clustered scale-free network model. It is found that self-avoiding random walk strategy is the best search strategy for such directed networks. Compared to unrestricted random walk strategy, path-iteration-avoiding random walks can also make the search process much more efficient. However, no-triangle-loop and no-quadrangle-loop random walks do not improve the search efficiency as expected, which is different from those on undirected networks since the clustering coefficient of directed networks are smaller than that of undirected networks.

Zhu, Zi-Qi; Jin, Xiao-Ling; Huang, Zhi-Long

2012-03-01

77

A direct search for Dirac magnetic monopoles  

E-print Network

Magnetic monopoles are highly ionizing and curve in the direction of the magnetic field. A new dedicated magnetic monopole trigger at CDF, which requires large light pulses in the scintillators of the time-of-flight system, ...

Mulhearn, Michael James

2005-01-01

78

Two Quantum Direct Communication Protocols Based on Quantum Search Algorithm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on the properties of two-qubit Grover's quantum search algorithm, we propose two quantum direct communication protocols, including a deterministic secure quantum communication and a quantum secure direct communication protocol. Secret messages can be directly sent from the sender to the receiver by using two-qubit unitary operations and the single photon measurement with one of the proposed protocols. Theoretical analysis shows that the security of the proposed protocols can be highly ensured.

Xu, Shu-Jiang; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Wang, Lian-Hai; Niu, Xin-Xin; Yang, Yi-Xian

2014-12-01

79

Direct Search for Low Mass Dark Matter Particles with CCDs  

A direct dark matter search is performed using fully-depleted high-resistivity CCD detectors. Due to their low electronic readout noise (RMS ~7 eV) these devices operate with a very low detection threshold of 40 eV, making the search for dark matter particles with low masses (~5 GeV) possible. The results of an engineering run performed in a shallow underground site are presented, demonstrating the potential of this technology in the low mass region.

Barreto, J [Rio de Janeiro Federal U.; Cease, H.; Diehl, H.T.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Harrison, N.; Jones, J.; Kilminster, B [Fermilab; Molina, J [Asuncion Natl. U.; Smith, J.; Sonnenschein, A [Fermilab

2012-05-15

80

Virtual Parallel Computing and a Search Algorithm Using Matrix Product States  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a form of parallel computing on classical computers that is based on matrix product states. The virtual parallelization is accomplished by representing bits with matrices and by evolving these matrices from an initial product state that encodes multiple inputs. Matrix evolution follows from the sequential application of gates, as in a logical circuit. The action by classical probabilistic one-bit and deterministic two-bit gates such as NAND are implemented in terms of matrix operations and, as opposed to quantum computing, it is possible to copy bits. We present a way to explore this method of computation to solve search problems and count the number of solutions. We argue that if the classical computational cost of testing solutions (witnesses) requires less than O(n^2) local two-bit gates acting on n bits, the search problem can be fully solved in subexponential time. Therefore, for this restricted type of search problem, the virtual parallelization scheme is faster than Grover's quantum algorithm.

Mucciolo, Eduardo; Chamon, Claudio

2013-03-01

81

ParAlign: a parallel sequence alignment algorithm for rapid and sensitive database searches  

PubMed Central

There is a need for faster and more sensitive algorithms for sequence similarity searching in view of the rapidly increasing amounts of genomic sequence data available. Parallel processing capabilities in the form of the single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) technology are now available in common microprocessors and enable a single microprocessor to perform many operations in parallel. The ParAlign algorithm has been specifically designed to take advantage of this technology. The new algorithm initially exploits parallelism to perform a very rapid computation of the exact optimal ungapped alignment score for all diagonals in the alignment matrix. Then, a novel heuristic is employed to compute an approximate score of a gapped alignment by combining the scores of several diagonals. This approximate score is used to select the most interesting database sequences for a subsequent Smith–Waterman alignment, which is also parallelised. The resulting method represents a substantial improvement compared to existing heuristics. The sensitivity and specificity of ParAlign was found to be as good as Smith–Waterman implementations when the same method for computing the statistical significance of the matches was used. In terms of speed, only the significantly less sensitive NCBI BLAST 2 program was found to outperform the new approach. Online searches are available at http://dna.uio.no/search/ PMID:11266569

Rognes, Torbjørn

2001-01-01

82

Parallel electric fields in the upward current region of the aurora: Indirect and direct observations  

E-print Network

Parallel electric fields in the upward current region of the aurora: Indirect and direct current region of the aurora focusing on the structure of electric fields at the boundary between account of the electric fields in the upward current region of the aurora as observed by the Fast Auroral

California at Berkeley, University of

83

Scalar and Parallel Optimized Implementation of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Method  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a new concept for the implementation of the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. It uses a localized data structure based on a computational cell to achieve high performance, especially on workstation processors, which can also be used in parallel. Since the data structure makes it possible to freely assign any cell to any processor, a domain

Stefan Dietrich; Iain D. Boyd

1996-01-01

84

Direct Non-baryonic Dark Matter Search - An experimental Review  

E-print Network

This review will present the latest advances in the search for non-baryonic dark matter from an experimental point of view, focusing more particularly on the direct detection approach. After a brief reminder of the main motivations for this search, we will expose the physical basis of WIMP detection, its advantages and limitations. The current techniques having achieved the most competitive results in terms of sensitivity will then be discussed. We will conclude with a rapid overview of the future of direct detection experiments, the techniques considered and their sensitivity goals.

S. Fiorucci

2004-06-11

85

A Direct Search for Dirac Magnetic Monopoles  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic monopoles are highly ionizing and curve in the direction of the magnetic field. A new dedicated magnetic monopole trigger at CDF, which requires large light pulses in the scintillators of the time-of-flight system, remains highly efficient to monopoles while consuming a tiny fraction of the available trigger bandwidth. A specialized offline reconstruction checks the central drift chamber for large dE/dx tracks which do not curve in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. We observed zero monopole candidate events in 35.7 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This implies a monopole production cross section limit {sigma} < 0.2 pb for monopoles with mass between 100 and 700 GeV, and, for a Drell-Yan like pair production mechanism, a mass limit m > 360 GeV.

Mulhearn, Michael James; /MIT; ,

2004-10-01

86

Parallel Implementation of the PHOENIX Generalized Stellar Atmosphere Program. III. A Parallel Algorithm for Direct Opacity Sampling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe two parallel algorithms for line opacity calculations based on a local file and on a global file approach. The performance and scalability of both approaches is discussed for different test cases and very different parallel computing systems. The results show that a global file approach is more efficient on high-performance parallel supercomputers with dedicated parallel I/O subsystem, whereas the local file approach is very useful on farms of workstations, e.g., cheap PC clusters.

Hauschildt, Peter H.; Lowenthal, David K.; Baron, E.

2001-06-01

87

Carbon Nanotubes Potentialities in Directional Dark Matter Searches  

E-print Network

We propose a new solution to the problem of dark matter directional detection based on large parallel arrays of carbon nanotubes. The phenomenon of ion channeling in single wall nanotubes is simulated to calculate the expected number of recoiling carbon ions, due to the hypothetical scattering with dark matter particles, subsequently being driven along their longitudinal extension. As shown by explicit calculation, the relative orientation of the carbon nanotube array with respect to the direction of motion of the Sun has an appreciable effect on the channeling probability of the struck ion and this provides the required detector anisotropic response.

L. M. Capparelli; G. Cavoto; D. Mazzilli; A. D. Polosa

2014-12-28

88

Direct-execution parallel architecture for the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL)  

SciTech Connect

A direct-execution parallel architecture for the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) is presented which overcomes the traditional disadvantages of simulations executed on a digital computer. The incorporation of parallel processing allows the mapping of simulations into a digital computer to be done in the same inherently parallel manner as they are currently mapped onto an analog computer. The direct-execution format maximizes the efficiency of the executed code since the need for a high level language compiler is eliminated. Resolution is greatly increased over that which is available with an analog computer without the sacrifice in execution speed normally expected with digitial computer simulations. Although this report covers all aspects of the new architecture, key emphasis is placed on the processing element configuration and the microprogramming of the ACLS constructs. The execution times for all ACLS constructs are computed using a model of a processing element based on the AMD 29000 CPU and the AMD 29027 FPU. The increase in execution speed provided by parallel processing is exemplified by comparing the derived execution times of two ACSL programs with the execution times for the same programs executed on a similar sequential architecture.

Carroll, C.C.; Owen, J.E.

1988-05-01

89

Parallel Directionally Split Solver Based on Reformulation of Pipelined Thomas Algorithm  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this research an efficient parallel algorithm for 3-D directionally split problems is developed. The proposed algorithm is based on a reformulated version of the pipelined Thomas algorithm that starts the backward step computations immediately after the completion of the forward step computations for the first portion of lines This algorithm has data available for other computational tasks while processors are idle from the Thomas algorithm. The proposed 3-D directionally split solver is based on the static scheduling of processors where local and non-local, data-dependent and data-independent computations are scheduled while processors are idle. A theoretical model of parallelization efficiency is used to define optimal parameters of the algorithm, to show an asymptotic parallelization penalty and to obtain an optimal cover of a global domain with subdomains. It is shown by computational experiments and by the theoretical model that the proposed algorithm reduces the parallelization penalty about two times over the basic algorithm for the range of the number of processors (subdomains) considered and the number of grid nodes per subdomain.

Povitsky, A.

1998-01-01

90

PoS(ICHEP2010)539 Dark Matter direct detection searches  

E-print Network

PoS(ICHEP2010)539 Dark Matter direct detection searches Jules Gascon IPNL, Université de Lyon searches for Dark Matter is presented. These experi- ments look for energetic recoiling ions produced)539 Direct Searches for Dark Matter Jules Gascon Direct searches for Dark Matter in the form of Weakly

Boyer, Edmond

91

Direct searches for dark matter: Recent?results  

PubMed Central

There is abundant evidence for large amounts of unseen matter in the universe. This dark matter, by its very nature, couples feebly to ordinary matter and is correspondingly difficult to detect. Nonetheless, several experiments are now underway with the sensitivity required to detect directly galactic halo dark matter through their interactions with matter and radiation. These experiments divide into two broad classes: searches for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) and searches for axions. There exists a very strong theoretical bias for supposing that supersymmetry (SUSY) is a correct description of nature. WIMPs are predicted by this SUSY theory and have the required properties to be dark matter. These WIMPs are detected from the byproducts of their occasional recoil against nucleons. There are efforts around the world to detect these rare recoils. The WIMP part of this overview focuses on the cryogenic dark matter search (CDMS) underway in California. Axions, another favored dark matter candidate, are predicted to arise from a minimal extension of the standard model that explains the absence of the expected large CP violating effects in strong interactions. Axions can, in the presence of a large magnetic field, turn into microwave photons. It is the slight excess of photons above noise that signals the axion. Axion searches are underway in California and Japan. The axion part of this overview focuses on the California effort. Brevity does not allow me to discuss other WIMP and axion searches, likewise for accelerator and satellite based searches; I apologize for their omission. PMID:9419325

Rosenberg, Leslie J.

1998-01-01

92

SUPREM-DSMC: A New Scalable, Parallel, Reacting, Multidimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Flow Code  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An AFRL/NRL team has recently been selected to develop a scalable, parallel, reacting, multidimensional (SUPREM) Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code for the DoD user community under the High Performance Computing Modernization Office (HPCMO) Common High Performance Computing Software Support Initiative (CHSSI). This paper will introduce the JANNAF Exhaust Plume community to this three-year development effort and present the overall goals, schedule, and current status of this new code.

Campbell, David; Wysong, Ingrid; Kaplan, Carolyn; Mott, David; Wadsworth, Dean; VanGilder, Douglas

2000-01-01

93

Direct kinematics solution architectures for industrial robot manipulators: Bit-serial versus parallel  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) architecture for robot direct kinematic computation suitable for industrial robot manipulators was investigated. The Denavit-Hartenberg transformations are reviewed to exploit a proper processing element, namely an augmented CORDIC. Specifically, two distinct implementations are elaborated on, such as the bit-serial and parallel. Performance of each scheme is analyzed with respect to the time to compute one location of the end-effector of a 6-links manipulator, and the number of transistors required.

Lee, J.; Kim, K.

1991-01-01

94

Parallel spatial direct numerical simulations on the Intel iPSC/860 hypercube  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation and performance of a parallel spatial direct numerical simulation (PSDNS) approach on the Intel iPSC/860 hypercube is documented. The direct numerical simulation approach is used to compute spatially evolving disturbances associated with the laminar-to-turbulent transition in boundary-layer flows. The feasibility of using the PSDNS on the hypercube to perform transition studies is examined. The results indicate that the direct numerical simulation approach can effectively be parallelized on a distributed-memory parallel machine. By increasing the number of processors nearly ideal linear speedups are achieved with nonoptimized routines; slower than linear speedups are achieved with optimized (machine dependent library) routines. This slower than linear speedup results because the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) routine dominates the computational cost and because the routine indicates less than ideal speedups. However with the machine-dependent routines the total computational cost decreases by a factor of 4 to 5 compared with standard FORTRAN routines. The computational cost increases linearly with spanwise wall-normal and streamwise grid refinements. The hypercube with 32 processors was estimated to require approximately twice the amount of Cray supercomputer single processor time to complete a comparable simulation; however it is estimated that a subgrid-scale model which reduces the required number of grid points and becomes a large-eddy simulation (PSLES) would reduce the computational cost and memory requirements by a factor of 10 over the PSDNS. This PSLES implementation would enable transition simulations on the hypercube at a reasonable computational cost.

Joslin, Ronald D.; Zubair, Mohammad

1993-01-01

95

Parallel-up structure evidences the molecular directionality during biosynthesis of bacterial?cellulose  

PubMed Central

The “parallel-up” packing in cellulose I? and I? unit cells was experimentally demonstrated by a combination of direct-staining the reducing ends of cellulose chains and microdiffraction-tilting electron crystallographic analysis. Microdiffraction investigation of nascent bacterial cellulose microfibrils showed that the reducing end of the growing cellulose chains points away from the bacterium, and this provides direct evidence that polymerization by the cellulose synthase takes place at the nonreducing end of the growing cellulose chains. This mechanism is likely to be valid also for a number of processive glycosyltransferases such as chitin synthases, hyaluronan synthases, and proteins involved in the synthesis of nodulation factor backbones. PMID:9256440

Koyama, Makiko; Helbert, William; Imai, Tomoya; Sugiyama, Junji; Henrissat, Bernard

1997-01-01

96

Directed search for continuous gravitational waves from the Galactic center  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of a directed search for continuous gravitational waves from unknown, isolated neutron stars in the Galactic center region, performed on two years of data from LIGO’s fifth science run from two LIGO detectors. The search uses a semicoherent approach, analyzing coherently 630 segments, each spanning 11.5 hours, and then incoherently combining the results of the single segments. It covers gravitational wave frequencies in a range from 78 to 496 Hz and a frequency-dependent range of first-order spindown values down to -7.86×10-8Hz/s at the highest frequency. No gravitational waves were detected. The 90% confidence upper limits on the gravitational wave amplitude of sources at the Galactic center are ˜3.35×10-25 for frequencies near 150 Hz. These upper limits are the most constraining to date for a large-parameter-space search for continuous gravitational wave signals.

Aasi, J.; Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Austin, L.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S. H.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Bebronne, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Belopolski, I.; Bergmann, G.; Berliner, J. M.; Bertolini, A.; Bessis, D.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhadbhade, T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Bitossi, M.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Blom, M.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Bosi, L.; Bowers, J.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brannen, C. A.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castiglia, A.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Chow, J.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cordier, M.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M.; Coyne, D. C.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; De Rosa, R.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Deleeuw, E.; Deléglise, S.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Díaz, M.; Dietz, A.; Dmitry, K.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endr?czi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, K.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R.; Flaminio, R.; Foley, E.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Forte, L. A.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J.; Gammaitoni, L.; Garcia, J.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gil-Casanova, S.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Griffo, C.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B.; Hall, E.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Horrom, T.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Hua, Z.; Huang, V.; Huerta, E. A.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Iafrate, J.; Ingram, D. R.

2013-11-01

97

WIMP Velocity Impact on Direct Dark Matter Searches  

E-print Network

We examine the effect of some uncertainties in the input astrophysical parameters on direct detection searches for WIMPs in the Galactic halo. We concentrate on the possible WIMP annual modulation signal recently reported by the DAMA Collaboration. We find that allowing for a reasonable uncertainty in a WIMP Maxwellian velocity distribution leads to significantly relaxed constraints on the WIMP mass as compared to the original DAMA analysis.

Michal Brhlik; Leszek Roszkowski

1999-03-24

98

Detector developing for directional dark matter search with nuclear emulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We are planing the directional dark matter search experiment with nuclear emulsion. Recoiled atoms inside of the emulsion fly several hundred nm, and it is too short to detect with usual emulsion. Fine crystal emulsion was needed to detect such tracks. We developed new method to produce them and succeeded to make crystals small as 20 nm at the minimum size. We also study several methods to improve sensitivity and reduce background noise to survey very interesting cross section region.

Asada, T.; Naka, T.; Kuwabara, K.; Katsuragawa, T.; Yoshimoto, M.; Hakamata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakamura, M.; Sato, O.; Nakano, T.

2013-12-01

99

Scalable High Performance Computing: Direct and Large-Eddy Turbulent Flow Simulations Using Massively Parallel Computers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This final report contains reports of research related to the tasks "Scalable High Performance Computing: Direct and Lark-Eddy Turbulent FLow Simulations Using Massively Parallel Computers" and "Devleop High-Performance Time-Domain Computational Electromagnetics Capability for RCS Prediction, Wave Propagation in Dispersive Media, and Dual-Use Applications. The discussion of Scalable High Performance Computing reports on three objectives: validate, access scalability, and apply two parallel flow solvers for three-dimensional Navier-Stokes flows; develop and validate a high-order parallel solver for Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) problems; and Investigate and develop a high-order Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes turbulence model. The discussion of High-Performance Time-Domain Computational Electromagnetics reports on five objectives: enhancement of an electromagnetics code (CHARGE) to be able to effectively model antenna problems; utilize lessons learned in high-order/spectral solution of swirling 3D jets to apply to solving electromagnetics project; transition a high-order fluids code, FDL3DI, to be able to solve Maxwell's Equations using compact-differencing; develop and demonstrate improved radiation absorbing boundary conditions for high-order CEM; and extend high-order CEM solver to address variable material properties. The report also contains a review of work done by the systems engineer.

Morgan, Philip E.

2004-01-01

100

Directing Web Search Engines using a Knowledge Amplification by Structured Expert Randomization Architecture  

E-print Network

Directing Web Search Engines using a Knowledge Amplification by Structured Expert Randomization is inevitable. 1 Web Search Engines The World Wide Web continues to play an important role in storing environments. Search engines for the general web typically do not really search the World Wide Web directly

Chen, Shu-Ching

101

Statistical Speech Segmentation and Word Learning in Parallel: Scaffolding from Child-Directed Speech  

PubMed Central

In order to acquire their native languages, children must learn richly structured systems with regularities at multiple levels. While structure at different levels could be learned serially, e.g., speech segmentation coming before word-object mapping, redundancies across levels make parallel learning more efficient. For instance, a series of syllables is likely to be a word not only because of high transitional probabilities, but also because of a consistently co-occurring object. But additional statistics require additional processing, and thus might not be useful to cognitively constrained learners. We show that the structure of child-directed speech makes simultaneous speech segmentation and word learning tractable for human learners. First, a corpus of child-directed speech was recorded from parents and children engaged in a naturalistic free-play task. Analyses revealed two consistent regularities in the sentence structure of naming events. These regularities were subsequently encoded in an artificial language to which adult participants were exposed in the context of simultaneous statistical speech segmentation and word learning. Either regularity was independently sufficient to support successful learning, but no learning occurred in the absence of both regularities. Thus, the structure of child-directed speech plays an important role in scaffolding speech segmentation and word learning in parallel. PMID:23162487

Yurovsky, Daniel; Yu, Chen; Smith, Linda B.

2012-01-01

102

Search for direct CP violation in B-->K? decays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We search for direct CP violation in flavor specific B-->K? decays by measuring the rate asymmetry between charge conjugate modes.The search is performed on a data sample of 11.1×106 BB¯ events recorded on the ?(4S) resonance by the Belle experiment at KEKB. We measure 90% confidence intervals in the partial rate asymmetry ACP of -0.25

Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Abe, R.; Adachi, I.; Ahn, Byoung Sup; Aihara, H.; Akatsu, M.; Asano, Y.; Aso, T.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; M. Bakich, A.; Banas, E.; Behari, S.; Behera, P. K.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; E. Browder, T.; Casey, B. C.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K.-F.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Dragic, J.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Enomoto, R.; Fang, F.; Fujii, H.; Fukunaga, C.; Fukushima, M.; Garmash, A.; Gordon, A.; Gotow, K.; Guo, R.; Haba, J.; Hamasaki, H.; Hanagaki, K.; Handa, F.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Heenan, E. M.; Higuchi, I.; Higuchi, T.; Hirano, H.; Hojo, T.; Hokuue, T.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, S. R.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huang, H.-C.; Igarashi, Y.; Iijima, T.; Ikeda, H.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, H.; Itoh, R.; Iwai, G.; Iwasaki, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D. J.; Jalocha, P.; Jang, H. K.; Jones, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapusta, P.; Katayama, N.; Kawai, H.; Kawai, H.; Kawakami, Y.; Kawamura, N.; Kawasaki, T.; Kichimi, H.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, Heejong; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Hyunwoo; Kim, S. K.; Kim, T. H.; Kinoshita, K.; Konishi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Kulasiri, R.; Kumar, S.; Kurihara, E.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Liventsev, D.; Lu, R.-S.; Marlow, D.; Matsubara, T.; Matsui, S.; Matsumoto, S.; Matsumoto, T.; Mikami, Y.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyata, H.; Moloney, G. R.; Mori, T.; Murakami, A.; Nagamine, T.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagashima, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nam, J. W.; Narita, S.; Natkaniec, Z.; Neichi, K.; Nishida, S.; Noguchi, S.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okabe, T.; Okuno, S.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Palka, H.; Park, C. S.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Peak, L. S.; Peters, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Prebys, E.; Root, N.; Rozanska, M.; Rybicki, K.; Ryuko, J.; Sagawa, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sakamoto, H.; Satapathy, M.; Satpathy, A.; Schrenk, S.; Semenov, S.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shibuya, H.; Shwartz, B.; Stani?, S.; Sugiyama, A.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, J.-I.; Suzuki, K.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Swain, S. K.; Takahashi, T.; Takasaki, F.; Takita, M.; Tamai, K.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Taylor, G. N.; Teramoto, Y.; Tomoto, M.; Tomura, T.; Tovey, S. N.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Uehara, S.; Ueno, K.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Ushiroda, Y.; Varvell, K. E.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, J. G.; Wang, M.-Z.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamada, Y.; Yamaga, M.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yanaka, S.; Yoshida, K.; Yusa, Y.; Yuta, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, H. W.; Zheng, Y.; Zhilich, V.; Žontar, D.

2001-10-01

103

Gravitational waves: search results, data analysis and parameter estimation. Amaldi 10 Parallel session C2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Amaldi 10 Parallel Session C2 on gravitational wave (GW) search results, data analysis and parameter estimation included three lively sessions of lectures by 13 presenters, and 34 posters. The talks and posters covered a huge range of material, including results and analysis techniques for ground-based GW detectors, targeting anticipated signals from different astrophysical sources: compact binary inspiral, merger and ringdown; GW bursts from intermediate mass binary black hole mergers, cosmic string cusps, core-collapse supernovae, and other unmodeled sources; continuous waves from spinning neutron stars; and a stochastic GW background. There was considerable emphasis on Bayesian techniques for estimating the parameters of coalescing compact binary systems from the gravitational waveforms extracted from the data from the advanced detector network. This included methods to distinguish deviations of the signals from what is expected in the context of General Relativity.

Astone, Pia; Weinstein, Alan; Agathos, Michalis; Bejger, Micha?; Christensen, Nelson; Dent, Thomas; Graff, Philip; Klimenko, Sergey; Mazzolo, Giulio; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Robinet, Florent; Schmidt, Patricia; Smith, Rory; Veitch, John; Wade, Madeline; Aoudia, Sofiane; Bose, Sukanta; Calderon Bustillo, Juan; Canizares, Priscilla; Capano, Colin; Clark, James; Colla, Alberto; Cuoco, Elena; Da Silva Costa, Carlos; Dal Canton, Tito; Evangelista, Edgar; Goetz, Evan; Gupta, Anuradha; Hannam, Mark; Keitel, David; Lackey, Benjamin; Logue, Joshua; Mohapatra, Satyanarayan; Piergiovanni, Francesco; Privitera, Stephen; Prix, Reinhard; Pürrer, Michael; Re, Virginia; Serafinelli, Roberto; Wade, Leslie; Wen, Linqing; Wette, Karl; Whelan, John; Palomba, C.; Prodi, G.

2015-02-01

104

Interchromosomal homology searches drive directional ALT telomere movement and synapsis.  

PubMed

Telomere length maintenance is a requisite feature of cellular immortalization and a hallmark of human cancer. While most human cancers express telomerase activity, ?10%-15% employ a recombination-dependent telomere maintenance pathway known as alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) that is characterized by multitelomere clusters and associated promyelocytic leukemia protein bodies. Here, we show that a DNA double-strand break (DSB) response at ALT telomeres triggers long-range movement and clustering between chromosome termini, resulting in homology-directed telomere synthesis. Damaged telomeres initiate increased random surveillance of nuclear space before displaying rapid directional movement and association with recipient telomeres over micron-range distances. This phenomenon required Rad51 and the Hop2-Mnd1 heterodimer, which are essential for homologous chromosome synapsis during meiosis. These findings implicate a specialized homology searching mechanism in ALT-dependent telomere maintenance and provide a molecular basis underlying the preference for recombination between nonsister telomeres during ALT. PMID:25259924

Cho, Nam Woo; Dilley, Robert L; Lampson, Michael A; Greenberg, Roger A

2014-09-25

105

A DIRECT METHOD TO DETERMINE THE PARALLEL MEAN FREE PATH OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES WITH ADIABATIC FOCUSING  

SciTech Connect

The parallel mean free path of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which is determined by physical properties of SEPs as well as those of solar wind, is a very important parameter in space physics to study the transport of charged energetic particles in the heliosphere, especially for space weather forecasting. In space weather practice, it is necessary to find a quick approach to obtain the parallel mean free path of SEPs for a solar event. In addition, the adiabatic focusing effect caused by a spatially varying mean magnetic field in the solar system is important to the transport processes of SEPs. Recently, Shalchi presented an analytical description of the parallel diffusion coefficient with adiabatic focusing. Based on Shalchi's results, in this paper we provide a direct analytical formula as a function of parameters concerning the physical properties of SEPs and solar wind to directly and quickly determine the parallel mean free path of SEPs with adiabatic focusing. Since all of the quantities in the analytical formula can be directly observed by spacecraft, this direct method would be a very useful tool in space weather research. As applications of the direct method, we investigate the inherent relations between the parallel mean free path and various parameters concerning physical properties of SEPs and solar wind. Comparisons of parallel mean free paths with and without adiabatic focusing are also presented.

He, H.-Q.; Wan, W., E-mail: hqhe@mail.iggcas.ac.cn, E-mail: wanw@mail.iggcas.ac.cn [Beijing National Observatory of Space Environment, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China)

2012-03-01

106

Speeding Up Learning in Real-time Search through Parallel Computing Vinicius Marques Luiz Chaimowicz Renato Ferreira  

E-print Network

of video games or robotics, there are some situations that may require fast responses, or even realSpeeding Up Learning in Real-time Search through Parallel Computing Vinicius Marques Luiz in the same environ- ment. In such methods, the learning step aims to avoid lo- cal minima and improve

Chaimowicz, Luiz

107

democrite-00023778,version1-11Apr2005 DIRECT SEARCH FOR WIMP DARK MATTER  

E-print Network

democrite-00023778,version1-11Apr2005 DIRECT SEARCH FOR WIMP DARK MATTER J. GASCON Institut de the experimental aspects of the direct search for WIMP dark matter. In this search, one looks in a terrestrial observations is that our Galaxy could be immersed in a halo of heavy Dark Matter particles of a fundamentally

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

108

Direct Dark Matter Searches with CDMS and XENON  

E-print Network

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) and XENON experiments aim to directly detect dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) via their elastic scattering on the target nuclei. The experiments use different techniques to suppress background event rates to the minimum, and at the same time, to achieve a high WIMP detection rate. The operation of cryogenic Ge and Si crystals of the CDMS-II experiment in the Soudan mine yielded the most stringent spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section (~10^{-43} cm^2) at a WIMP mass of 60 GeV/c^2. The two-phase xenon detector of the XENON10 experiment is currently taking data in the Gran Sasso underground lab and promising preliminary results were recently reported. Both experiments are expected to increase their WIMP sensitivity by a one order of magnitude in the scheduled science runs for 2007.

Kaixuan Ni; Laura Baudis

2006-11-09

109

Clustered-dot halftoning with direct binary search.  

PubMed

In this paper, we present a new algorithm for aperiodic clustered-dot halftoning based on direct binary search (DBS). The DBS optimization framework has been modified for designing clustered-dot texture, by using filters with different sizes in the initialization and update steps of the algorithm. Following an intuitive explanation of how the clustered-dot texture results from this modified framework, we derive a closed-form cost metric which, when minimized, equivalently generates stochastic clustered-dot texture. An analysis of the cost metric and its influence on the texture quality is presented, which is followed by a modification to the cost metric to reduce computational cost and to make it more suitable for screen design. PMID:22997264

Goyal, Puneet; Gupta, Madhur; Staelin, Carl; Fischer, Mani; Shacham, Omri; Allebach, Jan P

2013-02-01

110

Direct numerical simulation of instabilities in parallel flow with spherical roughness elements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results from a direct numerical simulation of laminar flow over a flat surface with spherical roughness elements using a spectral-element method are given. The numerical simulation approximates roughness as a cellular pattern of identical spheres protruding from a smooth wall. Periodic boundary conditions on the domain's horizontal faces simulate an infinite array of roughness elements extending in the streamwise and spanwise directions, which implies the parallel-flow assumption, and results in a closed domain. A body force, designed to yield the horizontal Blasius velocity in the absence of roughness, sustains the flow. Instabilities above a critical Reynolds number reveal negligible oscillations in the recirculation regions behind each sphere and in the free stream, high-amplitude oscillations in the layer directly above the spheres, and a mean profile with an inflection point near the sphere's crest. The inflection point yields an unstable layer above the roughness (where U''(y) is less than 0) and a stable region within the roughness (where U''(y) is greater than 0). Evidently, the instability begins when the low-momentum or wake region behind an element, being the region most affected by disturbances (purely numerical in this case), goes unstable and moves. In compressible flow with periodic boundaries, this motion sends disturbances to all regions of the domain. In the unstable layer just above the inflection point, the disturbances grow while being carried downstream with a propagation speed equal to the local mean velocity; they do not grow amid the low energy region near the roughness patch. The most amplified disturbance eventually arrives at the next roughness element downstream, perturbing its wake and inducing a global response at a frequency governed by the streamwise spacing between spheres and the mean velocity of the most amplified layer.

Deanna, R. G.

1992-01-01

111

Direct Spatial Search on Pictorial Databases Using Packed R-Trees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pictorial databases require efficient and direct spatial search based on the analog form of spatial objects and relationships instead of search based on some cumbersome alphanumeric encodings of the pictures. R-trees (two- dimensional B-trees) are excellent devices for indexing spatial objects and relationships found on pictures. Their most important feature is that they provide high level object oriented search rather

Nick Roussopoulos; Daniel Leifker

1985-01-01

112

Designing a modular system for direct search of video & audio content: The DIVAS project  

Microsoft Academic Search

The principal objective of the DIVAS IST project is to integrate essential knowledge from universities, research institutes, industrial partners and end-users, in order to design a multimedia search engine based on direct video and audio search algorithms applied on encoded representation formats of the content inside multimedia databases. The driving force is to disassociate content search from the availability of

Nikos Achilleopoulos; Christos Theoharatos

2008-01-01

113

Reducing Query Latencies in Web Search Using Fine-Grained Parallelism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Semantic Web search is a new application of recent advances in information retrieval (IR), natural language processing, artificial intelligence, and other fields. Our group (Powerset) develops a semantic search engine that aims to answer queries not only by matching keywords, but by actually matching meaning in queries to meaning in Web documents. Compared to typical keyword search, semantic search can

Eitan Frachtenberg

2009-01-01

114

PARALLEL R-POINT IMPLICIT BLOCK METHOD FOR SOLVING HIGHER ORDER ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS DIRECTLY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most of the existing methods for solving ordinary differential equations (ODEs) of higher order are sequential in nature. These methods approximate a numerical solution at one point at a time and therefore do not fully exploit the capability of parallel computers. Hence, the development of parallel algorithms to suit these machines becomes essenti al. In this paper, a new method

Z. Omar

115

Job Search as Goal-Directed Behavior: Objectives and Methods  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relationship between job search objectives (finding a new job/turnover, staying aware of job alternatives, developing a professional network, and obtaining leverage against an employer) and job search methods (looking at job ads, visiting job sites, networking, contacting employment agencies, contacting employers, and…

Van Hoye, Greet; Saks, Alan M.

2008-01-01

116

Job search as goal-directed behavior: Objectives and methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the relationship between job search objectives (finding a new job\\/turnover, staying aware of job alternatives, developing a professional network, and obtaining leverage against an employer) and job search methods (looking at job ads, visiting job sites, networking, contacting employment agencies, contacting employers, and submitting applications). In a sample of 205 employed individuals from Belgium and Romania, job

Greet Van Hoye; Alan M. Saks

2008-01-01

117

From cessation of south-directed mid-crust extrusion to onset of orogen-parallel extension, NW Nepal Himalaya  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field mapping and, structural, microstructural, and chronological analyses confirm the existence of a segment of the Gurla-Mandhata-Humla fault, an orogen-parallel strike-slip dominated shear zone in the upper Karnali valley of northwestern Nepal. This shear zone forms the upper contact of, and cuts obliquely across the Greater Himalayan Sequence (GHS). Data from this study reveal two phases of GHS deformation. Phase 1 is characterized by U-Th-Pb monazite crystallization ages (˜26--12 Ma, peak ˜18--15 Ma), consistent with typical Neohimalayan metamorphic ages, and the final stages of south-directed extrusion of the GHS. Phase 2 is characterized by south-dipping high-strain foliations and intensely developed ESE-WNW trending, shallowly plunging mineral elongation lineations, indicating orogen-parallel extension. Thermochronology of muscovite defining these fabrics implies that the area was cooling and experiencing orogen-parallel extension by ˜15--9 Ma. Mineral deformation mechanisms and quartz c-axis patterns of these fabrics record a rapid increase in temperature from ˜350°C along the shear zone, to ˜650°C at ˜2.5 structural km below the shear zone. Such temperature gradients may be remnants of telescoped and/or flattened isotherms generated during south-directed extrusion of the GHS. Overprinting ESE-WNW fabrics record progressive deformation of the GHS at lower temperatures. Progressive deformation included a significant component of pure shear, as indicated by symmetric high-temperature quartz c-axis fabrics and a lower-temperature vorticity estimate (˜59% pure shear). A transition in c-axis fabrics from type I to type II cross-girdles at ˜ 1.2 km below the fault could indicate a transition from plane strain towards constriction. Together, these data suggest orogen-parallel extension was occurring as a result of transtension. This study reveals a transition from south-directed extrusion of the GHS to orogen-parallel extension between ˜15--13 Ma. Comparing these data with tectonic events across the Himalaya reveals an orogen-wide middle Miocene transition, coeval with the uplift of eastern Tibet. This is consistent with interpretations invoking radial spreading of Tibet and east-directed lower-crustal flow to explain orogen-parallel extension. Our study leads to the suggestion that a transition affecting mid- to lower-crustal processes may be responsible for the cessation of south-directed extrusion of the GHS and onset of east-directed lower-crustal flow.

Nagy, Carl

118

Local Search for Hop-constrained Directed Steiner Tree Problem ...  

E-print Network

For the hop-constrained DSTP, we propose local search strategies aimed at ...... relatively inexpensive miniature vehicles with limited communication range. Fur- ... arbitrary measures for evaluating the suitability of positions for UAV placement.

2014-08-20

119

Scalability of Parallel Spatial Direct Numerical Simulations on Intel Hypercube and IBM SP1 and SP2  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The implementation and performance of a parallel spatial direct numerical simulation (PSDNS) approach on the Intel iPSC/860 hypercube and IBM SP1 and SP2 parallel computers is documented. Spatially evolving disturbances associated with the laminar-to-turbulent transition in boundary-layer flows are computed with the PSDNS code. The feasibility of using the PSDNS to perform transition studies on these computers is examined. The results indicate that PSDNS approach can effectively be parallelized on a distributed-memory parallel machine by remapping the distributed data structure during the course of the calculation. Scalability information is provided to estimate computational costs to match the actual costs relative to changes in the number of grid points. By increasing the number of processors, slower than linear speedups are achieved with optimized (machine-dependent library) routines. This slower than linear speedup results because the computational cost is dominated by FFT routine, which yields less than ideal speedups. By using appropriate compile options and optimized library routines on the SP1, the serial code achieves 52-56 M ops on a single node of the SP1 (45 percent of theoretical peak performance). The actual performance of the PSDNS code on the SP1 is evaluated with a "real world" simulation that consists of 1.7 million grid points. One time step of this simulation is calculated on eight nodes of the SP1 in the same time as required by a Cray Y/MP supercomputer. For the same simulation, 32-nodes of the SP1 and SP2 are required to reach the performance of a Cray C-90. A 32 node SP1 (SP2) configuration is 2.9 (4.6) times faster than a Cray Y/MP for this simulation, while the hypercube is roughly 2 times slower than the Y/MP for this application. KEY WORDS: Spatial direct numerical simulations; incompressible viscous flows; spectral methods; finite differences; parallel computing.

Joslin, Ronald D.; Hanebutte, Ulf R.; Zubair, Mohammad

1995-01-01

120

A direct search procedure for designing finite duration impulse response filters  

Microsoft Academic Search

We introduce an approach to the design of low-pass (and, by extension, bandpass) digital filters containing only zeros. This approach is that of directly searching for transition values of the sampled frequency response function to reduce the sidelobe level of the response. It is shown that the problem is a linear program and a search algorithm is derived which makes

B. Gold

1969-01-01

121

Search for direct CP violation in singly Cabibbo-suppressed D±?K+K-?± decays  

E-print Network

We report on a search for direct CP violation in the singly Cabibbo-suppressed decay D[superscript +]-->K[superscript +]K[superscript -]?[superscript +] using a data sample of 476??fb[subscript -1] of e[superscript ...

Cowan, Ray Franklin

122

Searching mixed DNA profiles directly against profile databases.  

PubMed

DNA databases have revolutionised forensic science. They are a powerful investigative tool as they have the potential to identify persons of interest in criminal investigations. Routinely, a DNA profile generated from a crime sample could only be searched for in a database of individuals if the stain was from single contributor (single source) or if a contributor could unambiguously be determined from a mixed DNA profile. This meant that a significant number of samples were unsuitable for database searching. The advent of continuous methods for the interpretation of DNA profiles offers an advanced way to draw inferential power from the considerable investment made in DNA databases. Using these methods, each profile on the database may be considered a possible contributor to a mixture and a likelihood ratio (LR) can be formed. Those profiles which produce a sufficiently large LR can serve as an investigative lead. In this paper empirical studies are described to determine what constitutes a large LR. We investigate the effect on a database search of complex mixed DNA profiles with contributors in equal proportions with dropout as a consideration, and also the effect of an incorrect assignment of the number of contributors to a profile. In addition, we give, as a demonstration of the method, the results using two crime samples that were previously unsuitable for database comparison. We show that effective management of the selection of samples for searching and the interpretation of the output can be highly informative. PMID:24528588

Bright, Jo-Anne; Taylor, Duncan; Curran, James; Buckleton, John

2014-03-01

123

HYPER-HEURISTICS: AN EMERGING DIRECTION IN MODERN SEARCH TECHNOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter introduces and overviews an emerging methodology in search and optimisation. One of the key aims of these new approaches, which have been termed hyper-heuristics, is to raise the level of generality at which optimisation systems can operate. An objective is that hyper-heuristics will lead to more general systems that are able to handle a wide range of problem

Edmund Burke; Emma Hart; G raham Kendall; Peter Ross; Sonia Schulenburg

2003-01-01

124

Some Comments on Possible Preferred Directions for the SETI Search  

E-print Network

The search for extraterrestrial intelligence by looking for signals from advanced technological civilizations has been ongoing for some decades. We suggest that it could possibly be made more efficient by focusing on stars from which the solar system can be observed via mini-eclipsings of the Sun by transiting planets.

Nussinov, Shmuel

2009-01-01

125

Acoustoelastic effect of wood II: Effect of compressive stress on the velocity of ultrasonic longitudinal waves parallel to the transverse direction of the wood  

Microsoft Academic Search

The changes in the velocity of ultrasonic waves propagating in wood parallel to the direction of applied stress are discussed.\\u000a The ultrasonic mode was longitudinal waves traveling along the direction of applied stress with the compressive load applied\\u000a parallel to the transverse direction of the wood. The ultrasonic velocities were measured by the sing-around method. The experimental\\u000a results indicated the

Yasutoshi Sasaki; Toshihiro Iwata; Kosei Ando

1998-01-01

126

Fast String Search on Multicore Processors: Mapping fundamental algorithms onto parallel hardware  

SciTech Connect

String searching is one of these basic algorithms. It has a host of applications, including search engines, network intrusion detection, virus scanners, spam filters, and DNA analysis, among others. The Cell processor, with its multiple cores, promises to speed-up string searching a lot. In this article, we show how we mapped string searching efficiently on the Cell. We present two implementations: • The fast implementation supports a small dictionary size (approximately 100 patterns) and provides a throughput of 40 Gbps, which is 100 times faster than reference implementations on x86 architectures. • The heavy-duty implementation is slower (3.3-4.3 Gbps), but supports dictionaries with tens of thousands of strings.

Scarpazza, Daniele P.; Villa, Oreste; Petrini, Fabrizio

2008-04-01

127

Design and analysis of a nondeterministic parallel breadth-first search algorithm  

E-print Network

I have developed a multithreaded implementation of breadth-first search (BFS) of a sparse graph using the Cilk++ extensions to C++. My PBFS program on a single processor runs as quickly as a standard C++ breadth-first ...

Schardl, Tao Benjamin

2010-01-01

128

Searches for direct stop production within the ATLAS experiment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ATLAS experiment at the LHC, in conjunction with the discovery of the Higgs boson is looking for signs of physics which go beyond the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. Among possible theories for physics beyond Standard Model, Supersymmetry seems to be the most promising one. This theory indeed addresses the Standard Model naturalness problem and offers a perfect candidate for the dark matter. Within this scenario the search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark, called stop, plays a key role. The ATLAS Experiment has developed a dedicated strategy for the discovery of this particle, focusing on achieving a complete coverage of the available parameter space for this particle, based on the combined search for all of its possible decay modes. The results obtained using the complete ATLAS 2012 statistics will be presented, targeting different decay modes and explaining the procedure to obtain the exclusion limits on the existence of a supersymmetric partner of the top quark at the electroweak scale.

Dondero, Paolo; Atlas Collaboration

2014-12-01

129

Alleviating Search Uncertainty through Concept Associations: Automatic Indexing, Co-Occurrence Analysis, and Parallel Computing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Grounded on object filtering, automatic indexing, and co-occurrence analysis, an experiment was performed using a parallel supercomputer to analyze over 400,000 abstracts in an INSPEC computer engineering collection. A user evaluation revealed that system-generated thesauri were better than the human-generated INSPEC subject thesaurus in concept…

Chen, Hsinchun; Martinez, Joanne; Kirchhoff, Amy; Ng, Tobun D.; Schatz, Bruce R.

1998-01-01

130

A Ka-band direct oscillation HBT VCO MMIC with a parallel negative resistor circuit  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a low phase noise Ka-band VCO MMIC employing InGaP\\/GaAs HBT processes. The VCO has the following two features: a novel circuit comprising negative resistors arranged in parallel that achieves a steep phase slope, and a tuning circuit with two resonators that offers a wide tuning range and steep phase slope. Measurement results of the developed VCO show

Kenichiro Choumei; Takayuki Matsuzuka; Satoshi Suzuki; Satoshi Hamano; Kenji Kawakami; Nobuyuki Ogawa; Makio Komaru; Yoshio Matsuda

2005-01-01

131

Search for direct photons in. Upsilon. (4 S ) decays  

SciTech Connect

We have searched for photon signals in {Upsilon}(4{ital S}) decays, indicative of large decay rates involving annihilation of the {ital b{bar b}} pair rather than decays to {ital B{bar B}} meson pairs. We do not observe any evidence for such signals. We also obtain a model-independent upper limit of (4.5--6.0)% for the branching ratio of {Upsilon}(4{ital S}){r arrow}{ital ggX}, for 0{lt}{ital M}({ital X}){lt}1.2 GeV, at 90% confidence level.

Narain, M.; Heintz, U.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lovelock, D.M.J.; Schamberger, R.D.; Willins, J.; Yanagisawa, C. (Physics Department, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (USA)); Franzini, P.; Tuts, P.M. (Columbia University, New York, NY (USA))

1990-11-26

132

Earthquake Location, Direct, Global-Search Methods E 2449 Earthquake Location,  

E-print Network

Earthquake Location, Direct, Global-Search Methods E 2449 Earthquake Location, Direct, Global Kingdom Article Outline Glossary Definition of the Subject Introduction The Earthquake Location Problem or temporal av- erage of some characteristic of an earthquake, such as surface shaking intensity or moment

133

Current Results and Future Directions of the Pulsar Search Collaboratory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Pulsar Search Collaboratory (PSC) is a joint partnership between the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) and West Virginia University (WVU). The ultimate goal of the PSC is to interest students in science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) fields by engaging them in conducting authentic scientific research-specifically the search for new pulsars. Of the 33 schools in the original PSC program, 13 come from rural school districts; one third of these are from schools where over 50% participate in the Free/Reduced School Lunch program. We are reaching first generation college-goers. For students, the program succeeds in building confidence in students, rapport with the scientists involved in the project, and greater comfort with team-work. We see additional gains in girls, as they see themselves more as scientists after participating in the PSC program, which is an important predictor of success in STEM fields. The PSC has had several scientific successes as well. To date, PSC students have made two astronomical discoveries: a 4.8-s pulsar and bright radio burst of astrophysical origin, most likely from a sporadic neutron star. We will report on the status of the project including new evaluation data. We will also describe PSC-West, an experiment to involve schools in Illinois and Wisconsin using primarily online tools for professional development of teachers and coaching of students. Knowledge gained through our efforts with PSC-West will assist the PSC team in scaling up the project.

Heatherly, Sue Ann; Rosen, R.; McLaughlin, M.; Lorimer, D.

2011-01-01

134

Astrophysical motivation for directed searches for a stochastic gravitational wave background  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The nearby Universe is expected to create an anisotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background (SGWB). Different algorithms have been developed and implemented to search for isotropic and anisotropic SGWBs. The aim of this paper is to quantify the advantage of an optimal anisotropic search, specifically comparing a point source with an isotropic background. Clusters of galaxies appear as point sources to a network of ground-based laser-interferometric detectors. The optimal search strategy for these sources is a "directed radiometer search." We show that the flux of SGWBs created by the millisecond pulsars in the Virgo cluster produces a significantly stronger signal than the nearly isotropic background of unresolved sources of the same kind. We compute their strain power spectra for different cosmologies and the distribution of populations over redshifts. We conclude that a localized source, like the Virgo cluster, can be resolved from the isotropic background with very high significance using the directed-search algorithm. For backgrounds dominated by nearby sources, up to a redshift of about 3, we show that the directed search for a localized source can have a signal-to-noise ratio that is greater than that for the all-sky integrated isotropic search.

Mazumder, Nairwita; Mitra, Sanjit; Dhurandhar, Sanjeev

2014-04-01

135

A comparison between direct and indirect dark matter search  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We carry out a comparison between different kinds of experiments for the detection of neutralino dark matter. In particular, we compare the theoretical predictions for the direct detection of these particles, through their elastic scattering on target nuclei through nuclear recoils, with those for their indirect detection through the gamma rays produced by their annihilation in the galactic centre. For the comparison we pay special attention to points which will be testable by very sensitive experiments, such as e.g. EDELWEISS II and GENIUS for direct detection, and GLAST for indirect detection. We perform the analysis in the framework of a general SUGRA theory, allowing the presence of non-universal soft scalar and gaugino masses in the parameter space. As a conclusion, we find that indirect detection experiments will be able to test larger regions of the parameter space than direct detection ones.

Mambrini, Y.; Muñoz, C.

2004-10-01

136

Lick Observatory Optical SETI: targeted search and new directions.  

PubMed

Lick Observatory's Optical SETI (search for extraterrestrial intelligence) program has been in regular operation for 4.5 years. We have observed 4,605 stars of spectral types F-M within 200 light-years of Earth. Occasionally, we have appended objects of special interest, such as stars with known planetary systems. We have observed 14 candidate signals ("triple coincidences"), all but one of which are explained by transient local difficulties. Additional observations of the remaining candidate have failed to confirm arriving pulse events. We now plan to proceed in a more economical manner by operating in an unattended drift scan mode. Between operational and equipment modifications, efficiency will more than double. PMID:16225433

Stone, R P S; Wright, S A; Drake, F; Muñoz, M; Treffers, R; Werthimer, D

2005-10-01

137

Parallel effects of memory set activation and search on timing and working memory capacity  

PubMed Central

Accurately estimating a time interval is required in everyday activities such as driving or cooking. Estimating time is relatively easy, provided a person attends to it. But a brief shift of attention to another task usually interferes with timing. Most processes carried out concurrently with timing interfere with it. Curiously, some do not. Literature on a few processes suggests a general proposition, the Timing and Complex-Span Hypothesis: A process interferes with concurrent timing if and only if process performance is related to complex span. Complex-span is the number of items correctly recalled in order, when each item presented for study is followed by a brief activity. Literature on task switching, visual search, memory search, word generation and mental time travel supports the hypothesis. Previous work found that another process, activation of a memory set in long term memory, is not related to complex-span. If the Timing and Complex-Span Hypothesis is true, activation should not interfere with concurrent timing in dual-task conditions. We tested such activation in single-task memory search task conditions and in dual-task conditions where memory search was executed with concurrent timing. In Experiment 1, activating a memory set increased reaction time, with no significant effect on time production. In Experiment 2, set size and memory set activation were manipulated. Activation and set size had a puzzling interaction for time productions, perhaps due to difficult conditions, leading us to use a related but easier task in Experiment 3. In Experiment 3 increasing set size lengthened time production, but memory activation had no significant effect. Results here and in previous literature on the whole support the Timing and Complex-Span Hypotheses. Results also support a sequential organization of activation and search of memory. This organization predicts activation and set size have additive effects on reaction time and multiplicative effects on percent correct, which was found. PMID:25120502

Schweickert, Richard; Fortin, Claudette; Xi, Zhuangzhuang; Viau-Quesnel, Charles

2014-01-01

138

Chaining direct memory access data transfer operations for compute nodes in a parallel computer  

DOEpatents

Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for chaining DMA data transfer operations for compute nodes in a parallel computer that include: receiving, by an origin DMA engine on an origin node in an origin injection FIFO buffer for the origin DMA engine, a RGET data descriptor specifying a DMA transfer operation data descriptor on the origin node and a second RGET data descriptor on the origin node, the second RGET data descriptor specifying a target RGET data descriptor on the target node, the target RGET data descriptor specifying an additional DMA transfer operation data descriptor on the origin node; creating, by the origin DMA engine, an RGET packet in dependence upon the RGET data descriptor, the RGET packet containing the DMA transfer operation data descriptor and the second RGET data descriptor; and transferring, by the origin DMA engine to a target DMA engine on the target node, the RGET packet.

Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN)

2010-09-28

139

Direct Search Methods on Parallel Machines 28 ment of Mathematical Sciences, Rice University, Houston, Texas 772511892.  

E-print Network

Information, Inc., Philadel­ phia, Pennsylvania. [19] W. W. Symes, Velocity inversion: A case study in infinite­dimensional optimization, Mathe­ matical Programming, 48 (1990), pp. 71--102. [20] W. W. Symes

Torczon, Virginia

140

Spiral search: a hydrophobic-core directed local search for simplified PSP on 3D FCC lattice  

PubMed Central

Background Protein structure prediction is an important but unsolved problem in biological science. Predicted structures vary much with energy functions and structure-mapping spaces. In our simplified ab initio protein structure prediction methods, we use hydrophobic-polar (HP) energy model for structure evaluation, and 3-dimensional face-centred-cubic lattice for structure mapping. For HP energy model, developing a compact hydrophobic-core (H-core) is essential for the progress of the search. The H-core helps find a stable structure with the lowest possible free energy. Results In order to build H-cores, we present a new Spiral Search algorithm based on tabu-guided local search. Our algorithm uses a novel H-core directed guidance heuristic that squeezes the structure around a dynamic hydrophobic-core centre. We applied random walks to break premature H-cores and thus to avoid early convergence. We also used a novel relay-restart technique to handle stagnation. Conclusions We have tested our algorithms on a set of benchmark protein sequences. The experimental results show that our spiral search algorithm outperforms the state-of-the-art local search algorithms for simplified protein structure prediction. We also experimentally show the effectiveness of the relay-restart. PMID:23368706

2013-01-01

141

Analyzing synchronous and asynchronous parallel distributed genetic algorithms  

Microsoft Academic Search

Parallel genetic algorithms (PGAs) have been traditionally used to extend the power of serial genetic algorithms (GAs), since they often can be tailored to provide a larger efficiency on complex search problems. In a PGA several sub-algorithms cooperate in parallel to solve the problem. This high-level definition has led to a considerable number of different implementations that preclude direct comparisons

Enrique Alba; José M. Troya

2001-01-01

142

Higgs boson coupling measurements and direct searches as complementary probes of the phenomenological MSSM  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) can be probed via many avenues, such as by precision measurements of the couplings of the ˜126 GeV Higgs boson, as well as the direct searches for supersymmetry (SUSY) partners. We examine the connection between these two collider observables at the LHC and International Linear Collider (ILC) in the 19 /20 -parameter phenomenological MSSM (pMSSM). Within this scenario, we address two questions: (i) How will potentially null direct searches for SUSY at the LHC influence the predicted properties of the lightest SUSY Higgs boson? (ii) What can be learned about the properties of the superpartners from precision measurements of the Higgs boson couplings? In this paper, we examine these questions by employing three different large sets of pMSSM models with either the neutralino or gravitino being the lightest supersymmetric particle. We make use of the ATLAS direct SUSY searches at the 7 /8 TeV LHC as well as expected results from 14 TeV operations, and the anticipated precision measurements of the Higgs boson couplings at the 14 TeV LHC and at the ILC. We demonstrate that the future Higgs coupling determinations can deeply probe the pMSSM parameter space and, in particular, can observe the effects of models that are projected to evade the direct searches at the 14 TeV LHC with 3 ab-1 of integrated luminosity. In addition, we compare the reach of the Higgs coupling determinations to the direct heavy Higgs searches in the MA-tan ? plane and show that they cover orthogonal regions. This analysis demonstrates the complementarity of the direct and indirect approaches in searching for supersymmetry, and the importance of precision studies of the properties of the Higgs boson.

Cahill-Rowley, M.; Hewett, J.; Ismail, A.; Rizzo, T.

2014-11-01

143

Higgs Coupling Measurements and Direct Searches as Complementary Probes of the pMSSM  

E-print Network

The parameter space of the MSSM can be probed via many avenues, such as by pre- cision measurements of the couplings of the ~126 GeV Higgs boson, as well as the direct searches for SUSY partners. We examine the connection between these two collider observables at the LHC and ILC in the 19/20-parameter p(henomenological)MSSM. Within this scenario, we address two questions: (i) How will potentially null direct searches for SUSY at the LHC influence the predicted properties of the lightest SUSY Higgs boson? (ii) What can be learned about the properties of the superpartners from precision measurements of the Higgs boson couplings? In this paper, we examine these questions by employing three different large sets of pMSSM models with either the neutralino or gravitino being the LSP. We make use of the ATLAS direct SUSY searches at the 7/8 TeV LHC as well as expected results from 14 TeV operations, and the anticipated precision measurements of the Higgs Boson couplings at the 14 TeV LHC and at the ILC. We demonstrate that the future Higgs coupling determinations can deeply probe the pMSSM parameter space and, in particular, can observe the effects of models that are projected to evade the direct searches at the 14 TeV LHC with 3 inverse ab of integrated luminosity. In addition, we compare the reach of the Higgs coupling determinations to the direct heavy Higgs searches in the MA - tan beta plane and show that they cover orthogonal regions. This analysis demonstrates the complementarity of the direct and indirect approaches in searching for Supersymmetry, and the importance of precision studies of the properties of the Higgs Boson.

M. Cahill-Rowley; J. Hewett; A. Ismail; T. Rizzo

2014-07-25

144

Massively parallel computing and the search for jets and black holes at the LHC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Massively parallel computing at the LHC could be the next leap necessary to reach an era of new discoveries at the LHC after the Higgs discovery. Scientific computing is a critical component of the LHC experiment, including operation, trigger, LHC computing GRID, simulation, and analysis. One way to improve the physics reach of the LHC is to take advantage of the flexibility of the trigger system by integrating coprocessors based on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) or the Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture into its server farm. This cutting edge technology provides not only the means to accelerate existing algorithms, but also the opportunity to develop new algorithms that select events in the trigger that previously would have evaded detection. In this paper we describe new algorithms that would allow us to select in the trigger new topological signatures that include non-prompt jet and black hole-like objects in the silicon tracker.

Halyo, V.; LeGresley, P.; Lujan, P.

2014-04-01

145

Taming astrophysical bias in direct dark matter searches  

SciTech Connect

We explore systematic biases in the identification of dark matter in future direct detection experiments and compare the reconstructed dark matter properties when assuming a self-consistent dark matter distribution function and the standard Maxwellian velocity distribution. We find that the systematic bias on the dark matter mass and cross-section determination arising from wrong assumptions for its distribution function is of order ? 1?. A much larger systematic bias can arise if wrong assumptions are made on the underlying Milky Way mass model. However, in both cases the bias is substantially mitigated by marginalizing over galactic model parameters. We additionally show that the velocity distribution can be reconstructed in an unbiased manner for typical dark matter parameters. Our results highlight both the robustness of the dark matter mass and cross-section determination using the standard Maxwellian velocity distribution and the importance of accounting for astrophysical uncertainties in a statistically consistent fashion.

Pato, Miguel [Physik-Department T30d, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße, 85748 Garching (Germany); Strigari, Louis E. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Trotta, Roberto [Astrophysics Group and Imperial Centre for Inference and Cosmology, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Bertone, Gianfranco, E-mail: miguel.pato@tum.de, E-mail: strigari@stanford.edu, E-mail: r.trotta@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: gf.bertone@gmail.com [GRAPPA Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2013-02-01

146

Taming astrophysical bias in direct dark matter searches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We explore systematic biases in the identification of dark matter in future direct detection experiments and compare the reconstructed dark matter properties when assuming a self-consistent dark matter distribution function and the standard Maxwellian velocity distribution. We find that the systematic bias on the dark matter mass and cross-section determination arising from wrong assumptions for its distribution function is of order ~ 1?. A much larger systematic bias can arise if wrong assumptions are made on the underlying Milky Way mass model. However, in both cases the bias is substantially mitigated by marginalizing over galactic model parameters. We additionally show that the velocity distribution can be reconstructed in an unbiased manner for typical dark matter parameters. Our results highlight both the robustness of the dark matter mass and cross-section determination using the standard Maxwellian velocity distribution and the importance of accounting for astrophysical uncertainties in a statistically consistent fashion.

Pato, Miguel; Strigari, Louis E.; Trotta, Roberto; Bertone, Gianfranco

2013-02-01

147

Characterization of Neutron Backgrounds for Direct Dark Matter Searches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Direct dark matter experiments generally cannot distinguish between nuclear recoils caused by Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) and those caused by neutron backgrounds. It is therefore crucial that all sources of neutron background are well understood and accounted for when claiming a discovery or reporting limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross section. One source of neutrons that is not well understood results from cosmogenic muon interactions in the material surrounding a detector. The Neutron Multiplicity Meter in the Soudan cavern is a gadolinium-doped water Cherenkov detector capable of detecting high multiplicity neutron showers resulting from fast neutrons incident on a lead target. This measurement is the first such measurement obtained without a liquid scintillator detector medium; muon and neutron spallation is media-dependent, and because neutron shield technology for dark matter detectors is moving towards water, this is an important measurement. The integrated fast neutron flux in the Soudan cavern is reported as a linear function of the power, alpha, of the neutron angular distribution with the zenith angle: F = 4.8x10-9 +/- 3.5x10-10 + (5.4x10-10 +/- 1.5x10-10)alpha. Technological studies of neutron detection with gadolinium-doped water are also reported here. The neutron detection efficiency of a cylindrical 3.5 kL detector is measured at 70% for neutrons in the center of the detector. In addition, other improvements to water Cherenkov technology are explored, namely the addition of water-soluble wavelength-shifting chemicals. The wavelength-shifting chemical 4-Methylumbelliferone has been shown here to increase the measured light output of Cherenkov radiation resulting from neutron capture showers by a factor of 1.7.

Sweany, Melinda Dominique

148

Nutritional endoderm in a direct developing frog: a potential parallel to the evolution of the amniote egg.  

PubMed

The egg of the direct-developing frog, Eleutherodactylus coqui, has 20 x the volume as that of the model amphibian, Xenopus laevis. Increased egg size led to the origin of nutritional endoderm, a novel cell type that provides nutrition but does not differentiate into digestive tract tissues. As the E. coqui endoderm develops, a distinct boundary exists between differentiating intestinal cells and large yolky cells, which persists even when yolk platelets are depleted. The yolky cells do not become tissues of the digestive tract and are lost, as shown by histology and lineage tracing. EcSox17, an endodermal transcriptional factor, did not distinguish these two cell types, however. When cleavage of the yolky cells was inhibited, embryogenesis continued, indicating that some degree of incomplete cleavage can be tolerated. The presence of cellularized nutritional endoderm in E. coqui may parallel changes that occurred in the evolution of the amniote egg 360 million years ago. PMID:17436277

Buchholz, Daniel R; Singamsetty, Srikanth; Karadge, Uma; Williamson, Sean; Langer, Carrie E; Elinson, Richard P

2007-05-01

149

Twin Similarities in Holland Types as Shown by Scores on the Self-Directed Search  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the degree of similarity between scores on the Self-Directed Search from one set of identical twins. Predictably, a high congruence score was found. Results from a biographical sheet are discussed as well as implications of the results for career counselors.

Chauvin, Ida; McDaniel, Janelle R.; Miller, Mark J.; King, James M.; Eddlemon, Ondie L. M.

2012-01-01

150

[Promising directions of search for antihypoxants and targets of their action].  

PubMed

The modem notions about mechanisms of the organism adaptation to hypoxia are reviewed. Promising new directions in the search for effective medicinal agents with antihypoxant action are proposed. Probable targets for antihypoxant action, including mitochondrial ATP-dependent potassium channel (mito-KATP), mitochondrial megapore (mPTP), and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alfa (HIF-1alpha) are discussed. PMID:23901468

Novikov, V E; Levchenkova, O S

2013-01-01

151

A Comparison of Satisfied and Dissatisfied Users of Holland's Self Directed Search (SDS).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Self-Directed Search for Educational and Vocational Planning (SDS) is a self-scoring, self-administering instrument designed by John L. Holland, author of the Vocational Reference Inventory. Preliminary use of the SDS led to the speculation that some people were very dissatisfied with their results and others were quite pleased. Of the 4,631…

Collins, Anne M.; Sedlacek, William E.

152

Multi-Species Fluxes for the Parallel Quiet Direct Simulation (QDS) Method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fluxes of multiple species are implemented in the Quiet Direct Simulation (QDS) scheme for gas flows. Each molecular species streams independently. All species are brought to local equilibrium at the end of each time step. The multi species scheme is compared to DSMC simulation, on a test case of a Mach 20 flow of a xenon/helium mixture over a forward facing step. Depletion of the heavier species in the bow shock and the near-wall layer are seen. The multi-species QDS code is then used to model the flow in a pulsed-pressure chemical vapour deposition reactor set up for carbon film deposition. The injected gas is a mixture of methane and hydrogen. The temporal development of the spatial distribution of methane over the substrate is tracked.

Cave, H. M.; Lim, C.-W.; Jermy, M. C.; Krumdieck, S. P.; Smith, M. R.; Lin, Y.-J.; Wu, J.-S.

2011-05-01

153

Advancing predictive models for particulate formation in turbulent flames via massively parallel direct numerical simulations.  

PubMed

Combustion of fossil fuels is likely to continue for the near future due to the growing trends in energy consumption worldwide. The increase in efficiency and the reduction of pollutant emissions from combustion devices are pivotal to achieving meaningful levels of carbon abatement as part of the ongoing climate change efforts. Computational fluid dynamics featuring adequate combustion models will play an increasingly important role in the design of more efficient and cleaner industrial burners, internal combustion engines, and combustors for stationary power generation and aircraft propulsion. Today, turbulent combustion modelling is hindered severely by the lack of data that are accurate and sufficiently complete to assess and remedy model deficiencies effectively. In particular, the formation of pollutants is a complex, nonlinear and multi-scale process characterized by the interaction of molecular and turbulent mixing with a multitude of chemical reactions with disparate time scales. The use of direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring a state of the art description of the underlying chemistry and physical processes has contributed greatly to combustion model development in recent years. In this paper, the analysis of the intricate evolution of soot formation in turbulent flames demonstrates how DNS databases are used to illuminate relevant physico-chemical mechanisms and to identify modelling needs. PMID:25024412

Bisetti, Fabrizio; Attili, Antonio; Pitsch, Heinz

2014-08-13

154

Search for direct CP-violation in singly-Cabibbo suppressed D+- --> K+ K- pi+- decays  

E-print Network

We report on a search for direct CP asymmetry in the singly Cabibbo-suppressed decay D+- --> K+ K- pi+- using a data sample of 476 fb-1 accumulated with the BaBar detector running at and just below the Y(4S) resonance. The CP-violating decay rate asymmetry A_CP is determined to be (0.35 +- 0.30 +- 0.15)%. Model-dependent and model-independent Dalitz plot analysis techniques are used to search for CP-violating asymmetries in the various intermediate states.

Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; So, R Y; Khan, A; Blinov, V E; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Yushkov, A N; Bondioli, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; West, C A; Eisner, A M; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Chao, D S; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Flood, K T; Hitlin, D G; Ongmongkolkul, P; Porter, F C; Rakitin, A Y; Andreassen, R; Huard, Z; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Sun, L; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Spaan, B; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Luppi, E; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Vetere, M Lo; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Bhuyan, B; Prasad, V; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Edwards, A J; Adametz, A; Uwer, U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Dauncey, P D; Mallik, U; Chen, C; Cochran, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Grosdidier, G; Diberder, F Le; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Griessinger, K; Hafner, A; Prencipe, E; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; Behn, E; Cenci, R; Hamilton, B; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Dallapiccola, C; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Sciolla, G; Cheaib, R; Lindemann, D; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Biassoni, P; Neri, N; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; De Nardo, G; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Martinelli, M; Raven, G; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Wang, W F; Honscheid, K; Kass, R; Brau, J; Frey, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Feltresi, E; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Akar, S; Ben-Haim, E; Bomben, M; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Sitt, S; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Pacetti, S; Rossi, A; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Casarosa, G; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Oberhof, B; Paoloni, E; Perez, A; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Pegna, D Lopes; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Piredda, G; Bunger, C; Grunberg, O; Hartmann, T; Leddig, T; Voss, C; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cartaro, C; Convery, M R; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Ebert, M; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Lewis, P; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Randle-Conde, A; Sekula, S J; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Miyashita, T S; Puccio, E M T; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Gorodeisky, R; Guttman, N; Peimer, D R; Soffer, A; Lund, P; Spanier, S M; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Zambito, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Oyanguren, A; Villanueva-Perez, P; Ahmed, H; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bernlochner, F U; Choi, H H F; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Tasneem, N; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Wu, S L

2012-01-01

155

Adaptive particle-based pore-level modeling of incompressible fluid flow in porous media: a direct and parallel approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a three-dimensional fully dynamic parallel particle-based model for direct pore-level simulation of incompressible viscous fluid flow in disordered porous media. The model was developed from scratch and is capable of simulating flow directly in three-dimensional high-resolution microtomography images of naturally occurring or man-made porous systems. It reads the images as input where the position of the solid walls are given. The entire medium, i.e., solid and fluid, is then discretized using particles. The model is based on Moving Particle Semi-implicit (MPS) technique. We modify this technique in order to improve its stability. The model handles highly irregular fluid-solid boundaries effectively. It takes into account viscous pressure drop in addition to the gravity forces. It conserves mass and can automatically detect any false connectivity with fluid particles in the neighboring pores and throats. It includes a sophisticated algorithm to automatically split and merge particles to maintain hydraulic connectivity of extremely narrow conduits. Furthermore, it uses novel methods to handle particle inconsistencies and open boundaries. To handle the computational load, we present a fully parallel version of the model that runs on distributed memory computer clusters and exhibits excellent scalability. The model is used to simulate unsteady-state flow problems under different conditions starting from straight noncircular capillary tubes with different cross-sectional shapes, i.e., circular/elliptical, square/rectangular and triangular cross-sections. We compare the predicted dimensionless hydraulic conductances with the data available in the literature and observe an excellent agreement. We then test the scalability of our parallel model with two samples of an artificial sandstone, samples A and B, with different volumes and different distributions (non-uniform and uniform) of solid particles among the processors. An excellent linear scalability is obtained for sample B that has more uniform distribution of solid particles leading to a superior load balancing. The model is then used to simulate fluid flow directly in REV size three-dimensional x-ray images of a naturally occurring sandstone. We analyze the quality and consistency of the predicted flow behavior and calculate absolute permeability, which compares well with the available network modeling and Lattice-Boltzmann permeabilities available in the literature for the same sandstone. We show that the model conserves mass very well and is stable computationally even at very narrow fluid conduits. The transient- and the steady-state fluid flow patterns are presented as well as the steady-state flow rates to compute absolute permeability. Furthermore, we discuss the vital role of our adaptive particle resolution scheme in preserving the original pore connectivity of the samples and their narrow channels through splitting and merging of fluid particles.

Ovaysi, S.; Piri, M.

2009-12-01

156

Cognitive Architecture for Direction of Attention Founded on Subliminal Memory Searches, Pseudorandom and Nonstop  

E-print Network

By way of explaining how a brain works logically, human associative memory is modeled with logical and memory neurons, corresponding to standard digital circuits. The resulting cognitive architecture incorporates basic psychological elements such as short term and long term memory. Novel to the architecture are memory searches using cues chosen pseudorandomly from short term memory. Recalls alternated with sensory images, many tens per second, are analyzed subliminally as an ongoing process, to determine a direction of attention in short term memory.

Burger, J R

2008-01-01

157

The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth study: rationale, findings, and future directions.  

PubMed

The SEARCH for Diabetes in Youth (SEARCH) study was initiated in 2000, with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and support from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, to address major knowledge gaps in the understanding of childhood diabetes. SEARCH is being conducted at five sites across the U.S. and represents the largest, most diverse study of diabetes among U.S. youth. An active registry of youth diagnosed with diabetes at age <20 years allows the assessment of prevalence (in 2001 and 2009), annual incidence (since 2002), and trends by age, race/ethnicity, sex, and diabetes type. Prevalence increased significantly from 2001 to 2009 for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in most age, sex, and race/ethnic groups. SEARCH has also established a longitudinal cohort to assess the natural history and risk factors for acute and chronic diabetes-related complications as well as the quality of care and quality of life of persons with diabetes from diagnosis into young adulthood. Many youth with diabetes, particularly those from low-resourced racial/ethnic minority populations, are not meeting recommended guidelines for diabetes care. Markers of micro- and macrovascular complications are evident in youth with either diabetes type, highlighting the seriousness of diabetes in this contemporary cohort. This review summarizes the study methods, describes key registry and cohort findings and their clinical and public health implications, and discusses future directions. PMID:25414389

Hamman, Richard F; Bell, Ronny A; Dabelea, Dana; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Dolan, Lawrence; Imperatore, Giuseppina; Lawrence, Jean M; Linder, Barbara; Marcovina, Santica M; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J; Pihoker, Catherine; Rodriguez, Beatriz L; Saydah, Sharon

2014-12-01

158

Applicability of preparative overpressured layer chromatography and direct bioautography in search of antibacterial chamomile compounds.  

PubMed

In situ sample preparation and preparative overpressured layer chromatography (OPLC) fractionation on a 0.5 mm thick adsorbent layer of chamomile flower methanol extract prepurified by conventional gravitation accelerated column chromatography were applied in searching for bioactive components. Sample cleanup in situ on the adsorbent layer subsequent to sample application was performed using mobile phase flow in the opposite direction (the input and output of the eluent was exchanged). The antibacterial effect of the fractions obtained from the stepwise gradient OPLC separation with the flow in the normal direction was evaluated by direct bioautography against two Gram-negative bacteria: the luminescence gene tagged plant pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola, and the naturally luminescent marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. The fractions having strong activity were analyzed by SPME-GC/MS and HPLC/MS/MS. Mainly essential oil components, coumarins, flavonoids, phenolic acids, and fatty acids were tentatively identified in the fractions. PMID:24645496

Móricz, Agnes M; Ott, Péter G; Alberti, Agnes; Böszörményi, Andrea; Lemberkovics, Eva; Szoke, Eva; Kéry, Agnes; Mincsovics, Emil

2013-01-01

159

Density matrix search using direct inversion in the iterative subspace as a linear scaling alternative to diagonalization in  

E-print Network

Density matrix search using direct inversion in the iterative subspace as a linear scaling alternative to diagonalization in electronic structure calculations Xiaosong Li Department of Chemistry, Wayne of the key bottlenecks. Density matrix search methods provide an efficient linear scaling approach

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

160

Light neutralino dark matter: direct/indirect detection and collider searches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study the neutralino being the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP) as a cold Dark Matter (DM) candidate with a mass less than 40 GeV in the framework of the Next-to-Minimal-Supersymmetric-Standard-Model (NMSSM). We find that with the current collider constraints from LEP, the Tevatron and the LHC, there are three types of light DM solutions consistent with the direct/indirect searches as well as the relic abundance considerations: ( i) A 1, H 1-funnels, ( ii) stau coannihilation and ( iii) sbottom coannihilation. Type-( i) may take place in any theory with a light scalar (or pseudo-scalar) near the LSP pair threshold; while Type-( ii) and ( iii) could occur in the framework of Minimal-Supersymmetric-Standard-Model (MSSM) as well. We present a comprehensive study on the properties of these solutions and point out their immediate relevance to the experiments of the underground direct detection such as superCDMS and LUX/LZ, and the astro-physical indirect search such as Fermi-LAT. We also find that the decays of the SM-like Higgs boson may be modified appreciably and the new decay channels to the light SUSY particles may be sizable. The new light CP-even and CP-odd Higgs bosons will decay to a pair of LSPs as well as other observable final states, leading to interesting new Higgs phenomenology at colliders. For the light sfermion searches, the signals would be very challenging to observe at the LHC given the current bounds. However, a high energy and high luminosity lepton collider, such as the ILC, would be able to fully cover these scenarios by searching for events with large missing energy plus charged tracks or displaced vertices.

Han, Tao; Liu, Zhen; Su, Shufang

2014-08-01

161

Template-directed atomically precise self-organization of perfectly ordered parallel cerium silicide nanowire arrays on Si(110)-16?×?2 surfaces  

PubMed Central

The perfectly ordered parallel arrays of periodic Ce silicide nanowires can self-organize with atomic precision on single-domain Si(110)-16?×?2 surfaces. The growth evolution of self-ordered parallel Ce silicide nanowire arrays is investigated over a broad range of Ce coverages on single-domain Si(110)-16?×?2 surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Three different types of well-ordered parallel arrays, consisting of uniformly spaced and atomically identical Ce silicide nanowires, are self-organized through the heteroepitaxial growth of Ce silicides on a long-range grating-like 16?×?2 reconstruction at the deposition of various Ce coverages. Each atomically precise Ce silicide nanowire consists of a bundle of chains and rows with different atomic structures. The atomic-resolution dual-polarity STM images reveal that the interchain coupling leads to the formation of the registry-aligned chain bundles within individual Ce silicide nanowire. The nanowire width and the interchain coupling can be adjusted systematically by varying the Ce coverage on a Si(110) surface. This natural template-directed self-organization of perfectly regular parallel nanowire arrays allows for the precise control of the feature size and positions within ±0.2 nm over a large area. Thus, it is a promising route to produce parallel nanowire arrays in a straightforward, low-cost, high-throughput process. PMID:24188092

2013-01-01

162

The degenerate scenario in the NMSSM: Direct singlino-like neutralino searches with a gravitino LSP  

E-print Network

A two-component dark matter model is studied adopting the degenerate scenario in the R-parity conserving NMSSM. The gravitino LSP and the neutralino NLSP are extremely degenerate in mass, avoiding the BBN bounds and obtaining a high reheating temperature for thermal leptogenesis to work. In this model both gravitino (absolutely stable) and neutralino (quasi-stable) contribute to dark matter, and direct detection searches for neutralino are discussed. Points that survive all the constraints correspond to a singlino-like neutralino.

Grigoris Panotopoulos

2011-03-01

163

Search for direct and indirect unitarity violation in neutrino oscillation experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

If three standard neutrinos mix with other degree of freedoms like sterile neutrinos, no matter how heavy the sterile neutrino masses are, it could result in the unitarity violation in the MNSP matrix. Nevertheless, the unitarity violation induced by the existence of light or heavy sterile neutrinos can have very different effects on neutrino oscillations, we call the former case direct unitarity violation and the later case the indirect unitarity violation. We will explain in this paper the difference of these two kinds of unitarity violations, then focus on the possibilities of searching the unitarity violation in neutrino oscillation experiments, of which the precision reactor experiments with multiple baselines are discussed in detail.

Luo, Shu

2014-08-01

164

Status and analysis system of directional dark matter search with nuclear emulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have been doing research and development for direct dark matter search by nuclear emulsion which is a solid state detector. This experiment enable directional detection of dark matter with the large mass target and model independent. Until now, we constructed a base of fully automatic analysis system and nuclear emulsion which can detect sub-micron tracks. We have demonstrated that it is possible to detect recoiled tracks of 100 nm or more by neutron irradiation. This track length is correspond to 37 keV in C(N,O) target. Additionally, we evaluated the angular resolution of the energy basis by using an ion implant system, and obtained 25 degrees or better resolution in 80 keV carbon ions. The fully automatic analysis system which can analyze very short tracks lead the experiment to next phase, we will do a quantitative study of the background toward gram scale test experiment at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory.

Katsuragawa, T.; Naka, T.; Asada, T.; Yoshimoto, M.; Hakamata, K.; Ishikawa, M.

2013-12-01

165

A Direct Dark Matter Search with the MAJORANA Low-Background Broad Energy Germanium Detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is well established that a significant portion of our Universe is comprised of invisible, non-luminous matter, commonly referred to as dark matter. The detection and characterization of this missing matter is an active area of research in cosmology and particle astrophysics. A general class of candidates for non-baryonic particle dark matter is weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). WIMPs emerge naturally from supersymmetry with predicted masses between 1--1000 GeV. There are many current and near-future experiments that may shed light on the nature of dark matter by directly detecting WIMP-nucleus scattering events. The MAJORANA experiment will use p-type point contact (PPC) germanium detectors as both the source and detector to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge. These detectors have both exceptional energy resolution and low-energy thresholds. The low-energy performance of PPC detectors, due to their low-capacitance point-contact design, makes them suitable for direct dark matter searches. As a part of the research and development efforts for the MAJORANA experiment, a custom Canberra PPC detector has been deployed at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility in Ripplemead, Virginia. This detector has been used to perform a search for low-mass (< 10 GeV) WIMP induced nuclear recoils using a 221.49 live-day exposure. It was found that events originating near the surface of the detector plague the signal region, even after all cuts. For this reason, only an upper limit on WIMP induced nuclear recoils was placed. This limit is inconsistent with several recent claims to have observed light WIMP based dark matter.

Finnerty, Padraic Seamus

166

Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or ‘multiplets’) which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic

P. Abreu; M. Aglietta; E. J. Ahn; I. F. M. Albuquerque; D. Allard; I. Allekotte; J. Allen; P. Allison; J. Alvarez Castillo; M. Ambrosio; A. Aminaei; L. Anchordoqui; S. Andringa; T. Anti?i?; A. Anzalone; C. Aramo; E. Arganda; F. Arqueros; H. Asorey; P. Assis; J. Aublin; M. Avenier; G. Avila; T. Bäcker; M. Balzer; K. B. Barber; A. F. Barbosa; R. Bardenet; S. L. C. Barroso; B. Baughman; J. Bäuml; J. J. Beatty; B. R. Becker; K. H. Becker; A. Bellétoile; J. A. Bellido; S. BenZvi; C. Berat; X. Bertou; P. L. Biermann; P. Billoir; F. Blanco; M. Blanco; H. Blümer; M. Bohá?ová; D. Boncioli; C. Bonifazi; R. Bonino; N. Borodai; J. Brack; P. Brogueira; W. C. Brown; R. Bruijn; P. Buchholz; A. Bueno; R. E. Burton; K. S. Caballero-Mora; L. Caramete; R. Caruso; A. Castellina; O. Catalano; G. Cataldi; L. Cazon; R. Cester; J. Chauvin; S. H. Cheng; A. Chiavassa; J. A. Chinellato; J. Chudoba; R. W. Clay; M. R. Coluccia; F. Contreras; H. Cook; M. J. Cooper; A. Cordier; S. Coutu; C. E. Covault; A. Creusot; J. Cronin; A. Curutiu; S. Dagoret-Campagne; R. Dallier; S. Dasso; K. Daumiller; B. R. Dawson; R. M. de Almeida; C. De Donato; S. J. de Jong; G. De La Vega; I. De Mitri; V. de Souza; K. D. de Vries; G. Decerprit; L. del Peral; M. del Río; O. Deligny; H. Dembinski; N. Dhital; C. Di Giulio; J. C. Diaz; M. L. Díaz Castro; P. N. Diep; C. Dobrigkeit; W. Docters; J. C. D’Olivo; P. N. Dong; A. Dorofeev; J. C. dos Anjos; M. T. Dova; D. D’Urso; I. Dutan; J. Ebr; R. Engel; M. Erdmann; C. O. Escobar; J. Espadanal; A. Etchegoyen; P. Facal San Luis; I. Fajardo Tapia; H. Falcke; G. Farrar; A. C. Fauth; N. Fazzini; A. P. Ferguson; A. Ferrero; B. Fick; A. Filevich; S. Fliescher; C. E. Fracchiolla; U. Fröhlich; B. Fuchs; R. Gaior; R. F. Gamarra; S. Gambetta; B. García; D. García Gámez; A. Gascon; H. Gemmeke; K. Gesterling; P. L. Ghia; U. Giaccari; M. Giller; H. Glass; M. S. Gold; G. Golup; F. Gomez Albarracin; M. Gómez Berisso; P. Gonçalves; D. Gonzalez; J. G. Gonzalez; B. Gookin; D. Góra; A. Gorgi; P. Gouffon; S. R. Gozzini; E. Grashorn; S. Grebe; N. Griffith; M. Grigat; A. F. Grillo; Y. Guardincerri; F. Guarino; G. P. Guedes; A. Guzman; J. D. Hague; P. Hansen; D. Harari; S. Harmsma; J. L. Harton; A. Haungs; T. Hebbeker; D. Heck; A. E. Herve; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; V. C. Holmes; P. Homola; J. R. Hörandel; A. Horneffer; M. Hrabovský; T. Huege; A. Insolia; F. Ionita; A. Italiano; C. Jarne; S. Jiraskova; M. Josebachuili; K. Kadija; K. H. Kampert; P. Karhan; B. Kégl; B. Keilhauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; E. Kemp; R. M. Kieckhafer; H. O. Klages; M. Kleifges; J. Kleinfeller; D.-H. Koang; K. Kotera; N. Krohm; O. Krömer; D. Kruppke-Hansen; F. Kuehn; D. Kuempel; J. K. Kulbartz; N. Kunka; G. La Rosa; C. Lachaud; P. Lautridou; M. S. A. B. Leão; D. Lebrun; P. Lebrun; M. A. Leigui de Oliveira; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. Lhenry-Yvon; K. Link; R. López; A. Lopez Agüera; K. Louedec; J. Lozano Bahilo; L. Lu; A. Lucero; M. Ludwig; H. Lyberis; M. C. Maccarone; S. Maldera; D. Mandat; P. Mantsch; A. G. Mariazzi; J. Marin; V. Marin; I. C. Maris; H. R. Marquez Falcon; G. Marsella; D. Martello; L. Martin; H. Martinez; O. Martínez Bravo; H. J. Mathes; J. A. J. Matthews; G. Matthiae; D. Maurizio; P. O. Mazur; G. Medina-Tanco; M. Melissas; D. Melo; E. Menichetti; A. Menshikov; P. Mertsch; C. Meurer; S. Mi?anovi?; M. I. Micheletti; W. Miller; L. Miramonti; L. Molina-Bueno; S. Mollerach; M. Monasor; D. Monnier Ragaigne; F. Montanet; B. Morales; C. Morello; E. Moreno; J. C. Moreno; M. Mostafá; C. A. Moura; S. Mueller; M. A. Muller; G. Müller; M. Münchmeyer; R. Mussa; G. Navarra; J. L. Navarro; S. Navas; P. Necesal; L. Nellen; A. Nelles; J. Neuser; P. T. Nhung; L. Niemietz; N. Nierstenhoefer; D. Nitz; D. Nosek; L. Nožka; M. Nyklicek; J. Oehlschläger; A. Olinto; P. Oliva; V. M. Olmos-Gilbaja; N. Pacheco; D. Pakk Selmi-Dei; M. Palatka; J. Pallotta; N. Palmieri; G. Parente; E. Parizot; A. Parra; R. D. Parsons; S. Pastor; T. Paul; M. Pech; R. Pelayo; I. M. Pepe; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; E. Petermann; S. Petrera; P. Petrinca; A. Petrolini; Y. Petrov; J. Petrovic; C. Pfendner; N. Phan; R. Piegaia; T. Pierog; P. Pieroni; M. Pimenta; V. Pirronello; M. Platino; V. H. Ponce; M. Pontz; P. Privitera; M. Prouza; E. J. Quel; S. Querchfeld; J. Rautenberg; O. Ravel; D. Ravignani; B. Revenu; J. Ridky; S. Riggi; M. Risse; P. Ristori; H. Rivera; V. Rizi; J. Roberts; C. Robledo; W. Rodrigues de Carvalho; G. Rodriguez; J. Rodriguez Martino; I. Rodriguez-Cabo; M. D. Rodríguez-Frías; G. Ros; J. Rosado; T. Rossler; M. Roth; B. Rouillé-d’Orfeuil; E. Roulet; A. C. Rovero; F. Salamida; H. Salazar; G. Salina; F. Sánchez; C. E. Santo; E. M. Santos; F. Sarazin; B. Sarkar; S. Sarkar; R. Sato; N. Scharf; V. Scherini; H. Schieler; P. Schiffer; A. Schmidt; F. Schmidt; O. Scholten; H. Schoorlemmer

2011-01-01

167

A class of trust-region methods for parallel optimization  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a new class of optimization methods that incorporates a Parallel Direct Search (PDS) method within a trust-region Newton framework. This approach combines the inherent parallelism of PDS with the rapid and robust convergence properties of Newton methods. Numerical tests have yielded favorable results for both standard test problems and engineering applications. In addition, the new method appears to be more robust in the presence of noisy functions that are inherent in many engineering simulations.

P. D. Hough; J. C. Meza

1999-03-01

168

J. Parallel Distrib. Comput. 72 (2012) 666677 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-print Network

-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud computing, computational resources are provided to remote users in the form of leases in the cloud system can improve the performance. When applying parallel processing in cloud computing Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction In cloud computing, a cloud is a cluster of distributed

Qin, Xiao

169

Identifying sneutrino dark matter: Interplay between the LHC and direct search  

SciTech Connect

Under R parity, the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is stable and may serve as a good dark matter candidate. The R parity can be naturally introduced with a gauge origin at the TeV scale. We go over why a TeV scale B-L gauge extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model is one of the most natural, if not demanded, low energy supersymmetric models. In the presence of a TeV scale Abelian gauge symmetry, the (predominantly) right-handed sneutrino LSP can be a good dark matter candidate. Its identification at the LHC is challenging because it does not carry any standard model charge. We show how we can use the correlation between the LHC experiments (dilepton resonance signals) and the direct dark matter search experiments (such as CDMS and XENON) to identify the right-handed sneutrino LSP dark matter in the B-L extended minimal supersymmetric standard model.

Hye-Sung L.; Li, Y.

2011-11-03

170

Identifying sneutrino dark matter: Interplay between the LHC and direct search  

SciTech Connect

Under R parity, the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is stable and may serve as a good dark matter candidate. The R parity can be naturally introduced with a gauge origin at the TeV scale. We go over why a TeV scale B-L gauge extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model is one of the most natural, if not demanded, low energy supersymmetric models. In the presence of a TeV scale Abelian gauge symmetry, the (predominantly) right-handed sneutrino LSP can be a good dark matter candidate. Its identification at the LHC is challenging because it does not carry any standard model charge. We show how we can use the correlation between the LHC experiments (dilepton resonance signals) and the direct dark matter search experiments (such as CDMS and XENON) to identify the right-handed sneutrino LSP dark matter in the B-L extended minimal supersymmetric standard model.

Lee, Hye-Sung; Li Yingchuan [Department of Physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2011-11-01

171

Prospects of dark matter direct search under deep sea water in India  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There is compelling evidence from cosmological and astrophysical observations that about one quarter of the energy density of the universe can be attributed to cold dark matter (CDM), whose nature and properties are still unknown. Around the world large numbers of experiments are using different techniques of dark matter direct and indirect detections. According to their experimental requirements location of the experiment prefer to use either underground, under ice, or under sea water. Country like India, digging underground cavern and long tunnel is not very convenient. Therefore, authors look from the either solutions of this problem preferring to use deep sea water. In this article, we discuss the pros and corns of use of deep sea water in the dark matter search.

Singh, V.; Subrahmanyam, V. S.; Singh, L.; Singh, M. K.; Sharma, V.; Chouhan, N. S.; Jaiswal, M. K.; Soma, A. K.

2013-04-01

172

Secondary scintillation yield from GEM and THGEM gaseous electron multipliers for direct dark matter search  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The search for alternatives to PMTs as photosensors in optical TPCs for rare event detection has significantly increased in the last few years. In particular, in view of the next generation large volume detectors, the use of photosensors with lower natural radioactivity, such as large area APDs or GM-APDs, with the additional possibility of sparse surface coverage, triggered the intense study of secondary scintillation production in micropattern electron multipliers, such as GEMs and THGEMs, as alternatives to the commonly used uniform electric field region between two parallel meshes. The much higher scintillation output obtained from the electron avalanches in such microstructures presents an advantage in those situations. The accurate knowledge of the amount of such scintillation is important for correct detector simulation and optimization. It will also serve as a benchmark for software tools developed and/or under development for the calculation of the amount of such scintillation.The secondary scintillation yield, or electroluminescence yield, in the electron avalanches of GEMs and THGEMs operating in gaseous xenon and argon has been determined for different gas pressures. At 1 bar, THGEMs deliver electroluminescence yields that are more than one order of magnitude higher when compared to those achieved in GEMs and two orders of magnitude when compared to those achieved in a uniform field gap. The THGEM electroluminescence yield presents a faster decrease with pressure when comparing to the GEM electroluminescence yield, reaching similar values to what is achieved in GEMs for xenon pressures of 2.5 bar, but still one order of magnitude higher than that produced in a uniform field gap. Another exception is the GEM operating in argon, which presents an electroluminescence yield similar to that produced in a uniform electric field gap, while the THGEM achieves yields that are more than one order of magnitude higher.

Monteiro, C. M. B.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; dos Santos, J. M. F.

2012-07-01

173

J. Parallel Distrib. Comput. 72 (2012) 14421449 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-print Network

of cloud workloads, network speed rapidly migrates from 1 to 10 Gbps and beyond. Ethernet's ubiquity/O architecture for high speed networks. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Ethernet search, web hosting etc., network speed rapidly migrates from 1 Gbps to 10 Gbps and beyond [9]. Ethernet

Bhuyan, Laxmi N.

174

New Parallel R-point Explicit Block Method for Solving Linear High-Order Ordinary Differential Equations Directly (Kaedah Baru R-titik Blok Selari Tak Tersirat bagi Menyelesaikan Persamaan Pembeza Biasa Linear Peringkat Tinggi Secara Langsung)  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new method called parallel R-point explicit block method for solving a single equation of higher order ordinary differential equation directly using a constant step size is developed. This method calculates the numerical solution at R point simultaneously and is parallel in nature. Computational advantages are presented by comparing the results obtained with the new method with that of the

ZURNI OMAR; MOHAMED SULEIMAN

175

ArDM: a ton-scale LAr detector for direct Dark Matter searches  

E-print Network

The Argon Dark Matter (ArDM-1t) experiment is a ton-scale liquid argon (LAr) double-phase time projection chamber designed for direct Dark Matter searches. Such a device allows to explore the low energy frontier in LAr with a charge imaging detector. The ionization charge is extracted from the liquid into the gas phase and there amplified by the use of a Large Electron Multiplier in order to reduce the detection threshold. Direct detection of the ionization charge with fine spatial granularity, combined with a measurement of the amplitude and time evolution of the associated primary scintillation light, provide powerful tools for the identification of WIMP interactions against the background due to electrons, photons and possibly neutrons if scattering more than once. A one ton LAr detector is presently installed on surface at CERN to fully test all functionalities and it will be soon moved to an underground location. We will emphasize here the lessons learned from such a device for the design of a large LAr ...

Marchionni, A; Badertscher, A; Boccone, V; Bueno, A; Carmona-Benitez, M C; Coleman, J; Creus, W; Curioni, A; Daniel, M; Dawe, E J; Degunda, U; Gendotti, A; Epprecht, L; Horikawa, S; Kaufmann, L; Knecht, L; Laffranchi, M; Lazzaro, C; Lightfoot, P K; Lussi, D; Lozano, J; Mavrokoridis, K; Melgarejo, A; Mijakowski, P; Natterer, G; Navas-Concha, S; Otyugova, P; de Prado, M; Przewlocki, P; Regenfus, C; Resnati, F; Robinson, M; Rochet, J; Romero, L; Rondio, E; Rubbia, A; Scotto-Lavina, L; Spooner, N J C; Strauss, T; Touramanis, C; Ulbricht, J; Viant, T

2010-01-01

176

Development and parallelization of a direct numerical simulation to study the formation and transport of nanoparticle clusters in a viscous fluid  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The direct numerical simulation (DNS) offers the most accurate approach to modeling the behavior of a physical system, but carries an enormous computation cost. There exists a need for an accurate DNS to model the coupled solid-fluid system seen in targeted drug delivery (TDD), nanofluid thermal energy storage (TES), as well as other fields where experiments are necessary, but experiment design may be costly. A parallel DNS can greatly reduce the large computation times required, while providing the same results and functionality of the serial counterpart. A D2Q9 lattice Boltzmann method approach was implemented to solve the fluid phase. The use of domain decomposition with message passing interface (MPI) parallelism resulted in an algorithm that exhibits super-linear scaling in testing, which may be attributed to the caching effect. Decreased performance on a per-node basis for a fixed number of processes confirms this observation. A multiscale approach was implemented to model the behavior of nanoparticles submerged in a viscous fluid, and used to examine the mechanisms that promote or inhibit clustering. Parallelization of this model using a masterworker algorithm with MPI gives less-than-linear speedup for a fixed number of particles and varying number of processes. This is due to the inherent inefficiency of the master-worker approach. Lastly, these separate simulations are combined, and two-way coupling is implemented between the solid and fluid.

Sloan, Gregory James

177

Distributed and Parallel Databases An Efficient Privacy-Preserving Multi-Keyword Search over Encrypted Cloud Data with  

E-print Network

(e.g., cloud server) involves a multitude of privacy issues. Submitted search terms is of a great concern, PIR protocols have been extensively studied in the past [2­6]. Cloud computing has storage and computation power tend to outsource their data and services to clouds. Clouds enable its

Yanikoglu, Berrin

178

Parallel microtubules and other conserved elements of dorsal axial specification in the direct developing frog, Eleutherodactylus coqui.  

PubMed

Specification of the dorsal axis in commonly studied frogs, such as Xenopus laevis and Rana pipiens, depends on a microtubule-mediated movement of cytoplasm in the fertilized egg. The Puerto Rican tree frog, Eleutherodactylus coqui, has an egg that is twenty times the volume of that of X. laevis, raising the question as to whether the mechanism of dorsal axial specification is conserved in these large eggs. Fertilized eggs of E. coqui develop a transient array of parallel microtubules, similar to other frogs, but proportionately larger. The array persists after first cleavage, longer than in other frogs, and is gone by the third cleavage. Correlated with the longer life of the parallel microtubules, both 2- and 8-cell E. coqui embryos remain sensitive to gravity-mediated axial specification, a sensitivity lost in X. laevis before the 2-cell stage. Activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway by injected Xwnt8 RNA causes axial formation as in X. laevis. The results indicate that elements of dorsal axial specification are conserved in E. coqui, but they occur later compared to in X. laevis. PMID:12590350

Elinson, Richard P; Ninomiya, Hiromasa

2003-02-01

179

Completely Specified Displacements of a Rigid Body and Their Application in the Direct Kinematics of In-Parallel Mechanisms  

E-print Network

1 Completely Specified Displacements of a Rigid Body and Their Application in the Direct Kinematics. If the six points are co-planar or symmetrical with respect to a plane then the number of screws reduces, is used to obtain a simple algebraic solution to the direct kinematics problem of a special type of in

Mavroidis, Constantinos

180

Dark matter direct search rates in simulations of the Milky Way and Sagittarius stream  

SciTech Connect

We analyze self-consistent N-body simulations of the Milky Way disk and the ongoing disruption of the Sagittarius dwarf satellite to study the effect of Sagittarius tidal debris on dark matter detection experiments. In agreement with significant previous work, we reiterate that the standard halo model is insufficient to describe the non-Maxwellian velocity distribution of the Milky Way halo in our equilibrium halo-only and halo/galaxy models, and offer suggestions for correcting for this discrepancy. More importantly, we emphasize that the dark matter component of the leading tidal arm of the Sagittarius dwarf is significantly more extended than the stellar component of the arm, and also that the dark matter and stellar streams are not necessarily coaxial and may be offset by several kpc at the point at which they impact the Galactic disk. This suggests that the dark matter component of the Sagittarius debris is likely to have a non-negligible influence on dark matter detection experiments even when the stellar debris is centered several kpc from the solar neighborhood. Relative to models without an infalling Sagittarius dwarf, the Sagittarius dark matter debris in our models induces an energy-dependent enhancement of direct search event rates of as much as ? 20–45%, an energy-dependent reduction in the amplitude of the annual modulation of the event rate by as much as a factor of two, a shift in the phase of the annual modulation by as much as ? 20 days, and a shift in the recoil energy at which the modulation reverses phase. These influences of Sagittarius are of general interest in the interpretation of dark matter searches, but may be particularly important in the case of relatively light (m{sub ?}?<20 GeV/c{sup 2}) dark matter because the Sagittarius stream impacts the solar system at high speed compared to the primary halo dark matter.

Purcell, Chris W.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Wang, Mei-Yu, E-mail: cpurcell@pitt.edu, E-mail: zentner@pitt.edu, E-mail: mew56@pitt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh 15260 (United States)

2012-08-01

181

Science Parametrics for Missions to Search for Earth-like Exoplanets by Direct Imaging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use Nt , the number of exoplanets observed in time t, as a science metric to study direct-search missions like Terrestrial Planet Finder. In our model, N has 27 parameters, divided into three categories: 2 astronomical, 7 instrumental, and 18 science-operational. For various "27-vectors" of those parameters chosen to explore parameter space, we compute design reference missions to estimate Nt . Our treatment includes the recovery of completeness c after a search observation, for revisits, solar and antisolar avoidance, observational overhead, and follow-on spectroscopy. Our baseline 27-vector has aperture D = 16 m, inner working angle IWA = 0.039'', mission time t = 0-5 yr, occurrence probability for Earth-like exoplanets ? = 0.2, and typical values for the remaining 23 parameters. For the baseline case, a typical five-year design reference mission has an input catalog of ~4700 stars with nonzero completeness, ~1300 unique stars observed in ~2600 observations, of which ~1300 are revisits, and it produces N 1 ~ 50 exoplanets after one year and N 5 ~ 130 after five years. We explore offsets from the baseline for 10 parameters. We find that N depends strongly on IWA and only weakly on D. It also depends only weakly on zodiacal light for Z < 50 zodis, end-to-end efficiency for h > 0.2, and scattered starlight for ? < 10–10. We find that observational overheads, completeness recovery and revisits, solar and antisolar avoidance, and follow-on spectroscopy are all important factors in estimating N.

Brown, Robert A.

2015-01-01

182

Results of a direct search using synchrotron radiation for the low-energy $^{229}$Th nuclear isomeric transition  

E-print Network

We report the results of a direct search for the $^{229}$Th ($I^{p} = 3/2^+\\leftarrow 5/2^+$) nuclear isomeric transition, performed by exposing $^{229}$Th-doped LiSrAlF$_6$ crystals to tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and observing any resulting fluorescence. We also use existing nuclear physics data to establish a range of possible transition strengths for the isomeric transition. We find no evidence for the thorium nuclear transition between $7.3 \\mbox{eV}$ and $8.8 \\mbox{eV}$ with transition lifetime $(1-2)\\mbox{s} \\lesssim \\tau \\lesssim (2000-5600)\\mbox{s}$. This measurement excludes roughly half of the favored transition search area and can be used to direct future searches.

Jeet, Justin; Sullivan, Scott T; Rellergert, Wade G; Mirzadeh, Saed; Cassanho, A; Jenssen, H P; Tkalya, Eugene V; Hudson, Eric R

2015-01-01

183

Using the Self-Directed Search in Research: Selecting a Representative Pool of Items to Measure Vocational Interests  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using Item Response Theory (IRT) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA), the goal of this study was to select a reduced pool of items from the French Canadian version of the Self-Directed Search--Activities Section (Holland, Fritzsche, & Powell, 1994). Two studies were conducted. Results of Study 1, involving 727 French Canadian students, showed…

Poitras, Sarah-Caroline; Guay, Frederic; Ratelle, Catherine F.

2012-01-01

184

Comparison of Self-Scoring Error Rate for SDS (Self Directed Search) (1970) and the Revised SDS (1977).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A comparison of Self-Scoring Error Rate for Self Directed Search (SDS) and the revised SDS is presented. The subjects were college freshmen and sophomores who participated in career planning as a part of their orientation program, and a career workshop. Subjects, N=190 on first study and N=84 on second study, were then randomly assigned to the SDS…

Price, Gary E.; And Others

185

The Suitability of Holland's Self-Directed Search for Non-Readers with Learning Disabilities or Mild Mental Retardation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An investigation explored the use of Holland's Self-Directed Search (SDS) by 185 readers and 152 non-readers (ages 14-21) with learning disabilities or mild mental retardation. The SDS was reliable for both readers and non-readers, able to validly measure preferences, and sensitive to preferences with respect to disability group membership.…

Mattie, Harold D.

2000-01-01

186

$H \\to \\gamma\\gamma$ search and direct photon pair production differential cross section  

SciTech Connect

At a hadron collider, diphoton ({gamma}{gamma}) production allows detailed studies of the Standard Model (SM), as well as as searches for new phenomena, such as new heavy resonances, extra spatial dimensions or cascade decays of heavy new particles. Within the SM, continuum {gamma}{gamma}+X production is characterized by a steeply-falling {gamma}{gamma} mass spectrum, on top of which a heavy resonance decaying into {gamma}{gamma} can potentially be observed. In particular, this is considered one of the most promising discovery channels for a SM Higgs boson at the LHC, despite the small branching ratio of BR (H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) {approx} 0.2% for 110 < M{sub Higgs} < 140 GeV. At the Tevatron, the dominant SM Higgs boson production mechanism is gluon fusion, followed by associated production with a W or Z boson, and vector boson fusion. While the SM Higgs production rate at the Tevatron is not sufficient to observe it in the {gamma}{gamma} mode, the Hgg and H{gamma}{gamma} couplings, being loop-mediated, are particularly sensitive to new physics effects. Furthermore, in some models beyond the SM, for instance, fermiophobic Higgs, with no couplings to fermions, the BR (H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}) can be enhanced significantly relative to the SM prediction, while has the SM-like production cross sections except the gluon fusion is absent. In this thesis, we present a search for a light Higgs boson in the diphoton final state using 4.2 {+-} 0.3 fb{sup -1} of the D0 Run II data, collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider from April 2002 to December 2008. Good agreement between the data and the SM background prediction is observed. Since there is no evidence for new physics, we set 95% C.L. limits on the production cross section times the branching ratio ({sigma} x BR(H {yields} {gamma}{gamma})) relative to the SM-like Higgs prediction for different assumed Higgs masses. The observed limits ({sigma}(limit)/{sigma}(SM)) range from 11.9 to 35.2 for Higgs masses from 100 to 150 GeV, while the expected limits range from 17.5 to 32.0. This search is also interpreted in the context of the particular fermiophobic Higgs model. The corresponding results have reached the same sensitivity as a single LEP experiement, setting a lower limit on the fermiophobic Higgs of M{sub h{sub f}} > 102.5 GeV (M{sub h{sub f}} > 107.5 GeV expected). We are slightly below the combined LEP limit (M{sub h{sub f}} > 109.7 GeV). We also provide access to the M{sub h{sub f}} > 125 GeV region which was inaccessible at LEP. During the study, we found the major and irreducible background direct {gamma}{gamma} (DPP) production is not well modelled by the current theoretical predictions: RESBOS, DIPHOX or PYTHIA. There is {approx}20% theoretical uncertainty for the predicted values. Thus, for our Higgs search, we use the side-band fitting method to estimate DPP contribution directly from the data events. Furthermore, DPP production is also a significant background in searches for new phenomena, such as new heavy resonances, extra spatial dimensions, or cascade decays of heavy new particles. Thus, precise measurements of the DPP cross sections for various kinematic variables and their theoretical understanding are extremely important for future Higgs and new phenomena searches. In this thesis, we also present a precise measurement of the DPP single differential cross sections as a function of the diphoton mass, the transverse momentum of the diphoton system, the azimuthal angle between the photons, and the polar scattering angle of the photons, as well as the double differential cross sections considering the last three kinematic variables in three diphoton mass bins, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} data. These results are the first of their kind at D0 Run II, and in fact the double differential measurements are the first of their kind at Tevatron. The results are compared with different perturbative QCD predictions and event generators.

Bu, Xuebing; /Hefei, CUST

2010-06-01

187

The first search for sub-eV scalar fields via four-wave mixing at a quasi-parallel laser collider  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A search for sub-eV scalar fields coupling to two photons has been performed via four-wave mixing at a quasi-parallel laser collider for the first time. The experiment demonstrates the novel approach of searching for resonantly produced sub-eV scalar fields by combining two-color laser fields in the vacuum. The aim of this paper is to provide the concrete experimental setup and the analysis method based on specific combinations of polarization states between incoming and outgoing photons, which is extendable to higher-intensity laser systems operated at high repetition rates. No significant signal of four-wave mixing was observed by combining a 0.2 ? J/0.75 ns pulse laser and a 2 mW CW laser on the same optical axis. Based on the prescription developed for this particular experimental approach, we obtained the upper limit at a confidence level of 95% on the coupling-mass relation.

Homma, Kensuke; Hasebe, Takashi; Kume, Kazuki

2014-08-01

188

The first search for sub-eV scalar fields via four-wave mixing at a quasi-parallel laser collider  

E-print Network

A search for sub-eV scalar fields coupling to two photons has been performed via four-wave mixing at a quasi-parallel laser collider for the first time. The experiment demonstrates the novel approach to search for resonantly produced sub-eV scalar fields by combining two-color laser fields in the vacuum. The aim of this paper is to provide the concrete experimental setup and the analysis method based on specific combinations of polarization states between incoming and outgoing photons, which is extendable to higher intensity laser systems operated at high repetition rates. No significant signal of four-wave mixing was observed by combining a $0.2\\mu$J/0.75ns pulse laser and a 2mW CW laser on the same optical axis. Based on the prescription developed for this particular experimental approach, we obtained the upper limit at a confidence level of 95% on the coupling-mass relation.

Kensuke Homma; Takashi Hasebe; Kazuki Kume

2014-05-16

189

Cost function analysis for stochastic clustered-dot halftoning based on direct binary search  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most electrophotographic printers use periodic, clustered-dot screening for rendering smooth and stable prints. However, periodic, clustered-dot screening suffers from the problem of periodic moi?e resulting from interference between the component periodic screens superposed for color printing. There has been proposed an approach, called CLU-DBS for stochastic, clustered-dot halftoning and screen design based on direct binary search. This method deviates from conventional DBS in its use of different filters in different phases of the algorithm. In this paper, we derive a closed-form expression for the cost metric which is minimized in CLU-DBS. The closed-form expression provides us with a clearer insight on the relationship between input parameters and processes, and the output texture, thus enabling us generate better quality texture. One of the limitations of the CLU-DBS algorithm proposed earlier is the inversion in the distribution of clusters and voids in the final halftone with respect to the initial halftone. In this paper, we also present a technique for avoiding the inversion by negating the sign of one of the error terms in the newly derived cost metric, which is responsible for clustering. This not only simplifies the CLU-DBS screen design process, but also significantly reduces the number of iterations required for optimization.

Goyal, Puneet; Gupta, Madhur; Staelin, Carl; Fischer, Mani; Shacham, Omri; Allebach, Jan

2011-01-01

190

Banks of templates for directed searches of gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars  

E-print Network

We construct efficient banks of templates suitable for directed searches of almost monochromatic gravitational waves originating from spinning nuetron stars in our Galaxy in data being collected by currently operating interferometric detectors. We thus assume that the position of the gravitational-wave source in the sky is known, but we do not assume that the wave's frequency and its derivatives are a priori known. In the construction we employ simplified model of the signal with constant amplitude and phase which is a polynomial function of time. All our template banks enable usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithm in the computation of the maximum-likelihood F-statistic for nodes of the grids defining the bank. We study and employ the dependence of the grid's construction on the choice of the position of the observational interval with respect to the origin of time axis. We also study the usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithms with non-standard frequency resolutions achieved by zero padding or folding the data. In the case of the gravitational-wave signal with one spindown parameter included we have found grids with covering thicknesses which are only 0.1%--16% larger than the thickness of the optimal two-dimensional hexagonal covering.

Andrzej Pisarski; Piotr Jaranowski; Maciej Pietka

2010-10-14

191

Direct dark matter searches—Test of the Big Bounce Cosmology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We consider the possibility of using dark matter particle's mass and its interaction cross section as a smoking gun signal of the existence of a Big Bounce at the early stage in the evolution of our currently observed universe. A study of dark matter production in the pre-bounce contraction and the post bounce expansion epochs of this universe reveals a new venue for achieving the observed relic abundance of our present universe. Specifically, it predicts a characteristic relation governing a dark matter mass and interaction cross section and a factor of 1/2 in thermally averaged cross section, as compared to the non-thermal production in standard cosmology, is needed for creating enough dark matter particle to satisfy the currently observed relic abundance because dark matter is being created during the pre-bounce contraction, in addition to the post-bounce expansion. As the production rate is lower than the Hubble expansion rate information of the bounce universe evolution is preserved. Therefore once the value of dark matter mass and interaction cross section are obtained by direct detection in laboratories, this alternative route becomes a signature prediction of the bounce universe scenario. This leads us to consider a scalar dark matter candidate, which if it is light, has important implications on dark matter searches.

Cheung, Yeuk-Kwan E.; Vergados, J. D.

2015-02-01

192

A Bayesian view of the current status of dark matter direct searches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bayesian statistical methods offer a simple and consistent framework for incorporating uncertainties into a multi-parameter inference problem. In this work we apply these methods to a selection of current direct dark matter searches. We consider the simplest scenario of spin-independent elastic WIMP scattering, and infer the WIMP mass and cross-section from the experimental data with the essential systematic uncertainties folded into the analysis. We find that when uncertainties in the scintillation efficiency of XENON100 have been accounted for, the resulting exclusion limit is not sufficiently constraining to rule out the CoGeNT preferred parameter region, contrary to previous claims. In the same vein, we also investigate the impact of astrophysical uncertainties on the preferred WIMP parameters. We find that within the class of smooth and isotropic WIMP velocity distributions, it is difficult to reconcile the DAMA and the CoGeNT preferred regions by tweaking the astrophysics parameters alone. If we demand compatibility between these experiments, then the inference process naturally concludes that a high value for the sodium quenching factor for DAMA is preferred.

Arina, Chiara; Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y. Y.

2011-09-01

193

Banks of templates for directed searches of gravitational waves from spinning neutron stars  

SciTech Connect

We construct efficient banks of templates suitable for directed searches of almost monochromatic gravitational waves originating from spinning neutron stars in our Galaxy in data being collected by currently operating interferometric detectors. We thus assume that the position of the gravitational-wave source in the sky is known, but we do not assume that the wave's frequency and its derivatives are a priori known. In the construction we employ a simplified model of the signal with constant amplitude and phase which is a polynomial function of time. All our template banks enable usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithm in the computation of the maximum-likelihood F-statistic for nodes of the grids defining the bank. We study and employ the dependence of the grid's construction on the choice of the position of the observational interval with respect to the origin of time axis. We also study the usage of the fast Fourier transform algorithms with nonstandard frequency resolutions achieved by zero padding or folding the data. In the case of the gravitational-wave signal with one spin-down parameter included we have found grids with covering thicknesses which are only 0.1-16% larger than the thickness of the optimal 2-dimensional hexagonal covering.

Pisarski, Andrzej; Jaranowski, Piotr; Pietka, Maciej [Faculty of Physics, University of Bialystok, Lipowa 41, 15-424 Bialystok (Poland)

2011-02-15

194

R&D Status of Nuclear Emulsion For Directional Dark Matter Search  

E-print Network

In this study, we are doing R&D for directional dark matter search with nuclear emulsion. First of all, higher resolution nuclear emulsion with fine silver halide crystals was developed in the production facility of emulsion at Nagoya university, and we confirmed that it can detect the expected nuclear recoil tracks. The readout of submicron tracks was required the new technology. We developed the expansion technique, and could readout the signal by shape analysis with optical microscopy. The two dimensional angular resolution is 36 degrees at the original track length of range from 150nm to 200nm with optical microscopy. Finally we demonstrated by using recoiled nuclei induced by 14.8MeV neutron, and confirmed the technique.Moreover, we developed the X-ray microscope system with SPring-8 as final check with higher resolution of selected candidate tracks with optical microscopy. The angular resolution was improved from 31 degrees with optical microscopy to 17degrees with X-ray microscopy at the track length of range from 150nm to 250nm. We are developing the practical system and planning for start of the test running with prototype detector.

T. Naka; M. Kimura; M. Nakamura; O. Sato; T. Nakano; T. Asada; Y. Tawara; Y. Suzuki

2011-09-22

195

Parallel and convergent processing in grid cell, head-direction cell, boundary cell, and place cell networks  

PubMed Central

The brain is able to construct internal representations that correspond to external spatial coordinates. Such brain maps of the external spatial topography may support a number of cognitive functions, including navigation and memory. The neuronal building block of brain maps are place cells, which are found throughout the hippocampus of rodents and, in a lower proportion, primates. Place cells typically fire in one or few restricted areas of space, and each area where a cell fires can range, along the dorsoventral axis of the hippocampus, from 30?cm to at least several meters. The sensory processing streams that give rise to hippocampal place cells are not fully understood, but substantial progress has been made in characterizing the entorhinal cortex, which is the gateway between neocortical areas and the hippocampus. Entorhinal neurons have diverse spatial firing characteristics, and the different entorhinal cell types converge in the hippocampus to give rise to a single, spatially modulated cell type—the place cell. We therefore suggest that parallel information processing in different classes of cells—as is typically observed at lower levels of sensory processing—continues up into higher level association cortices, including those that provide the inputs to hippocampus. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:207–219. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1272 PMID:24587849

Brandon, Mark P; Koenig, Julie; Leutgeb, Stefan

2014-01-01

196

Nutritional endoderm in a direct developing frog: A potential parallel to the evolution of the amniote egg  

Microsoft Academic Search

The egg of the direct-developing frog, Eleutherodactylus coqui, has 20! the volume as that of the model amphibian, Xenopus laevis. Increased egg size led to the origin of nutritional endoderm, a novel cell type that provides nutrition but does not differentiate into digestive tract tissues. As the E. coqui endoderm develops, a distinct boundary exists between differentiating intestinal cells and

Daniel R. Buchholz; Srikanth Singamsetty; Uma Karadge; Sean Williamson; Carrie E. Langer; Richard P. Elinson

2007-01-01

197

Evaluation of fault-normal/fault-parallel directions rotated ground motions for response history analysis of an instrumented six-story building  

USGS Publications Warehouse

According to regulatory building codes in United States (for example, 2010 California Building Code), at least two horizontal ground-motion components are required for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of buildings. For sites within 5 km of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal/fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHA analyses should be performed separately (when FN and then FP are aligned with the transverse direction of the structural axes). It is assumed that this approach will lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. This assumption is examined here using a 3D computer model of a six-story reinforced-concrete instrumented building subjected to an ensemble of bidirectional near-fault ground motions. Peak responses of engineering demand parameters (EDPs) were obtained for rotation angles ranging from 0° through 180° for evaluating the FN/FP directions. It is demonstrated that rotating ground motions to FN/FP directions (1) does not always lead to the maximum responses over all angles, (2) does not always envelope the range of possible responses, and (3) does not provide maximum responses for all EDPs simultaneously even if it provides a maximum response for a specific EDP.

Kalkan, Erol; Kwong, Neal S.

2012-01-01

198

Search for Direct CP Violation in Decays of Hyperons Y. C. Chen a , R. A. Burnstein b , A. Chakravorty b , A. Chan a ,  

E-print Network

Search for Direct CP Violation in Decays of Hyperons Y. C. Chen a , R. A. Burnstein b , A.S.A. The E871 (HyperCP) experiment at FNAL is searching for direct CP violation in decays of \\Xi \\Gamma (\\Xi more data which will improve the sensitivity to Ã? 1 \\Theta 10 \\Gamma4 . 1 Introduction CP violation has

Fermilab Experiment E871

199

Results from a direct dark matter search with the MAJORANA low-background broad energy germanium detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As a part of the research and development efforts for the Majorana experiment, we have deployed a customized Canberra broad energy germanium (BEGe) detector at the Kimballton Underground Research Facility (KURF). We have performed a direct search for low-mass particle dark matter using a 221.49 live day (89.53 kg-d) exposure. We discuss the backgrounds and report on results from this search, and their compatibility with other experiments that probe the low WIMP-mass (<10 GeV) parameter space.

Finnerty, Padraic

2013-04-01

200

Icarus: A 2D direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code for parallel computers. User`s manual - V.3.0  

SciTech Connect

Icarus is a 2D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code which has been optimized for the parallel computing environment. The code is based on the DSMC method of Bird and models from free-molecular to continuum flowfields in either cartesian (x, y) or axisymmetric (z, r) coordinates. Computational particles, representing a given number of molecules or atoms, are tracked as they have collisions with other particles or surfaces. Multiple species, internal energy modes (rotation and vibration), chemistry, and ion transport are modelled. A new trace species methodology for collisions and chemistry is used to obtain statistics for small species concentrations. Gas phase chemistry is modelled using steric factors derived from Arrhenius reaction rates. Surface chemistry is modelled with surface reaction probabilities. The electron number density is either a fixed external generated field or determined using a local charge neutrality assumption. Ion chemistry is modelled with electron impact chemistry rates and charge exchange reactions. Coulomb collision cross-sections are used instead of Variable Hard Sphere values for ion-ion interactions. The electrostatic fields can either be externally input or internally generated using a Langmuir-Tonks model. The Icarus software package includes the grid generation, parallel processor decomposition, postprocessing, and restart software. The commercial graphics package, Tecplot, is used for graphics display. The majority of the software packages are written in standard Fortran.

Bartel, T.; Plimpton, S.; Johannes, J.; Payne, J.

1996-10-01

201

A generating set direct search augmented Lagrangian algorithm for optimization with a combination of general and linear constraints.  

SciTech Connect

We consider the solution of nonlinear programs in the case where derivatives of the objective function and nonlinear constraints are unavailable. To solve such problems, we propose an adaptation of a method due to Conn, Gould, Sartenaer, and Toint that proceeds by approximately minimizing a succession of linearly constrained augmented Lagrangians. Our modification is to use a derivative-free generating set direct search algorithm to solve the linearly constrained subproblems. The stopping criterion proposed by Conn, Gould, Sartenaer and Toint for the approximate solution of the subproblems requires explicit knowledge of derivatives. Such information is presumed absent in the generating set search method we employ. Instead, we show that stationarity results for linearly constrained generating set search methods provide a derivative-free stopping criterion, based on a step-length control parameter, that is sufficient to preserve the convergence properties of the original augmented Lagrangian algorithm.

Lewis, Robert Michael (College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA); Torczon, Virginia Joanne (College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA); Kolda, Tamara Gibson

2006-08-01

202

Reynolds and Mach Number Scaling in Stationary Compressible Turbulence Using Massively Parallel High Resolution Direct Numerical Simulations  

E-print Network

follow: Mt ? 0.1 (dotted), 0.3 (dashed), 0.6 (solid). Arrows are in the direction of increasing Mt and colors for different R? according to figure IV.1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 IV.5 p.d.f of enstrophy at different... p?d and Kd with Mdt . The dashed lines in (a) denotes F = 1 and in (b) denotes a power-law best fit of 1.27Mdt 0.45. Symbols and colors for different s and Mt respec- tively are according to figure V.2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 V.5...

Jagannathan, Shriram

2014-07-24

203

Importance of upgraded energy reconstruction for direct dark matter searches with liquid xenon detectors  

E-print Network

The usual nuclear recoil energy reconstruction employed by liquid xenon dark matter search experiments relies only on the primary scintillation photon signal. Energy reconstruction based on both the photon and electron signals yields a more accurate representation of search results. For a dark matter particle mass m~10 GeV, a nuclear recoil from a scattering event is more likely to be observed in the lower left corner of the typical search box, rather than near the nuclear recoil calibration centroid. In this region of the search box, the actual nuclear recoil energies are smaller than the usual energy scale suggests, by about a factor x2. Recent search results from the XENON100 experiment are discussed in light of these considerations.

Peter Sorensen

2012-10-18

204

On the beam direction search space in computerized non-coplanar beam angle optimization for IMRT—prostate SBRT  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a recent paper, we have published a new algorithm, designated ‘iCycle’, for fully automated multi-criterial optimization of beam angles and intensity profiles. In this study, we have used this algorithm to investigate the relationship between plan quality and the extent of the beam direction search space, i.e. the set of candidate beam directions that may be selected for generating an optimal plan. For a group of ten prostate cancer patients, optimal IMRT plans were made for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), mimicking high dose rate brachytherapy dosimetry. Plans were generated for five different beam direction input sets: a coplanar (CP) set and four non-coplanar (NCP) sets. For CP treatments, the search space consisted of 72 orientations (5° separations). The NCP CyberKnife (CK) space contained all directions available in the robotic CK treatment unit. The fully non-coplanar (F-NCP) set facilitated the highest possible degree of freedom in selecting optimal directions. CK+ and CK++ were subsets of F-NCP to investigate some aspects of the CK space. For each input set, plans were generated with up to 30 selected beam directions. Generated plans were clinically acceptable, according to an assessment of our clinicians. Convergence in plan quality occurred only after around 20 included beams. For individual patients, variations in PTV dose delivery between the five generated plans were minimal, as aimed for (average spread in V95: 0.4%). This allowed plan comparisons based on organ at risk (OAR) doses, with the rectum considered most important. Plans generated with the NCP search spaces had improved OAR sparing compared to the CP search space, especially for the rectum. OAR sparing was best with the F-NCP, with reductions in rectum DMean, V40Gy, V60Gy and D2% compared to CP of 25%, 35%, 37% and 8%, respectively. Reduced rectum sparing with the CK search space compared to F-NCP could be largely compensated by expanding CK with beams with relatively large direction components along the superior-inferior axis (CK++). Addition of posterior beams (CK++ ? F-NCP) did not lead to further improvements in OAR sparing. Plans with 25 beams clearly performed better than 11-beam plans. For CP plans, an increase from 11 to 25 involved beams resulted in reductions in rectum DMean, V40Gy, V60Gy and D2% of 39%, 57%, 64% and 13%, respectively.

Rossi, Linda; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben J. M.; Voet, Peter W. J.; Lanconelli, Nico; Aluwini, Shafak

2012-09-01

205

Collective cargo hauling by a bundle of parallel microtubules: bi-directional motion caused by load-dependent polymerization and depolymerization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A microtubule (MT) is a hollow tube of approximately 25 nm diameter. The two ends of the tube are dissimilar and are designated as ‘plus’ and ‘minus’ ends. Motivated by the collective push and pull exerted by a bundle of MTs during chromosome segregation in a living cell, we have developed here a much simplified theoretical model of a bundle of parallel dynamic MTs. The plus-end of all the MTs in the bundle is permanently attached to a movable ‘wall’ by a device whose detailed structure is not treated explicitly in our model. The only requirement is that the device allows polymerization and depolymerization of each MT at the plus-end. In spite of the absence of external force and direct lateral interactions between the MTs, the group of polymerizing MTs attached to the wall create a load force against the group of depolymerizing MTs and vice versa; the load against a group is shared equally by the members of that group. Such indirect interactions among the MTs give rise to the rich variety of possible states of collective dynamics that we have identified by computer simulations of the model in different parameter regimes. The bi-directional motion of the cargo, caused by the load-dependence of the polymerization kinetics, is a ‘proof-of-principle’ that the bi-directional motion of chromosomes before cell division does not necessarily need active participation of motor proteins.

Ghanti, Dipanwita; Chowdhury, Debashish

2015-01-01

206

Collective cargo hauling by a bundle of parallel microtubules: bi-directional motion caused by load-dependent polymerization and depolymerization  

E-print Network

A microtubule (MT) is a hollow tube of approximately 25 nm diameter. The two ends of the tube are dissimilar and are designated as `plus' and `minus' ends. Motivated by the collective push and pull exerted by a bundle of MTs during chromosome segregation in a living cell, we have developed here a much simplified theoretical model of a bundle of parallel dynamic MTs. The plus-end of all the MTs in the bundle are permanently attached to a movable `wall' by a device whose detailed structure is not treated explicitly in our model. The only requirement is that the device allows polymerization and depolymerization of each MT at the plus-end. In spite of the absence of external force and direct lateral interactions between the MTs, the group of polymerizing MTs attached to the wall create a load force against the group of depolymerizing MTs and vice-versa; the load against a group is shared equally by the members of that group. Such indirect interactions among the MTs gives rise to the rich variety of possible states of collective dynamics that we have identified by computer simulations of the model in different parameter regimes. The bi-directional motion of the cargo, caused by the load-dependence of the polymerization kinetics, is a "proof-of-principle" that the bi-directional motion of chromosomes before cell division does not necessarily need active participation of motor proteins.

Dipanwita Ghanti; Debashish Chowdhury

2015-01-09

207

Improved direct binary search-based algorithm for generating holograms for the application of holographic optical tweezers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents an improved direct binary search (DBS)-based algorithm for generating holograms to holographic optical tweezers. The simulations show that the improved algorithm greatly enhances computation speed while maintaining high hologram efficiency and high-intensity homogeneous target spots. The improved algorithm was applied to generate holographic optical tweezers in several experiments. The experiments demonstrate that real-time trap and manipulation can be realized with the improved algorithm if the number of trapped microparticles is small.

Zhao, Xudong; Li, Jing; Tao, Tao; Long, Qian; Wu, Xiaoping

2012-01-01

208

A search for anisotropy in the arrival directions of ultra high energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations of cosmic ray arrival directions made with the Pierre Auger Observatory have previously provided evidence of anisotropy at the 99% CL using the correlation of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with objects drawn from the Véron-Cetty Véron catalog. In this paper we report on the use of three catalog independent methods to search for anisotropy. The 2pt–L, 2pt+

P. Abreu; M. Aglietta; M. Ahlers; E. J. Ahn; I. F. M. Albuquerque; D. Allard; I. Allekotte; J. Allen; P. Allison; A. Almela; J. Alvarez Castillo; J. Alvarez-Muñiz; M. Ambrosio; A. Aminaei; L. Anchordoqui; S. Andringa; T. Anticic; C. Aramo; E. Arganda; F. Arqueros; H. Asorey; P. Assis; J. Aublin; M. Avenier; G. Avila; T. Bäcker; A. M. Badescu; M. Balzer; K. B. Barber; A. F. Barbosa; R. Bardenet; S. L. C. Barroso; B. Baughman; J. Bäuml; J. J. Beatty; B. R. Becker; K. H. Becker; A. Bellétoile; J. A. Bellido; S. BenZvi; C. Berat; X. Bertou; P. L. Biermann; P. Billoir; F. Blanco; M. Blanco; C. Bleve; H. Blümer; M. Bohácová; D. Boncioli; C. Bonifazi; R. Bonino; N. Borodai; J. Brack; I. Brancus; P. Brogueira; W. C. Brown; R. Bruijn; P. Buchholz; A. Bueno; R. E. Burton; K. S. Caballero-Mora; B. Caccianiga; L. Caramete; R. Caruso; A. Castellina; O. Catalano; G. Cataldi; L. Cazon; R. Cester; J. Chauvin; S. H. Cheng; A. Chiavassa; J. A. Chinellato; J. Chirinos Diaz; J. Chudoba; M. Cilmo; R. W. Clay; M. R. Coluccia; R. Conceição; F. Contreras; H. Cook; M. J. Cooper; J. Coppens; A. Cordier; S. Coutu; C. E. Covault; A. Creusot; A. Criss; J. Cronin; A. Curutiu; S. Dagoret-Campagne; R. Dallier; S. Dasso; K. Daumiller; B. R. Dawson; R. M. de Almeida; M. De Domenico; C. De Donato; S. J. de Jong; G. De La Vega; I. De Mitri; V. de Souza; K. D. de Vries; L. del Peral; M. del Río; O. Deligny; H. Dembinski; N. Dhital; C. Di Giulio; M. L. Díaz Castro; P. N. Diep; F. Diogo; C. Dobrigkeit; W. Docters; J. C. DOlivo; P. N. Dong; A. Dorofeev; J. C. dos Anjos; M. T. Dova; D. DUrso; I. Dutan; J. Ebr; R. Engel; M. Erdmann; C. O. Escobar; J. Espadanal; A. Etchegoyen; P. Facal San Luis; I. Fajardo Tapia; H. Falcke; G. Farrar; A. C. Fauth; N. Fazzini; A. P. Ferguson; B. Fick; A. Filevich; A. Filipcic; S. Fliescher; C. E. Fracchiolla; E. D. Fraenkel; O. Fratu; U. Fröhlich; B. Fuchs; R. Gaior; R. F. Gamarra; S. Gambetta; B. García; S. T. Garcia Roca; D. Garcia-Gamez; D. Garcia-Pinto; A. Gascon; H. Gemmeke; P. L. Ghia; U. Giaccari; M. Giller; H. Glass; M. S. Gold; G. Golup; F. Gomez Albarracin; M. Gómez Berisso; P. F. Gómez Vitale; P. Gonçalves; D. Gonzalez; J. G. Gonzalez; B. Gookin; A. Gorgi; P. Gouffon; E. Grashorn; S. Grebe; N. Griffith; M. Grigat; A. F. Grillo; Y. Guardincerri; F. Guarino; G. P. Guedes; A. Guzman; J. D. Hague; P. Hansen; D. Harari; S. Harmsma; T. A. Harrison; J. L. Harton; A. Haungs; T. Hebbeker; D. Heck; A. E. Herve; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; V. C. Holmes; P. Homola; J. R. Hörandel; A. Horneffer; P. Horvath; M. Hrabovský; T. Huege; A. Insolia; F. Ionita; A. Italiano; C. Jarne; S. Jiraskova; M. Josebachuili; K. Kadija; K. H. Kampert; P. Karhan; P. Kasper; B. Kégl; B. Keilhauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; E. Kemp; R. M. Kieckhafer; H. O. Klages; M. Kleifges; J. Kleinfeller; J. Knapp; D.-H. Koang; K. Kotera; N. Krohm; O. Krömer; D. Kruppke-Hansen; F. Kuehn; D. Kuempel; J. K. Kulbartz; N. Kunka; G. La Rosa; C. Lachaud; R. Lauer; P. Lautridou; S. Le Coz; M. S. A. B. Leão; D. Lebrun; P. Lebrun; M. A. Leigui de Oliveira; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. Lhenry-Yvon; K. Link; R. López; A. Lopez Agüera; K. Louedec; J. Lozano Bahilo; L. Lu; A. Lucero; M. Ludwig; H. Lyberis; C. Macolino; S. Maldera; D. Mandat; P. Mantsch; A. G. Mariazzi; J. Marin; V. Marin; I. C. Maris; H. R. Marquez Falcon; G. Marsella; D. Martello; L. Martin; H. Martinez; O. Martínez Bravo; H. J. Mathes; J. Matthews; G. Matthiae; D. Maurel; D. Maurizio; P. O. Mazur; G. Medina-Tanco; M. Melissas; D. Melo; E. Menichetti; A. Menshikov; P. Mertsch; C. Meurer; S. Micanovic; M. I. Micheletti; I. A. Minaya; L. Miramonti; L. Molina-Bueno; S. Mollerach; M. Monasor; D. Monnier Ragaigne; F. Montanet; B. Morales; C. Morello; E. Moreno; J. C. Moreno; M. Mostafá; C. A. Moura; M. A. Muller; G. Müller; M. Münchmeyer; R. Mussa; G. Navarra; J. L. Navarro; S. Navas; P. Necesal; L. Nellen; A. Nelles; J. Neuser; P. T. Nhung; M. Niechciol; L. Niemietz; N. Nierstenhoefer; D. Nitz; D. Nosek; L. Nožka; M. Nyklicek; J. Oehlschläger; A. Olinto; M. Ortiz; N. Pacheco; D. Pakk Selmi-Dei; M. Palatka; J. Pallotta; N. Palmieri; G. Parente; E. Parizot; A. Parra; S. Pastor; T. Paul; M. Pech; J. Pekala; R. Pelayo; I. M. Pepe; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; E. Petermann; S. Petrera; P. Petrinca; A. Petrolini; Y. Petrov; J. Petrovic; C. Pfendner; R. Piegaia; T. Pierog; P. Pieroni; M. Pimenta; V. Pirronello; M. Platino; V. H. Ponce; M. Pontz; A. Porcelli; P. Privitera; M. Prouza; E. J. Quel; S. Querchfeld; J. Rautenberg; O. Ravel; D. Ravignani; B. Revenu; J. Ridky; S. Riggi; M. Risse; P. Ristori; H. Rivera; V. Rizi; J. Roberts; W. Rodrigues de Carvalho; G. Rodriguez; J. Rodriguez Martino; J. Rodriguez Rojo; I. Rodriguez-Cabo; M. D. Rodríguez-Frías; G. Ros; J. Rosado; T. Rossler; M. Roth; B. Rouillé-dOrfeuil; E. Roulet

2012-01-01

209

Complementarity of direct and indirect searches in the pMSSM  

E-print Network

We explore the pMSSM parameter space in view of the constraints from SUSY and monojet searches at the LHC, from Higgs data and flavour physics observables, as well as from dark matter searches. We show that whilst the simplest SUSY scenarios are already ruled out, there are still many possibilities left over in the pMSSM. We discuss the complementarity between different searches and consistency checks which are essential in probing the pMSSM and will be even more important in the near future with the next round of data becoming available.

F. Mahmoudi; A. Arbey

2014-11-08

210

Application of Direct Virtual Coil to Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI and MR Angiography with Data-Driven Parallel Imaging  

PubMed Central

Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of Direct Virtual Coil (DVC) in the setting of 4D dynamic imaging used in multiple clinical applications. Theory and Methods Three dynamic imaging applications were chosen: pulmonary perfusion, liver perfusion and peripheral MRA, with 18, 11 and 10 subjects respectively. After view-sharing, the k-space data were reconstructed twice: once with channel-by-channel (CBC) followed by sum-of-squares coil combination and once with DVC. Images reconstructed using CBC and DVC were compared and scored based on overall image quality by two experienced radiologists using a 5-point scale. Results The CBC and DVC showed similar image quality in image domain. Time course measurements also showed good agreement in the temporal domain. CBC and DVC images were scored as equivalent for all pulmonary perfusion cases, all liver perfusion cases, and 4 out of the 10 peripheral MRA cases. For the remaining 6 peripheral MRA cases, DVC were scored as slightly better (not clinically significant) than the CBC images by Radiologist A and as equivalent by Radiologist B. Conclusion For dynamic contrast-enhanced MR applications, it is clinically feasible to reduce image reconstruction time while maintaining image quality and time course measurement using the DVC technique. PMID:23441013

Wang, Kang; Beatty, Philip J.; Nagle, Scott K.; Reeder, Scott B.; Holmes, James H.; Rahimi, Mahdi S.; Bell, Laura C.; Korosec, Frank R.; Brittain, Jean H.

2013-01-01

211

Global steering of single gimballed control moment gyroscopes using a directed search  

Microsoft Academic Search

A guided depth-first search that manages null motion about torque-producing trajectories calculated with a singularity-robust inverse is proposed as a practical feedforward steering law that can globally avoid (or minimize the impact of) singular states in minimally-redundant systems of single gimballed control moment gyroscopes. Cost and heuristic functions are defined to guide the search procedure in improving gimbal trajectories. On-orbit

Joseph A. Paradiso

1992-01-01

212

A Massively Parallel Hybrid Dusty-Gasdynamics and Kinetic Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Model for Planetary Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In order to understand the global structure, dynamics, and physical and chemical processes occurring in the upper atmospheres, exospheres, and ionospheres of the Earth, the other planets, comets and planetary satellites and their interactions with their outer particles and fields environs, it is often necessary to address the fundamentally non-equilibrium aspects of the physical environment. These are regions where complex chemistry, energetics, and electromagnetic field influences are important. Traditional approaches are based largely on hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) formulations and are very important and highly useful. However, these methods often have limitations in rarefied physical regimes where the molecular collision rates and ion gyrofrequencies are small and where interactions with ionospheres and upper neutral atmospheres are important. At the University of Michigan we have an established base of experience and expertise in numerical simulations based on particle codes which address these physical regimes. The Principal Investigator, Dr. Michael Combi, has over 20 years of experience in the development of particle-kinetic and hybrid kinetichydrodynamics models and their direct use in data analysis. He has also worked in ground-based and space-based remote observational work and on spacecraft instrument teams. His research has involved studies of cometary atmospheres and ionospheres and their interaction with the solar wind, the neutral gas clouds escaping from Jupiter s moon Io, the interaction of the atmospheres/ionospheres of Io and Europa with Jupiter s corotating magnetosphere, as well as Earth s ionosphere. This report describes our progress during the year. The contained in section 2 of this report will serve as the basis of a paper describing the method and its application to the cometary coma that will be continued under a research and analysis grant that supports various applications of theoretical comet models to understanding the inner comae of comets (grant NAGS- 13239 from the Planetary Atmospheres program).

Combi, Michael R.

2004-01-01

213

Should ground-motion records be rotated to fault-normal/parallel or maximum direction for response history analysis of buildings?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the United States, regulatory seismic codes (for example, California Building Code) require at least two sets of horizontal ground-motion components for three-dimensional (3D) response history analysis (RHA) of building structures. For sites within 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) of an active fault, these records should be rotated to fault-normal and fault-parallel (FN/FP) directions, and two RHAs should be performed separately—when FN and then FP direction are aligned with transverse direction of the building axes. This approach is assumed to lead to two sets of responses that envelope the range of possible responses over all nonredundant rotation angles. The validity of this assumption is examined here using 3D computer models of single-story structures having symmetric (torsionally stiff) and asymmetric (torsionally flexible) layouts subjected to an ensemble of near-fault ground motions with and without apparent velocity pulses. In this parametric study, the elastic vibration period is varied from 0.2 to 5 seconds, and yield-strength reduction factors, R, are varied from a value that leads to linear-elastic design to 3 and 5. Further validations are performed using 3D computer models of 9-story structures having symmetric and asymmetric layouts subjected to the same ground-motion set. The influence of the ground-motion rotation angle on several engineering demand parameters (EDPs) is examined in both linear-elastic and nonlinear-inelastic domains to form benchmarks for evaluating the use of the FN/FP directions and also the maximum direction (MD). The MD ground motion is a new definition for horizontal ground motions for use in site-specific ground-motion procedures for seismic design according to provisions of the American Society of Civil Engineers/Seismic Engineering Institute (ASCE/SEI) 7-10. The results of this study have important implications for current practice, suggesting that ground motions rotated to MD or FN/FP directions do not necessarily provide the most critical EDPs in nonlinear-inelastic domain; however, they tend to produce larger EDPs than as-recorded (arbitrarily oriented) motions.

Reyes, Juan C.; Kalkan, Erol

2012-01-01

214

Directed follow-up strategy of low-cadence photometric surveys in search of transiting exoplanets - II. Application to Gaia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a previous paper we presented the directed follow-up (DFU) approach, which we suggested can be used to efficiently augment low-cadence photometric surveys in a way that will optimize the chances to detect transiting exoplanets. In this paper we present preliminary tests of applying the DFU approach to the future European Space Agency space mission Gaia. We demonstrate the strategy application to Gaia photometry through a few simulated cases of known transiting planets, using Gaia expected performance and current design. We show that despite the low-cadence observations DFU, when tailored for Gaia's scanning law, can facilitate detection of transiting planets with ground-based observations, even during the lifetime of the mission. We conclude that Gaia photometry, although not optimized for transit detection, should not be ignored in the search of transiting planets. With a suitable ground-based follow-up network it can make an important contribution to this search.

Dzigan, Yifat; Zucker, Shay

2013-02-01

215

A Search for Institutional Distinctiveness. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 65.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The essays in this collection argue that community colleges have much to gain by seeking out and maintaining positive recognition of the features that distinguish them from other colleges in the region and state. In addition, the sourcebook contains articles discussing the process of conducting a search for institutional distinctiveness and ways…

Townsend, Barbara K., Ed.

1989-01-01

216

Direct search for charged Higgs bosons in decays of top quarks  

E-print Network

We present a search for charged Higgs bosons in decays of pair-produced top quarks in p (p) over bar collisions at roots = 1.8 TeV recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. With no evidence for signal, ...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

2002-04-01

217

How choosy should I be? The relative searching time predicts evolution of choosiness under direct sexual selection  

PubMed Central

Most theoretical research in sexual selection has focused on indirect selection. However, empirical studies have not strongly supported indirect selection. A well-established finding is that direct benefits and costs exert a strong influence on the evolution of mate choice. We present an analytical model in which unilateral mate choice evolves solely by direct sexual selection on choosiness. We show this is sufficient to generate the evolution of all possible levels of choosiness, because of the fundamental trade-off between mating rate and mating benefits. We further identify the relative searching time (RST, i.e. the proportion of lifetime devoted to searching for mates) as a predictor of the effect of any variable affecting the mating rate on the evolution of choosiness. We show that the RST: (i) allows one to make predictions about the evolution of choosiness across a wide variety of mating systems; (ii) encompasses all alternative variables proposed thus far to explain the evolution of choosiness by direct sexual selection; and (iii) can be empirically used to infer qualitative differences in choosiness. PMID:24789896

Etienne, Loïc; Rousset, François; Godelle, Bernard; Courtiol, Alexandre

2014-01-01

218

Search for direct CP violation in D0?h-h+ modes using semileptonic B decays  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A search for direct CP violation in D0?h-h+ (where h=K or ?) is presented using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb collected in 2011 by LHCb in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The analysis uses D0 mesons produced in inclusive semileptonic b-hadron decays to the D0?X final state, where the charge of the accompanying muon is used to tag the flavour of the D0 meson. The difference in the CP-violating asymmetries between the two decay channels is measured to be ?ACP=ACP(K-K+)-ACP(?-?+)=(0.49±0.30 (stat)±0.14 (syst))%. This result does not confirm the evidence for direct CP violation in the charm sector reported in other analyses. Difference in b-hadron mixture. Due to the momentum requirements in the trigger and selection, the relative contribution from B0 and B+ decays (the contribution from b-baryon and Bs0 decays can be neglected) can be different between the D0?K-K+ and D0??-?+ modes. In combination with a different effective production asymmetry for candidates from B0 and B+ mesons (the production asymmetry from B0 mesons is diluted due to B0 mixing) this could lead to a non-vanishing bias in ?ACP. Assuming isospin symmetry, the production cross-sections for B0 and B+ mesons are expected to be equal. Therefore, the ratio between B0 and B+ decays is primarily determined by their branching fractions to the D0?X final state. Using the inclusive branching fractions [24], B?DX, the B0 fraction is expected to be f(B0)=(37.5±2.9)%. From the simulation the difference in the B0 fraction due to the difference in selection efficiencies is found to be at maximum 1%. Further assuming a B+ production asymmetry of 1.0%[25] and assuming no B0 production asymmetry, the difference in the effective production asymmetry between the two modes is ˜0.02%. Difference in B decay time acceptance. A difference between the D0?K-K+ and D0??-?+ modes in the B decay time acceptance, in combination with B0 mixing, changes the effective B production asymmetry. Its effect is estimated from integrating the expected B decay time distributions at different starting values, such that the mean lifetime ratio corresponds to the observed B decay length difference (˜5%) in the two modes. Using the estimated B0 fraction and assuming a 1.0% production asymmetry, the effect on ?ACP is found to be 0.02%. Effect of the weighting procedure. After weighting the D0 distributions in pT and ?, only small differences remain in the muon kinematic distributions. In order to estimate the systematic uncertainty from the B production and detection asymmetry due to residual differences in the muon kinematic distributions, an additional weight is applied according to the muon (pT,?) and the azimuthal angle ?. The value of ?ACP changes by 0.05%. Difference in mistag asymmetry. The difference in the mistag rate between positive and negative tags contributes to the measured raw asymmetry. The mistag difference using D0?K-?+ decays is measured to be ??=(0.006±0.021)% (see Section 5.2). In case ?? is different for D0?K-K+ and D0??-?+ there can be a small effect from the mistag asymmetry. A systematic uncertainty of 0.02% is assigned, coming from the uncertainty on ??. Effect of different fit models. A possible asymmetry in the background from false D0 combinations is accounted for in the fit to the D0 mass distribution. Different models can change the fraction between signal and background and therefore change the observed asymmetry. The baseline model is modified by either using a single Gaussian function for the signal, a single Gaussian plus a Crystal Ball function for the signal, a first- or second-order polynomial for the background, by leaving the asymmetry in the reflection free, or by modifying the fit range for D0??-?+ to exclude the reflection peak. The largest variation changes the value of ?ACP by 0.035%. As another check, the asymmetry is determined without any fit by counting the number of positively- and negatively-tagged events in the signal window and subtracting the corres

Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Baesso, C.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, P.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Dogaru, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurice, E.; Mazurov, A.; McCarthy, J.; McNulty, R.; Mcnab, A.

2013-06-01

219

Epitope mapping and direct visualization of the parallel, in-register arrangement of the double-stranded coiled-coil in the NuMA protein.  

PubMed Central

NuMA, a 238 kDa protein present in the nucleus during interphase, translocates to the spindle poles in mitosis. NuMA plays an essential role in mitosis, since microinjection of the NuMA SPN-3 monoclonal antibody causes mitotic arrest and micronuclei formation. We have mapped the approximate position of the epitopes of six monoclonal NuMA antibodies using recombinant NuMA fragments. The SPN-3 epitope has been located to residues 255-267 at the C-terminus of the first helical subdomain of the central rod domain and several residues crucial for antibody binding have been identified. To gain insight into the ultrastructure of NuMA, several defined fragments, as well as the full-length recombinant protein, were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. They were then characterized by chemical cross-linking, circular dichroism spectra and electron microscopy. The results directly reveal the tripartate structure of NuMA. A long central rod domain is flanked by globular end domains. The rod is 207 nm long and is at least 90% alpha-helical. It reflects a double-stranded coiled-coil with the alpha-helices arranged parallel and in register. The NuMA protein thus forms the longest coiled-coil currently known. Our analyses reveal no indication that recombinant NuMA assembles into filaments or other higher order structures. Images PMID:7781599

Harborth, J; Weber, K; Osborn, M

1995-01-01

220

A parallel-group, randomised controlled trial of a multimedia, self-directed, coping skills training intervention for patients with cancer and their partners: design and rationale  

PubMed Central

Introduction Coping skills training interventions have been found to be efficacious in helping both patients and their partners manage the physical and emotional challenges they face following a cancer diagnosis. However, many of these interventions are costly and not sustainable. To overcome these issues, a self-directed format is increasingly used. The efficacy of self-directed interventions for patients has been supported; however, no study has reported on the outcomes for their partners. This study will test the efficacy of Coping-Together—a multimedia, self-directed, coping skills training intervention for patients with cancer and their partners. Methods and analysis The proposed three-group, parallel, randomised controlled trial will recruit patients diagnosed in the past 4?months with breast, prostate, colorectal cancer or melanoma through their treating clinician. Patients and their partners will be randomised to (1) a minimal ethical care (MEC) condition—selected Cancer Council New South Wales booklets and a brochure for the Cancer Council Helpline, (2) Coping-Together generic—MEC materials, the six Coping-Together booklets and DVD, the Cancer Council Queensland relaxation audio CD and login to the Coping-Together website or (3) Coping-Together tailored—MEC materials, the Coping-Together DVD, the login to the website and only those Coping-Together booklet sections that pertain to their direct concerns. Anxiety (primary outcome), distress, depression, dyadic adjustment, quality of life, illness or caregiving appraisal, self-efficacy and dyadic and individual coping will be assessed before receiving the study material (ie, baseline) and again at 3, 6 and 12?months postbaseline. Intention-to-treat and per protocol analysis will be conducted. Ethics and dissemination This study has been approved by the relevant local area health and University ethics committees. Study findings will be disseminated not only through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations but also through educational outreach visits, publication of lay research summaries in consumer newsletters and publications targeting clinicians. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613000491763 (03/05/2013) PMID:23883890

Lambert, Sylvie D; Girgis, Afaf; McElduff, Patrick; Turner, Jane; Levesque, Janelle V; Kayser, Karen; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Shih, Sophy T F; Barker, Daniel

2013-01-01

221

Heuristic optimization methods for run-time intensive models (Dynamically Dimensioned Search, Particle Swarm Optimization, GA) - a comparison of performance and parallel implementation using R  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Calibrating complex hydrological models faces two major challenges: firstly, extended models, especially when spatially distributed, encompass a large number of parameters with different (and possibly a-priori unknown) sensitivity. Due to the usually rough surface of the objective function, this aggravates the risk of an algorithm to converge in a local optimum. Thus, gradient-based optimization methods are often bound to fail without a very good prior estimate. Secondly, despite growing computational power, it is not uncommon that models of large extent in space or time take several minutes to run, which severely restricts the total number of model evaluations under given computational and time resources. While various heuristic methods successfully address the first challenge, they tend to conflict with the second challenge due to the increased number of evaluations necessary. In that context we analyzed three methods (Dynamically Dimensioned Search / DDS, Particle Swarm Optimization / PSO, Genetic Algorithms /GA). We performed tests with common "synthetic" objective functions and a calibration of the hydrological model WASA-SED with different number of parameters. When looking at the reduction of the objective function within few (i.e.< 1000) evaluations, the methods generally perform in the order (best to worst) DDS-PSO-GA. Only at a larger number, GA can excel. To speed up optimization, we executed DDS and PSO as parallel applications, i.e. using multiple CPUs and/or computers. The parallelisation has been implemented in the ppso-package for the free computation environment R. Special focus has been laid onto the options to resume interrupted optimization runs and visualize progress.

Francke, Till; Bronster, Axel; Shoemaker, Christine A.

2010-05-01

222

First measurement of the Head-Tail directional nuclear recoil signature at energies relevant to WIMP dark matter searches  

E-print Network

We present first evidence for the so-called Head-Tail asymmetry signature of neutron-induced nuclear recoil tracks at energies down to 1.5 keV/amu using the 1m^3 DRIFT-IIc dark matter detector. This regime is appropriate for recoils induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) but one where the differential ionization is poorly understood. We show that the distribution of recoil energies and directions induced here by Cf-252 neutrons matches well that expected from massive WIMPs. The results open a powerful new means of searching for a galactic signature from WIMPs.

S. Burgos; E. Daw; J. Forbes; C. Ghag; M. Gold; C. Hagemann; V. A. Kudryavtsev; T. B. Lawson; D. Loomba; P. Majewski; D. Muna; A. StJ. Murphy; G. G. Nicklin; S. M. Paling; A. Petkov; S. J. S. Plank; M. Robinson; N. Sanghi; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; J. Turk; E. Tziaferi

2008-09-10

223

Footprint of Triplet Scalar Dark Matter in Direct, Indirect Search and Invisible Higgs Decay  

E-print Network

In this talk, we will review Inert Triplet Model (ITM) which provide candidate for dark matter (DM) particles. Then we study possible decays of Higgs boson to DM candidate and apply current experimental data for invisible Higgs decay to constrain parameter space of ITM. We also consider indirect search for DM and use FermiLAT data to put constraints on parameter space. Ultimately we compare this limit with constraints provided by LUX experiment for low mass DM and invisible Higgs decay.

Ayazi, Seyed Yaser

2015-01-01

224

Direct search for charged higgs bosons in decays of top quarks.  

PubMed

We present a search for charged Higgs bosons in decays of pair-produced top quarks in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.8 TeV recorded by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. With no evidence for signal, we exclude most regions of the ( M(H+/-),tan(beta)) parameter space where the decay t--> H(+)b has a branching fraction >0.36 and B(H+/--->tau(nu)(tau)) is large. PMID:11955191

Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abdesselam, A; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Ahmed, S N; Alexeev, G D; Alves, G A; Amos, N; Anderson, E W; Baarmand, M M; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, T C; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begel, M; Belyaev, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Boehnlein, A; Bojko, N I; Borcherding, F; Bos, K; Brandt, A; Breedon, R; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burtovoi, V S; Butler, J M; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, D; Casilum, Z; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chekulaev, S V; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christenson, J H; Chung, M; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Cochran, J; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; Davis, G A; Davis, K; De, K; de Jong, S J; Del Signore, K; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Di Loreto, G; Doulas, S; Draper, P; Ducros, Y; Dudko, L V; Duensing, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Dyshkant, A; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Eno, S; Eppley, G; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fahland, T; Feher, S; Fein, D; Ferbel, T; Filthaut, F; Fisk, H E; Fisyak, Y; Flattum, E; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M; Frame, K C; Fuess, S; Gallas, E; Galyaev, A N; Gao, M; Gavrilov, V; Genik, R J; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gilmartin, R; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Gómez, G; Goncharov, P I; González Solís, J L; Gordon, H; Goss, L T; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graf, N; Graham, G; Grannis, P D; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Grinstein, S; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Gupta, A; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Hall, R E; Hanlet, P; Hansen, S; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Heuring, T; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Huang, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Karmanov, D; Karmgard, D; Kehoe, R; Kharchilava, A; Kim, S K; Klima, B; Knuteson, B; Ko, W; Kohli, J M; Kostritskiy, A V; Kotcher, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovsky, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krivkova, P; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kuznetsov, V E; Landsberg, G; Leflat, A; Leggett, C; Lehner, F; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipton, R; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Lundstedt, C; Luo, C; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Malyshev, V L; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Marshall, T; Martin, M I; Martin, R D; Mauritz, K M; May, B; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McDonald, J; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mishra, C S; Mokhov, N; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mostafa, M; da Motta, H; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Negroni, S; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D; Oguri, V; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Pan, L J; Papageorgiou, K; Para, A; Parashar, N; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Paterno, M; Patwa, A; Pawlik, B; Perkins, J; Peters, M; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piekarz, H; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Raja, R; Rajagopalan, S; Ramberg, E; Rapidis, P A; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rha, J; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rockwell, T; Roco, M; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rutherfoord, J; Sabirov, B M; Santoro, A; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schwartzman, A; Sen, N; Shabalina, E; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Singh, H; Singh, J B; Sirotenko, V; Slattery, P; Smith, E; Smith, R P; Snihur, R; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solomon, J; Sorín, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Steinbrück, G; Stephens, R W; Stichelbaut, F; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Taylor, W; Tentindo-Repond, S; Tripathi, S M; Trippe, T G; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; van Gemmeren, P; Vaniev, V; Van Kooten, R; Varelas, N; Vertogradov, L S; Volkov, A A; Vorobiev, A P; Wahl, H D; Wang, H; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weerts, H; White, A; White, J T; Whiteson, D; Wightman, J A; Wijngaarden, D A; Willis, S; Wimpenny, S J; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Yamada, R; Yamin, P; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Youssef, S; Yu, J; Yu, Z; Zanabria, M; Zheng, H; Zhou, Z; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

2002-04-15

225

Direct search for pair production of heavy stable charged particles in Z decays  

Microsoft Academic Search

A search for pair production of stable charged particles from Z decay has been performed with the Mark II detector at the SLAC Linear Collider. Particle masses are determined from momentum, ionization energy loss, and time-of-flight measurements. A limit excluding pair production of stable fourth-generation charged leptons and stable mirror fermions with masses between the muon mass and 36.3 GeV\\/c2

E. Soderstrom; J. A. McKenna; G. S. Abrams; C. E. Adolphsen; D. Averill; J. Ballam; B. C. Barish; T. Barklow; B. A. Barnett; J. Bartelt; S. Bethke; D. Blockus; G. Bonvicini; A. Boyarski; B. Brabson; A. Breakstone; F. Bulos; P. R. Burchat; D. L. Burke; R. J. Cence; J. Chapman; M. Chmeissani; D. Cords; D. P. Coupal; P. Dauncey; H. C. Destaebler; D. E. Dorfan; J. M. Dorfan; D. C. Drewer; R. Elia; G. J. Feldman; D. Fernandes; R. C. Field; W. T. Ford; C. Fordham; R. Frey; D. Fujino; K. K. Gan; E. Gero; G. Gidal; T. Glanzman; G. Goldhaber; J. J. Gomez Cadenas; G. Gratta; G. Grindhammer; P. Grosse-Wiesmann; G. Hanson; R. Harr; B. Harral; F. A. Harris; C. M. Hawkes; K. Hayes; C. Hearty; C. A. Heusch; M. D. Hildreth; T. Himel; D. A. Hinshaw; S. J. Hong; D. Hutchinson; J. Hylen; W. R. Innes; R. G. Jacobsen; J. A. Jaros; C. K. Jung; J. A. Kadyk; J. Kent; M. King; D. S. Koetke; S. Komamiya; W. Koska; L. A. Kowalski; W. Kozanecki; J. F. Kral; M. Kuhlen; L. Labarga; A. J. Lankford; R. R. Larsen; F. Le Diberder; M. E. Levi; A. M. Litke; X. C. Lou; V. Lüth; J. A. Matthews; T. Mattison; B. D. Milliken; K. C. Moffeit; C. T. Munger; W. N. Murray; J. Nash; H. Ogren; K. F. O'shaughnessy; S. I. Parker; C. Peck; M. L. Perl; M. Petradza; R. Pitthan; F. C. Porter; P. Rankin; K. Riles; F. R. Rouse; D. R. Rust; H. F. Sadrozinski; M. W. Schaad; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; J. G. Smith; A. Snyder; D. P. Stoker; R. Stroynowski; M. Swartz; R. Thun; G. H. Trilling; R. van Kooten; P. Voruganti; S. R. Wagner; S. Watson; P. Weber; A. J. Weinstein; A. J. Weir; E. Wicklund; M. Woods; D. Y. Wu; M. Yurko; C. Zaccardelli; C. von Zanthie

1990-01-01

226

Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory  

E-print Network

We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or `multiplets') which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic fields. The observation of several events from the same source would open the possibility to accurately reconstruct the position of the source and also measure the integral of the component of the magnetic field orthogonal to the trajectory of the cosmic rays. We describe the largest multiplets found and compute the probability that they appeared by chance from an isotropic distribution. We find no statistically significant evidence for the presence of multiplets arising from magnetic deflections in the present data.

Abreu, P; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F M; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Aminaei, A; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anti?i?, T; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Arganda, E; Arqueros, F; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avenier, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Balzer, M; Barber, K B; Barbosa, A F; Bardenet, R; Barroso, S L C; Baughman, B; Bäuml, J; Beatty, J J; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellétoile, A; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Berat, C; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanco, F; Blanco, M; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Bohá?ová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Borodai, N; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Bruijn, R; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Cheng, S H; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chudoba, J; Clay, R W; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cook, H; Cooper, M J; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dallier, R; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Domenico, M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; Junior, W J M de Mello; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Souza, V; de Vries, K D; Decerprit, G; del Peral, L; del Río, M; Deligny, O; Dembinski, H; Dhital, N; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Castro, M L Díaz; Diep, P N; Dobrigkeit, C; Docters, W; D'Olivo, J C; Dong, P N; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, J C dos; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Luis, P Facal San; Tapia, I Fajardo; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferguson, A P; Ferrero, A; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filip?i?, A; Fliescher, S; Fracchiolla, C E; Fraenkel, E D; Fröhlich, U; Fuchs, B; Gaior, R; Gamarra, R F; Gambetta, S; García, B; Gámez, D García; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gascon, A; Gemmeke, H; Gesterling, K; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giller, M; Glass, H; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Albarracin, F Gomez; Berisso, M Gómez; Gonçalves, P; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; Gookin, B; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Gozzini, S R; Grashorn, E; Grebe, S; Griffith, N; Grigat, M; Grillo, A F; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Guzman, A; Hague, J D; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Herve, A E; Hojvat, C; Hollon, N; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Jarne, C; Jiraskova, S; Josebachuili, M; Kadija, K; Kampert, K H; Karhan, P; Kasper, P; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapp, J; Koang, D -H; Kotera, K; Krohm, N; Krömer, O; Kruppke-Hansen, D; Kuehn, F; Kuempel, D; Kulbartz, J K; Kunka, N; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lautridou, P; Leão, M S A B; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Lemiere, A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; López, R; Agüera, A Lopez; Louedec, K; Bahilo, J Lozano; Lu, L; Lucero, A; Ludwig, M; Lyberis, H; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Marin, J; Marin, V; Maris, I C; Falcon, H R Marquez; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martin, L; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Martínez; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; Medina-Tanco, G; Melissas, M; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Mertsch, P; Meurer, C; Mi?anovi?, S; Micheletti, M I; Miller, W; Miramonti, L; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Ragaigne, D Monnier; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, E; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Moura, C A; Mueller, S; Muller, M A; Müller, G; Münchmeyer, M; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Nelles, A; Neuser, J; Nhung, P T; Niemietz, L; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nožka, L; Nyklicek, M; Oehlschläger, J; Olinto, A; Oliva, P; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Pacheco, N; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Palmieri, N; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parra, A; Parsons, R D; Pastor, S; Paul, T; Pech, M; P?kala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Pesce, R; Petermann, E; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrolini, A; Petrov, Y; Petrovic, J; Pfendner, C; Phan, N; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Ponce, V H; Pontz, M; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Rautenberg, J; Ravel, O; Ravignani, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rivera, H; Rizi, V; Roberts, J; Robledo, C; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Rodriguez, G; Martino, J Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Rodríguez-Frías, M D; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Rossler, T; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Rühle, C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H

2011-01-01

227

Fourier Analysis of Gamma-Ray Burst Light Curves: Searching for Direct Signature of Cosmological Time Dilation  

E-print Network

We study the power density spectrum (PDS) of light curves of the observed gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to search for a direct signature for cosmological time dilation in the PDS statistics with the GRBs whose redshifts $z$'s are known. The anticorrelation of a timescale measure and a brightness measure is indirect evidence of its effect. On the other hand, we directly demonstrate that a time dilation effect can be seen in GRB light curves. We find that timescales tend to be shorter in bursts with small redshift, as expected from cosmological time-dilation effects, and we also find that there may be non-cosmological effects constituting to this correlation. We discuss its implication on interpretations of the PDS analysis results. We put forward another caution to this kind of analysis when we statistically exercise with GRBs whose $z$ is unknown.

Heon-Young Chang

2001-06-13

228

A parallelized binary search tree  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

PTTRNFNDR is an unsupervised statistical learning algorithm that detects patterns in DNA sequences, protein sequences, or any natural language texts that can be decomposed into letters of a finite alphabet. PTTRNFNDR performs complex mathematical computations and its processing time increases when i...

229

Structure prediction of nanoclusters; a direct or a pre-screened search on the DFT energy landscape?  

PubMed

The atomic structure of inorganic nanoclusters obtained via a search for low lying minima on energy landscapes, or hypersurfaces, is reported for inorganic binary compounds: zinc oxide (ZnO)n, magnesium oxide (MgO)n, cadmium selenide (CdSe)n, and potassium fluoride (KF)n, where n = 1-12 formula units. The computational cost of each search is dominated by the effort to evaluate each sample point on the energy landscape and the number of required sample points. The effect of changing the balance between these two factors on the success of the search is investigated. The choice of sample points will also affect the number of required data points and therefore the efficiency of the search. Monte Carlo based global optimisation routines (evolutionary and stochastic quenching algorithms) within a new software package, viz. Knowledge Led Master Code (KLMC), are employed to search both directly and after pre-screening on the DFT energy landscape. Pre-screening includes structural relaxation to minimise a cheaper energy function - based on interatomic potentials - and is found to improve significantly the search efficiency, and typically reduces the number of DFT calculations required to locate the local minima by more than an order of magnitude. Although the choice of functional form is important, the approach is robust to small changes to the interatomic potential parameters. The computational cost of initial DFT calculations of each structure is reduced by employing Gaussian smearing to the electronic energy levels. Larger (KF)n nanoclusters are predicted to form cuboid cuts from the rock-salt phase, but also share many structural motifs with (MgO)n for smaller clusters. The transition from 2D rings to 3D (bubble, or fullerene-like) structures occur at a larger cluster size for (ZnO)n and (CdSe)n. Differences between the HOMO and LUMO energies, for all the compounds apart from KF, are in the visible region of the optical spectrum (2-3 eV); KF lies deep in the UV region at 5 eV and shows little variation. Extrapolating the electron affinities found for the clusters with respect to size results in the qualitatively correct work functions for the respective bulk materials. PMID:25017305

Farrow, M R; Chow, Y; Woodley, S M

2014-10-21

230

Parallel rendering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This article provides a broad introduction to the subject of parallel rendering, encompassing both hardware and software systems. The focus is on the underlying concepts and the issues which arise in the design of parallel rendering algorithms and systems. We examine the different types of parallelism and how they can be applied in rendering applications. Concepts from parallel computing, such as data decomposition, task granularity, scalability, and load balancing, are considered in relation to the rendering problem. We also explore concepts from computer graphics, such as coherence and projection, which have a significant impact on the structure of parallel rendering algorithms. Our survey covers a number of practical considerations as well, including the choice of architectural platform, communication and memory requirements, and the problem of image assembly and display. We illustrate the discussion with numerous examples from the parallel rendering literature, representing most of the principal rendering methods currently used in computer graphics.

Crockett, Thomas W.

1995-01-01

231

Searching for evidence of a preferred rupture direction in small earthquakes at Parkfield  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Theoretical modeling of strike-slip ruptures along a bimaterial interface suggests that the interface will have a preferred rupture direction and will produce asymmetric ground motion (Shi and Ben-Zion, 2006). This could have widespread implications for earthquake source physics and for hazard analysis on mature faults because larger ground motions would be expected in the direction of rupture propagation. Studies have shown that many large global earthquakes exhibit unilateral rupture, but a consistently preferred rupture direction along faults has not been observed. Some researchers have argued that the bimaterial interface model does not apply to natural faults, noting that the rupture of the M 6 2004 Parkfield earthquake propagated in the opposite direction from previous M 6 earthquakes along that section of the San Andreas Fault (Harris and Day, 2005). We analyze earthquake spectra from the Parkfield area to look for evidence of consistent rupture directivity along the San Andreas Fault. We separate the earthquakes into spatially defined clusters and quantify the differences in high-frequency energy among earthquakes recorded at each station. Propagation path effects are minimized in this analysis because we compare earthquakes located within a small volume and recorded by the same stations. By considering a number of potential end-member models, we seek to determine if a preferred rupture direction is present among small earthquakes at Parkfield.

Kane, D. L.; Shearer, P. M.; Allmann, B.; Vernon, F. L.

2009-12-01

232

Direct search for solar axions by using strong magnetic field and X-ray detectors  

E-print Network

We have searched for axions which could be produced in the solar core by exploiting their conversion to X rays in a strong laboratory magnetic field. The signature of the solar axion is an increase in the rate of the X rays detected in a magnetic helioscope when the sun is within its acceptance. From the absence of such a signal we set a 95% confidence level limit on the axion coupling to two photons $g_{a\\gamma\\gamma}\\equiv 1/M solar age consideration.

Shigetaka Moriyama; Makoto Minowa; Toshio Namba; Yoshizumi Inoue; Yuko Takasu; Akira Yamamoto

1998-05-22

233

Automatic Multilevel Parallelization Using OpenMP  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper we describe the extension of the CAPO (CAPtools (Computer Aided Parallelization Toolkit) OpenMP) parallelization support tool to support multilevel parallelism based on OpenMP directives. CAPO generates OpenMP directives with extensions supported by the NanosCompiler to allow for directive nesting and definition of thread groups. We report some results for several benchmark codes and one full application that have been parallelized using our system.

Jin, Hao-Qiang; Jost, Gabriele; Yan, Jerry; Ayguade, Eduard; Gonzalez, Marc; Martorell, Xavier; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

234

Nuclear emulsions as a very high resolution detector for directional dark matter search  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of nuclear emulsions in particle physics dates back to the very early stages. They are now used when an extremely high position resolution is required like in the search for short lived particles. The capability to detect nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs relies on the possibility to detect sub-micrometric trajectories. Recently nuclear emulsions with silver grains of 20 nm diameter were developed, opening the way for the reconstruction of nanometric particles. This challenging purpose requires the development of fully automated optical readout systems for a fast scanning of the emulsion films. This is meant for a pre-selection of recoil candidates. Once candidates have been identified, a fine grained X-ray microscope is used to detect the grains making up the tracks. We report here the present results on the current development along this line.

D'Ambrosio, N.; Di Marco, N.; Pupilli, F.; Alexandrov, A.; De Lellis, G.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Tioukov, V.; Sirignano, C.; Naka, T.; Asada, T.; Katsuragawa, T.; Yoshimoto, M.; Hakamata, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Kuwabara, K.; Umemoto, A.; Furuya, S.; Machii, S.; Tawara, Y.

2014-01-01

235

Direct dark matter search using large-mass superheated droplet detectors in the PICASSO experiment.  

PubMed

The PICASSO experiment investigates the presence and nature of dark matter in the Universe. The experiment is based on the detection of acoustic signals generated in explosive phase transitions induced by dark matter particles. This technique is an alternative more traditional detection technique like scintillation and ionisation, which are largely employed for dark matter search. One of the main advantages of this technique, besides its sensitivity to very low nuclear recoil energies (few keV), is its excellent background suppression features. A pilot experiment consisting of six superheated droplet detectors (40 g of active mass) is presently taking data at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) at a depth of 2000 m. We discuss the operation, calibration and data acquisition of the experiment and also the ongoing work to increase the sensitivity and the active mass of the detectors. PMID:16644961

Azuelos, G; Barnabé-Heider, M; Behnke, E; Clark, K; Di Marco, M; Doane, P; Feighery, W; Genest, M-H; Gornea, R; Guenette, R; Kanagalingam, S; Krauss, C; Leroy, C; Lessard, L; Levine, I; Martin, J P; Noble, A J; Noulty, R; Shore, S N; Wichoski, U; Zacek, V

2006-01-01

236

Debris Flows in Direct Dark Matter Searches-The modulation effect  

E-print Network

The effect of some possible non standard WIMP velocity distributions, like the Debris Flows recently proposed, on the direct dark matter detection rates is investigated. We find that such distributions may be deciphered from the data, especially if the time variation of the event rates due to the annual motion of the Earth is observed

J. D. Vergados

2012-05-17

237

Parallel Optimisation  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

An introduction to optimisation techniques that may improve parallel performance and scaling on HECToR. It assumes that the reader has some experience of parallel programming including basic MPI and OpenMP. Scaling is a measurement of the ability for a parallel code to use increasing numbers of cores efficiently. A scalable application is one that, when the number of processors is increased, performs better by a factor which justifies the additional resource employed. Making a parallel application scale to many thousands of processes requires not only careful attention to the communication, data and work distribution but also to the choice of the algorithms to use. Since the choice of algorithm is too broad a subject and very particular to application domain to include in this brief guide we concentrate on general good practices towards parallel optimisation on HECToR.

238

Parallelization of CFD codes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of parallelization is examined for conducting CFD representations such as 3D Navier-Stokes simulations of flows about aircraft for engineering purposes. References are made to fine-, medium-, and coarse-grain levels of parallelism, the use of artificial viscosity, and the use of explicit Runge-Kutta time integration. The inherent parallelism in CFD is examined with attention given to the use of patched multiblocks on shared-memory and local-memory MIMD machines. Medium-grain parallelism is effective for the shared-memory MIMDs when using a compiler directive that advances the equations in time after copying them onto several independent processors. Local-memory computers can be used to avoid the performance restrictions of memory access by using processors with built-in memories. The microblock concept is described, and some examples are given of decomposed domains including a computational result for a simulated Euler equations.

Bergman, C. M.; Vos, J. B.

1991-08-01

239

Direct imaging search for planets around low-mass stars and spectroscopic characterization of young exoplanets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Low--mass stars between 0.1--0.6 M? are the most abundant members our galaxy and may be the most common sites of planet formation, but little is known about the outer architecture of their planetary systems. We have carried out a high-contrast adaptive imaging search for gas giant planets between 1--13 MJup around 122 newly identified young M dwarfs in the solar neighborhood ( ? 35 pc). Half of our targets are younger than 145 Myr, and 90% are younger than 580 Myr. After removing 39 resolved stellar binaries, our homogeneous sample of 83 single young M dwarfs makes it the largest imaging search for planets around low--mass stars to date. Our H- and K- band coronagraphic observations with Subaru/HiCIAO and Keck/NIRC2 achieve typical contrasts of 9--13 mag and 12--14 mag at 100, respectively, which corresponds to limiting masses of ˜1--10 M Jup at 10--30 AU for most of our sample. We discovered four brown dwarfs with masses between 25--60 MJup at projected separations of 4--190 AU. Over 100 candidate planets were discovered, nearly all of which were found to be background stars from follow-up second epoch imaging. Our null detection of planets nevertheless provides strong statistical constraints on the occurrence rate of giant planets around M dwarfs. Assuming circular orbits and a logarithmically-flat power law distribution in planet mass and semi--major axis of the form d 2N=(dloga dlogm) infinity m0 a0, we measure an upper limit (at the 95% confidence level) of 8.8% and 12.6% for 1--13 MJup companions between 10--100 AU for hot start and cold start evolutionary models, respectively. For massive gas giant planets in the 5--13 M Jup range like those orbiting HR 8799, GJ 504, and beta Pictoris, we find that fewer than 5.3% (7.8%) of M dwarfs harbor these planets between 10--100 AU for a hot start (cold start) formation scenario. Our best constraints are for brown dwarf companions; the frequency of 13--75 MJup companions between (de--projected) physical separations of 10--100 AU is 2.1+2.1-1.2 %. Altogether, our results show that gas giant planets, especially massive ones, are rare in the outskirts of M dwarf planetary systems. If disk instability is a viable way to form planets, our constraints for the most common type of star imply that overall it is an inefficient mechanism.

Bowler, Brendan Peter

240

Measurement and modeling of muon-induced neutrons in LSM in application for direct dark matter searches  

SciTech Connect

Due to a very low event rate expected in direct dark matter search experiments, a good understanding of every background component is crucial. Muon-induced neutrons constitute a prominent background, since neutrons lead to nuclear recoils and thus can mimic a potential dark matter signal. EDELWEISS is a Ge-bolometer experiment searching for WIMP dark matter. It is located in the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (LSM, France). We have measured muon-induced neutrons by means of a neutron counter based on Gd-loaded liquid scintillator. Studies of muon-induced neutrons are presented and include development of the appropriate MC model based on Geant4 and analysis of a 1000-days measurement campaign in LSM. We find a good agreement between measured rates of muon-induced neutrons and those predicted by the developed model with full event topology. The impact of the neutron background on current EDELWEISS data-taking as well as for next generation experiments such as EURECA is briefly discussed.

Kozlov, Valentin [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut für Kernphysik, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institut für Kernphysik, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Collaboration: EDELWEISS Collaboration

2013-08-08

241

Identification of Unknown Interface Locations in a Source/Shield System Using the Mesh Adaptive Direct Search Method  

SciTech Connect

The Levenberg-Marquardt (or simply Marquardt) and differential evolution (DE) optimization methods were recently applied to solve inverse transport problems. The Marquardt method is fast but convergence of the method is dependent on the initial guess. While it has been shown to work extremely well at finding an optimum independent of the initial guess, the DE method does not provide a global optimal solution in some problems. In this paper, we apply the Mesh Adaptive Direct Search (MADS) algorithm to solve the inverse problem of material interface location identification in one-dimensional spherical radiation source/shield systems, and we compare the results obtained by MADS to those obtained by Levenberg-Marquardt and DE.

Armstrong, Jerawan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Favorite, Jeffrey A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-20

242

Searches for Direct CP Violation in D+ Decays And for D0 Anti-D0 Mixing  

SciTech Connect

The authors present preliminary results of a search for direct CP violation in D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} decays using 87 fb{sup -1} of data acquired by the Babar experiment running on and near the {Upsilon}(4S) from 1999-2002. The authors report the asymmetries in the signal mode and in the main resonant subchannels. Based on the same dataset, they also report a new 90% CL upper limit of 0.0042 on the rate of D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing using the decay modes D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}, D{sup 0} {yields} [K/K*]ev (+c.c.).

Purohit, M.V.; /South Carolina U.

2005-10-11

243

Parallelization of the LBG Vector Quantization Algorithm for Shared Memory Systems  

E-print Network

This paper proposes a parallel approach for the Vector Quantization (VQ) problem in image processing. VQ deals with codebook generation from the input training data set and replacement of any arbitrary data with the nearest codevector. Most of the efforts in VQ have been directed towards designing parallel search algorithms for the codebook, and little has hitherto been done in evolving a parallelized procedure to obtain an optimum codebook. This parallel algorithm addresses the problem of designing an optimum codebook using the traditional LBG type of vector quantization algorithm for shared memory systems and for the efficient usage of parallel processors. Using the codebook formed from a training set, any arbitrary input data is replaced with the nearest codevector from the codebook. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is indicated.

Annaji, Rajashekar

2009-01-01

244

Multithreading and Parallel Microprocessors  

E-print Network

Multithreading and Parallel Microprocessors Stephen Jenks Electrical Engineering and Computer Scalable Parallel and Distributed Systems Lab 4 Outline Parallelism in Microprocessors Multicore Processor Parallelism Parallel Programming for Shared Memory OpenMP POSIX Threads Java Threads Parallel Microprocessor

Shinozuka, Masanobu

245

Lost in space? Searching for directions in the spatial modelling of individuals, populations and species ranges  

PubMed Central

The workshop ‘Spatial models in animal ecology, management and conservation’ held at Silwood Park (UK), 9–11 March 2010, aimed to synthesize recent progress in modelling the spatial dynamics of individuals, populations and species ranges and to provide directions for research. It brought together marine and terrestrial researchers working on spatial models at different levels of organization, using empirical as well as theory-driven approaches. Different approaches, temporal and spatial scales, and practical constraints predominate at different levels of organization and in different environments. However, there are theoretical concepts and specific methods that can fruitfully be transferred across levels and systems, including: habitat suitability characterization, movement rules, and ways of estimating uncertainty. PMID:20484232

Struve, Juliane; Lorenzen, Kai; Blanchard, Julia; Börger, Luca; Bunnefeld, Nils; Edwards, Charles; Hortal, Joaquín; MacCall, Alec; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Van Moorter, Bram; Ozgul, Arpat; Royer, François; Singh, Navinder; Yesson, Chris; Bernard, Rodolphe

2010-01-01

246

Direct search for a ferromagnetic phase in a heavily overdoped nonsuperconducting copper oxide  

PubMed Central

The doping of charge carriers into the CuO2 planes of copper oxide Mott insulators causes a gradual destruction of antiferromagnetism and the emergence of high-temperature superconductivity. Optimal superconductivity is achieved at a doping concentration p beyond which further increases in doping cause a weakening and eventual disappearance of superconductivity. A potential explanation for this demise is that ferromagnetic fluctuations compete with superconductivity in the overdoped regime. In this case, a ferromagnetic phase at very low temperatures is predicted to exist beyond the doping concentration at which superconductivity disappears. Here we report on a direct examination of this scenario in overdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 using the technique of muon spin relaxation. We detect the onset of static magnetic moments of electronic origin at low temperature in the heavily overdoped nonsuperconducting region. However, the magnetism does not exist in a commensurate long-range ordered state. Instead it appears as a dilute concentration of static magnetic moments. This finding places severe restrictions on the form of ferromagnetism that may exist in the overdoped regime. Although an extrinsic impurity cannot be absolutely ruled out as the source of the magnetism that does occur, the results presented here lend support to electronic band calculations that predict the occurrence of weak localized ferromagnetism at high doping. PMID:20855579

Sonier, J. E.; Kaiser, C. V.; Pacradouni, V.; Sabok-Sayr, S. A.; Cochrane, C.; MacLaughlin, D. E.; Komiya, S.; Hussey, N. E.

2010-01-01

247

Duplex interrogation by a direct DNA repair protein in search of base damage  

SciTech Connect

ALKBH2 is a direct DNA repair dioxygenase guarding the mammalian genome against N{sup 1}-methyladenine, N{sup 3}-methylcytosine and 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine damage. A prerequisite for repair is to identify these lesions in the genome. Here we present crystal structures of human ALKBH2 bound to different duplex DNAs. Together with computational and biochemical analyses, our results suggest that DNA interrogation by ALKBH2 has two previously unknown features: (i) ALKBH2 probes base-pair stability and detects base pairs with reduced stability, and (ii) ALKBH2 does not have nor need a damage-checking site, which is critical for preventing spurious base cleavage for several glycosylases. The demethylation mechanism of ALKBH2 insures that only cognate lesions are oxidized and reversed to normal bases, and that a flipped, non-substrate base remains intact in the active site. Overall, the combination of duplex interrogation and oxidation chemistry allows ALKBH2 to detect and process diverse lesions efficiently and correctly.

Yi, Chengqi; Chen, Baoen; Qi, Bo; Zhang, Wen; Jia, Guifang; Zhang, Liang; Li, Charles J.; Dinner, Aaron R.; Yang, Cai-Guang; He, Chuan (Peking); (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (UC)

2012-08-31

248

Discovering Common Ground: How Future Search Conferences Bring People Together To Achieve Breakthrough Innovation, Empowerment, Shared Vision, and Collaborative Action.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book contains 35 papers about planning and holding future search conferences, as well as their benefits and likely future directions. The following papers are included: "Applied Common Sense" (Weisbord); "Inventing the Search Conference" (Weisbord); "Building Collaborative Communities" (Schindler-Rainman, Lippitt); "Parallel Paths to…

Weisbord, Marvin R.; And Others

249

Making sense of the local Galactic escape speed estimates in direct dark matter searches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Direct detection (DD) of dark matter (DM) candidates in the ?10 GeV mass range is very sensitive to the tail of their velocity distribution. The important quantity is the maximum weakly interacting massive particle speed in the observer's rest frame, i.e. in average the sum of the local Galactic escape speed vesc and of the circular velocity of the Sun vc. While the latter has been receiving continuous attention, the former is more difficult to constrain. The RAVE Collaboration has just released a new estimate of vesc [T. Piffl et al., Astron. Astrophys. 562, A91 (2014)] that supersedes the previous one [M. C. Smith, et al. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 379, 755 (2007)], which is of interest in the perspective of reducing the astrophysical uncertainties in DD. Nevertheless, these new estimates cannot be used blindly as they rely on assumptions in the dark halo modeling which induce tight correlations between the escape speed and other local astrophysical parameters. We make a self-consistent study of the implications of the RAVE results on DD assuming isotropic DM velocity distributions, both Maxwellian and ergodic. Taking as references the experimental sensitivities currently achieved by LUX, CRESST-II, and SuperCDMS, we show that (i) the exclusion curves associated with the best-fit points of P14 may be more constraining by up to ˜40 % with respect to standard limits, because the underlying astrophysical correlations induce a larger local DM density, and (ii) the corresponding relative uncertainties inferred in the low weakly interacting massive particle mass region may be moderate, down to 10-15% below 10 GeV. We finally discuss the level of consistency of these results with other independent astrophysical constraints. This analysis is complementary to others based on rotation curves.

Lavalle, Julien; Magni, Stefano

2015-01-01

250

Directed follow-up strategy of low-cadence photometric surveys in Search of transiting exoplanets. A Bayesian approach for adaptive scheduling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a novel approach to utilize low-cadence photometric surveys for exoplanetary transit search. Even if transits are undetectable in the survey database alone, it can still be useful for finding preferred times for directed follow-up observations that will maximize the chances to detect transits [2].

Dzigan, Y.; Zucker, S.

2011-10-01

251

Applied Parallel Metadata Indexing  

SciTech Connect

The GPFS Archive is parallel archive is a parallel archive used by hundreds of users in the Turquoise collaboration network. It houses 4+ petabytes of data in more than 170 million files. Currently, users must navigate the file system to retrieve their data, requiring them to remember file paths and names. A better solution might allow users to tag data with meaningful labels and searach the archive using standard and user-defined metadata, while maintaining security. last summer, I developed the backend to a tool that adheres to these design goals. The backend works by importing GPFS metadata into a MongoDB cluster, which is then indexed on each attribute. This summer, the author implemented security and developed the user interfae for the search tool. To meet security requirements, each database table is associated with a single user, which only stores records that the user may read, and requires a set of credentials to access. The interface to the search tool is implemented using FUSE (Filesystem in USErspace). FUSE is an intermediate layer that intercepts file system calls and allows the developer to redefine how those calls behave. In the case of this tool, FUSE interfaces with MongoDB to issue queries and populate output. A FUSE implementation is desirable because it allows users to interact with the search tool using commands they are already familiar with. These security and interface additions are essential for a usable product.

Jacobi, Michael R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-01

252

A search for anisotropy in the arrival directions of ultra high energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect

Observations of cosmic ray arrival directions made with the Pierre Auger Observatory have previously provided evidence of anisotropy at the 99% CL using the correlation of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with objects drawn from the Veron-Cetty Veron catalog. In this paper we report on the use of three catalog independent methods to search for anisotropy. The 2pt-L, 2pt+ and 3pt methods, each giving a different measure of self-clustering in arrival directions, were tested on mock cosmic ray data sets to study the impacts of sample size and magnetic smearing on their results, accounting for both angular and energy resolutions. If the sources of UHECRs follow the same large scale structure as ordinary galaxies in the local Universe and if UHECRs are deflected no more than a few degrees, a study of mock maps suggests that these three methods can efficiently respond to the resulting anisotropy with a P-value = 1.0% or smaller with data sets as few as 100 events. Using data taken from January 1, 2004 to July 31, 2010 we examined the 20, 30, ..., 110 highest energy events with a corresponding minimum energy threshold of about 51 EeV. The minimum P-values found were 13.5% using the 2pt-L method, 1.0% using the 2pt+ method and 1.1% using the 3pt method for the highest 100 energy events. In view of the multiple (correlated) scans performed on the data set, these catalog-independent methods do not yield strong evidence of anisotropy in the highest energy cosmic rays.

Abreu, P.; ,

2012-01-01

253

A search for anisotropy in the arrival directions of ultra high energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect

Observations of cosmic ray arrival directions made with the Pierre Auger Observatory have previously provided evidence of anisotropy at the 99% CL using the correlation of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with objects drawn from the Véron-Cetty Véron catalog. In this paper we report on the use of three catalog independent methods to search for anisotropy. The 2pt–L, 2pt+ and 3pt methods, each giving a different measure of self-clustering in arrival directions, were tested on mock cosmic ray data sets to study the impacts of sample size and magnetic smearing on their results, accounting for both angular and energy resolutions. If the sources of UHECRs follow the same large scale structure as ordinary galaxies in the local Universe and if UHECRs are deflected no more than a few degrees, a study of mock maps suggests that these three methods can efficiently respond to the resulting anisotropy with a P-value = 1.0% or smaller with data sets as few as 100 events. Using data taken from January 1, 2004 to July 31, 2010 we examined the 20,30,...,110 highest energy events with a corresponding minimum energy threshold of about 49.3 EeV. The minimum P-values found were 13.5% using the 2pt-L method, 1.0% using the 2pt+ method and 1.1% using the 3pt method for the highest 100 energy events. In view of the multiple (correlated) scans performed on the data set, these catalog-independent methods do not yield strong evidence of anisotropy in the highest energy cosmic rays.

Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Técnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Università di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahlers, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ahn, E.J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Albuquerque, I.F.M. [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Física, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Université Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atómico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Universidad Tecnológica Nacional - Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Castillo, J. Alvarez [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muñiz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Università di Napoli 'Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Antici'c, T. [Rudjer Boškovi'c Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Arganda, E. [IFLP, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Arqueros, F., E-mail: auger_spokesperson@fnal.gov [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

2012-04-01

254

Parallel Resistors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students will measure the resistance of resistors that they have drawn on paper with a graphite pencil. They will then connect two resistors in parallel and measure the resistance of the combination. In this activity, it is important that students color v

Michael Horton

2009-05-30

255

Impact of Coherent Neutrino Nucleus Scattering on Direct Dark Matter Searches based on CaWO$_4$ Crystals  

E-print Network

Atmospheric and solar neutrinos scattering coherently off target nuclei could be a serious background source for the next generation of direct dark matter searches. We present our studies on the maximal sensitivity on the elastic spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section which can be achieved by a background-free experiment based on calcium tungstate as target material. An experiment achieves this maximal sensitivity when one neutrino event is expected for the experiment's energy threshold and exposure. Thus, a first detection of coherent neutrino nucleus scattering (CNNS) could also be in reach of such an experiment, if neutron-like backgrounds are small enough ($\\lesssim 0.1$ events for the respective exposures). Due to the small energies of solar neutrinos, calcium tungstate with its light nuclei oxygen and calcium seems to be well suited for a detection of CNNS. We show that for a counting experiment using only the integral above an energy threshold as well as a Bayesian analysis taking into account spectral shapes a detection of CNNS on a 3$\\sigma$ confidence level is possible for exposures between 50 and 300 kg-years.

A. Gütlein; G. Angloher; A. Bento; C. Bucci; L. Canonica; A. Erb; F. v. Feilitzsch; N. Ferreiro Iachellini; P. Gorla; D. Hauff; J. Jochum; M. Kiefer; H. Kluck; H. Kraus; J. -C. Lanfranchi; J. Loebell; A. Münster; F. Petricca; W. Potzel; F. Pröbst; F. Reindl; S. Roth; K. Rottler; C. Sailer; K. Schäffner; J. Schieck; S. Schönert; W. Seidel; M. v. Sivers; L. Stodolsky; C. Strandhagen; R. Strauss; A. Tanzke; M. Uffinger; A. Ulrich; I. Usherov; S. Wawoczny; M. Willers; M. Wüstrich; A. Zöller

2014-08-11

256

Process Simulation and Control Optimization of a Blast Furnace Using Classical Thermodynamics Combined to a Direct Search Algorithm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several numerical approaches have been proposed in the literature to simulate the behavior of modern blast furnaces: finite volume methods, data-mining models, heat and mass balance models, and classical thermodynamic simulations. Despite this, there is actually no efficient method for evaluating quickly optimal operating parameters of a blast furnace as a function of the iron ore composition, which takes into account all potential chemical reactions that could occur in the system. In the current study, we propose a global simulation strategy of a blast furnace, the 5-unit process simulation. It is based on classical thermodynamic calculations coupled to a direct search algorithm to optimize process parameters. These parameters include the minimum required metallurgical coke consumption as well as the optimal blast chemical composition and the total charge that simultaneously satisfy the overall heat and mass balances of the system. Moreover, a Gibbs free energy function for metallurgical coke is parameterized in the current study and used to fine-tune the simulation of the blast furnace. Optimal operating conditions and predicted output stream properties calculated by the proposed thermodynamic simulation strategy are compared with reference data found in the literature and have proven the validity and high precision of this simulation.

Harvey, Jean-Philippe; Gheribi, Aïmen E.

2013-12-01

257

Automatic Multilevel Parallelization Using OpenMP  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper we describe the extension of the CAPO parallelization support tool to support multilevel parallelism based on OpenMP directives. CAPO generates OpenMP directives with extensions supported by the NanosCompiler to allow for directive nesting and definition of thread groups. We report first results for several benchmark codes and one full application that have been parallelized using our system.

Jin, Hao-Qiang; Jost, Gabriele; Yan, Jerry; Ayguade, Eduard; Gonzalez, Marc; Martorell, Xavier; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

258

Parallel hierarchical global illumination  

SciTech Connect

Solving the global illumination problem is equivalent to determining the intensity of every wavelength of light in all directions at every point in a given scene. The complexity of the problem has led researchers to use approximation methods for solving the problem on serial computers. Rather than using an approximation method, such as backward ray tracing or radiosity, the authors have chosen to solve the Rendering Equation by direct simulation of light transport from the light sources. This paper presents an algorithm that solves the Rendering Equation to any desired accuracy, and can be run in parallel on distributed memory or shared memory computer systems with excellent scaling properties. It appears superior in both speed and physical correctness to recent published methods involving bidirectional ray tracing or hybrid treatments of diffuse and specular surfaces. Like progressive radiosity methods, it dynamically refines the geometry decomposition where required, but does so without the excessive storage requirements for ray histories. The algorithm, called Photon, produces a scene which converges to the global illumination solution. This amounts to a huge task for a 1997-vintage serial computer, but using the power of a parallel supercomputer significantly reduces the time required to generate a solution. Currently, Photon can be run on most parallel environments from a shared memory multiprocessor to a parallel supercomputer, as well as on clusters of heterogeneous workstations.

Snell, Q.O.

1997-10-08

259

Research on parallel algorithm for sequential pattern mining  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sequential pattern mining is the mining of frequent sequences related to time or other orders from the sequence database. Its initial motivation is to discover the laws of customer purchasing in a time section by finding the frequent sequences. In recent years, sequential pattern mining has become an important direction of data mining, and its application field has not been confined to the business database and has extended to new data sources such as Web and advanced science fields such as DNA analysis. The data of sequential pattern mining has characteristics as follows: mass data amount and distributed storage. Most existing sequential pattern mining algorithms haven't considered the above-mentioned characteristics synthetically. According to the traits mentioned above and combining the parallel theory, this paper puts forward a new distributed parallel algorithm SPP(Sequential Pattern Parallel). The algorithm abides by the principal of pattern reduction and utilizes the divide-and-conquer strategy for parallelization. The first parallel task is to construct frequent item sets applying frequent concept and search space partition theory and the second task is to structure frequent sequences using the depth-first search method at each processor. The algorithm only needs to access the database twice and doesn't generate the candidated sequences, which abates the access time and improves the mining efficiency. Based on the random data generation procedure and different information structure designed, this paper simulated the SPP algorithm in a concrete parallel environment and implemented the AprioriAll algorithm. The experiments demonstrate that compared with AprioriAll, the SPP algorithm had excellent speedup factor and efficiency.

Zhou, Lijuan; Qin, Bai; Wang, Yu; Hao, Zhongxiao

2008-03-01

260

Parallel Anisotropic Tetrahedral Adaptation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An adaptive method that robustly produces high aspect ratio tetrahedra to a general 3D metric specification without introducing hybrid semi-structured regions is presented. The elemental operators and higher-level logic is described with their respective domain-decomposed parallelizations. An anisotropic tetrahedral grid adaptation scheme is demonstrated for 1000-1 stretching for a simple cube geometry. This form of adaptation is applicable to more complex domain boundaries via a cut-cell approach as demonstrated by a parallel 3D supersonic simulation of a complex fighter aircraft. To avoid the assumptions and approximations required to form a metric to specify adaptation, an approach is introduced that directly evaluates interpolation error. The grid is adapted to reduce and equidistribute this interpolation error calculation without the use of an intervening anisotropic metric. Direct interpolation error adaptation is illustrated for 1D and 3D domains.

Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

2008-01-01

261

Analytic Guided-Search Model of Human Performance Accuracy in Target- Localization Search Tasks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Current models of human visual search have extended the traditional serial/parallel search dichotomy. Two successful models for predicting human visual search are the Guided Search model and the Signal Detection Theory model. Although these models are inherently different, it has been difficult to compare them because the Guided Search model is designed to predict response time, while Signal Detection Theory models are designed to predict performance accuracy. Moreover, current implementations of the Guided Search model require the use of Monte-Carlo simulations, a method that makes fitting the model's performance quantitatively to human data more computationally time consuming. We have extended the Guided Search model to predict human accuracy in target-localization search tasks. We have also developed analytic expressions that simplify simulation of the model to the evaluation of a small set of equations using only three free parameters. This new implementation and extension of the Guided Search model will enable direct quantitative comparisons with human performance in target-localization search experiments and with the predictions of Signal Detection Theory and other search accuracy models.

Eckstein, Miguel P.; Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.

2000-01-01

262

Mn 0.9Co 0.1P in field parallel to hard direction: phase diagram and irreversibility of CONE phase  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A single crystal of Mn 0.9Co 0.1P, a homologue of MnP with disordered metal sublattice, has been studied by the ac susceptibility method in a steady field H. This report concerns H parallel to the orthorhombic a axis ( a> b> c). The magnetic phase diagram is qualitatively similar to that of MnP, including the presence of a Lifshitz multicritical point ( TL = 98 K, HL = 42 kOe) at the confluence of the paramagnetic, ferromagnetic and modulated FAN phases. Contrary to pure MnP, irreversible behaviour was observed in the susceptibility of the modulated CONE phase. This phenomenon develops only for fields above 30 kOe, in contrast to the irreversibility of the FAN phase (reported previously for H? b in the whole field range down to H = 0). New features of the presumably continuous CONE-FAN transition were also found.

Zieba, A.; Becerra, C. C.; Oliveira, N. F.; Fjellvåg, H.; Kjekshus, A.

1992-02-01

263

Search for correlations of the arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic ray with extragalactic objects as observed by the telescope array experiment  

E-print Network

We search for correlations between positions of extragalactic objects and arrival directions of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) with primary energy $E \\ge 40$ EeV as observed by the surface detector array of the Telescope Array (TA) experiment during the first 40 months of operation. We examined several public astronomical object catalogs, including the Veron-Cetty and Veron catalog of active galactic nuclei. We counted the number of TA events correlated with objects in each catalog as a function of three parameters: the maximum angular separation between a TA event and an object, the minimum energy of the events, and the maximum redshift of the objects. We determine combinations of these parameters which maximize the correlations, and calculate the chance probabilities of having the same levels of correlations from an isotropic distribution of UHECR arrival directions. No statistically significant correlations are found when penalties for scanning over the above parameters and for searching in several...

Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, S; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zhou, X; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

2013-01-01

264

Implementing a parallel C++ runtime system for scalable parallel systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

pC++ is a language extension to C++ designed toallow programmers to compose "concurrent aggregate"collection classes which can be aligned and distributedover the memory hierarchy of a parallel machine ina manner modeled on the High Performance FortranForum (HPFF) directives for Fortran 90. pC++ allowsthe user to write portable and efficient code whichwill run on a wide range of scalable parallel computersystems.

A. Malony; B. Mohr; P. Beckman; D. Gannon; S. Yang; F. Bodin; S. Kesavan

1993-01-01

265

Parallelization of the LBG Vector Quantization Algorithm for Shared Memory Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper proposes a parallel approach for the Vector Quantization (VQ)\\u000aproblem in image processing. VQ deals with codebook generation from the input\\u000atraining data set and replacement of any arbitrary data with the nearest\\u000acodevector. Most of the efforts in VQ have been directed towards designing\\u000aparallel search algorithms for the codebook, and little has hitherto been done\\u000ain

Rajashekar Annaji; Shrisha Rao

2009-01-01

266

On the fly nodal searches in importance sampled fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo using a parallel, fine-grained, genetic algorithm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A method for finding nodal surfaces on the fly in importance-sampled, fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo calculations is described. The procedure relies on minimizing the difference between the nodal functions of the guiding wave function, ?T, and Hˆ ?T, where Hˆ is the Hamiltonian. This is done by allowing the trial function to depend on a set of parameters whose values are then optimized using a parallel genetic algorithm (e.g., the Pikaia code developed in astrophysics). Application is made to the calculation of several excited states of a non-integrable two-dimensional quartic oscillator and to excited states of the He-C2H2 complex.

Wairegi, Angeline; Farrelly, David

2015-01-01

267

A direct search for the CP-violating decay K-->3pi with the KLOE detector at DAPhiNE  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have searched for the decay K-->3pi with the KLOE experiment at DAPhiNE using data from ee collisions at a center of mass energy W˜mc for an integrated luminosity L=450pb. The search has been performed with a pure K beam obtained by tagging with K interactions in the calorimeter and detecting six photons. We find an upper limit for the

F. Ambrosino; A. Antonelli; M. Antonelli; C. Bacci; P. Beltrame; G. Bencivenni; S. Bertolucci; C. Bini; C. Bloise; V. Bocci; F. Bossi; D. Bowring; P. Branchini; R. Caloi; P. Campana; G. Capon; T. Capussella; F. Ceradini; S. Chi; G. Chiefari; P. Ciambrone; S. Conetti; E. De Lucia; A. De Santis; P. De Simone; G. De Zorzi; S. DellAgnello; A. Denig; A. Di Domenico; C. Di Donato; S. Di Falco; B. Di Micco; A. Doria; M. Dreucci; G. Felici; A. Ferrari; M. L. Ferrer; G. Finocchiaro; C. Forti; P. Franzini; C. Gatti; P. Gauzzi; S. Giovannella; E. Gorini; E. Graziani; M. Incagli; W. Kluge; V. Kulikov; F. Lacava; G. Lanfranchi; J. Lee-Franzini; D. Leone; M. Martini; P. Massarotti; W. Mei; S. Meola; S. Miscetti; M. Moulson; S. Muller; F. Murtas; M. Napolitano; F. Nguyen; M. Palutan; E. Pasqualucci; A. Passeri; V. Patera; F. Perfetto; L. Pontecorvo; M. Primavera; P. Santangelo; E. Santovetti; G. Saracino; B. Sciascia; A. Sciubba; F. Scuri; I. Sfiligoi; T. Spadaro; M. Testa; L. Tortora; P. Valente; B. Valeriani; G. Venanzoni; S. Veneziano; A. Ventura; R. Versaci; G. Xu

2005-01-01

268

A direct search for the CP-violating decay K S ? 3 ? 0 with the KLOE detector at DA ? NE  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have searched for the decay KS?3?0 with the KLOE experiment at DA?NE using data from e+e? collisions at a center of mass energy W?m?c2 for an integrated luminosity L=450pb?1. The search has been performed with a pure KS beam obtained by tagging with KL interactions in the calorimeter and detecting six photons. We find an upper limit for the

F. Ambrosino; A. Antonelli; M. Antonelli; C. Bacci; P. Beltrame; G. Bencivenni; S. Bertolucci; C. Bini; C. Bloise; V. Bocci; F. Bossi; D. Bowring; P. Branchini; R. Caloi; P. Campana; G. Capon; T. Capussella; F. Ceradini; S. Chi; G. Chiefari; P. Ciambrone; S. Conetti; E. De Lucia; A. De Santis; P. De Simone; G. De Zorzi; S. Dell'Agnello; A. Denig; A. Di Domenico; C. Di Donato; S. Di Falco; B. Di Micco; A. Doria; M. Dreucci; G. Felici; A. Ferrari; M. L. Ferrer; G. Finocchiaro; C. Forti; P. Franzini; C. Gatti; P. Gauzzi; S. Giovannella; E. Gorini; E. Graziani; M. Incagli; W. Kluge; V. Kulikov; F. Lacava; G. Lanfranchi; J. Lee-Franzini; D. Leone; M. Martini; P. Massarotti; W. Mei; S. Meola; S. Miscetti; M. Moulson; S. Müller; F. Murtas; M. Napolitano; F. Nguyen; M. Palutan; E. Pasqualucci; A. Passeri; V. Patera; F. Perfetto; L. Pontecorvo; M. Primavera; P. Santangelo; E. Santovetti; G. Saracino; B. Sciascia; A. Sciubba; F. Scuri; I. Sfiligoi; T. Spadaro; M. Testa; L. Tortora; P. Valente; B. Valeriani; G. Venanzoni; S. Veneziano; A. Ventura; R. Versaci; G. Xu

2005-01-01

269

Parallel Algorithms for Term Matching  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a new randomized parallel algorithm for term matching. Let n be the number of nodes of the directed acyclic graphs (dags) representing the terms to be matched, then our algorithm uses O(log2n) parallel time and M(n) processors, where M(n) is the complexity of n by n matrix multiplication. The number of processors is a significant improvement over previously

Cynthia Dwork; Paris C. Kanellakis; Larry J. Stockmeyer

1986-01-01

270

Weka-Parallel: Machine Learning in Parallel  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present Weka-Parallel, which is a modification to Weka, a popularmachine learning software package. Weka-Parallel expands uponthe original program by allowing one to perform n-fold cross-validationsin parallel. This added parallelism causes Weka-Parallel to demonstratea significant speed increase over Weka by lowering the amountof time necessary to evaluate a dataset using any given classifier. WekaParallelis designed for the researcher who needs

Sebastian Celis; David R. Musicant

271

Functional Interaction between Right Parietal and Bilateral Frontal Cortices during Visual Search Tasks Revealed Using Functional Magnetic Imaging and Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation  

PubMed Central

The existence of a network of brain regions which are activated when one undertakes a difficult visual search task is well established. Two primary nodes on this network are right posterior parietal cortex (rPPC) and right frontal eye fields. Both have been shown to be involved in the orientation of attention, but the contingency that the activity of one of these areas has on the other is less clear. We sought to investigate this question by using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to selectively decrease activity in rPPC and then asking participants to perform a visual search task whilst undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Comparison with a condition in which sham tDCS was applied revealed that cathodal tDCS over rPPC causes a selective bilateral decrease in frontal activity when performing a visual search task. This result demonstrates for the first time that premotor regions within the frontal lobe and rPPC are not only necessary to carry out a visual search task, but that they work together to bring about normal function. PMID:24705681

Ellison, Amanda; Ball, Keira L.; Moseley, Peter; Dowsett, James; Smith, Daniel T.; Weis, Susanne; Lane, Alison R.

2014-01-01

272

Architectural Requirements and Scalability of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks  

E-print Network

1 Architectural Requirements and Scalability of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks Frederick C. Wong of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks. Through direct measurements and simulations, we identify the factors which. 1 Introduction The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) are widely used to evaluate parallel machines [19

Arpaci-Dusseau, Remzi

273

SearchPad: explicit capture of search context to support Web search  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experienced users who query search engines have a complex behavior. They explore many topics in parallel, experiment with query variations, consult multiple search engines, and gather information over many sessions. In the process they need to keep track of search context — namely useful queries and promising result links, which can be hard. We present an extension to search engines

Krishna Bharat

2000-01-01

274

Search for Direct Top Squark Pair Production in Final States with One Isolated Lepton, Jets, and Missing Transverse Momentum in ?s=7??TeV pp Collisions Using 4.7??fb[superscript -1] of ATLAS Data  

E-print Network

A search is presented for direct top squark pair production in final states with one isolated electron or muon, jets, and missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at ?s=7??TeV. The measurement is based on ...

Taylor, Frank E.

275

Search for direct top squark pair production in events with a Z boson, b-jets and missing transverse momentum in ?s = 8 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector  

E-print Network

A search is presented for direct top squark pair production using events with at least two leptons including a same-flavour opposite-sign pair with invariant mass consistent with the Z boson mass, jets tagged as originating ...

Taylor, Frank E.

276

Search for direct production of charginos and neutralinos in events with three leptons and missing transverse momentum in = 8 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A search for the direct production of charginos and neutralinos in final states with three leptons and missing transverse momentum is presented. The analysis is based on 20.3 fb-1 of = 8 TeV proton-proton collision data delivered by the Large Hadron Collider and recorded with the ATLAS detector. Observations are consistent with the Standard Model expectations and limits are set in R-parity-conserving phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Models and in simplified supersymmetric models, significantly extending previous results. For simplified supersymmetric models of direct chargino and next-to-lightest neutralino production with decays to lightest neutralino via either all three generations of sleptons, staus only, gauge bosons, or Higgs bosons, and masses are excluded up to 700 GeV, 380 GeV, 345 GeV, or 148 GeV respectively, for a massless . [Figure not available: see fulltext.

Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Khalek, S. Abdel; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Verzini, M. J. Alconada; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Coutinho, Y. Amaral; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Ammosov, V. V.; Santos, S. P. Amor Dos; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Bella, L. Aperio; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Mayes, J. Backus; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bailey, D. C.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baker, S.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansal, V.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; da Costa, J. Barreiro Guimarães; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J. R.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bedikian, S.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Beloborodova, O. L.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Noccioli, E. Benhar; Garcia, J. A. Benitez; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Kuutmann, E. Bergeaas; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertolucci, F.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia, O.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; De Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bolnet, N. M.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Branchini, P.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, G.; Brown, J.; de Renstrom, P. A. Bruckman; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.

2014-04-01

277

Directed follow-up strategy of low-cadence photometric surveys in search of transiting exoplanets - I. Bayesian approach for adaptive scheduling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a novel approach to utilize low-cadence photometric surveys for exoplanetary transit search. Even if transits are undetectable in the survey data base alone, it can still be useful for finding preferred times for directed follow-up observations that will maximize the chances to detect transits. We demonstrate this approach through a few simulated cases. These simulations are based on the Hipparcos Epoch Photometry data base and on the transiting planets whose transits were already detected there. In principle, the approach we propose will be suitable for the directed follow-up of the photometry from the planned Gaia mission, and it can hopefully significantly increase the yield of exoplanetary transits detected, thanks to Gaia.

Dzigan, Yifat; Zucker, Shay

2011-08-01

278

Search for direct CP violation in \\Lambda and \\Xi hyperon decays C. G. White, a R. A. Burnstein, a M. Carmack, j A. Chakravorty, a A. Chan, b Y. C. Chen, b  

E-print Network

1 Search for direct CP violation in \\Lambda and \\Xi hyperon decays C. G. White, a R. A. Burnstein for direct CP violation in \\Xi \\Gamma ( ¯ \\Xi + ) and \\Lambda ( ¯ \\Lambda) decays is underway at FNAL. Experiment E871 (HyperCP) intends to perform a precision measurement of the angular distribution of protons

Fermilab Experiment E871

279

Integrated Task and Data Parallel Programming  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This research investigates the combination of task and data parallel language constructs within a single programming language. There are an number of applications that exhibit properties which would be well served by such an integrated language. Examples include global climate models, aircraft design problems, and multidisciplinary design optimization problems. Our approach incorporates data parallel language constructs into an existing, object oriented, task parallel language. The language will support creation and manipulation of parallel classes and objects of both types (task parallel and data parallel). Ultimately, the language will allow data parallel and task parallel classes to be used either as building blocks or managers of parallel objects of either type, thus allowing the development of single and multi-paradigm parallel applications. 1995 Research Accomplishments In February I presented a paper at Frontiers 1995 describing the design of the data parallel language subset. During the spring I wrote and defended my dissertation proposal. Since that time I have developed a runtime model for the language subset. I have begun implementing the model and hand-coding simple examples which demonstrate the language subset. I have identified an astrophysical fluid flow application which will validate the data parallel language subset. 1996 Research Agenda Milestones for the coming year include implementing a significant portion of the data parallel language subset over the Legion system. Using simple hand-coded methods, I plan to demonstrate (1) concurrent task and data parallel objects and (2) task parallel objects managing both task and data parallel objects. My next steps will focus on constructing a compiler and implementing the fluid flow application with the language. Concurrently, I will conduct a search for a real-world application exhibiting both task and data parallelism within the same program. Additional 1995 Activities During the fall I collaborated with Andrew Grimshaw and Adam Ferrari to write a book chapter which will be included in Parallel Processing in C++ edited by Gregory Wilson. I also finished two courses, Compilers and Advanced Compilers, in 1995. These courses complete my class requirements at the University of Virginia. I have only my dissertation research and defense to complete.

Grimshaw, A. S.

1998-01-01

280

A parallel processing tutorial  

Microsoft Academic Search

An overview of parallel computing is provided, with reference to numerical analysis and, in particular, to computational electromagnetics. The history of parallelism is reviewed, and the general principles are provided. The two main types of parallelism encountered, pipelining and replication are discussed, and an example of each is described. A parallel algorithm for forming a matrix-vector product is presented and

David B. Davidson

1990-01-01

281

Improved task scheduling for parallel simulations. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation is to design, analyze, and validate the generation of optimal schedules for simulation systems. Improved performance in simulation execution times can greatly improve the return rate of information provided by such simulations resulting in reduced development costs of future computer/electronic systems. Optimal schedule generation of precedence-constrained task systems including iterative feedback systems such as VHDL or war gaming simulations for execution on a parallel computer is known to be N P-hard. Efficiently parallelizing such problems takes full advantage of present computer technology to achieve a significant reduction in the search times required. Unfortunately, the extreme combinatoric 'explosion' of possible task assignments to processors creates an exponential search space prohibitive on any computer for search algorithms which maintain more than one branch of the search graph at any one time. This work develops various parallel modified backtracking (MBT) search algorithms for execution on an iPSC/2 hypercube that bound the space requirements and produce an optimally minimum schedule with linear speed-up. The parallel MBT search algorithm is validated using various feedback task simulation systems which are scheduled for execution on an iPSC/2 hypercube. The search time, size of the enumerated search space, and communications overhead required to ensure efficient utilization during the parallel search process are analyzed. The various applications indicated appreciable improvement in performance using this method.

McNear, A.E.

1991-12-01

282

Parallel Mandelbrot Set Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Parallel Mandelbrot Set Model is a parallelization of the sequential MandelbrotSet model, which does all the computations on a single processor core. This parallelization is able to use a computer with more than one cores (or processors) to carry out the same computation, thus speeding up the process. The parallelization is done using the model elements in the Parallel Java group. These model elements allow easy use of the Parallel Java library created by Alan Kaminsky. In particular, the parallelization used for this model is based on code in Chapters 11 and 12 of Kaminsky's book Building Parallel Java. The Parallel Mandelbrot Set Model was developed using the Easy Java Simulations (EJS) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double click the ejs_chaos_ParallelMandelbrotSet.jar file to run the program if Java is installed.

Franciscouembre

2011-11-24

283

Anisotropic diffusion of electrons in liquid xenon with application to improving the sensitivity of direct dark matter searches  

SciTech Connect

Electron diffusion in a liquid xenon time projection chamber has recently been used to infer the z coordinate of a particle interaction, from the width of the electron signal. The goal of this technique is to reduce the background event rate by discriminating edge events from bulk events. Analyses of dark matter search data which employ it would benefit from increased longitudinal electron diffusion. We show that a significant increase is expected if the applied electric field is decreased. This observation is trivial to implement but runs contrary to conventional wisdom and practice. We also extract a first measurement of the longitudinal diffusion coefficient, and confirm the expectation that electron diffusion in liquid xenon is highly anisotropic under typical operating conditions.

Sorensen, P

2011-02-14

284

Search for anisotropic directional correlations between. gamma. rays and K x rays emitted from /sup 154/Gd  

SciTech Connect

A very sensitive search has been made for an anisotropy between the 1274-keV ..gamma.. ray and K-shell x rays from the internal conversion of the 123-keV transition to the ground state. The asymmetry for the sum of K..cap alpha../sub 1/ and K..cap alpha../sub 2/ x rays was found to be 1.002 +- 0.004. Previous measurements in /sup 169/Tm and /sup 181/Ta showed effects of about 4% and 3%, respectively. Corrections for detector solid angles and perturbations of the correlation by the extranuclear crystalline fields were made. This null result, in an atom whose nuclear excited states are known to be highly deformed, might be explained by the disappearance of the nuclear deformation, to its final-state value of zero, in times short compared to those of the atomic processes resulting in the K-shell x rays.

Avignone F.T. III; Barker, W.C.; Miley, H.S.

1986-06-01

285

Parallel rendering techniques for massively parallel visualization  

SciTech Connect

As the resolution of simulation models increases, scientific visualization algorithms which take advantage of the large memory. and parallelism of Massively Parallel Processors (MPPs) are becoming increasingly important. For large applications rendering on the MPP tends to be preferable to rendering on a graphics workstation due to the MPP`s abundant resources: memory, disk, and numerous processors. The challenge becomes developing algorithms that can exploit these resources while minimizing overhead, typically communication costs. This paper will describe recent efforts in parallel rendering for polygonal primitives as well as parallel volumetric techniques. This paper presents rendering algorithms, developed for massively parallel processors (MPPs), for polygonal, spheres, and volumetric data. The polygon algorithm uses a data parallel approach whereas the sphere and volume render use a MIMD approach. Implementations for these algorithms are presented for the Thinking Ma.chines Corporation CM-5 MPP.

Hansen, C.; Krogh, M.; Painter, J.

1995-07-01

286

Task parallel implementation of NAS parallel benchmarks.  

E-print Network

??The multi-core era brings new challenges to the programming community. Parallelization requirements of applications in mainstream computing and applications in emergent fields of high performance… (more)

Nanjaiah, Shashi Kumar

2010-01-01

287

Ejs Parallel Plate Capacitor Model  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Ejs Parallel Plate Capacitor model displays a parallel-plate capacitor which consists of two identical metal plates, placed parallel to one another. The capacitor can be charged by connecting one plate to the positive terminal of a battery and the other plate to the negative terminal. The dielectric constant and the separation of the plates can be changed via sliders. You can modify this simulation if you have Ejs installed by right-clicking within the plot and selecting "Open Ejs Model" from the pop-up menu item. Ejs Parallel Plate Capacitor model was created using the Easy Java Simulations (Ejs) modeling tool. It is distributed as a ready-to-run (compiled) Java archive. Double clicking the ejs_bu_capacitor.jar file will run the program if Java is installed. Ejs is a part of the Open Source Physics Project and is designed to make it easier to access, modify, and generate computer models. Additional Ejs models for Newtonian mechanics are available. They can be found by searching ComPADRE for Open Source Physics, OSP, or Ejs.

Duffy, Andrew

2008-07-14

288

Fast data parallel polygon rendering  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a parallel method for polygonal rendering on a massively parallel SIMD machine. This method, based on a simple shading model, is targeted for applications which require very fast polygon rendering for extremely large sets of polygons such as is found in many scientific visualization applications. The algorithms described in this paper are incorporated into a library of 3D graphics routines written for the Connection Machine. The routines are implemented on both the CM-200 and the CM-5. This library enables a scientists to display 3D shaded polygons directly from a parallel machine without the need to transmit huge amounts of data to a post-processing rendering system.

Ortega, F.A.; Hansen, C.D.

1993-09-01

289

Real-time trajectory optimization on parallel processors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A parallel algorithm has been developed for rapidly solving trajectory optimization problems. The goal of the work has been to develop an algorithm that is suitable to do real-time, on-line optimal guidance through repeated solution of a trajectory optimization problem. The algorithm has been developed on an INTEL iPSC/860 message passing parallel processor. It uses a zero-order-hold discretization of a continuous-time problem and solves the resulting nonlinear programming problem using a custom-designed augmented Lagrangian nonlinear programming algorithm. The algorithm achieves parallelism of function, derivative, and search direction calculations through the principle of domain decomposition applied along the time axis. It has been encoded and tested on 3 example problems, the Goddard problem, the acceleration-limited, planar minimum-time to the origin problem, and a National Aerospace Plane minimum-fuel ascent guidance problem. Execution times as fast as 118 sec of wall clock time have been achieved for a 128-stage Goddard problem solved on 32 processors. A 32-stage minimum-time problem has been solved in 151 sec on 32 processors. A 32-stage National Aerospace Plane problem required 2 hours when solved on 32 processors. A speed-up factor of 7.2 has been achieved by using 32-nodes instead of 1-node to solve a 64-stage Goddard problem.

Psiaki, Mark L.

1993-01-01

290

Serial, covert shifts of attention during visual search are reflected by the frontal eye fields and correlated with population oscillations.  

PubMed

Attention regulates the flood of sensory information into a manageable stream, and so understanding how attention is controlled is central to understanding cognition. Competing theories suggest visual search involves serial and/or parallel allocation of attention, but there is little direct, neural evidence for either mechanism. Two monkeys were trained to covertly search an array for a target stimulus under visual search (endogenous) and pop-out (exogenous) conditions. Here, we present neural evidence in the frontal eye fields (FEF) for serial, covert shifts of attention during search but not pop-out. Furthermore, attention shifts reflected in FEF spiking activity were correlated with 18-34 Hz oscillations in the local field potential, suggesting a "clocking" signal. This provides direct neural evidence that primates can spontaneously adopt a serial search strategy and that these serial covert shifts of attention are directed by the FEF. It also suggests that neuron population oscillations may regulate the timing of cognitive processing. PMID:19679077

Buschman, Timothy J; Miller, Earl K

2009-08-13

291

Searching for short-period variable stars in the direction of Coma Berenices and Upgren 1 open clusters: Melotte 111 AV 1224 a new eclipsing binary star  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the results of CCD photometric observations in the direction of the Coma Berenices and Upgren 1 open clusters with the aim at searching for new short-period variable stars. A total of 35 stars were checked for variability. As a result of this search the star designated in the SIMBAD database as Melotte 111 AV 1224 was found to be a new eclipsing binary star. Follow-up Strömgren photometric and spectroscopic observations allowed us to derive the spectral type, distance, reddening and effective temperature of the star. A preliminary analysis of the binary light curve was performed and the parameters of the orbital system were derived. From the derived physical parameters we conclude that Melotte 111 AV 1224 is most likely a W-UMa eclipsing binary that is not a member of the Coma Berenices open cluster. On other hand, we did not find evidence of brightness variations in the stars NSV 5612 and NSV 5615 previously catalogued as variable stars in Coma Berenices open cluster.

Fox Machado, L.; Michel, R.; Alvarez, M.; Peña, J. H.

2015-01-01

292

Characterizing the parallelism in rule-based expert systems  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of two classes of rule-based expert systems is presented, followed by a detailed analysis of potential sources of parallelism at the production or rule level, the subrule level (including match, select, and act parallelism), and at the search level (including AND, OR, and stream parallelism). The potential amount of parallelism from each source is discussed and characterized in terms of its granularity, inherent serial constraints, efficiency, speedup, dynamic behavior, and communication volume, frequency, and topology. Subrule parallelism will yield, at best, two- to tenfold speedup, and rule level parallelism will yield a modest speedup on the order of 5 to 10 times. Rule level can be combined with OR, AND, and stream parallelism in many instances to yield further parallel speedups.

Douglass, R.J.

1984-01-01

293

Confronting recent results from selected direct and indirect dark matter searches and the Higgs boson with supersymmetric models with non-universal gaugino masses  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we study a class of supersymmetric models with non-universal gaugino masses that arise from a mixture of SU(5) singlet and non-singlet representations, i.e. a combination of 1, 24, 75 and 200. Based on these models we calculate the expected dark matter signatures within the linear combination 1 ? 24 ? 75 ? 200. We confront the model predictions with the detected boson as well as current experimental limits from selected indirect and direct dark matter search experiments ANTARES respective IceCube and XENON. We comment on the detection/exclusion capability of the future XENON 1t project. For the investigated parameter span we could not find a SU(5) singlet model that fulfils the Higgs mass and the relic density constraint. In contrary, allowing a mixture of 1 ? 24 ? 75 ? 200 enables a number of models fulfilling these constraints.

Spies, A.; Anton, G., E-mail: andreas.spies@physik.uni-erlangen.de, E-mail: gisela.anton@physik.uni-erlangen.de [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Department of Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2013-06-01

294

Exploiting run time distributions to compare sequential and parallel ...  

E-print Network

or strategies for solving a given problem and have been widely used as a tool for ... plications in the evaluation of parallel heuristics based on stochastic local search ..... An important issue regarding multicast communication is how to provide a.

Isabel Rosseti,,,,

295

Speculative parallelization of partially parallel loops  

E-print Network

, and applied a fully parallel data dependence test to determine if it had any cross–processor depen- dences. If the test failed, then the loop was re–executed serially. While this method exploits doall parallelism well, it can cause slowdowns for loops...

Dang, Francis Hoai Dinh

2009-05-15

296

Topic-based Index Partitions for Efficient and Effective Selective Search  

E-print Network

Keywords selective searching, federated search, document clustering 1. INTRODUCTION TraditionallyTopic-based Index Partitions for Efficient and Effective Selective Search Anagha Kulkarni and Jamie divided into shards that are distributed across multiple computers and searched in parallel to provide

Callan, Jamie

297

Computing contingency statistics in parallel.  

SciTech Connect

Statistical analysis is typically used to reduce the dimensionality of and infer meaning from data. A key challenge of any statistical analysis package aimed at large-scale, distributed data is to address the orthogonal issues of parallel scalability and numerical stability. Many statistical techniques, e.g., descriptive statistics or principal component analysis, are based on moments and co-moments and, using robust online update formulas, can be computed in an embarrassingly parallel manner, amenable to a map-reduce style implementation. In this paper we focus on contingency tables, through which numerous derived statistics such as joint and marginal probability, point-wise mutual information, information entropy, and {chi}{sup 2} independence statistics can be directly obtained. However, contingency tables can become large as data size increases, requiring a correspondingly large amount of communication between processors. This potential increase in communication prevents optimal parallel speedup and is the main difference with moment-based statistics where the amount of inter-processor communication is independent of data size. Here we present the design trade-offs which we made to implement the computation of contingency tables in parallel.We also study the parallel speedup and scalability properties of our open source implementation. In particular, we observe optimal speed-up and scalability when the contingency statistics are used in their appropriate context, namely, when the data input is not quasi-diffuse.

Bennett, Janine Camille; Thompson, David; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

2010-09-01

298

Parallel Global Aircraft Configuration Design Space Exploration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The preliminary design space exploration for large, interdisciplinary engineering problems is often a difficult and time-consuming task. General techniques are needed that efficiently and methodically search the design space. This work focuses on the use of parallel load balancing techniques integrated with a global optimizer to reduce the computational time of the design space exploration. The method is applied to

CHUCK A. BAKER; LAYNE T. WATSON; BERNARD GROSSMAN; WILLIAM H. MASON; RAPHAEL T. HAFTKA

1999-01-01

299

Dataflow Query Execution in a Parallel Main-Memory Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the performance and characteristics of the execution of various join-trees on a parallel DBMS are studied. The results of this study are a step into the direction of the design of a query optimization strategy that is fit for parallel execution of complex queries. Among others, synchronization issues are identified to limit the performance gain from parallelism.

Annita N. Wilschut; Peter M. G. Apers

1991-01-01

300

Parallelization of NAS Benchmarks for Shared Memory Multiprocessore  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents our experiences of parallelizing the sequential implementation of NAS benchmarks using compiler directives on SGI Origin2000 distributed shared memory (DSM) system. Porting existing applications to new high performance parallel and distributed computing platforms is a challenging task. Ideally, a user develops a sequential version of the application, leaving the task of porting the code to parallelization tools

Abdul Waheed; Jerry C. Yan

1998-01-01

301

Parallelization of NAS benchmarks for shared memory multiprocessors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents our experiences of parallelizing the sequential implementation of NAS benchmarks using compiler directives on SGI Origin2000 distributed shared memory (DSM) system. Porting existing applications to new high performance parallel and distributed computing platforms is a challenging task. Ideally, a user develops a sequential version of the application, leaving the task of porting the code to parallelization tools

Abdul Waheed; Jerry Yan

1999-01-01

302

Task Clustering and Scheduling for Distributed Memory Parallel Architectures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper addresses the problem of scheduling parallel programs represented as directed acyclic task graphs for execution on distributed memory parallel architectures. Because of the high communication overhead in existing parallel machines, a crucial step in scheduling is task clustering, the process of coalescing fine grain tasks into single coarser ones so that the overall execution time is minimized. The

Michael A. Palis; Jing-chiou Liou; David S. L. Wei

1996-01-01

303

Parallel manipulator for micro-assembly and micromachining  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a five DOF parallel manipulator. It consists of a four-DOF parallel manipulator and a rotate table. This kind of manipulator can be used in the field of micro machining and micro assembly. It owns all the advantage of parallel structure such as high stiffness, small dimension, low cost and high accuracy. Commonly the direct kinematics solution of

Xuezhong Wu; Yulie Wu; Shengyi Li

2001-01-01

304

Parallel Shortest Lattice Vector Enumeration on Graphics Cards  

E-print Network

of parallel computing systems. To illustrate the algorithm, it was implemented on graphics cards using CUDA, exhaustive search 1 Introduction Lattice-based cryptosystems are assumed to be secure against quantum com, especially to implementation aspects. In this paper we consider parallelization and special hardware

305

A parallel hybrid genetic algorithm for multiple protein sequence alignment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a parallel hybrid genetic algorithm (GA) for solving sum-of-pairs multiple protein sequence alignment. The method is based on a multiple population GENITOR-type GA and involves local search heuristics. It is then extended to parallel to exploit the benefit of a multiprocessor system. Benchmarks from the BAliBASE library are used to validate the method

Hung Dinh Nguyen; Ikuo YOSHIHARA; Kunihito YAMAMORI; Moritoshi YASUNAGA

2002-01-01

306

Specificity of task constraints and effects of visual demonstrations and verbal instructions in directing learners' search during skill acquisition.  

PubMed

In the present study, the efficacy of visual demonstrations and verbal instructions as instructional constraints on the acquisition of movement coordination was investigated. Fifteen participants performed an aiming task on 100 acquisition and 20 retention trials, under 1 of 3 conditions: a modeling group (MG), a verbally directed group (VDG), and a control group (CG). The MG observed a model intermittently throughout acquisition, whereas the VDG was verbally instructed to use the model's movement pattern. Participants in the CG received neither form of instruction. Kinematic analysis revealed that compared with verbal instructions or no instructions, visual demonstrations significantly improved participants' approximation of the model's coordination pattern. No differences were found in movement outcomes. Coordination data supported the visual perception perspective on observational learning, whereas outcome data suggested that the modeling effect is mainly a function of task constraints, that is, the novelty of a movement pattern. PMID:11495834

Al-Abood, S A; Davids, K F; Bennett, S J

2001-09-01

307

Two-dimensional spectral estimators of statistical anisotropy and search for the isolated directions in Planck mission data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a method for the analysis of homogeneity of the microwave background maps based on the behavior of the angular power spectrum C( ?) and parity parameter P. The estimator is built using the dispersion variation of the power spectrum of the background signal hemisphere and allows to visualize the statistical anisotropy as a new map which characterizes the homogeneity/heterogeneity of the background in the second order. Using the proposed method, we made the data analysis of the WMAP mission nine-year observations and the first Planck mission data release for the map with the resolution of ? ? 100. As a result, we have detected the asymmetry of the microwave background signal map associated with the ecliptic coordinate system both in the plane of the ecliptic and in the orthogonal direction. We also discuss the problems of generating the anisotropic signal.

Naiden, Ya. V.; Verkhodanov, O. V.

2014-10-01

308

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOEpatents

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

1984-01-01

309

DC Circuits: Parallel Resistances  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this interactive learning activity, students will learn about parallel circuits. They will measure and calculate the resistance of parallel circuits and answer several questions about the example circuit shown.

310

Parallel I/O Systems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

* Redundant disk array architectures,* Fault tolerance issues in parallel I/O systems,* Caching and prefetching,* Parallel file systems,* Parallel I/O systems, * Parallel I/O programming paradigms, * Parallel I/O applications and environments, * Parallel programming with parallel I/O

Amy Apon

311

Cortical Substrates Supporting Visual Search in Humans  

E-print Network

Cortical Substrates Supporting Visual Search in Humans Mirjam Eglin,1 Lynn C. Robertson,12 Administration Medical Center, Martinez, California 94553 Serial and parallel visual search tasks were presented types of visual search performance can be distinguished. At one extreme, search for simple vi- sual

Robertson, Lynn

312

Fits to the Fermi-LAT GeV excess with RH sneutrino dark matter: implications for direct and indirect dark matter searches and the LHC  

E-print Network

We show that the right-handed (RH) sneutrino in the NMSSM can account for the observed excess in the Fermi-LAT spectrum of gamma rays from the Galactic Centre, while fulfilling all the current experimental constraints from the LHC as well as from direct and indirect dark matter searches. We have explored the parameter space of this scenario, computed the gamma ray spectrum for each phenomenologically viable solution and then performed a chi^2 fit to the excess. Unlike previous studies based on model independent interpretations, we have taken into account the full annihilation spectrum, without assuming pure annihilation channels. Furthermore, we have incorporated limits from direct detection experiments, LHC bounds and also the constraints from Fermi-LAT on dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) and gamma ray spectral lines. In addition, we have estimated the effect of the most recent Fermi-LAT reprocessed data (Pass~8). In general, we obtain good fits to the GCE when the RH sneutrino annihilates mainly into pairs...

Cerdeno, D G; Robles, S

2015-01-01

313

Special issue on parallelism  

Microsoft Academic Search

The articles presented in our Special Issue on parallel processing on the supercomputing scale reflect, to some extent, splits in the community developing these machines. There are several schools of thought on how best to implement parallel processing at both the hard- and software levels. Controversy exists over the wisdom of aiming for general- or special-purpose parallel machines, and what

Karen A. Frenkel

1986-01-01

314

CFD on parallel computers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CFD or Computational Fluid Dynamics is one of the scientific disciplines that has always posed new challenges to the capabilities of the modern, ultra-fast supercomputers, and now to the even faster parallel computers. For applications where number crunching is of primary importance, there is perhaps no escaping parallel computers since sequential computers can only be (as projected) as fast as a few gigaflops and no more, unless, of course, some altogether new technology appears in future. For parallel computers, on the other hand, there is no such limit since any number of processors can be made to work in parallel. Computationally demanding CFD codes and parallel computers are therefore soul-mates, and will remain so for all foreseeable future. So much so that there is a separate and fast-emerging discipline that tackles problems specific to CFD as applied to parallel computers. For some years now, there is an international conference on parallel CFD. So, one can indeed say that parallel CFD has arrived. To understand how CFD codes are parallelized, one must understand a little about how parallel computers function. Therefore, in what follows we will first deal with parallel computers, how a typical CFD code (if there is one such) looks like, and then the strategies of parallelization.

Basu, A. J.

1994-10-01

315

Coordinating heterogeneous parallelism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our goal is to produce a client-server based programming environment to enable massively parallel symbolic computing on heterogeneous ensembles of parallel hardware. Multiple users should be able to log on as clients and use any combination of the resources available, via a single simple language. We want our users to have control over the Kind of parallelism employed by their

Duncan J. Batey; Julian A. Padget

1995-01-01

316

Parallel simulation today  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper surveys topics that presently define the state of the art in parallel simulation. Included in the tutorial are discussions on new protocols, mathematical performance analysis, time parallelism, hardware support for parallel simulation, load balancing algorithms, and dynamic memory management for optimistic synchronization.

Nicol, David; Fujimoto, Richard

1992-01-01

317

Research in parallel computing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report summarizes work on parallel computations for NASA Grant NAG-1-1529 for the period 1 Jan. - 30 June 1994. Short summaries on highly parallel preconditioners, target-specific parallel reductions, and simulation of delta-cache protocols are provided.

Ortega, James M.; Henderson, Charles

1994-01-01

318

Decomposing the Potentially Parallel  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This course provides an introduction to the issues involved in decomposing problems onto parallel machines, and to the types of architectures and programming styles commonly found in parallel computers. The list of topics discussed includes types of decomposition, task farming, regular domain decomposition, unbalanced grids, and parallel molecular dynamics.

Elspeth Minty, Robert Davey, Alan Simpson, David Henty

319

Multi-Target-Directed Ligands and other Therapeutic Strategies in the Search of a Real Solution for Alzheimer's Disease  

PubMed Central

The lack of an adequate therapy for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) contributes greatly to the continuous growing amount of papers and reviews, reflecting the important efforts made by scientists in this field. It is well known that AD is the most common cause of dementia, and up-to-date there is no prevention therapy and no cure for the disease, which contrasts with the enormous efforts put on the task. On the other hand many aspects of AD are currently debated or even unknown. This review offers a view of the current state of knowledge about AD which includes more relevant findings and processes that take part in the disease; it also shows more relevant past, present and future research on therapeutic drugs taking into account the new paradigm “Multi-Target-Directed Ligands” (MTDLs). In our opinion, this paradigm will lead from now on the research toward the discovery of better therapeutic solutions, not only in the case of AD but also in other complex diseases. This review highlights the strategies followed by now, and focuses other emerging targets that should be taken into account for the future development of new MTDLs. Thus, the path followed in this review goes from the pathology and the processes involved in AD to the strategies to consider in on-going and future researches. PMID:24533013

Agis-Torres, Angel; Sölhuber, Monica; Fernandez, Maria; Sanchez-Montero, J.M.

2014-01-01

320

B physics: measurement of partial widths and search for direct cp violation in d0 meson decays  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of relative partial widths and decay rate CP asymmetries in K{sup -}K{sup +} and {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays of D{sup 0} mesons produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96TeV. We use a sample of 2 x 10{sup 5} D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} (and charge conjugate) decays with the D{sup 0} decaying to K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, K{sup -}K{sup +}, and {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, corresponding to 123 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No significant direct CP violation is observed. We measure {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup +})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.0992 {+-} 0.0011 {+-} 0.0012, {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.03594 {+-} 0.00054 {+-} 0.00040, A{sub CP} (K{sup -}K{sup +}) = (2.0 {+-} 1.2 {+-} 0.6)%, and A{sub CP} ({pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (1.0 {+-} 1.3 {+-} 0.6) %, where, in all cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

2005-04-04

321

Multi-Target-Directed Ligands and other Therapeutic Strategies in the Search of a Real Solution for Alzheimer's Disease.  

PubMed

The lack of an adequate therapy for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) contributes greatly to the continuous growing amount of papers and reviews, reflecting the important efforts made by scientists in this field. It is well known that AD is the most common cause of dementia, and up-to-date there is no prevention therapy and no cure for the disease, which contrasts with the enormous efforts put on the task. On the other hand many aspects of AD are currently debated or even unknown. This review offers a view of the current state of knowledge about AD which includes more relevant findings and processes that take part in the disease; it also shows more relevant past, present and future research on therapeutic drugs taking into account the new paradigm "Multi-Target-Directed Ligands" (MTDLs). In our opinion, this paradigm will lead from now on the research toward the discovery of better therapeutic solutions, not only in the case of AD but also in other complex diseases. This review highlights the strategies followed by now, and focuses other emerging targets that should be taken into account for the future development of new MTDLs. Thus, the path followed in this review goes from the pathology and the processes involved in AD to the strategies to consider in on-going and future researches. PMID:24533013

Agis-Torres, Angel; Sölhuber, Monica; Fernandez, Maria; Sanchez-Montero, J M

2014-01-01

322

Parallel Imaging Microfluidic Cytometer  

PubMed Central

By adding an additional degree of freedom from multichannel flow, the parallel microfluidic cytometer (PMC) combines some of the best features of flow cytometry (FACS) and microscope-based high-content screening (HCS). The PMC (i) lends itself to fast processing of large numbers of samples, (ii) adds a 1-D imaging capability for intracellular localization assays (HCS), (iii) has a high rare-cell sensitivity and, (iv) has an unusual capability for time-synchronized sampling. An inability to practically handle large sample numbers has restricted applications of conventional flow cytometers and microscopes in combinatorial cell assays, network biology, and drug discovery. The PMC promises to relieve a bottleneck in these previously constrained applications. The PMC may also be a powerful tool for finding rare primary cells in the clinic. The multichannel architecture of current PMC prototypes allows 384 unique samples for a cell-based screen to be read out in approximately 6–10 minutes, about 30-times the speed of most current FACS systems. In 1-D intracellular imaging, the PMC can obtain protein localization using HCS marker strategies at many times the sample throughput of CCD-based microscopes or CCD-based single-channel flow cytometers. The PMC also permits the signal integration time to be varied over a larger range than is practical in conventional flow cytometers. The signal-to-noise advantages are useful, for example, in counting rare positive cells in the most difficult early stages of genome-wide screening. We review the status of parallel microfluidic cytometry and discuss some of the directions the new technology may take. PMID:21704835

Ehrlich, Daniel J.; McKenna, Brian K.; Evans, James G.; Belkina, Anna C.; Denis, Gerald V.; Sherr, David; Cheung, Man Ching

2011-01-01

323

Parallel algorithm for dominant points correspondences in robot binocular stereo vision  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents an algorithm to find the correspondences of points representing dominant feature in robot stereo vision. The algorithm consists of two main steps: dominant point extraction and dominant point matching. In the feature extraction phase, the algorithm utilizes the widely used Moravec Interest Operator and two other operators: the Prewitt Operator and a new operator called Gradient Angle Variance Operator. The Interest Operator in the Moravec algorithm was used to exclude featureless areas and simple edges which are oriented in the vertical, horizontal, and two diagonals. It was incorrectly detecting points on edges which are not on the four main directions (vertical, horizontal, and two diagonals). The new algorithm uses the Prewitt operator to exclude featureless areas, so that the Interest Operator is applied only on the edges to exclude simple edges and to leave interesting points. This modification speeds-up the extraction process by approximately 5 times. The Gradient Angle Variance (GAV), an operator which calculates the variance of the gradient angle in a window around the point under concern, is then applied on the interesting points to exclude the redundant ones and leave the actual dominant ones. The matching phase is performed after the extraction of the dominant points in both stereo images. The matching starts with dominant points in the left image and does a local search, looking for corresponding dominant points in the right image. The search is geometrically constrained the epipolar line of the parallel-axes stereo geometry and the maximum disparity of the application environment. If one dominant point in the right image lies in the search areas, then it is the corresponding point of the reference dominant point in the left image. A parameter provided by the GAV is thresholded and used as a rough similarity measure to select the corresponding dominant point if there is more than one point the search area. The correlation is used as a final decision tool when there is still more than one point in the search area. If there is no dominant point in the search area of if the points in the search area are below a correlation threshold, then the dominant point in the reference image is occluded and can not be corresponded. The algorithm has been modeled, implemented and shown to be fast, robust and parallel. The parallelism is created from three main features: locality of the operators; a memory optimization scheme; and the ability to fully parallelize the extraction phase which is the most computational intensive task in the algorithm. The last feature is achieved by performing the extraction phase on the two images simultaneously.

Al-Tammami, A.; Singh, B.

1993-01-01

324

A Local Stability Supported Parallel Distributed Constraint Optimization Algorithm  

PubMed Central

This paper presents a new distributed constraint optimization algorithm called LSPA, which can be used to solve large scale distributed constraint optimization problem (DCOP). Different from the access of local information in the existing algorithms, a new criterion called local stability is defined and used to evaluate which is the next agent whose value needs to be changed. The propose of local stability opens a new research direction of refining initial solution by finding key agents which can seriously effect global solution once they modify assignments. In addition, the construction of initial solution could be received more quickly without repeated assignment and conflict. In order to execute parallel search, LSPA finds final solution by constantly computing local stability of compatible agents. Experimental evaluation shows that LSPA outperforms some of the state-of-the-art incomplete distributed constraint optimization algorithms, guaranteeing better solutions received within ideal time. PMID:25105166

Peibo, Duan; Changsheng, Zhang; Bin, Zhang

2014-01-01

325

A parallel variable metric optimization algorithm  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An algorithm, designed to exploit the parallel computing or vector streaming (pipeline) capabilities of computers is presented. When p is the degree of parallelism, then one cycle of the parallel variable metric algorithm is defined as follows: first, the function and its gradient are computed in parallel at p different values of the independent variable; then the metric is modified by p rank-one corrections; and finally, a single univariant minimization is carried out in the Newton-like direction. Several properties of this algorithm are established. The convergence of the iterates to the solution is proved for a quadratic functional on a real separable Hilbert space. For a finite-dimensional space the convergence is in one cycle when p equals the dimension of the space. Results of numerical experiments indicate that the new algorithm will exploit parallel or pipeline computing capabilities to effect faster convergence than serial techniques.

Straeter, T. A.

1973-01-01

326

Search for direct pair production of the top squark in all-hadronic final states in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector  

E-print Network

The results of a search for direct pair production of the scalar partner to the top quark using an integrated luminosity of 20.1 fb?1 of proton-proton collision data at s? = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the ...

Taylor, Frank E.

327

PARASPICE: A Parallel Circuit Simulator for Shared-Memory Multiprocessors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a general approach to parallelizing direct method circuit simulation. The approach extracts parallel tasks at the algorithmic level for each compute-intensive module and therefore is suitable for a wide range of shared-memory multiprocessors. The implementation of the approach in SPICE2 resulted in a portable parallel direct circuit simulator, PARASPICE. The superior performance of PARASPICE is demonstrated on

Gung-chung Yang

1990-01-01

328

Parallel benchmarks of turbulence in complex geometries  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present benchmark results from the parallel implementation of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver Prism on different parallel platforms of current interest: IBM SP2 (all three types of processors), SGI Power Challenge XL and Cray C90. The numerical method is based on mixed spectral element-Fourier expansions in (x ? y) and z-directions, respectively. Each one (or a group)

Catherine H. Crawford; Constantinos Evangelinos; David Newman; George Em Karniadakis

1996-01-01

329

Parallel-Coupled Micro-Macro Actuators  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a new actuator system consisting of a micro- actuator and a macro-actuator coupled in parallel via a compliant transmission. The system is called the parallel-coupled micro-macro actuator, or PaCMMA.In this system, the micro-actuator is capable of high-bandwidth force control owing to its low mass and direct-drive connection to the output shaft. The compliant transmission of the macro-actuator

John B. Morrell; J. Kenneth Salisbury

1998-01-01

330

Parallel digital forensics infrastructure.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the architecture and implementation of a Parallel Digital Forensics infrastructure. This infrastructure is necessary for supporting the design, implementation, and testing of new classes of parallel digital forensics tools. Digital Forensics has become extremely difficult with data sets of one terabyte and larger. The only way to overcome the processing time of these large sets is to identify and develop new parallel algorithms for performing the analysis. To support algorithm research, a flexible base infrastructure is required. A candidate architecture for this base infrastructure was designed, instantiated, and tested by this project, in collaboration with New Mexico Tech. Previous infrastructures were not designed and built specifically for the development and testing of parallel algorithms. With the size of forensics data sets only expected to increase significantly, this type of infrastructure support is necessary for continued research in parallel digital forensics. This report documents the implementation of the parallel digital forensics (PDF) infrastructure architecture and implementation.

Liebrock, Lorie M. (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM); Duggan, David Patrick

2009-10-01

331

PCLIPS: Parallel CLIPS  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A parallel version of CLIPS 5.1 has been developed to run on Intel Hypercubes. The user interface is the same as that for CLIPS with some added commands to allow for parallel calls. A complete version of CLIPS runs on each node of the hypercube. The system has been instrumented to display the time spent in the match, recognize, and act cycles on each node. Only rule-level parallelism is supported. Parallel commands enable the assertion and retraction of facts to/from remote nodes working memory. Parallel CLIPS was used to implement a knowledge-based command, control, communications, and intelligence (C(sup 3)I) system to demonstrate the fusion of high-level, disparate sources. We discuss the nature of the information fusion problem, our approach, and implementation. Parallel CLIPS has also be used to run several benchmark parallel knowledge bases such as one to set up a cafeteria. Results show from running Parallel CLIPS with parallel knowledge base partitions indicate that significant speed increases, including superlinear in some cases, are possible.

Hall, Lawrence O.; Bennett, Bonnie H.; Tello, Ivan

1994-01-01

332

Density matrix search using direct inversion in the iterative subspace as a linear scaling alternative to diagonalization in electronic structure calculations  

Microsoft Academic Search

For electronic structure calculations on large systems, solving the self-consistent-field (SCF) equations is one of the key bottlenecks. Density matrix search methods provide an efficient linear scaling approach for circumventing the traditional O(N3) diagonalization procedure for solving the SCF equations. The conjugate gradient density matrix search (CG-DMS) method is a successful implementation of this approach. An alternative density matrix search

Xiaosong Li; John M. Millam; Gustavo E. Scuseria; Michael J. Frisch; H. Bernhard Schlegel

2003-01-01

333

A Programmable Preprocessor for Parallelizing Fortran-90  

SciTech Connect

A programmable preprocessor that generates portable and efficient parallel Fortran-90 code has been successfully used in the development of a variety of environmental transport simulators for the Department of Energy. The tool provides the basic functionality of a traditional preprocessor where directives are embedded in a serial Fortran program and interpreted by the preprocessor to produce parallel Fortran code with MPI calls. The unique aspect of this work is that the user can make additions to, or modify, these directives. The directives reside in a preprocessor library and changes to this library can range from small changes to customize an existing library, to larger changes for porting a library, to completely replacing the library. The preprocessor is programmed with a library of directives written in a C-like language, called DL, that has added support for manipulating Fortran code fragments. The primary benefits to the user are twofold: It is fairly easy for any user to generate efficient, parallel code from Fortran-90 with embedded directives, and the long term viability of the user?s software is guaranteed. This is because the source code will always run on a serial machine (the directives are transparent to standard Fortran compilers), and the preprocessor library can be modified to work with different hardware and software environments. A 4000 line preprocessor library has been written and used to parallelize roughly 50,000 lines of groundwater modeling code. The programs have been ported to a wide range of parallel architectures. Performance of these programs is similar to programs explicitly written for a parallel machine. Binaries of the preprocessor core, as well as the preprocessor library source code used in our groundwater modeling codes are currently available.

Rosing, Matthew; Yabusaki, Steven B.

1999-07-01

334

Compositional C++: Compositional Parallel Programming  

Microsoft Academic Search

A compositional parallel program is a program constructed by composing component programs in parallel, where the composed program inherits properties of its components. In this paper, we describe a small extension of C++ called Compositional C++ or CC++ which is an object-oriented notation that supports compositional parallel programming. CC++ integrates different paradigms of parallel programming: data-parallel, task-parallel and object-parallel paradigms;

K. Mani Chandy; Carl Kesselman

1992-01-01

335

Parallel Plate System for Collecting Data Used to Determine Viscosity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A parallel-plate system collects data used to determine viscosity. A first plate is coupled to a translator so that the first plate can be moved along a first direction. A second plate has a pendulum device coupled thereto such that the second plate is suspended above and parallel to the first plate. The pendulum device constrains movement of the second plate to a second direction that is aligned with the first direction and is substantially parallel thereto. A force measuring device is coupled to the second plate for measuring force along the second direction caused by movement of the second plate.

Kaukler, William (Inventor); Ethridge, Edwin C. (Inventor)

2013-01-01

336

NAS Parallel Benchmark Results  

Microsoft Academic Search

The NAS Parallel Benchmarks have been developed at NASA Ames Research Center to studythe performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a"pencil and paper" fashion. In other words, the complete details of the problem to be solved aregiven in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to selectthe language constructs and

Subhash Saini; David H. Bailey

1995-01-01

337

Parallelizing quantum circuits  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a novel automated technique for parallelizing quantum circuits via forward and backward translation to measurement-based quantum computing patterns and analyze the trade off in terms of depth and space complexity. As a result we distinguish a class of polynomial depth circuits that can be parallelized to logarithmic depth while adding only polynomial many auxiliary qubits. In particular, we

Anne Broadbent; Elham Kashefi

2009-01-01

338

Applied Parallel Metadata Indexing  

Microsoft Academic Search

The GPFS Archive is parallel archive is a parallel archive used by hundreds of users in the Turquoise collaboration network. It houses 4+ petabytes of data in more than 170 million files. Currently, users must navigate the file system to retrieve their data, requiring them to remember file paths and names. A better solution might allow users to tag data

Jacobi; Michael R

2012-01-01

339

Parallel computing works  

SciTech Connect

An account of the Caltech Concurrent Computation Program (C{sup 3}P), a five year project that focused on answering the question: Can parallel computers be used to do large-scale scientific computations '' As the title indicates, the question is answered in the affirmative, by implementing numerous scientific applications on real parallel computers and doing computations that produced new scientific results. In the process of doing so, C{sup 3}P helped design and build several new computers, designed and implemented basic system software, developed algorithms for frequently used mathematical computations on massively parallel machines, devised performance models and measured the performance of many computers, and created a high performance computing facility based exclusively on parallel computers. While the initial focus of C{sup 3}P was the hypercube architecture developed by C. Seitz, many of the methods developed and lessons learned have been applied successfully on other massively parallel architectures.

Not Available

1991-10-23

340

Characterization of parallel subtraction  

PubMed Central

Parallel subtraction is an operation defined on pairs of positive operators. In terms of electrical networks, one may pose the following problem: Given an electrical network, represented by a specified positive operator, determine the set of positive operators which when connected in parallel with the specified operator yield another prescribed operator. The set of solutions of this electrical network problem is shown to have a minimum. The minimum is termed “the parallel difference of the fixed operators,” and the operation is termed “parallel subtraction.” The parallel difference is used to obtain explicit error estimates for an iteration procedure which approximates the geometric mean of positive operators. This concept of the geometric mean reduces to the square root of the product of the operators if the operators commute. Finally, by using the geometric mean, an operator version of the Gaussian mean is presented. PMID:16592689

Anderson, W. N.; Morley, T. D.; Trapp, G. E.

1979-01-01

341

A Parallel Algorithm for Fixed-Length Approximate String-Matching with k-mismatches  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with the approximate string-matching problem with Hamming distance. The approximate string-matching with k-mismatches problem is to find all locations at which a query of length m matches a factor of a text of length n with k or fewer mismatches. The approximate string-matching algorithms have both pleasing theoretical features, as well as direct applications, especially in computational biology. We consider a generalisation of this problem, the fixed-length approximate string-matching with k -mismatches problem: given a text t, a pattern x and an integer ?, search for all the occurrences in t of all factors of x of length ? with k or fewer mismatches with a factor of t. We present a practical parallel algorithm of comparable simplicity that requires only time, where w is the word size of the machine (e.g. 32 or 64 in practice) and p the number of processors. Thus the algorithm's performance is independent of k and the alphabet size |?|. The proposed parallel algorithm makes use of message-passing parallelism model, and word-level parallelism for efficient approximate string-matching.

Crochemore, Maxime; Iliopoulos, Costas S.; Pissis, Solon P.

342

Parallel Image Segmentation with Adaptive Mesh  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a general-purpose parallel algorithm for image segmentation, which doesn't require any prior knowledge about the image or region. The algorithm, which is based on our adaptive mesh generation scheme, provides a binary tree structured split-and-merge mechanism to search and localize boundaries along discontinuities, and adapts the partition of the image to those detected discontinuities. This algorithm is independent

Sang Sun Lee; Hiromi T. Tanaka

2000-01-01

343

Parallel processing for scientific computations  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main contribution of the effort in the last two years is the introduction of the MOPPS system. After doing extensive literature search, we introduced the system which is described next. MOPPS employs a new solution to the problem of managing programs which solve scientific and engineering applications on a distributed processing environment. Autonomous computers cooperate efficiently in solving large scientific problems with this solution. MOPPS has the advantage of not assuming the presence of any particular network topology or configuration, computer architecture, or operating system. It imposes little overhead on network and processor resources while efficiently managing programs concurrently. The core of MOPPS is an intelligent program manager that builds a knowledge base of the execution performance of the parallel programs it is managing under various conditions. The manager applies this knowledge to improve the performance of future runs. The program manager learns from experience.

Alkhatib, Hasan S.

1991-01-01

344

A parallel execution model of logic programs  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a parallel-execution model that can concurrently exploit AND and OR parallelism in logic programs. This model employs a combination of techniques in an approach to executing logic programs in parallel, making tradeoffs among number of processes, degree of parallelism, and communication bandwidth. For interpreting a nondeterministic logic program, this model performs frame inheritance for newly created goals, creates data-dependency graphs (DDG's) that represent relationships among the goals, and constructs appropriate process structures based on the DDG's. The employment of frame inheritance serves to increase modularity. In contrast to most previous parallel models that have a large single process structure, frame inheritance facilitates the dynamic construction of multiple independent process structures, and thus enables further manipulation of each process structure. The dynamic determination of data dependency serves to reduce computational complexity. In comparison to models that exploit brute-force parallelism and models that have fixed execution sequences, this model can reduce the number of unification and/or merging steps substantially. In comparison to models that exploit only ''and'' parallelism, this model can selectively exploit demand-driven computation, according to the binding of the query and optional annotations. The construction of appropriate process structures serves to reduce communication complexity. Being different from other methods that map DDG's directly onto process structures, this model can significantly reduce the number of data sent to a process and/or the number of communication channels connected to a process.

Chen, A.C. (Motorola, Inc., Austin, TX (US)); Wu, C. (Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (US))

1991-01-01

345

Code Parallelization with CAPO: A User Manual  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A software tool has been developed to assist the parallelization of scientific codes. This tool, CAPO, extends an existing parallelization toolkit, CAPTools developed at the University of Greenwich, to generate OpenMP parallel codes for shared memory architectures. This is an interactive toolkit to transform a serial Fortran application code to an equivalent parallel version of the software - in a small fraction of the time normally required for a manual parallelization. We first discuss the way in which loop types are categorized and how efficient OpenMP directives can be defined and inserted into the existing code using the in-depth interprocedural analysis. The use of the toolkit on a number of application codes ranging from benchmark to real-world application codes is presented. This will demonstrate the great potential of using the toolkit to quickly parallelize serial programs as well as the good performance achievable on a large number of toolkit to quickly parallelize serial programs as well as the good performance achievable on a large number of processors. The second part of the document gives references to the parameters and the graphic user interface implemented in the toolkit. Finally a set of tutorials is included for hands-on experiences with this toolkit.

Jin, Hao-Qiang; Frumkin, Michael; Yan, Jerry; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

346

The PARTY parallel runtime system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In the present automated system for the organization of the data and computational operations entailed by parallel problems, in ways that optimize multiprocessor performance, general heuristics for partitioning program data and control are implemented by capturing and manipulating representations of a computation at run time. These heuristics are directed toward the dynamic identification and allocation of concurrent work in computations with irregular computational patterns. An optimized static-workload partitioning is computed for such repetitive-computation pattern problems as the iterative ones employed in scientific computation.

Saltz, J. H.; Mirchandaney, Ravi; Smith, R. M.; Crowley, Kay; Nicol, D. M.

1989-01-01

347

Factors Influencing Web Search Strategies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper studies the influence of question-related variables (closed/open and predictable/unpredictable) on a Web user's choice of search strategy in the initial stage of a search. Search strategies considered include direct address, subject directory, and search engine. Objectives were to determine the adaptiveness of Web users in choosing an…

White, Marilyn Domas; Iivonen, Mirja

348

The NAS parallel benchmarks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new set of benchmarks has been developed for the performance evaluation of highly parallel supercomputers in the framework of the NASA Ames Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program. These consist of five 'parallel kernel' benchmarks and three 'simulated application' benchmarks. Together they mimic the computation and data movement characteristics of large-scale computational fluid dynamics applications. The principal distinguishing feature of these benchmarks is their 'pencil and paper' specification-all details of these benchmarks are specified only algorithmically. In this way many of the difficulties associated with conventional benchmarking approaches on highly parallel systems are avoided.

Bailey, D. H.; Barszcz, E.; Barton, J. T.; Carter, R. L.; Lasinski, T. A.; Browning, D. S.; Dagum, L.; Fatoohi, R. A.; Frederickson, P. O.; Schreiber, R. S.

1991-01-01

349

The NAS parallel benchmarks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new set of benchmarks was developed for the performance evaluation of highly parallel supercomputers. These benchmarks consist of a set of kernels, the 'Parallel Kernels,' and a simulated application benchmark. Together they mimic the computation and data movement characteristics of large scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. The principal distinguishing feature of these benchmarks is their 'pencil and paper' specification - all details of these benchmarks are specified only algorithmically. In this way many of the difficulties associated with conventional benchmarking approaches on highly parallel systems are avoided.

Bailey, David (editor); Barton, John (editor); Lasinski, Thomas (editor); Simon, Horst (editor)

1993-01-01

350

NAS parallel benchmark results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NAS (Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation) parallel benchmarks have been developed at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a 'pencil and paper' fashion. The performance results of various systems using the NAS parallel benchmarks are presented. These results represent the best results that have been reported to the authors for the specific systems listed. They represent implementation efforts performed by personnel in both the NAS Applied Research Branch of NASA Ames Research Center and in other organizations.

Bailey, D. H.; Barszcz, E.; Dagum, L.; Simon, H. D.

1992-01-01

351

SavvySearch: A Meta-Search Engine that Learns which Search Engines to Query  

E-print Network

Search engines are among the most successful applications on the Web today. So many search engines have been created that it is difficult for users to know where they are, how to use them and what topics they best address. Meta-search engines reduce the user burden by dispatching queries to multiple search engines in parallel. The SavvySearch meta-search engine is designed to efficiently query other search engines by carefully selecting those search engines likely to return useful results and by responding to fluctuating load demands on the Web. SavvySearch learns to identify which search engines are most appropriate for particular queries, reasons about resource demands and represents an iterative parallel search strategy as a simple plan. 1 The Application: Meta-Search on the Web Companies, institutions and individuals must have a presence on the Web; each are vying for the attention of millions of people. Not too surprisingly then, the most successful applications on the Web to dat...

Adele E. Howe; Daniel Dreilinger

1997-01-01

352

Simulating Billion-Task Parallel Programs  

SciTech Connect

In simulating large parallel systems, bottom-up approaches exercise detailed hardware models with effects from simplified software models or traces, whereas top-down approaches evaluate the timing and functionality of detailed software models over coarse hardware models. Here, we focus on the top-down approach and significantly advance the scale of the simulated parallel programs. Via the direct execution technique combined with parallel discrete event simulation, we stretch the limits of the top-down approach by simulating message passing interface (MPI) programs with millions of tasks. Using a timing-validated benchmark application, a proof-of-concept scaling level is achieved to over 0.22 billion virtual MPI processes on 216,000 cores of a Cray XT5 supercomputer, representing one of the largest direct execution simulations to date, combined with a multiplexing ratio of 1024 simulated tasks per real task.

Perumalla, Kalyan S [ORNL] [ORNL; Park, Alfred J [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01

353

Parallelization of thermochemical nanolithography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the most pressing technological challenges in the development of next generation nanoscale devices is the rapid, parallel, precise and robust fabrication of nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the possibility to parallelize thermochemical nanolithography (TCNL) by employing five nano-tips for the fabrication of conjugated polymer nanostructures and graphene-based nanoribbons.One of the most pressing technological challenges in the development of next generation nanoscale devices is the rapid, parallel, precise and robust fabrication of nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the possibility to parallelize thermochemical nanolithography (TCNL) by employing five nano-tips for the fabrication of conjugated polymer nanostructures and graphene-based nanoribbons. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details on the cantilevers array, on the sample preparation, and on the GO AFM experiments. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05696a

Carroll, Keith M.; Lu, Xi; Kim, Suenne; Gao, Yang; Kim, Hoe-Joon; Somnath, Suhas; Polloni, Laura; Sordan, Roman; King, William P.; Curtis, Jennifer E.; Riedo, Elisa

2014-01-01

354

The Parallel Axiom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Criteria for a reasonable axiomatic system are discussed. A discussion of the historical attempts to prove the independence of Euclids parallel postulate introduces non-Euclidean geometries. Poincare's model for a non-Euclidean geometry is defined and analyzed. (LS)

Rogers, Pat

1972-01-01

355

Series and Parallel Circuits  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this activity, learners demonstrate and discuss simple circuits as well as the differences between parallel and serial circuit design and functions. Learners test two different circuit designs through the use of low voltage light bulbs.

IEEE

2013-08-30

356

Parallels with nature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Adam Nelson and Stuart Warriner, from the University of Leeds, talk with Nature Chemistry about their work to develop viable synthetic strategies for preparing new chemical structures in parallel with the identification of desirable biological activity.

2014-10-01

357

Series/Parallel Batteries  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

It is important for students to understand how resistors, capacitors, and batteries combine in series and parallel. The combination of batteries has a lot of practical applications in science competitions. This lab also reinforces how to use a voltmeter t

Michael Horton

2009-05-30

358

Parallel programming with PCN  

SciTech Connect

PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, a set of tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and C that allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. It includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underlie PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous FTP from Argonne National Laboratory at info.mcs.anl.gov.

Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

1991-09-01

359

Parallel programming with PCN  

SciTech Connect

PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and C that allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. In includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underly PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous FTP from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs.anl.gov (c.f. Appendix A).

Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

1991-12-01

360

Direct current transformer  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A direct current transformer in which the primary consists of an elongated strip of superconductive material, across the ends of which is direct current potential is described. Parallel and closely spaced to the primary is positioned a transformer secondary consisting of a thin strip of magnetoresistive material.

Khanna, S. M.; Urban, E. W. (inventors)

1979-01-01

361

Scalable parallel communications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Coarse-grain parallelism in networking (that is, the use of multiple protocol processors running replicated software sending over several physical channels) can be used to provide gigabit communications for a single application. Since parallel network performance is highly dependent on real issues such as hardware properties (e.g., memory speeds and cache hit rates), operating system overhead (e.g., interrupt handling), and protocol performance (e.g., effect of timeouts), we have performed detailed simulations studies of both a bus-based multiprocessor workstation node (based on the Sun Galaxy MP multiprocessor) and a distributed-memory parallel computer node (based on the Touchstone DELTA) to evaluate the behavior of coarse-grain parallelism. Our results indicate: (1) coarse-grain parallelism can deliver multiple 100 Mbps with currently available hardware platforms and existing networking protocols (such as Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and parallel Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) rings); (2) scale-up is near linear in n, the number of protocol processors, and channels (for small n and up to a few hundred Mbps); and (3) since these results are based on existing hardware without specialized devices (except perhaps for some simple modifications of the FDDI boards), this is a low cost solution to providing multiple 100 Mbps on current machines. In addition, from both the performance analysis and the properties of these architectures, we conclude: (1) multiple processors providing identical services and the use of space division multiplexing for the physical channels can provide better reliability than monolithic approaches (it also provides graceful degradation and low-cost load balancing); (2) coarse-grain parallelism supports running several transport protocols in parallel to provide different types of service (for example, one TCP handles small messages for many users, other TCP's running in parallel provide high bandwidth service to a single application); and (3) coarse grain parallelism will be able to incorporate many future improvements from related work (e.g., reduced data movement, fast TCP, fine-grain parallelism) also with near linear speed-ups.

Maly, K.; Khanna, S.; Overstreet, C. M.; Mukkamala, R.; Zubair, M.; Sekhar, Y. S.; Foudriat, E. C.

1992-01-01

362

Parallelization: Binary Tree Traversal  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This module teaches the use of binary trees to sort through large data sets, different traversal methods for binary trees, including parallel methods, and how to scale a binary tree traversal on multiple compute cores. Upon completion of this module, students should be able to recognize the structure of a binary tree, employ different methods for traversing a binary tree, understand how to parallelize a binary tree traversal, and how to scale a binary tree traversal over multiple compute cores.

Aaron Weeden

363

Control of parallel manipulators using force feedback  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two control schemes are compared for parallel robotic mechanisms actuated by hydraulic cylinders. One scheme, the 'rate based scheme', uses the position and rate information only for feedback. The second scheme, the 'force based scheme' feeds back the force information also. The force control scheme is shown to improve the response over the rate control one. It is a simple constant gain control scheme better suited to parallel mechanisms. The force control scheme can be easily modified for the dynamic forces on the end effector. This paper presents the results of a computer simulation of both the rate and force control schemes. The gains in the force based scheme can be individually adjusted in all three directions, whereas the adjustment in just one direction of the rate based scheme directly affects the other two directions.

Nanua, Prabjot

1994-01-01

364

Dataflow Query Execution in a Parallel, Main-memory Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, the performance and characteristics of the execution of various join-trees on a parallel DBMS are studied. The results of this study are a step into the direction of the design of a query optimization strategy that is fit for parallel execution of complex queries.\\u000aAmong others, synchronization issues are identified to limit the performance gain from parallelism.

Annita N. Wilschut; P. M. G. Apers

1993-01-01

365

Parallel transistor level circuit simulation using domain decomposition methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an efficient parallel transistor level full-chip circuit simulation tool with SPICE-accuracy. The new approach partitions the circuit into a linear domain and several non-linear domains based on circuit non-linearity and connectivity. The linear domain is solved by parallel fast linear solver while nonlinear domains are parallelly distributed into different processors and solved by direct solver. Parallel domain

He Peng; Chung-kuan Cheng

2009-01-01

366

Computational mechanics analysis tools for parallel-vector supercomputers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Computational algorithms for structural analysis on parallel-vector supercomputers are reviewed. These parallel algorithms, developed by the authors, are for the assembly of structural equations, 'out-of-core' strategies for linear equation solution, massively distributed-memory equation solution, unsymmetric equation solution, general eigensolution, geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis, design sensitivity analysis for structural dynamics, optimization search analysis and domain decomposition. The source code for many of these algorithms is available.

Storaasli, Olaf O.; Nguyen, Duc T.; Baddourah, Majdi; Qin, Jiangning

1993-01-01

367

A Parallel VLSI Circuit Layout Methodology  

Microsoft Academic Search

We propose a parallel computation layout technique that solves the layout problem directly rather than decomposing it into the traditional distinct steps of placement and routing. The method combines a superior geometric partitioning algorithm with extensive use of pre-computed minimum-length Steiner trees to produce layouts.

S. Bapat; James P. Cohoon

1993-01-01

368

Autonomous search for mines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Research on demining includes many different aspects, and in particular the design of efficient and intelligent strategies for (1) determining regions of interest using a variety of sensors, (2) detecting and classifying mines, and (3) searching for mines by autonomous agents. This paper discusses strategies for directing autonomous search based on spatio-temporal distributions. We discuss a model for search assuming that the environment is static, except for the effect of identifying mine locations. Algorithms are designed and compared for autonomously directing a robot, in the case where a single search engine carrying a single sensor.

Gelenbe, Erol; Cao, Yonghuan

1997-07-01

369

Directed network modules  

Microsoft Academic Search

A search technique locating network modules, i.e. internally densely connected groups of nodes in directed networks is introduced by extending the clique percolation method originally proposed for undirected networks. After giving a suitable definition for directed modules we investigate their percolation transition in the Erdos Rényi graph both analytically and numerically. We also analyse four real-world directed networks, including Google's

Gergely Palla; Illés J. Farkas; Péter Pollner; Imre Derényi; Tamás Vicsek

2007-01-01

370

Parallel Composition Communication and Allow Hiding Parallel Processes  

E-print Network

Communication and Allow Hiding The Saga of Axiomatizing Parallel Composition Challenge (Dish1+Dish2) || Coke ? = (Dish1 || Coke)+(Dish2 || Coke) Mousavi: Parallel Processes #12;Parallel Composition Communication and Allow Hiding The Saga of Axiomatizing Parallel Composition Challenge (Dish1+Dish2) || Coke ? = (Dish1

Groote, Jan Friso

371

Parallel Composition Communication and Allow Hiding Parallel Processes  

E-print Network

Parallel Composition Challenge (Dish1+Dish2) || Coke ? = (Dish1 || Coke)+(Dish2 || Coke) Mousavi: Parallel Composition Challenge (Dish1+Dish2) || Coke ? = (Dish1 || Coke)+(Dish2 || Coke) Faron Moller's Result Parallel Parallel Composition and |: Raisons d'^etre (Dish1 + Dish2) Coke (Dish1 Coke) + (Dish2 Coke) (Dish1 + Dish

Mousavi, Mohammad

372

Parallel plate THz transmitter S. Coleman and D. Grischkowskya)  

E-print Network

Parallel plate THz transmitter S. Coleman and D. Grischkowskya) School of Electrical and Computer December 2003 A THz transmitter that directly excites the guided wave modes of a dielectric filled parallel-domain THz signal. The device yields significant signal amplitudes with varying output spectra

373

IPSJ SIG Technical Report Automatic parallelization with OSCAR API Analyzer  

E-print Network

IPSJ SIG Technical Report Automatic parallelization with OSCAR API Analyzer: a cross have devel- oped the OSCAR API Analyzer. It allows programs automatically parallelized by the OSCAR compiler with OSCAR API directives to target many different platforms using just sequential compilers. We

Kasahara, Hironori

374

Sublattice parallel replica dynamics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Exascale computing presents a challenge for the scientific community as new algorithms must be developed to take full advantage of the new computing paradigm. Atomistic simulation methods that offer full fidelity to the underlying potential, i.e., molecular dynamics (MD) and parallel replica dynamics, fail to use the whole machine speedup, leaving a region in time and sample size space that is unattainable with current algorithms. In this paper, we present an extension of the parallel replica dynamics algorithm [A. F. Voter, Phys. Rev. B 57, R13985 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevB.57.R13985] by combining it with the synchronous sublattice approach of Shim and Amar [Y. Shim and J. G. Amar, Phys. Rev. B 71, 125432 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevB.71.125432], thereby exploiting event locality to improve the algorithm scalability. This algorithm is based on a domain decomposition in which events happen independently in different regions in the sample. We develop an analytical expression for the speedup given by this sublattice parallel replica dynamics algorithm and compare it with parallel MD and traditional parallel replica dynamics. We demonstrate how this algorithm, which introduces a slight additional approximation of event locality, enables the study of physical systems unreachable with traditional methodologies and promises to better utilize the resources of current high performance and future exascale computers.

Martínez, Enrique; Uberuaga, Blas P.; Voter, Arthur F.

2014-06-01

375

Optimized data communications in a parallel computer  

DOEpatents

A parallel computer includes nodes that include a network adapter that couples the node in a point-to-point network and supports communications in opposite directions of each dimension. Optimized communications include: receiving, by a network adapter of a receiving compute node, a packet--from a source direction--that specifies a destination node and deposit hints. Each hint is associated with a direction within which the packet is to be deposited. If a hint indicates the packet to be deposited in the opposite direction: the adapter delivers the packet to an application on the receiving node; forwards the packet to a next node in the opposite direction if the receiving node is not the destination; and forwards the packet to a node in a direction of a subsequent dimension if the hints indicate that the packet is to be deposited in the direction of the subsequent dimension.

Faraj, Daniel A.

2014-08-19

376

Optimized data communications in a parallel computer  

DOEpatents

A parallel computer includes nodes that include a network adapter that couples the node in a point-to-point network and supports communications in opposite directions of each dimension. Optimized communications include: receiving, by a network adapter of a receiving compute node, a packet--from a source direction--that specifies a destination node and deposit hints. Each hint is associated with a direction within which the packet is to be deposited. If a hint indicates the packet to be deposited in the opposite direction: the adapter delivers the packet to an application on the receiving node; forwards the packet to a next node in the opposite direction if the receiving node is not the destination; and forwards the packet to a node in a direction of a subsequent dimension if the hints indicate that the packet is to be deposited in the direction of the subsequent dimension.

Faraj, Daniel A

2014-10-21

377

Integrated Task And Data Parallel Programming: Language Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

his research investigates the combination of task and data parallel language constructs within a single programming language. There are an number of applications that exhibit properties which would be well served by such an integrated language. Examples include global climate models, aircraft design problems, and multidisciplinary design optimization problems. Our approach incorporates data parallel language constructs into an existing, object oriented, task parallel language. The language will support creation and manipulation of parallel classes and objects of both types (task parallel and data parallel). Ultimately, the language will allow data parallel and task parallel classes to be used either as building blocks or managers of parallel objects of either type, thus allowing the development of single and multi-paradigm parallel applications. 1995 Research Accomplishments In February I presented a paper at Frontiers '95 describing the design of the data parallel language subset. During the spring I wrote and defended my dissertation proposal. Since that time I have developed a runtime model for the language subset. I have begun implementing the model and hand-coding simple examples which demonstrate the language subset. I have identified an astrophysical fluid flow application which will validate the data parallel language subset. 1996 Research Agenda Milestones for the coming year include implementing a significant portion of the data parallel language subset over the Legion system. Using simple hand-coded methods, I plan to demonstrate (1) concurrent task and data parallel objects and (2) task parallel objects managing both task and data parallel objects. My next steps will focus on constructing a compiler and implementing the fluid flow application with the language. Concurrently, I will conduct a search for a real-world application exhibiting both task and data parallelism within the same program m. Additional 1995 Activities During the fall I collaborated with Andrew Grimshaw and Adam Ferrari to write a book chapter which will be included in Parallel Processing in C++ edited by Gregory Wilson. I also finished two courses, Compilers and Advanced Compilers, in 1995. These courses complete my class requirements at the University of Virginia. I have only my dissertation research and defense to complete.

Grimshaw, Andrew S.; West, Emily A.

1998-01-01

378

Parallel partitioned-inverse sparse matrix solutions  

SciTech Connect

The partitioned inverse method has been demonstrated to be quite effective for parallel sparse matrix solutions on massively parallel machines. Though experiments on CM-2 have illustrated the advantage of using partitions, Intel iPSC/860 multiprocessor only favors fewer and denser partitions, particularly in the case of extremely sparse matrices. Different decomposition and communication algorithms are investigated here on the iPSC/860 to improve the performance. The decomposition is done in an interleave fashion in two different directions (row-wise and column-wise). The need for synchronization due to the interchange of intermediate solution vectors makes load balancing an important factor in obtaining an optimum performance.

Dag, H.; Yasar, O.; Alvarado, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

1993-12-31

379

Is quantum parallelism real?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper we raise questions about the reality of computational quantum parallelism. Such questions are important because while quantum theory is rigorously established, the hypothesis that it supports a more powerful model of computation remains speculative. More specifically, we suggest the possibility that the seeming computational parallelism offered by quantum superpositions is actually effected by gate-level parallelism in the reversible implementation of the quantum operator. In other words, when the total number of logic operations is analyzed, quantum computing may not be more powerful than classical. This fact has significant public policy implications with regard to the relative levels of effort that are appropriate for the development of quantumparallel algorithms and associated hardware (i.e., qubit-based) versus quantum-scale classical hardware.

Lanzagorta, Marco; Uhlmann, Jeffrey

2008-04-01

380

Parallel optical sampler  

DOEpatents

An optical sampler includes a first and second 1.times.n optical beam splitters splitting an input optical sampling signal and an optical analog input signal into n parallel channels, respectively, a plurality of optical delay elements providing n parallel delayed input optical sampling signals, n photodiodes converting the n parallel optical analog input signals into n respective electrical output signals, and n optical modulators modulating the input optical sampling signal or the optical analog input signal by the respective electrical output signals, and providing n successive optical samples of the optical analog input signal. A plurality of output photodiodes and eADCs convert the n successive optical samples to n successive digital samples. The optical modulator may be a photodiode interconnected Mach-Zehnder Modulator. A method of sampling the optical analog input signal is disclosed.

Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Skogen, Erik J; Vawter, Gregory A

2014-05-20

381

Parallelizing Quantum Circuits  

E-print Network

We present a novel automated technique for parallelizing quantum circuits via forward and backward translation to measurement-based quantum computing patterns and analyze the trade off in terms of depth and space complexity. As a result we distinguish a class of polynomial depth circuits that can be parallelized to logarithmic depth while adding only polynomial many auxiliary qubits. In particular, we provide for the first time a full characterization of patterns with flow of arbitrary depth, based on the notion of influencing paths and a simple rewriting system on the angles of the measurement. Our method leads to insightful knowledge for constructing parallel circuits and as applications, we demonstrate several constant and logarithmic depth circuits. Furthermore, we prove a logarithmic separation in terms of quantum depth between the quantum circuit model and the measurement-based model.

Anne Broadbent; Elham Kashefi

2007-04-13

382

Hierarchical Parallelism in Finite Difference Analysis of Heat Conduction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Based on the concept of hierarchical parallelism, this research effort resulted in highly efficient parallel solution strategies for very large scale heat conduction problems. Overall, the method of hierarchical parallelism involves the partitioning of thermal models into several substructured levels wherein an optimal balance into various associated bandwidths is achieved. The details are described in this report. Overall, the report is organized into two parts. Part 1 describes the parallel modelling methodology and associated multilevel direct, iterative and mixed solution schemes. Part 2 establishes both the formal and computational properties of the scheme.

Padovan, Joseph; Krishna, Lala; Gute, Douglas

1997-01-01

383

SPINning parallel systems software.  

SciTech Connect

We describe our experiences in using Spin to verify parts of the Multi Purpose Daemon (MPD) parallel process management system. MPD is a distributed collection of processes connected by Unix network sockets. MPD is dynamic processes and connections among them are created and destroyed as MPD is initialized, runs user processes, recovers from faults, and terminates. This dynamic nature is easily expressible in the Spin/Promela framework but poses performance and scalability challenges. We present here the results of expressing some of the parallel algorithms of MPD and executing both simulation and verification runs with Spin.

Matlin, O.S.; Lusk, E.; McCune, W.

2002-03-15

384

Parallel signal processing  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The potential application of parallel computing techniques to digital signal processing for radar is discussed and two types of regular array processor are discussed. The first type of processor is the systolic or wavefront processor. The application of this type of processor to adaptive beamforming is discussed and the joint STL-RSRE adaptive antenna processor test-bed is reviewed. The second type of regular array processor is the SIMD parallel computer. One such processor, the Mil-DAP, is described, and its application to a varied range of radar signal processing tasks is discussed.

McWhirter, John G.

1989-12-01

385

Adaptive parallel logic networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Adaptive, self-organizing concurrent systems (ASOCS) that combine self-organization with massive parallelism for such applications as adaptive logic devices, robotics, process control, and system malfunction management, are presently discussed. In ASOCS, an adaptive network composed of many simple computing elements operating in combinational and asynchronous fashion is used and problems are specified by presenting if-then rules to the system in the form of Boolean conjunctions. During data processing, which is a different operational phase from adaptation, the network acts as a parallel hardware circuit.

Martinez, Tony R.; Vidal, Jacques J.

1988-01-01

386

Parallelization of NAS Benchmarks for Shared Memory Multiprocessors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents our experiences of parallelizing the sequential implementation of NAS benchmarks using compiler directives on SGI Origin2000 distributed shared memory (DSM) system. Porting existing applications to new high performance parallel and distributed computing platforms is a challenging task. Ideally, a user develops a sequential version of the application, leaving the task of porting to new generations of high performance computing systems to parallelization tools and compilers. Due to the simplicity of programming shared-memory multiprocessors, compiler developers have provided various facilities to allow the users to exploit parallelism. Native compilers on SGI Origin2000 support multiprocessing directives to allow users to exploit loop-level parallelism in their programs. Additionally, supporting tools can accomplish this process automatically and present the results of parallelization to the users. We experimented with these compiler directives and supporting tools by parallelizing sequential implementation of NAS benchmarks. Results reported in this paper indicate that with minimal effort, the performance gain is comparable with the hand-parallelized, carefully optimized, message-passing implementations of the same benchmarks.

Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry C.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

1998-01-01

387

Yahoo People Search  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In 1996 Yahoo added this enhancement to its popular Internet directory service. It's People Search allows you to find telephone numbers and email addresses by entering a search form. The telephone directory is supplied by Database America (the provider of the Switchboard.com database), and the email interface directly queries Four11.com.

1996-01-01

388

Parallel programming with PCN  

SciTech Connect

PCN is a system for developing and executing parallel programs. It comprises a high-level programming language, tools for developing and debugging programs in this language, and interfaces to Fortran and Cthat allow the reuse of existing code in multilingual parallel programs. Programs developed using PCN are portable across many different workstations, networks, and parallel computers. This document provides all the information required to develop parallel programs with the PCN programming system. It includes both tutorial and reference material. It also presents the basic concepts that underlie PCN, particularly where these are likely to be unfamiliar to the reader, and provides pointers to other documentation on the PCN language, programming techniques, and tools. PCN is in the public domain. The latest version of both the software and this manual can be obtained by anonymous ftp from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/pcn at info.mcs. ani.gov (cf. Appendix A). This version of this document describes PCN version 2.0, a major revision of the PCN programming system. It supersedes earlier versions of this report.

Foster, I.; Tuecke, S.

1993-01-01

389

Parallelism and evolutionary algorithms  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper contains a modern vision of the paral- lelization techniques used for evolutionary algorithms (EAs). The work is motivated by two fundamental facts: first, the different families of EAs have naturally converged in the last decade while parallel EAs (PEAs) seem still to lack unified studies, and second, there is a large number of improvements in these algorithms and

Enrique Alba; Marco Tomassini

2002-01-01

390

Parallelization for reaction  

E-print Network

Parallelization for reaction waves with complex chemistry Context Application Background Numerical with complex chemistry S. Descombes 2 M. Duarte 3 T. Dumont 1 V. Louvet 1 M. Massot 3 1Camille Jordan Institute - France 3EM2C Laboratory - Ecole Centrale Paris - France Workshop on Computational and Applied Mathematics

Louvet, Violaine

391

High performance parallel architectures  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the author describes current high performance parallel computer architectures. A taxonomy is presented to show computer architecture from the user programmer's point-of-view. The effects of the taxonomy upon the programming model are described. Some current architectures are described with respect to the taxonomy. Finally, some predictions about future systems are presented. 5 refs., 1 fig.

Anderson, R.E. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1989-09-01

392

IU parallel processing benchmark  

Microsoft Academic Search

A benchmark is presented that was designed to evaluate the merits of various parallel architectures as applied to image understanding (IU). This benchmark exercise addresses the issue of system performance on an integrated set of tasks, where the task interactions that are typical of complex vision application are present. The goal of this exercise is to gain a better understanding

Charles Weems; Edward Riseman; Allen Hanson; Azriel Rosenfeld

1988-01-01

393

NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) were developed in 1991 at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a pencil and paper fashion i.e. the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. In this paper, we present new NPB performance results for the following systems: (a) Parallel-Vector Processors: Cray C90, Cray T'90 and Fujitsu VPP500; (b) Highly Parallel Processors: Cray T3D, IBM SP2 and IBM SP-TN2 (Thin Nodes 2); (c) Symmetric Multiprocessing Processors: Convex Exemplar SPP1000, Cray J90, DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/300, and SGI Power Challenge XL. We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks. We also mention NAS future plans of NPB.

Subhash, Saini; Bailey, David H.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

1995-01-01

394

Parallel Spectral Numerical Methods  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This module teaches the principals of Fourier spectral methods, their utility in solving partial differential equation and how to implement them in code. Performance considerations for several Fourier spectral implementations are discussed and methods for effective scaling on parallel computers are explained.

Gong Chen

395

Parallel hierarchical radiosity rendering  

SciTech Connect

In this dissertation, the step-by-step development of a scalable parallel hierarchical radiosity renderer is documented. First, a new look is taken at the traditional radiosity equation, and a new form is presented in which the matrix of linear system coefficients is transformed into a symmetric matrix, thereby simplifying the problem and enabling a new solution technique to be applied. Next, the state-of-the-art hierarchical radiosity methods are examined for their suitability to parallel implementation, and scalability. Significant enhancements are also discovered which both improve their theoretical foundations and improve the images they generate. The resultant hierarchical radiosity algorithm is then examined for sources of parallelism, and for an architectural mapping. Several architectural mappings are discussed. A few key algorithmic changes are suggested during the process of making the algorithm parallel. Next, the performance, efficiency, and scalability of the algorithm are analyzed. The dissertation closes with a discussion of several ideas which have the potential to further enhance the hierarchical radiosity method, or provide an entirely new forum for the application of hierarchical methods.

Carter, M.

1993-07-01

396

Parallel Traveling Salesman Problem  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The traveling salesman problem is a classic optimization problem in which one seeks to minimize the path taken by a salesman in traveling between N cities, where the salesman stops at each city one and only one time, never retracing his/her route. This implementation is designed to run on UNIX systems with X-Windows, and includes parallelization using MPI.

Joiner, David; Hassinger, Jonathan

397

Enhancing web search by promoting multiple search engine use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Any given Web search engine may provide higher quality results than others for certain queries. Therefore, it is in users' best inter- est to utilize multiple search engines. In this paper, we propose and evaluate a framework that maximizes users' search effective- ness by directing them to the engine that yields the best results for the current query. In contrast

Ryen W. White; Matthew Richardson; Mikhail Bilenko; Allison P. Heath

2008-01-01

398

Is searching full text more effective than searching abstracts?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: With the growing availability of full-text articles online, scientists and other consumers of the life sciences literature now have the ability to go beyond searching bibliographic records (title, abstract, metadata) to directly access full-text content. Motivated by this emerging trend, I posed the following question: is searching full text more effective than searching abstracts? This question is answered by

Jimmy J. Lin

2009-01-01

399

A Parallel Genetic Algorithm for Automated Electronic Circuit Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We describe a parallel genetic algorithm (GA) that automatically generates circuit designs using evolutionary search. A circuit-construction programming language is introduced and we show how evolution can generate practical analog circuit designs. Our system allows circuit size (number of devices), circuit topology, and device values to be evolved. We present experimental results as applied to analog filter and amplifier design tasks.

Lohn, Jason D.; Colombano, Silvano P.; Haith, Gary L.; Stassinopoulos, Dimitris; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

400

Exploiting data parallelism in the Image Content Engine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Image Content Engine (ICE) is a framework of software and underlying mathematical and physical models that enable scientists and analysts to extract features from Terabytes of imagery and search the extracted features for content relevant to their problem domain. The ICE team has developed a set of tools for feature extraction and analysis of image data, primarily based on the image content. The scale and volume of imagery that must be searched presents a formidable computation and data bandwidth challenge, and a search of moderate to large scale imagery quickly becomes intractable without exploiting high degrees of data parallelism in the feature extraction engine. In this paper we describe the software and hardware architecture developed to build a data parallel processing engine for ICE. We discuss our highly tunable parallel process and job scheduling subsystem, remote procedure invocation, parallel I/O strategy, and our experience in running ICE on a 16 node, 32 processing element (CPU) Linux Cluster. We present performance and benchmark results, and describe how we obtain excellent speedup for the imagery searches in our test-bed prototype.

Miller, W. Marcus; Garlick, Jim E.; Weinert, George F.; Abdulla, Ghaleb M.

2006-05-01

401

Chapter in SYNTHESIS OF PARALLEL ALGORITHMS, MorganKaufmann, 1993. (Figures not yet included in this file.) Parallel Open Ear Decomposition  

E-print Network

in this file.) Parallel Open Ear Decomposition with Applications to Graph Biconnectivity and Triconnectivity describe this method for searching undirected graphs, called ``open ear decomposition'', and we relate and we relate it to a sequential algorithm based on depth­first search. We then apply open ear

Ramachandran, Vijaya

402

Chapter in SYNTHESIS OF PARALLEL ALGORITHMS, Morgan-Kaufmann, 1993. (Figures not yet included in this file.) Parallel Open Ear Decomposition  

E-print Network

in this file.) Parallel Open Ear Decomposition with Applications to Graph Biconnectivity and Triconnectivity this method for searching undirected graphs, called open ear decomposition", and we relate this decomposition relate it to a sequential algorithm based on depth- rst search. We then apply open ear decomposition

Ramachandran, Vijaya

403

RESEARCH REPORT Visual search and foraging compared in a large-scale search task  

E-print Network

RESEARCH REPORT Visual search and foraging compared in a large-scale search task Alastair D. Smith-Verlag 2008 Abstract It has been argued that visual search is a valid model for human foraging. However describe a direct comparison between visually guided searches (as studied in visual search tasks

Gilchrist, Iain D.

404

ZAMBEZI: a parallel pattern parallel fault sequential circuit fault simulator  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sequential circuit fault simulators use the multiple bits in a computer data word to accelerate simulation. We introduce, and implement, a new sequential circuit fault simulator, a parallel pattern parallel fault simulator, ZAMBEZI, which simultaneously simulates multiple faults with multiple vectors in one data word. ZAMBEZI is developed by enhancing the control flow, of existing parallel pattern algorithms. For a

Minesh B. Amin; Bapiraju Vinnakota

1996-01-01

405

Characteristics of parallel electric fields in the downward current region of the aurora  

E-print Network

Characteristics of parallel electric fields in the downward current region of the aurora L downward current region. The observed parallel electric fields have amplitudes reaching nearly 1 V, Colorado 80309 Received 19 December 2001; accepted 7 May 2002 Direct measurements of parallel electric

California at Berkeley, University of

406

Parallel electric fields in the upward current region of the aurora: Numerical solutions  

E-print Network

Parallel electric fields in the upward current region of the aurora: Numerical solutions R. E that a parallel electric field in the upward current region of the aurora is not confined to a single region along Direct observations of the parallel electric field by the Fast Auroral Snapshot satellite and the Polar

California at Berkeley, University of

407

Parallelized CCHE2D flow model with CUDA Fortran on Graphics Process Units  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

This paper presents the CCHE2D implicit flow model parallelized using CUDA Fortran programming technique on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). A parallelized implicit Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) solver using Parallel Cyclic Reduction (PCR) algorithm on GPU is developed and tested. This solve...

408

Performance and performance modeling of a parallel algorithm for solving the neutron transport equation  

Microsoft Academic Search

A parallel algorithm is derived for solving the discrete-ordinates approximation of the neutron transport equation, based on the naturally occurring decoupling between the mesh sweeps in the various discrete directions during each iteration. In addition, the parallel Source Iteration (SI) algorithm, characterized by its coarse granularity and static scheduling, is implemented for the Nodal Integral Method (NIM) into the Parallel

Yousry Y. Azmy

1992-01-01

409

Parallel Consensual Neural Networks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A new neural network architecture is proposed and applied in classification of remote sensing/geographic data from multiple sources. The new architecture is called the parallel consensual neural network and its relation to hierarchical and ensemble neural networks is discussed. The parallel consensual neural network architecture is based on statistical consensus theory. The input data are transformed several times and the different transformed data are applied as if they were independent inputs and are classified using stage neural networks. Finally, the outputs from the stage networks are then weighted and combined to make a decision. Experimental results based on remote sensing data and geographic data are given. The performance of the consensual neural network architecture is compared to that of a two-layer (one hidden layer) conjugate-gradient backpropagation neural network. The results with the proposed neural network architecture compare favorably in terms of classification accuracy to the backpropagation method.

Benediktsson, J. A.; Sveinsson, J. R.; Ersoy, O. K.; Swain, P. H.

1993-01-01

410

Parallelization: Sieve of Eratosthenes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This module presents the Sieve of Eratosthenes, a method for finding the prime numbers below a certain integer. One can model the sieve for small integers by hand. For bigger integers, it becomes necessary to use a coded implementation. This code can be either serial (sequential) or parallel. Students will explore the various forms of parallelism (shared memory, distributed memory, and hybrid) as well as the scaling of the algorithm on multiple cores in its various forms, observing the relationship between run time of the program and number of cores devoted to the program. An assessment rubric, two exercises, and two student project ideas allow the student to consolidate her/his understanding of the material presented in the module.

Weeden, Aaron

411

Parallel multilevel preconditioners  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we shall report on some techniques for the development of preconditioners for the discrete systems which arise in the approximation of solutions to elliptic boundary value problems. Here we shall only state the resulting theorems. It has been demonstrated that preconditioned iteration techniques often lead to the most computationally effective algorithms for the solution of the large algebraic systems corresponding to boundary value problems in two and three dimensional Euclidean space. The use of preconditioned iteration will become even more important on computers with parallel architecture. This paper discusses an approach for developing completely parallel multilevel preconditioners. In order to illustrate the resulting algorithms, we shall describe the simplest application of the technique to a model elliptic problem.

Bramble, J.H.; Pasciak, J.E.; Xu, Jinchao.

1989-01-01

412

Parallel Subconvolution Filtering Architectures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These architectures are based on methods of vector processing and the discrete-Fourier-transform/inverse-discrete- Fourier-transform (DFT-IDFT) overlap-and-save method, combined with time-block separation of digital filters into frequency-domain subfilters implemented by use of sub-convolutions. The parallel-processing method implemented in these architectures enables the use of relatively small DFT-IDFT pairs, while filter tap lengths are theoretically unlimited. The size of a DFT-IDFT pair is determined by the desired reduction in processing rate, rather than on the order of the filter that one seeks to implement. The emphasis in this report is on those aspects of the underlying theory and design rules that promote computational efficiency, parallel processing at reduced data rates, and simplification of the designs of very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits needed to implement high-order filters and correlators.

Gray, Andrew A.

2003-01-01

413

Collisionless parallel shocks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Consideration is given to a collisionless parallel shock based on solitary-type solutions of the modified derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation (MDNLS) for parallel Alfven waves. The standard derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation is generalized in order to include the possible anisotropy of the plasma distribution and higher-order Korteweg-de Vies-type dispersion. Stationary solutions of MDNLS are discussed. The anisotropic nature of 'adiabatic' reflections leads to the asymmetric particle distribution in the upstream as well as in the downstream regions of the shock. As a result, nonzero heat flux appears near the front of the shock. It is shown that this causes the stochastic behavior of the nonlinear waves, which can significantly contribute to the shock thermalization.

Khabibrakhmanov, I. KH.; Galeev, A. A.; Galinskii, V. L.

1993-01-01

414

Supporting dynamic parallel object arrays  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT We present efficient support for generalized arrays of parallel data driven objects. Array elements are regular C++ objects, and are scattered across the parallel machine. An individual element is addressed by its \\

Orion Sky Lawlor; Laxmikant V. Kalé

2003-01-01

415

Resistor Combinations for Parallel Circuits.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To help simplify both teaching and learning of parallel circuits, a high school electricity/electronics teacher presents and illustrates the use of tables of values for parallel resistive circuits in which total resistances are whole numbers. (MF)

McTernan, James P.

1978-01-01

416

Standard Templates Adaptive Parallel Library  

E-print Network

STAPL (Standard Templates Adaptive Parallel Library) is a parallel C++ library designed as a superset of the C++ Standard Template Library (STL), sequentially consistent for functions with the same name, and executed on uni- or multi- processor...

Arzu, Francisco Jose

2012-06-07

417

A Parallel Repetition Theorem  

Microsoft Academic Search

We show that a parallel repetition of any two-prover one-round proof system (MIP(2,1)) decreases the probability of error at an exponential rate. No constructive bound was previously known. The constant in the exponent (in our analysis) depends only on the original probability of error and on the total number of possible answers of the two provers. The dependency on the

Ran Raz

1998-01-01

418

Parallelization: Infectious Disease  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Epidemiology is the study of infectious disease. Infectious diseases are said to be "contagious" among people if they are transmittable from one person to another. Epidemiologists can use models to assist them in predicting the behavior of infectious diseases. This module will develop a simple agent-based infectious disease model, develop a parallel algorithm based on the model, provide a coded implementation for the algorithm, and explore the scaling of the coded implementation on high performance cluster resources.

Aaron Weeden

419

Massively parallel neural computation  

E-print Network

and communication resources is developed and then used to implement a neural computation system on the multi- FPGA platform. Finding suitable benchmark neural networks for a massively parallel neural com- putation system proves to be a challenge. A synthetic... .2.4 Accumulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 7.2.5 Memory spike source . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 7.2.6 Spike injector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 7.2.7 Spike auditor...

Fox, Paul James

2013-03-12

420

Parallel sphere rendering  

SciTech Connect

Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the M.

Krogh, M.; Painter, J.; Hansen, C.

1996-10-01

421

Exploratory Information Search by Domain Experts and Novices  

E-print Network

could influence search behavior in traditional search engines, we hypothesized and tested the idea Keywords Social search, exploratory search, domain expertise. ACM Classification Keywords H.3.3 Information retrieval. Though search engines are good for direct fact retrievals, exploratory search often involves

Mankoff, Jennifer

422

Parallel Pascal - An extended Pascal for parallel computers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Parallel Pascal is an extended version of the conventional serial Pascal programming language which includes a convenient syntax for specifying array operations. It is upward compatible with standard Pascal and involves only a small number of carefully chosen new features. Parallel Pascal was developed to reduce the semantic gap between standard Pascal and a large range of highly parallel computers. Two important design goals of Parallel Pascal were efficiency and portability. Portability is particularly difficult to achieve since different parallel computers frequently have very different capabilities.

Reeves, A. P.

1984-01-01

423

Synchronous Parallel Kinetic Monte Carlo  

SciTech Connect

A novel parallel kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) algorithm formulated on the basis of perfect time synchronicity is presented. The algorithm provides an exact generalization of any standard serial kMC model and is trivially implemented in parallel architectures. We demonstrate the mathematical validity and parallel performance of the method by solving several well-understood problems in diffusion.

Mart?nez, E; Marian, J; Kalos, M H

2006-12-14

424

Roo: A parallel theorem prover  

SciTech Connect

We describe a parallel theorem prover based on the Argonne theorem-proving system OTTER. The parallel system, called Roo, runs on shared-memory multiprocessors such as the Sequent Symmetry. We explain the parallel algorithm used and give performance results that demonstrate near-linear speedups on large problems.

Lusk, E.L.; McCune, W.W.; Slaney, J.K.

1991-11-01

425

Search for Neutrinos from Annihilating Dark Matter in the Direction of the Galactic Center with the 40-String IceCube Neutrino Observatory  

E-print Network

A search for muon neutrinos from dark matter annihilations in the Galactic Center region has been performed with the 40-string configuration of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory using data collected in 367 days of live-time starting in April 2008. The observed fluxes were consistent with the atmospheric background expectations. Upper limits on the self-annihilation cross-section are obtained for dark matter particle masses ranging from 100 GeV to 10 TeV. In the case of decaying dark matter, lower limits on the lifetime have been determined for masses between 200 GeV and 20 TeV.

Abbasi, R; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; Uiterweerd, G de Vries; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hülß, J -P; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

2012-01-01

426

Supercomputing on massively parallel bit-serial architectures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Research on the Goodyear Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) suggests that high-level parallel languages are practical and can be designed with powerful new semantics that allow algorithms to be efficiently mapped to the real machines. For the MPP these semantics include parallel/associative array selection for both dense and sparse matrices, variable precision arithmetic to trade accuracy for speed, micro-pipelined train broadcast, and conditional branching at the processing element (PE) control unit level. The preliminary design of a FORTRAN-like parallel language for the MPP has been completed and is being used to write programs to perform sparse matrix array selection, min/max search, matrix multiplication, Gaussian elimination on single bit arrays and other generic algorithms. A description is given of the MPP design. Features of the system and its operation are illustrated in the form of charts and diagrams.

Iobst, Ken

1985-01-01

427

PARALLEL ELECTRIC FIELD SPECTRUM OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE  

SciTech Connect

By searching through more than 10 satellite years of THEMIS and Cluster data, 3 reliable examples of parallel electric field turbulence in the undisturbed solar wind have been found. The perpendicular and parallel electric field spectra in these examples have similar shapes and amplitudes, even at large scales (frequencies below the ion gyroscale), where Alfvenic turbulence with no parallel electric field component is thought to dominate. The spectra of the parallel electric field fluctuations are power laws with exponents near -5/3 below the ion scales ({approx}0.1 Hz), and with a flattening of the spectrum in the vicinity of this frequency. At small scales (above a few Hz), the spectra are steeper than -5/3 with values in the range of -2.1 to -2.8. These steeper slopes are consistent with expectations for kinetic Alfven turbulence, although their amplitude relative to the perpendicular fluctuations is larger than expected.

Mozer, F. S.; Chen, C. H. K., E-mail: fmozer@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-05-01

428

Parallelization of Rocket Engine Simulator Software (PRESS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We have outlined our work in the last half of the funding period. We have shown how a demo package for RESSAP using MPI can be done. However, we also mentioned the difficulties with the UNIX platform. We have reiterated some of the suggestions made during the presentation of the progress of the at Fourth Annual HBCU Conference. Although we have discussed, in some detail, how TURBDES/PUMPDES software can be run in parallel using MPI, at present, we are unable to experiment any further with either MPI or PVM. Due to X windows not being implemented, we are also not able to experiment further with XPVM, which it will be recalled, has a nice GUI interface. There are also some concerns, on our part, about MPI being an appropriate tool. The best thing about MPr is that it is public domain. Although and plenty of documentation exists for the intricacies of using MPI, little information is available on its actual implementations. Other than very typical, somewhat contrived examples, such as Jacobi algorithm for solving Laplace's equation, there are few examples which can readily be applied to real situations, such as in our case. In effect, the review of literature on both MPI and PVM, and there is a lot, indicate something similar to the enormous effort which was spent on LISP and LISP-like languages as tools for artificial intelligence research. During the development of a book on programming languages [12], when we searched the literature for very simple examples like taking averages, reading and writing records, multiplying matrices, etc., we could hardly find a any! Yet, so much was said and done on that topic in academic circles. It appears that we faced the same problem with MPI, where despite significant documentation, we could not find even a simple example which supports course-grain parallelism involving only a few processes. From the foregoing, it appears that a new direction may be required for more productive research during the extension period (10/19/98 - 10/18/99). At the least, the research would need to be done on Windows 95/Windows NT based platforms. Moreover, with the acquisition of Lahey Fortran package for PC platform, and the existing Borland C + + 5. 0, we can do work on C + + wrapper issues. We have carefully studied the blueprint for Space Transportation Propulsion Integrated Design Environment for the next 25 years [13] and found the inclusion of HBCUs in that effort encouraging. Especially in the long period for which a map is provided, there is no doubt that HBCUs will grow and become better equipped to do meaningful research. In the shorter period, as was suggested in our presentation at the HBCU conference, some key decisions regarding the aging Fortran based software for rocket propellants will need to be made. One important issue is whether or not object oriented languages such as C + + or Java should be used for distributed computing. Whether or not "distributed computing" is necessary for the existing software is yet another, larger, question to be tackled with.

Cezzar, Ruknet

1998-01-01

429

Parallelized nested sampling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the important advantages of nested sampling as an MCMC technique is its ability to draw representative samples from multimodal distributions and distributions with other degeneracies. This coverage is accomplished by maintaining a number of so-called live samples within a likelihood constraint. In usual practice, at each step, only the sample with the least likelihood is discarded from this set of live samples and replaced. In [1], Skilling shows that for a given number of live samples, discarding only one sample yields the highest precision in estimation of the log-evidence. However, if we increase the number of live samples, more samples can be discarded at once while still maintaining the same precision. For computer code running only serially, this modification would considerably increase the wall clock time necessary to reach convergence. However, if we use a computer with parallel processing capabilities, and we write our code to take advantage of this parallelism to replace multiple samples concurrently, the performance penalty can be eliminated entirely and possibly reversed. In this case, we must use the more general equation in [1] for computing the expectation of the shrinkage distribution: E [- log t]= (N r-r+1)-1+(Nr-r+2)-1+⋯+Nr-1, for shrinkage t with Nr live samples and r samples discarded at each iteration. The equation for the variance Var (- log t)= (N r-r+1)-2+(Nr-r+2)-2+⋯+Nr-2 is used to find the appropriate number of live samples Nr to use with r > 1 to match the variance achieved with N1 live samples and r = 1. In this paper, we show that by replacing multiple discarded samples in parallel, we are able to achieve a more thorough sampling of the constrained prior distribution, reduce runtime, and increase precision.

Henderson, R. Wesley; Goggans, Paul M.

2014-12-01

430

Highly parallel computation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Highly parallel computing architectures are the only means to achieve the computation rates demanded by advanced scientific problems. A decade of research has demonstrated the feasibility of such machines and current research focuses on which architectures designated as multiple instruction multiple datastream (MIMD) and single instruction multiple datastream (SIMD) have produced the best results to date; neither shows a decisive advantage for most near-homogeneous scientific problems. For scientific problems with many dissimilar parts, more speculative architectures such as neural networks or data flow may be needed.

Denning, Peter J.; Tichy, Walter F.

1990-01-01

431

Parallel sphere rendering  

SciTech Connect

Sphere rendering is an important method for visualizing molecular dynamics data. This paper presents a parallel divide-and-conquer algorithm that is almost 90 times faster than current graphics workstations. To render extremely large data sets and large images, the algorithm uses the MIMD features of the supercomputers to divide up the data, render independent partial images, and then finally composite the multiple partial images using an optimal method. The algorithm and performance results are presented for the CM-5 and the T3D.

Krogh, M.; Hansen, C.; Painter, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); de Verdiere, G.C. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Limeil, 94 - Villeneuve-Saint-Georges (France)

1995-05-01

432

Parallel Eclipse Project Checkout  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Parallel Eclipse Project Checkout (PEPC) is a program written to leverage parallelism and to automate the checkout process of plug-ins created in Eclipse RCP (Rich Client Platform). Eclipse plug-ins can be aggregated in a feature project. This innovation digests a feature description (xml file) and automatically checks out all of the plug-ins listed in the feature. This resolves the issue of manually checking out each plug-in required to work on the project. To minimize the amount of time necessary to checkout the plug-ins, this program makes the plug-in checkouts parallel. After parsing the feature, a request to checkout for each plug-in in the feature has been inserted. These requests are handled by a thread pool with a configurable number of threads. By checking out the plug-ins in parallel, the checkout process is streamlined before getting started on the project. For instance, projects that took 30 minutes to checkout now take less than 5 minutes. The effect is especially clear on a Mac, which has a network monitor displaying the bandwidth use. When running the client from a developer s home, the checkout process now saturates the bandwidth in order to get all the plug-ins checked out as fast as possible. For comparison, a checkout process that ranged from 8-200 Kbps from a developer s home is now able to saturate a pipe of 1.3 Mbps, resulting in significantly faster checkouts. Eclipse IDE (integrated development environment) tries to build a project as soon as it is downloaded. As part of another optimization, this innovation programmatically tells Eclipse to stop building while checkouts are happening, which dramatically reduces lock contention and enables plug-ins to continue downloading until all of them finish. Furthermore, the software re-enables automatic building, and forces Eclipse to do a clean build once it finishes checking out all of the plug-ins. This software is fully generic and does not contain any NASA-specific code. It can be applied to any Eclipse-based repository with a similar structure. It also can apply build parameters and preferences automatically at the end of the checkout.

Crockett, Thomas M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Powell, Mark W.; Bachmann, Andrew G.

2011-01-01

433

Parallel manipulator for micro-assembly and micromachining  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents a five DOF parallel manipulator. It consists of a four-DOF parallel manipulator and a rotate table. This kind of manipulator can be used in the field of micro machining and micro assembly. It owns all the advantage of parallel structure such as high stiffness, small dimension, low cost and high accuracy. Commonly the direct kinematics solution of a parallel structure is very difficult to solve, because it comes down to getting the answers of several connected nonlinear equations. While that problem becomes very easy for our five DOF parallel machine tool because we use some special parameters to determine the spatial position of the end-effector. That results in the convenience of analyzing the kinematical characteristic.

Wu, Xuezhong; Wu, Yulie; Li, Shengyi

2001-10-01

434

Search for direct top squark pair production in final states with one electron or muon using 21 fb-1 of ATLAS data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This article presents latest results of the search for top squark pair production in final states with one isolated lepton, jets, and missing transverse momentum in ?s = 8 TeV pp collisions using L=21 fb-1 of data recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Two top squark decay scenarios are considered: (a) to a top quark and a long-lived undetected neutral particle (LSP), (b) to a bottom quark and a chargino, where the chargino decays via an on- or off-shellWboson to the LSP. The analysis also employs a new dedicated shape-fit method to target the challenging parameter region where m(bar t) is close to the kinematic boundary m(t) +m(LS P).

Rosbach, K.

2013-11-01

435

Two Computer Vision-Based Tracking Applications Solved Using a Robust Parallel Optimizer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method was developed as a response to the need for a robust optimizer for two different image vision algorithms. Our new approach is a synthesis of two modalities, a simulated annealing technique paired with a parallel search. Using an initial value and the maximum parametric variations, our method searches for a cost function minimum by using parameter subspaces combined

Pierre-louis Bazin; Philippe Gérard; André Gagalowicz

1999-01-01

436

Visual Search and Dual Tasks Reveal Two Distinct Attentional Resources  

E-print Network

Visual Search and Dual Tasks Reveal Two Distinct Attentional Resources Rufin VanRullen1, *, Lavanya will ``pop out'' from an array of distractors (``parallel'' visual search, e.g., color or orientation'' examination is needed in visual search. Attentional requirements are also frequently assessed by measuring

Koch, Christof

437

Massively Parallel QCD  

SciTech Connect

The theory of the strong nuclear force, Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), can be numerically simulated from first principles on massively-parallel supercomputers using the method of Lattice Gauge Theory. We describe the special programming requirements of lattice QCD (LQCD) as well as the optimal supercomputer hardware architectures that it suggests. We demonstrate these methods on the BlueGene massively-parallel supercomputer and argue that LQCD and the BlueGene architecture are a natural match. This can be traced to the simple fact that LQCD is a regular lattice discretization of space into lattice sites while the BlueGene supercomputer is a discretization of space into compute nodes, and that both are constrained by requirements of locality. This simple relation is both technologically important and theoretically intriguing. The main result of this paper is the speedup of LQCD using up to 131,072 CPUs on the largest BlueGene/L supercomputer. The speedup is perfect with sustained performance of about 20% of peak. This corresponds to a maximum of 70.5 sustained TFlop/s. At these speeds LQCD and BlueGene are poised to produce the next generation of strong interaction physics theoretical results.

Soltz, R; Vranas, P; Blumrich, M; Chen, D; Gara, A; Giampap, M; Heidelberger, P; Salapura, V; Sexton, J; Bhanot, G

2007-04-11

438

Parallelization of a treecode  

E-print Network

I describe here the performance of a parallel treecode with individual particle timesteps. The code is based on the Barnes-Hut algorithm and runs cosmological N-body simulations on parallel machines with a distributed memory architecture using the MPI message-passing library. For a configuration with a constant number of particles per processor the scalability of the code was tested up to P=128 processors on an IBM SP4 machine. In the large $P$ limit the average CPU time per processor necessary for solving the gravitational interactions is $\\sim 10 %$ higher than that expected from the ideal scaling relation. The processor domains are determined every large timestep according to a recursive orthogonal bisection, using a weighting scheme which takes into account the total particle computational load within the timestep. The results of the numerical tests show that the load balancing efficiency $L$ of the code is high ($>=90%$) up to P=32, and decreases to $L\\sim 80%$ when P=128. In the latter case it is found that some aspects of the code performance are affected by machine hardware, while the proposed weighting scheme can achieve a load balance as high as $L\\sim 90%$ even in the large $P$ limit.

R. Valdarnini

2003-03-18

439

Omni-directional railguns  

DOEpatents

A device is disclosed for electromagnetically accelerating projectiles. The invention features two parallel conducting circular plates, a plurality of electrode connections to both upper and lower plates, a support base, and a projectile magazine. A projectile is spring-loaded into a firing position concentrically located between the parallel plates. A voltage source is applied to the plates to cause current to flow in directions defined by selectable, discrete electrode connections on both upper and lower plates. Repulsive Lorentz forces are generated to eject the projectile in a 360 degree range of fire. 4 figs.

Shahinpoor, M.

1995-07-25

440

Omni-directional railguns  

DOEpatents

A device for electromagnetically accelerating projectiles. The invention features two parallel conducting circular plates, a plurality of electrode connections to both upper and lower plates, a support base, and a projectile magazine. A projectile is spring-loaded into a firing position concentrically located between the parallel plates. A voltage source is applied to the plates to cause current to flow in directions defined by selectable, discrete electrode connections on both upper and lower plates. Repulsive Lorentz forces are generated to eject the projectile in a 360 degree range of fire.

Shahinpoor, Mohsen (9521 Avenida Del Oso NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1995-01-01

441

Search Cloud  

MedlinePLUS

... Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Cool Tools ESPAÑOL Search Cloud To use the sharing features on this ... 64 of Top 110 zoloft Share the MedlinePlus search cloud with your users by embedding our search ...

442

Searching for inefficiency in visual search.  

PubMed

The time required to find an object of interest in the visual field often increases as a function of the number of items present. This increase or inefficiency was originally interpreted as evidence for the serial allocation of attention to potential target items, but controversy has ensued for decades. We investigated this issue by recording ERPs from humans searching for a target in displays containing several differently colored items. Search inefficiency was ascribed not to serial search but to the time required to selectively process the target once found. Additionally, less time was required for the target to "pop out" from the rest of the display when the color of the target repeated across trials. These findings indicate that task relevance can cause otherwise inconspicuous items to pop out and highlight the need for direct neurophysiological measures when investigating the causes of search inefficiency. PMID:25203277

Christie, Gregory J; Livingstone, Ashley C; McDonald, John J

2015-01-01

443

BLAST-ing in Parallel: Enabling an Essential Computational Tool to Keep Pace with the Explosive Growth in Biological Sequence Data  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This module explores the inner workings of the BLAST similarity search tool, considering the algorithm and the impact of various search conditions and settings on performance. Various approaches to parallelizing the computation and their performance impacts are considered. Benchmarking of the mpiBLAST parallel code is carried out at different scales.

Krause, Jeff

444

Parallel Computing in SCALE  

SciTech Connect

The SCALE computational architecture has remained basically the same since its inception 30 years ago, although constituent modules and capabilities have changed significantly. This SCALE concept was intended to provide a framework whereby independent codes can be linked to provide a more comprehensive capability than possible with the individual programs - allowing flexibility to address a wide variety of applications. However, the current system was designed originally for mainframe computers with a single CPU and with significantly less memory than today's personal computers. It has been recognized that the present SCALE computation system could be restructured to take advantage of modern hardware and software capabilities, while retaining many of the modular features of the present system. Preliminary work is being done to define specifications and capabilities for a more advanced computational architecture. This paper describes the state of current SCALE development activities and plans for future development. With the release of SCALE 6.1 in 2010, a new phase of evolutionary development will be available to SCALE users within the TRITON and NEWT modules. The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a comprehensive and integrated package of codes and nuclear data for a wide range of applications in criticality safety, reactor physics, shielding, isotopic depletion and decay, and sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analysis. Over the last three years, since the release of version 5.1 in 2006, several important new codes have been introduced within SCALE, and significant advances applied to existing codes. Many of these new features became available with the release of SCALE 6.0 in early 2009. However, beginning with SCALE 6.1, a first generation of parallel computing is being introduced. In addition to near-term improvements, a plan for longer term SCALE enhancement activities has been developed to provide an integrated framework for future methods development. Some of the major components of the SCALE parallel computing development plan are parallelization and multithreading of computationally intensive modules and redesign of the fundamental SCALE computational architecture.

DeHart, Mark D [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01

445

Search for direct top squark pair production in final states with one isolated lepton, jets, and missing transverse momentum in sqrt[s] = 7 TeV pp collisions using 4.7 fb(-10 of ATLAS data.  

PubMed

A search is presented for direct top squark pair production in final states with one isolated electron or muon, jets, and missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s] = 7 TeV. The measurement is based on 4.7 fb(-1) of data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Each top squark is assumed to decay to a top quark and the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). The data are found to be consistent with standard model expectations. Top squark masses between 230 GeV and 440 GeV are excluded with 95% confidence for massless LSPs, and top squark masses around 400 GeV are excluded for LSP masses up to 125 GeV. PMID:23215588

Aad, G; Abajyan, T; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdelalim, A A; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abi, B; Abolins, M; Abouzeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Addy, T N; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adragna, P; Adye, T; Aefsky, S; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Aharrouche, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahles, F; Ahmad, A; Ahsan, M; Aielli, G; Akdogan, T; Akesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alam, M S; Alam, M A; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alessandria, F; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Allwood-Spiers, S E; Almond, J; Aloisio, A; Alon, R; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Altheimer, A D; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amelung, C; Ammosov, V V; Amorim, A; Amram, N; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonaki, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aoun, S; Aperio Bella, L; Apolle, R; Arabidze, G; Aracena, I; Arai, Y; Arce, A T H; Arfaoui, S; Arguin, J-F; Arik, E; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnault, C; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Arutinov, D; Asai, S; Asfandiyarov, R; Ask, S; Asman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astbury, A; Atkinson, M; Aubert, B; Auge, E; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Avramidou, R; Axen, D; Azuelos, G; Azuma, Y; Baak, M A; Baccaglioni, G; Bacci, C; Bach, A M; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Badescu, E; Bagnaia, P; Bahinipati, S; Bai, Y; Bailey, D C; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baker, M D; Baker, S; Banas, E; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, Sw; Banfi, D; Bangert, A; Bansal, V; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barbaro Galtieri, A; Barber, T; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Bardin, D Y; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Barrillon, P; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartsch, V; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batkova, L; Batley, J R; Battaglia, A; Battistin, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beale, S; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, A K; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becks, K H; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bedikian, S; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Begel, M; Behar Harpaz, S; Beimforde, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellina, F; Bellomo, M; Belloni, A; Beloborodova, O; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Benslama, K; Bentvelsen, S; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Berglund, E; Beringer, J; Bernat, P; Bernhard, R; Bernius, C; Berry, T; Bertella, C; Bertin, A; Bertolucci, F; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Besson, N; Bethke, S; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Bierwagen, K; Biesiada, J; Biglietti, M; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biscarat, C; Bittner, B; Black, K M; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanchot, G; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blocki, J; Blondel, A; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V B; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Boek, J; Boelaert, N; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A; Bogouch, A; Bohm, C; Bohm, J; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Bolnet, N M; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Bordoni, S; Borer, C; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borjanovic, I; Borri, M; Borroni, S; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boterenbrood, H; Bouchami, J; Boudreau, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Branchini, P; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brazzale, S F; Brelier, B; Bremer, J; Brendlinger, K; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Broggi, F; Bromberg, C; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brown, G; Brown, H; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Brunet, S; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Bucci, F; Buchanan, J; Buchholz, P; Buckingham, R M; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Budick, B; Büscher, V; Bugge, L; Bulekov, O; Bundock, A C; Bunse, M; Buran, T; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgess, T; Burke, S; Busato, E; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butler, B; Butler, J M; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Buttinger, W; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Calkins, R; Caloba, L P; Caloi, R; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camarri, P; Cameron, D; Caminada, L M; Caminal Armadans, R; Campana, S

2012-11-21

446

Search for Direct Top Squark Pair Production in Final States with One Isolated Lepton, Jets, and Missing Transverse Momentum in s=7TeV pp Collisions Using 4.7fb-1 of ATLAS Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A search is presented for direct top squark pair production in final states with one isolated electron or muon, jets, and missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at s=7TeV. The measurement is based on 4.7fb-1 of data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Each top squark is assumed to decay to a top quark and the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP). The data are found to be consistent with standard model expectations. Top squark masses between 230 GeV and 440 GeV are excluded with 95% confidence for massless LSPs, and top squark masses around 400 GeV are excluded for LSP masses up to 125 GeV.

Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, M. S.; Alam, M. A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Altheimer, A. D.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aoun, S.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov,