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Sample records for paralogous genes radical-induced

  1. pATsi: Paralogs and Singleton Genes from Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosino, Luca; Bostan, Hamed; di Salle, Pasquale; Sangiovanni, Mara; Vigilante, Alessandra; Chiusano, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is widely accepted as a model species in plant biology. Its genome, due to its small size and diploidy, was the first to be sequenced among plants, making this species also a reference for plant comparative genomics. Nevertheless, the evolutionary mechanisms that shaped the Arabidopsis genome are still controversial. Indeed, duplications, translocations, inversions, and gene loss events that contributed to the current organization are difficult to be traced. A reliable identification of paralogs and single-copy genes is essential to understand these mechanisms. Therefore, we implemented a dedicated pipeline to identify paralog genes and classify single-copy genes into opportune categories. PATsi, a web-accessible database, was organized to allow the straightforward access to the paralogs organized into networks and to the classification of single-copy genes. This permits to efficiently explore the gene collection of Arabidopsis for evolutionary investigations and comparative genomics. PMID:26792975

  2. Hox11 paralogous genes are essential for metanephric kidney induction.

    PubMed

    Wellik, Deneen M; Hawkes, Patrick J; Capecchi, Mario R

    2002-06-01

    The mammalian Hox complex is divided into four linkage groups containing 13 sets of paralogous genes. These paralogous genes have retained functional redundancy during evolution. For this reason, loss of only one or two Hox genes within a paralogous group often results in incompletely penetrant phenotypes which are difficult to interpret by molecular analysis. For example, mice individually mutant for Hoxa11 or Hoxd11 show no discernible kidney abnormalities. Hoxa11/Hoxd11 double mutants, however, demonstrate hypoplasia of the kidneys. As described in this study, removal of the last Hox11 paralogous member, Hoxc11, results in the complete loss of metanephric kidney induction. In these triple mutants, the metanephric blastema condenses, and expression of early patterning genes, Pax2 and Wt1, is unperturbed. Eya1 expression is also intact. Six2 expression, however, is absent, as is expression of the inducing growth factor, Gdnf. In the absence of Gdnf, ureteric bud formation is not initiated. Molecular analysis of this phenotype demonstrates that Hox11 control of early metanephric induction is accomplished by the interaction of Hox11 genes with the pax-eya-six regulatory cascade, a pathway that may be used by Hox genes more generally for the induction of multiple structures along the anteroposterior axis. PMID:12050119

  3. Identification and mapping of paralogous genes on a known genomic DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Bina, Minou

    2006-01-01

    The completion of whole genome sequencing projects offers the opportunity to examine the organization of genes and the discovery of evolutionarily related genes in a given species. For the beginners in the field, through a specific example, this chapter provides a step-by-step procedure for identifying paralogous genes, using the genome browser at UCSC (http://genome.ucsc.edu/). The example describes identification and mapping in the human genome, the paralogs of TCF12/HTF4. The example identifies TCF3 and TCF4 as paralogs of the TCF12/HTF4 gene. The example also identifies a related sequence, corresponding to a pseudogene, in one of the introns of the JAK2 gene. The procedure described should be applicable to the discovery and creation of maps of paralogous genes in the genomic DNA sequences that are available at the genome browser at UCSC. PMID:16888348

  4. Vertebrate paralogous conserved noncoding sequences may be related to gene expressions in brain.

    PubMed

    Matsunami, Masatoshi; Saitou, Naruya

    2013-01-01

    Vertebrate genomes include gene regulatory elements in protein-noncoding regions. A part of gene regulatory elements are expected to be conserved according to their functional importance, so that evolutionarily conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) might be good candidates for those elements. In addition, paralogous CNSs, which are highly conserved among both orthologous loci and paralogous loci, have the possibility of controlling overlapping expression patterns of their adjacent paralogous protein-coding genes. The two-round whole-genome duplications (2R WGDs), which most probably occurred in the vertebrate common ancestors, generated large numbers of paralogous protein-coding genes and their regulatory elements. These events could contribute to the emergence of vertebrate features. However, the evolutionary history and influences of the 2R WGDs are still unclear, especially in noncoding regions. To address this issue, we identified paralogous CNSs. Region-focused Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) search of each synteny block revealed 7,924 orthologous CNSs and 309 paralogous CNSs conserved among eight high-quality vertebrate genomes. Paralogous CNSs we found contained 115 previously reported ones and newly detected 194 ones. Through comparisons with VISTA Enhancer Browser and available ChIP-seq data, one-third (103) of paralogous CNSs detected in this study showed gene regulatory activity in the brain at several developmental stages. Their genomic locations are highly enriched near the transcription factor-coding regions, which are expressed in brain and neural systems. These results suggest that paralogous CNSs are conserved mainly because of maintaining gene expression in the vertebrate brain. PMID:23267051

  5. Transcriptomic and phenotypic analysis of paralogous spx gene function in Bacillus anthracis Sterne

    PubMed Central

    Barendt, Skye; Lee, Hyunwoo; Birch, Cierra; Nakano, Michiko M; Jones, Marcus; Zuber, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Spx of Bacillus subtilis is a redox-sensitive protein, which, under disulfide stress, interacts with RNA polymerase to activate genes required for maintaining thiol homeostasis. Spx orthologs are highly conserved among low %GC Gram-positive bacteria, and often exist in multiple paralogous forms. In this study, we used B. anthracis Sterne, which harbors two paralogous spx genes, spxA1 and spxA2, to examine the phenotypes of spx null mutations and to identify the genes regulated by each Spx paralog. Cells devoid of spxA1 were sensitive to diamide and hydrogen peroxide, while the spxA1 spoxA2 double mutant was hypersensitive to the thiol-specific oxidant, diamide. Bacillus anthracis Sterne strains expressing spxA1DD or spxA2DD alleles encoding protease-resistant products were used in microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analyses in order to uncover genes under SpxA1, SpxA2, or SpxA1/SpxA2 control. Comparison of transcriptomes identified many genes that were upregulated when either SpxA1DD or SpxA2DD was produced, but several genes were uncovered whose transcript levels increased in only one of the two SpxADD-expression strains, suggesting that each Spx paralog governs a unique regulon. Among genes that were upregulated were those encoding orthologs of proteins that are specifically involved in maintaining intracellular thiol homeostasis or alleviating oxidative stress. Some of these genes have important roles in B. anthracis pathogenesis, and a large number of upregulated hypothetical genes have no homology outside of the B. cereus/thuringiensis group. Microarray and RT-qPCR analyses also unveiled a regulatory link that exists between the two spx paralogous genes. The data indicate that spxA1 and spxA2 are transcriptional regulators involved in relieving disulfide stress but also control a set of genes whose products function in other cellular processes. Bacillus anthracis harbors two paralogs of the global transcriptional

  6. Gain of function mutations for paralogous Hox genes: implications for the evolution of Hox gene function.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, R A; Sreenath, T; Ngo, L; Bieberich, C J

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the functions of paralogous Hox genes, we compared the phenotypic consequences of altering the embryonic patterns of expression of Hoxb-8 and Hoxc-8 in transgenic mice. A comparison of the phenotypic consequences of altered expression of the two paralogs in the axial skeletons of newborns revealed an array of common transformations as well as morphological changes unique to each gene. Divergence of function of the two paralogs was clearly evident in costal derivatives, where increased expression of the two genes affected opposite ends of the ribs. Many of the morphological consequences of expanding the mesodermal domain and magnitude of expression of either gene were atavistic, inducing the transformation of axial skeletal structures from a modern to an earlier evolutionary form. We propose that regional specialization of the vertebral column has been driven by regionalization of Hox gene function and that a major aspect of this evolutionary progression may have been restriction of Hox gene expression. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7753831

  7. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows.

    PubMed

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows. PMID:26689951

  8. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows

    PubMed Central

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L.; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows. PMID:26689951

  9. Systematic Variation in the Pattern of Gene Paralog Retention between the Teleost Superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii

    PubMed Central

    Garcia de la serrana, Daniel; Mareco, Edson A.; Johnston, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Teleost fish underwent whole-genome duplication around 450 Ma followed by diploidization and loss of 80–85% of the duplicated genes. To identify a deep signature of this teleost-specific whole-genome duplication (TSGD), we searched for duplicated genes that were systematically and uniquely retained in one or other of the superorders Ostariophysi and Acanthopterygii. TSGD paralogs comprised 17–21% of total gene content. Some 2.6% (510) of TSGD paralogs were present as pairs in the Ostariophysi genomes of Danio rerio (Cypriniformes) and Astyanax mexicanus (Characiformes) but not in species from four orders of Acanthopterygii (Gasterosteiformes, Gasterosteus aculeatus; Tetraodontiformes, Tetraodon nigroviridis; Perciformes, Oreochromis niloticus; and Beloniformes, Oryzias latipes) where a single copy was identified. Similarly, 1.3% (418) of total gene number represented cases where TSGD paralogs pairs were systematically retained in the Acanthopterygian but conserved as a single copy in Ostariophysi genomes. We confirmed the generality of these results by phylogenetic and synteny analysis of 40 randomly selected linage-specific paralogs (LSPs) from each superorder and completed with the transcriptomes of three additional Ostariophysi species (Ictalurus punctatus [Siluriformes], Sinocyclocheilus species [Cypriniformes], and Piaractus mesopotamicus [Characiformes]). No chromosome bias was detected in TSGD paralog retention. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed significant enrichment of GO terms relative to the human GO SLIM database for “growth,” “Cell differentiation,” and “Embryo development” in Ostariophysi and for “Transport,” “Signal Transduction,” and “Vesicle mediated transport” in Acanthopterygii. The observed patterns of paralog retention are consistent with different diploidization outcomes having contributed to the evolution/diversification of each superorder. PMID:24732281

  10. Palaeophylogenomics of the vertebrate ancestor--impact of hidden paralogy on hagfish and lamprey gene phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro

    2010-07-01

    In dissecting the transition from invertebrates to vertebrates at the molecular level, whole-genome duplications are recognized as a key event. This gave rise to more copies of genes in jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes), such as the four Hox clusters in the human, compared to the single ancestral cluster in invertebrates. To date, as the most early-branching lineages in vertebrates, cyclostomes (hagfishes and lampreys) have been used for comparative analyses of gene regulations and functions. However, assignment of orthology/paralogy for cyclostomes' genes is not unambiguously demonstrated. Thus, there is a high degree of incongruence in tree topologies between gene families, although whole genome duplications postulate uniform patterns in gene phylogeny. In this review, we demonstrate how expansion of an ancient genome before the cyclostome-gnathostome split, followed by reciprocal gene loss, can cause this incongruence. This is sometimes referred to as 'hidden paralogy'. PMID:21558193

  11. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants. PMID:25909656

  12. Characterization of two paralogous myostatin genes and evidence for positive selection in Tibet fish: Gymnocypris przewalskii.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chao; Zhang, Cunfang; Shi, Jianquan; Qi, Hongfang; Zhang, Renyi; Tang, Yongtao; Li, Guogang; Feng, Chenguang; Zhao, Kai

    2015-07-10

    Myostatin (mstn) is an important member of TGF-β superfamily, a muscle growth inhibitor. Though mstn has been identified in many organisms, little is known about this gene in highland fish, Gymnocypris przewalskii endemic to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. In this study, we first cloned two paralogous mstn genes (mstn1 and mstn2) from G. przewalskii through homologue cloning. The 3D structures of both Mstn proteins varied in the numbers of β-sheets and conformations of α-helices. The branch-site model showed that mstn1 has undergone positive selection, and two positively selected sites (107M and 181T) were located on the random coils of the 3D protein structure. Expression patterns indicated that the mstn1 expressed widely, while the mstn2 only expressed in the muscle and brain. During the early stage of embryo development, the expression levels of both mstn paralogous genes showed different increasing trends. These results suggest that it is diverging in two mstn paralogues of G. przewalskii via specific differences in gene structure, protein structure, selection pressure and gene expression patterns. Taken together, this study provides novel contribution on the research topics of growth related gene function and mechanism of highland fish in extreme aquatic environment on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. PMID:25861868

  13. Extensive Local Gene Duplication and Functional Divergence among Paralogs in Atlantic Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Ian A.; Ciborowski, Kate L.; Casadei, Elisa; Hazlerigg, David G.; Martin, Sam; Jordan, William C.; Sumner, Seirian

    2014-01-01

    Many organisms can generate alternative phenotypes from the same genome, enabling individuals to exploit diverse and variable environments. A prevailing hypothesis is that such adaptation has been favored by gene duplication events, which generate redundant genomic material that may evolve divergent functions. Vertebrate examples of recent whole-genome duplications are sparse although one example is the salmonids, which have undergone a whole-genome duplication event within the last 100 Myr. The life-cycle of the Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, depends on the ability to produce alternating phenotypes from the same genome, to facilitate migration and maintain its anadromous life history. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that genome-wide and local gene duplication events have contributed to the salmonid adaptation. We used high-throughput sequencing to characterize the transcriptomes of three key organs involved in regulating migration in S. salar: Brain, pituitary, and olfactory epithelium. We identified over 10,000 undescribed S. salar sequences and designed an analytic workflow to distinguish between paralogs originating from local gene duplication events or from whole-genome duplication events. These data reveal that substantial local gene duplications took place shortly after the whole-genome duplication event. Many of the identified paralog pairs have either diverged in function or become noncoding. Future functional genomics studies will reveal to what extent this rich source of divergence in genetic sequence is likely to have facilitated the evolution of extreme phenotypic plasticity required for an anadromous life-cycle. PMID:24951567

  14. The paralogous SPX3 and SPX5 genes redundantly modulate Pi homeostasis in rice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The importance of SPX-domain-containing proteins to phosphate (Pi) homeostasis and signalling transduction has been established in plants. In this study, phylogenetic analysis revealed that OsSPX3 and OsSPX5 (SPX3/5) are paralogous SPX genes (SYG1/Pho81/XPR1) in cereal crops. SPX3/5 are specifically responsive to Pi starvation at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Similar tissue expression patterns of the two genes and proteins were identified by in situ hybridization and the transgenic plants harbouring SPX3pro-SPX3-GUS or SPX5pro-SPX5-GUS fusions, respectively. Both SPX3/5 are localized in the nucleus and cytoplasm in rice protoplasts and plants. SPX3/5 negatively regulate root-to-shoot Pi translocation with redundant function. The data showed that the Pi-starvation-accumulated SPX3/5 proteins are players in restoring phosphate balance following phosphate starvation. In vitro and in vivo protein–protein interaction analyses indicated that these two proteins can form homodimers and heterodimers, also implying their functional redundancy. Genetic interaction analysis indicated that SPX3/5 are functional repressors of OsPHR2 (PHR2), the rice orthologue of the central regulator AtPHR1 for Pi homeostasis and Pi signalling. These results suggest that the evolution of the additional redundant paralogous SPX genes is beneficial to plants recovering Pi homeostasis after Pi starvation by PHR2 pathway. PMID:24368504

  15. Deregulation of paralogous 13 HOX genes in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Aquino, Gabriella; Franco, Renato; Sabatino, Rocco; Mantia, Elvira La; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; Collina, Francesca; Longo, Francesco; Ionna, Franco; Losito, Nunzia S; Liguori, Giuseppina; Botti, Gerardo; Cantile, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Many oncogenic drivers related to the pathogenesis of OSCC have identified, but the discovery of new molecular markers for early detection of this cancer, remains one the main goals of clinical research. HOX genes regulate normal embryonic development, cell differentiation and other critical processes in eukaryotic cell life. Several studies have demonstrated that the deregulation of HOX genes play a significant role in cancer development and progression. In this study, we built a prognostic TMA with 119 OSCC samples, representative of deep and superficial part of the tumour, to investigate, the paralogous 13 HOX proteins expression, correlating them with clinicpathological parameters, outcomes and therapy information. Our results show an aberrant expression of HOX A13 and HOX D13 in OSCC pathogenesis and tumour progression. HOX A13 overexpression is related to an OSCC better prognosis (P=0.029) and better therapy response in patients treated with both radiotherapy and chemotherapy (P=0.015). HOX D13 overexpression is inversely related to an overall survival (P=0.004). These data highlight the potential prognostic role of HOX paralogous group 13 genes in OSCC. PMID:26693058

  16. No Distinction of Orthology/Paralogy between Human and Chimpanzee Rh Blood Group Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Takashi; Kim, Choong-Gon; Blancher, Antoine; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-01-01

    On human (Homo sapiens) chromosome 1, there is a tandem duplication encompassing Rh blood group genes (Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE). This duplication occurred in the common ancestor of humans, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and gorillas, after splitting from their common ancestor with orangutans. Although several studies have been conducted on ape Rh blood group genes, the clear genome structures of the gene clusters remain unknown. Here, we determined the genome structure of the gene cluster of chimpanzee Rh genes by sequencing five BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) clones derived from chimpanzees. We characterized three complete loci (Patr_RHα, Patr_RHβ, and Patr_RHγ). In the Patr_RHβ locus, a short version of the gene, which lacked the middle part containing exons 4–8, was observed. The Patr_RHα and Patr_RHβ genes were located on the locations corresponding to Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE, respectively, and Patr_RHγ was in the immediate vicinity of Patr_RHβ. Sequence comparisons revealed high sequence similarity between Patr_RHβ and Hosa_RHCE, while the chimpanzee Rh gene closest to Hosa_RHD was not Patr_RHα but rather Patr_RHγ. The results suggest that rearrangements and gene conversions frequently occurred between these genes and that the classic orthology/paralogy dichotomy no longer holds between human and chimpanzee Rh blood group genes. PMID:26872772

  17. No Distinction of Orthology/Paralogy between Human and Chimpanzee Rh Blood Group Genes.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Takashi; Kim, Choong-Gon; Blancher, Antoine; Saitou, Naruya

    2016-03-01

    On human (Homo sapiens) chromosome 1, there is a tandem duplication encompassing Rh blood group genes (Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE). This duplication occurred in the common ancestor of humans, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and gorillas, after splitting from their common ancestor with orangutans. Although several studies have been conducted on ape Rh blood group genes, the clear genome structures of the gene clusters remain unknown. Here, we determined the genome structure of the gene cluster of chimpanzee Rh genes by sequencing five BAC (Bacterial Artificial Chromosome) clones derived from chimpanzees. We characterized three complete loci (Patr_RHα, Patr_RHβ, and Patr_RHγ). In the Patr_RHβ locus, a short version of the gene, which lacked the middle part containing exons 4-8, was observed. The Patr_RHα and Patr_RHβ genes were located on the locations corresponding to Hosa_RHD and Hosa_RHCE, respectively, and Patr_RHγ was in the immediate vicinity of Patr_RHβ. Sequence comparisons revealed high sequence similarity between Patr_RHβ and Hosa_RHCE, while the chimpanzee Rh gene closest to Hosa_RHD was not Patr_RHα but rather Patr_RHγ. The results suggest that rearrangements and gene conversions frequently occurred between these genes and that the classic orthology/paralogy dichotomy no longer holds between human and chimpanzee Rh blood group genes. PMID:26872772

  18. Identification of pathways, gene networks and paralogous gene families in Daphnia pulex responding to exposure to the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Asselman, Jana; De Coninck, Dieter IM; Glaholt, Stephen; Colbourne, John K; Janssen, Colin R; Shaw, Joseph R; De Schamphelaere, Karel AC

    2013-01-01

    Although cyanobacteria produce a wide range of natural toxins that impact aquatic organisms, food webs and water quality, the mechanisms of toxicity are still insufficiently understood. Here, we implemented a whole-genome expression microarray to identify pathways, gene networks and paralogous gene families responsive to Microcystis stress in Daphnia pulex. Therefore, neonates of a sensitive isolate were given a diet contaminated with Microcystis to contrast with those given a control diet for sixteen days. The microarray revealed 2247 differentially expressed (DE) genes (7.6% of the array) in response to Microcystis, of which 17% are lineage specific( i.e., these genes have no detectable homology to any other gene in currently available databases) and 49% are gene duplicates (paralogs). We identified four pathways/gene networks and eight paralogous gene families affected by Microcystis. Differential regulation of the ribosome, including 3 paralogous gene families encoding 40S, 60S and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, suggests an impact of Microcystis on protein synthesis of D. pulex. In addition, differential regulation of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway (including the NADH ubquinone oxidoreductase gene family) and the trypsin paralogous gene family (a major component of the digestive system in D. pulex) could explain why fitness is reduced based on energy budget considerations. PMID:22799445

  19. Evolutionary history and epigenetic regulation of the three paralogous pax7 genes in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Seiliez, Iban; Froehlich, Jacob Michael; Marandel, Lucie; Gabillard, Jean-Charles; Biga, Peggy R

    2015-03-01

    The extraordinary muscle growth potential of teleost fish, particular those of the Salmoninae clade, elicits questions about the regulation of the relatively highly conserved transcription factors of the myogenic program. The pseudotetraploid nature of the salmonid genome adds another layer of regulatory complexity that must be reconciled with epigenetic data to improve our understanding of the achievement of lifelong muscle growth in these fish. We identify three paralogous pax7 genes (pax7a1, pax7a2 and pax7b) in the rainbow trout genome. During in vitro myogenesis, pax7a1 transcripts remain stable, whereas pax7a2 and pax7b mRNAs increase in abundance, similarly to myogenin mRNAs but in contrast to the expression pattern of the mammalian ortholog. We also profile the distribution of repressive H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 and permissive H3K4me3 marks during in vitro myogenesis across these loci and find that pax7a2 expression is associated with decreased H3K27 trimethylation, whereas pax7b expression is correlated with decreased H3K9me3 and H3K27me3. These data link the unique differential expression of pax7 paralogs with epigenetic histone modifications in a vertebrate species displaying growth divergent from that of mammals and highlight an important divergence in the regulatory mechanisms of pax7 expression among vertebrates. The system described here provides a more comprehensive picture of the combinatorial control mechanisms orchestrating skeletal muscle growth in a salmonid, leading to a better understanding of myogenesis in this species and across Vertebrata more generally. PMID:25487404

  20. Evolutionary history and epigenetic regulation of the three paralogous pax7 genes in rainbow trout

    PubMed Central

    Seiliez, Iban; Froehlich, Jacob Michael; Marandel, Lucie; Gabillard, Jean-Charles; Biga, Peggy R.

    2015-01-01

    The extraordinary muscle growth potential of teleost fish, particular those of the Salmoninae clade, elicits questions about how the relatively highly conserved transcription factors of the myogenic program are regulated. In addition, the pseudotetraploid nature of the salmonid genome adds another layer of regulatory complexity, and this must be reconciled with epigenetic data to better understand how these fish achieve lifelong muscle growth. To this end, we identified three paralogous pax7 genes (pax7a1, pax7a2, and pax7b) in the rainbow trout genome. During in vitro myogenesis, pax7a1 transcripts remain stable, while pax7a2 and pax7b mRNAs increase in abundance, similarly to myogenin mRNAs and in contrast to the expression pattern of the mammalian ortholog. In addition, we profiled the distribution of repressive H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 and permissive H3K4me3 marks during in vitro myogenesis across these loci, finding that pax7a2 expression was associated with decreased H3K27 trimethylation, while pax7b expression was correlated with decreased H3K9me3 and −K27me3. Altogether, these data link the highly unique differential expression of pax7 paralogs with epigenetic histone modifications in a vertebrate species displaying growth divergent from that of mammals and highlight an important divergence in the regulatory mechanisms of pax7 expression among vertebrates. The system described here provides a more comprehensive picture of the combinatorial control mechanisms orchestrating skeletal muscle growth in a salmonid, leading to a better understanding of myogenesis in this species and across Vertebrata more generally. PMID:25487404

  1. Comparative analysis of Hox paralog group 2 gene expression during Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Le Pabic, Pierre; Stellwag, Edmund J; Brothers, Shelby N; Scemama, Jean-Luc

    2007-12-01

    The hindbrain and pharyngeal arch-derived structures of vertebrates are determined, at least in part, by Hox paralog group 2 genes. In sarcopterygians, the Hoxa2 gene alone appears to specify structures derived from the second pharyngeal arch (PA2), while in zebrafish (Danio rerio), either of the two Hox PG2 genes, hoxa2b or hoxb2a, can specify PA2-derived structures. We previously reported three Hox PG2 genes in striped bass (Morone saxatilis), including hoxa2a, hoxa2b, and hoxb2a and observed that only HoxA cluster genes are expressed in PA2, indicative that they function alone or together to specify PA2. In this paper, we present the cloning and expression analysis of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) Hox PG2 genes and show that all three genes are expressed in the hindbrain and in PA2. The expression of hoxb2a in PA2 was unexpected given the close phylogenetic relationship of Nile tilapia and striped bass, both of which are members of the order Perciformes. A reanalysis of striped bass hoxb2a expression demonstrated that it is expressed in PA2 with nearly the same temporal and spatial expression pattern as its Nile tilapia ortholog. Further, we determined that Nile tilapia and striped bass hoxa2a orthologs are expressed in PA2 well beyond the onset of chondrogenesis whereas neither hoxa2b nor hoxb2a expression persist until this stage, which, according to previous hypotheses, suggests that hoxa2a orthologs in these two species function alone as selector genes of PA2 identity. PMID:17924140

  2. Four paralogous protein 4.1 genes map to distinct chromosomes in mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Peters, L L; Weier, H U; Walensky, L D; Snyder, S H; Parra, M; Mohandas, N; Conboy, J G

    1998-12-01

    Four highly conserved members of the skeletal protein 4.1 gene family encode a diverse array of protein isoforms via tissue-specific transcription and developmentally regulated alternative pre-mRNA splicing. In addition to the prototypical red blood cell 4.1R (human gene symbol EPB41,) these include two homologues that are strongly expressed in the brain (4.1N, EPB41L1; and 4.1B, EPB41L3) and another that is widely expressed in many tissues (4.1G, EPB41L2). As part of a study on the structure and evolution of the 4.1 genes in human and mouse, we have now completed the chromosomal mapping of their respective loci by reporting the localization of mouse 4.1N, 4.1G, and 4.1B, as well as human 4.1B. For the mouse 4.1 genes, Southern blot analysis of RFLPs in The Jackson Laboratory BSS interspecific backcross yielded the following assignments: 4.1N (Epb4.1l1,) chromosome 2; 4.1G (Epb4.1l2,) chromosome 10; and 4.1B (Epb4.1l3,) mouse chromosome 17. Human 4.1B was physically mapped to chromosome 18p11 using fluorescence in situ hybridization. All of the mouse genes mapped within or adjacent to regions of conserved synteny with corresponding human chromosomes. We conclude that a set of four paralogous 4.1 genes has been evolutionarily conserved in rodents and primates. PMID:9828140

  3. Assessment of Complement C4 Gene Copy Number Using the Paralog Ratio Test

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Michelle M.A.; Boteva, Lora; Morris, David L.; Zhou, Bi; Wu, Yee Ling; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Yu, Chack Yung; Rioux, John D.; Hollox, Edward J.; Vyse, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    The complement C4 locus is in the class III region of the MHC, and exhibits copy number variation. Complement C4 null alleles have shown association with a number of diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, most studies to date have used protein immunophenotyping and not direct interrogation of the genome to determine C4 null allele status. Moreover, a lack of accurate C4 gene copy number (GCN) estimation and tight linkage disequilibrium across the disease-associated MHC haplotypes has confounded attempts to establish whether or not these associations are causal. We have therefore developed a high through-put paralog ratio test (PRT) in association with two restriction enzyme digest variant ratio tests (REDVRs) to determine total C4 GCN, C4A GCN, and C4B GCN. In the densely genotyped CEU cohort we show that this method is accurate and reproducible when compared to gold standard Southern blot copy number estimation with a discrepancy rate of 9%. We find a broad range of C4 GCNs in the CEU and the 1958 British Birth Cohort populations under study. In addition, SNP-C4 CNV analyses show only moderate levels of correlation and therefore do not support the use of SNP genotypes as proxies for complement C4 GCN. PMID:20506482

  4. Orthologs and paralogs of regA, a master cell-type regulatory gene in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Leonard; Nishii, Ichiro; Howard, Alicia; Kirk, David; Miller, Stephen M

    2006-07-01

    The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri forma nagariensis has only two cell types: terminally differentiated somatic cells and reproductive cells. The regA gene maintains the terminally differentiated state of the somatic cells, apparently by repressing transcription of genes required for chloroplast biogenesis and thereby preventing cell growth. Because the RegA protein sequence bore no obvious motifs, we are attempting to identify regions of functional importance by searching for strongly conserved domains in RegA orthologs. Here we report the cloning and characterization of regA from the most closely related known taxon, V. carteri f. kawasakiensis. Given the closeness of the relationship between these two formas, their regA genes are surprisingly different: they differ in the number of introns and by several lengthy indels, and they encode proteins that are only 80% identical. We also serendipitously discovered a paralogous gene immediately upstream of each regA locus. The two regA genes, both upstream paralogs and several genes in Chlamydomonas (the closest unicellular relative of Volvox) encode a conserved region (the VARL domain) that contains what appears to be a DNA-binding SAND domain. This discovery has opened up a new avenue for exploring how regA and the terminally differentiated state that it controls evolved. PMID:16622701

  5. [Fish growth-hormone genes: functionality evidence of paralogous genes in Levanidov's charr].

    PubMed

    Kamenskaya, D N; Pankova, M V; Atopkin, D M; Brykov, V A

    2015-01-01

    In the genome of most vertebrates growth-hormone gene is presented in a single copy, while in salmonids after one of the duplication events many genes were multiplied, including growth hormone gene. In salmonids, the growth-hormone gene exists as two independently inherited functional paralogues, gh1 and gh2. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of gh1 and gh2 growth-hormone genes and their adjacent sequences in Levanidov's charr Salvelinus levanidovi to determine their functionality and define the potential differences. We found that both genes have the same gene structure and are composed of six exons (I-VI) and five introns (A, B, C, D, E). However, the respective gene sequences differ in length. A comparison of exons showed that the size of each exon is identical in both paralogues. The overall length of genes differs due to the varying lengths of introns. Coding sequence of both genes contains an open reading frame for 210 amino acids. We identified regulatory elements in the promoter region of both genes: TATA box, A/T-rich regions that contain binding sites for pituitary-specific transcriptional activator Pit-1, and regions responsible for interaction with other transcriptional activators and initiators, in particular hormone receptors. The obtained data indicate that both genes are functional. PMID:26510594

  6. Amyrel, a paralogous gene of the amylase gene family in Drosophila melanogaster and the Sophophora subgenus

    PubMed Central

    Da Lage, Jean-Luc; Renard, Emmanuelle; Chartois, Frédérique; Lemeunier, Françoise; Cariou, Marie-Louise

    1998-01-01

    We describe a gene from Drosophila melanogaster related to the alpha-amylase gene Amy. This gene, which exists as a single copy, was named Amyrel. It is strikingly divergent from Amy because the amino acid divergence is 40%. The coding sequence is interrupted by a short intron at position 655, which is unusual in amylase genes. Amyrel has also been cloned in Drosophila ananassae, Drosophila pseudoobscura, and Drosophila subobscura and is likely to be present throughout the Sophophora subgenus, but, to our knowledge, it has not been detected outside. Unexpectedly, there is a strong conservation of 5′ and 3′ flanking regions between Amyrel genes from different species, which is not the case for Amy and which suggests that selection acts on these regions. In contrast to the Amy genes, Amyrel is transcribed in larvae of D. melanogaster but not in adults. However, the protein has not been detected yet. Amyrel evolves about twice as fast as Amy in the several species studied. We suggest that this gene could result from a duplication of Amy followed by accelerated and selected divergence toward a new adaptation. PMID:9618501

  7. All-or-(N)One - an epistemological characterization of the human tumorigenic neuronal paralogous FAM72 gene loci.

    PubMed

    Kutzner, Arne; Pramanik, Subrata; Kim, Pok-Son; Heese, Klaus

    2015-11-01

    FAM72 is a novel neuronal progenitor cell (NPC) self-renewal supporting protein expressed under physiological conditions at low levels in other tissues. Accumulating data indicate the potential pivotal tumourigenic effects of FAM72. Our in silico human genome-wide analysis (GWA) revealed that the FAM72 gene family consists of four human-specific paralogous members, all of which are located on chromosome (chr) 1. Unique asymmetric FAM72 segmental gene duplications are most likely to have occurred in conjunction with the paired genomic neighbour SRGAP2 (SLIT-ROBO Rho GTPase activating protein), as both genes have four paralogues in humans but only one vertebra-emerging orthologue in all other species. No species with two or three FAM72/SRGAP2 gene pairs could be identified, and the four exclusively human-defining ohnologues, with different mutation patterns in Homo neanderthalensis and Denisova hominin, may remain under epigenetic control through long non-coding (lnc) RNAs. PMID:26206078

  8. Did Androgen-Binding Protein Paralogs Undergo Neo- and/or Subfunctionalization as the Abp Gene Region Expanded in the Mouse Genome?

    PubMed Central

    Karn, Robert C.; Chung, Amanda G.; Laukaitis, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    The Androgen-binding protein (Abp) region of the mouse genome contains 30 Abpa genes encoding alpha subunits and 34 Abpbg genes encoding betagamma subunits, their products forming dimers composed of an alpha and a betagamma subunit. We endeavored to determine how many Abp genes are expressed as proteins in tears and saliva, and as transcripts in the exocrine glands producing them. Using standard PCR, we amplified Abp transcripts from cDNA libraries of C57BL/6 mice and found fifteen Abp gene transcripts in the lacrimal gland and five in the submandibular gland. Proteomic analyses identified proteins corresponding to eleven of the lacrimal gland transcripts, all of them different from the three salivary ABPs reported previously. Our qPCR results showed that five of the six transcripts that lacked corresponding proteins are expressed at very low levels compared to those transcripts with proteins. We found 1) no overlap in the repertoires of expressed Abp paralogs in lacrimal gland/tears and salivary glands/saliva; 2) substantial sex-limited expression of lacrimal gland/tear expressed-paralogs in males but no sex-limited expression in females; and 3) that the lacrimal gland/tear expressed-paralogs are found exclusively in ancestral clades 1, 2 and 3 of the five clades described previously while the salivary glands/saliva expressed-paralogs are found only in clade 5. The number of instances of extremely low levels of transcription without corresponding protein production in paralogs specific to tears and saliva suggested the role of subfunctionalization, a derived condition wherein genes that may have been expressed highly in both glands ancestrally were down-regulated subsequent to duplication. Thus, evidence for subfunctionalization can be seen in our data and we argue that the partitioning of paralog expression between lacrimal and salivary glands that we report here occurred as the result of adaptive evolution. PMID:25531410

  9. Orthopedia Transcription Factor otpa and otpb Paralogous Genes Function during Dopaminergic and Neuroendocrine Cell Specification in Larval Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, António M.; Beddows, Erin; Filippi, Alida; Driever, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor Orthopedia (Otp) is an important regulator for specification of defined subsets of neuroendocrine cells and dopaminergic neurons in vertebrates. In zebrafish, two paralogous otp genes, otpa and otpb, are present in the genome. Neither complete loss of Otp activity nor differential contributions of Otpa and Otpb to specification of defined neuronal populations have been analyzed in detail. We characterized zebrafish embryos and early larvae mutant for null alleles of otpa, otpb, or both genes to determine their individual contributions to the specification of th expressing dopaminergic neuronal populations as well as of crh, oxt, avp, trh or sst1.1 expressing neuroendocrine cells. otpa mutant larvae show an almost complete reduction of ventral diencephalic dopaminergic neurons, as reported previously. A small reduction in the number of trh cells in the preoptic region is detectable in otpa mutants, but no significant loss of crh, oxt and avp preoptic neuroendocrine cells. otpb single mutant larvae do not display a reduction in dopaminergic neurons or neuroendocrine cells in the otp expressing regions. In contrast, in otpa and otpb double mutant larvae specific groups of dopaminergic neurons as well as of crh, oxt, avp, trh and sst1.1-expressing neuroendocrine cells are completely lost. These observations suggest that the requirement for otpa and otpb function during development of the larval diencephalon is partially redundant. During evolutionary diversification of the paralogous otp genes, otpa maintained the prominent role in ventral diencephalic dopaminergic and neuroendocrine cell specification and is capable of partially compensating otpb loss of function. In addition, we identified a role of Otp in the development of a domain of somatostatin1-expressing cells in the rostral hindbrain, a region with strong otp expression but so far uncharacterized Otp function. Otp may thus be crucial for defined neuronal cell types also in

  10. Paralogs of Atlantic salmon myoblast determination factor genes are distinctly regulated in proliferating and differentiating myogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Bower, Neil I; Johnston, Ian A

    2010-06-01

    The mRNA expression of myogenic regulatory factors, including myoD1 (myoblast determination factor) gene paralogs, and their regulation by amino acids and insulin-like growth factors were investigated in primary cell cultures isolated from fast myotomal muscle of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). The cell cycle and S phase were determined as 28.1 and 13.3 h, respectively, at 18 degrees C. Expression of myoD1b and myoD1c peaked at 8 days of culture in the initial proliferation phase and then declined more than sixfold as cells differentiated and was correlated with PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) expression (R = 0.88, P < 0.0001; R = 0.70, P < 0.0001). In contrast, myoD1a transcripts increased from 2 to 8 days and remained at elevated levels as myotubes were formed. mRNA levels of myoD1c were, on average, 3.1- and 5.7-fold higher than myoD1a and myoD1b, respectively. Depriving cells of amino acids and serum led to a rapid increase in pax7 and a decrease in myoD1c and PCNA expression, indicating a transition to a quiescent state. In contrast, amino acid replacement in starved cells produced significant increases in myoD1c (at 6 h), PCNA (at 12 h), and myoD1b (at 24 h) and decreases in pax7 expression as cells entered the cell cycle. Our results are consistent with temporally distinct patterns of myoD1c and myoD1b expression at the G(1) and S/G(2) phases of the cell cycle. Treatment of starved cells with insulin-like growth factor I or II did not alter expression of the myoD paralogs. It was concluded that, in vitro, amino acids alone are sufficient to stimulate expression of genes regulating myogenesis in myoblasts involving autocrine/paracrine pathways. The differential responses of myoD paralogs during myotube maturation and amino acid treatments suggest that myoD1b and myoD1c are primarily expressed in proliferating cells and myoD1a in differentiating cells, providing evidence for their subfunctionalization following whole genome and local duplications in

  11. Evolution of plant RNA polymerase IV/V genes: evidence of subneofunctionalization of duplicated NRPD2/NRPE2-like paralogs in Viola (Violaceae)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background DNA-dependent RNA polymerase IV and V (Pol IV and V) are multi-subunit enzymes occurring in plants. The origin of Pol V, specific to angiosperms, from Pol IV, which is present in all land plants, is linked to the duplication of the gene encoding the largest subunit and the subsequent subneofunctionalization of the two paralogs (NRPD1 and NRPE1). Additional duplication of the second-largest subunit, NRPD2/NRPE2, has happened independently in at least some eudicot lineages, but its paralogs are often subject to concerted evolution and gene death and little is known about their evolution nor their affinity with Pol IV and Pol V. Results We sequenced a ~1500 bp NRPD2/E2-like fragment from 18 Viola species, mostly paleopolyploids, and 6 non-Viola Violaceae species. Incongruence between the NRPD2/E2-like gene phylogeny and species phylogeny indicates a first duplication of NRPD2 relatively basally in Violaceae, with subsequent sorting of paralogs in the descendants, followed by a second duplication in the common ancestor of Viola and Allexis. In Viola, the mutation pattern suggested (sub-) neofunctionalization of the two NRPD2/E2-like paralogs, NRPD2/E2-a and NRPD2/E2-b. The dN/dS ratios indicated that a 54 bp region exerted strong positive selection for both paralogs immediately following duplication. This 54 bp region encodes a domain that is involved in the binding of the Nrpd2 subunit with other Pol IV/V subunits, and may be important for correct recognition of subunits specific to Pol IV and Pol V. Across all Viola taxa 73 NRPD2/E2-like sequences were obtained, of which 23 (32%) were putative pseudogenes - all occurring in polyploids. The NRPD2 duplication was conserved in all lineages except the diploid MELVIO clade, in which NRPD2/E2-b was lost, and its allopolyploid derivates from hybridization with the CHAM clade, section Viola and section Melanium, in which NRPD2/E2-a occurred in multiple copies while NRPD2/E2-b paralogs were either absent or

  12. An Intronless β-amyrin Synthase Gene is More Efficient in Oleanolic Acid Accumulation than its Paralog in Gentiana straminea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanling; Zhao, Zhongjuan; Xue, Zheyong; Wang, Long; Cai, Yunfei; Wang, Peng; Wei, Tiandi; Gong, Jing; Liu, Zhenhua; Li, Juan; Li, Shuo; Xiang, Fengning

    2016-01-01

    Paralogous members of the oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) family encode a diversity of enzymes that are important in triterpenoid biosynthesis. This report describes the isolation of the Gentiana straminea gene GsAS2 that encodes a β-amyrin synthase (βAS) enzyme. Unlike its previously isolated paralog GsAS1, GsAS2 lacks introns. Its predicted protein product was is a 759 residue polypeptide that shares high homology with other known β-amyrin synthases (βASs). Heterologously expressed GsAS2 generates more β-amyrin in yeast than does GsAS1. Constitutive over-expression of GsAS2 resulted in a 5.7 fold increase in oleanolic acid accumulation, while over-expression of GsAS1 led to a 3 fold increase. Additionally, RNAi-directed suppression of GsAS2 and GsAS1 in G. straminea decreased oleonolic acid levels by 65.9% and 21% respectively, indicating that GsAS2 plays a more important role than GsAS1 in oleanolic acid biosynthesis in G. straminea. We uses a docking model to explore the catalytic mechanism of GsAS1/2 and predicted that GsAS2, with its Y560, have higher efficiency than GsAS1 and mutated versions of GsAS2 in β-amyrin produce. When the key residue in GsAS2 was mutagenized, it produced about 41.29% and 71.15% less β-amyrin than native, while the key residue in GsAS1 was mutagenized to that in GsAS2, the mutant produced 38.02% more β-amyrin than native GsAS1. PMID:27624821

  13. Functional Studies of Heading Date-Related Gene TaPRR73, a Paralog of Ppd1 in Common Wheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenping; Zhao, Guangyao; Gao, Lifeng; Kong, Xiuying; Guo, Zhiai; Wu, Bihua; Jia, Jizeng

    2016-01-01

    Photoperiod response-related genes play a crucial role in duration of the plant growth. In this study, we focused on TaPRR73, a paralog of "Green Revolution" gene Ppd1 (TaPRR37). We found that overexpression of the truncated TaPRR73 form lacking part of the N-terminal PR domain in transgenic rice promoted heading under long day conditions. Association analysis in common wheat verified that TaPRR73 was an important agronomic photoperiod response gene that significantly affected heading date and plant height; expression analysis proved that specific alleles of TaPRR73-A1 had highly expressed levels in earlier heading lines; the distribution of haplotypes indicated that one of these alleles had been selected in breeding programs. Our results demonstrated that TaPRR73 contributed to regulation of heading date in wheat and could be useful in wheat breeding and in broadening adaptation of the crop to new regions. PMID:27313595

  14. Functional Studies of Heading Date-Related Gene TaPRR73, a Paralog of Ppd1 in Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenping; Zhao, Guangyao; Gao, Lifeng; Kong, Xiuying; Guo, Zhiai; Wu, Bihua; Jia, Jizeng

    2016-01-01

    Photoperiod response-related genes play a crucial role in duration of the plant growth. In this study, we focused on TaPRR73, a paralog of “Green Revolution” gene Ppd1 (TaPRR37). We found that overexpression of the truncated TaPRR73 form lacking part of the N-terminal PR domain in transgenic rice promoted heading under long day conditions. Association analysis in common wheat verified that TaPRR73 was an important agronomic photoperiod response gene that significantly affected heading date and plant height; expression analysis proved that specific alleles of TaPRR73-A1 had highly expressed levels in earlier heading lines; the distribution of haplotypes indicated that one of these alleles had been selected in breeding programs. Our results demonstrated that TaPRR73 contributed to regulation of heading date in wheat and could be useful in wheat breeding and in broadening adaptation of the crop to new regions. PMID:27313595

  15. Gene Conversion and DNA Sequence Polymorphism in the Sex-Determination Gene fog-2 and Its Paralog ftr-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Rane, Hallie S.; Smith, Jessica M.; Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Katju, Vaishali

    2010-01-01

    Gene conversion, a form of concerted evolution, bears enormous potential to shape the trajectory of sequence and functional divergence of gene paralogs subsequent to duplication events. fog-2, a sex-determination gene unique to Caenorhabditis elegans and implicated in the origin of hermaphroditism in this species, resulted from the duplication of ftr-1, an upstream gene of unknown function. Synonymous sequence divergence in regions of fog-2 and ftr-1 (excluding recent gene conversion tracts) suggests that the duplication occurred 46 million generations ago. Gene conversion between fog-2 and ftr-1 was previously discovered in experimental fog-2 knockout lines of C. elegans, whereby hermaphroditism was restored in mutant obligately outcrossing male–female populations. We analyzed DNA-sequence variation in fog-2 and ftr-1 within 40 isolates of C. elegans from diverse geographic locations in order to evaluate the contribution of gene conversion to genetic variation in the two gene paralogs. The analysis shows that gene conversion contributes significantly to DNA-sequence diversity in fog-2 and ftr-1 (22% and 34%, respectively) and may have the potential to alter sexual phenotypes in natural populations. A radical amino acid change in a conserved region of the F-box domain of fog-2 was found in natural isolates of C. elegans with significantly lower fecundity. We hypothesize that the lowered fecundity is due to reduced masculinization and less sperm production and that amino acid replacement substitutions and gene conversion in fog-2 may contribute significantly to variation in the degree of inbreeding and outcrossing in natural populations. PMID:20133352

  16. Highly divergent 18S rRNA gene paralogs in a Cryptosporidium genotype from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus)1

    PubMed Central

    Stenger, Brianna L.S.; Clark, Mark E.; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W.; Dyer, Neil W.; Schultz, Jessie L.; McEvoy, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an apicomplexan parasite that causes the disease cryptosporidiosis in humans, livestock, and other vertebrates. Much of the knowledge on Cryptosporidium diversity is derived from 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) phylogenies. Eukaryote genomes generally have multiple 18S rDNA copies that evolve in concert, which is necessary for the accurate inference of phylogenetic relationships. However, 18S rDNA copies in some genomes evolve by a birth-and-death process that can result in sequence divergence among copies. Most notably, divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in the apicomplexan Plasmodium share only 89–95% sequence similarity, encode structurally distinct rRNA molecules, and are expressed at different life cycle stages. In the present study, Cryptosporidium 18S rDNA was amplified from 28/72 (38.9%) eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus). Phylogenetic analyses showed the co-occurrence of two 18S rDNA types, Type A and Type B, in 26 chipmunks, and Type B clustered with a sequence previously identified as Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Types A and B had a sister group relationship but shared less than 93% sequence similarity. In contrast, actin and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences were homogeneous in samples with both Types A and B present. It was therefore concluded that Types A and B are divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Substitution patterns in Types A and B were consistent with functionally constrained evolution; however, Type B evolved more rapidly than Type A and had a higher G+C content (46.3% versus 41.0%). Oocysts of Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II measured 4.17 μm (3.73–5.04 μm) × 3.94 μm (3.50–4.98 μm) with a length-to-width ratio of 1.06 ± 0.06 μm, and infection occurred naturally in the jejunum, cecum, and colon of eastern chipmunks. The findings of this study have implications for the use of 18S rDNA sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25772204

  17. Highly divergent 18S rRNA gene paralogs in a Cryptosporidium genotype from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus).

    PubMed

    Stenger, Brianna L S; Clark, Mark E; Kváč, Martin; Khan, Eakalak; Giddings, Catherine W; Dyer, Neil W; Schultz, Jessie L; McEvoy, John M

    2015-06-01

    Cryptosporidium is an apicomplexan parasite that causes the disease cryptosporidiosis in humans, livestock, and other vertebrates. Much of the knowledge on Cryptosporidium diversity is derived from 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) phylogenies. Eukaryote genomes generally have multiple 18S rDNA copies that evolve in concert, which is necessary for the accurate inference of phylogenetic relationships. However, 18S rDNA copies in some genomes evolve by a birth-and-death process that can result in sequence divergence among copies. Most notably, divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in the apicomplexan Plasmodium share only 89-95% sequence similarity, encode structurally distinct rRNA molecules, and are expressed at different life cycle stages. In the present study, Cryptosporidium 18S rDNA was amplified from 28/72 (38.9%) eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus). Phylogenetic analyses showed the co-occurrence of two 18S rDNA types, Type A and Type B, in 26 chipmunks, and Type B clustered with a sequence previously identified as Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Types A and B had a sister group relationship but shared less than 93% sequence similarity. In contrast, actin and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences were homogeneous in samples with both Types A and B present. It was therefore concluded that Types A and B are divergent 18S rDNA paralogs in Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II. Substitution patterns in Types A and B were consistent with functionally constrained evolution; however, Type B evolved more rapidly than Type A and had a higher G+C content (46.3% versus 41.0%). Oocysts of Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype II measured 4.17 μm (3.73-5.04 μm) × 3.94 μm (3.50-4.98 μm) with a length-to-width ratio of 1.06 ± 0.06 μm, and infection occurred naturally in the jejunum, cecum, and colon of eastern chipmunks. The findings of this study have implications for the use of 18S rDNA sequences to infer phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25772204

  18. Phylogeny and expression of paralogous and orthologous sulphate transporter genes in diploid and hexaploid wheats.

    PubMed

    Buchner, Peter; Prosser, Ian M; Hawkesford, Malcolm J

    2004-06-01

    Twelve genes encoding two closely related subtypes (ST1.1a and ST1.1b) of a sulphate transporter have been identified in the diploid wheats Aegilops tauschii, Triticum urartu, and Aegilops speltoides, as well as the hexaploid Triticum aestivum. Based on phylogenetic comparisons with other plant sulphate transporters, the ST1.1a and 1.1b subtypes aligned with group 1 of the plant sulphate transporter gene family. The exon-intron structure was conserved within the ST1.1a or ST1.1b genes; however, substantial variability in intron sequences existed between the two types. The high overall sequence similarity indicated that ST1.1b represented a duplication of the ST1.1a gene, which must have occurred before the evolution of the ancestral diploid wheat progenitor. In contrast with the close relationship of the T. urartu and Ae. tauschii sequences to the corresponding A and D genome sequences of T. aestivum, the divergence between the Ae. speltoides sequences and the B genome sequences suggested that the B genome ST1.1a gene has been modified by recombination. Transcript analysis revealed predominant expression of the ST1.1a type and an influence of sulphur availability on the level of expression. PMID:15190370

  19. Cloning and characterization of the promoter regions from the parent and paralogous creatine transporter genes.

    PubMed

    Ndika, Joseph D T; Lusink, Vera; Beaubrun, Claudine; Kanhai, Warsha; Martinez-Munoz, Cristina; Jakobs, Cornelis; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-01-10

    Interconversion between phosphocreatine and creatine, catalyzed by creatine kinase is crucial in the supply of ATP to tissues with high energy demand. Creatine's importance has been established by its use as an ergogenic aid in sport, as well as the development of intellectual disability in patients with congenital creatine deficiency. Creatine biosynthesis is complemented by dietary creatine uptake. Intracellular transport of creatine is carried out by a creatine transporter protein (CT1/CRT/CRTR) encoded by the SLC6A8 gene. Most tissues express this gene, with highest levels detected in skeletal muscle and kidney. There are lower levels of the gene detected in colon, brain, heart, testis and prostate. The mechanism(s) by which this regulation occurs is still poorly understood. A duplicated unprocessed pseudogene of SLC6A8-SLC6A10P has been mapped to chromosome 16p11.2 (contains the entire SLC6A8 gene, plus 2293 bp of 5'flanking sequence and its entire 3'UTR). Expression of SLC6A10P has so far only been shown in human testis and brain. It is still unclear as to what is the function of SLC6A10P. In a patient with autism, a chromosomal breakpoint that intersects the 5'flanking region of SLC6A10P was identified; suggesting that SLC6A10P is a non-coding RNA involved in autism. Our aim was to investigate the presence of cis-acting factor(s) that regulate expression of the creatine transporter, as well as to determine if these factors are functionally conserved upstream of the creatine transporter pseudogene. Via gene-specific PCR, cloning and functional luciferase assays we identified a 1104 bp sequence proximal to the mRNA start site of the SLC6A8 gene with promoter activity in five cell types. The corresponding 5'flanking sequence (1050 bp) on the pseudogene also had promoter activity in all 5 cell lines. Surprisingly the pseudogene promoter was stronger than that of its parent gene in 4 of the cell lines tested. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first

  20. Expression profile of IGF paralog genes in liver and muscle of a GH-transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nornberg, Bruna Felix; Figueiredo, Marcio Azevedo; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between IGFs produced in the liver and skeletal muscle with muscle hypertrophy previously observed in a line of GH-transgenic zebrafish. In this sense, we evaluated the expression of genes related to the IGF system in liver and muscle of transgenics, as well as the main intracellular signaling pathways used by GH/IGF axis. Our results showed an increase in expression of igf1a, igf2a, and igf2b genes in the liver. Moreover, there was a decrease in the expression of igf1ra and an increase in muscle igf2r of transgenics, indicating a negative response of muscle tissue with respect to excess circulating IGFs. Muscle IGFs expression analyses revealed a significant increase only for igf2b, accompanied by a parallel induction of igfbp5a gene. The presence of IGFBP5a may potentiate the IGF2 action in muscle cells differentiation. Regarding JAK/STAT-related genes, we observed an alteration in the expression profile of both stat3 and stat5a in transgenic fish liver. No changes were observed in the muscle, suggesting that both tissues respond differently to GH-transgenesis. Western blotting analyses indicated an imbalance between the phosphorylation levels of the proliferative (MEK/ERK) and hypertrophic (PI3K/Akt) pathways, in favor of the latter. In summary, the results of this study suggest that the hypertrophy caused by GH-transgenesis in zebrafish may be due to circulating IGFs produced by the liver, with an important participation of muscle IGF2b. This group of IGFs appears to be favoring the hypertrophic intracellular pathway in muscle tissue of transgenic zebrafish. PMID:26718079

  1. Characterization of two paralogous StAR genes in a teleost, Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiangguo; Wu, Limin; Xie, Lang; Yang, Shijie; Charkraborty, Tapas; Shi, Hongjuan; Wang, Deshou; Zhou, Linyan

    2014-07-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transports cholesterol, the substrate for steroid synthesis, to the inner membranes of mitochondria. It is well known that estrogen is essential for female sex determination/differentiation in fish. However, no reports showed that the conventional StAR, which was supposed to be essential for estrogen production, was expressed in female gonads during the critical timing of sex determination/differentiation. In this study, two different StAR isoforms, named as StAR1 and StAR2, were characterized from the gonads of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). Phylogenetic and synteny analysis revealed that two StAR genes existed in teleosts, Xenopus and chicken indicating that the duplication event occurred before the divergence of teleosts and tetrapods. Real-time PCR revealed that StAR1 was dominantly expressed in the testis, head kidney and kidney; while StAR2 was expressed exclusively in the gonads. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that StAR1 was expressed in the interrenal cells of the head kidney and Leydig cells of the testis; while StAR2 was expressed in the Leydig cells of the testis and the interstitial cells of the ovary. Ontogenic analysis demonstrated that StAR2 was expressed abundantly from 5 days after hatching (dah) in the somatic cells in XX gonads, whereas in XY gonads, both StARs could be detected from 30 dah until adulthood. Intraperitoneal injection of human chorionic gonadotropin experiments showed that expression of StAR1 and 2 was significantly elevated at 8h and persisted until 24h after injection in the testis. Taken together, our data suggested that StAR1 is likely to be required for cortisol production in the head kidney, and StAR2 is probably involved in estrogen production during early sex differentiation in XX gonads. In contrast, both StARs might be required for androgen production in testes. For the first time, our data demonstrated that two fish StARs might be involved

  2. Functional Diversification after Gene Duplication: Paralog Specific Regions of Structural Disorder and Phosphorylation in p53, p63, and p73

    PubMed Central

    Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Conformational and functional flexibility promote protein evolvability. High evolvability allows related proteins to functionally diverge and perhaps to neostructuralize. p53 is a multifunctional protein frequently referred to as the Guardian of the Genome–a hub for e.g. incoming and outgoing signals in apoptosis and DNA repair. p53 has been found to be structurally disordered, an extreme form of conformational flexibility. Here, p53, and its paralogs p63 and p73, were studied for further insights into the evolutionary dynamics of structural disorder, secondary structure, and phosphorylation. This study is focused on the post gene duplication phase for the p53 family in vertebrates, but also visits the origin of the protein family and the early domain loss and gain events. Functional divergence, measured by rapid evolutionary dynamics of protein domains, structural properties, and phosphorylation propensity, is inferred across vertebrate p53 proteins, in p63 and p73 from fish, and between the three paralogs. In particular, structurally disordered regions are redistributed among paralogs, but within clades redistribution of structural disorder also appears to be an ongoing process. Despite its deemed importance as the Guardian of the Genome, p53 is indeed a protein with high evolvability as seen not only in rearranged structural disorder, but also in fluctuating domain sequence signatures among lineages. PMID:27003913

  3. Positive Selection and Functional Divergence of R2R3-MYB Paralogous Genes Expressed in Inflorescence Buds of Scutellaria Species (Labiatae)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bing-Hong; Pang, Erli; Chen, Yi-Wen; Cao, Huifen; Ruan, Yu; Liao, Pei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanin is the main pigment forming floral diversity. Several transcription factors that regulate the expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes belong to the R2R3-MYB family. Here we examined the transcriptomes of inflorescence buds of Scutellaria species (skullcaps), identified the expression R2R3-MYBs, and detected the genetic signatures of positive selection for adaptive divergence across the rapidly evolving skullcaps. In the inflorescence buds, seven R2R3-MYBs were identified. MYB11 and MYB16 were detected to be positively selected. The signature of positive selection on MYB genes indicated that species diversification could be affected by transcriptional regulation, rather than at the translational level. When comparing among the background lineages of Arabidopsis, tomato, rice, and Amborella, heterogeneous evolutionary rates were detected among MYB paralogs, especially between MYB13 and MYB19. Significantly different evolutionary rates were also evidenced by type-I functional divergence between MYB13 and MYB19, and the accelerated evolutionary rates in MYB19, implied the acquisition of novel functions. Another paralogous pair, MYB2/7 and MYB11, revealed significant radical amino acid changes, indicating divergence in the regulation of different anthocyanin-biosynthetic enzymes. Our findings not only showed that Scutellaria R2R3-MYBs are functionally divergent and positively selected, but also indicated the adaptive relevance of regulatory genes in floral diversification. PMID:25782156

  4. Positive selection and functional divergence of R2R3-MYB paralogous genes expressed in inflorescence buds of Scutellaria species (Labiatae).

    PubMed

    Huang, Bing-Hong; Pang, Erli; Chen, Yi-Wen; Cao, Huifen; Ruan, Yu; Liao, Pei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanin is the main pigment forming floral diversity. Several transcription factors that regulate the expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes belong to the R2R3-MYB family. Here we examined the transcriptomes of inflorescence buds of Scutellaria species (skullcaps), identified the expression R2R3-MYBs, and detected the genetic signatures of positive selection for adaptive divergence across the rapidly evolving skullcaps. In the inflorescence buds, seven R2R3-MYBs were identified. MYB11 and MYB16 were detected to be positively selected. The signature of positive selection on MYB genes indicated that species diversification could be affected by transcriptional regulation, rather than at the translational level. When comparing among the background lineages of Arabidopsis, tomato, rice, and Amborella, heterogeneous evolutionary rates were detected among MYB paralogs, especially between MYB13 and MYB19. Significantly different evolutionary rates were also evidenced by type-I functional divergence between MYB13 and MYB19, and the accelerated evolutionary rates in MYB19, implied the acquisition of novel functions. Another paralogous pair, MYB2/7 and MYB11, revealed significant radical amino acid changes, indicating divergence in the regulation of different anthocyanin-biosynthetic enzymes. Our findings not only showed that Scutellaria R2R3-MYBs are functionally divergent and positively selected, but also indicated the adaptive relevance of regulatory genes in floral diversification. PMID:25782156

  5. Are solar UV-B- and UV-A-dependent gene expression and metabolite accumulation in Arabidopsis mediated by the stress response regulator RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1?

    PubMed

    Morales, Luis O; Brosché, Mikael; Vainonen, Julia P; Sipari, Nina; Lindfors, Anders V; Strid, Åke; Aphalo, Pedro J

    2015-05-01

    Wavelengths in the ultraviolet (UV) region of the solar spectrum, UV-B (280-315 nm) and UV-A (315-400 nm), are key environmental signals modifying several aspects of plant physiology. Despite significant advances in the understanding of plant responses to UV-B and the identification of signalling components involved, there is limited information on the molecular mechanisms that control UV-B signalling in plants under natural sunlight. Here, we aimed to corroborate the previous suggested role for RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) in UV-B signalling under full spectrum sunlight. Wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana and the rcd1-1 mutant were used in an experimental design outdoors where UV-B and UV-A irradiances were manipulated using plastic films, and gene expression, PYRIDOXINE BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PDX1) accumulation and metabolite profiles were analysed in the leaves. At the level of transcription, RCD1 was not directly involved in the solar UV-B regulation of genes with functions in UV acclimation, hormone signalling and stress-related markers. Furthermore, RCD1 had no role on PDX1 accumulation but modulated the UV-B induction of flavonoid accumulation in leaves of Arabidopsis exposed to solar UV. We conclude that RCD1 does not play an active role in UV-B signalling but rather modulates UV-B responses under full spectrum sunlight. PMID:24689869

  6. Zinc Finger Domain of the PRDM9 Gene on Chromosome 1 Exhibits High Diversity in Ruminants but Its Paralog PRDM7 Contains Multiple Disruptive Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ahlawat, Sonika; Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Rekha; Arora, Reena; De, Sachinandan

    2016-01-01

    PRDM9 is the sole hybrid sterility gene identified so far in vertebrates. PRDM9 gene encodes a protein with an immensely variable zinc-finger (ZF) domain that determines the site of meiotic recombination hotspots genome-wide. In this study, the terminal ZF domain of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 1 and its paralog on chromosome 22 were characterized in 225 samples from five ruminant species (cattle, yak, mithun, sheep and goat). We found extraordinary variation in the number of PRDM9 zinc fingers (6 to 12). We sequenced PRDM9 ZF encoding region from 15 individuals (carrying the same ZF number in both copies) and found 43 different ZF domain sequences. Ruminant zinc fingers of PRDM9 were found to be diversifying under positive selection and concerted evolution, specifically at positions involved in defining their DNA-binding specificity, consistent with the reports from other vertebrates such as mice, humans, equids and chimpanzees. ZF-encoding regions of the PRDM7, a paralog of PRDM9 on bovine chromosome 22 and on unknown chromosomes in other studied species were found to contain 84 base repeat units as in PRDM9, but there were multiple disruptive mutations after the first repeat unit. The diversity of the ZFs suggests that PRDM9 may activate recombination hotspots that are largely unique to each ruminant species. PMID:27203728

  7. Evolution of the Actin Gene Family in Testate Lobose Amoebae (Arcellinida) is Characterized by Two Distinct Clades of Paralogs and Recent Independent Expansions

    PubMed Central

    Lahr, Daniel J. G.; Nguyen, Truc B.; Barbero, Erika; Katz, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of actin gene families is characterized by independent expansions and contractions across the eukaryotic tree of life. Here, we assess diversity of actin gene sequences within three lineages of the genus Arcella, a free-living testate (shelled) amoeba in the Arcellinida. We established four clonal lines of two morphospecies, Arcella hemisphaerica and A. vulgaris, and assessed their phylogenetic relationship within the “Amoebozoa” using small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU-rDNA) genealogy. We determined that the two lines of A. hemisphaerica are identical in SSU-rDNA, while the two A. vulgaris are independent genetic lineages. Furthermore, we characterized multiple actin gene copies from all lineages. Analyses of the resulting sequences reveal numerous diverse actin genes, which differ mostly by synonymous substitutions. We estimate that the actin gene family contains 40–50 paralogous members in each lineage. None of the three independent lineages share the same paralog with another, and divergence between actins reaches 29% in contrast to just 2% in SSU-rDNA. Analyses of effective number of codons (ENC), compositional bias, recombination signatures, and genetic diversity in the context of a gene tree indicate that there are two groups of actins evolving with distinct patterns of molecular evolution. Within these groups, there have been multiple independent expansions of actin genes within each lineage. Together, these data suggest that the two groups are located in different regions of the Arcella genome. Furthermore, we compare the Arcella actin gene family with the relatively well-described gene family in the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum and other members of the Amoebozoa clade. Overall patterns of molecular evolution are similar in Arcella and Dictyostelium. However, the separation of genes in two distinct groups coupled with recent expansion is characteristic of Arcella and might reflect an unusual pattern of gene family evolution in the

  8. Evolution of the actin gene family in testate lobose amoebae (Arcellinida) is characterized by two distinct clades of paralogs and recent independent expansions.

    PubMed

    Lahr, Daniel J G; Nguyen, Truc B; Barbero, Erika; Katz, Laura A

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of actin gene families is characterized by independent expansions and contractions across the eukaryotic tree of life. Here, we assess diversity of actin gene sequences within three lineages of the genus Arcella, a free-living testate (shelled) amoeba in the Arcellinida. We established four clonal lines of two morphospecies, Arcella hemisphaerica and A. vulgaris, and assessed their phylogenetic relationship within the "Amoebozoa" using small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU-rDNA) genealogy. We determined that the two lines of A. hemisphaerica are identical in SSU-rDNA, while the two A. vulgaris are independent genetic lineages. Furthermore, we characterized multiple actin gene copies from all lineages. Analyses of the resulting sequences reveal numerous diverse actin genes, which differ mostly by synonymous substitutions. We estimate that the actin gene family contains 40-50 paralogous members in each lineage. None of the three independent lineages share the same paralog with another, and divergence between actins reaches 29% in contrast to just 2% in SSU-rDNA. Analyses of effective number of codons (ENC), compositional bias, recombination signatures, and genetic diversity in the context of a gene tree indicate that there are two groups of actins evolving with distinct patterns of molecular evolution. Within these groups, there have been multiple independent expansions of actin genes within each lineage. Together, these data suggest that the two groups are located in different regions of the Arcella genome. Furthermore, we compare the Arcella actin gene family with the relatively well-described gene family in the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum and other members of the Amoebozoa clade. Overall patterns of molecular evolution are similar in Arcella and Dictyostelium. However, the separation of genes in two distinct groups coupled with recent expansion is characteristic of Arcella and might reflect an unusual pattern of gene family evolution in the lobose

  9. Genome-Wide Analysis of PHOSPHOLIPID:DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE (PDAT) Genes in Plants Reveals the Eudicot-Wide PDAT Gene Expansion and Altered Selective Pressures Acting on the Core Eudicot PDAT Paralogs1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xue; Peng, Fred Y.; Weselake, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    PHOSPHOLIPID:DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE (PDAT) is an enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a fatty acyl moiety from the sn-2 position of a phospholipid to the sn-3-position of sn-1,2-diacylglyerol, thus forming triacylglycerol and a lysophospholipid. Although the importance of PDAT in triacylglycerol biosynthesis has been illustrated in some previous studies, the evolutionary relationship of plant PDATs has not been studied in detail. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary relationship of the PDAT gene family across the green plants using a comparative phylogenetic framework. We found that the PDAT candidate genes are present in all examined green plants, including algae, lowland plants (a moss and a lycophyte), monocots, and eudicots. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the evolutionary division of the PDAT gene family into seven major clades. The separation is supported by the conservation and variation in the gene structure, protein properties, motif patterns, and/or selection constraints. We further demonstrated that there is a eudicot-wide PDAT gene expansion, which appears to have been mainly caused by the eudicot-shared ancient gene duplication and subsequent species-specific segmental duplications. In addition, selection pressure analyses showed that different selection constraints have acted on three core eudicot clades, which might enable paleoduplicated PDAT paralogs to either become nonfunctionalized or develop divergent expression patterns during evolution. Overall, our study provides important insights into the evolution of the plant PDAT gene family and explores the evolutionary mechanism underlying the functional diversification among the core eudicot PDAT paralogs. PMID:25585619

  10. Expression of paralogous SEP-, FUL-, AG- and STK-like MADS-box genes in wild-type and peloric Phalaenopsis flowers

    PubMed Central

    Acri-Nunes-Miranda, Roberta; Mondragón-Palomino, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    The diverse flowers of Orchidaceae are the result of several major morphological transitions, among them the most studied is the differentiation of the inner median tepal into the labellum, a perianth organ key in pollinator attraction. Type A peloria lacking stamens and with ectopic labella in place of inner lateral tepals are useful for testing models on the genes specifying these organs by comparing their patterns of expression between wild-type and peloric flowers. Previous studies focused on DEFICIENS- and GLOBOSA-like MADS-box genes because of their conserved role in perianth and stamen development. The “orchid code” model summarizes this work and shows in Orchidaceae there are four paralogous lineages of DEFICIENS/AP3-like genes differentially expressed in each floral whorl. Experimental tests of this model showed the conserved, higher expression of genes from two specific DEF-like gene lineages is associated with labellum development. The present study tests whether eight MADS-box candidate SEP-, FUL-, AG-, and STK-like genes have been specifically duplicated in the Orchidaceae and are also differentially expressed in association with the distinct flower organs of Phalaenopsis hyb. “Athens.” The gene trees indicate orchid-specific duplications. In a way analogous to what is observed in labellum-specific DEF-like genes, a two-fold increase in the expression of SEP3-like gene PhaMADS7 was measured in the labellum-like inner lateral tepals of peloric flowers. The overlap between SEP3-like and DEF-like genes suggests both are associated with labellum specification and similar positional cues determine their domains of expression. In contrast, the uniform messenger levels of FUL-like genes suggest they are involved in the development of all organs and their expression in the ovary suggests cell differentiation starts before pollination. As previously reported AG-like and STK-like genes are exclusively expressed in gynostemium and ovary, however no

  11. CHD5, a Brain-Specific Paralog of Mi2 Chromatin Remodeling Enzymes, Regulates Expression of Neuronal Genes

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Rebecca Casaday; Zhang, Peisu; Wurster, Andrea L.; Precht, Patricia; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Wood, William H.; Zhang, Yonqing; Becker, Kevin G.; Mattson, Mark P.; Pazin, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    CHD5 is frequently deleted in neuroblastoma and is a tumor suppressor gene. However, little is known about the role of CHD5 other than it is homologous to chromatin remodeling ATPases. We found CHD5 mRNA was restricted to the brain; by contrast, most remodeling ATPases were broadly expressed. CHD5 protein isolated from mouse brain was associated with HDAC2, p66ß, MTA3 and RbAp46 in a megadalton complex. CHD5 protein was detected in several rat brain regions and appeared to be enriched in neurons. CHD5 protein was predominantly nuclear in primary rat neurons and brain sections. Microarray analysis revealed genes that were upregulated and downregulated when CHD5 was depleted from primary neurons. CHD5 depletion altered expression of neuronal genes, transcription factors, and brain-specific subunits of the SWI/SNF remodeling enzyme. Expression of gene sets linked to aging and Alzheimer's disease were strongly altered by CHD5 depletion from primary neurons. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed CHD5 bound to these genes, suggesting the regulation was direct. Together, these results indicate that CHD5 protein is found in a NuRD-like multi-protein complex. CHD5 expression is restricted to the brain, unlike the closely related family members CHD3 and CHD4. CHD5 regulates expression of neuronal genes, cell cycle genes and remodeling genes. CHD5 is linked to regulation of genes implicated in aging and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:21931736

  12. Regulation of Aerobic Energy Metabolism in Podospora anserina by Two Paralogous Genes Encoding Structurally Different c-Subunits of ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sellem, Carole H.; di Rago, Jean-Paul; Lasserre, Jean-Paul; Ackerman, Sharon H.; Sainsard-Chanet, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Most of the ATP in living cells is produced by an F-type ATP synthase. This enzyme uses the energy of a transmembrane electrochemical proton gradient to synthesize ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate. Proton movements across the membrane domain (FO) of the ATP synthase drive the rotation of a ring of 8–15 c-subunits, which induces conformational changes in the catalytic part (F1) of the enzyme that ultimately promote ATP synthesis. Two paralogous nuclear genes, called Atp9-5 and Atp9-7, encode structurally different c-subunits in the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina. We have in this study identified differences in the expression pattern for the two genes that correlate with the mitotic activity of cells in vegetative mycelia: Atp9-7 is transcriptionally active in non-proliferating (stationary) cells while Atp9-5 is expressed in the cells at the extremity (apex) of filaments that divide and are responsible for mycelium growth. When active, the Atp9-5 gene sustains a much higher rate of c-subunit synthesis than Atp9-7. We further show that the ATP9-7 and ATP9-5 proteins have antagonist effects on the longevity of P. anserina. Finally, we provide evidence that the ATP9-5 protein sustains a higher rate of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and yield in ATP molecules per electron transferred to oxygen than the c-subunit encoded by Atp9-7. These findings reveal that the c-subunit genes play a key role in the modulation of ATP synthase production and activity along the life cycle of P. anserina. Such a degree of sophistication for regulating aerobic energy metabolism has not been described before. PMID:27442014

  13. Similar but not the same: insights into the evolutionary history of paralogous sex-determining genes of the dwarf honey bee Apis florea.

    PubMed

    Biewer, M; Lechner, S; Hasselmann, M

    2016-01-01

    Studying the fate of duplicated genes provides informative insight into the evolutionary plasticity of biological pathways to which they belong. In the paralogous sex-determining genes complementary sex determiner (csd) and feminizer (fem) of honey bee species (genus Apis), only heterozygous csd initiates female development. Here, the full-length coding sequences of the genes csd and fem of the phylogenetically basal dwarf honey bee Apis florea are characterized. Compared with other Apis species, remarkable evolutionary changes in the formation and localization of a protein-interacting (coiled-coil) motif and in the amino acids coding for the csd characteristic hypervariable region (HVR) are observed. Furthermore, functionally different csd alleles were isolated as genomic fragments from a random population sample. In the predicted potential specifying domain (PSD), a high ratio of πN/πS=1.6 indicated positive selection, whereas signs of balancing selection, commonly found in other Apis species, are missing. Low nucleotide diversity on synonymous and genome-wide, non-coding sites as well as site frequency analyses indicated a strong impact of genetic drift in A. florea, likely linked to its biology. Along the evolutionary trajectory of ~30 million years of csd evolution, episodic diversifying selection seems to have acted differently among distinct Apis branches. Consistently low amino-acid differences within the PSD among pairs of functional heterozygous csd alleles indicate that the HVR is the most important region for determining allele specificity. We propose that in the early history of the lineage-specific fem duplication giving rise to csd in Apis, A. florea csd stands as a remarkable example for the plasticity of initial sex-determining signals. PMID:26153222

  14. Functional Evolution of a Multigene Family: Orthologous and Paralogous Pheromone Receptor Genes in the Turnip Moth, Agrotis segetum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan-Dan; Löfstedt, Christer

    2013-01-01

    Lepidopteran pheromone receptors (PRs), for which orthologies are evident among closely related species, provide an intriguing example of gene family evolution in terms of how new functions may arise. However, only a limited number of PRs have been functionally characterized so far and thus evolutionary scenarios suffer from elements of speculation. In this study we investigated the turnip moth Agrotis segetum, in which female moths produce a mixture of chemically related pheromone components that elicit specific responses from receptor cells on male antennae. We cloned nine A. segetum PR genes and the Orco gene by degenerate primer based RT-PCR. The nine PR genes, named as AsegOR1 and AsegOR3-10, fall into four distinct orthologous clusters of known lepidopteran PRs, of which one contains six paralogues. The paralogues are under relaxed selective pressure, contrasting with the purifying selection on other clusters. We identified the receptors AsegOR9, AsegOR4 and AsegOR5, specific for the respective homologous pheromone components (Z)-5-decenyl, (Z)-7-dodecenyl and (Z)-9-tetradecenyl acetates, by two-electrode voltage clamp recording from Xenopus laevis oocytes co-expressing Orco and each PR candidate. These receptors occur in three different orthologous clusters. We also found that the six paralogues with high sequence similarity vary dramatically in ligand selectivity and sensitivity. Different from AsegOR9, AsegOR6 showed a relatively large response to the behavioural antagonist (Z)-5-decenol, and a small response to (Z)-5-decenyl acetate. AsegOR1 was broadly tuned, but most responsive to (Z)-5-decenyl acetate, (Z)-7-dodecenyl acetate and the behavioural antagonist (Z)-8-dodecenyl acetate. AsegOR8 and AsegOR7, which differ from AsegOR6 and AsegOR1 by 7 and 10 aa respectively, showed much lower sensitivities. AsegOR10 showed only small responses to all the tested compounds. These results suggest that new receptors arise through gene duplication, and relaxed

  15. Expression of the mouse MHC class Ib H2-T11 gene product, a paralog of H2-T23 (Qa-1) with shared peptide-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Reyes-Vargas, Eduardo; Dai, Hu; Escobar, Hernando; Rudd, Brant; Fairbanks, Jared; Ho, Alexander; Cusick, Mathew F; Kumánovics, Attila; Delgado, Julio; He, Xiao; Jensen, Peter E

    2014-08-01

    The mouse MHC class Ib gene H2-T11 is 95% identical at the DNA level to H2-T23, which encodes Qa-1, one of the most studied MHC class Ib molecules. H2-T11 mRNA was observed to be expressed widely in tissues of C57BL/6 mice, with the highest levels in thymus. To circumvent the availability of a specific mAb, cells were transduced with cDNA encoding T11 with a substituted α3 domain. Hybrid T11D3 protein was expressed at high levels similar to control T23D3 molecules on the surface of both TAP(+) and TAP(-) cells. Soluble T11D3 was generated by folding in vitro with Qa-1 determinant modifier, the dominant peptide presented by Qa-1. The circular dichroism spectrum of this protein was similar to that of other MHC class I molecules, and it was observed to bind labeled Qa-1 determinant modifier peptide with rapid kinetics. By contrast to the Qa-1 control, T11 tetramers did not react with cells expressing CD94/NKG2A, supporting the conclusion that T11 cannot replace Qa-1 as a ligand for NK cell inhibitory receptors. T11 also failed to substitute for Qa-1 in the presentation of insulin to a Qa-1-restricted T cell hybridoma. Despite divergent function, T11 was observed to share peptide-loading specificity with Qa-1. Direct analysis by tandem mass spectrometry of peptides eluted from T11D3 and T23D3 isolated from Hela cells demonstrated a diversity of peptides with a clear motif that was shared between the two molecules. Thus, T11 is a paralog of T23 encoding an MHC class Ib molecule that shares peptide-binding specificity with Qa-1 but differs in function. PMID:24958902

  16. Hox Paralog Group 2 Genes Control the Migration of Mouse Pontine Neurons through Slit-Robo Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualetti, Massimo; Ducret, Sebastien; Brunet, Jean-François; Chedotal, Alain; Rijli, Filippo M

    2008-01-01

    The pontine neurons (PN) represent a major source of mossy fiber projections to the cerebellum. During mouse hindbrain development, PN migrate tangentially and sequentially along both the anteroposterior (AP) and dorsoventral (DV) axes. Unlike DV migration, which is controlled by the Netrin-1/Dcc attractive pathway, little is known about the molecular mechanisms guiding PN migration along the AP axis. Here, we show that Hoxa2 and Hoxb2 are required both intrinsically and extrinsically to maintain normal AP migration of subsets of PN, by preventing their premature ventral attraction towards the midline. Moreover, the migration defects observed in Hoxa2 and Hoxb2 mutant mice were phenocopied in compound Robo1;Robo2, Slit1;Slit2, and Robo2;Slit2 knockout animals, indicating that these guidance molecules act downstream of Hox genes to control PN migration. Indeed, using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we further demonstrated that Robo2 is a direct target of Hoxa2 in vivo and that maintenance of high Robo and Slit expression levels was impaired in Hoxa2 mutant mice. Lastly, the analysis of Phox2b-deficient mice indicated that the facial motor nucleus is a major Slit signaling source required to prevent premature ventral migration of PN. These findings provide novel insights into the molecular control of neuronal migration from transcription factor to regulation of guidance receptor and ligand expression. Specifically, they address the question of how exposure to multiple guidance cues along the AP and DV axes is regulated at the transcriptional level and in turn translated into stereotyped migratory responses during tangential migration of neurons in the developing mammalian brain. PMID:18547144

  17. Ancestral paralogs and pseudoparalogs and their role in the emergence of the eukaryotic cell

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Kira S.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Mekhedov, Sergey L.; Mirkin, Boris G.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2005-01-01

    Gene duplication is a crucial mechanism of evolutionary innovation. A substantial fraction of eukaryotic genomes consists of paralogous gene families. We assess the extent of ancestral paralogy, which dates back to the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes, and examine the origins of the ancestral paralogs and their potential roles in the emergence of the eukaryotic cell complexity. A parsimonious reconstruction of ancestral gene repertoires shows that 4137 orthologous gene sets in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) map back to 2150 orthologous sets in the hypothetical first eukaryotic common ancestor (FECA) [paralogy quotient (PQ) of 1.92]. Analogous reconstructions show significantly lower levels of paralogy in prokaryotes, 1.19 for archaea and 1.25 for bacteria. The only functional class of eukaryotic proteins with a significant excess of paralogous clusters over the mean includes molecular chaperones and proteins with related functions. Almost all genes in this category underwent multiple duplications during early eukaryotic evolution. In structural terms, the most prominent sets of paralogs are superstructure-forming proteins with repetitive domains, such as WD-40 and TPR. In addition to the true ancestral paralogs which evolved via duplication at the onset of eukaryotic evolution, numerous pseudoparalogs were detected, i.e. homologous genes that apparently were acquired by early eukaryotes via different routes, including horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from diverse bacteria. The results of this study demonstrate a major increase in the level of gene paralogy as a hallmark of the early evolution of eukaryotes. PMID:16106042

  18. Identification and functional analysis of light-responsive unique or paralogous gene family members in rice using a near genomic gene microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using a NSF45K-gene-microarray, we performed expression-profiling experiments on 2-week-old light- and dark-grown rice leaf tissue to identify mutants of light-responsive genes. We identified 356 genes that were at least 8-fold light induced genes at FDR of 1.00E-06. Then, we screened rice T-DNA i...

  19. Isoform-Level Gene Expression Profiles of Human Y Chromosome Azoospermia Factor Genes and Their X Chromosome Paralogs in the Testicular Tissue of Non-Obstructive Azoospermia Patients.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi Rastegar, Diba; Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Alikhani, Mehdi; Parsamatin, Pouria; Sahraneshin Samani, Fazel; Sabbaghian, Marjan; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Mohammad Ahadi, Ali; Mohseni Meybodi, Anahita; Piryaei, Abbas; Ansari-Pour, Naser; Gourabi, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2015-09-01

    The human Y chromosome has an inevitable role in male fertility because it contains many genes critical for spermatogenesis and the development of the male gonads. Any genetic variation or epigenetic modification affecting the expression pattern of Y chromosome genes may thus lead to male infertility. In this study, we performed isoform-level gene expression profiling of Y chromosome genes within the azoospermia factor (AZF) regions, their X chromosome counterparts, and few autosomal paralogues in testicular biopsies of 12 men with preserved spermatogenesis and 68 men with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) (40 Sertoli-cell-only syndrome (SCOS) and 28 premiotic maturation arrest (MA)). This was undertaken using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) at the transcript level and Western blotting (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) at the protein level. We profiled the expression of 41 alternative transcripts encoded by 14 AZFa, AZFb, and AZFc region genes (USP9Y, DDX3Y, XKRY, HSFY1, CYORF15A, CYORF15B, KDM5D, EIF1AY, RPS4Y2, RBMY1A1, PRY, BPY2, DAZ1, and CDY1) as well as their X chromosome homologue transcripts and a few autosomal homologues. Of the 41 transcripts, 18 were significantly down-regulated in men with NOA when compared with those of men with complete spermatogenesis. In contrast, the expression of five transcripts increased significantly in NOA patients. Furthermore, to confirm the qPCR results at the protein level, we performed immunoblotting and IHC experiments (based on 24 commercial and homemade antibodies) that detected 10 AZF-encoded proteins. In addition, their localization in testis cell types and organelles was determined. Interestingly, the two missing proteins, XKRY and CYORF15A, were detected for the first time. Finally, we focused on the expression patterns of the significantly altered genes in 12 MA patients with successful sperm retrieval compared to those of 12 MA patients with failed sperm retrieval to predict the success of sperm retrieval in

  20. Gains and Losses of Cis-regulatory Elements Led to Divergence of the Arabidopsis APETALA1 and CAULIFLOWER Duplicate Genes in the Time, Space, and Level of Expression and Regulation of One Paralog by the Other.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingling; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Wengen; Shan, Hongyan; Kong, Hongzhi

    2016-06-01

    How genes change their expression patterns over time is still poorly understood. Here, by conducting expression, functional, bioinformatic, and evolutionary analyses, we demonstrate that the differences between the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) APETALA1 (AP1) and CAULIFLOWER (CAL) duplicate genes in the time, space, and level of expression were determined by the presence or absence of functionally important transcription factor-binding sites (TFBSs) in regulatory regions. In particular, a CArG box, which is the autoregulatory site of AP1 that can also be bound by the CAL protein, is a key determinant of the expression differences. Because of the CArG box, AP1 is both autoregulated and cross-regulated (by AP1 and CAL, respectively), and its relatively high-level expression is maintained till to the late stages of sepal and petal development. The observation that the CArG box was gained recently further suggests that the autoregulation and cross-regulation of AP1, as well as its function in sepal and petal development, are derived features. By comparing the evolutionary histories of this and other TFBSs, we further indicate that the divergence of AP1 and CAL in regulatory regions has been markedly asymmetric and can be divided into several stages. Specifically, shortly after duplication, when AP1 happened to be the paralog that maintained the function of the ancestral gene, CAL experienced certain degrees of degenerate evolution, in which several functionally important TFBSs were lost. Later, when functional divergence allowed the survival of both paralogs, CAL remained largely unchanged in expression, whereas the functions of AP1 were gradually reinforced by gains of the CArG box and other TFBSs. PMID:27208240

  1. Gains and Losses of Cis-regulatory Elements Led to Divergence of the Arabidopsis APETALA1 and CAULIFLOWER Duplicate Genes in the Time, Space, and Level of Expression and Regulation of One Paralog by the Other1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    How genes change their expression patterns over time is still poorly understood. Here, by conducting expression, functional, bioinformatic, and evolutionary analyses, we demonstrate that the differences between the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) APETALA1 (AP1) and CAULIFLOWER (CAL) duplicate genes in the time, space, and level of expression were determined by the presence or absence of functionally important transcription factor-binding sites (TFBSs) in regulatory regions. In particular, a CArG box, which is the autoregulatory site of AP1 that can also be bound by the CAL protein, is a key determinant of the expression differences. Because of the CArG box, AP1 is both autoregulated and cross-regulated (by AP1 and CAL, respectively), and its relatively high-level expression is maintained till to the late stages of sepal and petal development. The observation that the CArG box was gained recently further suggests that the autoregulation and cross-regulation of AP1, as well as its function in sepal and petal development, are derived features. By comparing the evolutionary histories of this and other TFBSs, we further indicate that the divergence of AP1 and CAL in regulatory regions has been markedly asymmetric and can be divided into several stages. Specifically, shortly after duplication, when AP1 happened to be the paralog that maintained the function of the ancestral gene, CAL experienced certain degrees of degenerate evolution, in which several functionally important TFBSs were lost. Later, when functional divergence allowed the survival of both paralogs, CAL remained largely unchanged in expression, whereas the functions of AP1 were gradually reinforced by gains of the CArG box and other TFBSs. PMID:27208240

  2. Whole genome and exome sequencing realignment supports the assignment of KCNJ12, KCNJ17, and KCNJ18 paralogous genes in thyrotoxic periodic paralysis locus: functional characterization of two polymorphic Kir2.6 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Paninka, Rolf M; Mazzotti, Diego R; Kizys, Marina M L; Vidi, Angela C; Rodrigues, Hélio; Silva, Silas P; Kunii, Ilda S; Furuzawa, Gilberto K; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Dias-da-Silva, Magnus R

    2016-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has enriched the understanding of the human genome. However, homologous or repetitive sequences shared among genes frequently produce dubious alignments and can puzzle NGS mutation analysis, especially for paralogous potassium channels. Potassium inward rectifier (Kir) channels are important to establish the resting membrane potential and regulating the muscle excitability. Mutations in Kir channels cause disorders affecting the heart and skeletal muscle, such as arrhythmia and periodic paralysis. Recently, a susceptibility muscle channelopathy-thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP)-has been related to Kir2.6 channel (KCNJ18 gene). Due to their high nucleotide sequence homology, variants found in the potassium channels Kir2.6 and Kir2.5 have been mistakenly attributable to Kir2.2 polymorphisms or mutations. We aimed at elucidating nucleotide misalignments by performing realignment of whole exome sequencing (WES) and whole genome sequencing (WGS) reads to specific Kir2.2, Kir2.5, and Kir2.6 cDNA sequences using BWA-MEM/GATK pipeline. WES/WGS reads correctly aligned 26.9/43.2, 37.6/31.0, and 35.4/25.8 % to Kir2.2, Kir2.5, and Kir2.6, respectively. Realignment was able to reduce over 94 % of misalignments. No putative mutations of Kir2.6 were identified for the three TPP patients included in the cohort of 36 healthy controls using either WES or WGS. We also distinguished sequences for a single Kir2.2, a single Kir2.5 sequence, and two Kir2.6 isoforms, which haplotypes were named RRAI and QHEV, based on changes at 39, 40, 56, and 249 residues. Electrophysiology records on both Kir2.6_RRAI and _QHEV showed typical rectifying currents. In our study, the reduction of misalignments allowed the elucidation of paralogous gene sequences and two distinct Kir2.6 haplotypes, and pointed the need for checking the frequency of these polymorphisms in other populations with different genetic background. PMID:27008341

  3. Monilophyte mitochondrial rps1 genes carry a unique group II intron that likely originated from an ancient paralog in rpl2.

    PubMed

    Knie, Nils; Grewe, Felix; Knoop, Volker

    2016-09-01

    Intron patterns in plant mitochondrial genomes differ significantly between the major land plant clades. We here report on a new, clade-specific group II intron in the rps1 gene of monilophytes (ferns). This intron, rps1i25g2, is strikingly similar to rpl2i846g2 previously identified in the mitochondrial rpl2 gene of seed plants, ferns, and the lycophyte Phlegmariurus squarrosus Although mitochondrial ribosomal protein genes are frequently subject to endosymbiotic gene transfer among plants, we could retrieve the mitochondrial rps1 gene in a taxonomically wide sampling of 44 monilophyte taxa including basal lineages such as the Ophioglossales, Psilotales, and Marattiales with the only exception being the Equisetales (horsetails). Introns rps1i25g2 and rpl2i846g2 were likewise consistently present with only two exceptions: Intron rps1i25g2 is lost in the genus Ophioglossum and intron rpl2i846g2 is lost in Equisetum bogotense Both intron sequences are moderately affected by RNA editing. The unprecedented primary and secondary structure similarity of rps1i25g2 and rpl2i846g2 suggests an ancient retrotransposition event copying rpl2i846g2 into rps1, for which we suggest a model. Our phylogenetic analysis adding the new rps1 locus to a previous data set is fully congruent with recent insights on monilophyte phylogeny and further supports a sister relationship of Gleicheniales and Hymenophyllales. PMID:27354706

  4. The five glucose-6-phosphatase paralogous genes are differentially regulated by insulin alone or combined with high level of amino acids and/or glucose in trout hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lucie, Marandel; Weiwei, Dai; Stéphane, Panserat; Sandrine, Skiba-Cassy

    2016-04-01

    A recent analysis of the newly sequenced rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) genome suggested that duplicated gluconeogenic g6pc paralogues, fixed in this genome after the salmonid-specific 4th whole genome duplication, may have a role in the setting up of the glucose-intolerant phenotype in this carnivorous species. This should be due to the sub- or neo-functionalization of their regulation. In the present short communication we thus addressed the question of the regulation of these genes by insulin, hormone involved in the glucose homeostasis, and its interaction with glucose and amino acids in vitro. The stimulation of trout hepatocytes with insulin revealed an atypical up-regulation of g6pcb2 ohnologues and confirmed the sub- or neo-functionalization of the five g6pc genes at least at the regulatory level. Intriguingly, when hepatocytes were cultured with high levels of glucose and/or AAs in presence of insulin, most of the g6pc paralogues were up-regulated. It strongly suggested a cross-talk between insulin and nutrients for the regulation of these genes. Moreover these results strengthened the idea that g6pc duplicated genes may significantly contribute to the setting up of the glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout via their atypical regulation by insulin alone or in interaction with nutrients. These findings open new perspectives to better understand in vivo glucose-intolerant phenotype in trout fed a high carbohydrate diet. PMID:26896939

  5. Evolution of glutamate dehydrogenase genes: evidence for two paralogous protein families and unusual branching patterns of the archaebacteria in the universal tree of life.

    PubMed

    Benachenhou-Lahfa, N; Forterre, P; Labedan, B

    1993-04-01

    The existence of two families of genes coding for hexameric glutamate dehydrogenases has been deduced from the alignment of 21 primary sequences and the determination of the percentages of similarity between each pair of proteins. Each family could also be characterized by specific motifs. One family (Family I) was composed of gdh genes from six eubacteria and six lower eukaryotes (the primitive protozoan Giardia lamblia, the green alga Chlorella sorokiniana, and several fungi and yeasts). The other one (Family II) was composed of gdh genes from two eubacteria, two archaebacteria, and five higher eukaryotes (vertebrates). Reconstruction of phylogenetic trees using several parsimony and distance methods confirmed the existence of these two families. Therefore, these results reinforced our previously proposed hypothesis that two close but already different gdh genes were present in the last common ancestor to the three Ur-kingdoms (eubacteria, archaebacteria, and eukaryotes). The branching order of the different species of Family I was found to be the same whatever the method of tree reconstruction although it varied slightly according the region analyzed. Similarly, the topological positions of eubacteria and eukaryotes of Family II were independent of the method used. However, the branching of the two archaebacteria in Family II appeared to be unexpected: (1) the thermoacidophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus was found clustered with the two eubacteria of this family both in parsimony and distance trees, a situation not predicted by either one of the contradictory trees recently proposed; and (2) the branching of the halophilic Halobacterium salinarium varied according to the method of tree construction: it was closer to the eubacteria in the maximum parsimony tree and to eukaryotes in distance trees. Therefore, whatever the actual position of the halophilic species, archaebacteria did not appear to be monophyletic in these gdh gene trees. This result questions the

  6. Differential domain evolution and complex RNA processing in a family of paralogous EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes facilitates expression of diverse tissue-specific isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Chan, Nadine; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Dubchak, Inna; Narla, Mohandas; Gascard, Philippe D.; Conboy, John G.

    2004-07-15

    The EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes epitomize the resourcefulness of the mammalian genome to encode a complex proteome from a small number of genes. By utilizing alternative transcriptional promoters and tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing, EPB41, EPB41L2, EPB41L3, and EPB41L1 encode a diverse array of structural adapter proteins. Comparative genomic and transcript analysis of these 140kb-240kb genes indicates several unusual features: differential evolution of highly conserved exons encoding known functional domains, interspersed with unique exons whose size and sequence variations contribute substantially to intergenic diversity: alternative first exons, most of which map far upstream of the coding regions; and complex tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing that facilitates synthesis of functionally different complements of 4.1 proteins in various cells. Understanding the splicing regulatory networks that control protein 4.1 expression will be critical to a full appreciation of the many roles of 4.1 proteins in normal cell biology and their proposed roles in human cancer.

  7. Differential domain evolution and complex RNA processing in a family of paralogous EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes facilitate expression of diverse tissue-specific isoforms.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marilyn; Gee, Sherry; Chan, Nadine; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Dubchak, Inna; Mohandas, Narla; Gascard, Philippe D; Conboy, John G

    2004-10-01

    The EPB41 (protein 4.1) genes epitomize the resourcefulness of the mammalian genome to encode a complex proteome from a small number of genes. By utilizing alternative transcriptional promoters and tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing, EPB41, EPB41L2, EPB41L3, and EPB41L1 encode a diverse array of structural adapter proteins. Comparative genomic and transcript analysis of these 140- to 240-kb genes indicates several unusual features: differential evolution of highly conserved exons encoding known functional domains interspersed with unique exons whose size and sequence variations contribute substantially to intergenic diversity; alternative first exons, most of which map far upstream of the coding regions; and complex tissue-specific alternative pre-mRNA splicing that facilitates synthesis of functionally different complements of 4.1 proteins in various cells. Understanding the splicing regulatory networks that control protein 4.1 expression will be critical to a full appreciation of the many roles of 4.1 proteins in normal cell biology and their proposed roles in human cancer. PMID:15475241

  8. Reverse genetic characterization of two paralogous acetoacetyl CoA thiolase genes in Arabidopsis reveals their importance in plant growth and development

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Huanan; Song, Zhihong; Nikolau, Basil J.

    2012-03-31

    Acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT, EC 2.3.1.9) catalyzes the condensation of two acetyl CoA molecules to form acetoacetyl CoA. Two AACT‐encoding genes, At5g47720 (AACT1) and At5g48230 (AACT2), were functionally identified in the Arabidopsis genome by direct enzymological assays and functional expression in yeast. Promoter::GUS fusion experiments indicated that AACT1 is primarily expressed in the vascular system and AACT2 is highly expressed in root tips, young leaves, top stems and anthers. Characterization of T‐DNA insertion mutant alleles at each AACT locus established that AACT2 function is required for embryogenesis and for normal male gamete transmission. In contrast, plants lacking AACT1 function are completely viable and show no apparent growth phenotypes, indicating that AACT1 is functionally redundant with respect to AACT2 function. RNAi lines that express reduced levels of AACT2 show pleiotropic phenotypes, including reduced apical dominance, elongated life span and flowering duration, sterility, dwarfing, reduced seed yield and shorter root length. Microscopic analysis reveals that the reduced stature is caused by a reduction in cell size and fewer cells, and male sterility is caused by loss of the pollen coat and premature degeneration of the tapetal cells. Biochemical analyses established that the roots of AACT2 RNAi plants show quantitative and qualitative alterations in phytosterol profiles. These phenotypes and biochemical alterations are reversed when AACT2 RNAi plants are grown in the presence of mevalonate, which is consistent with the role of AACT2 in generating the bulk of the acetoacetyl CoA precursor required for the cytosol‐localized, mevalonate‐derived isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

  9. Using Disease-Associated Coding Sequence Variation to Investigate Functional Compensation by Human Paralogous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Sayaka; Tate, Stephanie; Kumar, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication enables the functional diversification in species. It is thought that duplicated genes may be able to compensate if the function of one of the gene copies is disrupted. This possibility is extensively debated with some studies reporting proteome-wide compensation, whereas others suggest functional compensation among only recent gene duplicates or no compensation at all. We report results from a systematic molecular evolutionary analysis to test the predictions of the functional compensation hypothesis. We contrasted the density of Mendelian disease-associated single nucleotide variants (dSNVs) in proteins with no discernable paralogs (singletons) with the dSNV density in proteins found in multigene families. Under the functional compensation hypothesis, we expected to find greater numbers of dSNVs in singletons due to the lack of any compensating partners. Our analyses produced an opposite pattern; paralogs have over 35% higher dSNV density than singletons. We found that these patterns are concordant with similar differences in the rates of amino acid evolution (ie, functional constraints), as the proteins with paralogs have evolved 33% slower than singletons. Our evolutionary constraint explanation is robust to differences in family sizes, ages (young vs. old duplicates), and degrees of amino acid sequence similarities among paralogs. Therefore, disease-associated human variation does not exhibit significant signals of functional compensation among paralogous proteins, but rather an evolutionary constraint hypothesis provides a better explanation for the observed patterns of disease-associated and neutral polymorphisms in the human genome. PMID:26604664

  10. The Impact of Paralogy on Phylogenomic Studies – A Case Study on Annelid Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Struck, Torsten H.

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenomic studies based on hundreds of genes derived from expressed sequence tags libraries are increasingly used to reveal the phylogeny of taxa. A prerequisite for these studies is the assignment of genes into clusters of orthologous sequences. Sophisticated methods of orthology prediction are used in such analyses, but it is rarely assessed whether paralogous sequences have been erroneously grouped together as orthologous sequences after the prediction, and whether this had an impact on the phylogenetic reconstruction using a super-matrix approach. Herein, I tested the impact of paralogous sequences on the reconstruction of annelid relationships based on phylogenomic datasets. Using single-partition analyses, screening for bootstrap support, blast searches and pruning of sequences in the supermatrix, wrongly assigned paralogous sequences were found in eight partitions and the placement of five taxa (the annelids Owenia, Scoloplos, Sthenelais and Eurythoe and the nemertean Cerebratulus) including the robust bootstrap support could be attributed to the presence of paralogous sequences in two partitions. Excluding these sequences resulted in a different, weaker supported placement for these taxa. Moreover, the analyses revealed that paralogous sequences impacted the reconstruction when only a single taxon represented a previously supported higher taxon such as a polychaete family. One possibility of a priori detection of wrongly assigned paralogous sequences could combine 1) a screening of single-partition analyses based on criteria such as nodal support or internal branch length with 2) blast searches of suspicious cases as presented herein. Also possible are a posteriori approaches in which support for specific clades is investigated by comparing alternative hypotheses based on differences in per-site likelihoods. Increasing the sizes of EST libraries will also decrease the likelihood of wrongly assigned paralogous sequences, and in the case of orthology

  11. Functional prediction: identification of protein orthologs and paralogs.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, R.; Jeong, S. S.

    2000-01-01

    Orthologs typically retain the same function in the course of evolution. Using beta-decarboxylating dehydrogenase family as a model, we demonstrate that orthologs can be confidently identified. The strategy is based on our recent findings that substitutions of only a few amino acid residues in these enzymes are sufficient to exchange substrate and coenzyme specificities. Hence, the few major specificity determinants can serve as reliable markers for determining orthologous or paralogous relationships. The power of this approach has been demonstrated by correcting similarity-based functional misassignment and discovering new genes and related pathways, and should be broadly applicable to other enzyme families. PMID:11206056

  12. Differential Selection within the Drosophila Retinal Determination Network and Evidence for Functional Divergence between Paralog Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rhea R.; Cruickshank, Tami; Kumar, Justin P.

    2011-01-01

    The retinal determination (RD) network in Drosophila comprises fourteen known nuclear proteins that include DNA binding proteins, transcriptional co-activators, kinases and phosphatases. The composition of the network varies considerably throughout the animal kingdom, with the network in several basal insects having fewer members and with vertebrates having potentially significantly higher numbers of retinal determination genes. One important contributing factor for the variation in gene number within the network is gene duplication. For example, ten members of the RD network in Drosophila are derived from duplication events. Here we present an analysis of the coding regions of the five pairs of duplicate genes from within the retinal determination network of several different Drosophila species. We demonstrate that there is differential selection across the coding regions of all RD genes. Additionally, some of the most significant differences in ratios of non-silent to silent site substitutions (dN/dS) between paralog pairs are found within regions that have no ascribed function. Previous structure/function analyses of several duplicate genes have identified areas within one gene that contain novel activities when compared to its paralog. The evolutionary analysis presented here identifies these same areas in the paralogs as being under high levels of relaxed selection. We suggest that sequence divergence between paralogs and selection signatures can be used as a reasonable predictor of functional changes in rapidly evolving motifs. PMID:21210943

  13. Phloroglucinol Attenuates Free Radical-induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    So, Mi Jung; Cho, Eun Ju

    2014-01-01

    The protective role of phloroglucinol against oxidative stress and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) was investigated in vitro and in cell culture. Phloroglucinol had strong and concentration-dependent radical scavenging effects against nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anions (O2−), and hydroxyl radicals. In this study, free radical generators were used to induce oxidative stress in LLC-PK1 renal epithelial cells. Treatment with phloroglucinol attenuated the oxidative stress induced by peroxyl radicals, NO, O2−, and peroxynitrite. Phloroglucinol also increased cell viability and decreased lipid peroxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. WI-38 human diploid fibroblast cells were used to investigate the protective effect of phloroglucinol against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced SIPS. Phloroglucinol treatment attenuated H2O2-induced SIPS by increasing cell viability and inhibited lipid peroxidation, suggesting that treatment with phloroglucinol should delay the aging process. The present study supports the promising role of phloroglucinol as an antioxidative agent against free radical-induced oxidative stress and SIPS. PMID:25320709

  14. Distal substitutions drive divergent DNA specificity among paralogous transcription factors through subdivision of conformational space.

    PubMed

    Hudson, William H; Kossmann, Bradley R; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Chuo, Shih-Wei; Weikum, Emily R; Eick, Geeta N; Thornton, Joseph W; Ivanov, Ivaylo N; Kojetin, Douglas J; Ortlund, Eric A

    2016-01-12

    Many genomes contain families of paralogs--proteins with divergent function that evolved from a common ancestral gene after a duplication event. To understand how paralogous transcription factors evolve divergent DNA specificities, we examined how the glucocorticoid receptor and its paralogs evolved to bind activating response elements [(+)GREs] and negative glucocorticoid response elements (nGREs). We show that binding to nGREs is a property of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) DNA-binding domain (DBD) not shared by other members of the steroid receptor family. Using phylogenetic, structural, biochemical, and molecular dynamics techniques, we show that the ancestral DBD from which GR and its paralogs evolved was capable of binding both nGRE and (+)GRE sequences because of the ancestral DBD's ability to assume multiple DNA-bound conformations. Subsequent amino acid substitutions in duplicated daughter genes selectively restricted protein conformational space, causing this dual DNA-binding specificity to be selectively enhanced in the GR lineage and lost in all others. Key substitutions that determined the receptors' response element-binding specificity were far from the proteins' DNA-binding interface and interacted epistatically to change the DBD's function through DNA-induced allosteric mechanisms. These amino acid substitutions subdivided both the conformational and functional space of the ancestral DBD among the present-day receptors, allowing a paralogous family of transcription factors to control disparate transcriptional programs despite high sequence identity. PMID:26715749

  15. Orthologs, paralogs and genome comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogarten, J. P.; Olendzenski, L.

    1999-01-01

    During the past decade, ancient gene duplications were recognized as one of the main forces in the generation of diverse gene families and the creation of new functional capabilities. New tools developed to search data banks for homologous sequences, and an increased availability of reliable three-dimensional structural information led to the recognition that proteins with diverse functions can belong to the same superfamily. Analyses of the evolution of these superfamilies promises to provide insights into early evolution but are complicated by several important evolutionary processes. Horizontal transfer of genes can lead to a vertical spread of innovations among organisms, therefore finding a certain property in some descendants of an ancestor does not guarantee that it was present in that ancestor. Complete or partial gene conversion between duplicated genes can yield phylogenetic trees with several, apparently independent gene duplications, suggesting an often surprising parallelism in the evolution of independent lineages. Additionally, the breakup of domains within a protein and the fusion of domains into multifunctional proteins makes the delineation of superfamilies a task that remains difficult to automate.

  16. Adaptation of topoisomerase I paralogs to nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Ilaria Dalla; Goffart, Steffi; Wurm, Melanie; Wiek, Constanze; Essmann, Frank; Sobek, Stefan; Schroeder, Peter; Zhang, Hongliang; Krutmann, Jean; Hanenberg, Helmut; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Mielke, Christian; Pommier, Yves; Boege, Fritz; Christensen, Morten O.

    2009-01-01

    Topoisomerase I is essential for DNA metabolism in nuclei and mitochondria. In yeast, a single topoisomerase I gene provides for both organelles. In vertebrates, topoisomerase I is divided into nuclear and mitochondrial paralogs (Top1 and Top1mt). To assess the meaning of this gene duplication, we targeted Top1 to mitochondria or Top1mt to nuclei. Overexpression in the fitting organelle served as control. Targeting of Top1 to mitochondria blocked transcription and depleted mitochondrial DNA. This was also seen with catalytically inactive Top1 mutants, but not with Top1mt overexpressed in mitochondria. Targeting of Top1mt to the nucleus revealed that it was much less able to interact with mitotic chromosomes than Top1 overexpressed in the nucleus. Similar experiments with Top1/Top1mt hybrids assigned these functional differences to structural divergences in the DNA-binding core domains. We propose that adaptation of this domain to different chromatin environments in nuclei and mitochondria has driven evolutional development and conservation of organelle-restricted topoisomerase I paralogs in vertebrates. PMID:19720733

  17. Close association between paralogous multiple isomiRs and paralogous/orthologues miRNA sequences implicates dominant sequence selection across various animal species.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Sheng; Chen, Feng

    2013-09-25

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are crucial negative regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Next-generation sequencing technologies have identified a series of miRNA variants (named isomiRs). In this study, paralogous isomiR assemblies (from the miRNA locus) were systematically analyzed based on data acquired from deep sequencing data sets. Evolutionary analysis of paralogous (members in miRNA gene family in a specific species) and orthologues (across different animal species) miRNAs was also performed. The sequence diversity of paralogous isomiRs was found to be similar to the diversity of paralogous and orthologues miRNAs. Additionally, both isomiRs and paralogous/orthologues miRNAs were implicated in 5' and 3' ends (especially 3' ends), nucleotide substitutions, and insertions and deletions. Generally, multiple isomiRs can be produced from a single miRNA locus, but most of them had lower enrichment levels, and only several dominant isomiR sequences were detected. These dominant isomiR groups were always stable, and one of them would be selected as the most abundant miRNA sequence in specific animal species. Some isomiRs might be consistent to miRNA sequences in some species but not the other. Homologous miRNAs were often detected in similar isomiR repertoires, and showed similar expression patterns, while dominant isomiRs showed complex evolutionary patterns from miRNA sequences across the animal kingdom. These results indicate that the phenomenon of multiple isomiRs is not a random event, but rather the result of evolutionary pressures. The existence of multiple isomiRs enables different species to express advantageous sequences in different environments. Thus, dominant sequences emerge in response to functional and evolutionary pressures, allowing an organism to adapt to complex intra- and extra-cellular events. PMID:23856130

  18. Characterization and Expression of the Zebrafish qki Paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Radomska, Katarzyna J.; Sager, Jonathan; Farnsworth, Bryn; Tellgren-Roth, Åsa; Tuveri, Giulia; Peuckert, Christiane; Kettunen, Petronella; Jazin, Elena; Emilsson, Lina S.

    2016-01-01

    Quaking (QKI) is an RNA-binding protein involved in post-transcriptional mRNA processing. This gene is found to be associated with several human neurological disorders. Early expression of QKI proteins in the developing mouse neuroepithelium, together with neural tube defects in Qk mouse mutants, suggest the functional requirement of Qk for the establishment of the nervous system. As a knockout of Qk is embryonic lethal in mice, other model systems like the zebrafish could serve as a tool to study the developmental functions of qki. In the present study we sought to characterize the evolutionary relationship and spatiotemporal expression of qkia, qki2, and qkib; zebrafish homologs of human QKI. We found that qkia is an ancestral paralog of the single tetrapod Qk gene that was likely lost during the fin-to-limb transition. Conversely, qkib and qki2 are orthologs, emerging at the root of the vertebrate and teleost lineage, respectively. Both qki2 and qkib, but not qkia, were expressed in the progenitor domains of the central nervous system, similar to expression of the single gene in mice. Despite having partially overlapping expression domains, each gene has a unique expression pattern, suggesting that these genes have undergone subfunctionalization following duplication. Therefore, we suggest the zebrafish could be used to study the separate functions of qki genes during embryonic development. PMID:26727370

  19. Characterization and Expression of the Zebrafish qki Paralogs.

    PubMed

    Radomska, Katarzyna J; Sager, Jonathan; Farnsworth, Bryn; Tellgren-Roth, Åsa; Tuveri, Giulia; Peuckert, Christiane; Kettunen, Petronella; Jazin, Elena; Emilsson, Lina S

    2016-01-01

    Quaking (QKI) is an RNA-binding protein involved in post-transcriptional mRNA processing. This gene is found to be associated with several human neurological disorders. Early expression of QKI proteins in the developing mouse neuroepithelium, together with neural tube defects in Qk mouse mutants, suggest the functional requirement of Qk for the establishment of the nervous system. As a knockout of Qk is embryonic lethal in mice, other model systems like the zebrafish could serve as a tool to study the developmental functions of qki. In the present study we sought to characterize the evolutionary relationship and spatiotemporal expression of qkia, qki2, and qkib; zebrafish homologs of human QKI. We found that qkia is an ancestral paralog of the single tetrapod Qk gene that was likely lost during the fin-to-limb transition. Conversely, qkib and qki2 are orthologs, emerging at the root of the vertebrate and teleost lineage, respectively. Both qki2 and qkib, but not qkia, were expressed in the progenitor domains of the central nervous system, similar to expression of the single gene in mice. Despite having partially overlapping expression domains, each gene has a unique expression pattern, suggesting that these genes have undergone subfunctionalization following duplication. Therefore, we suggest the zebrafish could be used to study the separate functions of qki genes during embryonic development. PMID:26727370

  20. COPII Paralogs in Plants: Functional Redundancy or Diversity?

    PubMed

    Chung, Kin Pan; Zeng, Yonglun; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-09-01

    In eukaryotes, the best-described mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) export is mediated by coat protein complex II (COPII) vesicles, which comprise five conserved cytosolic components [secretion-associated, Ras-related protein 1 (Sar1), Sec23-24, and Sec13-31]. In higher organisms, multiple paralogs of COPII components are created due to gene duplication. However, the functional diversity of plant COPII subunit isoforms remains largely elusive. Here we summarize and discuss the latest findings derived from studies of various arabidopsis COPII subunit isoforms and their functional diversity. We also put forward testable hypotheses on distinct populations of COPII vesicles performing unique functions in ER export in developmental and stress-related pathways in plants. PMID:27317568

  1. Computational Identification of the Paralogs and Orthologs of Human Cytochrome P450 Superfamily and the Implication in Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Xue, Danfeng; Li, Zhi-Ling; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Yang, Yinxue; Yang, Tianxin; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The human cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily consisting of 57 functional genes is the most important group of Phase I drug metabolizing enzymes that oxidize a large number of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds, including therapeutic drugs and environmental toxicants. The CYP superfamily has been shown to expand itself through gene duplication, and some of them become pseudogenes due to gene mutations. Orthologs and paralogs are homologous genes resulting from speciation or duplication, respectively. To explore the evolutionary and functional relationships of human CYPs, we conducted this bioinformatic study to identify their corresponding paralogs, homologs, and orthologs. The functional implications and implications in drug discovery and evolutionary biology were then discussed. GeneCards and Ensembl were used to identify the paralogs of human CYPs. We have used a panel of online databases to identify the orthologs of human CYP genes: NCBI, Ensembl Compara, GeneCards, OMA ("Orthologous MAtrix") Browser, PATHER, TreeFam, EggNOG, and Roundup. The results show that each human CYP has various numbers of paralogs and orthologs using GeneCards and Ensembl. For example, the paralogs of CYP2A6 include CYP2A7, 2A13, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C18, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2F1, 2J2, 2R1, 2S1, 2U1, and 2W1; CYP11A1 has 6 paralogs including CYP11B1, 11B2, 24A1, 27A1, 27B1, and 27C1; CYP51A1 has only three paralogs: CYP26A1, 26B1, and 26C1; while CYP20A1 has no paralog. The majority of human CYPs are well conserved from plants, amphibians, fishes, or mammals to humans due to their important functions in physiology and xenobiotic disposition. The data from different approaches are also cross-validated and validated when experimental data are available. These findings facilitate our understanding of the evolutionary relationships and functional implications of the human CYP superfamily in drug discovery. PMID:27367670

  2. Computational Identification of the Paralogs and Orthologs of Human Cytochrome P450 Superfamily and the Implication in Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Xue, Danfeng; Li, Zhi-Ling; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Yang, Yinxue; Yang, Tianxin; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The human cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily consisting of 57 functional genes is the most important group of Phase I drug metabolizing enzymes that oxidize a large number of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds, including therapeutic drugs and environmental toxicants. The CYP superfamily has been shown to expand itself through gene duplication, and some of them become pseudogenes due to gene mutations. Orthologs and paralogs are homologous genes resulting from speciation or duplication, respectively. To explore the evolutionary and functional relationships of human CYPs, we conducted this bioinformatic study to identify their corresponding paralogs, homologs, and orthologs. The functional implications and implications in drug discovery and evolutionary biology were then discussed. GeneCards and Ensembl were used to identify the paralogs of human CYPs. We have used a panel of online databases to identify the orthologs of human CYP genes: NCBI, Ensembl Compara, GeneCards, OMA (“Orthologous MAtrix”) Browser, PATHER, TreeFam, EggNOG, and Roundup. The results show that each human CYP has various numbers of paralogs and orthologs using GeneCards and Ensembl. For example, the paralogs of CYP2A6 include CYP2A7, 2A13, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C18, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2F1, 2J2, 2R1, 2S1, 2U1, and 2W1; CYP11A1 has 6 paralogs including CYP11B1, 11B2, 24A1, 27A1, 27B1, and 27C1; CYP51A1 has only three paralogs: CYP26A1, 26B1, and 26C1; while CYP20A1 has no paralog. The majority of human CYPs are well conserved from plants, amphibians, fishes, or mammals to humans due to their important functions in physiology and xenobiotic disposition. The data from different approaches are also cross-validated and validated when experimental data are available. These findings facilitate our understanding of the evolutionary relationships and functional implications of the human CYP superfamily in drug discovery. PMID:27367670

  3. ß-tubulin Paralogs Provide a Qualitative Test for a Phylogeny of Cyst Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Sabo, A.; Ferris, V. R.

    2004-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships among cyst nematodes based on predicted ß-tubulin amino acid and DNA sequence data were compared with phylogenies inferred from ribosomal DNA (ITS1, 5.8S gene, ITS2). The ß-tubulin amino acid data were highly conserved and not useful for phylogenetic inference at the taxonomic level of genus and species. Phylogenetic trees based on ß-tubulin DNA sequence data were better resolved, but the relationships at lower taxonomic levels could not be inferred with confidence. Sequences from single species often appeared in more than one monophyletic clade, indicating the presence of ß-tubulin paralogs (confirmed by Southern blot analysis). For a subset of taxa, good congruence between the two data sets was revealed by the presence of the same putative ß-tubulin gene paralogs in monophyletic groups on the rDNA tree, corroborating the taxon relationships inferred from ribosomal DNA data. PMID:19262824

  4. Hypothesis: Paralog Formation from Progenitor Proteins and Paralog Mutagenesis Spur the Rapid Evolution of Telomere Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Arthur J

    2016-01-01

    Through elegant studies in fungal cells and complex organisms, we propose a unifying paradigm for the rapid evolution of telomere binding proteins (TBPs) that associate with either (or both) telomeric DNA and telomeric proteins. TBPs protect and regulate telomere structure and function. Four critical factors are involved. First, TBPs that commonly bind to telomeric DNA include the c-Myb binding proteins, OB-fold single-stranded binding proteins, and G-G base paired Hoogsteen structure (G4) binding proteins. Each contributes independently or, in some cases, cooperatively, to provide a minimum level of telomere function. As a result of these minimal requirements and the great abundance of homologs of these motifs in the proteome, DNA telomere-binding activity may be generated more easily than expected. Second, telomere dysfunction gives rise to genome instability, through the elevation of recombination rates, genome ploidy, and the frequency of gene mutations. The formation of paralogs that diverge from their progenitor proteins ultimately can form a high frequency of altered TBPs with altered functions. Third, TBPs that assemble into complexes (e.g., mammalian shelterin) derive benefits from the novel emergent functions. Fourth, a limiting factor in the evolution of TBP complexes is the formation of mutually compatible interaction surfaces amongst the TBPs. These factors may have different degrees of importance in the evolution of different phyla, illustrated by the apparently simpler telomeres in complex plants. Selective pressures that can utilize the mechanisms of paralog formation and mutagenesis to drive TBP evolution along routes dependent on the requisite physiologic changes. PMID:26904098

  5. Hypothesis: Paralog Formation from Progenitor Proteins and Paralog Mutagenesis Spur the Rapid Evolution of Telomere Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lustig, Arthur J.

    2016-01-01

    Through elegant studies in fungal cells and complex organisms, we propose a unifying paradigm for the rapid evolution of telomere binding proteins (TBPs) that associate with either (or both) telomeric DNA and telomeric proteins. TBPs protect and regulate telomere structure and function. Four critical factors are involved. First, TBPs that commonly bind to telomeric DNA include the c-Myb binding proteins, OB-fold single-stranded binding proteins, and G-G base paired Hoogsteen structure (G4) binding proteins. Each contributes independently or, in some cases, cooperatively, to provide a minimum level of telomere function. As a result of these minimal requirements and the great abundance of homologs of these motifs in the proteome, DNA telomere-binding activity may be generated more easily than expected. Second, telomere dysfunction gives rise to genome instability, through the elevation of recombination rates, genome ploidy, and the frequency of gene mutations. The formation of paralogs that diverge from their progenitor proteins ultimately can form a high frequency of altered TBPs with altered functions. Third, TBPs that assemble into complexes (e.g., mammalian shelterin) derive benefits from the novel emergent functions. Fourth, a limiting factor in the evolution of TBP complexes is the formation of mutually compatible interaction surfaces amongst the TBPs. These factors may have different degrees of importance in the evolution of different phyla, illustrated by the apparently simpler telomeres in complex plants. Selective pressures that can utilize the mechanisms of paralog formation and mutagenesis to drive TBP evolution along routes dependent on the requisite physiologic changes. PMID:26904098

  6. Participation of cationic intermediates in radical-induced homopolymerization of maleic anhydride

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, N.G.; Koo, J.Y.

    1981-03-01

    Since the failure to promote MAH polymerization in the presence of amine-containing redox catalyst systems suggested the presence of cationic intermediates, the radical-induced polymerization of MAH was carried out in the absence and in the presence of N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N, N-dimethylaniline (DMA).

  7. Roles of Rad51 paralogs for promoting homologous recombination in Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Plourde, Marie; Éthier, Chantal; Roy, Gaétan; Poirier, Guy G.; Ouellette, Marc; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    To achieve drug resistance Leishmania parasite alters gene copy number by using its repeated sequences widely distributed through the genome. Even though homologous recombination (HR) is ascribed to maintain genome stability, this eukaryote exploits this potent mechanism driven by the Rad51 recombinase to form beneficial extrachromosomal circular amplicons. Here, we provide insights on the formation of these circular amplicons by analyzing the functions of the Rad51 paralogs. We purified three Leishmania infantum Rad51 paralogs homologs (LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6) all of which directly interact with LiRad51. LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6 show differences in DNA binding and annealing capacities. Moreover, it is also noteworthy that LiRad51-3 and LiRad51-4 are able to stimulate Rad51-mediated D-loop formation. In addition, we succeed to inactivate the LiRad51-4 gene and report a decrease of circular amplicons in this mutant. The LiRad51-3 gene was found to be essential for cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LiRad51 paralogs play crucial functions in extrachromosomal circular DNA amplification to circumvent drug actions and preserve survival. PMID:25712090

  8. Roles of Rad51 paralogs for promoting homologous recombination in Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Plourde, Marie; Éthier, Chantal; Roy, Gaétan; Poirier, Guy G; Ouellette, Marc; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-03-11

    To achieve drug resistance Leishmania parasite alters gene copy number by using its repeated sequences widely distributed through the genome. Even though homologous recombination (HR) is ascribed to maintain genome stability, this eukaryote exploits this potent mechanism driven by the Rad51 recombinase to form beneficial extrachromosomal circular amplicons. Here, we provide insights on the formation of these circular amplicons by analyzing the functions of the Rad51 paralogs. We purified three Leishmania infantum Rad51 paralogs homologs (LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6) all of which directly interact with LiRad51. LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6 show differences in DNA binding and annealing capacities. Moreover, it is also noteworthy that LiRad51-3 and LiRad51-4 are able to stimulate Rad51-mediated D-loop formation. In addition, we succeed to inactivate the LiRad51-4 gene and report a decrease of circular amplicons in this mutant. The LiRad51-3 gene was found to be essential for cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LiRad51 paralogs play crucial functions in extrachromosomal circular DNA amplification to circumvent drug actions and preserve survival. PMID:25712090

  9. Robustness of Helicobacter pylori Infection Conferred by Context-Variable Redundancy among Cysteine-Rich Paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Putty, Kalyani; Marcus, Sarah A.; Mittl, Peer R. E.; Bogadi, Lindsey E.; Hunter, Allison M.; Arur, Swathi; Berg, Douglas E.; Sethu, Palaniappan; Kalia, Awdhesh

    2013-01-01

    Deletion of single genes from expanded gene families in bacterial genomes often does not elicit a phenotype thus implying redundancy or functional non-essentiality of paralogous genes. The molecular mechanisms that facilitate evolutionary maintenance of such paralogs despite selective pressures against redundancy remain mostly unexplored. Here, we investigate the evolutionary, genetic, and functional interaction between the Helicobacter pylori cysteine-rich paralogs hcpG and hcpC in the context of H. pylori infection of cultured mammalian cells. We find that in natural H. pylori populations both hcpG and hcpC are maintained by positive selection in a dual genetic relationship that switches from complete redundancy during early infection, whereby ΔhcpC or ΔhcpG mutants themselves show no growth defect but a significant growth defect is seen in the ΔhcpC,ΔhcpG double mutant, to quantitative redundancy during late infection wherein the growth defect of the ΔhcpC mutant is exacerbated in the ΔhcpC,ΔhcpG double mutant although the ΔhcpG mutant itself shows no defect. Moreover, during early infection both hcpG and hcpC are essential for optimal translocation of the H. pylori HspB/GroEL chaperone, but during middle-to-late infection hcpC alone is necessary and sufficient for HspB/GroEL translocation thereby revealing the lack of functional compensation among paralogs. We propose that evolution of context-dependent differences in the nature of genetic redundancy, and function, between hcpG and hcpC may facilitate their maintenance in H. pylori genomes, and confer robustness to H. pylori growth during infection of cultured mammalian cells. PMID:23555707

  10. Characterization of Zebrafish Cardiac and Slow Skeletal Troponin C Paralogs by MD Simulation and ITC.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Charles M; Rayani, Kaveh; Genge, Christine E; Singh, Gurpreet; Liang, Bo; Roller, Janine M; Li, Cindy; Li, Alison Yueh; Tieleman, D Peter; van Petegem, Filip; Tibbits, Glen F

    2016-07-12

    Zebrafish, as a model for teleost fish, have two paralogous troponin C (TnC) genes that are expressed in the heart differentially in response to temperature acclimation. Upon Ca(2+) binding, TnC changes conformation and exposes a hydrophobic patch that interacts with troponin I and initiates cardiac muscle contraction. Teleost-specific TnC paralogs have not yet been functionally characterized. In this study we have modeled the structures of the paralogs using molecular dynamics simulations at 18°C and 28°C and calculated the different Ca(2+)-binding properties between the teleost cardiac (cTnC or TnC1a) and slow-skeletal (ssTnC or TnC1b) paralogs through potential-of-mean-force calculations. These values are compared with thermodynamic binding properties obtained through isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The modeled structures of each of the paralogs are similar at each temperature, with the exception of helix C, which flanks the Ca(2+) binding site; this region is also home to paralog-specific sequence substitutions that we predict have an influence on protein function. The short timescale of the potential-of-mean-force calculation precludes the inclusion of the conformational change on the ΔG of Ca(2+) interaction, whereas the ITC analysis includes the Ca(2+) binding and conformational change of the TnC molecule. ITC analysis has revealed that ssTnC has higher Ca(2+) affinity than cTnC for Ca(2+) overall, whereas each of the paralogs has increased affinity at 28°C compared to 18°C. Microsecond-timescale simulations have calculated that the cTnC paralog transitions from the closed to the open state more readily than the ssTnC paralog, an unfavorable transition that would decrease the ITC-derived Ca(2+) affinity while simultaneously increasing the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the myofilament. We propose that the preferential expression of cTnC at lower temperatures increases myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity by this mechanism, despite the lower Ca(2+) affinity

  11. Arabidopsis Small Ubiquitin-Like Modifier Paralogs Have Distinct Functions in Development and Defense[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    van den Burg, Harrold A.; Kini, Ramachandra K.; Schuurink, Robert C.; Takken, Frank L.W.

    2010-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications allow dynamic and reversible changes to protein function. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a small gene family encodes paralogs of the small ubiquitin-like posttranslational modifier. We studied the function of these paralogs. Single mutants of the SUM1 and SUM2 paralogs do not exhibit a clear phenotype. However, the corresponding double knockdown mutant revealed that SUM1 and SUM2 are essential for plant development, floral transition, and suppression of salicylic acid (SA)–dependent defense responses. The SUM1 and SUM2 genes are constitutively expressed, but their spatial expression patterns do not overlap. Tight transcriptional regulation of these two SUM genes appears to be important, as overexpression of either wild-type or conjugation-deficient mutants resulted in activation of SA-dependent defense responses, as did the sum1 sum2 knockdown mutant. Interestingly, expression of the paralog SUM3 is strongly and widely induced by SA and by the defense elicitor Flg22, whereas its expression is otherwise low and restricted to a few specific cell types. Loss of SUM3 does not result in an aberrant developmental phenotype except for late flowering, while SUM3 overexpression causes early flowering and activates plant defense. Apparently, SUM3 promotes plant defense downstream of SA, while SUM1 and SUM2 together prevent SA accumulation in noninfected plants. PMID:20525853

  12. Roles of ATR1 paralogs YMR279c and YOR378w in boron stress tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Bozdag, Gonensin Ozan; Uluisik, Irem; Gulculer, Gulce Sila; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} ATR1 paralog YMR279c plays role in boron detoxification. {yields} YMR279c overexpression lowers cytoplasmic boron levels. {yields} ATR1 paralog YOR378w has no roles in boron stress response. -- Abstract: Boron is a necessary nutrient for plants and animals, however excess of it causes toxicity. Previously, Atr1 and Arabidopsis Bor1 homolog were identified as the boron efflux pump in yeast, which lower the cytosolic boron concentration and help cells to survive in the presence of toxic amount of boron. In this study, we analyzed ATR1 paralogs, YMR279c and YOR378w, to understand whether they participate in boron stress tolerance in yeast. Even though these genes share homology with ATR1, neither their deletion rendered cells boron sensitive nor their expression was significantly upregulated by boron treatment. However, expression of YMR279, but not YOR378w, from the constitutive GAPDH promoter on a high copy plasmid provided remarkable boron resistance by decreasing intracellular boron levels. Thus our results suggest the presence of a third boron exporter, YMR279c, which functions similar to ATR1 and provides boron resistance in yeast.

  13. Functional specialization of chordate CDK1 paralogs during oogenic meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Øvrebø, Jan Inge; Campsteijn, Coen; Kourtesis, Ioannis; Hausen, Harald; Raasholm, Martina; Thompson, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are central regulators of eukaryotic cell cycle progression. In contrast to interphase CDKs, the mitotic phase CDK1 is the only CDK capable of driving the entire cell cycle and it can do so from yeast to mammals. Interestingly, plants and the marine chordate, Oikopleura dioica, possess paralogs of the highly conserved CDK1 regulator. However, whereas in plants the 2 CDK1 paralogs replace interphase CDK functions, O. dioica has a full complement of interphase CDKs in addition to its 5 odCDK1 paralogs. Here we show specific sub-functionalization of odCDK1 paralogs during oogenesis. Differential spatiotemporal dynamics of the odCDK1a, d and e paralogs and the meiotic polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) and aurora kinase determine the subset of meiotic nuclei in prophase I arrest that will seed growing oocytes and complete meiosis. Whereas we find odCDK1e to be non-essential, knockdown of the odCDK1a paralog resulted in the spawning of non-viable oocytes of reduced size. Knockdown of odCDK1d also resulted in the spawning of non-viable oocytes. In this case, the oocytes were of normal size, but were unable to extrude polar bodies upon exposure to sperm, because they were unable to resume meiosis from prophase I arrest, a classical function of the sole CDK1 during meiosis in other organisms. Thus, we reveal specific sub-functionalization of CDK1 paralogs, during the meiotic oogenic program. PMID:25714331

  14. Functional specialization of chordate CDK1 paralogs during oogenic meiosis.

    PubMed

    Øvrebø, Jan Inge; Campsteijn, Coen; Kourtesis, Ioannis; Hausen, Harald; Raasholm, Martina; Thompson, Eric M

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are central regulators of eukaryotic cell cycle progression. In contrast to interphase CDKs, the mitotic phase CDK1 is the only CDK capable of driving the entire cell cycle and it can do so from yeast to mammals. Interestingly, plants and the marine chordate, Oikopleura dioica, possess paralogs of the highly conserved CDK1 regulator. However, whereas in plants the 2 CDK1 paralogs replace interphase CDK functions, O. dioica has a full complement of interphase CDKs in addition to its 5 odCDK1 paralogs. Here we show specific sub-functionalization of odCDK1 paralogs during oogenesis. Differential spatiotemporal dynamics of the odCDK1a, d and e paralogs and the meiotic polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) and aurora kinase determine the subset of meiotic nuclei in prophase I arrest that will seed growing oocytes and complete meiosis. Whereas we find odCDK1e to be non-essential, knockdown of the odCDK1a paralog resulted in the spawning of non-viable oocytes of reduced size. Knockdown of odCDK1d also resulted in the spawning of non-viable oocytes. In this case, the oocytes were of normal size, but were unable to extrude polar bodies upon exposure to sperm, because they were unable to resume meiosis from prophase I arrest, a classical function of the sole CDK1 during meiosis in other organisms. Thus, we reveal specific sub-functionalization of CDK1 paralogs, during the meiotic oogenic program. PMID:25714331

  15. Properties of Sequence Conservation in Upstream Regulatory and Protein Coding Sequences among Paralogs in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Dale N.; Wiehe, Thomas

    Whole genome duplication (WGD) has catalyzed the formation of new species, genes with novel functions, altered expression patterns, complexified signaling pathways and has provided organisms a level of genetic robustness. We studied the long-term evolution and interrelationships of 5’ upstream regulatory sequences (URSs), protein coding sequences (CDSs) and expression correlations (EC) of duplicated gene pairs in Arabidopsis. Three distinct methods revealed significant evolutionary conservation between paralogous URSs and were highly correlated with microarray-based expression correlation of the respective gene pairs. Positional information on exact matches between sequences unveiled the contribution of micro-chromosomal rearrangements on expression divergence. A three-way rank analysis of URS similarity, CDS divergence and EC uncovered specific gene functional biases. Transcription factor activity was associated with gene pairs exhibiting conserved URSs and divergent CDSs, whereas a broad array of metabolic enzymes was found to be associated with gene pairs showing diverged URSs but conserved CDSs.

  16. Genetic dissection of a TIR-NB-LRR locus from the wild North American grapevine species Muscadinia rotundifolia identifies paralogous genes conferring resistance to major fungal and oomycete pathogens in cultivated grapevine.

    PubMed

    Feechan, Angela; Anderson, Claire; Torregrosa, Laurent; Jermakow, Angelica; Mestre, Pere; Wiedemann-Merdinoglu, Sabine; Merdinoglu, Didier; Walker, Amanda R; Cadle-Davidson, Lance; Reisch, Bruce; Aubourg, Sebastien; Bentahar, Nadia; Shrestha, Bipna; Bouquet, Alain; Adam-Blondon, Anne-Françoise; Thomas, Mark R; Dry, Ian B

    2013-11-01

    The most economically important diseases of grapevine cultivation worldwide are caused by the fungal pathogen powdery mildew (Erysiphe necator syn. Uncinula necator) and the oomycete pathogen downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola). Currently, grapegrowers rely heavily on the use of agrochemicals to minimize the potentially devastating impact of these pathogens on grape yield and quality. The wild North American grapevine species Muscadinia rotundifolia was recognized as early as 1889 to be resistant to both powdery and downy mildew. We have now mapped resistance to these two mildew pathogens in M. rotundifolia to a single locus on chromosome 12 that contains a family of seven TIR-NB-LRR genes. We further demonstrate that two highly homologous (86% amino acid identity) members of this gene family confer strong resistance to these unrelated pathogens following genetic transformation into susceptible Vitis vinifera winegrape cultivars. These two genes, designated resistance to Uncinula necator (MrRUN1) and resistance to Plasmopara viticola (MrRPV1) are the first resistance genes to be cloned from a grapevine species. Both MrRUN1 and MrRPV1 were found to confer resistance to multiple powdery and downy mildew isolates from France, North America and Australia; however, a single powdery mildew isolate collected from the south-eastern region of North America, to which M. rotundifolia is native, was capable of breaking MrRUN1-mediated resistance. Comparisons of gene organization and coding sequences between M. rotundifolia and the cultivated grapevine V. vinifera at the MrRUN1/MrRPV1 locus revealed a high level of synteny, suggesting that the TIR-NB-LRR genes at this locus share a common ancestor. PMID:24033846

  17. Different Functions of the Paralogs to the N-Terminal Domain of the Orange Carotenoid Protein in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 71201[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    López-Igual, Rocío; Wilson, Adjélé; Bourcier de Carbon, Céline; Sutter, Markus; Turmo, Aiko

    2016-01-01

    The photoactive Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) is involved in cyanobacterial photoprotection. Its N-terminal domain (NTD) is responsible for interaction with the antenna and induction of excitation energy quenching, while the C-terminal domain is the regulatory domain that senses light and induces photoactivation. In most nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterial strains, there are one to four paralogous genes coding for homologs to the NTD of the OCP. The functions of these proteins are unknown. Here, we study the expression, localization, and function of these genes in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that the four genes present in the genome are expressed in both vegetative cells and heterocysts but do not seem to have an essential role in heterocyst formation. This study establishes that all four Anabaena NTD-like proteins can bind a carotenoid and the different paralogs have distinct functions. Surprisingly, only one paralog (All4941) was able to interact with the antenna and to induce permanent thermal energy dissipation. Two of the other Anabaena paralogs (All3221 and Alr4783) were shown to be very good singlet oxygen quenchers. The fourth paralog (All1123) does not seem to be involved in photoprotection. Structural homology modeling allowed us to propose specific features responsible for the different functions of these soluble carotenoid-binding proteins. PMID:27208286

  18. Different Functions of the Paralogs to the N-Terminal Domain of the Orange Carotenoid Protein in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    López-Igual, Rocío; Wilson, Adjélé; Leverenz, Ryan L; Melnicki, Matthew R; Bourcier de Carbon, Céline; Sutter, Markus; Turmo, Aiko; Perreau, François; Kerfeld, Cheryl A; Kirilovsky, Diana

    2016-07-01

    The photoactive Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) is involved in cyanobacterial photoprotection. Its N-terminal domain (NTD) is responsible for interaction with the antenna and induction of excitation energy quenching, while the C-terminal domain is the regulatory domain that senses light and induces photoactivation. In most nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterial strains, there are one to four paralogous genes coding for homologs to the NTD of the OCP. The functions of these proteins are unknown. Here, we study the expression, localization, and function of these genes in Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. We show that the four genes present in the genome are expressed in both vegetative cells and heterocysts but do not seem to have an essential role in heterocyst formation. This study establishes that all four Anabaena NTD-like proteins can bind a carotenoid and the different paralogs have distinct functions. Surprisingly, only one paralog (All4941) was able to interact with the antenna and to induce permanent thermal energy dissipation. Two of the other Anabaena paralogs (All3221 and Alr4783) were shown to be very good singlet oxygen quenchers. The fourth paralog (All1123) does not seem to be involved in photoprotection. Structural homology modeling allowed us to propose specific features responsible for the different functions of these soluble carotenoid-binding proteins. PMID:27208286

  19. Influence of Cocoa Flavanols and Procyanidins on Free Radical-induced Human Erythrocyte Hemolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qin Yan; Schramm, Derek D.; Gross, Heidrun B.; Holt, Roberta R.; Kim, Sun H.; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kwik-Uribe, Catherine L.; Keen, Carl L.

    2005-01-01

    Cocoa can be a rich source of antioxidants including the flavan-3-ols, epicatechin and catechin, and their oligomers (procyanidins). While these flavonoids have been reported to reduce the rate of free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis in experimental animal models, little is known about their effect on human erythrocyte hemolysis. The major objective of this work was to study the effect of a flavonoid-rich cocoa beverage on the resistance of human erythrocytes to oxidative stress. A second objective was to assess the effects of select purified cocoa flavonoids, epicatechin, catechin, the procyanidin Dimer B2 and one of its major metabolites, 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin, on free radical-induced erythrocyte hemolysis in vitro. Peripheral blood was obtained from 8 healthy subjects before and 1, 2, 4 and 8 h after consuming a flavonoid-rich cocoa beverage that provided 0.25 g/kg body weight (BW), 0.375 or 0.50 g/kg BW of cocoa. Plasma flavanol and dimer concentrations were determined for each subject. Erythrocyte hemolysis was evaluated using a controlled peroxidation reaction. Epicatechin, catechin, 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin and (-)-epicatechin-(4β > 8)epicatechin (Dimer B2) were detected in the plasma within 1 h after the consumption of the beverage. The susceptibility of erythrocytes to hemolysis was reduced significantly following the consumption of the beverages. The duration of the lag time, which reflects the capacity of cells to buffer free radicals, was increased. Consistent with the above, the purified flavonoids, epicatechin, catechin, Dimer B2 and the metabolite 3ʹ-O-methyl epicatechin, exhibited dose-dependent protection against AAPH-induced erythrocyte hemolysis at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 20 μM. Erythrocytes from subjects consuming flavonoid-rich cocoa show reduced susceptibility to free radical-induced hemolysis (p < 0.05). PMID:15712596

  20. Human-chimpanzee alignment: ortholog exponentials and paralog power laws.

    PubMed

    Gao, Kun; Miller, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Genomic subsequences conserved between closely related species such as human and chimpanzee exhibit an exponential length distribution, in contrast to the algebraic length distribution observed for sequences shared between distantly related genomes. We find that the former exponential can be further decomposed into an exponential component primarily composed of orthologous sequences, and a truncated algebraic component primarily composed of paralogous sequences. PMID:25443749

  1. The evolution of Bab paralog expression and abdominal pigmentation among Sophophora fruit fly species.

    PubMed

    Salomone, Joseph R; Rogers, William A; Rebeiz, Mark; Williams, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of gene networks lies at the heart of understanding trait divergence. Intrinsic to development is the dimension of time: a network must be altered during the correct phase of development to generate the appropriate phenotype. One model of developmental network evolution is the origination of dimorphic (male-specific) abdomen pigmentation in the fruit fly subgenus Sophophora. In Drosophila (D.) melanogaster, dimorphic pigmentation is controlled by the dimorphic expression of the paralogous Bab1 and Bab2 transcription factors that repress pigmentation. These expression patterns are thought to have evolved from a monomorphic ancestral state. Here we show that the spatial domain and contrast in dimorphic Bab expression increases during the latter half of pupal development, and this late pupal expression is necessary and sufficient to suppress pigmentation. Late pupal Bab expression was monomorphic for species from basal clades exhibiting monomorphic pigmentation, though dimorphic expression was observed in D. pseudoobscura that represents an intermediate-branching monomorphic clade. Among species from the dimorphic Sophophora clades, Bab expression was dimorphic, but a poor correlation was found between the domains of expression and male pigmentation. Lastly, while Bab paralog co-expression was generally observed, an instance of paralog-specific expression was found, indicating more complex regulatory mechanisms and mutational effects have shaped the evolution of the bab locus. These results highlight the importance of the time and place of Bab expression for pigmentation development and evolution, and suggest that dimorphism evolved early in Sophophora, but diversity in male pigmentation was not further shaped by alterations in Bab expression. PMID:24261445

  2. Evolution of the vertebrate genome as reflected in paralogous chromosomal regions in man and the house mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Lundin, L.G. )

    1993-04-01

    Gene constellations on several human chromosomes are interpreted as indications of large regional duplications that took place during evolution of the vertebrate genome. Four groups of paralogous chromosomal regions in man and the house mouse are suggested and are believed to be conserved remnants of the two or three rounds of tetraploidization that are likely to have occurred during evolution of the vertebrates. The phenomenon of differential silencing of genes is described. The importance of conservation of linkage of particular genes is discussed in relation to genetic regulation and cell differentiation. 120 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. A paralog of the proteinaceous elicitor SM1 is involved in colonization of maize roots by Trichoderma virens.

    PubMed

    Crutcher, Frankie K; Moran-Diez, Maria E; Ding, Shengli; Liu, Jinggao; Horwitz, Benjamin A; Mukherjee, Prasun K; Kenerley, Charles M

    2015-06-01

    The biocontrol agent, Trichoderma virens, has the ability to protect plants from pathogens by eliciting plant defense responses, involvement in mycoparasitism, or secreting antagonistic secondary metabolites. SM1, an elicitor of induced systemic resistance (ISR), was found to have three paralogs within the T. virens genome. The paralog sm2 is highly expressed in the presence of plant roots. Gene deletion mutants of sm2 were generated and the mutants were found to overproduce SM1. The ability to elicit ISR in maize against Colletotrichum graminicola was not compromised for the mutants compared to that of wild type isolate. However, the deletion strains had a significantly lowered ability to colonize maize roots. This appears to be the first report on the involvement of an effector-like protein in colonization of roots by Trichoderma. PMID:25986544

  4. NADPH-Cytochrome P450 Reductase: Molecular Cloning and Functional Characterization of Two Paralogs from Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Satiander; Lattoo, Surrinder K.; Dhar, Niha; Razdan, Sumeer; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Dhar, Rekha S.; Vishwakarma, Ram

    2013-01-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal, a highly reputed medicinal plant, synthesizes a large array of steroidal lactone triterpenoids called withanolides. Although its chemical profile and pharmacological activities have been studied extensively during the last two decades, limited attempts have been made to decipher the biosynthetic route and identification of key regulatory genes involved in withanolide biosynthesis. Cytochrome P450 reductase is the most imperative redox partner of multiple P450s involved in primary and secondary metabolite biosynthesis. We describe here the cloning and characterization of two paralogs of cytochrome P450 reductase from W. somnifera. The full length paralogs of WsCPR1 and WsCPR2 have open reading frames of 2058 and 2142 bp encoding 685 and 713 amino acid residues, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that grouping of dual CPRs was in accordance with class I and class II of eudicotyledon CPRs. The corresponding coding sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli as glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins, purified and characterized. Recombinant proteins of both the paralogs were purified with their intact membrane anchor regions and it is hitherto unreported for other CPRs which have been purified from microsomal fraction. Southern blot analysis suggested that two divergent isoforms of CPR exist independently in Withania genome. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that both genes were widely expressed in leaves, stalks, roots, flowers and berries with higher expression level of WsCPR2 in comparison to WsCPR1. Similar to CPRs of other plant species, WsCPR1 was un-inducible while WsCPR2 transcript level increased in a time-dependent manner after elicitor treatments. High performance liquid chromatography of withanolides extracted from elicitor-treated samples showed a significant increase in two of the key withanolides, withanolide A and withaferin A, possibly indicating the role of WsCPR2 in withanolide biosynthesis

  5. An HcpR paralog of Desulfovibrio gigas provides protection against nitrosative stress

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Sofia M.; Amaral, Catarina; Neves, Susana S.; Santos, Cátia; Pimentel, Catarina; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2015-01-01

    Desulfovibrio gigas belongs to the group of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). These ubiquitous and metabolically versatile microorganisms are often exposed to reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Nonetheless, the mechanisms and regulatory elements involved in nitrosative stress protection are still poorly understood. The transcription factor HcpR has emerged as a putative regulator of nitrosative stress response among anaerobic bacteria. HcpR is known to orchestrate the expression of the hybrid cluster protein gene, hcp, proposed to be involved in cellular defense against RNS. According to phylogenetic analyses, the occurrence of hcpR paralog genes is a common feature among several Desulfovibrio species. Within the D. gigas genome we have identified two HcpR-related sequences. One of these sequences, hcpR1, was found in the close vicinity of the hcp gene and this finding prompted us to proceed with its functional characterization. We observed that the growth of a D. gigas strain lacking hcpR1 is severely impaired under nitrosative stress. An in silico search revealed several putative targets of HcpR1 that were experimentally validated. The fact that HcpR1 regulates several genes encoding proteins involved in nitrite and nitrate metabolism, together with the sensitive growth phenotype to NO displayed by an hcpR1 mutant strain, strongly supports a relevant role of this factor under nitrosative stress. Moreover, the finding that several Desulfovibrio species possess HcpR paralogs, which have been transmitted vertically in the evolution and diversification of the genus, suggests that these sequences may confer adaptive or survival advantage to these organisms, possibly by increasing their tolerance to nitrosative stress. PMID:26273559

  6. Divergence of Gene Body DNA Methylation and Evolution of Plant Duplicate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Marowsky, Nicholas C.; Fan, Chuanzhu

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that gene body DNA methylation is associated with gene expression. However, whether and how deviation of gene body DNA methylation between duplicate genes can influence their divergence remains largely unexplored. Here, we aim to elucidate the potential role of gene body DNA methylation in the fate of duplicate genes. We identified paralogous gene pairs from Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa ssp. japonica) genomes and reprocessed their single-base resolution methylome data. We show that methylation in paralogous genes nonlinearly correlates with several gene properties including exon number/gene length, expression level and mutation rate. Further, we demonstrated that divergence of methylation level and pattern in paralogs indeed positively correlate with their sequence and expression divergences. This result held even after controlling for other confounding factors known to influence the divergence of paralogs. We observed that methylation level divergence might be more relevant to the expression divergence of paralogs than methylation pattern divergence. Finally, we explored the mechanisms that might give rise to the divergence of gene body methylation in paralogs. We found that exonic methylation divergence more closely correlates with expression divergence than intronic methylation divergence. We show that genomic environments (e.g., flanked by transposable elements and repetitive sequences) of paralogs generated by various duplication mechanisms are associated with the methylation divergence of paralogs. Overall, our results suggest that the changes in gene body DNA methylation could provide another avenue for duplicate genes to develop differential expression patterns and undergo different evolutionary fates in plant genomes. PMID:25310342

  7. Petal-specific subfunctionalization of an APETALA3 paralog in the Ranunculales and its implications for petal evolution.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bharti; Guo, Chunce; Kong, Hongzhi; Kramer, Elena M

    2011-08-01

    • The petals of the lower eudicot family Ranunculaceae are thought to have been derived many times independently from stamens. However, investigation of the genetic basis of their identity has suggested an alternative hypothesis: that they share a commonly inherited petal identity program. This theory is based on the fact that an ancient paralogous lineage of APETALA3 (AP3) in the Ranunculaceae appears to have a conserved, petal-specific expression pattern. • Here, we have used a combination of approaches, including RNAi, comparative gene expression and molecular evolutionary studies, to understand the function of this petal-specific AP3 lineage. • Functional analysis of the Aquilegia locus AqAP3-3 has demonstrated that the paralog is required for petal identity with little contribution to the identity of the other floral organs. Expanded expression studies and analyses of molecular evolutionary patterns provide further evidence that orthologs of AqAP3-3 are primarily expressed in petals and are under higher purifying selection across the family than the other AP3 paralogs. • Taken together, these findings suggest that the AqAP3-3 lineage underwent progressive subfunctionalization within the order Ranunculales, ultimately yielding a specific role in petal identity that has probably been conserved, in stark contrast with the multiple independent origins predicted by botanical theories. PMID:21557746

  8. Age-dependence of free radical-induced oxidative damage in ischemic-reperfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Nagy, K; Takács, I E; Pankucsi, C

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen free radical-induced oxidative damage is involved in both aging and ischemia-reperfusion. The purpose of this study was to determine the aging-induced oxidative alterations in rat heart as well as the age-dependence of heart injury following ischemia-reperfusion. A comparative study was performed on young and old ischemic-reperfused rat hearts. Protein oxidation and the ascorbyl radical level in heart tissue were determined in order to characterize the oxidative stress. Comparing the control conditions, old hearts have 31% more oxidized proteins as measured by protein carbonyl content, and 18% lower ascorbyl radical level as determined by ESR, than young ones. The extent of increase of protein oxidation and ascorbyl free radical depletion induced by ischemia-reperfusion is less pronounced in the old hearts (7 and 8% respectively), as compared to the young ones (55 and 21% respectively). Pre-treatment with a free radical scavenger, such as centrophenoxine, diminished the ischemia-reperfusion injury in both young and old rat hearts. PMID:15374178

  9. Antioxidative effects of Kimchi under different fermentation stage on radical-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Boh Kyung; Choi, Ji Myung; Kang, Soon Ah; Park, Kun Young

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Kimchi is a traditional Korean fermented vegetable containing several ingredients. We investigated the protective activity of methanol extract of kimchi under different fermentation stages against oxidative damage. MATERIALS/METHODS Fresh kimchi (Fresh), optimally ripened kimchi (OptR), and over ripened kimchi (OvR) were fermented until the pH reached pH 5.6, pH 4.3, and pH 3.8, respectively. The radical scavenging activity and protective activity from oxidative stress of kimchi during fermentation were investigated under in vitro and cellular systems using LLC-PK1 cells. RESULTS Kimchi exhibited strong radical scavenging activities against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, nitric oxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radical. In addition, the free radical generators led to loss of cell viability and elevated lipid peroxidation, while treatment with kimchi resulted in significantly increased cell viability and decreased lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, the protective effect against oxidative stress was related to regulation of cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor-κB p65, and IκB expression. In particular, OvR showed the strongest protective effect from cellular oxidative stress among other kimchi. CONCLUSION The current study indicated that kimchi, particularly OptR and OvR, played a protective role against free radical-induced oxidative stress. These findings suggest that kimchi is a promising functional food with an antioxidative effect and fermentation of kimchi led to elevation of antioxidative activity. PMID:25489403

  10. SPOCS: Software for Predicting and Visualizing Orthology/Paralogy Relationships Among Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Darren S.; Phillips, Aaron R.; Callister, Stephen J.; Conlan, Sean; McCue, Lee Ann

    2013-10-15

    At the rate that prokaryotic genomes can now be generated, comparative genomics studies require a flexible method for quickly and accurately predicting orthologs among the rapidly changing set of genomes available. SPOCS implements a graph-based ortholog prediction method to generate a simple tab-delimited table of orthologs and in addition, html files that provide a visualization of the predicted ortholog/paralog relationships to which gene/protein expression metadata may be overlaid. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: A SPOCS web application is freely available at http://cbb.pnnl.gov/portal/tools/spocs.html. Source code for Linux systems is also freely available under an open source license at http://cbb.pnnl.gov/portal/software/spocs.html; the Boost C++ libraries and BLAST are required.

  11. Functional Promiscuity of Two Divergent Paralogs of Type III Plant Polyketide Synthases.

    PubMed

    Pandith, Shahzad A; Dhar, Niha; Rana, Satiander; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Kushwaha, Manoj; Gupta, Ajai P; Shah, Manzoor A; Vishwakarma, Ram; Lattoo, Surrinder K

    2016-08-01

    Plants effectively defend themselves against biotic and abiotic stresses by synthesizing diverse secondary metabolites, including health-protective flavonoids. These display incredible chemical diversity and ubiquitous occurrence and confer impeccable biological and agricultural applications. Chalcone synthase (CHS), a type III plant polyketide synthase, is critical for flavonoid biosynthesis. It catalyzes acyl-coenzyme A thioesters to synthesize naringenin chalcone through a polyketidic intermediate. The functional divergence among the evolutionarily generated members of a gene family is pivotal in driving the chemical diversity. Against this backdrop, this study was aimed to functionally characterize members of the CHS gene family from Rheum emodi, an endangered and endemic high-altitude medicinal herb of northwestern Himalayas. Two full-length cDNAs (1,179 bp each), ReCHS1 and ReCHS2, encoding unique paralogs were isolated and characterized. Heterologous expression and purification in Escherichia coli, bottom-up proteomic characterization, high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, and enzyme kinetic studies using five different substrates confirmed their catalytic potential. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of higher synonymous mutations in the intronless divergents of ReCHS. ReCHS2 displayed significant enzymatic efficiency (Vmax/Km) with different substrates. There were significant spatial and altitudinal variations in messenger RNA transcript levels of ReCHSs correlating positively with metabolite accumulation. Furthermore, the elicitations in the form of methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, ultraviolet B light, and wounding, chosen on the basis of identified cis-regulatory promoter elements, presented considerable differences in the transcript profiles of ReCHSs. Taken together, our results demonstrate differential propensities of CHS paralogs in terms of the accumulation of flavonoids and

  12. Analytical approaches to the OH radical induced degradation of sulfonamide antibiotics in dilute aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Sági, Gyuri; Csay, Tamás; Szabó, László; Pátzay, György; Csonka, Emil; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2015-03-15

    By combining a large variety of analytical techniques this study aimed at elaborating methods to follow up the degradation of sulfonamides in an advanced oxidation process (AOP): irradiation with ionizing radiation in dilute aqueous solution. In this process, besides other radicals, hydroxyl radicals are produced. As pulse radiolysis experiments show the basic initial reaction is hydroxyl radical addition to the benzene ring, forming cyclohexadienyl radical intermediates. In aerated solutions these radicals transform to peroxy radicals. Among the first formed products aromatic molecules hydroxylated in the benzene rings or in some cases in the heterocyclic rings were observed by LC-MS/MS. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements indicate that at the early reaction period of degradation one hydroxyl radical induces incorporation of 1.5 O atoms into the products. Comparison of the COD and TOC (total organic carbon content) results shows gradual oxidation. Simultaneously with hydroxylation ring opening also takes place. The kinetics of inorganic SO4(2-) and NH4(+) formation, analyzed by ion chromatography, is similar to the kinetics of ring degradation (UV spectroscopy), however, there is a delayed formation of NO3(-). The latter ions may be produced in oxidative degradation of smaller N containing fragments. The S atoms of the sulfonamides remain in the solution (ICP-MS measurements) after degradation, whereas some part of the N atoms leaves the solution probably in the form of N2 (total nitrogen content (TN) measurements). Degradation is accompanied by a high pH drop due to formation of SO4(2-), NO3(-) and smaller organic acids. The degradation goes through many simultaneous and consecutive reactions, and with the applied methods the different stages of degradation can be characterized. PMID:25266558

  13. Evolutionary rate analyses of orthologs and paralogs from 12 Drosophila genomes

    PubMed Central

    Heger, Andreas; Ponting, Chris P.

    2007-01-01

    The newly sequenced genome sequences of 11 Drosophila species provide the first opportunity to investigate variations in evolutionary rates across a clade of closely related species. Protein-coding genes were predicted using established Drosophila melanogaster genes as templates, with recovery rates ranging from 81%–97% depending on species divergence and on genome assembly quality. Orthology and paralogy assignments were shown to be self-consistent among the different Drosophila species and to be consistent with regions of conserved gene order (synteny blocks). Next, we investigated the rates of diversification among these species’ gene repertoires with respect to amino acid substitutions and to gene duplications. Constraints on amino acid sequences appear to have been most pronounced on D. ananassae and least pronounced on D. simulans and D. erecta terminal lineages. Codons predicted to have been subject to positive selection were found to be significantly over-represented among genes with roles in immune response and RNA metabolism, with the latter category including each subunit of the Dicer-2/r2d2 heterodimer. The vast majority of gene duplications (96.5%) and synteny rearrangements were found to occur, as expected, within single Müller elements. We show that the rate of ancient gene duplications was relatively uniform. However, gene duplications in terminal lineages are strongly skewed toward very recent events, consistent with either a rapid-birth and rapid-death model or the presence of large proportions of copy number variable genes in these Drosophila populations. Duplications were significantly more frequent among trypsin-like proteases and DM8 putative lipid-binding domain proteins. PMID:17989258

  14. Protein Phosphatase 1 β Paralogs Encode the Zebrafish Myosin Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Jayashankar, Vaishali; Nguyen, Michael J.; Carr, Brandon W.; Zheng, Dale C.; Rosales, Joseph B.; Rosales, Joshua B.; Weiser, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Background The myosin phosphatase is a highly conserved regulator of actomyosin contractility. Zebrafish has emerged as an ideal model system to study the in vivo role of myosin phosphatase in controlling cell contractility, cell movement and epithelial biology. Most work in zebrafish has focused on the regulatory subunit of the myosin phosphatase called Mypt1. In this work, we examined the critical role of Protein Phosphatase 1, PP1, the catalytic subunit of the myosin phosphatase. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed that in zebrafish two paralogous genes encoding PP1β, called ppp1cba and ppp1cbb, are both broadly expressed during early development. Furthermore, we found that both gene products interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase complex. In addition, expression of this complex results in dephosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain and large scale rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. Morpholino knock-down of ppp1cba and ppp1cbb results in severe defects in morphogenetic cell movements during gastrulation through loss of myosin phosphatase function. Conclusions/Significance Our work demonstrates that zebrafish have two genes encoding PP1β, both of which can interact with Mypt1 and assemble an active myosin phosphatase. In addition, both genes are required for convergence and extension during gastrulation and correct dosage of the protein products is required. PMID:24040418

  15. Genomic Anatomy of a Premier Major Histocompatibility Complex Paralogous Region on Chromosome 1q21–q22

    PubMed Central

    Shiina, Takashi; Ando, Asako; Suto, Yumiko; Kasai, Fumio; Shigenari, Atsuko; Takishima, Nobusada; Kikkawa, Eri; Iwata, Kyoko; Kuwano, Yuko; Kitamura, Yuka; Matsuzawa, Yumiko; Sano, Kazumi; Nogami, Masahiro; Kawata, Hisako; Li, Suyun; Fukuzumi, Yasuhito; Yamazaki, Masaaki; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Tamiya, Gen; Kohda, Atsushi; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Ikemura, Toshimichi; Soeda, Eiichi; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Kimura, Minoru; Bahram, Seiamak; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2001-01-01

    Human chromosomes 1q21–q25, 6p21.3–22.2, 9q33–q34, and 19p13.1–p13.4 carry clusters of paralogous loci, to date best defined by the flagship 6p MHC region. They have presumably been created by two rounds of large-scale genomic duplications around the time of vertebrate emergence. Phylogenetically, the 1q21–25 region seems most closely related to the 6p21.3 MHC region, as it is only the MHC paralogous region that includes bona fide MHC class I genes, the CD1 and MR1 loci. Here, to clarify the genomic structure of this model MHC paralogous region as well as to gain insight into the evolutionary dynamics of the entire quadriplication process, a detailed analysis of a critical 1.7 megabase (Mb) region was performed. To this end, a composite, deep, YAC, BAC, and PAC contig encompassing all five CD1 genes and linking the centromeric +P5 locus to the telomeric KRTC7 locus was constructed. Within this contig a 1.1-Mb BAC and PAC core segment joining CD1D to FCER1A was fully sequenced and thoroughly analyzed. This led to the mapping of a total of 41 genes (12 expressed genes, 12 possibly expressed genes, and 17 pseudogenes), among which 31 were novel. The latter include 20 olfactory receptor (OR) genes, 9 of which are potentially expressed. Importantly, CD1, SPTA1, OR, and FCERIA belong to multigene families, which have paralogues in the other three regions. Furthermore, it is noteworthy that 12 of the 13 expressed genes in the 1q21–q22 region around the CD1 loci are immunologically relevant. In addition to CD1A-E, these include SPTA1, MNDA, IFI-16, AIM2, BL1A, FY and FCERIA. This functional convergence of structurally unrelated genes is reminiscent of the 6p MHC region, and perhaps represents the emergence of yet another antigen presentation gene cluster, in this case dedicated to lipid/glycolipid antigens rather than antigen-derived peptides. [The nucleotide sequence data reported in this paper have been submitted to the DDBJ, EMBL, and GenBank databases under

  16. Tocotrienol offers better protection than tocopherol from free radical-induced damage of rat bone.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, N S; Khalid, B A K; Luke, D A; Ima Nirwana, S

    2005-09-01

    1. Free radicals generated by ferric nitrilotriacetate (FeNTA) can activate osteoclastic activity and this is associated with elevation of the bone resorbing cytokines interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 2 mg/kg FeNTA (2 mg iron/kg) on the levels of serum IL-1 and IL-6 with or without supplementation with a palm oil tocotrienol mixture or alpha-tocopherol acetate in Wistar rats. 2. The FeNTA was found to elevate levels of IL-1 and IL-6. Only the palm oil tocotrienol mixture at doses of 60 and 100 mg/kg was able to prevent FeNTA-induced increases in IL-1 (P < 0.01). Both the palm oil tocotrienol mixture and alpha-tocopherol acetate, at doses of 30, 60 and 100 mg/kg, were able to reduce FeNTA-induced increases in IL-6 (P < 0.05). Therefore, the palm oil tocotrienol mixture was better than pure alpha-tocopherol acetate in protecting bone against FeNTA (free radical)-induced elevation of bone-resorbing cytokines. 3. Supplementation with the palm oil tocotrienol mixture or alpha-tocopherol acetate at 100 mg/kg restored the reduction in serum osteocalcin levels due to ageing, as seen in the saline (control) group (P < 0.05). All doses of the palm oil tocotrienol mixture decreased urine deoxypyridinoline cross-link (DPD) significantly compared with the control group, whereas a trend for decreased urine DPD was only seen for doses of 60 mg/kg onwards of alpha-tocopherol acetate (P < 0.05). 4. Bone histomorphometric analyses have shown that FeNTA injections significantly lowered mean osteoblast number (P < 0.001) and the bone formation rate (P < 0.001), but raised osteoclast number (P < 0.05) and the ratio of eroded surface/bone surface (P < 0.001) compared with the saline (control) group. Supplementation with 100 mg/kg palm oil tocotrienol mixture was able to prevent all these FeNTA-induced changes, but a similar dose of alpha-tocopherol acetate was found to be effective only for mean osteoclast number. Injections of FeNTA were

  17. Knockout of the abundant Trichomonas vaginalis hydrogenosomal membrane protein TvHMP23 increases hydrogenosome size but induces no compensatory up-regulation of paralogous copies.

    PubMed

    Brás, Xavier Pereira; Zimorski, Verena; Bolte, Kathrin; Maier, Uwe-G; Martin, William F; Gould, Sven B

    2013-05-01

    The Trichomonas vaginalis genome encodes up to 60000 genes, many of which stem from genome duplication events. Paralogous copies thus accompany most T. vaginalis genes, a phenomenon that limits genetic manipulation. We characterized one of the parasite's most abundant hydrogenosomal membrane proteins, TvHMP23, which is phylogenetically distinct from canonical metabolite carriers, and which localizes to the inner hydrogenosomal membrane as shown through sub-organellar fractionation and protease protection assays. Knockout of Tvhmp23 through insertion of the selectable neomycin marker led to a size increase of hydrogenosomes, the first knockout-induced phenotypes reported for Trichomonas, but no growth impairment. The transcriptional response of its four paralogous copies then analyzed revealed that they are not up-regulated, and hence do not compensate for the Tvhmp23 knockout. PMID:23499435

  18. Fitness Assays Reveal Incomplete Functional Redundancy of the HoxA1 and HoxB1 Paralogs of Mice.

    PubMed

    Ruff, James S; Saffarini, Raed B; Ramoz, Leda L; Morrison, Linda C; Baker, Shambralyn; Laverty, Sean M; Tvrdik, Petr; Potts, Wayne K

    2015-10-01

    Gene targeting techniques have led to the phenotypic characterization of numerous genes; however, many genes show minimal to no phenotypic consequences when disrupted, despite many having highly conserved sequences. The standard explanation for these findings is functional redundancy. A competing hypothesis is that these genes have important ecological functions in natural environments that are not needed under laboratory settings. Here we discriminate between these hypotheses by competing mice (Mus musculus) whose Hoxb1 gene has been replaced by Hoxa1, its highly conserved paralog, against matched wild-type controls in seminatural enclosures. This Hoxb1(A1) swap was reported as a genetic manipulation resulting in no discernible embryonic or physiological phenotype under standard laboratory tests. We observed a transient decline in first litter size for Hoxb1(A1) homozygous mice in breeding cages, but their fitness was consistently and more dramatically reduced when competing against controls within seminatural populations. Specifically, males homozygous for the Hoxb1(A1) swap acquired 10.6% fewer territories and the frequency of the Hoxb1(A1) allele decreased from 0.500 in population founders to 0.419 in their offspring. The decrease in Hoxb1(A1) frequency corresponded with a deficiency of both Hoxb1(A1) homozygous and heterozygous offspring. These data suggest that Hoxb1 and Hoxa1 are more phenotypically divergent than previously reported and support that sub- and/or neofunctionalization has occurred in these paralogous genes leading to a divergence of gene function and incomplete redundancy. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of obtaining fitness measures of mutants in ecologically relevant conditions to better understand gene function and evolution. PMID:26447130

  19. Gene duplications in prokaryotes can be associated with environmental adaptation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene duplication is a normal evolutionary process. If there is no selective advantage in keeping the duplicated gene, it is usually reduced to a pseudogene and disappears from the genome. However, some paralogs are retained. These gene products are likely to be beneficial to the organism, e.g. in adaptation to new environmental conditions. The aim of our analysis is to investigate the properties of paralog-forming genes in prokaryotes, and to analyse the role of these retained paralogs by relating gene properties to life style of the corresponding prokaryotes. Results Paralogs were identified in a number of prokaryotes, and these paralogs were compared to singletons of persistent orthologs based on functional classification. This showed that the paralogs were associated with for example energy production, cell motility, ion transport, and defence mechanisms. A statistical overrepresentation analysis of gene and protein annotations was based on paralogs of the 200 prokaryotes with the highest fraction of paralog-forming genes. Biclustering of overrepresented gene ontology terms versus species was used to identify clusters of properties associated with clusters of species. The clusters were classified using similarity scores on properties and species to identify interesting clusters, and a subset of clusters were analysed by comparison to literature data. This analysis showed that paralogs often are associated with properties that are important for survival and proliferation of the specific organisms. This includes processes like ion transport, locomotion, chemotaxis and photosynthesis. However, the analysis also showed that the gene ontology terms sometimes were too general, imprecise or even misleading for automatic analysis. Conclusions Properties described by gene ontology terms identified in the overrepresentation analysis are often consistent with individual prokaryote lifestyles and are likely to give a competitive advantage to the organism

  20. Light-dependent chlorophyll f synthase is a highly divergent paralog of PsbA of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Yang; Shen, Gaozhong; Canniffe, Daniel P; Zhao, Chi; Bryant, Donald A

    2016-08-26

    Chlorophyll f (Chl f) permits some cyanobacteria to expand the spectral range for photosynthesis by absorbing far-red light. We used reverse genetics and heterologous expression to identify the enzyme for Chl f synthesis. Null mutants of "super-rogue" psbA4 genes, divergent paralogs of psbA genes encoding the D1 core subunit of photosystem II, abolished Chl f synthesis in two cyanobacteria that grow in far-red light. Heterologous expression of the psbA4 gene, which we rename chlF, enables Chl f biosynthesis in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Because the reaction requires light, Chl f synthase is probably a photo-oxidoreductase that employs catalytically useful Chl a molecules, tyrosine YZ, and plastoquinone (as does photosystem II) but lacks a Mn4Ca1O5 cluster. Introduction of Chl f biosynthesis into crop plants could expand their ability to use solar energy. PMID:27386923

  1. Paralogous Antirepressors Acting on the Master Regulator for Biofilm Formation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yunrong; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Summary Matrix production during biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is governed by a gene control circuit at the heart of which are three dedicated regulatory proteins, the antirepressor SinI, the repressor SinR, and the downstream regulator SlrR. Matrix production is triggered by the synthesis of SinI, which binds to and inactivates SinR, thereby derepressing genes for matrix production as well as the gene for SlrR. Recently, two additional regulators of matrix genes were identified: SlrA, which was reported to be an activator of SlrR, and YwcC, a repressor of SlrA synthesis. We present evidence indicating that SlrA, which is a paralog of SinI, is like SinI, an antirepressor that binds to, and inactivates, SinR. We also show that SlrA does not activate SlrR for expression of matrix genes. Instead, SlrR binds to, and inhibits the activity of, SlrA. Thus, the YwcC-SlrA-SinR-SlrR pathway is a negative feedback loop in which SlrA indirectly stimulates the synthesis of SlrR, and SlrR, in turn, inhibits the activity of SlrA. Finally, we report that under standard laboratory conditions SlrA makes only a small contribution to the expression of genes for matrix production. We propose that in response to an unknown signal recognized by the YwcC repressor, SlrA transiently boosts matrix production. PMID:19788541

  2. Conserved structure and expression of hsp70 paralogs in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Metzger, David C H; Hemmer-Hansen, Jakob; Schulte, Patricia M

    2016-06-01

    The cytosolic 70KDa heat shock proteins (Hsp70s) are widely used as biomarkers of environmental stress in ecological and toxicological studies in fish. Here we analyze teleost genome sequences to show that two genes encoding inducible hsp70s (hsp70-1 and hsp70-2) are likely present in all teleost fish. Phylogenetic and synteny analyses indicate that hsp70-1 and hsp70-2 are distinct paralogs that originated prior to the diversification of the teleosts. The promoters of both genes contain a TATA box and conserved heat shock elements (HSEs), but unlike mammalian HSP70s, both genes contain an intron in the 5' UTR. The hsp70-2 gene has undergone tandem duplication in several species. In addition, many other teleost genome assemblies have multiple copies of hsp70-2 present on separate, small, genomic scaffolds. To verify that these represent poorly assembled tandem duplicates, we cloned the genomic region surrounding hsp70-2 in Fundulus heteroclitus and showed that the hsp70-2 gene copies that are on separate scaffolds in the genome assembly are arranged as tandem duplicates. Real-time quantitative PCR of F. heteroclitus genomic DNA indicates that four copies of the hsp70-2 gene are likely present in the F. heteroclitus genome. Comparison of expression patterns in F. heteroclitus and Gasterosteus aculeatus demonstrates that hsp70-2 has a higher fold increase than hsp70-1 following heat shock in gill but not in muscle tissue, revealing a conserved difference in expression patterns between isoforms and tissues. These data indicate that ecological and toxicological studies using hsp70 as a biomarker in teleosts should take this complexity into account. PMID:26922644

  3. Targeted Identification of SUMOylation Sites in Human Proteins Using Affinity Enrichment and Paralog-specific Reporter Ions*

    PubMed Central

    Lamoliatte, Frederic; Bonneil, Eric; Durette, Chantal; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Wildemann, Dirk; Zerweck, Johannes; Wenshuk, Holger; Thibault, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Protein modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modulates the activities of numerous proteins involved in different cellular functions such as gene transcription, cell cycle, and DNA repair. Comprehensive identification of SUMOylated sites is a prerequisite to determine how SUMOylation regulates protein function. However, mapping SUMOylated Lys residues by mass spectrometry (MS) is challenging because of the dynamic nature of this modification, the existence of three functionally distinct human SUMO paralogs, and the large SUMO chain remnant that remains attached to tryptic peptides. To overcome these problems, we created HEK293 cell lines that stably express functional SUMO paralogs with an N-terminal His6-tag and an Arg residue near the C terminus that leave a short five amino acid SUMO remnant upon tryptic digestion. We determined the fragmentation patterns of our short SUMO remnant peptides by collisional activation and electron transfer dissociation using synthetic peptide libraries. Activation using higher energy collisional dissociation on the LTQ-Orbitrap Elite identified SUMO paralog-specific fragment ions and neutral losses of the SUMO remnant with high mass accuracy (< 5 ppm). We exploited these features to detect SUMO modified tryptic peptides in complex cell extracts by correlating mass measurements of precursor and fragment ions using a data independent acquisition method. We also generated bioinformatics tools to retrieve MS/MS spectra containing characteristic fragment ions to the identification of SUMOylated peptide by conventional Mascot database searches. In HEK293 cell extracts, this MS approach uncovered low abundance SUMOylated peptides and 37 SUMO3-modified Lys residues in target proteins, most of which were previously unknown. Interestingly, we identified mixed SUMO-ubiquitin chains with ubiquitylated SUMO proteins (K20 and K32) and SUMOylated ubiquitin (K63), suggesting a complex crosstalk between these two modifications. PMID

  4. Molecular characterization of BrMYB28 and BrMYB29 paralogous transcription factors involved in the regulation of aliphatic glucosinolate profiles in Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis.

    PubMed

    Baskar, Venkidasamy; Park, Se Won

    2015-07-01

    Glucosinolates (GSL) are one of the major secondary metabolites of the Brassicaceae family. In the present study, we aim at characterizing the multiple paralogs of aliphatic GSL regulators, such as BrMYB28 and BrMYB29 genes in Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis, by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis in different tissues and at various developmental stages. An overlapping gene expression pattern between the BrMYBs as well as their downstream genes (DSGs) was found at different developmental stages. Among the BrMYB28 and BrMYB29 paralogous genes, the BrMYB28.3 and BrMYB29.1 genes were dominantly expressed in most of the developmental stages, compared to the other paralogs of the BrMYB genes. Furthermore, the differential expression pattern of the BrMYBs was observed under various stress treatments. Interestingly, BrMYB28.2 showed the least expression in most developmental stages, while its expression was remarkably high in different stress conditions. More specifically, the BrMYB28.2, BrMYB28.3, and BrMYB29.1 genes were highly responsive to various abiotic and biotic stresses, further indicating their possible role in stress tolerance. Moreover, the in silico cis motif analysis in the upstream regulatory regions of BrMYBs showed the presence of various putative stress-specific motifs, which further indicated their responsiveness to biotic and abiotic stresses. These observations suggest that the dominantly expressed BrMYBs, both in different developmental stages and under various stress treatments (BrMYB28.3 and BrMYB29.1), may be potential candidate genes for altering the GSL level through genetic modification studies in B. rapa ssp. pekinensis. PMID:26043798

  5. Mammalian RAD51 paralogs protect nascent DNA at stalled forks and mediate replication restart

    PubMed Central

    Somyajit, Kumar; Saxena, Sneha; Babu, Sharath; Mishra, Anup; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian RAD51 paralogs are implicated in the repair of collapsed replication forks by homologous recombination. However, their physiological roles in replication fork maintenance prior to fork collapse remain obscure. Here, we report on the role of RAD51 paralogs in short-term replicative stress devoid of DSBs. We show that RAD51 paralogs localize to nascent DNA and common fragile sites upon replication fork stalling. Strikingly, RAD51 paralogs deficient cells exhibit elevated levels of 53BP1 nuclear bodies and increased DSB formation, the latter being attributed to extensive degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks. RAD51C and XRCC3 promote the restart of stalled replication in an ATP hydrolysis dependent manner by disengaging RAD51 and other RAD51 paralogs from the halted forks. Notably, we find that Fanconi anemia (FA)-like disorder and breast and ovarian cancer patient derived mutations of RAD51C fails to protect replication fork, exhibit under-replicated genomic regions and elevated micro-nucleation. Taken together, RAD51 paralogs prevent degradation of stalled forks and promote the restart of halted replication to avoid replication fork collapse, thereby maintaining genomic integrity and suppressing tumorigenesis. PMID:26354865

  6. Identical Substitutions in Magnesium Chelatase Paralogs Result in Chlorophyll-Deficient Soybean Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Benjamin W.; Mani, Dhananjay; Curtin, Shaun J.; Slattery, Rebecca A.; Michno, Jean-Michel; Ort, Donald R.; Schaus, Philip J.; Palmer, Reid G.; Orf, James H.; Stupar, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    The soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] chlorophyll-deficient line MinnGold is a spontaneous mutant characterized by yellow foliage. Map-based cloning and transgenic complementation revealed that the mutant phenotype is caused by a nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution in the third exon of a Mg-chelatase subunit gene (ChlI1a) on chromosome 13. This gene was selected as a candidate for a different yellow foliage mutant, T219H (Y11y11), that had been previously mapped to chromosome 13. Although the phenotypes of MinnGold and T219H are clearly distinct, sequencing of ChlI1a in T219H identified a different nonsynonymous mutation in the third exon, only six base pairs from the MinnGold mutation. This information, along with previously published allelic tests, were used to identify and clone a third yellow foliage mutation, CD-5, which was previously mapped to chromosome 15. This mutation was identified in the ChlI1b gene, a paralog of ChlI1a. Sequencing of the ChlI1b allele in CD-5 identified a nonsynonymous substitution in the third exon that confers an identical amino acid change as the T219H substitution at ChlI1a. Protein sequence alignments of the two Mg-chelatase subunits indicated that the sites of amino acid modification in MinnGold, T219H, and CD-5 are highly conserved among photosynthetic species. These results suggest that amino acid alterations in this critical domain may create competitive inhibitory interactions between the mutant and wild-type ChlI1a and ChlI1b proteins. PMID:25452420

  7. Independent regulation of vertebral number and vertebral identity by microRNA-196 paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Siew Fen Lisa; Agarwal, Vikram; Mansfield, Jennifer H.; Denans, Nicolas; Schwartz, Matthew G.; Prosser, Haydn M.; Pourquié, Olivier; Bartel, David P.; Tabin, Clifford J.; McGlinn, Edwina

    2015-01-01

    The Hox genes play a central role in patterning the embryonic anterior-to-posterior axis. An important function of Hox activity in vertebrates is the specification of different vertebral morphologies, with an additional role in axis elongation emerging. The miR-196 family of microRNAs (miRNAs) are predicted to extensively target Hox 3′ UTRs, although the full extent to which miR-196 regulates Hox expression dynamics and influences mammalian development remains to be elucidated. Here we used an extensive allelic series of mouse knockouts to show that the miR-196 family of miRNAs is essential both for properly patterning vertebral identity at different axial levels and for modulating the total number of vertebrae. All three miR-196 paralogs, 196a1, 196a2, and 196b, act redundantly to pattern the midthoracic region, whereas 196a2 and 196b have an additive role in controlling the number of rib-bearing vertebra and positioning of the sacrum. Independent of this, 196a1, 196a2, and 196b act redundantly to constrain total vertebral number. Loss of miR-196 leads to a collective up-regulation of numerous trunk Hox target genes with a concomitant delay in activation of caudal Hox genes, which are proposed to signal the end of axis extension. Additionally, we identified altered molecular signatures associated with the Wnt, Fgf, and Notch/segmentation pathways and demonstrate that miR-196 has the potential to regulate Wnt activity by multiple mechanisms. By feeding into, and thereby integrating, multiple genetic networks controlling vertebral number and identity, miR-196 is a critical player defining axial formulae. PMID:26283362

  8. OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic- and hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of aromatic products—A gamma radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmel, Birgit; Swoboda, Friederike; Solar, Sonja; Reznicek, Gottfried

    2010-12-01

    The OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic acids (HBA), hydroxycinnamic acids (HCiA) and methoxylated derivatives, as well as of chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid was studied by gamma radiolysis in aerated aqueous solutions. Primary aromatic products resulting from an OH-radical attachment to the ring (hydroxylation), to the position occupied by the methoxyl group (replacement -OCH 3 by -OH) as well as to the propenoic acid side chain of the cinnamic acids (benzaldehyde formations) were analysed by HPLC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. A comparison of the extent of these processes is given for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, syringic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid. For all cinnamic acids and derivatives benzaldehydes were significant oxidation products. With the release of caffeic acid from chlorogenic acid the cleavage of a phenolic glycoside could be demonstrated. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  9. Control of copper resistance and inorganic sulfur metabolism by paralogous regulators in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Grossoehme, Nicholas; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Ma, Zhen; Adams, Keith W; Cowart, Darin M; Scott, Robert A; Skaar, Eric P; Giedroc, David P

    2011-04-15

    All strains of Staphylococcus aureus encode a putative copper-sensitive operon repressor (CsoR) and one other CsoR-like protein of unknown function. We show here that NWMN_1991 encodes a bona fide Cu(I)-inducible CsoR of a genetically unlinked copA-copZ copper resistance operon in S. aureus strain Newman. In contrast, an unannotated open reading frame found between NWMN_0027 and NWMN_0026 (denoted NWMN_0026.5) encodes a CsoR-like regulator that represses expression of adjacent genes by binding specifically to a pair of canonical operator sites positioned in the NWMN_0027-0026.5 intergenic region. Inspection of these regulated genes suggests a role in assimilation of inorganic sulfur from thiosulfate and vectorial sulfur transfer, and we designate NWMN_0026.5 as CstR (CsoR-like sulfur transferase repressor). Expression analysis demonstrates that CsoR and CstR control their respective regulons in response to distinct stimuli with no overlap in vivo. Unlike CsoR, CstR does not form a stable complex with Cu(I); operator binding is instead inhibited by oxidation of the intersubunit cysteine pair to a mixture of disulfide and trisulfide linkages by a likely metabolite of thiosulfate assimilation, sulfite. CsoR is unreactive toward sulfite under the same conditions. We conclude that CsoR and CstR are paralogs in S. aureus that function in the same cytoplasm to control distinct physiological processes. PMID:21339296

  10. Functional divergence of gene duplicates through ectopic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Christiaens, Joaquin F; Van Mulders, Sebastiaan E; Duitama, Jorge; Brown, Chris A; Ghequire, Maarten G; De Meester, Luc; Michiels, Jan; Wenseleers, Tom; Voordeckers, Karin; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    Gene duplication stimulates evolutionary innovation as the resulting paralogs acquire mutations that lead to sub- or neofunctionalization. A comprehensive in silico analysis of paralogs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals that duplicates of cell-surface and subtelomeric genes also undergo ectopic recombination, which leads to new chimaeric alleles. Mimicking such intergenic recombination events in the FLO (flocculation) family of cell-surface genes shows that chimaeric FLO alleles confer different adhesion phenotypes than the parental genes. Our results indicate that intergenic recombination between paralogs can generate a large set of new alleles, thereby providing the raw material for evolutionary adaptation and innovation. PMID:23070367

  11. csrR, a Paralog and Direct Target of CsrA, Promotes Legionella pneumophila Resilience in Water

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Zachary D.; Yakhnin, Helen; Babitzke, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Critical to microbial versatility is the capacity to express the cohort of genes that increase fitness in different environments. Legionella pneumophila occupies extensive ecological space that includes diverse protists, pond water, engineered water systems, and mammalian lung macrophages. One mechanism that equips this opportunistic pathogen to adapt to fluctuating conditions is a switch between replicative and transmissive cell types that is controlled by the broadly conserved regulatory protein CsrA. A striking feature of the legionellae surveyed is that each of 14 strains encodes 4 to 7 csrA-like genes, candidate regulators of distinct fitness traits. Here we focus on the one csrA paralog (lpg1593) that, like the canonical csrA, is conserved in all 14 strains surveyed. Phenotypic analysis revealed that long-term survival in tap water is promoted by the lpg1593 locus, which we name csrR (for “CsrA-similar protein for resilience”). As predicted by its GGA motif, csrR mRNA was bound directly by the canonical CsrA protein, as judged by electromobility shift and RNA-footprinting assays. Furthermore, CsrA repressed translation of csrR mRNA in vivo, as determined by analysis of csrR-gfp reporters, csrR mRNA stability in the presence and absence of csrA expression, and mutation of the CsrA binding site identified on the csrR mRNA. Thus, CsrA not only governs the transition from replication to transmission but also represses translation of its paralog csrR when nutrients are available. We propose that, during prolonged starvation, relief of CsrA repression permits CsrR protein to coordinate L. pneumophila’s switch to a cell type that is resilient in water supplies. PMID:26060275

  12. Functional Redundancy of Paralogs of an Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome Subunit in Caenorhabditis elegans Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Kathryn K.; Nesmith, Jessica E.; Ross, Benjamin D.; Golden, Andy

    2010-01-01

    The anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) mediates the metaphase-to-anaphase transition by instructing the ubiquitination and turnover of key proteins at this stage of the cell cycle. We have recovered a gain-of-function allele in an APC5 subunit of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome. This finding led us to investigate further the role of APC5 in Caenorhabditis elegans, which contains two APC5 paralogs. We have shown that these two paralogs, such-1 and gfi-3, are coexpressed in the germline but have nonoverlapping expression patterns in other tissues. Depletion of such-1 or gfi-3 alone does not have a notable effect on the meiotic divisions; however, codepletion of these two factors results in meiotic arrest. In sum, the two C. elegans APC5 paralogs have a redundant function during the meiotic divisions. PMID:20944012

  13. Functional Divergence in Teleost Cardiac Troponin Paralogs Guides Variation in the Interaction of TnI Switch Region with TnC.

    PubMed

    Genge, Christine E; Stevens, Charles M; Davidson, William S; Singh, Gurpreet; Peter Tieleman, D; Tibbits, Glen F

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication results in extra copies of genes that must coevolve with their interacting partners in multimeric protein complexes. The cardiac troponin (Tn) complex, containing TnC, TnI, and TnT, forms a distinct functional unit critical for the regulation of cardiac muscle contraction. In teleost fish, the function of the Tn complex is modified by the consequences of differential expression of paralogs in response to environmental thermal challenges. In this article, we focus on the interaction between TnI and TnC, coded for by genes that have independent evolutionary origins, but the co-operation of their protein products has necessitated coevolution. In this study, we characterize functional divergence of TnC and TnI paralogs, specifically the interrelated roles of regulatory subfunctionalization and structural subfunctionalization. We determined that differential paralog transcript expression in response to temperature acclimation results in three combinations of TnC and TnI in the zebrafish heart: TnC1a/TnI1.1, TnC1b/TnI1.1, and TnC1a/TnI1.5. Phylogenetic analysis of these highly conserved proteins identified functionally divergent residues in TnI and TnC. The structural and functional effect of these Tn combinations was modeled with molecular dynamics simulation to link divergent sites to changes in interaction strength. Functional divergence in TnI and TnC were not limited to the residues involved with TnC/TnI switch interaction, which emphasizes the complex nature of Tn function. Patterns in domain-specific divergent selection and interaction energies suggest that substitutions in the TnI switch region are crucial to modifying TnI/TnC function to maintain cardiac contraction with temperature changes. This integrative approach introduces Tn as a model of functional divergence that guides the coevolution of interacting proteins. PMID:26979795

  14. Functional Divergence in Teleost Cardiac Troponin Paralogs Guides Variation in the Interaction of TnI Switch Region with TnC

    PubMed Central

    Genge, Christine E.; Stevens, Charles M.; Davidson, William S.; Singh, Gurpreet; Peter Tieleman, D.; Tibbits, Glen F.

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication results in extra copies of genes that must coevolve with their interacting partners in multimeric protein complexes. The cardiac troponin (Tn) complex, containing TnC, TnI, and TnT, forms a distinct functional unit critical for the regulation of cardiac muscle contraction. In teleost fish, the function of the Tn complex is modified by the consequences of differential expression of paralogs in response to environmental thermal challenges. In this article, we focus on the interaction between TnI and TnC, coded for by genes that have independent evolutionary origins, but the co-operation of their protein products has necessitated coevolution. In this study, we characterize functional divergence of TnC and TnI paralogs, specifically the interrelated roles of regulatory subfunctionalization and structural subfunctionalization. We determined that differential paralog transcript expression in response to temperature acclimation results in three combinations of TnC and TnI in the zebrafish heart: TnC1a/TnI1.1, TnC1b/TnI1.1, and TnC1a/TnI1.5. Phylogenetic analysis of these highly conserved proteins identified functionally divergent residues in TnI and TnC. The structural and functional effect of these Tn combinations was modeled with molecular dynamics simulation to link divergent sites to changes in interaction strength. Functional divergence in TnI and TnC were not limited to the residues involved with TnC/TnI switch interaction, which emphasizes the complex nature of Tn function. Patterns in domain-specific divergent selection and interaction energies suggest that substitutions in the TnI switch region are crucial to modifying TnI/TnC function to maintain cardiac contraction with temperature changes. This integrative approach introduces Tn as a model of functional divergence that guides the coevolution of interacting proteins. PMID:26979795

  15. Paralog specific Hsp90 Inhibitors – a brief history and a bright future

    PubMed Central

    Gewirth, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Structured Abstract Background The high sequence and structural homology among the hsp90 paralogs – Hsp90α, Hsp90β, Grp94, and Trap-1 – has made the development of paralog-specific inhibitors a challenging proposition. Objective This review surveys the state of developments in structural analysis, compound screening, and structure-based design that have been brought to bear on this problem. Results First generation compounds that selectively bind to Hsp90, Grp94, or Trap-1 have been identified. Conclusion With the proof of principle firmly established, the prospects for further progress are bright. PMID:27072700

  16. Regulation of gill claudin paralogs by salinity, cortisol and prolactin in Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    PubMed

    Tipsmark, Christian K; Breves, Jason P; Rabeneck, D Brett; Trubitt, Rebecca T; Lerner, Darren T; Grau, E Gordon

    2016-09-01

    In euryhaline teleosts, reorganization of gill tight junctions during salinity acclimation involves dynamic expression of specific claudin (Cldn) paralogs. We identified four transcripts encoding Cldn tight junction proteins in the tilapia gill transcriptome: cldn10c, cldn10e, cldn28a and cldn30. A tissue distribution experiment found cldn10c and cldn10e expression levels in the gill to be 100-fold higher than any other tissues examined. cldn28a and cldn30 levels in the gill were 10-fold greater than levels in other tissues. Expression of these genes in Mozambique tilapia was examined during acclimation to fresh water (FW), seawater (SW), and in response to hormone treatments. Transfer of tilapia from FW to SW elevated cldn10c and cldn10e, while cldn28a and cldn30 were stimulated following transfer from SW to FW. In hypophysectomized tilapia transferred to FW, pituitary extirpation induced reduced expression of cldn10c, cldn10e and cldn28a; these effects were mitigated equally by either prolactin or cortisol replacement. In vitro experiments with gill filaments showed that cortisol stimulated expression of all four cldns examined, suggesting a direct action of cortisol in situ. Our data indicate that elevated cldn10c and cldn10e expression is important during acclimation of tilapia to SW possibly by conferring ion specific paracellular permeability. On the other hand, expression of cldn28a and cldn30 appears to contribute to reorganization of branchial epithelium during FW acclimation. Hormone treatment experiments showed that particular FW- and SW-induced cldns are controlled by cortisol and prolactin. PMID:27210417

  17. NLR-Associating Transcription Factor bHLH84 and Its Paralogs Function Redundantly in Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fang; Kapos, Paul; Cheng, Yu Ti; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yuelin; Li, Xin

    2014-01-01

    In plants and animals, nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat domain containing (NLR) immune receptors are utilized to detect the presence or activities of pathogen-derived molecules. However, the mechanisms by which NLR proteins induce defense responses remain unclear. Here, we report the characterization of one basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH) type transcription factor (TF), bHLH84, identified from a reverse genetic screen. It functions as a transcriptional activator that enhances the autoimmunity of NLR mutant snc1 (suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 1) and confers enhanced immunity in wild-type backgrounds when overexpressed. Simultaneously knocking out three closely related bHLH paralogs attenuates RPS4-mediated immunity and partially suppresses the autoimmune phenotypes of snc1, while overexpression of the other two close paralogs also renders strong autoimmunity, suggesting functional redundancy in the gene family. Intriguingly, the autoimmunity conferred by bHLH84 overexpression can be largely suppressed by the loss-of-function snc1-r1 mutation, suggesting that SNC1 is required for its proper function. In planta co-immunoprecipitation revealed interactions between not only bHLH84 and SNC1, but also bHLH84 and RPS4, indicating that bHLH84 associates with these NLRs. Together with previous finding that SNC1 associates with repressor TPR1 to repress negative regulators, we hypothesize that nuclear NLR proteins may interact with both transcriptional repressors and activators during immune responses, enabling potentially faster and more robust transcriptional reprogramming upon pathogen recognition. PMID:25144198

  18. Protection of Clitoria ternatea flower petal extract against free radical-induced hemolysis and oxidative damage in canine erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Phrueksanan, Wathuwan; Yibchok-anun, Sirinthorn; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2014-10-01

    The present study assessed the antioxidant activity and protective ability of Clitoria ternatea flower petal extract (CTE) against in vitro 2,2'-azobis-2-methyl-propanimidamide dihydrochloride (AAPH)-induced hemolysis and oxidative damage of canine erythrocytes. From the phytochemical analysis, CTE contained phenolic compounds, flavonoids, and anthocyanins. In addition, CTE showed antioxidant activity as measured by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) method and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. CTE (400 µg/ml) remarkably protected erythrocytes against AAPH-induced hemolysis at 4 h of incubation. Moreover, CTE (400 µg/ml) reduced membrane lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl group formation and prevented the reduction of glutathione concentration in AAPH-induced oxidation of erythrocytes. The AAPH-induced morphological alteration of erythrocytes from a smooth discoid to an echinocytic form was effectively protected by CTE. The present results contribute important insights that CTE may have the potential to act as a natural antioxidant to prevent free radical-induced hemolysis, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation in erythrocytes. PMID:25241390

  19. Hydroxyl radical-induced cross-linking of thymine and lysine: identification of the primary structure and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, S; Hatta, H; Fujita, S; Matsuyama, T; Ueno, T; Nishimoto, S

    1998-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical-induced formation of a cross-link of thymine (Thy) and lysine (Lys) in the gamma-radiolysis of N2O-saturated aqueous solution was studied. A Thy-Lys cross-link (I) of the formal structure that OH radical and 4-carbon-centered Lys radical added respectively to C(5) and C(6) positions of Thy was isolated by a preparative HPLC and identified by a FAB-HRMS. The primary cross-link I was dehydrated by treatment with HCl at 120 degrees C to yield the secondary structure (II) possessing a C(5)-C(6) double bond in the Thy moiety: the latter structure II was reported previously (Dizdaroglu, M.; Gajewski, E. Cancer Res. 1989, 49, 3463-3467). A pulse radiolysis study with a redox titration method indicated that 4-carbon centered Lys radical intermediate was of neutral redox reactivity in contrast to reducing reactivity of 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymin-6-yl radical intermediate. The cross-link I could be formed by a conventional radical recombination mechanism, but not by an ionic recombination mechanism involving a redox reaction between the radical intermediates. PMID:9871556

  20. A paralog of the proteinaceous elicitor sm1 affects colonization of maize roots by Trichoderma virens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biocontrol agent, Trichoderma virens, has the ability to protect plants from pathogens by eliciting plant defense responses, involvement in mycoparasitism, or secreting antagonistic secondary metabolites. SM1, an elicitor of induced systemic resistance (ISR), was found to have three paralogs wi...

  1. Functional Annotations of Paralogs: A Blessing and a Curse.

    PubMed

    Zallot, Rémi; Harrison, Katherine J; Kolaczkowski, Bryan; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Gene duplication followed by mutation is a classic mechanism of neofunctionalization, producing gene families with functional diversity. In some cases, a single point mutation is sufficient to change the substrate specificity and/or the chemistry performed by an enzyme, making it difficult to accurately separate enzymes with identical functions from homologs with different functions. Because sequence similarity is often used as a basis for assigning functional annotations to genes, non-isofunctional gene families pose a great challenge for genome annotation pipelines. Here we describe how integrating evolutionary and functional information such as genome context, phylogeny, metabolic reconstruction and signature motifs may be required to correctly annotate multifunctional families. These integrative analyses can also lead to the discovery of novel gene functions, as hints from specific subgroups can guide the functional characterization of other members of the family. We demonstrate how careful manual curation processes using comparative genomics can disambiguate subgroups within large multifunctional families and discover their functions. We present the COG0720 protein family as a case study. We also discuss strategies to automate this process to improve the accuracy of genome functional annotation pipelines. PMID:27618105

  2. Key factors which concur to the correct therapeutic evaluation of herbal products in free radical-induced diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mancuso, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    For many years now the world’s scientific literature has been perfused with articles on the therapeutic potential of natural products, the vast majority of which have herbal origins, as in the case of free radical-induced diseases. What is often overlooked is the effort of researchers who take into consideration the preclinical and clinical evaluation of these herbal products, in order to demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy and safety. The first critical issue to be addressed in the early stages of the preclinical studies is related to pharmacokinetics, which is sometimes not very favorable, of some of these products, which limits the bioavailability after oral intake. In this regard, it is worthy underlining how it is often unethical to propose the therapeutic efficacy of a compound on the basis of preclinical results obtained with far higher concentrations to those which, hopefully, could be achieved in organs and tissues of subjects taking these products by mouth. The most widely used approach to overcome the problem related to the low bioavailability involves the complexation of the active ingredients of herbal products with non-toxic carriers that facilitate the absorption and distribution. Even the induction or inhibition of drug metabolizing enzymes by herbal products, and the consequent variations of plasma concentrations of co-administered drugs, are phenomena to be carefully evaluated as they can give rise to side-effects. This risk is even greater when considering that people lack the perception of the risk arising from an over use of herbal products that, by their very nature, are considered risk-free. PMID:25954201

  3. Key factors which concur to the correct therapeutic evaluation of herbal products in free radical-induced diseases.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    For many years now the world's scientific literature has been perfused with articles on the therapeutic potential of natural products, the vast majority of which have herbal origins, as in the case of free radical-induced diseases. What is often overlooked is the effort of researchers who take into consideration the preclinical and clinical evaluation of these herbal products, in order to demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy and safety. The first critical issue to be addressed in the early stages of the preclinical studies is related to pharmacokinetics, which is sometimes not very favorable, of some of these products, which limits the bioavailability after oral intake. In this regard, it is worthy underlining how it is often unethical to propose the therapeutic efficacy of a compound on the basis of preclinical results obtained with far higher concentrations to those which, hopefully, could be achieved in organs and tissues of subjects taking these products by mouth. The most widely used approach to overcome the problem related to the low bioavailability involves the complexation of the active ingredients of herbal products with non-toxic carriers that facilitate the absorption and distribution. Even the induction or inhibition of drug metabolizing enzymes by herbal products, and the consequent variations of plasma concentrations of co-administered drugs, are phenomena to be carefully evaluated as they can give rise to side-effects. This risk is even greater when considering that people lack the perception of the risk arising from an over use of herbal products that, by their very nature, are considered risk-free. PMID:25954201

  4. Sub- and neo-functionalization of APETALA3 paralogs have contributed to the evolution of novel floral organ identity in Aquilegia (columbine, Ranunculaceae).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bharti; Kramer, Elena

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies of the lower eudicot model Aquilegia have revealed differential expression patterns of two APETALA3 (AP3) paralogs that appear to coincide with the development of a distinct fifth floral organ type, the staminodium. The AqAP3-1 locus quickly becomes limited to the staminodia while AqAP3-2 becomes stamen-specific. We used transient RNAi-based methods to silence each of these loci individually and in combination, followed by detailed studies of the resultant morphologies and the effects on gene expression patterns. Silencing of AqAP3-1 had a strong effect on the staminodia, causing transformation into carpeloid organs, while silencing of AqAP3-2 only affected the stamens, resulting in sterility, stunting or weak transformation towards carpel identity. Much more dramatic phenotypes were obtained in the doubly silenced flowers, where all stamens and staminodia were transformed into carpels. Quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses of B gene homolog expression in these flowers are consistent with complex patterns of regulatory feedback among the loci. These findings suggest that the presence of ancient AP3 paralogs in the Ranunculaceae has facilitated the recent evolution of a novel organ identity program in Aquilegia. Specifically, it appears that downregulation of AqAP3-2 in the innermost whorl of stamens was a critical step in the evolution of elaborated sterile organs in this position. PMID:23278258

  5. The Sheep Tetherin Paralog oBST2B Blocks Envelope Glycoprotein Incorporation into Nascent Retroviral Virions

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Lita; Varela, Mariana; Desloire, Sophie; Ftaich, Najate; Murgia, Claudio; Golder, Matthew; Neil, Stuart; Spencer, Thomas E.; Wootton, Sarah K.; Lavillette, Dimitri; Terzian, Christophe; Palmarini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bone marrow stromal cell antigen 2 (BST2) is a cellular restriction factor with a broad antiviral activity. In sheep, the BST2 gene is duplicated into two paralogs termed oBST2A and oBST2B. oBST2A impedes viral exit of the Jaagsiekte sheep retroviruses (JSRV), most probably by retaining virions at the cell membrane, similar to the “tethering” mechanism exerted by human BST2. In this study, we provide evidence that unlike oBST2A, oBST2B is limited to the Golgi apparatus and disrupts JSRV envelope (Env) trafficking by sequestering it. In turn, oBST2B leads to a reduction in Env incorporation into viral particles, which ultimately results in the release of virions that are less infectious. Furthermore, the activity of oBST2B does not seem to be restricted to retroviruses, as it also acts on vesicular stomatitis virus glycoproteins. Therefore, we suggest that oBST2B exerts antiviral activity using a mechanism distinct from the classical tethering restriction observed for oBST2A. IMPORTANCE BST2 is a powerful cellular restriction factor against a wide range of enveloped viruses. Sheep possess two paralogs of the BST2 gene called oBST2A and oBST2B. JSRV, the causative agent of a transmissible lung cancer of sheep, is known to be restricted by oBST2A. In this study, we show that unlike oBST2A, oBST2B impairs the normal cellular trafficking of JSRV envelope glycoproteins by sequestering them within the Golgi apparatus. We also show that oBST2B decreases the incorporation of envelope glycoprotein into JSRV viral particles, which in turn reduces virion infectivity. In conclusion, oBST2B exerts a novel antiviral activity that is distinct from those of BST2 proteins of other species. PMID:25339764

  6. Two proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) paralogs from the tropical sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus): Molecular characterization and inducible expression with immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunhua; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Xiao; Sun, Hongyan; Qian, Jing; Hu, Chaoqun; Wang, Yanhong

    2016-09-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a multifunctional protein that widely exists in eukaryotic species. In this study, two PCSK9 paralogs, named StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2, were identified from the tropical sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus). The cDNAs of StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2 are 1330 kb and 1508 kb in size, respectively. The open reading frames (ORF) for StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2 cDNAs are 1128 and 1167 bp in length, encoding the proteins of 375 and 388 amino acids with the deduced molecular weights of 38.76 and 41.07 kDa, respectively. In accord with other members in PCSK9 family, the two StmPCSK9 paralogs possessed the inhibitor_I9 and peptidase_S8 functional domains, seven active sites, a catalytic triad and two calcium binding sites. For the gene structure, the splicing of the two StmPCSK9 paralogs was relatively conserved. In addition, the mRNA expression of StmPCSK9-1 and StmPCSK9-2 was only detected in the sea cucumber intestine and coelomocytes, and the expression levels of both the two StmPCSK9 paralogs were higher in intestine. Moreover, StmPCSK9-2 was found to be a cytoplasm protein without signal peptide, and show no response to the immune challenge. On the contrary, StmPCSK9-1 was a secreted protein and the transcriptional expression of StmPCSK9-1 was significantly up-regulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) treatment and slightly down-regulated by polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid [Poly (I:C)] challenge in in vitro experiments performed in the cultural primary coelomocytes, suggesting that the StmPCSK9-1 may play critical roles in the innate immune defense of sea cucumber, S. monotuberculatus, against bacterial and/or viral infections. PMID:27426522

  7. ZINC-INDUCED FACILITATOR-LIKE family in plants: lineage-specific expansion in monocotyledons and conserved genomic and expression features among rice (Oryza sativa) paralogs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Duplications are very common in the evolution of plant genomes, explaining the high number of members in plant gene families. New genes born after duplication can undergo pseudogenization, neofunctionalization or subfunctionalization. Rice is a model for functional genomics research, an important crop for human nutrition and a target for biofortification. Increased zinc and iron content in the rice grain could be achieved by manipulation of metal transporters. Here, we describe the ZINC-INDUCED FACILITATOR-LIKE (ZIFL) gene family in plants, and characterize the genomic structure and expression of rice paralogs, which are highly affected by segmental duplication. Results Sequences of sixty-eight ZIFL genes, from nine plant species, were comparatively analyzed. Although related to MSF_1 proteins, ZIFL protein sequences consistently grouped separately. Specific ZIFL sequence signatures were identified. Monocots harbor a larger number of ZIFL genes in their genomes than dicots, probably a result of a lineage-specific expansion. The rice ZIFL paralogs were named OsZIFL1 to OsZIFL13 and characterized. The genomic organization of the rice ZIFL genes seems to be highly influenced by segmental and tandem duplications and concerted evolution, as rice genome contains five highly similar ZIFL gene pairs. Most rice ZIFL promoters are enriched for the core sequence of the Fe-deficiency-related box IDE1. Gene expression analyses of different plant organs, growth stages and treatments, both from our qPCR data and from microarray databases, revealed that the duplicated ZIFL gene pairs are mostly co-expressed. Transcripts of OsZIFL4, OsZIFL5, OsZIFL7, and OsZIFL12 accumulate in response to Zn-excess and Fe-deficiency in roots, two stresses with partially overlapping responses. Conclusions We suggest that ZIFL genes have different evolutionary histories in monocot and dicot lineages. In rice, concerted evolution affected ZIFL duplicated genes, possibly maintaining similar

  8. Interactions involving the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C and XRCC3 in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Collins, David W.; Albala, Joanna S.; Thompson, Larry H.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Homologous recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks and crosslinks in human cells is likely to require Rad51 and the five Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2 and Rad51D/Rad51L3), as has been shown in chicken and rodent cells. Previously, we reported on the interactions among these proteins using baculovirus and two- and three-hybrid yeast systems. To test for interactions involving XRCC3 and Rad51C, stable human cell lines have been isolated that express (His)6-tagged versions of XRCC3 or Rad51C. Ni2+-binding experiments demonstrate that XRCC3 and Rad51C interact in human cells. In addition, we find that Rad51C, but not XRCC3, interacts directly or indirectly with Rad51B, Rad51D and XRCC2. These results argue that there are at least two complexes of Rad51 paralogs in human cells (Rad51C-XRCC3 and Rad51B-Rad51C-Rad51D-XRCC2), both containing Rad51C. Moreover, Rad51 is not found in these complexes. X-ray treatment did not alter either the level of any Rad51 paralog or the observed interactions between paralogs. However, the endogenous level of Rad51C is moderately elevated in the XRCC3-overexpressing cell line, suggesting that dimerization between these proteins might help stabilize Rad51C.

  9. Identification, origin and evidence for retained functionality of two IκBα paralogs in Megalobrama amblycephala.

    PubMed

    Jakovlić, Ivan; Liu, Han; Wang, Wei-Min

    2016-09-01

    IκBα plays an essential role in the innate immune response in mammals. We found two functional IκBα paralogs, originating from the teleost-specific genome duplication, in Megalobrama amblycephala: maIκBαa and maIκBαb. Their size (936/933 bp) and structure are highly analogous to known orthologs. mRNA expression was analysed by qPCR in spleen, liver, kidney, intestine and gills. Apart from maIκBαb in gills (<0.001-fold), both paralogs were constitutively expressed in all tissues. Differential expression was observed in gills (high for maIκBαa) and liver: maIκBαa - 2nd lowest (0.47), maIκBαb - 2nd highest (4.25). Both paralogs (mRNA) were upregulated in liver, spleen and kidney after a bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) challenge. In spleen, expressions peaked at 12 h post injection (hpi) (maIκBαa = 14.3-fold, maIκBαb = 21.3-fold), but only maIκBαb was highly upregulated at 4, 24 and 120 hpi. In liver, both were upregulated early, but maIκBαa peaked at 4 hpi (15.2-fold) and maIκBαb at 12 hpi (9.8-fold). In kidney, maIκBαa was highly upregulated only at 12 hpi (8.7-fold), and maIκBαb at 4 (peak - 8.2-fold), 12 and 24 hpi. The results indicate that both IκBα paralogs have retained their functionality, that they are structurally and functionally homologous to IκBα orthologs described in other animal species, and that they both play an important role in the innate immune system of M. amblycephala. PMID:27155355

  10. Diversification of Paralogous α-Isopropylmalate Synthases by Modulation of Feedback Control and Hetero-Oligomerization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Quezada, Héctor; Duhne, Mariana; González, James; Lezama, Mijail; El-Hafidi, Mohammed; Colón, Maritrini; Martínez de la Escalera, Ximena; Flores-Villegas, Mirelle Citlali; Scazzocchio, Claudio; DeLuna, Alexander; González, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Production of α-isopropylmalate (α-IPM) is critical for leucine biosynthesis and for the global control of metabolism. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two paralogous genes, LEU4 and LEU9, that encode α-IPM synthase (α-IPMS) isozymes. Little is known about the biochemical differences between these two α-IPMS isoenzymes. Here, we show that the Leu4 homodimer is a leucine-sensitive isoform, while the Leu9 homodimer is resistant to such feedback inhibition. The leu4Δ mutant, which expresses only the feedback-resistant Leu9 homodimer, grows slowly with either glucose or ethanol and accumulates elevated pools of leucine; this phenotype is alleviated by the addition of leucine. Transformation of the leu4Δ mutant with a centromeric plasmid carrying LEU4 restored the wild-type phenotype. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation analysis showed that Leu4-Leu9 heterodimeric isozymes are formed in vivo. Purification and kinetic analysis showed that the hetero-oligomeric isozyme has a distinct leucine sensitivity behavior. Determination of α-IPMS activity in ethanol-grown cultures showed that α-IPM biosynthesis and growth under these respiratory conditions depend on the feedback-sensitive Leu4 homodimer. We conclude that retention and further diversification of two yeast α-IPMSs have resulted in a specific regulatory system that controls the leucine–α-IPM biosynthetic pathway by selective feedback sensitivity of homomeric and heterodimeric isoforms. PMID:25841022

  11. Exchanging ligand-binding specificity between a pair of mouse olfactory receptor paralogs reveals odorant recognition principles.

    PubMed

    Baud, Olivia; Yuan, Shuguang; Veya, Luc; Filipek, Slawomir; Vogel, Horst; Pick, Horst

    2015-01-01

    A multi-gene family of ~1000 G protein-coupled olfactory receptors (ORs) constitutes the molecular basis of mammalian olfaction. Due to the lack of structural data its remarkable capacity to detect and discriminate thousands of odorants remains poorly understood on the structural level of the receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis we transferred ligand specificity between two functionally related ORs and thereby revealed amino acid residues of central importance for odorant recognition and discrimination of the two receptors. By exchanging two of three residues, differing at equivalent positions of the putative odorant binding site between the mouse OR paralogs Olfr73 (mOR-EG) and Olfr74 (mOR-EV), we selectively changed ligand preference but remarkably also signaling activation strength in both ORs. Computer modeling proposed structural details at atomic resolution how the very same odorant molecule might interact with different contact residues to induce different functional responses in two related receptors. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation of how the olfactory system distinguishes different molecular aspects of a given odorant molecule, and unravel important molecular details of the combinatorial encoding of odorant identity at the OR level. PMID:26449412

  12. Exchanging ligand-binding specificity between a pair of mouse olfactory receptor paralogs reveals odorant recognition principles

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Olivia; Yuan, Shuguang; Veya, Luc; Filipek, Slawomir; Vogel, Horst; Pick, Horst

    2015-01-01

    A multi-gene family of ~1000 G protein-coupled olfactory receptors (ORs) constitutes the molecular basis of mammalian olfaction. Due to the lack of structural data its remarkable capacity to detect and discriminate thousands of odorants remains poorly understood on the structural level of the receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis we transferred ligand specificity between two functionally related ORs and thereby revealed amino acid residues of central importance for odorant recognition and discrimination of the two receptors. By exchanging two of three residues, differing at equivalent positions of the putative odorant binding site between the mouse OR paralogs Olfr73 (mOR-EG) and Olfr74 (mOR-EV), we selectively changed ligand preference but remarkably also signaling activation strength in both ORs. Computer modeling proposed structural details at atomic resolution how the very same odorant molecule might interact with different contact residues to induce different functional responses in two related receptors. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation of how the olfactory system distinguishes different molecular aspects of a given odorant molecule, and unravel important molecular details of the combinatorial encoding of odorant identity at the OR level. PMID:26449412

  13. SP Transcription Factor Paralogs and DNA-Binding Sites Coevolve and Adaptively Converge in Mammals and Birds

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Ken Daigoro; Pollock, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Functional modification of regulatory proteins can affect hundreds of genes throughout the genome, and is therefore thought to be almost universally deleterious. This belief, however, has recently been challenged. A potential example comes from transcription factor SP1, for which statistical evidence indicates that motif preferences were altered in eutherian mammals. Here, we set out to discover possible structural and theoretical explanations, evaluate the role of selection in SP1 evolution, and discover effects on coregulatory proteins. We show that SP1 motif preferences were convergently altered in birds as well as mammals, inducing coevolutionary changes in over 800 regulatory regions. Structural and phylogenic evidence implicates a single causative amino acid replacement at the same SP1 position along both lineages. Furthermore, paralogs SP3 and SP4, which coregulate SP1 target genes through competitive binding to the same sites, have accumulated convergent replacements at the homologous position multiple times during eutherian and bird evolution, presumably to preserve competitive binding. To determine plausibility, we developed and implemented a simple model of transcription factor and binding site coevolution. This model predicts that, in contrast to prevailing beliefs, even small selective benefits per locus can drive concurrent fixation of transcription factor and binding site mutants under a broad range of conditions. Novel binding sites tend to arise de novo, rather than by mutation from ancestral sites, a prediction substantiated by SP1-binding site alignments. Thus, multiple lines of evidence indicate that selection has driven convergent evolution of transcription factors along with their binding sites and coregulatory proteins. PMID:23019068

  14. Functional Interplay of Two Paralogs Encoding SWI/SNF Chromatin-Remodeling Accessory Subunits During Caenorhabditis elegans Development.

    PubMed

    Ertl, Iris; Porta-de-la-Riva, Montserrat; Gómez-Orte, Eva; Rubio-Peña, Karinna; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Cornes, Eric; Fontrodona, Laura; Osteikoetxea, Xabier; Ayuso, Cristina; Askjaer, Peter; Cabello, Juan; Cerón, Julián

    2016-03-01

    SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complexes have been related to several cellular processes such as transcription, regulation of chromosomal stability, and DNA repair. The Caenorhabditis elegans gene ham-3 (also known as swsn-2.1) and its paralog swsn-2.2 encode accessory subunits of SWI/SNF complexes. Using RNA interference (RNAi) assays and diverse alleles we investigated whether ham-3 and swsn-2.2 have different functions during C. elegans development since they encode proteins that are probably mutually exclusive in a given SWI/SNF complex. We found that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 display similar functions in vulva specification, germline development, and intestinal cell proliferation, but have distinct roles in embryonic development. Accordingly, we detected functional redundancy in some developmental processes and demonstrated by RNA sequencing of RNAi-treated L4 animals that ham-3 and swsn-2.2 regulate the expression of a common subset of genes but also have specific targets. Cell lineage analyses in the embryo revealed hyper-proliferation of intestinal cells in ham-3 null mutants whereas swsn-2.2 is required for proper cell divisions. Using a proteomic approach, we identified SWSN-2.2-interacting proteins needed for early cell divisions, such as SAO-1 and ATX-2, and also nuclear envelope proteins such as MEL-28. swsn-2.2 mutants phenocopy mel-28 loss-of-function, and we observed that SWSN-2.2 and MEL-28 colocalize in mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. Moreover, we demonstrated that SWSN-2.2 is required for correct chromosome segregation and nuclear reassembly after mitosis including recruitment of MEL-28 to the nuclear periphery. PMID:26739451

  15. Promotion of Homologous Recombination by SWS-1 in Complex with RAD-51 Paralogs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    McClendon, T Brooke; Sullivan, Meghan R; Bernstein, Kara A; Yanowitz, Judith L

    2016-05-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs cytotoxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with high fidelity. Deficiencies in HR result in genome instability. A key early step in HR is the search for and invasion of a homologous DNA template by a single-stranded RAD-51 nucleoprotein filament. The Shu complex, composed of a SWIM domain-containing protein and its interacting RAD51 paralogs, promotes HR by regulating RAD51 filament dynamics. Despite Shu complex orthologs throughout eukaryotes, our understanding of its function has been most extensively characterized in budding yeast. Evolutionary analysis of the SWIM domain identified Caenorhabditis elegans sws-1 as a putative homolog of the yeast Shu complex member Shu2. Using a CRISPR-induced nonsense allele of sws-1, we show that sws-1 promotes HR in mitotic and meiotic nuclei. sws-1 mutants exhibit sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and fail to form mitotic RAD-51 foci following treatment with camptothecin. Phenotypic similarities between sws-1 and the two RAD-51 paralogs rfs-1 and rip-1 suggest that they function together. Indeed, we detect direct interaction between SWS-1 and RIP-1 by yeast two-hybrid assay that is mediated by the SWIM domain in SWS-1 and the Walker B motif in RIP-1 Furthermore, RIP-1 bridges an interaction between SWS-1 and RFS-1, suggesting that RIP-1 facilitates complex formation with SWS-1 and RFS-1 We propose that SWS-1, RIP-1, and RFS-1 compose a C. elegans Shu complex. Our work provides a new model for studying Shu complex disruption in the context of a multicellular organism that has important implications as to why mutations in the human RAD51 paralogs are associated with genome instability. PMID:26936927

  16. Gene family level comparative analysis of gene expression in mammals validates the ortholog conjecture.

    PubMed

    Rogozin, Igor B; Managadze, David; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Koonin, Eugene V

    2014-04-01

    The ortholog conjecture (OC), which is central to functional annotation of genomes, posits that orthologous genes are functionally more similar than paralogous genes at the same level of sequence divergence. However, a recent study challenged the OC by reporting a greater functional similarity, in terms of Gene Ontology (GO) annotations and expression profiles, among within-species paralogs compared with orthologs. These findings were taken to indicate that functional similarity of homologous genes is primarily determined by the cellular context of the genes, rather than evolutionary history. However, several subsequent studies suggest that GO annotations and microarray data could artificially inflate functional similarity between paralogs from the same organism. We sought to test the OC using approaches distinct from those used in previous studies. Analysis of a large RNAseq data set from multiple human and mouse tissues shows that expression similarity (correlations coefficients, rank's, or Z-scores) between orthologs is substantially greater than that for between-species paralogs with the same sequence divergence, in agreement with the OC and the results of recent detailed analyses. These findings are further corroborated by a fine-grain analysis in which expression profiles of orthologs and paralogs were compared separately for individual gene families. Expression profiles of within-species paralogs are more strongly correlated than profiles of orthologs but it is shown that this is caused by high background noise, that is, correlation between profiles of unrelated genes in the same organism. Z-scores and rank scores show a nonmonotonic dependence of expression profile similarity on sequence divergence. This complexity of gene expression evolution after duplication might be at least partially caused by selection for protein dosage rebalancing following gene duplication. PMID:24610837

  17. Unexpected Ancient Paralogs and an Evolutionary Model for the COPII Coat Complex

    PubMed Central

    Schlacht, Alexander; Dacks, Joel B.

    2015-01-01

    The coat protein complex II (COPII) is responsible for the transport of protein cargoes from the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus. COPII has been functionally characterized extensively in vivo in humans and yeast. This complex shares components with the nuclear pore complex and the Seh1-Associated (SEA) complex, inextricably linking its evolution with that of the nuclear pore and other protocoatomer domain-containing complexes. Importantly, this is one of the last coat complexes to be examined from a comparative genomic and phylogenetic perspective. We use homology searching of eight components across 74 eukaryotic genomes, followed by phylogenetic analyses, to assess both the distribution of the COPII components across eukaryote diversity and to assess its evolutionary history. We report that Sec12, but not Sed4 was present in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor along with Sec16, Sar1, Sec13, Sec31, Sec23, and Sec24. We identify a previously undetected paralog of Sec23 that, at least, predates the archaeplastid clade. We also describe three Sec24 paralogs likely present in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor, including one newly detected that was anciently present but lost from both opisthokonts and excavates. Altogether, we report previously undescribed complexity of the COPII coat in the ancient eukaryotic ancestor and speculate on models for the evolution, not only of the complex, but its relationship to other protocoatomer-derived complexes. PMID:25747251

  18. A tale of two paralogs: human Transformer2 proteins with differential RNA-binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pritha; Grellscheid, Sushma Nagaraja; Sowdhamini, R

    2016-09-01

    The Transformer2 (Tra2) proteins in humans are homologues of the Drosophila Tra2 protein. One of the two RNA-binding paralogs, Tra2β, has been very well-studied over the past decade, but not much is known about Tra2α. It was very recently shown that the two proteins demonstrate the phenomenon of paralog compensation. Here, we provide a structural basis for this genetic backup circuit, using molecular modelling and dynamics studies. We show that the two proteins display similar binding specificities, but differential affinities to a short GAA-rich RNA stretch. Starting from the 6-nucleotide RNA in the solution structure, close to 4000 virtual mutations were modelled on RNA and the domain-RNA interactions were studied after energy minimisation to convergence. Separately, another known 13-nucleotide stretch was docked and the domain-RNA interactions were observed through a 100-ns dynamics trajectory. We have also demonstrated the 'compensatory' mechanism at the level of domains in one of the domain repeat-containing RNA-binding proteins. PMID:26414300

  19. Generation of Variants in Listeria monocytogenes Continuous-Flow Biofilms Is Dependent on Radical-Induced DNA Damage and RecA-Mediated Repair

    PubMed Central

    van der Veen, Stijn; Abee, Tjakko

    2011-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive microaerophilic facultative anaerobic rod and the causative agent of the devastating disease listeriosis. L. monocytogenes is able to form biofilms in the food processing environment. Since biofilms are generally hard to eradicate, they can function as a source for food contamination. In several occasions biofilms have been identified as a source for genetic variability, which potentially can result in adaptation of strains to food processing or clinical conditions. However, nothing is known about mutagenesis in L. monocytogenes biofilms and the possible mechanisms involved. In this study, we showed that the generation of genetic variants was specifically induced in continuous-flow biofilms of L. monocytogenes, but not in static biofilms. Using specific dyes and radical inhibitors, we showed that the formation of superoxide and hydroxyl radicals was induced in continuous-flow biofilms, which was accompanied with in an increase in DNA damage. Promoter reporter studies showed that recA, which is an important component in DNA repair and the activator of the SOS response, is activated in continuous-flow biofilms and that activation was dependent on radical-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, continuous-flow biofilm experiments using an in-frame recA deletion mutant verified that RecA is required for induced generation of genetic variants. Therefore, we can conclude that generation of genetic variants in L. monocytogenes continuous-flow biofilms results from radical-induced DNA damage and RecA-mediated mutagenic repair of the damaged DNA. PMID:22163039

  20. An Independent Genome Duplication Inferred from Hox Paralogs in the American Paddlefish—A Representative Basal Ray-Finned Fish and Important Comparative Reference

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Karen D.; Smith, Christopher D.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Wagner, Günter P.; Amemiya, Chris T.

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrates have experienced two rounds of whole-genome duplication (WGD) in the stem lineages of deep nodes within the group and a subsequent duplication event in the stem lineage of the teleosts—a highly diverse group of ray-finned fishes. Here, we present the first full Hox gene sequences for any member of the Acipenseriformes, the American paddlefish, and confirm that an independent WGD occurred in the paddlefish lineage, approximately 42 Ma based on sequences spanning the entire HoxA cluster and eight genes on the HoxD gene cluster. These clusters comprise different HOX loci and maintain conserved synteny relative to bichir, zebrafish, stickleback, and pufferfish, as well as human, mouse, and chick. We also provide a gene genealogy for the duplicated fzd8 gene in paddlefish and present evidence for the first Hox14 gene in any ray-finned fish. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the American paddlefish has an independently duplicated genome. Substitution patterns of the “alpha” paralogs on both the HoxA and HoxD gene clusters suggest transcriptional inactivation consistent with functional diploidization. Further, there are similarities in the pattern of sequence divergence among duplicated Hox genes in paddlefish and teleost lineages, even though they occurred independently approximately 200 Myr apart. We highlight implications on comparative analyses in the study of the “fin-limb transition” as well as gene and genome duplication in bony fishes, which includes all ray-finned fishes as well as the lobe-finned fishes and tetrapod vertebrates. PMID:22851613

  1. MglC, a Paralog of Myxococcus xanthus GTPase-Activating Protein MglB, Plays a Divergent Role in Motility Regulation

    PubMed Central

    McLoon, Anna L.; Wuichet, Kristin; Häsler, Michael; Keilberg, Daniela; Szadkowski, Dobromir

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to optimize interactions with their environment and one another, bacteria regulate their motility. In the case of the rod-shaped cells of Myxococcus xanthus, regulated motility is essential for social behaviors. M. xanthus moves over surfaces using type IV pilus-dependent motility and gliding motility. These two motility systems are coordinated by a protein module that controls cell polarity and consists of three polarly localized proteins, the small G protein MglA, the cognate MglA GTPase-activating protein MglB, and the response regulator RomR. Cellular reversals are induced by the Frz chemosensory system, and the output response regulator of this system, FrzZ, interfaces with the MglA/MglB/RomR module to invert cell polarity. Using a computational approach, we identify a paralog of MglB, MXAN_5770 (MglC). Genetic epistasis experiments demonstrate that MglC functions in the same pathway as MglA, MglB, RomR, and FrzZ and is important for regulating cellular reversals. Like MglB, MglC localizes to the cell poles asymmetrically and with a large cluster at the lagging pole. Correct polar localization of MglC depends on RomR and MglB. Consistently, MglC interacts directly with MglB and the C-terminal output domain of RomR, and we identified a surface of MglC that is necessary for the interaction with MglB and for MglC function. Together, our findings identify an additional member of the M. xanthus polarity module involved in regulating motility and demonstrate how gene duplication followed by functional divergence can add a layer of control to the complex cellular processes of motility and motility regulation. IMPORTANCE Gene duplication and the subsequent divergence of the duplicated genes are important evolutionary mechanisms for increasing both biological complexity and regulation of biological processes. The bacterium Myxococcus xanthus is a soil bacterium with an unusually large genome that carries out several social processes, including

  2. A strong deletion bias in nonallelic gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Assis, Raquel; Kondrashov, Alexey S

    2012-01-01

    Gene conversion is the unidirectional transfer of genetic information between orthologous (allelic) or paralogous (nonallelic) genomic segments. Though a number of studies have examined nucleotide replacements, little is known about length difference mutations produced by gene conversion. Here, we investigate insertions and deletions produced by nonallelic gene conversion in 338 Drosophila and 10,149 primate paralogs. Using a direct phylogenetic approach, we identify 179 insertions and 614 deletions in Drosophila paralogs, and 132 insertions and 455 deletions in primate paralogs. Thus, nonallelic gene conversion is strongly deletion-biased in both lineages, with almost 3.5 times as many conversion-induced deletions as insertions. In primates, the deletion bias is considerably stronger for long indels and, in both lineages, the per-site rate of gene conversion is orders of magnitudes higher than that of ordinary mutation. Due to this high rate, deletion-biased nonallelic gene conversion plays a key role in genome size evolution, leading to the cooperative shrinkage and eventual disappearance of selectively neutral paralogs. PMID:22359514

  3. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) paralog dose governs T cell effector and regulatory functions

    PubMed Central

    Villarino, Alejandro; Laurence, Arian; Robinson, Gertraud W; Bonelli, Michael; Dema, Barbara; Afzali, Behdad; Shih, Han-Yu; Sun, Hong-Wei; Brooks, Stephen R; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kanno, Yuka; O'Shea, John J

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is fundamental to the mammalian immune system. However, the relationship between its two paralogs, STAT5A and STAT5B, and the extent to which they are functionally distinct, remain uncertain. Using mouse models of paralog deficiency, we demonstrate that they are not equivalent for CD4+ 'helper' T cells, the principal orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Instead, we find that STAT5B is dominant for both effector and regulatory (Treg) responses and, therefore, uniquely necessary for immunological tolerance. Comparative analysis of genomic distribution and transcriptomic output confirm that STAT5B has fargreater impact but, surprisingly, the data point towards asymmetric expression (i.e. paralog dose), rather than distinct functional properties, as the key distinguishing feature. Thus, we propose a quantitative model of STAT5 paralog activity whereby relative abundance imposes functional specificity (or dominance) in the face of widespread structural homology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08384.001 PMID:26999798

  4. Effects of MreB paralogs on poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis and cell morphology in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weixia; Zhang, Zhongxiong; Feng, Jun; Dang, Yulei; Quan, Yufen; Gu, Yanyan; Wang, Shufang; Song, Cunjiang

    2016-09-01

    Actin-like MreB paralogs play important roles in cell shape maintenance, cell wall synthesis and the regulation of the D,L-endopeptidases, CwlO and LytE. The gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens LL3, is a poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) producing strain that contains three MreB paralogs: MreB, Mbl and MreBH. In B. amyloliquefaciens, CwlO and LytE can degrade γ-PGA. In this study, we aimed to test the hypothesis that modulating transcript levels of MreB paralogs would alter the synthesis and degradation of γ-PGA. The results showed that overexpression or inhibition of MreB, Mbl or MreBH had distinct effects on cell morphology and the molecular weight of the γ-PGA products. In fermentation medium, cells of mreB inhibition mutant were 50.2% longer than LL3, and the γ-PGA titer increased by 55.7%. However, changing the expression level of mbl showed only slight effects on the morphology, γ-PGA molecular weight and titer. In the mreBH inhibition mutant, γ-PGA production and its molecular weight increased by 56.7% and 19.4%, respectively. These results confirmed our hypothesis that suppressing the expression of MreB paralogs might reduce γ-PGA degradation, and that improving the cell size could strengthen γ-PGA synthesis. This is the first report of enhanced γ-PGA production via suppression of actin-like MreB paralogs. PMID:27481703

  5. Different Poses for Ligand and Chaperone in Inhibitor Bound Hsp90 and GRP94: Implications for Paralog-specific Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Immormino, Robert M.; Metzger, Louis E.; Reardon, Patrick N.; Dollins, D. Eric; Blagg, Brian S.J.; Gewirth, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    Hsp90 chaperones contain an N-terminal ATP binding site that has been effectively targeted by competitive inhibitors. Despite the myriad of inhibitors, none to date have been designed to bind specifically to just one of the four mammalian hsp90 paralogs, which are cytoplasmic Hsp90α and β, ER GRP94, and mitochondrial Trap-1. Given that each of the hsp90 paralogs is responsible for chaperoning a distinct set of client proteins, specific targeting of one hsp90 paralog may result in higher efficacy and therapeutic control. Specific inhibitors may also help elucidate the biochemical roles of each hsp90 paralog. Here we present side by side comparisons of the structures of yeast Hsp90 and mammalian GRP94, bound to the pan-hsp90 inhibitors Geldanamycin and Radamide. These structures reveal paralog specific differences in the Hsp90 and GRP94 conformations in response to Geldanamycin binding. We also report significant variation in the pose and disparate binding affinities for the Geldanamycin-Radicicol chimera Radamide when bound to the two paralogs, which may be exploited in the design of paralog-specific inhibitors. PMID:19361515

  6. In Vitro Antioxidant-Activity Evaluation of Gallic-Acid-Grafted Chitosan Conjugate Synthesized by Free-Radical-Induced Grafting Method.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiaobin; Wang, Taoran; Zhou, Mingyong; Xue, Jingyi; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-07-27

    The major objective of this work was to develop a green and facile process to prepare gallic acid-chitosan conjugate and comprehensively evaluate the physicochemical properties and biological activities of an as-prepared water-soluble chitosan derivative. A free-radical-induced grafting approach using an ascorbic acid-hydrogen peroxide redox pair was adopted. The obtained conjugate was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, UV-vis, X-ray diffraction, and pKa analysis. The antioxidant activities were evaluated by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6)-sulphonic acid (ABTS), reducing power, and oxygen-radical antioxidant-capacity assays. The results showed that the mass ratio of gallic acid to chitosan played a vital role in determining the grafting degree and ζ potential of the conjugates, with the ratio of 0.5:1 being the optimal ratio that resulted in the highest grafting degree. The antioxidant assays demonstrated that conjugation significantly improved the antioxidant activities, being dramatically higher than that of free chitosan. It was notable that the DPPH- and ABTS-scavenging activities of conjugate at 0.4 mg/mL reached the same level as the free gallic acid at the equivalent concentration. Our study demonstrated a green and facile synthesis approach to preparing a novel water-soluble chitosan derivative that may have promising potentials in the food industry. PMID:27379913

  7. Cooperative action of the paralogous maize lateral organ boundaries (LOB) domain proteins RTCS and RTCL in shoot-borne root formation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changzheng; Tai, Huanhuan; Saleem, Muhammad; Ludwig, Yvonne; Majer, Christine; Berendzen, Kenneth W; Nagel, Kerstin A; Wojciechowski, Tobias; Meeley, Robert B; Taramino, Graziana; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2015-09-01

    The paralogous maize (Zea mays) LBD (Lateral Organ Boundaries Domain) genes rtcs (rootless concerning crown and seminal roots) and rtcl (rtcs-like) emerged from an ancient whole-genome duplication. RTCS is a key regulator of crown root initiation. The diversity of expression, molecular interaction and phenotype of rtcs and rtcl were investigated. The rtcs and rtcl genes display highly correlated spatio-temporal expression patterns in roots, despite the significantly higher expression of rtcs. Both RTCS and RTCL proteins bind to LBD downstream promoters and act as transcription factors. In line with its auxin inducibility and binding to auxin response elements of rtcs and rtcl promoters, ARF34 (AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 34) acts as transcriptional activator. Yeast two-hybrid screening combined with bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) experiments revealed conserved and unique interaction partners of RTCS and RTCL. The rtcl mutation leads to defective shoot-borne root elongation early in development. Cooperative action of RTCS and RTCL during shoot-borne root formation was demonstrated by rtcs-dependent repression of rtcl transcription in coleoptilar nodes. Although RTCS is instrumental in shoot-borne root initiation, RTCL controls shoot-borne root elongation early in development. Their conserved role in auxin signaling, but diverse function in shoot-borne root formation, is underscored by their conserved and unique interaction partners. PMID:25902765

  8. Crystal structure of human pFGE, the paralog of the Calpha-formylglycine-generating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dickmanns, Achim; Schmidt, Bernhard; Rudolph, Markus G; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Dierks, Thomas; von Figura, Kurt; Ficner, Ralf

    2005-04-15

    In eukaryotes, sulfate esters are degraded by sulfatases, which possess a unique Calpha-formylglycine residue in their active site. The defect in post-translational formation of the Calpha-formylglycine residue causes a severe lysosomal storage disorder in humans. Recently, FGE (formylglycine-generating enzyme) has been identified as the protein required for this specific modification. Using sequence comparisons, a protein homologous to FGE was found and denoted pFGE (paralog of FGE). pFGE binds a sulfatase-derived peptide bearing the FGE recognition motif, but it lacks formylglycine-generating activity. Both proteins belong to a large family of pro- and eukaryotic proteins containing the DUF323 domain, a formylglycine-generating enzyme domain of unknown three-dimensional structure. We have crystallized the glycosylated human pFGE and determined its crystal structure at a resolution of 1.86 A. The structure reveals a novel fold, which we denote the FGE fold and which therefore serves as a paradigm for the DUF323 domain. It is characterized by an asymmetric partitioning of secondary structure elements and is stabilized by two calcium cations. A deep cleft on the surface of pFGE most likely represents the sulfatase polypeptide binding site. The asymmetric unit of the pFGE crystal contains a homodimer. The putative peptide binding site is buried between the monomers, indicating a biological significance of the dimer. The structure suggests the capability of pFGE to form a heterodimer with FGE. PMID:15687489

  9. Regulation of Ras Paralog Thermostability by Networks of Buried Ionizable Groups.

    PubMed

    Isom, Daniel G; Sridharan, Vishwajith; Dohlman, Henrik G

    2016-01-26

    Protein folding is governed by a variety of molecular forces including hydrophobic and ionic interactions. Less is known about the molecular determinants of protein stability. Here we used a recently developed computer algorithm (pHinder) to investigate the relationship between buried charge and thermostability. Our analysis revealed that charge networks in the protein core are generally smaller in thermophilic organisms as compared to mesophilic organisms. To experimentally test whether core network size influences protein thermostability, we purified 18 paralogous Ras superfamily GTPases from yeast and determined their melting temperatures (Tm, or temperature at which 50% of the protein is unfolded). This analysis revealed a wide range of Tm values (35-63 °C) that correlated significantly (R = 0.87) with core network size. These results suggest that thermostability depends in part on the arrangement of ionizable side chains within a protein core. An improved capacity to predict protein thermostability may be useful for selecting the best candidates for protein crystallography, the development of protein-based therapeutics, as well as for industrial enzyme applications. PMID:26701741

  10. Urbilaterian origin of paralogous GnRH and corazonin neuropeptide signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shi; Zandawala, Meet; Beets, Isabel; Baytemur, Esra; Slade, Susan E; Scrivens, James H; Elphick, Maurice R

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a key regulator of reproductive maturation in humans and other vertebrates. Homologs of GnRH and its cognate receptor have been identified in invertebrates-for example, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and corazonin (CRZ) neuropeptide pathways in arthropods. However, the precise evolutionary relationships and origins of these signalling systems remain unknown. Here we have addressed this issue with the first identification of both GnRH-type and CRZ-type signalling systems in a deuterostome-the echinoderm (starfish) Asterias rubens. We have identified a GnRH-like neuropeptide (pQIHYKNPGWGPG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens GnRH-type receptor and a novel neuropeptide (HNTFTMGGQNRWKAG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens CRZ-type receptor. With the discovery of these ligand-receptor pairs, we demonstrate that the vertebrate/deuterostomian GnRH-type and the protostomian AKH systems are orthologous and the origin of a paralogous CRZ-type signalling system can be traced to the common ancestor of the Bilateria (Urbilateria). PMID:27350121

  11. Urbilaterian origin of paralogous GnRH and corazonin neuropeptide signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shi; Zandawala, Meet; Beets, Isabel; Baytemur, Esra; Slade, Susan E.; Scrivens, James H.; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a key regulator of reproductive maturation in humans and other vertebrates. Homologs of GnRH and its cognate receptor have been identified in invertebrates–for example, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and corazonin (CRZ) neuropeptide pathways in arthropods. However, the precise evolutionary relationships and origins of these signalling systems remain unknown. Here we have addressed this issue with the first identification of both GnRH-type and CRZ-type signalling systems in a deuterostome–the echinoderm (starfish) Asterias rubens. We have identified a GnRH-like neuropeptide (pQIHYKNPGWGPG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens GnRH-type receptor and a novel neuropeptide (HNTFTMGGQNRWKAG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens CRZ-type receptor. With the discovery of these ligand-receptor pairs, we demonstrate that the vertebrate/deuterostomian GnRH-type and the protostomian AKH systems are orthologous and the origin of a paralogous CRZ-type signalling system can be traced to the common ancestor of the Bilateria (Urbilateria). PMID:27350121

  12. Sost and its paralog Sostdc1 coordinate digit number in a Gli3-dependent manner☆

    PubMed Central

    Collette, Nicole M.; Yee, Cristal S.; Murugesh, Deepa; Sebastian, Aimy; Taher, Leila; Gale, Nicholas W.; Economides, Aris N.; Harland, Richard M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2013-01-01

    WNT signaling is critical in most aspects of skeletal development and homeostasis, and antagonists of WNT signaling are emerging as key regulatory proteins with great promise as therapeutic agents for bone disorders. Here we show that Sost and its paralog Sostdc1 emerged through ancestral genome duplication and their expression patterns have diverged to delineate non-overlapping domains in most organ systems including musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, nervous, digestive, reproductive and respiratory. In the developing limb, Sost and Sostdc1 display dynamic expression patterns with Sost being restricted to the distal ectoderm and Sostdc1 to the proximal ectoderm and the mesenchyme. While Sostdc1–/– mice lack any obvious limb or skeletal defects, Sost–/– mice recapitulate the hand defects described for Sclerosteosis patients. However, elevated WNT signaling in Sost–/–; Sostdc1–/– mice causes misregulation of SHH signaling, ectopic activation of Sox9 in the digit 1 field and preaxial polydactyly in a Gli1- and Gli3-dependent manner. In addition, we show that the syndactyly documented in Sclerosteosis is present in both Sost–/– and Sost–/–; Sostdc1–/– mice, and is driven by misregulation of Fgf8 in the AER, a region lacking Sost and Sostdc1 expression. This study highlights the complexity of WNT signaling in skeletal biology and disease and emphasizes how redundant mechanism and non-cell autonomous effects can synergize to unveil new intricate phenotypes caused by elevated WNT signaling. PMID:23994639

  13. Trichomonas vaginalis Repair of Iron Centres Proteins: The Different Role of Two Paralogs.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Lígia S; Meloni, Dionigia; Teixeira, Miguel; Viscogliosi, Eric; Saraiva, Lígia M

    2016-06-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative parasite of one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases is, so far, the only protozoan encoding two putative Repair of Iron Centres (RIC) proteins. Homologs of these proteins have been shown to protect bacteria from the chemical stress imposed by mammalian immunity. In this work, the biochemical and functional characterisation of the T. vaginalis RICs revealed that the two proteins have different properties. Expression of ric1 is induced by nitrosative stress but not by hydrogen peroxide, while ric2 transcription remained unaltered under similar conditions. T. vaginalis RIC1 contains a di-iron centre, but RIC2 apparently does not. Only RIC1 resembles bacterial RICs on spectroscopic profiling and repairing ability of oxidatively-damaged iron-sulfur clusters. Unexpectedly, RIC2 was found to bind DNA plasmid and T. vaginalis genomic DNA, a function proposed to be related with its leucine zipper domain. The two proteins also differ in their cellular localization: RIC1 is expressed in the cytoplasm only, and RIC2 occurs both in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Therefore, we concluded that the two RIC paralogs have different roles in T. vaginalis, with RIC2 showing an unprecedented DNA binding ability when compared with all other until now studied RICs. PMID:27124376

  14. Nuclear Ribosomal ITS Functional Paralogs Resolve the Phylogenetic Relationships of a Late-Miocene Radiation Cycad Cycas (Cycadaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Long-Qian; Möller, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cycas is the most widespread and diverse genus among the ancient cycads, but the extant species could be the product of late Miocene rapid radiations. Taxonomic treatments to date for this genus are quite controversial, which makes it difficult to elucidate its evolutionary history. We cloned 161 genomic ITS sequences from 31 species representing all sections of Cycas. The divergent ITS paralogs were examined within each species and identified as putative pseudogenes, recombinants and functional paralogs. Functional paralogs were used to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships with pseudogene sequences as molecular outgroups, since an unambiguous ITS sequence alignment with their closest relatives, the Zamiaceae, is unachievable. A fully resolved and highly supported tree topology was obtained at the section level, with two major clades including six minor clades. The results fully supported the classification scheme proposed by Hill (2004) at the section level, with the minor clades representing his six sections. The two major clades could be recognised as two subgenera. The obtained pattern of phylogenetic relationships, combined with the different seed dispersal capabilities and paleogeography, allowed us to propose a late Miocene rapid radiation of Cycas that might have been promoted by vicariant events associated with the complex topography and orogeny of South China and adjacent regions. In contrast, transoceanic dispersals might have played an important role in the rapid diversification of sect. Cycas, whose members have evolved a spongy layer in their seeds aiding water dispersals. PMID:25635842

  15. Why the DNA self-depurination mechanism operates in HB-β but not in β-globin paralogs HB-δ, HB-ɛ1, HB-γ1 and HB-γ2.

    PubMed

    Amosova, Olga; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Fresco, Jacques R

    2015-08-01

    The human β-globin, δ-globin and ɛ-globin genes contain almost identical coding strand sequences centered about codon 6 having potential to form a stem-loop with a 5'GAGG loop. Provided with a sufficiently stable stem, such a structure can self-catalyze depurination of the loop 5'G residue, leading to a potential mutation hotspot. Previously, we showed that such a hotspot exists about codon 6 of β-globin, with by far the highest incidence of mutations across the gene, including those responsible for 6 anemias (notably Sickle Cell Anemia) and β-thalassemias. In contrast, we show here that despite identical loop sequences, there is no mutational hotspot in the δ- or ɛ1-globin potential self-depurination sites, which differ by only one or two base pairs in the stem region from that of the β-globin gene. These differences result in either one or two additional mismatches in the potential 7-base pair-forming stem region, thereby weakening its stability, so that either DNA cruciform extrusion from the duplex is rendered ineffective or the lifetime of the stem-loop becomes too short to permit self-catalysis to occur. Having that same loop sequence, paralogs HB-γ1 and HB-γ2 totally lack stem-forming potential. Hence the absence in δ- and ɛ1-globin genes of a mutational hotspot in what must now be viewed as non-functional homologs of the self-depurination site in β-globin. Such stem-destabilizing variants appeared early among vertebrates and remained conserved among mammals and primates. Thus, this study has revealed conserved sequence determinants of self-catalytic DNA depurination associated with variability of mutation incidence among human β-globin paralogs. PMID:26042536

  16. Crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of the third paralog of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus oligosaccharyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein N-glycosylation occurs in the three domains of life. Oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) transfers an oligosaccharide chain to the asparagine residue in the N-glycosylation sequons. The catalytic subunits of the OST enzyme are STT3 in eukaryotes, AglB in archaea and PglB in eubacteria. The genome of a hyperthermophilic archaeon, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, encodes three paralogous AglB proteins. We previously solved the crystal structures of the C-terminal globular domains of two paralogs, AglB-Short 1 and AglB-Short 2. Results We determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal globular domain of the third AglB paralog, AglB-Long, at 1.9 Å resolutions. The crystallization of the fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP) afforded high quality protein crystals. Two MBP-AglB-L molecules formed a swapped dimer in the crystal. Since the fusion protein behaved as a monomer upon gel filtration, we reconstituted the monomer structure from the swapped dimer by exchanging the swapped segments. The C-terminal domain of A. fulgidus AglB-L includes a structural unit common to AglB-S1 and AglB-S2. This structural unit contains the evolutionally conserved WWDYG and DK motifs. The present structure revealed that A. fulgidus AglB-L contained a variant type of the DK motif with a short insertion, and confirmed that the second signature residue, Lys, of the DK motif participates in the formation of a pocket that binds to the serine and threonine residues at the +2 position of the N-glycosylation sequon. Conclusions The structure of A. fulgidus AglB-L, together with the two previously solved structures of AglB-S1 and AglB-S2, provides a complete overview of the three AglB paralogs encoded in the A. fulgidus genome. All three AglBs contain a variant type of the DK motif. This finding supports a previously proposed rule: The STT3/AglB/PglB paralogs in one organism always contain the same type of Ser/Thr-binding pocket. The present structure will be useful as a

  17. Loss of function of 1-FEH IIb has more impact on post-harvest inulin degradation in Cichorium intybus than copy number variation of its close paralog 1-FEH IIa.

    PubMed

    Dauchot, Nicolas; Raulier, Pierre; Maudoux, Olivier; Notté, Christine; Draye, Xavier; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Key Message: The loss of mini-exon 2 in the 1-FEH IIb glycosyl-hydrolase results in a putative non-functional allele. This loss of function has a strong impact on the susceptibility to post-harvest inulin depolymerization. Significant variation of copy number was identified in its close paralog 1-FEH IIa, but no quantitative effect of copy number on carbohydrates-related phenotypes was detected. Inulin polyfructan is the second most abundant storage carbohydrate in flowering plants. After harvest, it is depolymerized by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) as an adaptive response to end-season cold temperatures. In chicory, the intensity of this depolymerization differs between cultivars but also between individuals within a cultivar. Regarding this phenotypic variability, we recently identified statistically significant associations between inulin degradation and genetic polymorphisms located in three FEHs. We present here new results of a systematic analysis of copy number variation (CNV) in five key members of the chicory (Cichorium intybus) GH32 multigenic family, including three FEH genes and the two inulin biosynthesis genes: 1-SST and 1-FFT. qPCR analysis identified a significant variability of relative copy number only in the 1-FEH IIa gene. However, this CNV had no quantitative effect. Instead, cloning of the full length gDNA of a close paralogous sequence (1-FEH IIb) identified a 1028 bp deletion in lines less susceptible to post-harvest inulin depolymerization. This region comprises a 9 bp mini-exon containing one of the three conserved residues of the active site. This results in a putative non-functional 1-FEH IIb allele and an observed lower inulin depolymerization. Extensive genotyping confirmed that the loss of mini-exon 2 in 1-FEH IIb and the previously identified 47 bp duplication located in the 3'UTR of 1-FEH IIa belong to a single haplotype, both being statistically associated with reduced susceptibility to post-harvest inulin depolymerization

  18. Evolution of ketosynthase domains of polyketide synthase genes in the Cladonia chlorophaea species complex (Cladoniaceae).

    PubMed

    Timsina, Brinda A; Hausner, Georg; Piercey-Normore, Michele D

    2014-11-01

    Lichen-forming fungi synthesize a diversity of polyketides, but only a few non-reducing polyketide synthase (PKS) genes from a lichen-forming fungus have been linked with a specific polyketide. While it is a challenge to link the large number of PKS paralogs in fungi with specific products, it might be expected that the PKS paralogs from closely related species would be similar because of recent evolutionary divergence. The objectives of this study were to reconstruct a PKS gene phylogeny of the Cladonia chlorophaea species complex based on the ketosynthase domain, a species phylogeny of the complex, and to explore the presence of PKS gene paralogs among members of the species complex. DNA was isolated from 51 individuals of C. chlorophaea and allies to screen for the presence of 13 PKS paralogs. A 128 sequence PKS gene phylogeny using deduced amino acid sequences estimated from the 13 PKS paralogs and sequences subjected to BLASTx comparisons showed losses of each of two PKS domains (reducing and methylation). This research provided insight into the evolution of PKS genes in the C. chlorophaea group, species evolution in the group, and it identified potential directions for further investigation of polyketide synthesis in the C. chlorophaea species complex. PMID:25442293

  19. Paralog-Specific Kinase Inhibition of FGFR4: Adding to the Arsenal of Anti-FGFR Agents.

    PubMed

    Packer, Leisl M; Pollock, Pamela M

    2015-04-01

    In this issue of Cancer Discovery, Hagel and colleagues report the design and the in vitro and in vivo activity of a novel, irreversible, paralog-specific kinase inhibitor of FGFR4, BLU9931. This compound binds covalently to a cysteine residue in the hinge region of FGFR4 but not in FGFR1-3. BLU9931 induces tumor shrinkage in hepatocellular carcinoma models that express a functioning ligand/receptor complex consisting of FGF19/FGFR4/KLB and adds to a growing list of anti-FGFR4 agents. PMID:25847957

  20. A Minimal Set of Glycolytic Genes Reveals Strong Redundancies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Central Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Solis-Escalante, Daniel; Kuijpers, Niels G. A.; Barrajon-Simancas, Nuria; van den Broek, Marcel; Pronk, Jack T.; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    As a result of ancestral whole-genome and small-scale duplication events, the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and many eukaryotes still contain a substantial fraction of duplicated genes. In all investigated organisms, metabolic pathways, and more particularly glycolysis, are specifically enriched for functionally redundant paralogs. In ancestors of the Saccharomyces lineage, the duplication of glycolytic genes is purported to have played an important role leading to S. cerevisiae's current lifestyle favoring fermentative metabolism even in the presence of oxygen and characterized by a high glycolytic capacity. In modern S. cerevisiae strains, the 12 glycolytic reactions leading to the biochemical conversion from glucose to ethanol are encoded by 27 paralogs. In order to experimentally explore the physiological role of this genetic redundancy, a yeast strain with a minimal set of 14 paralogs was constructed (the “minimal glycolysis” [MG] strain). Remarkably, a combination of a quantitative systems approach and semiquantitative analysis in a wide array of growth environments revealed the absence of a phenotypic response to the cumulative deletion of 13 glycolytic paralogs. This observation indicates that duplication of glycolytic genes is not a prerequisite for achieving the high glycolytic fluxes and fermentative capacities that are characteristic of S. cerevisiae and essential for many of its industrial applications and argues against gene dosage effects as a means of fixing minor glycolytic paralogs in the yeast genome. The MG strain was carefully designed and constructed to provide a robust prototrophic platform for quantitative studies and has been made available to the scientific community. PMID:26071034

  1. Gene structure, regulatory control, and evolution of black widow venom latrotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Bhere, Kanaka Varun; Haney, Robert A.; Ayoub, Nadia A.; Garb, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Black widow venom contains α-latrotoxin, infamous for causing intense pain. Combining 33 kb of Latrodectus hesperus genomic DNA with RNA-Seq, we characterized the α-latrotoxin gene and discovered a paralog, 4.5 kb downstream. Both paralogs exhibit venom gland specific transcription, and may be regulated post-transcriptionally via musashi-like proteins. A 4 kb intron interrupts the α-latrotoxin coding sequence, while a 10 kb intron in the 3′ UTR of the paralog may cause nonsense-mediated decay. Phylogenetic analysis confirms these divergent latrotoxins diversified through recent tandem gene duplications. Thus, latrotoxin genes have more complex structures, regulatory controls, and sequence diversity than previously proposed. PMID:25217831

  2. Comparison of the peptide binding preferences of three closely related TRAF paralogs: TRAF2, TRAF3, and TRAF5.

    PubMed

    Foight, Glenna Wink; Keating, Amy E

    2016-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (TRAFs) constitute a family of adapter proteins that act in numerous signaling pathways important in human biology and disease. The MATH domain of TRAF proteins binds peptides found in the cytoplasmic domains of signaling receptors, thereby connecting extracellular signals to downstream effectors. Beyond several very general motifs, the peptide binding preferences of TRAFs have not been extensively characterized, and differences between the binding preferences of TRAF paralogs are poorly understood. Here we report a screening system that we established to explore TRAF peptide-binding specificity using deep mutational scanning of TRAF-peptide ligands. We displayed single- and double-mutant peptide libraries based on the TRAF-binding sites of CD40 or TANK on the surface of Escherichia coli and screened them for binding to TRAF2, TRAF3, and TRAF5. Enrichment analysis of the library sequencing results showed differences in the permitted substitution patterns in the TANK versus CD40 backgrounds. The three TRAF proteins also demonstrated different preferences for binding to members of the CD40 library, and three peptides from that library that were analyzed individually showed striking differences in affinity for the three TRAFs. These results illustrate a previously unappreciated level of binding specificity between these close paralogs and demonstrate that established motifs are overly simplistic. The results from this work begin to outline differences between TRAF family members, and the experimental approach established herein will enable future efforts to investigate and redesign TRAF peptide-binding specificity. PMID:26779844

  3. Identifying Cognate Binding Pairs among a Large Set of Paralogs: The Case of PE/PPE Proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Robert; Pellegrini, Matteo; Eisenberg, David

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of how to detect cognate pairs of proteins that bind when each belongs to a large family of paralogs. To illustrate the problem, we have undertaken a genomewide analysis of interactions of members of the PE and PPE protein families of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our computational method uses structural information, operon organization, and protein coevolution to infer the interaction of PE and PPE proteins. Some 289 PE/PPE complexes were predicted out of a possible 5,590 PE/PPE pairs genomewide. Thirty-five of these predicted complexes were also found to have correlated mRNA expression, providing additional evidence for these interactions. We show that our method is applicable to other protein families, by analyzing interactions of the Esx family of proteins. Our resulting set of predictions is a starting point for genomewide experimental interaction screens of the PE and PPE families, and our method may be generally useful for detecting interactions of proteins within families having many paralogs. PMID:18787688

  4. Allelic variation in paralogs of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase is a major determinant of vitamin C concentrations in apple fruit.

    PubMed

    Mellidou, Ifigeneia; Chagné, David; Laing, William A; Keulemans, Johan; Davey, Mark W

    2012-11-01

    To identify the genetic factors underlying the regulation of fruit vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid [AsA]) concentrations, quantitative trait loci (QTL) studies were carried out in an F1 progeny derived from a cross between the apple (Malus × domestica) cultivars Telamon and Braeburn over three years. QTL were identified for AsA, glutathione, total antioxidant activity in both flesh and skin tissues, and various quality traits, including flesh browning. Four regions on chromosomes 10, 11, 16, and 17 contained stable fruit AsA-QTL clusters. Mapping of AsA metabolic genes identified colocations between orthologs of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), and nucleobase-ascorbate transporter within these QTL clusters. Of particular interest are the three paralogs of MdGGP, which all colocated within AsA-QTL clusters. Allelic variants of MdGGP1 and MdGGP3 derived from the cultivar Braeburn parent were also consistently associated with higher fruit total AsA concentrations both within the mapping population (up to 10-fold) and across a range of commercial apple germplasm (up to 6-fold). Striking differences in the expression of the cv Braeburn MdGGP1 allele between fruit from high- and low-AsA genotypes clearly indicate a key role for MdGGP1 in the regulation of fruit AsA concentrations, and this MdGGP allele-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism marker represents an excellent candidate for directed breeding for enhanced fruit AsA concentrations. Interestingly, colocations were also found between MdDHAR3-3 and a stable QTL for browning in the cv Telamon parent, highlighting links between the redox status of the AsA pool and susceptibility to flesh browning. PMID:23001142

  5. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Riley, M

    1998-01-01

    GenProtEC is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins, representing groups of paralogous genes, with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. GenProtEC can be accessed at the URL http://www.mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html PMID:9399799

  6. Gene Duplication, Population Genomics, and Species-Level Differentiation within a Tropical Mountain Shrub

    PubMed Central

    Mastretta-Yanes, Alicia; Zamudio, Sergio; Jorgensen, Tove H.; Arrigo, Nils; Alvarez, Nadir; Piñero, Daniel; Emerson, Brent C.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication leads to paralogy, which complicates the de novo assembly of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data. The issue of paralogous genes is exacerbated in plants, because they are particularly prone to gene duplication events. Paralogs are normally filtered from GBS data before undertaking population genomics or phylogenetic analyses. However, gene duplication plays an important role in the functional diversification of genes and it can also lead to the formation of postzygotic barriers. Using populations and closely related species of a tropical mountain shrub, we examine 1) the genomic differentiation produced by putative orthologs, and 2) the distribution of recent gene duplication among lineages and geography. We find high differentiation among populations from isolated mountain peaks and species-level differentiation within what is morphologically described as a single species. The inferred distribution of paralogs among populations is congruent with taxonomy and shows that GBS could be used to examine recent gene duplication as a source of genomic differentiation of nonmodel species. PMID:25223767

  7. Gene duplication, population genomics, and species-level differentiation within a tropical mountain shrub.

    PubMed

    Mastretta-Yanes, Alicia; Zamudio, Sergio; Jorgensen, Tove H; Arrigo, Nils; Alvarez, Nadir; Piñero, Daniel; Emerson, Brent C

    2014-10-01

    Gene duplication leads to paralogy, which complicates the de novo assembly of genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data. The issue of paralogous genes is exacerbated in plants, because they are particularly prone to gene duplication events. Paralogs are normally filtered from GBS data before undertaking population genomics or phylogenetic analyses. However, gene duplication plays an important role in the functional diversification of genes and it can also lead to the formation of postzygotic barriers. Using populations and closely related species of a tropical mountain shrub, we examine 1) the genomic differentiation produced by putative orthologs, and 2) the distribution of recent gene duplication among lineages and geography. We find high differentiation among populations from isolated mountain peaks and species-level differentiation within what is morphologically described as a single species. The inferred distribution of paralogs among populations is congruent with taxonomy and shows that GBS could be used to examine recent gene duplication as a source of genomic differentiation of nonmodel species. PMID:25223767

  8. PAXX, a paralog of XRCC4 and XLF, interacts with Ku to promote DNA double-strand break repair**

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Julia; Jhujh, Satpal; Mehmood, Shahid; Tamura, Naoka; Travers, Jon; Wu, Qian; Draviam, Viji M.; Robinson, Carol V.; Blundell, Tom L.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    XRCC4 and XLF are two structurally-related proteins that function in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here, we identify human PAXX (PAralog of XRCC4 and XLF; also called C9orf142) as a new XRCC4-superfamily member, and show that its crystal structure resembles that of XRCC4. PAXX interacts directly with the DSB-repair protein Ku and is recruited to DNA-damage sites in cells. Using RNA interference and CRISPR-Cas9 to generate PAXX−/− cells, we demonstrate that PAXX functions with XRCC4 and XLF to mediate DSB repair and cell survival in response to DSB-inducing agents. Finally, we reveal that PAXX promotes Ku-dependent DNA ligation in vitro, and assembly of core non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) factors on damaged chromatin in cells. These findings identify PAXX as a new component of the NHEJ machinery. PMID:25574025

  9. Structure–Activity Relationship in a Purine-Scaffold Compound Series with Selectivity for the Endoplasmic Reticulum Hsp90 Paralog Grp94

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hardik J.; Patel, Pallav D.; Ochiana, Stefan O.; Yan, Pengrong; Sun, Weilin; Patel, Maulik R.; Shah, Smit K.; Tramentozzi, Elisa; Brooks, James; Bolaender, Alexander; Shrestha, Liza; Stephani, Ralph; Finotti, Paola; Leifer, Cynthia; Li, Zihai; Gewirth, Daniel T.; Taldone, Tony; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    Grp94 is involved in the regulation of a restricted number of proteins and represents a potential target in a host of diseases, including cancer, septic shock, autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammatory conditions, diabetes, coronary thrombosis, and stroke. We have recently identified a novel allosteric pocket located in the Grp94 N-terminal binding site that can be used to design ligands with a 2-log selectivity over the other Hsp90 paralogs. Here we perform extensive SAR investigations in this ligand series and rationalize the affinity and paralog selectivity of choice derivatives by molecular modeling. We then use this to design 18c, a derivative with good potency for Grp94 (IC50 = 0.22 μM) and selectivity over other paralogs (>100- and 33-fold for Hsp90α/β and Trap-1, respectively). The paralog selectivity and target-mediated activity of 18c was confirmed in cells through several functional readouts. Compound 18c was also inert when tested against a large panel of kinases. We show that 18c has biological activity in several cellular models of inflammation and cancer and also present here for the first time the in vivo profile of a Grp94 inhibitor. PMID:25901531

  10. Establishing Precise Evolutionary History of a Gene Improves Predicting Disease Causing Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O.; Ory, Daniel S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are likely benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, while inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and moreover are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. Methods We identified major events in NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism’s fitness. Results Removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. Conclusion The results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well. PMID:26890452

  11. Occurrence and Evolution of the Paralogous Zinc Metalloproteases IgA1 Protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Related Commensal Species

    PubMed Central

    Bek-Thomsen, Malene; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The distribution, genome location, and evolution of the four paralogous zinc metalloproteases, IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD, in Streptococcus pneumoniae and related commensal species were studied by in silico analysis of whole genomes and by activity screening of 154 representatives of 20 species. ZmpB was ubiquitous in the Mitis and Salivarius groups of the genus Streptococcus and in the genera Gemella and Granulicatella, with the exception of a fragmented gene in Streptococcus thermophilus, the only species with a nonhuman habitat. IgA1 protease activity was observed in all members of S. pneumoniae, S. pseudopneumoniae, S. oralis, S. sanguinis, and Gemella haemolysans, was variably present in S. mitis and S. infantis, and absent in S. gordonii, S. parasanguinis, S. cristatus, S. oligofermentans, S. australis, S. peroris, and S. suis. Phylogenetic analysis of 297 zmp sequences and representative housekeeping genes provided evidence for an unprecedented selection for genetic diversification of the iga, zmpB, and zmpD genes in S. pneumoniae and evidence of very frequent intraspecies transfer of entire genes and combination of genes. Presumably due to their adaptation to a commensal lifestyle, largely unaffected by adaptive mucosal immune factors, the corresponding genes in commensal streptococci have remained conserved. The widespread distribution and significant sequence diversity indicate an ancient origin of the zinc metalloproteases predating the emergence of the humanoid species. zmpB, which appears to be the ancestral gene, subsequently duplicated and successfully diversified into distinct functions, is likely to serve an important but yet unknown housekeeping function associated with the human host. PMID:23033471

  12. Aberrant Expression of Posterior HOX Genes in Well Differentiated Histotypes of Thyroid Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cantile, Monica; Scognamiglio, Giosuè; La Sala, Lucia; La Mantia, Elvira; Scaramuzza, Veronica; Valentino, Elena; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Losito, Simona; Pezzullo, Luciano; Chiofalo, Maria Grazia; Fulciniti, Franco; Franco, Renato; Botti, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    Molecular etiology of thyroid cancers has been widely studied, and several molecular alterations have been identified mainly associated with follicular and papillary histotypes. However, the molecular bases of the complex pathogenesis of thyroid carcinomas remain poorly understood. HOX genes regulate normal embryonic development, cell differentiation and other critical processes in eukaryotic cell life. Several studies have shown that HOX genes play a role in neoplastic transformation of several human tissues. In particular, the genes belonging to HOX paralogous group 13 seem to hold a relevant role in both tumor development and progression. We have identified a significant prognostic role of HOX D13 in pancreatic cancer and we have recently showed the strong and progressive over-expression of HOX C13 in melanoma metastases and deregulation of HOX B13 expression in bladder cancers. In this study we have investigated, by immunohistochemisty and quantitative Real Time PCR, the HOX paralogous group 13 genes/proteins expression in thyroid cancer evolution and progression, also evaluating its ability to discriminate between main histotypes. Our results showed an aberrant expression, both at gene and protein level, of all members belonging to paralogous group 13 (HOX A13, HOX B13, HOX C13 and HOX D13) in adenoma, papillary and follicular thyroid cancers samples. The data suggest a potential role of HOX paralogous group 13 genes in pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of thyroid cancers. PMID:24189220

  13. THE WHEAT D-GENOME HMW-GLUTENIN LOCUS:BAC SEQUENCING, GENE DISTRIBUTION, AND RETROTRANSPOSON CLUSTERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A bacterial-artificial-chromosome (BAC) clone from the genome of Triticum tauschii, the D-genome ancestor of hexaploid bread wheat, was sequenced and the presence of the two paralogous x- and y- type high-molecular-weight (HMW) glutenin genes of the Glu-D1 locus was confirmed. These two genes occur...

  14. Loss of function of 1-FEH IIb has more impact on post-harvest inulin degradation in Cichorium intybus than copy number variation of its close paralog 1-FEH IIa

    PubMed Central

    Dauchot, Nicolas; Raulier, Pierre; Maudoux, Olivier; Notté, Christine; Draye, Xavier; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Key Message: The loss of mini-exon 2 in the 1-FEH IIb glycosyl-hydrolase results in a putative non-functional allele. This loss of function has a strong impact on the susceptibility to post-harvest inulin depolymerization. Significant variation of copy number was identified in its close paralog 1-FEH IIa, but no quantitative effect of copy number on carbohydrates-related phenotypes was detected. Inulin polyfructan is the second most abundant storage carbohydrate in flowering plants. After harvest, it is depolymerized by fructan exohydrolases (FEHs) as an adaptive response to end-season cold temperatures. In chicory, the intensity of this depolymerization differs between cultivars but also between individuals within a cultivar. Regarding this phenotypic variability, we recently identified statistically significant associations between inulin degradation and genetic polymorphisms located in three FEHs. We present here new results of a systematic analysis of copy number variation (CNV) in five key members of the chicory (Cichorium intybus) GH32 multigenic family, including three FEH genes and the two inulin biosynthesis genes: 1-SST and 1-FFT. qPCR analysis identified a significant variability of relative copy number only in the 1-FEH IIa gene. However, this CNV had no quantitative effect. Instead, cloning of the full length gDNA of a close paralogous sequence (1-FEH IIb) identified a 1028 bp deletion in lines less susceptible to post-harvest inulin depolymerization. This region comprises a 9 bp mini-exon containing one of the three conserved residues of the active site. This results in a putative non-functional 1-FEH IIb allele and an observed lower inulin depolymerization. Extensive genotyping confirmed that the loss of mini-exon 2 in 1-FEH IIb and the previously identified 47 bp duplication located in the 3′UTR of 1-FEH IIa belong to a single haplotype, both being statistically associated with reduced susceptibility to post-harvest inulin depolymerization

  15. Homology-dependent Gene Silencing in Paramecium

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Françoise; Vayssié, Laurence; Klotz, Catherine; Sperling, Linda; Madeddu, Luisa

    1998-01-01

    Microinjection at high copy number of plasmids containing only the coding region of a gene into the Paramecium somatic macronucleus led to a marked reduction in the expression of the corresponding endogenous gene(s). The silencing effect, which is stably maintained throughout vegetative growth, has been observed for all Paramecium genes examined so far: a single-copy gene (ND7), as well as members of multigene families (centrin genes and trichocyst matrix protein genes) in which all closely related paralogous genes appeared to be affected. This phenomenon may be related to posttranscriptional gene silencing in transgenic plants and quelling in Neurospora and allows the efficient creation of specific mutant phenotypes thus providing a potentially powerful tool to study gene function in Paramecium. For the two multigene families that encode proteins that coassemble to build up complex subcellular structures the analysis presented herein provides the first experimental evidence that the members of these gene families are not functionally redundant. PMID:9529389

  16. A phylogenomic gene cluster resource: The phylogeneticallyinferred groups (PhlGs) database

    SciTech Connect

    Dehal, Paramvir S.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-08-25

    We present here the PhIGs database, a phylogenomic resource for sequenced genomes. Although many methods exist for clustering gene families, very few attempt to create truly orthologous clusters sharing descent from a single ancestral gene across a range of evolutionary depths. Although these non-phylogenetic gene family clusters have been used broadly for gene annotation, errors are known to be introduced by the artifactual association of slowly evolving paralogs and lack of annotation for those more rapidly evolving. A full phylogenetic framework is necessary for accurate inference of function and for many studies that address pattern and mechanism of the evolution of the genome. The automated generation of evolutionary gene clusters, creation of gene trees, determination of orthology and paralogy relationships, and the correlation of this information with gene annotations, expression information, and genomic context is an important resource to the scientific community.

  17. Phosphorylation network rewiring by gene duplication

    PubMed Central

    Freschi, Luca; Courcelles, Mathieu; Thibault, Pierre; Michnick, Stephen W; Landry, Christian R

    2011-01-01

    Elucidating how complex regulatory networks have assembled during evolution requires a detailed understanding of the evolutionary dynamics that follow gene duplication events, including changes in post-translational modifications. We compared the phosphorylation profiles of paralogous proteins in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to that of a species that diverged from the budding yeast before the duplication of those genes. We found that 100 million years of post-duplication divergence are sufficient for the majority of phosphorylation sites to be lost or gained in one paralog or the other, with a strong bias toward losses. However, some losses may be partly compensated for by the evolution of other phosphosites, as paralogous proteins tend to preserve similar numbers of phosphosites over time. We also found that up to 50% of kinase–substrate relationships may have been rewired during this period. Our results suggest that after gene duplication, proteins tend to subfunctionalize at the level of post-translational regulation and that even when phosphosites are preserved, there is a turnover of the kinases that phosphorylate them. PMID:21734643

  18. Signals of historical interlocus gene conversion in human segmental duplications.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Beth L; Eichler, Evan E

    2013-01-01

    Standard methods of DNA sequence analysis assume that sequences evolve independently, yet this assumption may not be appropriate for segmental duplications that exchange variants via interlocus gene conversion (IGC). Here, we use high quality multiple sequence alignments from well-annotated segmental duplications to systematically identify IGC signals in the human reference genome. Our analysis combines two complementary methods: (i) a paralog quartet method that uses DNA sequence simulations to identify a statistical excess of sites consistent with inter-paralog exchange, and (ii) the alignment-based method implemented in the GENECONV program. One-quarter (25.4%) of the paralog families in our analysis harbor clear IGC signals by the quartet approach. Using GENECONV, we identify 1477 gene conversion tracks that cumulatively span 1.54 Mb of the genome. Our analyses confirm the previously reported high rates of IGC in subtelomeric regions and Y-chromosome palindromes, and identify multiple novel IGC hotspots, including the pregnancy specific glycoproteins and the neuroblastoma breakpoint gene families. Although the duplication history of a paralog family is described by a single tree, we show that IGC has introduced incredible site-to-site variation in the evolutionary relationships among paralogs in the human genome. Our findings indicate that IGC has left significant footprints in patterns of sequence diversity across segmental duplications in the human genome, out-pacing the contributions of single base mutation by orders of magnitude. Collectively, the IGC signals we report comprise a catalog that will provide a critical reference for interpreting observed patterns of DNA sequence variation across duplicated genomic regions, including targets of recent adaptive evolution in humans. PMID:24124524

  19. Expanding Duplication of Free Fatty Acid Receptor-2 (GPR43) Genes in the Chicken Genome

    PubMed Central

    Meslin, Camille; Desert, Colette; Callebaut, Isabelle; Djari, Anis; Klopp, Christophe; Pitel, Frédérique; Leroux, Sophie; Martin, Pascal; Froment, Pascal; Guilbert, Edith; Gondret, Florence; Lagarrigue, Sandrine; Monget, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptors (FFAR) belong to a family of five G-protein coupled receptors that are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism, so that their loss of function increases the risk of obesity. The aim of this study was to determine the expansion of genes encoding paralogs of FFAR2 in the chicken, considered as a model organism for developmental biology and biomedical research. By estimating the gene copy number using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, genomic DNA resequencing, and RNA sequencing data, we showed the existence of 23 ± 1.5 genes encoding FFAR2 paralogs in the chicken genome. The FFAR2 paralogs shared an identity from 87.2% up to 99%. Extensive gene conversion was responsible for this high degree of sequence similarities between these genes, and this concerned especially the four amino acids known to be critical for ligand binding. Moreover, elevated nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios on some amino acids within or in close-vicinity of the ligand-binding groove suggest that positive selection may have reduced the effective rate of gene conversion in this region, thus contributing to diversify the function of some FFAR2 paralogs. All the FFAR2 paralogs were located on a microchromosome in a same linkage group. FFAR2 genes were expressed in different tissues and cells such as spleen, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, abdominal adipose tissue, intestine, and lung, with the highest rate of expression in testis. Further investigations are needed to determine whether these chicken-specific events along evolution are the consequence of domestication and may play a role in regulating lipid metabolism in this species. PMID:25912043

  20. Deciphering the spatio-temporal expression and stress regulation of Fam107B, the paralog of the resilience-promoting protein DRR1 in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Masana, M; Jukic, M M; Kretzschmar, A; Wagner, K V; Westerholz, S; Schmidt, M V; Rein, T; Brodski, C; Müller, M B

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms that promote stress resilience might open up new therapeutic avenues to prevent stress-related disorders. We recently characterized a stress and glucocorticoid-regulated gene, down-regulated in renal cell carcinoma - DRR1 (Fam107A). DRR1 is expressed in the mouse brain; it is up-regulated by stress and glucocorticoids and modulates neuronal actin dynamics. In the adult mouse, DRR1 was shown to facilitate specific behaviors which might be protective against some of the deleterious consequences of stress exposure: in the hippocampal CA3 region, DRR1 improved cognitive performance whereas in the septum, it specifically increased social behavior. Therefore DRR1 was suggested as a candidate protein promoting stress-resilience. Fam107B (family with sequence similarity 107, member B) is the unique paralog of DRR1, and both share high sequence similarities, predicted glucocorticoid response elements, heat-shock induction and tumor suppressor properties. So far, the role of Fam107B in the central nervous system was not studied. The aim of the present investigation, therefore, was to analyze whether Fam107B and DRR1 display comparable mRNA expression patterns in the brain and whether both are modulated by stress and glucocorticoids. Spatio-temporal mapping of Fam107B mRNA expression in the embryonic and adult mouse brain, by means of in situ hybridization, showed that Fam107B was expressed during embryogenesis and in the adulthood, with particularly high and specific expression in the forming telencephalon suggestive of an involvement in corticogenesis. In the adult mouse, expression was restricted to neurogenic niches, like the dentate gyrus. In contrast to DRR1, Fam107B mRNA expression failed to be modulated by glucocorticoids and social stress in the adult mouse. In summary, Fam107B and DRR1 show different spatio-temporal expression patterns in the central nervous system, suggesting at least partially different functional roles in

  1. Metazoan Gene Families from Metazome

    DOE Data Explorer

    Metazome is a joint project of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute and the Center for Integrative Genomics to facilitate comparative genomic studies amongst metazoans. Clusters of orthologous and paralogous genes that represent the modern descendents of ancestral gene sets are constructed at key phylogenetic nodes. These clusters allow easy access to clade specific orthology/paralogy relationships as well as clade specific genes and gene expansions. As of version 2.0.4, Metazome provides access to twenty-four sequenced and annotated metazoan genomes, clustered at nine evolutionarily significant nodes. Where possible, each gene has been annotated with PFAM, KOG, KEGG, and PANTHER assignments, and publicly available annotations from RefSeq, UniProt, Ensembl, and JGI are hyper-linked and searchable. The included organisms (by common name) are: Human, Mouse, Rat, Dog, Opossum, Chicken, Frog, Stickleback, Medaka, Fugu pufferfish; Zebrafish, Seasquirt - savignyi, Seasquirt - intestinalis, Amphioxus, Sea Urchin, Fruitfly, Mosquite, Yellow Fever Mosquito, Silkworm, Red Flour Beetle, Worm, Briggsae Worm, Owl limpet (snail), and Sea anemone. [Copied from Metazome Overview at http://www.metazome.net/Metazome_info.php

  2. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    SciTech Connect

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.

  3. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; et al

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintainingmore » wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.« less

  4. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  5. Unfolding stabilities of two paralogous proteins from Naja naja naja (Indian cobra) as probed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gorai, Biswajit; Sivaraman, Thirunavukkarasu

    2013-09-01

    Structurally similar but functionally different two paralogous proteins, CTX1 (a cardiotoxin) and LNTX2 (an alpha-neurotoxin), from venom of Naja naja naja have been homology modeled and subjected to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at four different temperatures (298 K, 310 K, 373 K & 473 K) under close quarters of physiological conditions. Each MD simulation was performed for 25 ns and trajectory structures stored at every 25 ps were used to probe various structural events occurring in the temperature-induced unfolding of the proteins. Notwithstanding their similar scaffolds, the two proteins are drastically differing in their unfolding stabilities from each other. The structural orders of flexibilities for the CTX1 and LNTX2 were found to be loop II > loop III > loop I > C-terminal and C-terminal > loop I > loop III > loop II, respectively. Based on the comprehensive analyses of the simulation data and studies on the various structural interactions of all cardiotoxins (CTXs) and alpha-neurotoxins (NTXs) for which three-dimensional structures determined by experimental techniques are available to date, we have herein proposed a hypothesis ('CN network') rationalizing the differential stabilities of the CTXs and NTXs belonging to a three-finger toxin superfamily of snake venoms. PMID:23791667

  6. Case study on the evolution of hetero-oligomer interfaces based on the differences in paralogous proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Saki; Yura, Kei

    2015-01-01

    We addressed the evolutionary trace of hetero-oligomer interfaces by comparing the structures of paralogous proteins; one of them is a monomer or homo-oligomer and the other is a hetero-oligomer. We found different trends in amino acid conservation pattern and hydrophobicity between homo-oligomer and hetero-oligomer. The degree of amino acid conservation in the interface of homo-oligomer has no obvious difference from that in the surface, whereas the degree of conservation is much higher in the interface of hetero-oligomer. The interface of homo-oligomer has a few very conserved residue positions, whereas the residue conservation in the interface of hetero-oligomer tends to be higher. In addition, the interface of hetero-oligomer has a tendency of being more hydrophobic compared with the one in homo-oligomer. We conjecture that these differences are related to the inherent symmetry in homo-oligomers that cannot exist in hetero-oligomers. Paucity of the structural data precludes statistical tests of these tendencies, yet the trend can be applied to the prediction of the interface of hetero-oligomer. We obtained putative interfaces of the subunits in CPSF (cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor), one of the human pre-mRNA 3′-processing complexes. The locations of predicted interface residues were consistent with the known experimental data. PMID:27493859

  7. Expression, localization, structural, and functional characterization of pFGE, the paralog of the Calpha-formylglycine-generating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Preusser-Kunze, Andrea; Balleininger, Martina; Eiselt, Nicole; Schmidt, Bernhard; Gande, Santosh Lakshmi; Wenzel, Dirk; Dierks, Thomas; von Figura, Kurt

    2005-04-15

    pFGE is the paralog of the formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE), which catalyzes the oxidation of a specific cysteine to Calpha-formylglycine, the catalytic residue in the active site of sulfatases. The enzymatic activity of sulfatases depends on this posttranslational modification, and the genetic defect of FGE causes multiple sulfatase deficiency. The structural and functional properties of pFGE were analyzed. The comparison with FGE demonstrates that both share a tissue-specific expression pattern and the localization in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Both are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum by a saturable mechanism. Limited proteolytic cleavage at similar sites indicates that both also share a similar three-dimensional structure. pFGE, however, is lacking the formylglycine-generating activity of FGE. Although overexpression of FGE stimulates the generation of catalytically active sulfatases, overexpression of pFGE has an inhibitory effect. In vitro pFGE interacts with sulfatase-derived peptides but not with FGE. The inhibitory effect of pFGE on the generation of active sulfatases may therefore be caused by a competition of pFGE and FGE for newly synthesized sulfatase polypeptides. PMID:15708861

  8. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Parplys, Ann C; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G; Leung, Stanley G; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-11-16

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  9. Detecting Functional Divergence after Gene Duplication through Evolutionary Changes in Posttranslational Regulatory Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen Ba, Alex N.; Strome, Bob; Hua, Jun Jie; Desmond, Jonathan; Gagnon-Arsenault, Isabelle; Weiss, Eric L.; Landry, Christian R.; Moses, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important evolutionary mechanism that can result in functional divergence in paralogs due to neo-functionalization or sub-functionalization. Consistent with functional divergence after gene duplication, recent studies have shown accelerated evolution in retained paralogs. However, little is known in general about the impact of this accelerated evolution on the molecular functions of retained paralogs. For example, do new functions typically involve changes in enzymatic activities, or changes in protein regulation? Here we study the evolution of posttranslational regulation by examining the evolution of important regulatory sequences (short linear motifs) in retained duplicates created by the whole-genome duplication in budding yeast. To do so, we identified short linear motifs whose evolutionary constraint has relaxed after gene duplication with a likelihood-ratio test that can account for heterogeneity in the evolutionary process by using a non-central chi-squared null distribution. We find that short linear motifs are more likely to show changes in evolutionary constraints in retained duplicates compared to single-copy genes. We examine changes in constraints on known regulatory sequences and show that for the Rck1/Rck2, Fkh1/Fkh2, Ace2/Swi5 paralogs, they are associated with previously characterized differences in posttranslational regulation. Finally, we experimentally confirm our prediction that for the Ace2/Swi5 paralogs, Cbk1 regulated localization was lost along the lineage leading to SWI5 after gene duplication. Our analysis suggests that changes in posttranslational regulation mediated by short regulatory motifs systematically contribute to functional divergence after gene duplication. PMID:25474245

  10. Functions of Ceramide Synthase Paralogs YPR114w and YJR116w of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mallela, Shamroop K.; Almeida, Reinaldo; Ejsing, Christer S.; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide is synthesized in yeast by two redundant acyl-CoA dependent synthases, Lag1 and Lac1. In lag1∆ lac1∆ cells, free fatty acids and sphingoid bases are elevated, and ceramides are produced through the redundant alkaline ceramidases Ypc1 and Ydc1, working backwards. Even with all four of these genes deleted, cells are surviving and continue to contain small amounts of complex sphingolipids. Here we show that these residual sphingolipids are not synthesized by YPR114w or YJR116w, proteins of unknown function showing a high degree of homology to Lag1 and Lac1. Indeed, the hextuple lag1∆ lac1∆ ypc1∆ ydc1∆ ypr114w∆ yjr116w∆ mutant still contains ceramides and complex sphingolipids. Yjr116w∆ exhibit an oxygen-dependent hypersensitivity to Cu2+ due to an increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a mitochondrially orchestrated programmed cell death in presence of copper, but also a general copper hypersensitivity that cannot be counteracted by the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). Myriocin efficiently represses the synthesis of sphingoid bases of ypr114w∆, but not its growth. Both yjr116w∆ and ypr114w∆ have fragmented vacuoles and produce less ROS than wild type, before and after diauxic shift. Ypr114w∆/ypr114w∆ have an increased chronological life span. Thus, Yjr116w and Ypr114w are related, but not functionally redundant. PMID:26752183

  11. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  12. A Network of Paralogous Stress Response Transcription Factors in the Human Pathogen Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Merhej, Jawad; Thiebaut, Antonin; Blugeon, Corinne; Pouch, Juliette; Ali Chaouche, Mohammed El Amine; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Le Crom, Stéphane; Lelandais, Gaëlle; Devaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Candida glabrata has become the second cause of systemic candidemia in humans. However, relatively few genome-wide studies have been conducted in this organism and our knowledge of its transcriptional regulatory network is quite limited. In the present work, we combined genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), transcriptome analyses, and DNA binding motif predictions to describe the regulatory interactions of the seven Yap (Yeast AP1) transcription factors of C. glabrata. We described a transcriptional network containing 255 regulatory interactions and 309 potential target genes. We predicted with high confidence the preferred DNA binding sites for 5 of the 7 CgYaps and showed a strong conservation of the Yap DNA binding properties between S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. We provided reliable functional annotation for 3 of the 7 Yaps and identified for Yap1 and Yap5 a core regulon which is conserved in S. cerevisiae, C. glabrata, and C. albicans. We uncovered new roles for CgYap7 in the regulation of iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, for CgYap1 in the regulation of heme biosynthesis and for CgYap5 in the repression of GRX4 in response to iron starvation. These transcription factors define an interconnected transcriptional network at the cross-roads between redox homeostasis, oxygen consumption, and iron metabolism. PMID:27242683

  13. Functional Analysis of Paralogous Thiol-disulfide Oxidoreductases in Streptococcus gordonii*

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Lauren; Ng, Crystal K. W.; Halperin, Scott A.; Lee, Song F.

    2013-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are important for the stability of many extracellular proteins, including bacterial virulence factors. Formation of these bonds is catalyzed by thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases (TDORs). Little is known about their formation in Gram-positive bacteria, particularly among facultative anaerobic Firmicutes, such as streptococci. To investigate disulfide bond formation in Streptococcus gordonii, we identified five putative TDORs from the sequenced genome. Each of the putative TDOR genes was insertionally inactivated with an erythromycin resistance cassette, and the mutants were analyzed for autolysis, extracellular DNA release, biofilm formation, bacteriocin production, and genetic competence. This analysis revealed a single TDOR, SdbA, which exhibited a pleiotropic mutant phenotype. Using an in silico analysis approach, we identified the major autolysin AtlS as a natural substrate of SdbA and showed that SdbA is critical to the formation of a disulfide bond that is required for autolytic activity. Analysis by BLAST search revealed homologs to SdbA in other Gram-positive species. This study provides the first in vivo evidence of an oxidoreductase, SdbA, that affects multiple phenotypes in a Gram-positive bacterium. SdbA shows low sequence homology to previously identified oxidoreductases, suggesting that it may belong to a different class of enzymes. Our results demonstrate that SdbA is required for disulfide bond formation in S. gordonii and indicate that this enzyme may represent a novel type of oxidoreductase in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23615907

  14. Functions of Ceramide Synthase Paralogs YPR114w and YJR116w of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mallela, Shamroop K; Almeida, Reinaldo; Ejsing, Christer S; Conzelmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide is synthesized in yeast by two redundant acyl-CoA dependent synthases, Lag1 and Lac1. In lag1∆ lac1∆ cells, free fatty acids and sphingoid bases are elevated, and ceramides are produced through the redundant alkaline ceramidases Ypc1 and Ydc1, working backwards. Even with all four of these genes deleted, cells are surviving and continue to contain small amounts of complex sphingolipids. Here we show that these residual sphingolipids are not synthesized by YPR114w or YJR116w, proteins of unknown function showing a high degree of homology to Lag1 and Lac1. Indeed, the hextuple lag1∆ lac1∆ ypc1∆ ydc1∆ ypr114w∆ yjr116w∆ mutant still contains ceramides and complex sphingolipids. Yjr116w∆ exhibit an oxygen-dependent hypersensitivity to Cu2+ due to an increased mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a mitochondrially orchestrated programmed cell death in presence of copper, but also a general copper hypersensitivity that cannot be counteracted by the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). Myriocin efficiently represses the synthesis of sphingoid bases of ypr114w∆, but not its growth. Both yjr116w∆ and ypr114w∆ have fragmented vacuoles and produce less ROS than wild type, before and after diauxic shift. Ypr114w∆/ypr114w∆ have an increased chronological life span. Thus, Yjr116w and Ypr114w are related, but not functionally redundant. PMID:26752183

  15. Duplicate gene divergence by changes in microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis and Brassica.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sishuo; Adams, Keith L

    2015-03-01

    Gene duplication provides large numbers of new genes that can lead to the evolution of new functions. Duplicated genes can diverge by changes in sequences, expression patterns, and functions. MicroRNAs play an important role in the regulation of gene expression in many eukaryotes. After duplication, two paralogs may diverge in their microRNA binding sites, which might impact their expression and function. Little is known about conservation and divergence of microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in plants. We analyzed microRNA binding sites in duplicated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa. We found that duplicates are more often targeted by microRNAs than singletons. The vast majority of duplicated genes in A. thaliana with microRNA binding sites show divergence in those sites between paralogs. Analysis of microRNA binding sites in genes derived from the ancient whole-genome triplication in B. rapa also revealed extensive divergence. Paralog pairs with divergent microRNA binding sites show more divergence in expression patterns compared with paralog pairs with the same microRNA binding sites in Arabidopsis. Close to half of the cases of binding site divergence are caused by microRNAs that are specific to the Arabidopsis genus, indicating evolutionarily recent gain of binding sites after target gene duplication. We also show rapid evolution of microRNA binding sites in a jacalin gene family. Our analyses reveal a dynamic process of changes in microRNA binding sites after gene duplication in Arabidopsis and highlight the role of microRNA regulation in the divergence and contrasting evolutionary fates of duplicated genes. PMID:25644246

  16. Altitudinal Variation at Duplicated β-Globin Genes in Deer Mice: Effects of Selection, Recombination, and Gene Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F.; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Cheviron, Zachary A.; Hoffmann, Federico G.; Kelly, John K.

    2012-01-01

    Spatially varying selection on a given polymorphism is expected to produce a localized peak in the between-population component of nucleotide diversity, and theory suggests that the chromosomal extent of elevated differentiation may be enhanced in cases where tandemly linked genes contribute to fitness variation. An intriguing example is provided by the tandemly duplicated β-globin genes of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), which contribute to adaptive differentiation in blood–oxygen affinity between high- and low-altitude populations. Remarkably, the two β-globin genes segregate the same pair of functionally distinct alleles due to a history of interparalog gene conversion and alleles of the same functional type are in perfect coupling-phase linkage disequilibrium (LD). Here we report a multilocus analysis of nucleotide polymorphism and LD in highland and lowland mice with different genetic backgrounds at the β-globin genes. The analysis of haplotype structure revealed a paradoxical pattern whereby perfect LD between the two β-globin paralogs (which are separated by 16.2 kb) is maintained in spite of the fact that LD within both paralogs decays to background levels over physical distances of less than 1 kb. The survey of nucleotide polymorphism revealed that elevated levels of altitudinal differentiation at each of the β-globin genes drop away quite rapidly in the external flanking regions (upstream of the 5′ paralog and downstream of the 3′ paralog), but the level of differentiation remains unexpectedly high across the intergenic region. Observed patterns of diversity and haplotype structure are difficult to reconcile with expectations of a two-locus selection model with multiplicative fitness. PMID:22042573

  17. The evolutionary appearance of non-cyanogenic hydroxynitrile glucosides in the Lotus genus is accompanied by the substrate specialization of paralogous β-glucosidases resulting from a crucial amino acid substitution.

    PubMed

    Lai, Daniela; Abou Hachem, Maher; Robson, Fran; Olsen, Carl Erik; Wang, Trevor L; Møller, Birger L; Takos, Adam M; Rook, Fred

    2014-07-01

    Lotus japonicus, like several other legumes, biosynthesizes the cyanogenic α-hydroxynitrile glucosides lotaustralin and linamarin. Upon tissue disruption these compounds are hydrolysed by a specific β-glucosidase, resulting in the release of hydrogen cyanide. Lotus japonicus also produces the non-cyanogenic γ- and β-hydroxynitrile glucosides rhodiocyanoside A and D using a biosynthetic pathway that branches off from lotaustralin biosynthesis. We previously established that BGD2 is the only β-glucosidase responsible for cyanogenesis in leaves. Here we show that the paralogous BGD4 has the dominant physiological role in rhodiocyanoside degradation. Structural modelling, site-directed mutagenesis and activity assays establish that a glycine residue (G211) in the aglycone binding site of BGD2 is essential for its ability to hydrolyse the endogenous cyanogenic glucosides. The corresponding valine (V211) in BGD4 narrows the active site pocket, resulting in the exclusion of non-flat substrates such as lotaustralin and linamarin, but not of the more planar rhodiocyanosides. Rhodiocyanosides and the BGD4 gene only occur in L. japonicus and a few closely related species associated with the Lotus corniculatus clade within the Lotus genus. This suggests the evolutionary scenario that substrate specialization for rhodiocyanosides evolved from a promiscuous activity of a progenitor cyanogenic β-glucosidase, resembling BGD2, and required no more than a single amino acid substitution. PMID:24861854

  18. Paralog of the formylglycine-generating enzyme--retention in the endoplasmic reticulum by canonical and noncanonical signals.

    PubMed

    Gande, Santosh Lakshmi; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Schmidt, Bernhard; Pringle, Thomas H; von Figura, Kurt; Dierks, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE) catalyzes in newly synthesized sulfatases the oxidation of a specific cysteine residue to formylglycine, which is the catalytic residue required for sulfate ester hydrolysis. This post-translational modification occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and is an essential step in the biogenesis of this enzyme family. A paralog of FGE (pFGE) also localizes to the ER. It shares many properties with FGE, but lacks formylglycine-generating activity. There is evidence that FGE and pFGE act in concert, possibly by forming complexes with sulfatases and one another. Here we show that human pFGE, but not FGE, is retained in the ER through its C-terminal tetrapeptide PGEL, a noncanonical variant of the classic KDEL ER-retention signal. Surprisingly, PGEL, although having two nonconsensus residues (PG), confers efficient ER retention when fused to a secretory protein. Inducible coexpression of pFGE at different levels in FGE-expressing cells did not significantly influence the kinetics of FGE secretion, suggesting that pFGE is not a retention factor for FGE in vivo. PGEL is accessible at the surface of the pFGE structure. It is found in 21 mammalian species with available pFGE sequences. Other species carry either canonical signals (eight mammals and 26 nonmammals) or different noncanonical variants (six mammals and six nonmammals). Among the latter, SGEL was tested and found to also confer ER retention. Although evolutionarily conserved for mammalian pFGE, the PGEL signal is found only in one further human protein entering the ER. Its consequences for KDEL receptor-mediated ER retrieval and benefit for pFGE functionality remain to be fully resolved. PMID:18266766

  19. Sensitivities of Two Zebrafish TRPA1 Paralogs to Chemical and Thermal Stimuli Analyzed in Heterologous Expression Systems.

    PubMed

    Oda, Mai; Kurogi, Mako; Kubo, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Osamu

    2016-03-01

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is the only member of the mouse, chick, and frog TRPA family, whereas 2 paralogs (zTRPA1a and zTRPA1b) are present in zebrafish. We herein investigated functional differences in the 2 zebrafish TRPA1s. HEK293T cells were used as heterologous expression systems, and the sensitivities of these cells to 4 chemical irritants (allyl isothiocyanate [AITC], caffeine, auto-oxidized epigallocatechin gallate [EGCG], and hydrogen peroxide [H2O2]) were compared with Ca(2+) imaging techniques. Sensitivities to the activators for AITC, oxidized EGCG, and H2O2 were higher in cells expressing zTRPA1a than in those expressing zTRPA1b, whereas caffeine appeared to activate both cells equally. We also characterized the thermal sensitivity of Xenopus oocytes expressing each TRPA1 electrophysiologically using a 2-electrode voltage clamp. Although endogenous currents induced by a cold stimulation were observed in control oocytes in some batches, oocytes expressing zTRPA1b showed significantly stronger cold- and heat-induced responses. However, significant thermal activation was not observed in oocytes expressing zTRPA1a. The results obtained using in vitro expression systems suggest that zTRPA1a is specialized for chemical sensing, whereas zTRPA1b responds to thermal stimuli. Furthermore, characterization of the chimeric molecule of TRPA1a and 1b revealed the importance of the N-terminal region in chemical and thermal sensing by zTRPA1s. PMID:26826723

  20. Crystal Structure of Thermus Aquaticus Gfh1, a Gre-factor Paralog that Inhibits rather than Stimulates transcript Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Lamour,V.; Hogan, B.; Erie, D.; Darst, S.

    2006-01-01

    Transcription elongation in bacteria is promoted by Gre-factors, which stimulate an endogenous, endonucleolytic transcript cleavage activity of the RNA polymerase. A GreA paralog, Gfh1, present in Thermus aquaticus and Thermus thermophilus, has the opposite effect on elongation complexes, inhibiting rather than stimulating transcript cleavage. We have determined the 3.3 Angstroms-resolution X-ray crystal structure of T. aquaticus Gfh1. The structure reveals an N-terminal and a C-terminal domain with close structural similarity to the domains of GreA, but with an unexpected conformational change in terms of the orientation of the domains with respect to each other. However, structural and functional analysis suggests that when complexed with RNA polymerase, Gfh1 adopts a conformation similar to that of GreA. These results reveal considerable structural flexibility for Gfh1, and for Gre-factors in general, as suggested by structural modeling, and point to a possible role for the conformational switch in Gre-factor and Gfh1 regulation. The opposite functional effect of Gfh1 compared with GreA may be determined by three structural characteristics. First, Gfh1 lacks the basic patch present in Gre-factors that likely plays a role in anchoring the 3'-fragment of the backtracked RNA. Second, the loop at the tip of the N-terminal coiled-coil is highly flexible and contains extra acidic residues compared with GreA. Third, the N-terminal coiled-coil finger lacks a kink in the first a-helix, resulting in a straight coiled-coil compared with GreA. The latter two characteristics suggest that Gfh1 chelates a magnesium ion in the RNA polymerase active site (like GreA) but in a catalytically inactive configuration.

  1. The yields of free radicals induced by monochromatic soft X-rays with energy of the K-absorption edge of bromine in BrdU/dThd complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, M.; Sawamura, S.; Inanami, O.; Kobayashi, K.

    1995-12-31

    Biological Auger effects have been found not only in Br-substituted plasmid DNA (Menke et al. 1991) but also in cells with Br-DNA when they are exposed to soft X-rays with energies above and below the K-absorption edge of Br. These biological Auger effects were sometimes correlated to enhanced DNA damage such as single- or double-strand breaks in these studies. Free radicals induced in DNA are regarded as precursors of base damage and strand breaks. Therefore, it is of interest to examine whether the Auger effects are also reflected in free-radical formation in Br-substituted DNA when they are exposed to soft X-rays with energy corresponding to the K-absorption edge of Br. In the present study BrdU{center_dot}dThd complexes were employed as Br-substituted DNA models, and the yields of free radicals were measured by ESR after irradiating them in the solid state with soft X-rays having energies above and below the K-absorption edge of Br.

  2. beta 1-Integrin-mediated glioma cell adhesion and free radical-induced apoptosis are regulated by binding to a C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yaojiong; Chen, Liwen; Zheng, Peng-Sheng; Yang, Burton B

    2002-04-01

    Integrins are cell-surface glycoproteins that mediate cell activities, including tissue morphogenesis, development, immune response, and cancer, through interaction with extracellular proteins. Here we report a novel means by which integrin signaling and functions are regulated. In pull-down assays and immunoprecipitation, beta(1)-integrin bound to the C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican, an extracellular chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. This was confirmed by cell-surface binding assays. Binding was calcium- and manganese-dependent. Upon native gel electrophoresis, beta(1)-integrin comigrated with the C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican. The interaction of beta(1)-integrin with the C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican activated focal adhesion kinase, enhanced integrin expression, and promoted cell adhesion. As a result, cells expressing the C-terminal domain of PG-M/versican were resistant to free radical-induced apoptosis. As the PG-M/versican peptide used in this study does not contain the RGD consensus-binding motif for integrins, the mechanism of the observed binding represents an entirely new function. PMID:11805102

  3. Evolution by gene duplication of Medicago truncatula PISTILLATA-like transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Roque, Edelín; Fares, Mario A; Yenush, Lynne; Rochina, Mari Cruz; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Gómez-Mena, Concepción; Beltrán, José Pío; Cañas, Luis A

    2016-04-01

    PISTILLATA (PI) is a member of the B-function MADS-box gene family, which controls the identity of both petals and stamens in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Medicago truncatula (Mt), there are two PI-like paralogs, known as MtPI and MtNGL9. These genes differ in their expression patterns, but it is not known whether their functions have also diverged. Describing the evolution of certain duplicated genes, such as transcription factors, remains a challenge owing to the complex expression patterns and functional divergence between the gene copies. Here, we report a number of functional studies, including analyses of gene expression, protein-protein interactions, and reverse genetic approaches designed to demonstrate the respective contributions of each M. truncatula PI-like paralog to the B-function in this species. Also, we have integrated molecular evolution approaches to determine the mode of evolution of Mt PI-like genes after duplication. Our results demonstrate that MtPI functions as a master regulator of B-function in M. truncatula, maintaining the overall ancestral function, while MtNGL9 does not seem to have a role in this regard, suggesting that the pseudogenization could be the functional evolutionary fate for this gene. However, we provide evidence that purifying selection is the primary evolutionary force acting on this paralog, pinpointing the conservation of its biochemical function and, alternatively, the acquisition of a new role for this gene. PMID:26773809

  4. Evolution by gene duplication of Medicago truncatula PISTILLATA-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Roque, Edelín; Fares, Mario A.; Yenush, Lynne; Rochina, Mari Cruz; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Gómez-Mena, Concepción; Beltrán, José Pío; Cañas, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    PISTILLATA (PI) is a member of the B-function MADS-box gene family, which controls the identity of both petals and stamens in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Medicago truncatula (Mt), there are two PI-like paralogs, known as MtPI and MtNGL9. These genes differ in their expression patterns, but it is not known whether their functions have also diverged. Describing the evolution of certain duplicated genes, such as transcription factors, remains a challenge owing to the complex expression patterns and functional divergence between the gene copies. Here, we report a number of functional studies, including analyses of gene expression, protein–protein interactions, and reverse genetic approaches designed to demonstrate the respective contributions of each M. truncatula PI-like paralog to the B-function in this species. Also, we have integrated molecular evolution approaches to determine the mode of evolution of Mt PI-like genes after duplication. Our results demonstrate that MtPI functions as a master regulator of B-function in M. truncatula, maintaining the overall ancestral function, while MtNGL9 does not seem to have a role in this regard, suggesting that the pseudogenization could be the functional evolutionary fate for this gene. However, we provide evidence that purifying selection is the primary evolutionary force acting on this paralog, pinpointing the conservation of its biochemical function and, alternatively, the acquisition of a new role for this gene. PMID:26773809

  5. Genome-Wide Expression Analysis of Soybean MADS Genes Showing Potential Function in the Seed Development

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rui-Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Chen, Jian-Xin; Fu, Yong-Fu

    2013-01-01

    The MADS family is an ancient and best-studied transcription factor and plays fundamental roles in almost every developmental process in plants. In the plant evolutionary history, the whole genome duplication (WGD) events are important not only to the plant species evolution, but to expansion of members of the gene families. Soybean as a model legume crop has experience three rounds of WGD events. Members of some MIKCC subfamilies, such as SOC, AGL6, SQUA, SVP, AGL17 and DEF/GLO, were expanded after soybean three rounds of WGD events. And some MIKCC subfamilies, MIKC* and type I MADS families had experienced faster birth-and-death evolution and their traces before the Glycine WGD event were not found. Transposed duplication played important roles in tandem arrangements among the members of different subfamilies. According to the expression profiles of type I and MIKC paralog pair genes, the fates of MIKC paralog gene pairs were subfunctionalization, and the fates of type I MADS paralog gene pairs were nonfunctionalization. 137 out of 163 MADS genes were close to 186 loci within 2 Mb genomic regions associated with seed-relative QTLs, among which 115 genes expressed during the seed development. Although MIKCC genes kept the important and conserved functions of the flower development, most MIKCC genes showed potentially essential roles in the seed development as well as the type I MADS. PMID:23638026

  6. Gene Family Expansions in Aphids Maintained by Endosymbiotic and Nonsymbiotic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Rebecca P.; Feng, Honglin; Nguyen, Douglas M.; Wilson, Alex C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Facilitating the evolution of new gene functions, gene duplication is a major mechanism driving evolutionary innovation. Gene family expansions relevant to host/symbiont interactions are increasingly being discovered in eukaryotes that host endosymbiotic microbes. Such discoveries entice speculation that gene duplication facilitates the evolution of novel, endosymbiotic relationships. Here, using a comparative transcriptomic approach combined with differential gene expression analysis, we investigate the importance of endosymbiosis in retention of amino acid transporter paralogs in aphid genomes. To pinpoint the timing of amino acid transporter duplications we inferred gene phylogenies for five aphid species and three outgroups. We found that while some duplications arose in the aphid common ancestor concurrent with endosymbiont acquisition, others predate aphid divergence from related insects without intracellular symbionts, and still others appeared during aphid diversification. Interestingly, several aphid-specific paralogs have conserved enriched expression in bacteriocytes, the insect cells that host primary symbionts. Conserved bacteriocyte enrichment suggests that the transporters were recruited to the aphid/endosymbiont interface in the aphid common ancestor, consistent with a role for gene duplication in facilitating the evolution of endosymbiosis in aphids. In contrast, the temporal variability of amino acid transporter duplication indicates that endosymbiosis is not the only trait driving selection for retention of amino acid transporter paralogs in sap-feeding insects. This study cautions against simplistic interpretations of the role of gene family expansion in the evolution of novel host/symbiont interactions by further highlighting that multiple complex factors maintain gene family paralogs in the genomes of eukaryotes that host endosymbiotic microbes. PMID:26878871

  7. Gene Family Expansions in Aphids Maintained by Endosymbiotic and Nonsymbiotic Traits.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Rebecca P; Feng, Honglin; Nguyen, Douglas M; Wilson, Alex C C

    2016-03-01

    Facilitating the evolution of new gene functions, gene duplication is a major mechanism driving evolutionary innovation. Gene family expansions relevant to host/symbiont interactions are increasingly being discovered in eukaryotes that host endosymbiotic microbes. Such discoveries entice speculation that gene duplication facilitates the evolution of novel, endosymbiotic relationships. Here, using a comparative transcriptomic approach combined with differential gene expression analysis, we investigate the importance of endosymbiosis in retention of amino acid transporter paralogs in aphid genomes. To pinpoint the timing of amino acid transporter duplications we inferred gene phylogenies for five aphid species and three outgroups. We found that while some duplications arose in the aphid common ancestor concurrent with endosymbiont acquisition, others predate aphid divergence from related insects without intracellular symbionts, and still others appeared during aphid diversification. Interestingly, several aphid-specific paralogs have conserved enriched expression in bacteriocytes, the insect cells that host primary symbionts. Conserved bacteriocyte enrichment suggests that the transporters were recruited to the aphid/endosymbiont interface in the aphid common ancestor, consistent with a role for gene duplication in facilitating the evolution of endosymbiosis in aphids. In contrast, the temporal variability of amino acid transporter duplication indicates that endosymbiosis is not the only trait driving selection for retention of amino acid transporter paralogs in sap-feeding insects. This study cautions against simplistic interpretations of the role of gene family expansion in the evolution of novel host/symbiont interactions by further highlighting that multiple complex factors maintain gene family paralogs in the genomes of eukaryotes that host endosymbiotic microbes. PMID:26878871

  8. Specific Duplication and Dorsoventrally Asymmetric Expression Patterns of Cycloidea-Like Genes in Zygomorphic Species of Ranunculaceae

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Florian; Cossard, Guillaume; Le Guilloux, Martine; Sannier, Julie; Nadot, Sophie; Damerval, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Floral bilateral symmetry (zygomorphy) has evolved several times independently in angiosperms from radially symmetrical (actinomorphic) ancestral states. Homologs of the Antirrhinum majus Cycloidea gene (Cyc) have been shown to control floral symmetry in diverse groups in core eudicots. In the basal eudicot family Ranunculaceae, there is a single evolutionary transition from actinomorphy to zygomorphy in the stem lineage of the tribe Delphinieae. We characterized Cyc homologs in 18 genera of Ranunculaceae, including the four genera of Delphinieae, in a sampling that represents the floral morphological diversity of this tribe, and reconstructed the evolutionary history of this gene family in Ranunculaceae. Within each of the two RanaCyL (Ranunculaceae Cycloidea-like) lineages previously identified, an additional duplication possibly predating the emergence of the Delphinieae was found, resulting in up to four gene copies in zygomorphic species. Expression analyses indicate that the RanaCyL paralogs are expressed early in floral buds and that the duration of their expression varies between species and paralog class. At most one RanaCyL paralog was expressed during the late stages of floral development in the actinomorphic species studied whereas all paralogs from the zygomorphic species were expressed, composing a species-specific identity code for perianth organs. The contrasted asymmetric patterns of expression observed in the two zygomorphic species is discussed in relation to their distinct perianth architecture. PMID:24752428

  9. Specific duplication and dorsoventrally asymmetric expression patterns of Cycloidea-like genes in zygomorphic species of Ranunculaceae.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Florian; Cossard, Guillaume; Le Guilloux, Martine; Sannier, Julie; Nadot, Sophie; Damerval, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Floral bilateral symmetry (zygomorphy) has evolved several times independently in angiosperms from radially symmetrical (actinomorphic) ancestral states. Homologs of the Antirrhinum majus Cycloidea gene (Cyc) have been shown to control floral symmetry in diverse groups in core eudicots. In the basal eudicot family Ranunculaceae, there is a single evolutionary transition from actinomorphy to zygomorphy in the stem lineage of the tribe Delphinieae. We characterized Cyc homologs in 18 genera of Ranunculaceae, including the four genera of Delphinieae, in a sampling that represents the floral morphological diversity of this tribe, and reconstructed the evolutionary history of this gene family in Ranunculaceae. Within each of the two RanaCyL (Ranunculaceae Cycloidea-like) lineages previously identified, an additional duplication possibly predating the emergence of the Delphinieae was found, resulting in up to four gene copies in zygomorphic species. Expression analyses indicate that the RanaCyL paralogs are expressed early in floral buds and that the duration of their expression varies between species and paralog class. At most one RanaCyL paralog was expressed during the late stages of floral development in the actinomorphic species studied whereas all paralogs from the zygomorphic species were expressed, composing a species-specific identity code for perianth organs. The contrasted asymmetric patterns of expression observed in the two zygomorphic species is discussed in relation to their distinct perianth architecture. PMID:24752428

  10. Wanda: a database of duplicated fish genes

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Yves; Taylor, John S.; Joseph, Jayabalan; Meyer, Axel

    2002-01-01

    Comparative genomics has shown that ray-finned fish (Actinopterygii) contain more copies of many genes than other vertebrates. A large number of these additional genes appear to have been produced during a genome duplication event that occurred early during the evolution of Actinopterygii (i.e. before the teleost radiation). In addition to this ancient genome duplication event, many lineages within Actinopterygii have experienced more recent genome duplications. Here we introduce a curated database named Wanda that lists groups of orthologous genes with one copy from man, mouse and chicken, one or two from tetraploid Xenopus and two or more ancient copies (i.e. paralogs) from ray-finned fish. The database also contains the sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees that were necessary for determining the correct orthologous and paralogous relationships among genes. Where available, map positions and functional data are also reported. The Wanda database should be of particular use to evolutionary and developmental biologists who are interested in the evolutionary and functional divergence of genes after duplication. Wanda is available at http://www.evolutionsbiologie.uni-konstanz.de/Wanda/. PMID:11752268

  11. Replication-dependent histone genes are actively transcribed in differentiating and aging retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Banday, Abdul Rouf; Baumgartner, Marybeth; Al Seesi, Sahar; Karunakaran, Devi Krishna Priya; Venkatesh, Aditya; Congdon, Sean; Lemoine, Christopher; Kilcollins, Ashley M; Mandoiu, Ion; Punzo, Claudio; Kanadia, Rahul N

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian genome, each histone family contains multiple replication-dependent paralogs, which are found in clusters where their transcription is thought to be coupled to the cell cycle. Here, we wanted to interrogate the transcriptional regulation of these paralogs during retinal development and aging. We employed deep sequencing, quantitative PCR, in situ hybridization (ISH), and microarray analysis, which revealed that replication-dependent histone genes were not only transcribed in progenitor cells but also in differentiating neurons. Specifically, by ISH analysis we found that different histone genes were actively transcribed in a subset of neurons between postnatal day 7 and 14. Interestingly, within a histone family, not all paralogs were transcribed at the same level during retinal development. For example, expression of Hist1h1b was higher embryonically, while that of Hist1h1c was higher postnatally. Finally, expression of replication-dependent histone genes was also observed in the aging retina. Moreover, transcription of replication-dependent histones was independent of rapamycin-mediated mTOR pathway inactivation. Overall, our data suggest the existence of variant nucleosomes produced by the differential expression of the replication-dependent histone genes across retinal development. Also, the expression of a subset of replication-dependent histone isotypes in senescent neurons warrants re-examining these genes as "replication-dependent." Thus, our findings underscore the importance of understanding the transcriptional regulation of replication-dependent histone genes in the maintenance and functioning of neurons. PMID:25486194

  12. The Rate and Tract Length of Gene Conversion between Duplicated Genes.

    PubMed

    Mansai, Sayaka P; Kado, Tomoyuki; Innan, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Interlocus gene conversion occurs such that a certain length of DNA fragment is non-reciprocally transferred (copied and pasted) between paralogous regions. To understand the rate and tract length of gene conversion, there are two major approaches. One is based on mutation-accumulation experiments, and the other uses natural DNA sequence variation. In this review, we overview the two major approaches and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. In addition, to demonstrate the importance of statistical analysis of empirical and evolutionary data for estimating tract length, we apply a maximum likelihood method to several data sets. PMID:24710193

  13. Diversity of 5S rRNA genes within individual prokaryotic genomes

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Anna; Li, Hongru; Oberdorf, William E; Alekseyenko, Alexander V.; Parsons, Tamasha; Yang, Liying; Gerz, Erika A.; Lee, Peng; Xiang, Charlie; Nossa, Carlos W.; Pei, Zhiheng

    2012-01-01

    We examined intragenomic variation of paralogous 5S rRNA genes to evaluate the concept of ribosomal constraints. In a dataset containing 1168 genomes from 779 unique species, 96 species exhibited >3% diversity. Twenty seven species with >10% diversity contained a total of 421 mismatches between all pairs of the most dissimilar copies of 5S rRNA genes. The large majority (401 of 421) the diversified positions were conserved at the secondary structure level. The high diversity was associated with partial rRNA operon, split operon, or spacer length-related divergence. In total, these findings indicated that there were tight ribosomal constraints on paralogous 5S rRNA genes in a genome despite of the high degree of diversity at the primary structure level. There is supplementary material. PMID:22765222

  14. Divergent functions through alternative splicing: the Drosophila CRMP gene in pyrimidine metabolism, brain, and behavior.

    PubMed

    Morris, Deanna H; Dubnau, Josh; Park, Jae H; Rawls, John M

    2012-08-01

    DHP and CRMP proteins comprise a family of structurally similar proteins that perform divergent functions, DHP in pyrimidine catabolism in most organisms and CRMP in neuronal dynamics in animals. In vertebrates, one DHP and five CRMP proteins are products of six genes; however, Drosophila melanogaster has a single CRMP gene that encodes one DHP and one CRMP protein through tissue-specific, alternative splicing of a pair of paralogous exons. The proteins derived from the fly gene are identical over 90% of their lengths, suggesting that unique, novel functions of these proteins derive from the segment corresponding to the paralogous exons. Functional homologies of the Drosophila and mammalian CRMP proteins are revealed by several types of evidence. Loss-of-function CRMP mutation modifies both Ras and Rac misexpression phenotypes during fly eye development in a manner that is consistent with the roles of CRMP in Ras and Rac signaling pathways in mammalian neurons. In both mice and flies, CRMP mutation impairs learning and memory. CRMP mutant flies are defective in circadian activity rhythm. Thus, DHP and CRMP proteins are derived by different processes in flies (tissue-specific, alternative splicing of paralogous exons of a single gene) and vertebrates (tissue-specific expression of different genes), indicating that diverse genetic mechanisms have mediated the evolution of this protein family in animals. PMID:22649077

  15. Population structure of the Indonesian giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon: a window into evolutionary similarities between paralogous mitochondrial DNA sequences and their genomes.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Aziz, Muslihudeen A; Schöfl, Gerhard; Mrotzek, Grit; Haryanti, Haryanti; Sugama, Ketut; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2015-09-01

    Here we used both microsatellites and mtCR (mitochondrial DNA control region) sequences as genetic markers to examine the genetic diversity and population structure of Penaeus monodon shrimp from six Indonesian regions. The microsatellite data showed that shrimp from the Indian and the Pacific Ocean were genetically distinct from each other. It has been reported previously that P. monodon mtCR sequences from the Indo-Pacific group into two major paralogous clades of unclear origin. Here we show that the population structure inferred from mtCR sequences matches the microsatellite-based population structure for one of these clades. This is consistent with the notion that this mtCR clade shares evolutionary history with nuclear DNA and may thus represent nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (Numts). PMID:26380687

  16. Population structure of the Indonesian giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon: a window into evolutionary similarities between paralogous mitochondrial DNA sequences and their genomes

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Aziz, Muslihudeen A; Schöfl, Gerhard; Mrotzek, Grit; Haryanti, Haryanti; Sugama, Ketut; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2015-01-01

    Here we used both microsatellites and mtCR (mitochondrial DNA control region) sequences as genetic markers to examine the genetic diversity and population structure of Penaeus monodon shrimp from six Indonesian regions. The microsatellite data showed that shrimp from the Indian and the Pacific Ocean were genetically distinct from each other. It has been reported previously that P. monodon mtCR sequences from the Indo-Pacific group into two major paralogous clades of unclear origin. Here we show that the population structure inferred from mtCR sequences matches the microsatellite-based population structure for one of these clades. This is consistent with the notion that this mtCR clade shares evolutionary history with nuclear DNA and may thus represent nuclear mitochondrial pseudogenes (Numts). PMID:26380687

  17. Biological consequences of ancient gene acquisition and duplication in the large genome soil bacterium, ""solibacter usitatus"" strain Ellin6076

    SciTech Connect

    Challacombe, Jean F; Eichorst, Stephanie A; Xie, Gary; Kuske, Cheryl R; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial genome sizes range from ca. 0.5 to 10Mb and are influenced by gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, gene loss and other evolutionary processes. Sequenced genomes of strains in the phylum Acidobacteria revealed that 'Solibacter usistatus' strain Ellin6076 harbors a 9.9 Mb genome. This large genome appears to have arisen by horizontal gene transfer via ancient bacteriophage and plasmid-mediated transduction, as well as widespread small-scale gene duplications. This has resulted in an increased number of paralogs that are potentially ecologically important (ecoparalogs). Low amino acid sequence identities among functional group members and lack of conserved gene order and orientation in the regions containing similar groups of paralogs suggest that most of the paralogs were not the result of recent duplication events. The genome sizes of cultured subdivision 1 and 3 strains in the phylum Acidobacteria were estimated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine the prevalence of the large genome trait within the phylum. Members of subdivision 1 were estimated to have smaller genome sizes ranging from ca. 2.0 to 4.8 Mb, whereas members of subdivision 3 had slightly larger genomes, from ca. 5.8 to 9.9 Mb. It is hypothesized that the large genome of strain Ellin6076 encodes traits that provide a selective metabolic, defensive and regulatory advantage in the variable soil environment.

  18. Biological Consequences of Ancient Gene Acquisition and Duplication in the Large Genome of Candidatus Solibacter usitatus Ellin6076

    SciTech Connect

    Challacombe, Jean F; Eichorst, Stephanie A; Hauser, Loren John; Land, Miriam L; Xie, Gary; Kuske, Cheryl R

    2011-01-01

    Members of the bacterial phylum Acidobacteria are widespread in soils and sediments worldwide, and are abundant in many soils. Acidobacteria are challenging to culture in vitro, and many basic features of their biology and functional roles in the soil have not been determined. Candidatus Solibacter usitatus strain Ellin6076 has a 9.9 Mb genome that is approximately 2 5 times as large as the other sequenced Acidobacteria genomes. Bacterial genome sizes typically range from 0.5 to 10 Mb and are influenced by gene duplication, horizontal gene transfer, gene loss and other evolutionary processes. Our comparative genome analyses indicate that the Ellin6076 large genome has arisen by horizontal gene transfer via ancient bacteriophage and/or plasmid-mediated transduction, and widespread small-scale gene duplications, resulting in an increased number of paralogs. Low amino acid sequence identities among functional group members, and lack of conserved gene order and orientation in regions containing similar groups of paralogs, suggest that most of the paralogs are not the result of recent duplication events. The genome sizes of additional cultured Acidobacteria strains were estimated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine the prevalence of the large genome trait within the phylum. Members of subdivision 3 had larger genomes than those of subdivision 1, but none were as large as the Ellin6076 genome. The large genome of Ellin6076 may not be typical of the phylum, and encodes traits that could provide a selective metabolic, defensive and regulatory advantage in the soil environment.

  19. Pathogenomic Inference of Virulence-Associated Genes in Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Jason S.; Fouts, Derrick E.; Haft, Daniel H.; Cannella, Anthony P.; Ricaldi, Jessica N.; Brinkac, Lauren; Harkins, Derek; Durkin, Scott; Sanka, Ravi; Sutton, Granger; Moreno, Angelo; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Matthias, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a globally important, neglected zoonotic infection caused by spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Since genetic transformation remains technically limited for pathogenic Leptospira, a systems biology pathogenomic approach was used to infer leptospiral virulence genes by whole genome comparison of culture-attenuated Leptospira interrogans serovar Lai with its virulent, isogenic parent. Among the 11 pathogen-specific protein-coding genes in which non-synonymous mutations were found, a putative soluble adenylate cyclase with host cell cAMP-elevating activity, and two members of a previously unstudied ∼15 member paralogous gene family of unknown function were identified. This gene family was also uniquely found in the alpha-proteobacteria Bartonella bacilliformis and Bartonella australis that are geographically restricted to the Andes and Australia, respectively. How the pathogenic Leptospira and these two Bartonella species came to share this expanded gene family remains an evolutionary mystery. In vivo expression analyses demonstrated up-regulation of 10/11 Leptospira genes identified in the attenuation screen, and profound in vivo, tissue-specific up-regulation by members of the paralogous gene family, suggesting a direct role in virulence and host-pathogen interactions. The pathogenomic experimental design here is generalizable as a functional systems biology approach to studying bacterial pathogenesis and virulence and should encourage similar experimental studies of other pathogens. PMID:24098822

  20. Defining a Structural and Kinetic Rationale for Paralogous Copies of Phenylacetate-CoA Ligases from the Cystic Fibrosis Pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315*

    PubMed Central

    Law, Adrienne; Boulanger, Martin J.

    2011-01-01

    The phenylacetic acid (PAA) degradation pathway is the sole aerobic route for phenylacetic acid metabolism in bacteria and facilitates degradation of environmental pollutants such as styrene and ethylbenzene. The PAA pathway also is implicated in promoting Burkholderia cenocepacia infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Intriguingly, the first enzyme in the PAA pathway is present in two copies (paaK1 and paaK2), yet each subsequent enzyme is present in only a single copy. Furthermore, sequence divergence indicates that PaaK1 and PaaK2 form a unique subgroup within the adenylate-forming enzyme (AFE) superfamily. To establish a biochemical rationale for the existence of the PaaK paralogs in B. cenocepacia, we present high resolution x-ray crystal structures of a selenomethionine derivative of PaaK1 in complex with ATP and adenylated phenylacetate intermediate complexes of PaaK1 and PaaK2 in distinct conformations. Structural analysis reveals a novel N-terminal microdomain that may serve to recruit subsequent PAA enzymes, whereas a bifunctional role is proposed for the P-loop in stabilizing the C-terminal domain in conformation 2. The potential for different kinetic profiles was suggested by a structurally divergent extension of the aryl substrate pocket in PaaK1 relative to PaaK2. Functional characterization confirmed this prediction, with PaaK1 possessing a lower Km for phenylacetic acid and better able to accommodate 3′ and 4′ substitutions on the phenyl ring. Collectively, these results offer detailed insight into the reaction mechanism of a novel subgroup of the AFE superfamily and provide a clear biochemical rationale for the presence of paralogous copies of PaaK of B. cenocepacia. PMID:21388965

  1. Immune-Related Functions of the Hivep Gene Family in East African Cichlid Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Diepeveen, Eveline T.; Roth, Olivia; Salzburger, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Immune-related genes are often characterized by adaptive protein evolution. Selection on immune genes can be particularly strong when hosts encounter novel parasites, for instance, after the colonization of a new habitat or upon the exploitation of vacant ecological niches in an adaptive radiation. We examined a set of new candidate immune genes in East African cichlid fishes. More specifically, we studied the signatures of selection in five paralogs of the human immunodeficiency virus type I enhancer-binding protein (Hivep) gene family, tested their involvement in the immune defense, and related our results to explosive speciation and adaptive radiation events in cichlids. We found signatures of long-term positive selection in four Hivep paralogs and lineage-specific positive selection in Hivep3b in two radiating cichlid lineages. Exposure of the cichlid Astatotilapia burtoni to a vaccination with Vibrio anguillarum bacteria resulted in a positive correlation between immune response parameters and expression levels of three Hivep loci. This work provides the first evidence for a role of Hivep paralogs in teleost immune defense and links the signatures of positive selection to host–pathogen interactions within an adaptive radiation. PMID:24142922

  2. Circadian expression of clock and putative clock-controlled genes in skeletal muscle of the zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Ian P G; Johnston, Ian A

    2012-01-01

    To identify circadian patterns of gene expression in skeletal muscle, adult male zebrafish were acclimated for 2 wk to a 12:12-h light-dark photoperiod and then exposed to continuous darkness for 86 h with ad libitum feeding. The increase in gut food content associated with the subjective light period was much diminished by the third cycle, enabling feeding and circadian rhythms to be distinguished. Expression of zebrafish paralogs of mammalian transcriptional activators of the circadian mechanism (bmal1, clock1, and rora) followed a rhythmic pattern with a ∼24-h periodicity. Peak expression of rora paralogs occurred at the beginning of the subjective light period [Zeitgeber time (ZT)07 and ZT02 for roraa and rorab], whereas the highest expression of bmal1 and clock paralogs occurred 12 h later (ZT13-15 and ZT16 for bmal and clock paralogs). Expression of the transcriptional repressors cry1a, per1a/1b, per2, per3, nr1d2a/2b, and nr1d1 also followed a circadian pattern with peak expression at ZT0-02. Expression of the two paralogs of cry2 occurred in phase with clock1a/1b. Duplicated genes had a high correlation of expression except for paralogs of clock1, nr1d2, and per1, with cry1b showing no circadian pattern. The highest expression difference was 9.2-fold for the activator bmal1b and 51.7-fold for the repressor per1a. Out of 32 candidate clock-controlled genes, only myf6, igfbp3, igfbp5b, and hsf2 showed circadian expression patterns. Igfbp3, igfbp5b, and myf6 were expressed in phase with clock1a/1b and had an average of twofold change in expression from peak to trough, whereas hsf2 transcripts were expressed in phase with cry1a and had a 7.2-fold-change in expression. The changes in expression of clock and clock-controlled genes observed during continuous darkness were also observed at similar ZTs in fish exposed to a normal photoperiod in a separate control experiment. The role of circadian clocks in regulating muscle maintenance and growth are discussed

  3. Elucidating the evolutionary history and expression patterns of nucleoside phosphorylase paralogs (vegetative storage proteins) in Populus and the plant kingdom

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nucleoside phosphorylases (NPs) have been extensively investigated in human and bacterial systems for their role in metabolic nucleotide salvaging and links to oncogenesis. In plants, NP-like proteins have not been comprehensively studied, likely because there is no evidence of a metabolic function in nucleoside salvage. However, in the forest trees genus Populus a family of NP-like proteins function as an important ecophysiological adaptation for inter- and intra-seasonal nitrogen storage and cycling. Results We conducted phylogenetic analyses to determine the distribution and evolution of NP-like proteins in plants. These analyses revealed two major clusters of NP-like proteins in plants. Group I proteins were encoded by genes across a wide range of plant taxa while proteins encoded by Group II genes were dominated by species belonging to the order Malpighiales and included the Populus Bark Storage Protein (BSP) and WIN4-like proteins. Additionally, we evaluated the NP-like genes in Populus by examining the transcript abundance of the 13 NP-like genes found in the Populus genome in various tissues of plants exposed to long-day (LD) and short-day (SD) photoperiods. We found that all 13 of the Populus NP-like genes belonging to either Group I or II are expressed in various tissues in both LD and SD conditions. Tests of natural selection and expression evolution analysis of the Populus genes suggests that divergence in gene expression may have occurred recently during the evolution of Populus, which supports the adaptive maintenance models. Lastly, in silico analysis of cis-regulatory elements in the promoters of the 13 NP-like genes in Populus revealed common regulatory elements known to be involved in light regulation, stress/pathogenesis and phytohormone responses. Conclusion In Populus, the evolution of the NP-like protein and gene family has been shaped by duplication events and natural selection. Expression data suggest that previously

  4. The Evolutionary Fate of Alternatively Spliced Homologous Exons after Gene Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L.; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene. PMID:25931610

  5. The evolutionary fate of alternatively spliced homologous exons after gene duplication.

    PubMed

    Abascal, Federico; Tress, Michael L; Valencia, Alfonso

    2015-06-01

    Alternative splicing and gene duplication are the two main processes responsible for expanding protein functional diversity. Although gene duplication can generate new genes and alternative splicing can introduce variation through alternative gene products, the interplay between the two processes is complex and poorly understood. Here, we have carried out a study of the evolution of alternatively spliced exons after gene duplication to better understand the interaction between the two processes. We created a manually curated set of 97 human genes with mutually exclusively spliced homologous exons and analyzed the evolution of these exons across five distantly related vertebrates (lamprey, spotted gar, zebrafish, fugu, and coelacanth). Most of these exons had an ancient origin (more than 400 Ma). We found examples supporting two extreme evolutionary models for the behaviour of homologous axons after gene duplication. We observed 11 events in which gene duplication was accompanied by splice isoform separation, that is, each paralog specifically conserved just one distinct ancestral homologous exon. At other extreme, we identified genes in which the homologous exons were always conserved within paralogs, suggesting that the alternative splicing event cannot easily be separated from the function in these genes. That many homologous exons fall in between these two extremes highlights the diversity of biological systems and suggests that the subtle balance between alternative splicing and gene duplication is adjusted to the specific cellular context of each gene. PMID:25931610

  6. Evolutionary history of the reprimo tumor suppressor gene family in vertebrates with a description of a new reprimo gene lineage.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Ignacio A; Zavala, Kattina; Hoffmann, Federico G; Vandewege, Michael W; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Amigo, Julio D; Owen, Gareth I; Opazo, Juan C

    2016-10-10

    Genes related to human diseases should be natural targets for evolutionary studies, since they could provide clues regarding the genetic bases of pathologies and potential treatments. Here we studied the evolution of the reprimo gene family, a group of tumor-suppressor genes that are implicated in p53-mediated cell cycle arrest. These genes, especially the reprimo duplicate located on human chromosome 2, have been associated with epigenetic modifications correlated with transcriptional silencing and cancer progression. We demonstrate the presence of a third reprimo lineage that, together with the reprimo and reprimo-like genes, appears to have been differentially retained during the evolutionary history of vertebrates. We present evidence that these reprimo lineages originated early in vertebrate evolution and expanded as a result of the two rounds of whole genome duplications that occurred in the last common ancestor of vertebrates. The reprimo gene has been lost in birds, and the third reprimo gene lineage has been retained in only a few distantly related species, such as coelacanth and gar. Expression analyses revealed that the reprimo paralogs are mainly expressed in the nervous system. Different vertebrate lineages have retained different reprimo paralogs, and even in species that have retained multiple copies, only one of them is heavily expressed. PMID:27432065

  7. The F8H Glycosyltransferase is a Functional Paralog of FRA8 Involved in Glucuronoxylan Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The FRAGILE FIBER8 gene was previously shown to be required for the biosynthesis of the reducing end tetrasaccharide sequence of glucuronoxylan (GX) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we demonstrate that F8H, a close homolog of FRA8, is a functional ortholog of FRA8 involved in GX bi...

  8. h-Goliath, paralog of GRAIL, is a new E3 ligase protein, expressed in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Guais, Adeline; Siegrist, Sylvie; Solhonne, Brigitte; Jouault, Hélène; Guellaën, Georges; Bulle, Frédérique

    2006-06-01

    In Drosophila, the RING finger protein d-Goliath was originally identified as a transcription factor involved in the embryo mesoderm formation [Bouchard, M.L., Cote, S., 1993. The Drosophila melanogaster developmental gene g1 encodes a variant zinc-finger-motif protein. Gene 125, 205-209]. In mouse, the m-Goliath mRNA level was shown to be increased in growth factor withdrawal-induced apoptosis of myeloid cells [Baker, S.J., Reddy, E.P., 2000. Cloning of murine G1RP, a novel gene related to Drosophila melanogaster g1. Gene 248, 33-40]. Due to its putative function of transcription factor in apoptosis, we cloned the human cDNA for h-Goliath and characterized the expression of the protein in blood and bone marrow cells. The human protein of 419 aa (44 kDa) contains a protease-associated domain, a transmembrane domain and a RING-H2 motif. This structure classifies h-Goliath as a new member of a human family of ubiquitin ligases with GRAIL (gene related to anergy in lymphocytes) as founder. This E3 ligase controls the development of T cell clonal anergy by ubiquitination [Anandasabapathy, N., Ford, G.S., Bloom, D., Holness, C., Paragas, V., Seroogy, C., Skrenta, H., Hollenhorst, M., Fathman, C.G., Soares, L., 2003. GRAIL: an E3 ubiquitin ligase that inhibits cytokine gene transcription is expressed in anergic CD4+ T cells. Immunity 18, 535-547]. In vitro ubiquitination studies support the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of h-Goliath. In human, the protein is expressed under 3 isoforms, a major one at 28 kDa and two others at 46 and 55 kDa. These proteins come from a common precursor (44 kDa) as we observed using in vitro transcription-translation. Using immunohistochemistry on blood or bone marrow smears, of healthy or leukemia samples, we found that the protein expression was restricted to the cytoplasm of progenitors and fully differentiated leukocyte populations. We did not observe any modification of h-Goliath expression or localization in leukemia. In these cells

  9. Host Mitochondrial Association Evolved in the Human Parasite Toxoplasma gondii via Neofunctionalization of a Gene Duplicate.

    PubMed

    Adomako-Ankomah, Yaw; English, Elizabeth D; Danielson, Jeffrey J; Pernas, Lena F; Parker, Michelle L; Boulanger, Martin J; Dubey, Jitender P; Boyle, Jon P

    2016-05-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite of humans and other animals, host mitochondrial association (HMA) is driven by a gene family that encodes multiple mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1) proteins. However, the importance of MAF1 gene duplication in the evolution of HMA is not understood, nor is the impact of HMA on parasite biology. Here we used within- and between-species comparative analysis to determine that the MAF1 locus is duplicated in T. gondii and its nearest extant relative Hammondia hammondi, but not another close relative, Neospora caninum Using cross-species complementation, we determined that the MAF1 locus harbors multiple distinct paralogs that differ in their ability to mediate HMA, and that only T. gondii and H. hammondi harbor HMA(+) paralogs. Additionally, we found that exogenous expression of an HMA(+) paralog in T. gondii strains that do not normally exhibit HMA provides a competitive advantage over their wild-type counterparts during a mouse infection. These data indicate that HMA likely evolved by neofunctionalization of a duplicate MAF1 copy in the common ancestor of T. gondii and H. hammondi, and that the neofunctionalized gene duplicate is selectively advantageous. PMID:26920761

  10. Host Mitochondrial Association Evolved in the Human Parasite Toxoplasma gondii via Neofunctionalization of a Gene Duplicate

    PubMed Central

    Adomako-Ankomah, Yaw; English, Elizabeth D.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Pernas, Lena F.; Parker, Michelle L.; Boulanger, Martin J.; Dubey, Jitender P.; Boyle, Jon P.

    2016-01-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular parasite of humans and other animals, host mitochondrial association (HMA) is driven by a gene family that encodes multiple mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1) proteins. However, the importance of MAF1 gene duplication in the evolution of HMA is not understood, nor is the impact of HMA on parasite biology. Here we used within- and between-species comparative analysis to determine that the MAF1 locus is duplicated in T. gondii and its nearest extant relative Hammondia hammondi, but not another close relative, Neospora caninum. Using cross-species complementation, we determined that the MAF1 locus harbors multiple distinct paralogs that differ in their ability to mediate HMA, and that only T. gondii and H. hammondi harbor HMA+ paralogs. Additionally, we found that exogenous expression of an HMA+ paralog in T. gondii strains that do not normally exhibit HMA provides a competitive advantage over their wild-type counterparts during a mouse infection. These data indicate that HMA likely evolved by neofunctionalization of a duplicate MAF1 copy in the common ancestor of T. gondii and H. hammondi, and that the neofunctionalized gene duplicate is selectively advantageous. PMID:26920761

  11. The Zebrafish Annexin Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Steven A.; De Rose, Robert A.; Olson, Eric S.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2003-01-01

    The Annexins (ANXs) are a family of calcium- and phospholipid-binding proteins that have been implicated in many cellular processes, including channel formation, membrane fusion, vesicle transport, and regulation of phospholipase A2 activity. As a first step toward understanding in vivo function, we have cloned 11 zebrafish anx genes. Four genes (anx1a, anx2a, anx5,and anx11a) were identified by screening a zebrafish cDNA library with a Xenopus anx2 fragment. For these genes, full-length cDNA sequences were used to cluster 212 EST sequences generated by the Zebrafish Genome Resources Project. The EST analysis revealed seven additional anx genes that were subsequently cloned. The genetic map positions of all 11 genes were determined by using a zebrafish radiation hybrid panel. Sequence and syntenic relationships between zebrafish and human genes indicate that the 11 genes represent orthologs of human anx1,2,4,5,6,11,13,and suggest that several zebrafish anx genes resulted from duplications that arose after divergence of the zebrafish and mammalian genomes. Zebrafish anx genes are expressed in a wide range of tissues during embryonic and larval stages. Analysis of the expression patterns of duplicated genes revealed both redundancy and divergence, with the most similar genes having almost identical tissue-specific patterns of expression and with less similar duplicates showing no overlap. The differences in gene expression of recently duplicated anx genes could explain why highly related paralogs were maintained in the genome and did not rapidly become pseudogenes. PMID:12799347

  12. Co-expression of soybean Dicer-like genes in response to stress and development.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Shaun J; Kantar, Michael B; Yoon, Han W; Whaley, Adam M; Schlueter, Jessica A; Stupar, Robert M

    2012-11-01

    Regulation of gene transcription and post-transcriptional processes is critical for proper development, genome integrity, and stress responses in plants. Many genes involved in the key processes of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation have been well studied in model diploid organisms. However, gene and genome duplication may alter the function of the genes involved in these processes. To address this question, we assayed the stress-induced transcription patterns of duplicated gene pairs involved in RNAi and DNA methylation processes in the paleopolyploid soybean. Real-time quantitative PCR and Sequenom MassARRAY expression assays were used to profile the relative expression ratios of eight gene pairs across eight different biotic and abiotic stress conditions. The transcriptional responses to stress for genes involved in DNA methylation, RNAi processing, and miRNA processing were compared. The strongest evidence for pairwise co-expression in response to stresses was exhibited by non-paralogous Dicer-like (DCL) genes GmDCL2a-GmDCL3a and GmDCL1b-GmDCL2b, most profoundly in root tissues. Among homoeologous or paralogous DCL genes, the Dicer-like 2 (DCL2) gene pair exhibited the strongest response to stress and most conserved co-expression pattern. This was surprising because the DCL2 duplication event is more ancient than the other DCL duplications. Possible mechanisms that may be driving the DCL2 co-expression are discussed. PMID:22527487

  13. Gene duplication and the evolution of moonlighting proteins.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Cantú, Adriana; Ascencio, Diana; Barona-Gómez, Francisco; DeLuna, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication is a recurring phenomenon in genome evolution and a major driving force in the gain of biological functions. Here, we examine the role of gene duplication in the origin and maintenance of moonlighting proteins, with special focus on functional redundancy and innovation, molecular tradeoffs, and genetic robustness. An overview of specific examples-mainly from yeast-suggests a widespread conservation of moonlighting behavior in duplicate genes after long evolutionary times. Dosage amplification and incomplete subfunctionalization appear to be prevalent in the maintenance of multifunctionality. We discuss the role of gene-expression divergence and paralog responsiveness in moonlighting proteins with overlapping biochemical properties. Future studies analyzing multifunctional genes in a more systematic and comprehensive manner will not only enable a better understanding of how this emerging class of protein behavior originates and is maintained, but also provide new insights on the mechanisms of evolution by gene duplication. PMID:26217376

  14. Hox gene survey in the chaetognath Spadella cephaloptera: evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Papillon, Daniel; Perez, Yvan; Fasano, Laurent; Le Parco, Yannick; Caubit, Xavier

    2003-04-01

    We present the isolation of six Hox genes in the chaetognath Spadella cephaloptera. We identified one member of the paralogy group 3, four median genes and a mosaic gene that shares features of both median and posterior classes ( SceMedPost). Several hypotheses may account for the presence of a mosaic Hox gene in this animal. Here we propose that SceMedPost may represent an ancestral gene, which has not diverged totally into a posterior or a median one. This hypothesis has interesting implications for the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of Hox genes and suggests that Chaetognatha lineage divergence could predate the deuterostome/protostome split. Such a phylogenetic position is considered in the light of their embryological and morphological characters. PMID:12690453

  15. Patterns of gene duplication and functional evolution during the diversification of the AGAMOUS subfamily of MADS box genes in angiosperms.

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Elena M; Jaramillo, M Alejandra; Di Stilio, Verónica S

    2004-01-01

    Members of the AGAMOUS (AG) subfamily of MIKC-type MADS-box genes appear to control the development of reproductive organs in both gymnosperms and angiosperms. To understand the evolution of this subfamily in the flowering plants, we have identified 26 new AG-like genes from 15 diverse angiosperm species. Phylogenetic analyses of these genes within a large data set of AG-like sequences show that ancient gene duplications were critical in shaping the evolution of the subfamily. Before the radiation of extant angiosperms, one event produced the ovule-specific D lineage and the well-characterized C lineage, whose members typically promote stamen and carpel identity as well as floral meristem determinacy. Subsequent duplications in the C lineage resulted in independent instances of paralog subfunctionalization and maintained functional redundancy. Most notably, the functional homologs AG from Arabidopsis and PLENA (PLE) from Antirrhinum are shown to be representatives of separate paralogous lineages rather than simple genetic orthologs. The multiple subfunctionalization events that have occurred in this subfamily highlight the potential for gene duplication to lead to dissociation among genetic modules, thereby allowing an increase in morphological diversity. PMID:15020484

  16. Patterns of Gene Conversion in Duplicated Yeast Histones Suggest Strong Selection on a Coadapted Macromolecular Complex

    PubMed Central

    Scienski, Kathy; Fay, Justin C.; Conant, Gavin C.

    2015-01-01

    We find evidence for interlocus gene conversion in five duplicated histone genes from six yeast species. The sequences of these duplicated genes, surviving from the ancient genome duplication, show phylogenetic patterns inconsistent with the well-resolved orthology relationships inferred from a likelihood model of gene loss after the genome duplication. Instead, these paralogous genes are more closely related to each other than any is to its nearest ortholog. In addition to simulations supporting gene conversion, we also present evidence for elevated rates of radical amino acid substitutions along the branches implicated in the conversion events. As these patterns are similar to those seen in ribosomal proteins that have undergone gene conversion, we speculate that in cases where duplicated genes code for proteins that are a part of tightly interacting complexes, selection may favor the fixation of gene conversion events in order to maintain high protein identities between duplicated copies. PMID:26560339

  17. 2.4 Å resolution crystal structure of human TRAP1NM, the Hsp90 paralog in the mitochondrial matrix.

    PubMed

    Sung, Nuri; Lee, Jungsoon; Kim, Ji Hyun; Chang, Changsoo; Tsai, Francis T F; Lee, Sukyeong

    2016-08-01

    TRAP1 is an organelle-specific Hsp90 paralog that is essential for neoplastic growth. As a member of the Hsp90 family, TRAP1 is presumed to be a general chaperone facilitating the late-stage folding of Hsp90 client proteins in the mitochondrial matrix. Interestingly, TRAP1 cannot replace cytosolic Hsp90 in protein folding, and none of the known Hsp90 co-chaperones are found in mitochondria. Thus, the three-dimensional structure of TRAP1 must feature regulatory elements that are essential to the ATPase activity and chaperone function of TRAP1. Here, the crystal structure of a human TRAP1NM dimer is presented, featuring an intact N-domain and M-domain structure, bound to adenosine 5'-β,γ-imidotriphosphate (ADPNP). The crystal structure together with epitope-mapping results shows that the TRAP1 M-domain loop 1 contacts the neighboring subunit and forms a previously unobserved third dimer interface that mediates the specific interaction with mitochondrial Hsp70. PMID:27487821

  18. Genomic structure and evolution of the ancestral chromosome fusion site in 2q13-2q14.1 and paralogous regions on other human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuxin; Linardopoulou, Elena; Friedman, Cynthia; Williams, Eleanor; Trask, Barbara J

    2002-11-01

    Human chromosome 2 was formed by the head-to-head fusion of two ancestral chromosomes that remained separate in other primates. Sequences that once resided near the ends of the ancestral chromosomes are now interstitially located in 2q13-2q14.1. Portions of these sequences had duplicated to other locations prior to the fusion. Here we present analyses of the genomic structure and evolutionary history of >600 kb surrounding the fusion site and closely related sequences on other human chromosomes. Sequence blocks that closely flank the inverted arrays of degenerate telomere repeats marking the fusion site are duplicated at many, primarily subtelomeric, locations. In addition, large portions of a 168-kb centromere-proximal block are duplicated at 9pter, 9p11.2, and 9q13, with 98%-99% average sequence identity. A 67-kb block on the distal side of the fusion site is highly homologous to sequences at 22qter. A third ~100-kb segment is 96% identical to a region in 2q11.2. By integrating data on the extent and similarity of these paralogous blocks, including the presence of phylogenetically informative repetitive elements, with observations of their chromosomal distribution in nonhuman primates, we infer the order of the duplications that led to their current arrangement. Several of these duplicated blocks may be associated with breakpoints of inversions that occurred during primate evolution and of recurrent chromosome rearrangements in humans. PMID:12421751

  19. Rad51/Dmc1 paralogs and mediators oppose DNA helicases to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote crossovers during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander; Mehats, Alizée; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2014-12-16

    During meiosis programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by homologous recombination using the sister chromatid or the homologous chromosome (homolog) as a template. This repair results in crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) recombinants. Only CO formation between homologs provides the physical linkages guiding correct chromosome segregation, which are essential to produce healthy gametes. The factors that determine the CO/NCO decision are still poorly understood. Using Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model we show that the Rad51/Dmc1-paralog complexes Rad55-Rad57 and Rdl1-Rlp1-Sws1 together with Swi5-Sfr1 play a major role in antagonizing both the FANCM-family DNA helicase/translocase Fml1 and the RecQ-type DNA helicase Rqh1 to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote Mus81-Eme1-dependent COs. A common attribute of these protein complexes is an ability to stabilize the Rad51/Dmc1 nucleoprotein filament, and we propose that it is this property that imposes constraints on which enzymes gain access to the recombination intermediate, thereby controlling the manner in which it is processed and resolved. PMID:25414342

  20. Interactome Analyses Identify Ties of PrPC and Its Mammalian Paralogs to Oligomannosidic N-Glycans and Endoplasmic Reticulum-Derived Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Won, Amy Hye; Shi, Tujin; Daude, Nathalie; Lau, Agnes; Young, Rebecca; Xu, Lei; Carlson, George A.; Williams, David; Westaway, David; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold

    2009-01-01

    The physiological environment which hosts the conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) to disease-associated isoforms has remained enigmatic. A quantitative investigation of the PrPC interactome was conducted in a cell culture model permissive to prion replication. To facilitate recognition of relevant interactors, the study was extended to Doppel (Prnd) and Shadoo (Sprn), two mammalian PrPC paralogs. Interestingly, this work not only established a similar physiological environment for the three prion protein family members in neuroblastoma cells, but also suggested direct interactions amongst them. Furthermore, multiple interactions between PrPC and the neural cell adhesion molecule, the laminin receptor precursor, Na/K ATPases and protein disulfide isomerases (PDI) were confirmed, thereby reconciling previously separate findings. Subsequent validation experiments established that interactions of PrPC with PDIs may extend beyond the endoplasmic reticulum and may play a hitherto unrecognized role in the accumulation of PrPSc. A simple hypothesis is presented which accounts for the majority of interactions observed in uninfected cells and suggests that PrPC organizes its molecular environment on account of its ability to bind to adhesion molecules harboring immunoglobulin-like domains, which in turn recognize oligomannose-bearing membrane proteins. PMID:19798432

  1. Revising the Taxonomic Distribution, Origin and Evolution of Ribosome Inactivating Protein Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lapadula, Walter J.; Sánchez Puerta, María Virginia; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome inactivating proteins are enzymes that depurinate a specific adenine residue in the alpha-sarcin-ricin loop of the large ribosomal RNA, being ricin and Shiga toxins the most renowned examples. They are widely distributed in plants and their presence has also been confirmed in a few bacterial species. According to this taxonomic distribution, the current model about the origin and evolution of RIP genes postulates that an ancestral RIP domain was originated in flowering plants, and later acquired by some bacteria via horizontal gene transfer. Here, we unequivocally detected the presence of RIP genes in fungi and metazoa. These findings, along with sequence and phylogenetic analyses, led us to propose an alternative, more parsimonious, hypothesis about the origin and evolutionary history of the RIP domain, where several paralogous RIP genes were already present before the three domains of life evolved. This model is in agreement with the current idea of the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) as a complex, genetically redundant organism. Differential loss of paralogous genes in descendants of LUCA, rather than multiple horizontal gene transfer events, could account for the complex pattern of RIP genes across extant species, as it has been observed for other genes. PMID:24039805

  2. Unraveling the evolution and regulation of the alternative oxidase gene family in plants.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xiao-jun; Lv, Xin; Lin, Hong-hui

    2015-11-01

    Alternative oxidase (AOX) is a diiron carboxylate protein present in all plants examined to date that couples the oxidation of ubiquinol with the reduction of oxygen to water. The predominant structure of AOX genes is four exons interrupted by three introns. In this study, by analyzing the genomic sequences of genes from different plant species, we deduced that intron/exon loss/gain and deletion of fragments are the major mechanisms responsible for the generation and evolution of AOX paralogous genes. Integrating gene duplication and structural information with expression profiles for various AOXs revealed that tandem duplication/block duplication contributed greatly to the generation and maintenance of the AOX gene family. Notably, the expression profiles based on public microarray database showed highly diverse expression patterns among AOX members in different developmental stages and tissues and that both orthologous and paralogous genes did not have the same expression profiles due to their divergence in regulatory regions. Comparative analysis of genes in six plant species under various perturbations indicated a large number of protein kinases, transcription factors and antioxidant enzymes are co-expressed with AOX. Of these, four sets of transcription factors--WRKY, NAC, bZIP and MYB--are likely involved in the regulating the differential responses of AOX1 genes to specific stresses. Furthermore, divergence of AOX1 and AOX2 subfamilies in regulation might be the main reason for their differential stress responses. PMID:26438244

  3. Multispecies Analysis of Expression Pattern Diversification in the Recently Expanded Insect Ly6 Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kohtaro; Hazbun, Alexis; Hijazi, Assia; Vreede, Barbara; Sucena, Élio

    2015-01-01

    Gene families often consist of members with diverse expression domains reflecting their functions in a wide variety of tissues. However, how the expression of individual members, and thus their tissue-specific functions, diversified during the course of gene family expansion is not well understood. In this study, we approached this question through the analysis of the duplication history and transcriptional evolution of a rapidly expanding subfamily of insect Ly6 genes. We analyzed different insect genomes and identified seven Ly6 genes that have originated from a single ancestor through sequential duplication within the higher Diptera. We then determined how the original embryonic expression pattern of the founding gene diversified by characterizing its tissue-specific expression in the beetle Tribolium castaneum, the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, and the mosquito Anopheles stephensi and those of its duplicates in three higher dipteran species, representing various stages of the duplication history (Megaselia abdita, Ceratitis capitata, and Drosophila melanogaster). Our results revealed that frequent neofunctionalization episodes contributed to the increased expression breadth of this subfamily and that these events occurred after duplication and speciation events at comparable frequencies. In addition, at each duplication node, we consistently found asymmetric expression divergence. One paralog inherited most of the tissue-specificities of the founder gene, whereas the other paralog evolved drastically reduced expression domains. Our approach attests to the power of combining a well-established duplication history with a comprehensive coverage of representative species in acquiring unequivocal information about the dynamics of gene expression evolution in gene families. PMID:25743545

  4. Horizontal gene transfer and the evolution of transcriptionalregulation in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2007-12-20

    Background: Most bacterial genes were acquired by horizontalgene transfer from other bacteria instead of being inherited bycontinuous vertical descent from an ancient ancestor}. To understand howthe regulation of these {acquired} genes evolved, we examined theevolutionary histories of transcription factors and of regulatoryinteractions from the model bacterium Escherichia coli K12. Results:Although most transcription factors have paralogs, these usually arose byhorizontal gene transfer rather than by duplication within the E. colilineage, as previously believed. In general, most neighbor regulators --regulators that are adjacent to genes that they regulate -- were acquiredby horizontal gene transfer, while most global regulators evolvedvertically within the gamma-Proteobacteria. Neighbor regulators wereoften acquired together with the adjacent operon that they regulate, sothe proximity might be maintained by repeated transfers (like "selfishoperons"). Many of the as-yet-uncharacterized (putative) regulators havealso been acquired together with adjacent genes, so we predict that theseare neighbor regulators as well. When we analyzed the histories ofregulatory interactions, we found that the evolution of regulation byduplication was rare, and surprisingly, many of the regulatoryinteractions that are shared between paralogs result from convergentevolution. Another surprise was that horizontally transferred genes aremore likely than other genes to be regulated by multiple regulators, andmost of this complex regulation probably evolved after the transfer.Conclusions: Our results highlight the rapid evolution of niche-specificgene regulation in bacteria.

  5. CYP701A8: a rice ent-kaurene oxidase paralog diverted to more specialized diterpenoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Hillwig, Matthew L; Wu, Yisheng; Peters, Reuben J

    2012-03-01

    All higher plants contain an ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), as such a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 701 family member is required for gibberellin (GA) phytohormone biosynthesis. While gene expansion and functional diversification of GA-biosynthesis-derived diterpene synthases into more specialized metabolism has been demonstrated, no functionally divergent KO/CYP701 homologs have been previously identified. Rice (Oryza sativa) contains five CYP701A subfamily members in its genome, despite the fact that only one (OsKO2/CYP701A6) is required for GA biosynthesis. Here we demonstrate that one of the other rice CYP701A subfamily members, OsKOL4/CYP701A8, does not catalyze the prototypical conversion of the ent-kaurene C4α-methyl to a carboxylic acid, but instead carries out hydroxylation at the nearby C3α position in a number of related diterpenes. In particular, under conditions where OsKO2 catalyzes the expected conversion of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid required for GA biosynthesis, OsKOL4 instead efficiently reacts with ent-sandaracopimaradiene and ent-cassadiene to produce the corresponding C3α-hydroxylated diterpenoids. These compounds are expected intermediates in biosynthesis of the oryzalexin and phytocassane families of rice antifungal phytoalexins, respectively, and can be detected in rice plants under the appropriate conditions. Thus, it appears that OsKOL4 plays a role in the more specialized diterpenoid metabolism of rice, and our results provide evidence for divergence of a KO/CYP701 family member from GA biosynthesis. This further expands the range of enzymes recruited from the ancestral GA primary pathway to the more complex and specialized labdane-related diterpenoid metabolic network found in rice. PMID:22247270

  6. Identification and evolution of an NFAT gene involving Branchiostoma belcheri innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojun; Hu, Jing; Jin, Ping; Chen, Liming; Ma, Fei

    2013-10-01

    The Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) plays an important role in innate and adaptive immunity, but no NFAT genes have yet been identified in amphioxus species. Here we identified and characterized an NFAT-like gene from Branchiostoma belcheri, and also studied extensively the evolutionary history of NFAT family genes. We found that the amphioxus genome contains an AmphiNFAT gene encoding an NFAT homolog. The AmphiNFAT gene was found to be involved in the innate immune response to LPS stimulation in B. belcheri and was ubiquitously and differentially expressed in all investigated tissues. The NFAT family genes were present in a common ancestor with cnidaria, and NFAT1-4 paralogs were lost early in Branchiostoma and Strongylocentrotus genomes. We discovered that NFAT family genes underwent strong purifying selection. Taken together, our findings provide an insight into the innate immune response of amphioxus and the evolution of the NFAT gene family. PMID:23657135

  7. Genome-Wide Analysis Reveals Diverged Patterns of Codon Bias, Gene Expression, and Rates of Sequence Evolution in Picea Gene Families

    PubMed Central

    De La Torre, Amanda R.; Lin, Yao-Cheng; Van de Peer, Yves; Ingvarsson, Pär K.

    2015-01-01

    The recent sequencing of several gymnosperm genomes has greatly facilitated studying the evolution of their genes and gene families. In this study, we examine the evidence for expression-mediated selection in the first two fully sequenced representatives of the gymnosperm plant clade (Picea abies and Picea glauca). We use genome-wide estimates of gene expression (>50,000 expressed genes) to study the relationship between gene expression, codon bias, rates of sequence divergence, protein length, and gene duplication. We found that gene expression is correlated with rates of sequence divergence and codon bias, suggesting that natural selection is acting on Picea protein-coding genes for translational efficiency. Gene expression, rates of sequence divergence, and codon bias are correlated with the size of gene families, with large multicopy gene families having, on average, a lower expression level and breadth, lower codon bias, and higher rates of sequence divergence than single-copy gene families. Tissue-specific patterns of gene expression were more common in large gene families with large gene expression divergence than in single-copy families. Recent family expansions combined with large gene expression variation in paralogs and increased rates of sequence evolution suggest that some Picea gene families are rapidly evolving to cope with biotic and abiotic stress. Our study highlights the importance of gene expression and natural selection in shaping the evolution of protein-coding genes in Picea species, and sets the ground for further studies investigating the evolution of individual gene families in gymnosperms. PMID:25747252

  8. Ancient Duplications and Expression Divergence in the Globin Gene Superfamily of Vertebrates: Insights from the Elephant Shark Genome and Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Juan C.; Toloza-Villalobos, Jessica; Burmester, Thorsten; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Storz, Jay F.

    2015-01-01

    Comparative analyses of vertebrate genomes continue to uncover a surprising diversity of genes in the globin gene superfamily, some of which have very restricted phyletic distributions despite their antiquity. Genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes) should be especially informative about the duplicative origins and ancestral functions of vertebrate globins, as divergence between Chondrichthyes and bony vertebrates represents the most basal split within the jawed vertebrates. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the vertebrate globin gene family that includes the complete globin gene repertoire of the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii). Using genomic sequence data from representatives of all major vertebrate classes, integrated analyses of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships revealed that the last common ancestor of vertebrates possessed a repertoire of at least seven globin genes: single copies of androglobin and neuroglobin, four paralogous copies of globin X, and the single-copy progenitor of the entire set of vertebrate-specific globins. Combined with expression data, the genomic inventory of elephant shark globins yielded four especially surprising findings: 1) there is no trace of the neuroglobin gene (a highly conserved gene that is present in all other jawed vertebrates that have been examined to date), 2) myoglobin is highly expressed in heart, but not in skeletal muscle (reflecting a possible ancestral condition in vertebrates with single-circuit circulatory systems), 3) elephant shark possesses two highly divergent globin X paralogs, one of which is preferentially expressed in gonads, and 4) elephant shark possesses two structurally distinct α-globin paralogs, one of which is preferentially expressed in the brain. Expression profiles of elephant shark globin genes reveal distinct specializations of function relative to orthologs in bony vertebrates and suggest hypotheses about

  9. Parallel evolution of tetrodotoxin resistance in three voltage-gated sodium channel genes in the garter snake Thamnophis sirtalis.

    PubMed

    McGlothlin, Joel W; Chuckalovcak, John P; Janes, Daniel E; Edwards, Scott V; Feldman, Chris R; Brodie, Edmund D; Pfrender, Michael E; Brodie, Edmund D

    2014-11-01

    Members of a gene family expressed in a single species often experience common selection pressures. Consequently, the molecular basis of complex adaptations may be expected to involve parallel evolutionary changes in multiple paralogs. Here, we use bacterial artificial chromosome library scans to investigate the evolution of the voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) family in the garter snake Thamnophis sirtalis, a predator of highly toxic Taricha newts. Newts possess tetrodotoxin (TTX), which blocks Nav's, arresting action potentials in nerves and muscle. Some Thamnophis populations have evolved resistance to extremely high levels of TTX. Previous work has identified amino acid sites in the skeletal muscle sodium channel Nav1.4 that confer resistance to TTX and vary across populations. We identify parallel evolution of TTX resistance in two additional Nav paralogs, Nav1.6 and 1.7, which are known to be expressed in the peripheral nervous system and should thus be exposed to ingested TTX. Each paralog contains at least one TTX-resistant substitution identical to a substitution previously identified in Nav1.4. These sites are fixed across populations, suggesting that the resistant peripheral nerves antedate resistant muscle. In contrast, three sodium channels expressed solely in the central nervous system (Nav1.1-1.3) showed no evidence of TTX resistance, consistent with protection from toxins by the blood-brain barrier. We also report the exon-intron structure of six Nav paralogs, the first such analysis for snake genes. Our results demonstrate that the molecular basis of adaptation may be both repeatable across members of a gene family and predictable based on functional considerations. PMID:25135948

  10. Parallel Evolution of Tetrodotoxin Resistance in Three Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Genes in the Garter Snake Thamnophis sirtalis

    PubMed Central

    McGlothlin, Joel W.; Chuckalovcak, John P.; Janes, Daniel E.; Edwards, Scott V.; Feldman, Chris R.; Brodie, Edmund D.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Brodie, Edmund D.

    2014-01-01

    Members of a gene family expressed in a single species often experience common selection pressures. Consequently, the molecular basis of complex adaptations may be expected to involve parallel evolutionary changes in multiple paralogs. Here, we use bacterial artificial chromosome library scans to investigate the evolution of the voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) family in the garter snake Thamnophis sirtalis, a predator of highly toxic Taricha newts. Newts possess tetrodotoxin (TTX), which blocks Nav’s, arresting action potentials in nerves and muscle. Some Thamnophis populations have evolved resistance to extremely high levels of TTX. Previous work has identified amino acid sites in the skeletal muscle sodium channel Nav1.4 that confer resistance to TTX and vary across populations. We identify parallel evolution of TTX resistance in two additional Nav paralogs, Nav1.6 and 1.7, which are known to be expressed in the peripheral nervous system and should thus be exposed to ingested TTX. Each paralog contains at least one TTX-resistant substitution identical to a substitution previously identified in Nav1.4. These sites are fixed across populations, suggesting that the resistant peripheral nerves antedate resistant muscle. In contrast, three sodium channels expressed solely in the central nervous system (Nav1.1–1.3) showed no evidence of TTX resistance, consistent with protection from toxins by the blood–brain barrier. We also report the exon–intron structure of six Nav paralogs, the first such analysis for snake genes. Our results demonstrate that the molecular basis of adaptation may be both repeatable across members of a gene family and predictable based on functional considerations. PMID:25135948

  11. Elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii) provides insights into the evolution of Hox gene clusters in gnathostomes.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Vydianathan; Lam, Kevin; Tay, Boon-Hui; Tay, Alice; Brenner, Sydney; Venkatesh, Byrappa

    2009-09-22

    We have sequenced and analyzed Hox gene clusters from elephant shark, a holocephalian cartilaginous fish. Elephant shark possesses 4 Hox clusters with 45 Hox genes that include orthologs for a higher number of ancient gnathostome Hox genes than the 4 clusters in tetrapods and the supernumerary clusters in teleost fishes. Phylogenetic analysis of elephant shark Hox genes from 7 paralogous groups that contain all of the 4 members indicated an ((AB)(CD)) topology for the order of Hox cluster duplication, providing support for the 2R hypothesis (i.e., 2 rounds of whole-genome duplication during the early evolution of vertebrates). Comparisons of noncoding sequences of the elephant shark and human Hox clusters have identified a large number of conserved noncoding elements (CNEs), which represent putative cis-regulatory elements that may be involved in the regulation of Hox genes. Interestingly, in fugu more than 50% of these ancient CNEs have diverged beyond recognition in the duplicated (HoxA, HoxB, and HoxD) as well as the singleton (HoxC) Hox clusters. Furthermore, the b-paralogs of the duplicated fugu Hox clusters are virtually devoid of unique ancient CNEs. In contrast to fugu Hox clusters, elephant shark and human Hox clusters have lost fewer ancient CNEs. If these ancient CNEs are indeed enhancers directing tissue-specific expression of Hox genes, divergence of their sequences in vertebrate lineages might have led to altered expression patterns and presumably the functions of their associated Hox genes. PMID:19805301

  12. Evolutionary genomics and adaptive evolution of the Hedgehog gene family (Shh, Ihh and Dhh) in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Joana; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Jarvis, Erich D; Zhang, Guojie; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) gene family codes for a class of secreted proteins composed of two active domains that act as signalling molecules during embryo development, namely for the development of the nervous and skeletal systems and the formation of the testis cord. While only one Hh gene is found typically in invertebrate genomes, most vertebrates species have three (Sonic hedgehog--Shh; Indian hedgehog--Ihh; and Desert hedgehog--Dhh), each with different expression patterns and functions, which likely helped promote the increasing complexity of vertebrates and their successful diversification. In this study, we used comparative genomic and adaptive evolutionary analyses to characterize the evolution of the Hh genes in vertebrates following the two major whole genome duplication (WGD) events. To overcome the lack of Hh-coding sequences on avian publicly available databases, we used an extensive dataset of 45 avian and three non-avian reptilian genomes to show that birds have all three Hh paralogs. We find suggestions that following the WGD events, vertebrate Hh paralogous genes evolved independently within similar linkage groups and under different evolutionary rates, especially within the catalytic domain. The structural regions around the ion-binding site were identified to be under positive selection in the signaling domain. These findings contrast with those observed in invertebrates, where different lineages that experienced gene duplication retained similar selective constraints in the Hh orthologs. Our results provide new insights on the evolutionary history of the Hh gene family, the functional roles of these paralogs in vertebrate species, and on the location of mutational hotspots. PMID:25549322

  13. Evolutionary Genomics and Adaptive Evolution of the Hedgehog Gene Family (Shh, Ihh and Dhh) in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Joana; Johnson, Warren E.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Jarvis, Erich D.; Zhang, Guojie; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Antunes, Agostinho

    2014-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) gene family codes for a class of secreted proteins composed of two active domains that act as signalling molecules during embryo development, namely for the development of the nervous and skeletal systems and the formation of the testis cord. While only one Hh gene is found typically in invertebrate genomes, most vertebrates species have three (Sonic hedgehog – Shh; Indian hedgehog – Ihh; and Desert hedgehog – Dhh), each with different expression patterns and functions, which likely helped promote the increasing complexity of vertebrates and their successful diversification. In this study, we used comparative genomic and adaptive evolutionary analyses to characterize the evolution of the Hh genes in vertebrates following the two major whole genome duplication (WGD) events. To overcome the lack of Hh-coding sequences on avian publicly available databases, we used an extensive dataset of 45 avian and three non-avian reptilian genomes to show that birds have all three Hh paralogs. We find suggestions that following the WGD events, vertebrate Hh paralogous genes evolved independently within similar linkage groups and under different evolutionary rates, especially within the catalytic domain. The structural regions around the ion-binding site were identified to be under positive selection in the signaling domain. These findings contrast with those observed in invertebrates, where different lineages that experienced gene duplication retained similar selective constraints in the Hh orthologs. Our results provide new insights on the evolutionary history of the Hh gene family, the functional roles of these paralogs in vertebrate species, and on the location of mutational hotspots. PMID:25549322

  14. Generating single-copy nuclear gene data for a recent adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Whittall, Justen B; Medina-Marino, Andrew; Zimmer, Elizabeth A; Hodges, Scott A

    2006-04-01

    Recent adaptive radiations provide an exceptional opportunity to understand the processes of speciation and adaptation. However, reconstructing the phylogenetic history of recent and rapidly evolving clades often requires the use of multiple, independent gene genealogies. Nuclear introns are an obvious source of the necessary data but their use is often limited because degenerate primers can amplify paralogous loci. To identify PCR primers for a large number of loci in an especially rapid adaptive radiation, that of the flowering plant genus Aquilegia (Ranunculaceae), we developed an efficient method for amplifying multiple single-copy nuclear loci by sequencing a modest number of clones from a cDNA library and designing PCR primers; with one primer anchored in the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) and one primer in the coding region of each gene. Variation between paralogous loci evolves more quickly in 3'-UTR regions compared to adjacent exons, and therefore we achieved high specificity for isolating orthologous loci. Furthermore, we were able to identify genes containing large introns by amplifying genes from genomic DNA and comparing the PCR product size to that predicted from their cDNA sequence. In Aquilegia eight out of eleven loci were isolated with this method and six of these loci had introns. Among four genes sequenced for samples spanning the phylogenetic breadth of the genus, we found sequence variation at levels similar to that observed in ITS, further supporting the recent and rapid radiation in Aquilegia. We assessed the orthology of amplification products by phylogenetic congruence among loci, the presence of two well established phylogenetic relationships, and similarity among loci for levels of sequence variation. Higher levels of variation among samples for one locus suggest possible paralogy. Overall, this method provides an efficient means of isolating predominantly single-copy loci from both low and high-copy gene families, providing ample

  15. Update of the human and mouse SERPIN gene superfamily.

    PubMed

    Heit, Claire; Jackson, Brian C; McAndrews, Monica; Wright, Mathew W; Thompson, David C; Silverman, Gary A; Nebert, Daniel W; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    The serpin family comprises a structurally similar, yet functionally diverse, set of proteins. Named originally for their function as serine proteinase inhibitors, many of its members are not inhibitors but rather chaperones, involved in storage, transport, and other roles. Serpins are found in genomes of all kingdoms, with 36 human protein-coding genes and five pseudogenes. The mouse has 60 Serpin functional genes, many of which are orthologous to human SERPIN genes and some of which have expanded into multiple paralogous genes. Serpins are found in tissues throughout the body; whereas most are extracellular, there is a class of intracellular serpins. Serpins appear to have roles in inflammation, immune function, tumorigenesis, blood clotting, dementia, and cancer metastasis. Further characterization of these proteins will likely reveal potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for disease. PMID:24172014

  16. Update of the human and mouse SERPIN gene superfamily

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The serpin family comprises a structurally similar, yet functionally diverse, set of proteins. Named originally for their function as serine proteinase inhibitors, many of its members are not inhibitors but rather chaperones, involved in storage, transport, and other roles. Serpins are found in genomes of all kingdoms, with 36 human protein-coding genes and five pseudogenes. The mouse has 60 Serpin functional genes, many of which are orthologous to human SERPIN genes and some of which have expanded into multiple paralogous genes. Serpins are found in tissues throughout the body; whereas most are extracellular, there is a class of intracellular serpins. Serpins appear to have roles in inflammation, immune function, tumorigenesis, blood clotting, dementia, and cancer metastasis. Further characterization of these proteins will likely reveal potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for disease. PMID:24172014

  17. Diversity of human copy number variation and multicopy genes.

    PubMed

    Sudmant, Peter H; Kitzman, Jacob O; Antonacci, Francesca; Alkan, Can; Malig, Maika; Tsalenko, Anya; Sampas, Nick; Bruhn, Laurakay; Shendure, Jay; Eichler, Evan E

    2010-10-29

    Copy number variants affect both disease and normal phenotypic variation, but those lying within heavily duplicated, highly identical sequence have been difficult to assay. By analyzing short-read mapping depth for 159 human genomes, we demonstrated accurate estimation of absolute copy number for duplications as small as 1.9 kilobase pairs, ranging from 0 to 48 copies. We identified 4.1 million "singly unique nucleotide" positions informative in distinguishing specific copies and used them to genotype the copy and content of specific paralogs within highly duplicated gene families. These data identify human-specific expansions in genes associated with brain development, reveal extensive population genetic diversity, and detect signatures consistent with gene conversion in the human species. Our approach makes ~1000 genes accessible to genetic studies of disease association. PMID:21030649

  18. Duplication and expression of CYC2-like genes in the origin and maintenance of corolla zygomorphy in Lamiales.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jinshun; Kellogg, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Duplication, retention, and expression of CYCLOIDEA2 (CYC2)-like genes are thought to affect evolution of corolla symmetry. However, exactly what and how changes in CYC2-like genes correlate with the origin of corolla zygomorphy are poorly understood. We inferred and calibrated a densely sampled phylogeny of CYC2-like genes across the Lamiales and examined their expression in early diverging (EDL) and higher core clades (HCL). CYC2-like genes duplicated extensively in Lamiales, at least six times in core Lamiales (CL) around the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary, and seven more in EDL relatively more recently. Nested duplications and losses of CYC2-like paralogs are pervasive but may not correlate with transitions in corolla symmetry. We found evidence for dN/dS (ω) variation following gene duplications. CYC2-like paralogs in HCL show differential expression with higher expression in adaxial petals. Asymmetric expression but not recurrent duplication of CYC2-like genes correlates with the origin of corolla zygomorphy. Changes in both cis-regulatory and coding domains of CYC2-like genes are probably crucial for the evolution of corolla zygomorphy. Multiple selection regimes appear likely to play important roles in gene retention. The parallel duplications of CYC2-like genes are after the initial diversification of bumble bees and Euglossine bees. PMID:25329857

  19. Divergence of recently duplicated M{gamma}-type MADS-box genes in Petunia.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Marian; Gordon, Jonathan; Weterings, Koen; Angenent, Gerco C

    2010-02-01

    The MADS-box transcription factor family has expanded considerably in plants via gene and genome duplications and can be subdivided into type I and MIKC-type genes. The two gene classes show a different evolutionary history. Whereas the MIKC-type genes originated during ancient genome duplications, as well as during more recent events, the type I loci appear to experience high turnover with many recent duplications. This different mode of origin also suggests a different fate for the type I duplicates, which are thought to have a higher chance to become silenced or lost from the genome. To get more insight into the evolution of the type I MADS-box genes, we isolated nine type I genes from Petunia, which belong to the Mgamma subclass, and investigated the divergence of their coding and regulatory regions. The isolated genes could be subdivided into two categories: two genes were highly similar to Arabidopsis Mgamma-type genes, whereas the other seven genes showed less similarity to Arabidopsis genes and originated more recently. Two of the recently duplicated genes were found to contain deleterious mutations in their coding regions, and expression analysis revealed that a third paralog was silenced by mutations in its regulatory region. However, in addition to the three genes that were subjected to nonfunctionalization, we also found evidence for neofunctionalization of one of the Petunia Mgamma-type genes. Our study shows a rapid divergence of recently duplicated Mgamma-type MADS-box genes and suggests that redundancy among type I paralogs may be less common than expected. PMID:19933156

  20. Genome-wide Generation and Systematic Phenotyping of Knockout Mice Reveals New Roles for Many Genes

    PubMed Central

    White, Jacqueline K.; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Karp, Natasha A.; Ryder, Ed; Buljan, Marija; Bussell, James N.; Salisbury, Jennifer; Clare, Simon; Ingham, Neil J.; Podrini, Christine; Houghton, Richard; Estabel, Jeanne; Bottomley, Joanna R.; Melvin, David G.; Sunter, David; Adams, Niels C.; Baker, Lauren; Barnes, Caroline; Beveridge, Ryan; Cambridge, Emma; Carragher, Damian; Chana, Prabhjoat; Clarke, Kay; Hooks, Yvette; Igosheva, Natalia; Ismail, Ozama; Jackson, Hannah; Kane, Leanne; Lacey, Rosalind; Lafont, David Tino; Lucas, Mark; Maguire, Simon; McGill, Katherine; McIntyre, Rebecca E.; Messager, Sophie; Mottram, Lynda; Mulderrig, Lee; Pearson, Selina; Protheroe, Hayley J.; Roberson, Laura-Anne; Salsbury, Grace; Sanderson, Mark; Sanger, Daniel; Shannon, Carl; Thompson, Paul C.; Tuck, Elizabeth; Vancollie, Valerie E.; Brackenbury, Lisa; Bushell, Wendy; Cook, Ross; Dalvi, Priya; Gleeson, Diane; Habib, Bishoy; Hardy, Matt; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Miklejewska, Evelina; Price, Stacey; Sethi, Debarati; Trenchard, Elizabeth; von Schiller, Dominique; Vyas, Sapna; West, Anthony P.; Woodward, John; Wynn, Elizabeth; Evans, Arthur; Gannon, David; Griffiths, Mark; Holroyd, Simon; Iyer, Vivek; Kipp, Christian; Lewis, Morag; Li, Wei; Oakley, Darren; Richardson, David; Smedley, Damian; Agu, Chukwuma; Bryant, Jackie; Delaney, Liz; Gueorguieva, Nadia I.; Tharagonnet, Helen; Townsend, Anne J.; Biggs, Daniel; Brown, Ellen; Collinson, Adam; Dumeau, Charles-Etienne; Grau, Evelyn; Harrison, Sarah; Harrison, James; Ingle, Catherine E.; Kundi, Helen; Madich, Alla; Mayhew, Danielle; Metcalf, Tom; Newman, Stuart; Pass, Johanna; Pearson, Laila; Reynolds, Helen; Sinclair, Caroline; Wardle-Jones, Hannah; Woods, Michael; Alexander, Liam; Brown, Terry; Flack, Francesca; Frost, Carole; Griggs, Nicola; Hrnciarova, Silvia; Kirton, Andrea; McDermott, Jordan; Rogerson, Claire; White, Gemma; Zielezinski, Pawel; DiTommaso, Tia; Edwards, Andrew; Heath, Emma; Mahajan, Mary Ann; Yalcin, Binnaz; Tannahill, David; Logan, Darren W.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Flint, Jonathan; Mahajan, Vinit B.; Tsang, Stephen H.; Smyth, Ian; Watt, Fiona M.; Skarnes, William C.; Dougan, Gordon; Adams, David J.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mutations in whole organisms are powerful ways of interrogating gene function in a realistic context. We describe a program, the Sanger Institute Mouse Genetics Project, that provides a step toward the aim of knocking out all genes and screening each line for a broad range of traits. We found that hitherto unpublished genes were as likely to reveal phenotypes as known genes, suggesting that novel genes represent a rich resource for investigating the molecular basis of disease. We found many unexpected phenotypes detected only because we screened for them, emphasizing the value of screening all mutants for a wide range of traits. Haploinsufficiency and pleiotropy were both surprisingly common. Forty-two percent of genes were essential for viability, and these were less likely to have a paralog and more likely to contribute to a protein complex than other genes. Phenotypic data and more than 900 mutants are openly available for further analysis. PaperClip PMID:23870131

  1. Target gene approaches: Gene expression in Daphnia magna exposed to predator-borne kairomones or to microcystin-producing and microcystin-free Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    ubiquitin conjugating enzyme to be up-regulated in the presence of microcystins in the food of D. magna. These findings demonstrate that certain enzymes of glycolysis and protein catabolism are significantly upgregulated when daphnids ingest microcystins. Each differentially regulated gene is a member of an expanded gene family in the D. pulex genome. The cyclophilin, GapDH and UBC genes show moderately large sequence divergence from their closest paralogs. Yet actin and alpha-tubulin genes targeteted by our study have nearly identical paralogs at the amino acid level. Conclusion Gene expression analysis using a normalisation factor based on three reference genes showed that transcription levels of actin and alpha-tubulin were not substantially changed by predator-borne chemical cues from fishes or invertebrates, although changes in expression on the protein level were shown elsewhere. These changes in protein level could be caused by others than the investigated paralogs, showing the importance of the construction of phylogenetic trees for candidate gene approaches. However, fish kairomones caused an up-regulation, and Chaoborus kairomone caused a down-regulation of cyclophylin, which proved to be a potential target gene for further analysis of kairomone effects on the life history of daphnids. Changes in food quality required a different set of reference genes compared to the kairomone experiment. The presence of dietary microcystins led to an up-regulation of two genes involved in the basic metabolism of D. magna, i.e. glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, which suggests that microcystins in cyanobacteria have more general effects on the metabolism of D. magna than previously thought. Phylogenetic trees resolving relationships among paralogs that share the same gene name are shown to be important for determining the identity of the candidate genes under investigation. PMID:19917101

  2. Cloning of novel rice blast resistance genes from two rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families in rice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changjiang; Sun, Xiaoguang; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Sihai; Li, Jing; Wang, Long; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Most rice blast resistance genes (R-genes) encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Our previous study has shown that more rice blast R-genes can be cloned in rapidly evolving NBS-LRR gene families. In the present study, two rapidly evolving R-gene families in rice were selected for cloning a subset of genes from their paralogs in three resistant rice lines. A total of eight functional blast R-genes were identified among nine NBS-LRR genes, and some of these showed resistance to three or more blast strains. Evolutionary analysis indicated that high nucleotide diversity of coding regions served as important parameters in the determination of gene resistance. We also observed that amino-acid variants (nonsynonymous mutations, insertions, or deletions) in essential motifs of the NBS domain contribute to the blast resistance capacity of NBS-LRR genes. These results suggested that the NBS regions might also play an important role in resistance specificity determination. On the other hand, different splicing patterns of introns were commonly observed in R-genes. The results of the present study contribute to improving the effectiveness of R-gene identification by using evolutionary analysis method and acquisition of novel blast resistance genes. PMID:26530637

  3. Population Genetics of Duplicated Alternatively Spliced Exons of the Dscam Gene in Daphnia and Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Brites, Daniela; Encinas-Viso, Francisco; Ebert, Dieter; Du Pasquier, Louis; Haag, Christoph R.

    2011-01-01

    In insects and crustaceans, the Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) occurs in many different isoforms. These are produced by mutually exclusive alternative splicing of dozens of tandem duplicated exons coding for parts or whole immunoglobulin (Ig) domains of the Dscam protein. This diversity plays a role in the development of the nervous system and also in the immune system. Structural analysis of the protein suggested candidate epitopes where binding to pathogens could occur. These epitopes are coded by regions of the duplicated exons and are therefore diverse within individuals. Here we apply molecular population genetics and molecular evolution analyses using Daphnia magna and several Drosophila species to investigate the potential role of natural selection in the divergence between orthologs of these duplicated exons among species, as well as between paralogous exons within species. We found no evidence for a role of positive selection in the divergence of these paralogous exons. However, the power of this test was low, and the fact that no signs of gene conversion between paralogous exons were found suggests that paralog diversity may nonetheless be maintained by selection. The analysis of orthologous exons in Drosophila and in Daphnia revealed an excess of non-synonymous polymorphisms in the epitopes putatively involved in pathogen binding. This may be a sign of balancing selection. Indeed, in Dr. melanogaster the same derived non-synonymous alleles segregate in several populations around the world. Yet other hallmarks of balancing selection were not found. Hence, we cannot rule out that the excess of non-synonymous polymorphisms is caused by segregating slightly deleterious alleles, thus potentially indicating reduced selective constraints in the putative pathogen binding epitopes of Dscam. PMID:22174757

  4. Alternative Transposition Generates New Chimeric Genes and Segmental Duplications at the Maize p1 Locus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dafang; Yu, Chuanhe; Zuo, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Weber, David F; Peterson, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The maize Ac/Ds transposon family was the first transposable element system identified and characterized by Barbara McClintock. Ac/Ds transposons belong to the hAT family of class II DNA transposons. We and others have shown that Ac/Ds elements can undergo a process of alternative transposition in which the Ac/Ds transposase acts on the termini of two separate, nearby transposons. Because these termini are present in different elements, alternative transposition can generate a variety of genome alterations such as inversions, duplications, deletions, and translocations. Moreover, Ac/Ds elements transpose preferentially into genic regions, suggesting that structural changes arising from alternative transposition may potentially generate chimeric genes at the rearrangement breakpoints. Here we identified and characterized 11 independent cases of gene fusion induced by Ac alternative transposition. In each case, a functional chimeric gene was created by fusion of two linked, paralogous genes; moreover, each event was associated with duplication of the ∼70-kb segment located between the two paralogs. An extant gene in the maize B73 genome that contains an internal duplication apparently generated by an alternative transposition event was also identified. Our study demonstrates that alternative transposition-induced duplications may be a source for spontaneous creation of diverse genome structures and novel genes in maize. PMID:26434719

  5. Neofunctionalization of Chromoplast Specific Lycopene Beta Cyclase Gene (CYC-B) in Tomato Clade.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Vijee; Pandey, Arun; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    The ancestor of tomato underwent whole genome triplication ca. 71 Myr ago followed by widespread gene loss. However, few of the triplicated genes are retained in modern day tomato including lycopene beta cyclase that mediates conversion of lycopene to β-carotene. The fruit specific β-carotene formation is mediated by a chromoplast-specific paralog of lycopene beta cyclase (CYC-B) gene. Presently limited information is available about how the variations in CYC-B gene contributed to its neofunctionalization. CYC-B gene in tomato clade contained several SNPs and In-Dels in the coding sequence (33 haplotypes) and promoter region (44 haplotypes). The CYC-B gene coding sequence in tomato appeared to undergo purifying selection. The transit peptide sequence of CYC-B protein was predicted to have a stronger plastid targeting signal than its chloroplast specific paralog indicating a possible neofunctionalization. In promoter of two Bog (Beta old gold) mutants, a NUPT (nuclear plastid) DNA fragment of 256 bp, likely derived from a S. chilense accession, was present. In transient expression assay, this promoter was more efficient than the "Beta type" promoter. CARGATCONSENSUS box sequences are required for the binding of the MADS-box regulatory protein RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN). The loss of CARGATCONSENSUS box sequence from CYC-B promoter in tomato may be related to attenuation of its efficiency to promote higher accumulation of β-carotene than lycopene during fruit ripening. PMID:27070417

  6. Neofunctionalization of Chromoplast Specific Lycopene Beta Cyclase Gene (CYC-B) in Tomato Clade

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vijee; Pandey, Arun; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    The ancestor of tomato underwent whole genome triplication ca. 71 Myr ago followed by widespread gene loss. However, few of the triplicated genes are retained in modern day tomato including lycopene beta cyclase that mediates conversion of lycopene to β-carotene. The fruit specific β-carotene formation is mediated by a chromoplast-specific paralog of lycopene beta cyclase (CYC-B) gene. Presently limited information is available about how the variations in CYC-B gene contributed to its neofunctionalization. CYC-B gene in tomato clade contained several SNPs and In-Dels in the coding sequence (33 haplotypes) and promoter region (44 haplotypes). The CYC-B gene coding sequence in tomato appeared to undergo purifying selection. The transit peptide sequence of CYC-B protein was predicted to have a stronger plastid targeting signal than its chloroplast specific paralog indicating a possible neofunctionalization. In promoter of two Bog (Beta old gold) mutants, a NUPT (nuclear plastid) DNA fragment of 256 bp, likely derived from a S. chilense accession, was present. In transient expression assay, this promoter was more efficient than the “Beta type” promoter. CARGATCONSENSUS box sequences are required for the binding of the MADS-box regulatory protein RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN). The loss of CARGATCONSENSUS box sequence from CYC-B promoter in tomato may be related to attenuation of its efficiency to promote higher accumulation of β-carotene than lycopene during fruit ripening. PMID:27070417

  7. Evolution of an Expanded Mannose Receptor Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Staines, Karen; Hunt, Lawrence G.; Young, John R.; Butter, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Sequences of peptides from a protein specifically immunoprecipitated by an antibody, KUL01, that recognises chicken macrophages, identified a homologue of the mammalian mannose receptor, MRC1, which we called MRC1L-B. Inspection of the genomic environment of the chicken gene revealed an array of five paralogous genes, MRC1L-A to MRC1L-E, located between conserved flanking genes found either side of the single MRC1 gene in mammals. Transcripts of all five genes were detected in RNA from a macrophage cell line and other RNAs, whose sequences allowed the precise definition of spliced exons, confirming or correcting existing bioinformatic annotation. The confirmed gene structures were used to locate orthologues of all five genes in the genomes of two other avian species and of the painted turtle, all with intact coding sequences. The lizard genome had only three genes, one orthologue of MRC1L-A and two orthologues of the MRC1L-B antigen gene resulting from a recent duplication. The Xenopus genome, like that of most mammals, had only a single MRC1-like gene at the corresponding locus. MRC1L-A and MRC1L-B genes had similar cytoplasmic regions that may be indicative of similar subcellular migration and functions. Cytoplasmic regions of the other three genes were very divergent, possibly indicating the evolution of a new functional repertoire for this family of molecules, which might include novel interactions with pathogens. PMID:25390371

  8. Evaluation of recombinant Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae P97/P102 paralogs formulated with selected adjuvants as vaccines against mycoplasmal pneumonia in pigs.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Lauren K; Fell, Shayne A; Gonsalves, Jocelyn R; Raymond, Benjamin B A; Collins, Damian; Kuit, Tracey A; Walker, Mark J; Djordjevic, Steven P; Eamens, Graeme J; Jenkins, Cheryl

    2014-07-23

    Pig responses to recombinant subunit vaccines containing fragments of eight multifunctional adhesins of the Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhp) P97/P102 paralog family formulated with Alhydrogel(®) or Montanide™ Gel01 were compared with a commercial bacterin following experimental challenge. Pigs, vaccinated intramuscularly at 9, 12 and 15 weeks of age with either of the recombinant formulations (n=10 per group) or Suvaxyn(®) M. hyo (n=12), were challenged with Mhp strain Hillcrest at 17 weeks of age. Unvaccinated, challenged pigs (n=12) served as a control group. Coughing was assessed daily. Antigen-specific antibody responses were monitored by ELISA in serum and tracheobronchial lavage fluid (TBLF), while TBLF was also assayed for cytokine responses (ELISA) and bacterial load (qPCR). At slaughter, gross and histopathology of lungs were quantified and damage to epithelial cilia in the porcine trachea was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Suvaxyn(®) M. hyo administration induced significant serological responses against Mhp strain 232 whole cell lysates (wcl) and recombinant antigen F3P216, but not against the remaining vaccine subunit antigens. Alhydrogel(®) and Montanide™ Gel01-adjuvanted antigen induced significant antigen-specific IgG responses, with the latter adjuvant eliciting comparable Mhp strain 232 wcl specific IgG responses to Suvaxyn(®) M. hyo. No significant post-vaccination antigen-specific mucosal responses were detected with the recombinant vaccinates. Suvaxyn(®) M. hyo was superior in reducing clinical signs, lung lesion severity and bacterial load but the recombinant formulations offered comparable protection against cilial damage. Lower IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 responses after challenge were associated with reduced lung lesion severity in Suvaxyn(®) M. hyo vaccinates, while elevated pathology scores in recombinant vaccinates corresponded to cytokine levels that were similarly elevated as in unvaccinated pigs. This study highlights

  9. Interplay of the Serine/Threonine-Kinase StkP and the Paralogs DivIVA and GpsB in Pneumococcal Cell Elongation and Division

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Nathalie; Cluzel, Caroline; Lavergne, Jean-Pierre; Freton, Céline; Combet, Christophe; Guiral, Sébastien; Soufi, Boumediene; Macek, Boris; Kuru, Erkin; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Brun, Yves V.; Di Guilmi, Anne-Marie; Claverys, Jean-Pierre; Galinier, Anne; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Despite years of intensive research, much remains to be discovered to understand the regulatory networks coordinating bacterial cell growth and division. The mechanisms by which Streptococcus pneumoniae achieves its characteristic ellipsoid-cell shape remain largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed the interplay of the cell division paralogs DivIVA and GpsB with the ser/thr kinase StkP. We observed that the deletion of divIVA hindered cell elongation and resulted in cell shortening and rounding. By contrast, the absence of GpsB resulted in hampered cell division and triggered cell elongation. Remarkably, ΔgpsB elongated cells exhibited a helical FtsZ pattern instead of a Z-ring, accompanied by helical patterns for DivIVA and peptidoglycan synthesis. Strikingly, divIVA deletion suppressed the elongated phenotype of ΔgpsB cells. These data suggest that DivIVA promotes cell elongation and that GpsB counteracts it. Analysis of protein-protein interactions revealed that GpsB and DivIVA do not interact with FtsZ but with the cell division protein EzrA, which itself interacts with FtsZ. In addition, GpsB interacts directly with DivIVA. These results are consistent with DivIVA and GpsB acting as a molecular switch to orchestrate peripheral and septal PG synthesis and connecting them with the Z-ring via EzrA. The cellular co-localization of the transpeptidases PBP2x and PBP2b as well as the lipid-flippases FtsW and RodA in ΔgpsB cells further suggest the existence of a single large PG assembly complex. Finally, we show that GpsB is required for septal localization and kinase activity of StkP, and therefore for StkP-dependent phosphorylation of DivIVA. Altogether, we propose that the StkP/DivIVA/GpsB triad finely tunes the two modes of peptidoglycan (peripheral and septal) synthesis responsible for the pneumococcal ellipsoid cell shape. PMID:24722178

  10. The human gene damage index as a gene-level approach to prioritizing exome variants

    PubMed Central

    Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Boisson, Bertrand; Patin, Etienne; Bolze, Alexandre; Moncada-Vélez, Marcela; Scott, Eric; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Lafaille, Fabien G.; Markle, Janet G.; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; de Jong, Sarah Jill; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Nitschke, Patrick; Belkadi, Aziz; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Stenson, Peter D.; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Cooper, David N.; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The protein-coding exome of a patient with a monogenic disease contains about 20,000 variants, only one or two of which are disease causing. We found that 58% of rare variants in the protein-coding exome of the general population are located in only 2% of the genes. Prompted by this observation, we aimed to develop a gene-level approach for predicting whether a given human protein-coding gene is likely to harbor disease-causing mutations. To this end, we derived the gene damage index (GDI): a genome-wide, gene-level metric of the mutational damage that has accumulated in the general population. We found that the GDI was correlated with selective evolutionary pressure, protein complexity, coding sequence length, and the number of paralogs. We compared GDI with the leading gene-level approaches, genic intolerance, and de novo excess, and demonstrated that GDI performed best for the detection of false positives (i.e., removing exome variants in genes irrelevant to disease), whereas genic intolerance and de novo excess performed better for the detection of true positives (i.e., assessing de novo mutations in genes likely to be disease causing). The GDI server, data, and software are freely available to noncommercial users from lab.rockefeller.edu/casanova/GDI. PMID:26483451

  11. The human gene damage index as a gene-level approach to prioritizing exome variants.

    PubMed

    Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Boisson, Bertrand; Patin, Etienne; Bolze, Alexandre; Moncada-Vélez, Marcela; Scott, Eric; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Lafaille, Fabien G; Markle, Janet G; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; de Jong, Sarah Jill; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Nitschke, Patrick; Belkadi, Aziz; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Stenson, Peter D; Gleeson, Joseph G; Cooper, David N; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-11-01

    The protein-coding exome of a patient with a monogenic disease contains about 20,000 variants, only one or two of which are disease causing. We found that 58% of rare variants in the protein-coding exome of the general population are located in only 2% of the genes. Prompted by this observation, we aimed to develop a gene-level approach for predicting whether a given human protein-coding gene is likely to harbor disease-causing mutations. To this end, we derived the gene damage index (GDI): a genome-wide, gene-level metric of the mutational damage that has accumulated in the general population. We found that the GDI was correlated with selective evolutionary pressure, protein complexity, coding sequence length, and the number of paralogs. We compared GDI with the leading gene-level approaches, genic intolerance, and de novo excess, and demonstrated that GDI performed best for the detection of false positives (i.e., removing exome variants in genes irrelevant to disease), whereas genic intolerance and de novo excess performed better for the detection of true positives (i.e., assessing de novo mutations in genes likely to be disease causing). The GDI server, data, and software are freely available to noncommercial users from lab.rockefeller.edu/casanova/GDI. PMID:26483451

  12. Two C or not two C: recurrent disruption of Zn-ribbons, gene duplication, lineage-specific gene loss, and horizontal gene transfer in evolution of bacterial ribosomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Kira S; Ponomarev, Vladimir A; Koonin, Eugene V

    2001-01-01

    Background Ribosomal proteins are encoded in all genomes of cellular life forms and are, generally, well conserved during evolution. In prokaryotes, the genes for most ribosomal proteins are clustered in several highly conserved operons, which ensures efficient co-regulation of their expression. Duplications of ribosomal-protein genes are infrequent, and given their coordinated expression and functioning, it is generally assumed that ribosomal-protein genes are unlikely to undergo horizontal transfer. However, with the accumulation of numerous complete genome sequences of prokaryotes, several paralogous pairs of ribosomal protein genes have been identified. Here we analyze all such cases and attempt to reconstruct the evolutionary history of these ribosomal proteins. Results Complete bacterial genomes were searched for duplications of ribosomal proteins. Ribosomal proteins L36, L33, L31, S14 are each duplicated in several bacterial genomes and ribosomal proteins L11, L28, L7/L12, S1, S15, S18 are so far duplicated in only one genome each. Sequence analysis of the four ribosomal proteins, for which paralogs were detected in several genomes, two of the ribosomal proteins duplicated in one genome (L28 and S18), and the ribosomal protein L32 showed that each of them comes in two distinct versions. One form contains a predicted metal-binding Zn-ribbon that consists of four conserved cysteines (in some cases replaced by histidines), whereas, in the second form, these metal-chelating residues are completely or partially replaced. Typically, genomes containing paralogous genes for these ribosomal proteins encode both versions, designated C+ and C-, respectively. Analysis of phylogenetic trees for these seven ribosomal proteins, combined with comparison of genomic contexts for the respective genes, indicates that in most, if not all cases, their evolution involved a duplication of the ancestral C+ form early in bacterial evolution, with subsequent alternative loss of the C

  13. csrT Represents a New Class of csrA-Like Regulatory Genes Associated with Integrative Conjugative Elements of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Zachary D.; Flynn, Kaitlin J.; Byrne, Brenda G.; Mukherjee, Sampriti; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial evolution is accelerated by mobile genetic elements. To spread horizontally and to benefit the recipient bacteria, genes encoded on these elements must be properly regulated. Among the legionellae are multiple integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) that each encode a paralog of the broadly conserved regulator csrA. Using bioinformatic analyses, we deduced that specific csrA paralogs are coinherited with particular lineages of the type IV secretion system that mediates horizontal spread of its ICE, suggesting a conserved regulatory interaction. As a first step to investigate the contribution of csrA regulators to this class of mobile genetic elements, we analyzed here the activity of the csrA paralog encoded on Legionella pneumophila ICE-βox. Deletion of this gene, which we name csrT, had no observed effect under laboratory conditions. However, ectopic expression of csrT abrogated the protection to hydrogen peroxide and macrophage degradation that ICE-βox confers to L. pneumophila. When ectopically expressed, csrT also repressed L. pneumophila flagellin production and motility, a function similar to the core genome's canonical csrA. Moreover, csrT restored the repression of motility to csrA mutants of Bacillus subtilis, a finding consistent with the predicted function of CsrT as an mRNA binding protein. Since all known ICEs of legionellae encode coinherited csrA-type IV secretion system pairs, we postulate that CsrA superfamily proteins regulate ICE activity to increase their horizontal spread, thereby expanding L. pneumophila versatility. IMPORTANCE ICEs are mobile DNA elements whose type IV secretion machineries mediate spread among bacterial populations. All surveyed ICEs within the Legionella genus also carry paralogs of the essential life cycle regulator csrA. It is striking that the csrA loci could be classified into distinct families based on either their sequence or the subtype of the adjacent type IV secretion system locus. To

  14. Similarly Strong Purifying Selection Acts on Human Disease Genes of All Evolutionary Ages

    PubMed Central

    Cai, James J.; Borenstein, Elhanan; Chen, Rong

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies have showed that recently created genes differ from the genes created in deep evolutionary past in many aspects. Here, we determined the age of emergence and propensity for gene loss (PGL) of all human protein–coding genes and compared disease genes with non-disease genes in terms of their evolutionary rate, strength of purifying selection, mRNA expression, and genetic redundancy. The older and the less prone to loss, non-disease genes have been evolving 1.5- to 3-fold slower between humans and chimps than young non-disease genes, whereas Mendelian disease genes have been evolving very slowly regardless of their ages and PGL. Complex disease genes showed an intermediate pattern. Disease genes also have higher mRNA expression heterogeneity across multiple tissues than non-disease genes regardless of age and PGL. Young and middle-aged disease genes have fewer similar paralogs as non-disease genes of the same age. We reasoned that genes were more likely to be involved in human disease if they were under a strong functional constraint, expressed heterogeneously across tissues, and lacked genetic redundancy. Young human genes that have been evolving under strong constraint between humans and chimps might also be enriched for genes that encode important primate or even human-specific functions. PMID:20333184

  15. Genes Frequently Coexpressed with Hoxc8 Provide Insight into the Discovery of Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Kalyani, Ruthala; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Min, Hyehyun; Yoon, Heejei; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2016-05-31

    Identifying Hoxc8 target genes is at the crux of understanding the Hoxc8-mediated regulatory networks underlying its roles during development. However, identification of these genes remains difficult due to intrinsic factors of Hoxc8, such as low DNA binding specificity, context-dependent regulation, and unknown cofactors. Therefore, as an alternative, the present study attempted to test whether the roles of Hoxc8 could be inferred by simply analyzing genes frequently coexpressed with Hoxc8, and whether these genes include putative target genes. Using archived gene expression datasets in which Hoxc8 was differentially expressed, we identified a total of 567 genes that were positively coexpressed with Hoxc8 in at least four out of eight datasets. Among these, 23 genes were coexpressed in six datasets. Gene sets associated with extracellular matrix and cell adhesion were most significantly enriched, followed by gene sets for skeletal system development, morphogenesis, cell motility, and transcriptional regulation. In particular, transcriptional regulators, including paralogs of Hoxc8, known Hox co-factors, and transcriptional remodeling factors were enriched. We randomly selected Adam19, Ptpn13, Prkd1, Tgfbi, and Aldh1a3, and validated their coexpression in mouse embryonic tissues and cell lines following TGF-β2 treatment or ectopic Hoxc8 expression. Except for Aldh1a3, all genes showed concordant expression with that of Hoxc8, suggesting that the coexpressed genes might include direct or indirect target genes. Collectively, we suggest that the coexpressed genes provide a resource for constructing Hoxc8-mediated regulatory networks. PMID:27025388

  16. Genes Frequently Coexpressed with Hoxc8 Provide Insight into the Discovery of Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Ruthala; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Min, Hyehyun; Yoon, Heejei; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2016-01-01

    Identifying Hoxc8 target genes is at the crux of understanding the Hoxc8-mediated regulatory networks underlying its roles during development. However, identification of these genes remains difficult due to intrinsic factors of Hoxc8, such as low DNA binding specificity, context-dependent regulation, and unknown cofactors. Therefore, as an alternative, the present study attempted to test whether the roles of Hoxc8 could be inferred by simply analyzing genes frequently coexpressed with Hoxc8, and whether these genes include putative target genes. Using archived gene expression datasets in which Hoxc8 was differentially expressed, we identified a total of 567 genes that were positively coexpressed with Hoxc8 in at least four out of eight datasets. Among these, 23 genes were coexpressed in six datasets. Gene sets associated with extracellular matrix and cell adhesion were most significantly enriched, followed by gene sets for skeletal system development, morphogenesis, cell motility, and transcriptional regulation. In particular, transcriptional regulators, including paralogs of Hoxc8, known Hox co-factors, and transcriptional remodeling factors were enriched. We randomly selected Adam19, Ptpn13, Prkd1, Tgfbi, and Aldh1a3, and validated their coexpression in mouse embryonic tissues and cell lines following TGF-β2 treatment or ectopic Hoxc8 expression. Except for Aldh1a3, all genes showed concordant expression with that of Hoxc8, suggesting that the coexpressed genes might include direct or indirect target genes. Collectively, we suggest that the coexpressed genes provide a resource for constructing Hoxc8-mediated regulatory networks. PMID:27025388

  17. Genome-wide Analyses of the Structural Gene Families Involved in the Legume-specific 5-Deoxyisoflavonoid Biosynthesis of Lotus japonicus

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Norimoto; Sato, Shusei; Akashi, Tomoyoshi; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Tabata, Satoshi; Ayabe, Shin-ichi; Aoki, Toshio

    2007-01-01

    Abstract A model legume Lotus japonicus (Regel) K. Larsen is one of the subjects of genome sequencing and functional genomics programs. In the course of targeted approaches to the legume genomics, we analyzed the genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of the legume-specific 5-deoxyisoflavonoid of L. japonicus, which produces isoflavan phytoalexins on elicitor treatment. The paralogous biosynthetic genes were assigned as comprehensively as possible by biochemical experiments, similarity searches, comparison of the gene structures, and phylogenetic analyses. Among the 10 biosynthetic genes investigated, six comprise multigene families, and in many cases they form gene clusters in the chromosomes. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase–PCR analyses showed coordinate up-regulation of most of the genes during phytoalexin induction and complex accumulation patterns of the transcripts in different organs. Some paralogous genes exhibited similar expression specificities, suggesting their genetic redundancy. The molecular evolution of the biosynthetic genes is discussed. The results presented here provide reliable annotations of the genes and genetic markers for comparative and functional genomics of leguminous plants. PMID:17452423

  18. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  19. Genes and Gene Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  20. Age distribution of human gene families shows significant roles of both large- and small-scale duplications in vertebrate evolution.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xun; Wang, Yufeng; Gu, Jianying

    2002-06-01

    The classical (two-round) hypothesis of vertebrate genome duplication proposes two successive whole-genome duplication(s) (polyploidizations) predating the origin of fishes, a view now being seriously challenged. As the debate largely concerns the relative merits of the 'big-bang mode' theory (large-scale duplication) and the 'continuous mode' theory (constant creation by small-scale duplications), we tested whether a significant proportion of paralogous genes in the contemporary human genome was indeed generated in the early stage of vertebrate evolution. After an extensive search of major databases, we dated 1,739 gene duplication events from the phylogenetic analysis of 749 vertebrate gene families. We found a pattern characterized by two waves (I, II) and an ancient component. Wave I represents a recent gene family expansion by tandem or segmental duplications, whereas wave II, a rapid paralogous gene increase in the early stage of vertebrate evolution, supports the idea of genome duplication(s) (the big-bang mode). Further analysis indicated that large- and small-scale gene duplications both make a significant contribution during the early stage of vertebrate evolution to build the current hierarchy of the human proteome. PMID:12032571

  1. Methuselah/Methuselah-like G protein-coupled receptors constitute an ancient metazoan gene family

    PubMed Central

    de Mendoza, Alexandre; Jones, Jeffery W.; Friedrich, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Inconsistent conclusions have been drawn regarding the phylogenetic age of the Methuselah/Methuselah-like (Mth/Mthl) gene family of G protein-coupled receptors, the founding member of which regulates development and lifespan in Drosophila. Here we report the results from a targeted homolog search of 39 holozoan genomes and phylogenetic analysis of the conserved seven transmembrane domain. Our findings reveal that the Mth/Mthl gene family is ancient, has experienced numerous extinction and expansion events during metazoan evolution, and acquired the current definition of the Methuselah ectodomain during its exceptional expansion in arthropods. In addition, our findings identify Mthl1, Mthl5, Mthl14, and Mthl15 as the oldest Mth/Mthl gene family paralogs in Drosophila. Future studies of these genes have the potential to define ancestral functions of the Mth/Mthl gene family. PMID:26915348

  2. Isolation and characterization of the gene cluster for biosynthesis of the thiopeptide antibiotic TP-1161.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Kerstin; Degnes, Kristin F; Zotchev, Sergey B

    2010-11-01

    Recently, we isolated a new thiopeptide antibiotic, TP-1161, from the fermentation broth of a marine actinomycete typed as a member of the genus Nocardiopsis. Here we report the identification, isolation, and analysis of the TP-1161 biosynthetic gene cluster from this species. The gene cluster was identified by mining a draft genome sequence using the predicted structural peptide sequence of TP-1161. Functional assignment of a ∼16-kb genomic region revealed 13 open reading frames proposed to constitute the TP-1161 biosynthetic locus. While the typical core set of thiopeptide modification enzymes contains one cyclodehydratase/dehydrogenase pair, paralogous genes predicted to encode additional cyclodehydratases and dehydrogenases were identified. Although attempts at heterologous expression of the TP-1161 gene cluster in Streptomyces coelicolor failed, its identity was confirmed through the targeted gene inactivation in the original host. PMID:20851988

  3. The evolution of vertebrate somatostatin receptors and their gene regions involves extensive chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Somatostatin and its related neuroendocrine peptides have a wide variety of physiological functions that are mediated by five somatostatin receptors with gene names SSTR1-5 in mammals. To resolve their evolution in vertebrates we have investigated the SSTR genes and a large number of adjacent gene families by phylogeny and conserved synteny analyses in a broad range of vertebrate species. Results We find that the SSTRs form two families that belong to distinct paralogons. We observe not only chromosomal similarities reflecting the paralogy relationships between the SSTR-bearing chromosome regions, but also extensive rearrangements between these regions in teleost fish genomes, including fusions and translocations followed by reshuffling through intrachromosomal rearrangements. These events obscure the paralogy relationships but are still tractable thanks to the many genomes now available. We have identified a previously unrecognized SSTR subtype, SSTR6, previously misidentified as either SSTR1 or SSTR4. Conclusions Two ancestral SSTR-bearing chromosome regions were duplicated in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidizations (2R). One of these ancestral SSTR genes generated SSTR2, -3 and -5, the other gave rise to SSTR1, -4 and -6. Subsequently SSTR6 was lost in tetrapods and SSTR4 in teleosts. Our study shows that extensive chromosomal rearrangements have taken place between related chromosome regions in teleosts, but that these events can be resolved by investigating several distantly related species. PMID:23194088

  4. Spider Transcriptomes Identify Ancient Large-Scale Gene Duplication Event Potentially Important in Silk Gland Evolution.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Thomas H; Garb, Jessica E; Hayashi, Cheryl Y; Arensburger, Peter; Ayoub, Nadia A

    2015-07-01

    The evolution of specialized tissues with novel functions, such as the silk synthesizing glands in spiders, is likely an influential driver of adaptive success. Large-scale gene duplication events and subsequent paralog divergence are thought to be required for generating evolutionary novelty. Such an event has been proposed for spiders, but not tested. We de novo assembled transcriptomes from three cobweb weaving spider species. Based on phylogenetic analyses of gene families with representatives from each of the three species, we found numerous duplication events indicative of a whole genome or segmental duplication. We estimated the age of the gene duplications relative to several speciation events within spiders and arachnids and found that the duplications likely occurred after the divergence of scorpions (order Scorpionida) and spiders (order Araneae), but before the divergence of the spider suborders Mygalomorphae and Araneomorphae, near the evolutionary origin of spider silk glands. Transcripts that are expressed exclusively or primarily within black widow silk glands are more likely to have a paralog descended from the ancient duplication event and have elevated amino acid replacement rates compared with other transcripts. Thus, an ancient large-scale gene duplication event within the spider lineage was likely an important source of molecular novelty during the evolution of silk gland-specific expression. This duplication event may have provided genetic material for subsequent silk gland diversification in the true spiders (Araneomorphae). PMID:26058392

  5. Spider Transcriptomes Identify Ancient Large-Scale Gene Duplication Event Potentially Important in Silk Gland Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Thomas H.; Garb, Jessica E.; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.; Arensburger, Peter; Ayoub, Nadia A.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of specialized tissues with novel functions, such as the silk synthesizing glands in spiders, is likely an influential driver of adaptive success. Large-scale gene duplication events and subsequent paralog divergence are thought to be required for generating evolutionary novelty. Such an event has been proposed for spiders, but not tested. We de novo assembled transcriptomes from three cobweb weaving spider species. Based on phylogenetic analyses of gene families with representatives from each of the three species, we found numerous duplication events indicative of a whole genome or segmental duplication. We estimated the age of the gene duplications relative to several speciation events within spiders and arachnids and found that the duplications likely occurred after the divergence of scorpions (order Scorpionida) and spiders (order Araneae), but before the divergence of the spider suborders Mygalomorphae and Araneomorphae, near the evolutionary origin of spider silk glands. Transcripts that are expressed exclusively or primarily within black widow silk glands are more likely to have a paralog descended from the ancient duplication event and have elevated amino acid replacement rates compared with other transcripts. Thus, an ancient large-scale gene duplication event within the spider lineage was likely an important source of molecular novelty during the evolution of silk gland-specific expression. This duplication event may have provided genetic material for subsequent silk gland diversification in the true spiders (Araneomorphae). PMID:26058392

  6. Gene Duplication, Gene Conversion and the Evolution of the Y Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Connallon, Tim; Clark, Andrew G.

    2010-01-01

    Nonrecombining chromosomes, such as the Y, are expected to degenerate over time due to reduced efficacy of natural selection compared to chromosomes that recombine. However, gene duplication, coupled with gene conversion between duplicate pairs, can potentially counteract forces of evolutionary decay that accompany asexual reproduction. Using a combination of analytical and computer simulation methods, we explicitly show that, although gene conversion has little impact on the probability that duplicates become fixed within a population, conversion can be effective at maintaining the functionality of Y-linked duplicates that have already become fixed. The coupling of Y-linked gene duplication and gene conversion between paralogs can also prove costly by increasing the rate of nonhomologous crossovers between duplicate pairs. Such crossovers can generate an abnormal Y chromosome, as was recently shown to reduce male fertility in humans. The results represent a step toward explaining some of the more peculiar attributes of the human Y as well as preliminary Y-linked sequence data from other mammals and Drosophila. The results may also be applicable to the recently observed pattern of tetraploidy and gene conversion in asexual, bdelloid rotifers. PMID:20551442

  7. Gene structure, phylogeny and expression profile of the sucrose synthase gene family in cacao (Theobroma cacao L.).

    PubMed

    Li, Fupeng; Hao, Chaoyun; Yan, Lin; Wu, Baoduo; Qin, Xiaowei; Lai, Jianxiong; Song, Yinghui

    2015-09-01

    In higher plants, sucrose synthase (Sus, EC 2.4.1.13) is widely considered as a key enzyme involved in sucrose metabolism. Although, several paralogous genes encoding different isozymes of Sus have been identified and characterized in multiple plant genomes, to date detailed information about the Sus genes is lacking for cacao. This study reports the identification of six novel Sus genes from economically important cacao tree. Analyses of the gene structure and phylogeny of the Sus genes demonstrated evolutionary conservation in the Sus family across cacao and other plant species. The expression of cacao Sus genes was investigated via real-time PCR in various tissues, different developmental phases of leaf, flower bud and pod. The Sus genes exhibited distinct but partially redundant expression profiles in cacao, with TcSus1, TcSus5 and TcSus6, being the predominant genes in the bark with phloem, TcSus2 predominantly expressing in the seed during the stereotype stage. TcSus3 and TcSus4 were significantly detected more in the pod husk and seed coat along the pod development, and showed development dependent expression profiles in the cacao pod. These results provide new insights into the evolution, and basic information that will assist in elucidating the functions of cacao Sus gene family. PMID:26440085

  8. Targeted mutagenesis of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2a and 2b genes in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus).

    PubMed

    Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Karchner, Sibel I; Franks, Diana G; Nacci, Diane; Champlin, Denise; Hahn, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms of toxicity is facilitated by experimental manipulations, such as disruption of function by gene targeting, that are especially challenging in non-standard model species with limited genomic resources. While loss-of-function approaches have included gene knock-down using morpholino-modified oligonucleotides and random mutagenesis using mutagens or retroviruses, more recent approaches include targeted mutagenesis using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 technology. These latter methods provide more accessible opportunities to explore gene function in non-traditional model species. To facilitate evaluation of toxic mechanisms for important categories of aryl hydrocarbon pollutants, whose actions are known to be receptor mediated, we used ZFN and CRISPR-Cas9 approaches to generate aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2a (AHR2a) and AHR2b gene mutations in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) embryos. This killifish is a particularly valuable non-traditional model, with multiple paralogs of AHR whose functions are not well characterized. In addition, some populations of this species have evolved resistance to toxicants such as halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. AHR-null killifish will be valuable for characterizing the role of the individual AHR paralogs in evolved resistance, as well as in normal development. We first used five-finger ZFNs targeting exons 1 and 3 of AHR2a. Subsequently, CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs were designed to target regions in exon 2 and 3 of AHR2a and AHR2b. We successfully induced frameshift mutations in AHR2a exon 3 with ZFN and CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs, with mutation frequencies of 10% and 16%, respectively. In AHR2b, mutations were induced using CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs targeting sites in both exon 2 (17%) and exon 3 (63%). We screened AHR2b exon 2 CRISPR-Cas9-injected embryos for off

  9. Targeted mutagenesis of aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2a and 2b genes in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    PubMed Central

    Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Karchner, Sibel I.; Franks, Diana G.; Nacci, Diane; Champlin, Denise; Hahn, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms of toxicity is facilitated by experimental manipulations, such as disruption of function by gene targeting, that are especially challenging in non-standard model species with limited genomic resources. While loss-of-function approaches have included gene knock-down using morpholino-modified oligonucleotides and random mutagenesis using mutagens or retroviruses, more recent approaches include targeted mutagenesis using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 technology. These latter methods provide more accessible opportunities to explore gene function in non-traditional model species. To facilitate evaluations of toxic mechanisms for important categories of aryl hydrocarbon pollutants, whose actions are known to be receptor mediated, we used ZFN and CRISPR-Cas9 approaches to generate aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2a (AHR2a) and AHR2b gene mutations in Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) embryos. This killifish is a particularly valuble non-traditional model for this study, with multiple paralogs of AHR whose functions are not well characterized. In addition, some populations of this species have evolved resistance to toxicants such as halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons. AHR-null killifish will be valuable for characterizing the role of the individual AHR paralogs in evolved resistance, as well as in normal development. We first used five-finger ZFNs targeting exons 1 and 3 of AHR2a. Subsequently, CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs were designed to target regions in exon 2 and 3 of AHR2a and AHR2b. We successfully induced frameshift mutations in AHR2a exon 3 with ZFN and CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs, with mutation frequencies of 10% and 16%, respectively. In AHR2b, mutations were induced using CRISPR-Cas9 guide RNAs targeting sites in both exon 2 (17%) and exon 3 (63%). We screened AHR2b exon 2 CRISPR-Cas9-injected embryos for

  10. Annotation of human chromosome 21 for relevance to Down syndrome: gene structure and expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Katheleen; Slavov, Dobromir; Bechtel, Lawrence; Davisson, Muriel

    2002-06-01

    Down syndrome is caused by an extra copy of human chromosome 21 and the resultant dosage-related overexpression of genes contained within it. To efficiently direct experiments to determine specific gene-phenotype correlations, it is necessary to identify all genes within 21q and assess their functional associations and expression patterns. Analysis of the complete finished sequence of 21q resulted in annotated 225 genes and gene models, most of which were incomplete and/or had little or no experimental verification. Here we correct or complete the genomic structures of 16 genes, 4 of which were not reported in the annotation of the complete sequence. Our data include the identification of six genes encoding short or ambiguous open reading frames; the identification of three cases in which alternative splicing produces two structurally unrelated protein sequences; and the identification of six genes encoding proteins with functional motifs, two genes with unusually low similarity to their orthologous mouse proteins, and four genes with significant conservation in Drosophila melanogaster. We further demonstrate that an additional nine gene models represent bona fide transcripts and develop expression patterns for these genes plus nine additional novel chromosome 21 genes and four paralogous genes mapping elsewhere in the human genome. These data have implications for generating complete transcript maps of chromosome 21 and for the entire human genome, and for defining expression abnormalities in Down syndrome and mouse models. PMID:12036298

  11. Conservation and Expression Patterns Divergence of Ascorbic Acid d-mannose/l-galactose Pathway Genes in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weike; Ren, Jun; Li, Yan; Liu, Tongkun; Song, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhongwen; Huang, Zhinan; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) participates in diverse biological processes, is regulated by multiple factors and is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant. The D-Mannose/L-Galactose pathway is a major plant AsA biosynthetic pathway that is highly connected within biosynthetic networks, and generally conserved across plants. Previous work has shown that, although most genes of this pathway are expressed under standard growth conditions in Brassica rapa, some paralogs of these genes are not. We hypothesize that regulatory evolution in duplicate AsA pathway genes has occurred as an adaptation to environmental stressors, and that gene retention has been influenced by polyploidation events in Brassicas. To test these hypotheses, we explored the conservation of these genes in Brassicas and their expression patterns divergence in B. rapa. Similar retention and a high degree of gene sequence similarity were identified in B. rapa (A genome), B. oleracea (C genome) and B. napus (AC genome). However, the number of genes that encode the same type of enzymes varied among the three plant species. With the exception of GMP, which has nine genes, there were one to four genes that encoded the other enzymes. Moreover, we found that expression patterns divergence widely exists among these genes. (i) VTC2 and VTC5 are paralogous genes, but only VTC5 is influenced by FLC. (ii) Under light treatment, PMI1 co-regulates the AsA pool size with other D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes, whereas PMI2 is regulated only by darkness. (iii) Under NaCl, Cu(2+), MeJA and wounding stresses, most of the paralogs exhibit different expression patterns. Additionally, GME and GPP are the key regulatory enzymes that limit AsA biosynthesis in response to these treatments. In conclusion, our data support that the conservative and divergent expression patterns of D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes not only avoid AsA biosynthesis network instability but also allow B. rapa to better adapt to complex environments. PMID:27313597

  12. Conservation and Expression Patterns Divergence of Ascorbic Acid d-mannose/l-galactose Pathway Genes in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Weike; Ren, Jun; Li, Yan; Liu, Tongkun; Song, Xiaoming; Chen, Zhongwen; Huang, Zhinan; Hou, Xilin; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) participates in diverse biological processes, is regulated by multiple factors and is a potent antioxidant and cellular reductant. The D-Mannose/L-Galactose pathway is a major plant AsA biosynthetic pathway that is highly connected within biosynthetic networks, and generally conserved across plants. Previous work has shown that, although most genes of this pathway are expressed under standard growth conditions in Brassica rapa, some paralogs of these genes are not. We hypothesize that regulatory evolution in duplicate AsA pathway genes has occurred as an adaptation to environmental stressors, and that gene retention has been influenced by polyploidation events in Brassicas. To test these hypotheses, we explored the conservation of these genes in Brassicas and their expression patterns divergence in B. rapa. Similar retention and a high degree of gene sequence similarity were identified in B. rapa (A genome), B. oleracea (C genome) and B. napus (AC genome). However, the number of genes that encode the same type of enzymes varied among the three plant species. With the exception of GMP, which has nine genes, there were one to four genes that encoded the other enzymes. Moreover, we found that expression patterns divergence widely exists among these genes. (i) VTC2 and VTC5 are paralogous genes, but only VTC5 is influenced by FLC. (ii) Under light treatment, PMI1 co-regulates the AsA pool size with other D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes, whereas PMI2 is regulated only by darkness. (iii) Under NaCl, Cu2+, MeJA and wounding stresses, most of the paralogs exhibit different expression patterns. Additionally, GME and GPP are the key regulatory enzymes that limit AsA biosynthesis in response to these treatments. In conclusion, our data support that the conservative and divergent expression patterns of D-Man/L-Gal pathway genes not only avoid AsA biosynthesis network instability but also allow B. rapa to better adapt to complex environments. PMID:27313597

  13. Identification and characterization of essential genes in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tim; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Hughes, Nicholas W.; Krupczak, Kevin M.; Post, Yorick; Wei, Jenny J.; Lander, Eric S.; Sabatini, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale genetic analysis of lethal phenotypes has elucidated the molecular underpinnings of many biological processes. Using the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, we constructed a genome-wide single-guide RNA (sgRNA) library to screen for genes required for proliferation and survival in a human cancer cell line. Our screen revealed the set of cell-essential genes, which was validated by an orthogonal gene-trap-based screen and comparison with yeast gene knockouts. This set is enriched for genes that encode components of fundamental pathways, are expressed at high levels, and contain few inactivating polymorphisms in the human population. We also uncovered a large group of uncharacterized genes involved in RNA processing, a number of whose products localize to the nucleolus. Lastly, screens in additional cell lines showed a high degree of overlap in gene essentiality, but also revealed differences specific to each cell line and cancer type that reflect the developmental origin, oncogenic drivers, paralogous gene expression pattern, and chromosomal structure of each line. These results demonstrate the power of CRISPR-based screens and suggest a general strategy for identifying liabilities in cancer cells. PMID:26472758

  14. Identification and characterization of essential genes in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tim; Birsoy, Kıvanç; Hughes, Nicholas W; Krupczak, Kevin M; Post, Yorick; Wei, Jenny J; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M

    2015-11-27

    Large-scale genetic analysis of lethal phenotypes has elucidated the molecular underpinnings of many biological processes. Using the bacterial clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system, we constructed a genome-wide single-guide RNA library to screen for genes required for proliferation and survival in a human cancer cell line. Our screen revealed the set of cell-essential genes, which was validated with an orthogonal gene-trap-based screen and comparison with yeast gene knockouts. This set is enriched for genes that encode components of fundamental pathways, are expressed at high levels, and contain few inactivating polymorphisms in the human population. We also uncovered a large group of uncharacterized genes involved in RNA processing, a number of whose products localize to the nucleolus. Last, screens in additional cell lines showed a high degree of overlap in gene essentiality but also revealed differences specific to each cell line and cancer type that reflect the developmental origin, oncogenic drivers, paralogous gene expression pattern, and chromosomal structure of each line. These results demonstrate the power of CRISPR-based screens and suggest a general strategy for identifying liabilities in cancer cells. PMID:26472758

  15. Similarities and differences in the structure and function of 4.1G and 4.1R135, two protein 4.1 paralogs expressed in erythroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Nunomura, Wataru; Kinoshita, Kengo; Parra, Marilyn; Gascard, Philippe; An, Xiuli; Mohandas, Narla; Takakuwa, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Membrane skeletal protein 4.1R is the prototypical member of a family of four highly paralogous proteins that include 4.1G, 4.1N and 4.1B. Two isoforms of 4.1R (4.1R135 and 4.1R80) as well as 4.1G are expressed in erythroblasts during terminal differentiation, but only 4.1R80 is present in mature erythrocytes. While the function of 4.1R isoforms in erythroid cells has been well characterized, there is little or no information on the function of 4.1G in these cells. In the present study, we performed detailed characterization of the interaction of 4.1G with various erythroid membrane proteins and the regulation of these interactions by calcium-saturated calmodulin. Like both isoforms of 4.1R, 4.1G bound to band 3, glycophorin C, CD44, p55 and calmodulin. While both 4.1G and 4.1R135 interact with similar affinity with CD44 and p55, there are significant differences in the affinity of their interaction with band 3 and glycophorin C. This difference in affinity is related to the non-conserved N-terminal headpiece region of the two proteins that is upstream of the 30kDa membrane binding domain that harbors the binding sites for the various membrane proteins. The headpiece region of 4.1G also contains a high affinity calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding site that plays a key role in modulating its interaction with various membrane proteins. We suggest that expression of the two paralogs of protein 4.1 with different affinities for band 3 and glycophorin C is likely to play a role in assembly of these two membrane proteins during terminal erythroid differentiation. PMID:20812914

  16. Repeated Evolution of Testis-Specific New Genes: The Case of Telomere-Capping Genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Marais, Gabriel A. B.; Loppin, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Comparative genome analysis has allowed the identification of various mechanisms involved in gene birth. However, understanding the evolutionary forces driving new gene origination still represents a major challenge. In particular, an intriguing and not yet fully understood trend has emerged from the study of new genes: many of them show a testis-specific expression pattern, which has remained poorly understood. Here we review the case of such a new gene, which involves a telomere-capping gene family in Drosophila. hiphop and its testis-specific paralog K81 are critical for the protection of chromosome ends in somatic cells and male gametes, respectively. Two independent functional studies recently proposed that these genes evolved under a reproductive-subfunctionalization regime. The 2011 release of new Drosophila genome sequences from the melanogaster group of species allowed us to deepen our phylogenetic analysis of the hiphop/K81 family. This work reveals an unsuspected dynamic of gene birth and death within the group, with recurrent duplication events through retroposition mechanisms. Finally, we discuss the plausibility of different evolutionary scenarios that could explain the diversification of this gene family. PMID:22844639

  17. Repeated evolution of testis-specific new genes: the case of telomere-capping genes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Marais, Gabriel A B; Loppin, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Comparative genome analysis has allowed the identification of various mechanisms involved in gene birth. However, understanding the evolutionary forces driving new gene origination still represents a major challenge. In particular, an intriguing and not yet fully understood trend has emerged from the study of new genes: many of them show a testis-specific expression pattern, which has remained poorly understood. Here we review the case of such a new gene, which involves a telomere-capping gene family in Drosophila. hiphop and its testis-specific paralog K81 are critical for the protection of chromosome ends in somatic cells and male gametes, respectively. Two independent functional studies recently proposed that these genes evolved under a reproductive-subfunctionalization regime. The 2011 release of new Drosophila genome sequences from the melanogaster group of species allowed us to deepen our phylogenetic analysis of the hiphop/K81 family. This work reveals an unsuspected dynamic of gene birth and death within the group, with recurrent duplication events through retroposition mechanisms. Finally, we discuss the plausibility of different evolutionary scenarios that could explain the diversification of this gene family. PMID:22844639

  18. Adaptive Evolution of Genes Duplicated from the Drosophila pseudoobscura neo-X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Richard P.; Hilldorfer, Benedict B.; Koch, Jessica L.; Lockton, Steven; Schaeffer, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila X chromosomes are disproportionate sources of duplicated genes, and these duplications are usually the result of retrotransposition of X-linked genes to the autosomes. The excess duplication is thought to be driven by natural selection for two reasons: X chromosomes are inactivated during spermatogenesis, and the derived copies of retroposed duplications tend to be testis expressed. Therefore, autosomal derived copies of retroposed genes provide a mechanism for their X-linked paralogs to “escape” X inactivation. Once these duplications have fixed, they may then be selected for male-specific functions. Throughout the evolution of the Drosophila genus, autosomes have fused with X chromosomes along multiple lineages giving rise to neo-X chromosomes. There has also been excess duplication from the two independent neo-X chromosomes that have been examined—one that occurred prior to the common ancestor of the willistoni species group and another that occurred along the lineage leading to Drosophila pseudoobscura. To determine what role natural selection plays in the evolution of genes duplicated from the D. pseudoobscura neo-X chromosome, we analyzed DNA sequence divergence between paralogs, polymorphism within each copy, and the expression profiles of these duplicated genes. We found that the derived copies of all duplicated genes have elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism, suggesting that they are under relaxed selective constraints. The derived copies also tend to have testis- or male-biased expression profiles regardless of their chromosome of origin. Genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome appear to be under less constraints than those duplicated from other chromosome arms. We also find more evidence for historical adaptive evolution in genes duplicated from the neo-X chromosome, suggesting that they are under a unique selection regime in which elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism provides a large reservoir of functional variants, some of which are

  19. Protection factors against free radical-induced ceroidogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Aloj Totaro, E.; Lucadamo, L.; Pisanti, F.A. )

    1989-01-01

    The most important products of the combustion process are SO2, NOx, CO2 and the heavy metals. When these substances come into contact with the biotic components of the ecosystems they produce an oxidative damage by means of a free radical mechanism. One of the significant natural sources of these oxides and metals are the volcanic emissions that contribute, either locally or more diffusely, to enrich the atmosphere with these substances. The area of Campi Flegrei (Naples, Italy) is an experimental model fit for studying the contemporary effect of the aforesaid oxidative agents, because it is characterized by a continuous fumarolic activity, particularly in the area of the widest crater (Solfatara). We have made so two experiments utilizing rats and earthworms (Octolasium complanatum) to evaluate the following aspects in phylogenetically very different organisms: 1. the combined effect of the atmospheric pollutants, 2. the effect of the heavy metals (Cu, Ni, Mn), 3. the protection action played by reduced glutathione in rats. The reduced glutathione being either a substrate of the glutathione proxidase or an oxyradicals scavenger, is one of the main protection agents against the above stress. Because many papers suggest that the mentioned atmospheric pollutants damage both animal and vegetable organisms by their oxidative properties, the reduced glutathione seems to be able to counteract efficaciously the damaging activity studied in terms of age pigments production.

  20. Hydroxyl radical induced degradation of salicylates in aerated aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, László; Tóth, Tünde; Homlok, Renáta; Rácz, Gergely; Takács, Erzsébet; Wojnárovits, László

    2014-04-01

    Ionizing radiation induced degradation of acetylsalicylic acid, its hydrolysis product salicylic acid and a salicylic acid derivative 5-sulpho-salicylic acid, was investigated in dilute aqueous solutions by UV-vis spectrophotometry, HPLC separation and diode-array or MS/MS detection, chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon content and by Vibrio fischeri toxicity measurements. Hydroxyl radicals were shown to degrade these molecules readily, and first degradation products were hydroxylated derivatives in all cases. Due to the by-products, among them hydrogen peroxide, the toxicity first increased and then decreased with the absorbed dose. With prolonged irradiation complete mineralization was achieved.

  1. Free-Radical-Induced Grafting from Plasma Polymer Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Khelifa, Farid; Ershov, Sergey; Habibi, Youssef; Snyders, Rony; Dubois, Philippe

    2016-03-23

    With the advances in science and engineering in the second part of the 20th century, emerging plasma-based technologies continuously find increasing applications in the domain of polymer chemistry, among others. Plasma technologies are predominantly used in two different ways: for the treatment of polymer substrates by a reactive or inert gas aiming at a specific surface functionalization or for the synthesis of a plasma polymer with a unique set of properties from an organic or mixed organic-inorganic precursor. Plasma polymer films (PPFs), often deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), currently attract a great deal of attention. Such films are widely used in various fields for the coating of solid substrates, including membranes, semiconductors, metals, textiles, and polymers, because of a combination of interesting properties such as excellent adhesion, highly cross-linked structures, and the possibility of tuning properties by simply varying the precursor and/or the synthesis parameters. Among the many appealing features of plasma-synthesized and -treated polymers, a highly reactive surface, rich in free radicals arising from deposition/treatment specifics, offers a particular advantage. When handled carefully, these reactive free radicals open doors to the controllable surface functionalization of materials without affecting their bulk properties. The goal of this review is to illustrate the increasing application of plasma-based technologies for tuning the surface properties of polymers, principally through free-radical chemistry. PMID:26943005

  2. Global gene expression profiling of JMJD6- and JMJD4-depleted mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Jie; Imbalzano, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests Jumonji domain-containing proteins are epigenetic regulators in diverse biological processes including cellular differentiation and proliferation. RNA interference-based analyses combined with gene expression profiling can effectively characterize the cellular functions of these enzymes. We found that the depletion of Jumonji domain-containing protein 6 (JMJD6) and its paralog protein Jumonji domain-containing protein 4 (JMJD4) individually by small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) slowed cell proliferation of mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts. We subsequently performed gene expression profiling on both JMJD6- and JMJD4-depleted mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts using the Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Exon 1.0 ST Array. Here we report the gene profiling datasets along with the experimental procedures. The information can be used to further investigate how JMJD6 and JMJD4 affect gene expression and cellular physiology. PMID:27071056

  3. Transcriptome-Wide Identification and Expression Profiling of the DOF Transcription Factor Gene Family in Chrysanthemum morifolium.

    PubMed

    Song, Aiping; Gao, Tianwei; Li, Peiling; Chen, Sumei; Guan, Zhiyong; Wu, Dan; Xin, Jingjing; Fan, Qingqing; Zhao, Kunkun; Chen, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    The family of DNA binding with one finger (DOF) transcription factors is plant specific, and these proteins contain a highly conserved domain (DOF domain) of 50-52 amino acids that includes a C2C2-type zinc finger motif at the N-terminus that is known to function in a number of plant processes. Here, we characterized 20 DOF genes in the important ornamental species chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium) based on transcriptomic sequences. Phylogenetic analysis identified one pair of putative orthologous proteins in Arabidopsis and chrysanthemum and six pairs of paralogous proteins in chrysanthemum. Conserved motifs in the DOF proteins shared by Arabidopsis and chrysanthemum were analyzed using MEME. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 13 CmDOFs could be targeted by 16 miRNA families. Moreover, we used 5' RLM-RACE to map the cleavage sites in CmDOF3, 15, and 21. The expression of these 20 genes in response to phytohormone treatments and abiotic stresses was characterized, and the expression patterns of six pairs of paralogous CmDOF genes were found to completely differ from one another, except for CmDOF6 and CmDOF7. This work will promote our research of the various functions of DOF gene family members in plant hormone and stress responses. PMID:26941763

  4. Transcriptome-Wide Identification and Expression Profiling of the DOF Transcription Factor Gene Family in Chrysanthemum morifolium

    PubMed Central

    Song, Aiping; Gao, Tianwei; Li, Peiling; Chen, Sumei; Guan, Zhiyong; Wu, Dan; Xin, Jingjing; Fan, Qingqing; Zhao, Kunkun; Chen, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    The family of DNA binding with one finger (DOF) transcription factors is plant specific, and these proteins contain a highly conserved domain (DOF domain) of 50-52 amino acids that includes a C2C2-type zinc finger motif at the N-terminus that is known to function in a number of plant processes. Here, we characterized 20 DOF genes in the important ornamental species chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium) based on transcriptomic sequences. Phylogenetic analysis identified one pair of putative orthologous proteins in Arabidopsis and chrysanthemum and six pairs of paralogous proteins in chrysanthemum. Conserved motifs in the DOF proteins shared by Arabidopsis and chrysanthemum were analyzed using MEME. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that 13 CmDOFs could be targeted by 16 miRNA families. Moreover, we used 5' RLM-RACE to map the cleavage sites in CmDOF3, 15, and 21. The expression of these 20 genes in response to phytohormone treatments and abiotic stresses was characterized, and the expression patterns of six pairs of paralogous CmDOF genes were found to completely differ from one another, except for CmDOF6 and CmDOF7. This work will promote our research of the various functions of DOF gene family members in plant hormone and stress responses. PMID:26941763

  5. Phylogeny reconstruction in the Caesalpinieae grade (Leguminosae) based on duplicated copies of the sucrose synthase gene and plastid markers.

    PubMed

    Manzanilla, Vincent; Bruneau, Anne

    2012-10-01

    The Caesalpinieae grade (Leguminosae) forms a morphologically and ecologically diverse group of mostly tropical tree species with a complex evolutionary history. This grade comprises several distinct lineages, but the exact delimitation of the group relative to subfamily Mimosoideae and other members of subfamily Caesalpinioideae, as well as phylogenetic relationships among the lineages are uncertain. With the aim of better resolving phylogenetic relationships within the Caesalpinieae grade, we investigated the utility of several nuclear markers developed from genomic studies in the Papilionoideae. We cloned and sequenced the low copy nuclear gene sucrose synthase (SUSY) and combined the data with plastid trnL and matK sequences. SUSY has two paralogs in the Caesalpinieae grade and in the Mimosoideae, but occurs as a single copy in all other legumes tested. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses suggest the two nuclear markers are congruent with plastid DNA data. The Caesalpinieae grade is divided into four well-supported clades (Cassia, Caesalpinia, Tachigali and Peltophorum clades), a poorly supported clade of Dimorphandra Group genera, and two paraphyletic groups, one with other Dimorphandra Group genera and the other comprising genera previously recognized as the Umtiza clade. A selection analysis of the paralogs, using selection models from PAML, suggests that SUSY genes are subjected to a purifying selection. One of the SUSY paralogs, under slightly stronger positive selection, may be undergoing subfunctionalization. The low copy SUSY gene is useful for phylogeny reconstruction in the Caesalpinieae despite the presence of duplicate copies. This study confirms that the Caesalpinieae grade is an artificial group, and highlights the need for further analyses of lineages at the base of the Mimosoideae. PMID:22699157

  6. Recurrent Tandem Gene Duplication Gave Rise to Functionally Divergent Genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Long, Manyuan

    2008-01-01

    Tandem gene duplication is one of the major gene duplication mechanisms in eukaryotes, as illustrated by the prevalence of gene family clusters. Tandem duplicated paralogs usually share the same regulatory element, and as a consequence, they are likely to perform similar biological functions. Here, we provide an example of a newly evolved tandem duplicate acquiring novel functions, which were driven by positive selection. CG32708, CG32706, and CG6999 are 3 clustered genes residing in the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. CG6999 and CG32708 have been examined for their molecular population genetic properties (Thornton and Long 2005). We further investigated the evolutionary forces acting on these genes with greater sample sizes and a broader approach that incorporate between-species divergence, using more variety of statistical methods. We explored the possible functional implications by characterizing the tissue-specific and developmental expression patterns of these genes. Sequence comparison of species within D. melanogaster subgroup reveals that this 3-gene cluster was created by 2 rounds of tandem gene duplication in the last 5 Myr. Based on phylogenetic analysis, CG32708 is clearly the parental copy that is shared by all species. CG32706 appears to have originated in the ancestor of Drosophila simulans and D. melanogaster about 5 Mya, and CG6999 is the newest duplicate that is unique to D. melanogaster. All 3 genes have different expression profiles, and CG6999 has in addition acquired a novel transcript. Biased polymorphism frequency spectrum, linkage disequilibrium, nucleotide substitution, and McDonald–Kreitman analyses suggested that the evolution of CG6999 and CG32706 were driven by positive Darwinian selection. PMID:18408233

  7. The transcription factor Ace2 and its paralog Swi5 regulate ethanol production during static fermentation through their targets Cts1 and Rps4a in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Du, Jie; Xu, Guoqiang; Jiang, Linghuo

    2016-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most widely used fermentation organism for ethanol production. However, the gene expression regulatory networks behind the ethanol fermentation are still not fully understood. Using a static fermentation model, we examined the ethanol yields on biomass of deletion mutants for 77 yeast genes encoding nonessential transcription factors, and found that deletion mutants for ACE2 and SWI5 showed dramatically increased ethanol yields. Overexpression of ACE2 or SWI5 in wild type cells reduced their ethanol yields. Furthermore, among the 34 target genes regulated by Ace2 and Swi5, deletion of CTS1,RPS4a,SIC1,EGT2,DSE2, or SCP160 led to increased ethanol yields, with the former two showing higher effects. Overexpression of CTS1 or RPS4a in both ace2/ace2 and swi5/swi5 mutants reduced their ethanol yields. In contrast, deletion of MCR1 or HO significantly decreased ethanol yields, with the former one showing the highest effect. Therefore, Ace2 and Swi5 are two negative regulators of ethanol yield during static fermentation of yeast cells, and both CTS1 and RPS4a are major effectors mediating these two transcription factors in regulating ethanol production. PMID:26975390

  8. Origin and Ascendancy of a Chimeric Fusion Gene: The β/δ-Globin Gene of Paenungulate Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Opazo, Juan C.; Sloan, Angela M.; Campbell, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    The δ-globin gene (HBD) of eutherian mammals exhibits a propensity for recombinational exchange with the closely linked β-globin gene (HBB) and has been independently converted by the HBB gene in multiple lineages. Here we report the presence of a chimeric β/δ fusion gene in the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) that was created by unequal crossing-over between misaligned HBD and HBB paralogs. The recombinant chromosome that harbors the β/δ fusion gene in elephants is structurally similar to the “anti-Lepore” duplication mutant of humans (the reciprocal exchange product of the hemoglobin Lepore deletion mutant). However, the situation in the African elephant is unique in that the chimeric β/δ fusion gene supplanted the parental HBB gene and is therefore solely responsible for synthesizing the β-chain subunits of adult hemoglobin. A phylogenetic survey of β-like globin genes in afrotherian and xenarthran mammals revealed that the origin of the chimeric β/δ fusion gene and the concomitant inactivation of the HBB gene predated the radiation of “Paenungulata,” a clade of afrotherian mammals that includes three orders: Proboscidea (elephants), Sirenia (dugongs and manatees), and Hyracoidea (hyraxes). The reduced fitness of the human Hb Lepore deletion mutant helps to explain why independently derived β/δ fusion genes (which occur on an anti-Lepore chromosome) have been fixed in a number of mammalian lineages, whereas the reciprocal δ/β fusion gene (which occurs on a Lepore chromosome) has yet to be documented in any nonhuman mammal. This illustrates how the evolutionary fates of chimeric fusion genes can be strongly influenced by their recombinational mode of origin. PMID:19332641

  9. The BLADE-ON-PETIOLE genes of Arabidopsis are essential for resistance induced by methyl jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background NPR1 is a gene of Arabidopsis thaliana required for the perception of salicylic acid. This perception triggers a defense response and negatively regulates the perception of jasmonates. Surprisingly, the application of methyl jasmonate also induces resistance, and NPR1 is also suspected to be relevant. Since an allelic series of npr1 was recently described, the behavior of these alleles was tested in response to methyl jasmonate. Results The response to methyl jasmonate of different npr1s alleles and NPR1 paralogs null mutants was measured by the growth of a pathogen. We have also tested the subcellular localization of some npr1s, along with the protein-protein interactions that can be measured in yeast. The localization of the protein in npr1 alleles does not affect the response to methyl jasmonate. In fact, NPR1 is not required. The genes that are required in a redundant fashion are the BOPs. The BOPs are paralogs of NPR1, and they physically interact with the TGA family of transcription factors. Conclusions Some npr1 alleles have a phenotype in this response likely because they are affecting the interaction between BOPs and TGAs, and these two families of proteins are responsible for the resistance induced by methyl jasmonate in wild type plants. PMID:23116333

  10. Re-engineering cellular physiology by rewiring high-level global regulatory genes

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Stephen; Dillon, Shane C.; Chao, Tzu-Chiao; Wiencko, Heather L.; Hokamp, Karsten; Cameron, Andrew D. S.; Dorman, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of global regulatory networks has been exploited to rewire the gene control programmes of the model bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The product is an organism with competitive fitness that is superior to that of the wild type but tuneable under specific growth conditions. The paralogous hns and stpA global regulatory genes are located in distinct regions of the chromosome and control hundreds of target genes, many of which contribute to stress resistance. The locations of the hns and stpA open reading frames were exchanged reciprocally, each acquiring the transcription control signals of the other. The new strain had none of the compensatory mutations normally associated with alterations to hns expression in Salmonella; instead it displayed rescheduled expression of the stress and stationary phase sigma factor RpoS and its regulon. Thus the expression patterns of global regulators can be adjusted artificially to manipulate microbial physiology, creating a new and resilient organism. PMID:26631971

  11. Re-engineering cellular physiology by rewiring high-level global regulatory genes.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Stephen; Dillon, Shane C; Chao, Tzu-Chiao; Wiencko, Heather L; Hokamp, Karsten; Cameron, Andrew D S; Dorman, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of global regulatory networks has been exploited to rewire the gene control programmes of the model bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The product is an organism with competitive fitness that is superior to that of the wild type but tuneable under specific growth conditions. The paralogous hns and stpA global regulatory genes are located in distinct regions of the chromosome and control hundreds of target genes, many of which contribute to stress resistance. The locations of the hns and stpA open reading frames were exchanged reciprocally, each acquiring the transcription control signals of the other. The new strain had none of the compensatory mutations normally associated with alterations to hns expression in Salmonella; instead it displayed rescheduled expression of the stress and stationary phase sigma factor RpoS and its regulon. Thus the expression patterns of global regulators can be adjusted artificially to manipulate microbial physiology, creating a new and resilient organism. PMID:26631971

  12. Introns regulate the production of ribosomal proteins by modulating splicing of duplicated ribosomal protein genes.

    PubMed

    Petibon, Cyrielle; Parenteau, Julie; Catala, Mathieu; Elela, Sherif Abou

    2016-05-01

    Most budding yeast introns exist in the many duplicated ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) and it has been posited that they remain there to modulate the expression of RPGs and cell growth in response to stress. However, the mechanism by which introns regulate the expression of RPGs and their impact on the synthesis of ribosomal proteins remain unclear. In this study, we show that introns determine the ratio of ribosomal protein isoforms through asymmetric paralog-specific regulation of splicing. Exchanging the introns and 3' untranslated regions of the duplicated RPS9 genes altered the splicing efficiency and changed the ratio of the ribosomal protein isoforms. Mutational analysis of the RPS9 genes indicated that splicing is regulated by variations in the intron structure and the 3' untranslated region. Together these data suggest that preferential splicing of duplicated RPGs provides a means for adjusting the ratio of different ribosomal protein isoforms, while maintaining the overall expression level of each ribosomal protein. PMID:26945043

  13. Comprehensive identification and expression analysis of Hsp90s gene family in Solanum lycopersicum.

    PubMed

    Zai, W S; Miao, L X; Xiong, Z L; Zhang, H L; Ma, Y R; Li, Y L; Chen, Y B; Ye, S G

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a protein produced by plants in response to adverse environmental stresses. In this study, we identified and analyzed Hsp90 gene family members using a bioinformatic method based on genomic data from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). The results illustrated that tomato contains at least 7 Hsp90 genes distributed on 6 chromosomes; protein lengths ranged from 267-794 amino acids. Intron numbers ranged from 2-19 in the genes. The phylogenetic tree revealed that Hsp90 genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), rice (Oryza sativa L.), and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.) could be divided into 5 groups, which included 3 pairs of orthologous genes and 4 pairs of paralogous genes. Expression analysis of RNA-sequence data showed that the Hsp90-1 gene was specifically expressed in mature fruits, while Hsp90-5 and Hsp90-6 showed opposite expression patterns in various tissues of cultivated and wild tomatoes. The expression levels of the Hsp90-1, Hsp90-2, and Hsp90- 3 genes in various tissues of cultivated tomatoes were high, while both the expression levels of genes Hsp90-3 and Hsp90-4 were low. Additionally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that these genes were involved in the responses to yellow leaf curl virus in tomato plant leaves. Our results provide a foundation for identifying the function of the Hsp90 gene in tomato. PMID:26214462

  14. Operon Formation is Driven by Co-Regulation and Not by Horizontal Gene Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Huang, Katherine H.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, Eric J.

    2005-04-12

    Although operons are often subject to horizontal gene transfer (HGT), non-HGT genes are particularly likely to be in operons. To resolve this apparent discrepancy and to determine whether HGT is involved in operon formation, we examined the evolutionary history of the genes and operons in Escherichia coli K12. We show that genes that have homologs in distantly related bacteria but not in close relatives of E. coli (indicating HGTi) form new operons at about the same rates as native genes. Furthermore, genes in new operons are no more likely than other genes to have phylogenetic trees that are inconsistent with the species tree. In contrast, essential genes and ubiquitous genes without paralogs (genes believed to undergo HGT rarely) often form new operons. We conclude that HGT is not associated with operon formation, but instead promotes the prevalence of pre-existing operons. To explain operon formation, we propose that new operons reduce the amount of regulatory information required to specify optimal expression patterns. Consistent with this hypothesis, operons have greater amounts of conserved regulatory sequences than do individually transcribed genes.

  15. BodyMap-Xs: anatomical breakdown of 17 million animal ESTs for cross-species comparison of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Osamu; Otsuji, Makiko; Watanabe, Kouji; Iizuka, Takayasu; Tamura, Takuro; Hishiki, Teruyoshi; Kawamoto, Shoko; Okubo, Kousaku

    2006-01-01

    BodyMap-Xs () is a database for cross-species gene expression comparison. It was created by the anatomical breakdown of 17 million animal expressed sequence tag (EST) records in DDBJ using a sorting program tailored for this purpose. In BodyMap-Xs, users are allowed to compare the expression patterns of orthologous and paralogous genes in a coherent manner. This will provide valuable insights for the evolutionary study of gene expression and identification of a responsive motif for a particular expression pattern. In addition, starting from a concise overview of the taxonomical and anatomical breakdown of all animal ESTs, users can navigate to obtain gene expression ranking of a particular tissue in a particular animal. This method may lead to the understanding of the similarities and differences between the homologous tissues across animal species. BodyMap-Xs will be automatically updated in synchronization with the major update in DDBJ, which occurs periodically. PMID:16381946

  16. The bdr gene families of the Lyme disease and relapsing fever spirochetes: potential influence on biology, pathogenesis, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D M; Carlyon, J A; Theisen, M; Marconi, R T

    2000-01-01

    Species of the genus Borrelia cause human and animal infections, including Lyme disease, relapsing fever, and epizootic bovine abortion. The borrelial genome is unique among bacterial genomes in that it is composed of a linear chromosome and a series of linear and circular plasmids. The plasmids exhibit significant genetic redundancy and carry 175 paralogous gene families, most of unknown function. Homologous alleles on different plasmids could influence the organization and evolution of the Borrelia genome by serving as foci for interplasmid homologous recombination. The plasmid-carried Borrelia direct repeat (bdr) gene family encodes polymorphic, acidic proteins with putative phosphorylation sites and transmembrane domains. These proteins may play regulatory roles in Borrelia. We describe recent progress in the characterization of the Borrelia bdr genes and discuss the possible influence of this gene family on the biology, pathogenesis, and evolution of the Borrelia genome. PMID:10756144

  17. Gene duplication, loss and selection in the evolution of saxitoxin biosynthesis in alveolates.

    PubMed

    Murray, Shauna A; Diwan, Rutuja; Orr, Russell J S; Kohli, Gurjeet S; John, Uwe

    2015-11-01

    A group of marine dinoflagellates (Alveolata, Eukaryota), consisting of ∼10 species of the genus Alexandrium, Gymnodinium catenatum and Pyrodinium bahamense, produce the toxin saxitoxin and its analogues (STX), which can accumulate in shellfish, leading to ecosystem and human health impacts. The genes, sxt, putatively involved in STX biosynthesis, have recently been identified, however, the evolution of these genes within dinoflagellates is not clear. There are two reasons for this: uncertainty over the phylogeny of dinoflagellates; and that the sxt genes of many species of Alexandrium and other dinoflagellate genera are not known. Here, we determined the phylogeny of STX-producing and other dinoflagellates based on a concatenated eight-gene alignment. We determined the presence, diversity and phylogeny of sxtA, domains A1 and A4 and sxtG in 52 strains of Alexandrium, and a further 43 species of dinoflagellates and thirteen other alveolates. We confirmed the presence and high sequence conservation of sxtA, domain A4, in 40 strains (35 Alexandrium, 1 Pyrodinium, 4 Gymnodinium) of 8 species of STX-producing dinoflagellates, and absence from non-producing species. We found three paralogs of sxtA, domain A1, and a widespread distribution of sxtA1 in non-STX producing dinoflagellates, indicating duplication events in the evolution of this gene. One paralog, clade 2, of sxtA1 may be particularly related to STX biosynthesis. Similarly, sxtG appears to be generally restricted to STX-producing species, while three amidinotransferase gene paralogs were found in dinoflagellates. We investigated the role of positive (diversifying) selection following duplication in sxtA1 and sxtG, and found negative selection in clades of sxtG and sxtA1, clade 2, suggesting they were functionally constrained. Significant episodic diversifying selection was found in some strains in clade 3 of sxtA1, a clade that may not be involved in STX biosynthesis, indicating pressure for diversification

  18. Characterization of PREP2, a paralog of PREP1, which defines a novel sub-family of the MEINOX TALE homeodomain transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Fognani, C; Kilstrup-Nielsen, C; Berthelsen, J; Ferretti, E; Zappavigna, V; Blasi, F

    2002-05-01

    TALE (three amino acid loop extension) homeodomain proteins include the PBC and the MEINOX sub-families. MEINOX proteins form heterodimer complexes with PBC proteins. Heterodimerization is crucial to DNA binding and for nuclear localization. PBC-MEINOX heterodimers bind DNA also in combination with HOX proteins, thereby modulating their DNA-binding specificity. TALE proteins therefore play crucial roles in multiple developmental and differentiation pathways in vivo. We report the identification and characterization of a novel human gene homologous to PREP1, called PREP2. Sequence comparisons indicate that PREP1 and PREP2 define a novel sub-family of MEINOX proteins, distinct from the MEIS sub-family. PREP2 is expressed in a variety of human adult tissues and displays a more restricted expression pattern than PREP1. PREP2 is capable of heterodimerizing with PBC proteins. Heterodimerization with PBX1 appears to be essential for nuclear localization of both PREP2 and PBX1. A comparison between the functional properties of PREP1 and PREP2 reveals that PREP2-PBX display a faster DNA-dissociation rate than PREP1-PBX heterodimers, suggesting different roles in controlling gene expression. Like PREP1, PREP2-PBX heterodimers are capable of forming ternary complexes with HOXB1. The analysis of some PREP2 in vitro properties suggests a functional diversification among PREP and between PREP and MEIS MEINOX proteins. PMID:11972344

  19. Copy number variation of lipocalin family genes for male-specific proteins in tilapia and its association with gender.

    PubMed

    Shirak, A; Golik, M; Lee, B-Y; Howe, A E; Kocher, T D; Hulata, G; Ron, M; Seroussi, E

    2008-11-01

    Lipocalins are involved in the binding of small molecules like sex steroids. We show here that the previously reported tilapia male-specific protein (MSP) is a lipocalin encoded by a variety of paralogous and homologous genes in different tilapia species. Exon-intron boundaries of MSP genes were typical of the six-exon genomic structure of lipocalins, and the transcripts were capable of encoding 200 amino-acid polypeptides that consisted of a putative signal peptide and a lipocalin domain. Cysteine residues are conserved in positions analogous to those forming the three disulfide bonds characteristic of the ligand pocket. The calculated molecular mass of the secreted MSP (20.4 kDa) was less than half of that observed, suggesting that it is highly glycosylated like its homologue tributyltin-binding protein. Analysis of sequence variations revealed three types of paralogs MSPA, MSPB and MSPC. Expression of both MSPA and MSPB was detected in testis. In haploid Oreochromis niloticus embryos, each of these types consisted of two closely related paralogs, and asymmetry between MSP copy numbers on the maternal (six copies) and the paternal (three copies) chromosomes was observed. Using this polymorphism we mapped MSPA and MSPC to linkage group 12 of an F(2) mapping family derived from a cross between O. niloticus and Oreochromis aureus. Females with high MSP copy number were more frequent by more than twofold than males. Gender-MSPC combinations showed significant deviation from expected Mendelian segregation (P=0.009) suggesting elimination of males with MSPC copies. We discuss different hypotheses to explain this elimination, including possibility for allelic conflict resulted by the hybridization. PMID:18648387

  20. Fine Pathogen Discrimination within the APL1 Gene Family Protects Anopheles gambiae against Human and Rodent Malaria Species

    PubMed Central

    Mitri, Christian; Jacques, Jean-Claude; Thiery, Isabelle; Riehle, Michelle M.; Xu, Jiannong; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Morlais, Isabelle; Nsango, Sandrine E.; Vernick, Kenneth D.; Bourgouin, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Genetically controlled resistance of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to Plasmodium falciparum is a common trait in the natural population, and a cluster of natural resistance loci were mapped to the Plasmodium-Resistance Island (PRI) of the A. gambiae genome. The APL1 family of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins was highlighted by candidate gene studies in the PRI, and is comprised of paralogs APL1A, APL1B and APL1C that share ≥50% amino acid identity. Here, we present a functional analysis of the joint response of APL1 family members during mosquito infection with human and rodent Plasmodium species. Only paralog APL1A protected A. gambiae against infection with the human malaria parasite P. falciparum from both the field population and in vitro culture. In contrast, only paralog APL1C protected against the rodent malaria parasites P. berghei and P. yoelii. We show that anti-P. falciparum protection is mediated by the Imd/Rel2 pathway, while protection against P. berghei infection was shown to require Toll/Rel1 signaling. Further, only the short Rel2-S isoform and not the long Rel2-F isoform of Rel2 confers protection against P. falciparum. Protection correlates with the transcriptional regulation of APL1A by Rel2-S but not Rel2-F, suggesting that the Rel2-S anti-parasite phenotype results at least in part from its transcriptional control over APL1A. These results indicate that distinct members of the APL1 gene family display a mutually exclusive protective effect against different classes of Plasmodium parasites. It appears that a gene-for-pathogen-class system orients the appropriate host defenses against distinct categories of similar pathogens. It is known that insect innate immune pathways can distinguish between grossly different microbes such as Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, or fungi, but the function of the APL1 paralogs reveals that mosquito innate immunity possesses a more fine-grained capacity to distinguish between classes of closely

  1. SpinachDB: A Well-Characterized Genomic Database for Gene Family Classification and SNP Information of Spinach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Dong; Tan, Hua-Wei; Zhu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), which originated in central and western Asia, belongs to the family Amaranthaceae. Spinach is one of most important leafy vegetables with a high nutritional value as well as being a perfect research material for plant sex chromosome models. As the completion of genome assembly and gene prediction of spinach, we developed SpinachDB (http://222.73.98.124/spinachdb) to store, annotate, mine and analyze genomics and genetics datasets efficiently. In this study, all of 21702 spinach genes were annotated. A total of 15741 spinach genes were catalogued into 4351 families, including identification of a substantial number of transcription factors. To construct a high-density genetic map, a total of 131592 SSRs and 1125743 potential SNPs located in 548801 loci of spinach genome were identified in 11 cultivated and wild spinach cultivars. The expression profiles were also performed with RNA-seq data using the FPKM method, which could be used to compare the genes. Paralogs in spinach and the orthologous genes in Arabidopsis, grape, sugar beet and rice were identified for comparative genome analysis. Finally, the SpinachDB website contains seven main sections, including the homepage; the GBrowse map that integrates genome, genes, SSR and SNP marker information; the Blast alignment service; the gene family classification search tool; the orthologous and paralogous gene pairs search tool; and the download and useful contact information. SpinachDB will be continually expanded to include newly generated robust genomics and genetics data sets along with the associated data mining and analysis tools. PMID:27148975

  2. SpinachDB: A Well-Characterized Genomic Database for Gene Family Classification and SNP Information of Spinach

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), which originated in central and western Asia, belongs to the family Amaranthaceae. Spinach is one of most important leafy vegetables with a high nutritional value as well as being a perfect research material for plant sex chromosome models. As the completion of genome assembly and gene prediction of spinach, we developed SpinachDB (http://222.73.98.124/spinachdb) to store, annotate, mine and analyze genomics and genetics datasets efficiently. In this study, all of 21702 spinach genes were annotated. A total of 15741 spinach genes were catalogued into 4351 families, including identification of a substantial number of transcription factors. To construct a high-density genetic map, a total of 131592 SSRs and 1125743 potential SNPs located in 548801 loci of spinach genome were identified in 11 cultivated and wild spinach cultivars. The expression profiles were also performed with RNA-seq data using the FPKM method, which could be used to compare the genes. Paralogs in spinach and the orthologous genes in Arabidopsis, grape, sugar beet and rice were identified for comparative genome analysis. Finally, the SpinachDB website contains seven main sections, including the homepage; the GBrowse map that integrates genome, genes, SSR and SNP marker information; the Blast alignment service; the gene family classification search tool; the orthologous and paralogous gene pairs search tool; and the download and useful contact information. SpinachDB will be continually expanded to include newly generated robust genomics and genetics data sets along with the associated data mining and analysis tools. PMID:27148975

  3. Identification and characterization of the GhHsp20 gene family in Gossypium hirsutum.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Zhao, Ting; Li, Jie; Liu, Bingliang; Fang, Lei; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, Heat Shock Protein 20 (Hsp20) plays crucial roles in growth, development and responses to abiotic stresses. In this study, 94 GhHsp20 genes were identified in G. hirsutum, and these genes were phylogenetically clustered into 14 subfamilies. Out of these, 73 paralogous gene pairs remained in conserved positions on segmental duplicated blocks and only 14 genes clustered into seven tandem duplication event regions. Transcriptome analysis showed that 82 GhHsp20 genes were expressed in at least one tested tissues, indicating that the GhHsp20 genes were involved in physiological and developmental processes of cotton. Further, expression profiles under abiotic stress exhibited that two-thirds of the GhHsp20 genes were responsive to heat stress, while 15 genes were induced by multiple stresses. In addition, qRT-PCR confirmed that 16 GhHsp20 genes were hot-induced, and eight genes were up-regulated under multiple abiotic stresses and stress-related phytohormone treatments. Taken together, our results presented here would be helpful in laying the foundation for understanding the complex mechanisms of GhHsp20 mediated developmental processes and abiotic stress signaling transduction pathways in cotton. PMID:27580529

  4. Unusual Gene Order and Organization of the Sea Urchin HoxCluster

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Paul M.; Lucas, Susan; Cameron, R. Andrew; Rowen,Lee; Nesbitt, Ryan; Bloom, Scott; Rast, Jonathan P.; Berney, Kevin; Arenas-Mena, Cesar; Martinez, Pedro; Davidson, Eric H.; Peterson, KevinJ.; Hood, Leroy

    2005-05-10

    The highly consistent gene order and axial colinear expression patterns found in vertebrate hox gene clusters are less well conserved across the rest of bilaterians. We report the first deuterostome instance of an intact hox cluster with a unique gene order where the paralog groups are not expressed in a sequential manner. The finished sequence from BAC clones from the genome of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, reveals a gene order wherein the anterior genes (Hox1, Hox2 and Hox3) lie nearest the posterior genes in the cluster such that the most 3' gene is Hox5. (The gene order is : 5'-Hox1,2, 3, 11/13c, 11/13b, '11/13a, 9/10, 8, 7, 6, 5 - 3)'. The finished sequence result is corroborated by restriction mapping evidence and BAC-end scaffold analyses. Comparisons with a putative ancestral deuterostome Hox gene cluster suggest that the rearrangements leading to the sea urchin gene order were many and complex.

  5. Unusual Gene Order and Organization of the Sea Urchin Hox Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, R A; Rowen, L; Nesbitt, R; Bloom, S; Rast, J P; Berney, K; Arenas-Mena, C; Martinez, P; Lucas, S; Richardson, P M; Davidson, E H; Peterson, K J; Hood, L

    2005-10-11

    The highly consistent gene order and axial colinear expression patterns found in vertebrate hox gene clusters are less well conserved across the rest of bilaterians. We report the first deuterostome instance of an intact hox cluster with a unique gene order where the paralog groups are not expressed in a sequential manner. The finished sequence from BAC clones from the genome of the sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, reveals a gene order wherein the anterior genes (Hox1, Hox2 and Hox3) lie nearest the posterior genes in the cluster such that the most 3 gene is Hox5. (The gene order is : 5-Hox1, 2, 3, 11/13c, 11/13b, 11/13a, 9/10, 8, 7, 6, 5 - 3). The finished sequence result is corroborated by restriction mapping evidence and BAC-end scaffold analyses. Comparisons with a putative ancestral deuterostome Hox gene cluster suggest that the rearrangements leading to the sea urchin gene order were many and complex.

  6. Identification of Enzyme Genes Using Chemical Structure Alignments of Substrate-Product Pairs.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Yuki; Yamada, Takuji; Okuda, Shujiro; Nakagawa, Zenichi; Kotera, Masaaki; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Kanehisa, Minoru; Goto, Susumu

    2016-03-28

    Although there are several databases that contain data on many metabolites and reactions in biochemical pathways, there is still a big gap in the numbers between experimentally identified enzymes and metabolites. It is supposed that many catalytic enzyme genes are still unknown. Although there are previous studies that estimate the number of candidate enzyme genes, these studies required some additional information aside from the structures of metabolites such as gene expression and order in the genome. In this study, we developed a novel method to identify a candidate enzyme gene of a reaction using the chemical structures of the substrate-product pair (reactant pair). The proposed method is based on a search for similar reactant pairs in a reference database and offers ortholog groups that possibly mediate the given reaction. We applied the proposed method to two experimentally validated reactions. As a result, we confirmed that the histidine transaminase was correctly identified. Although our method could not directly identify the asparagine oxo-acid transaminase, we successfully found the paralog gene most similar to the correct enzyme gene. We also applied our method to infer candidate enzyme genes in the mesaconate pathway. The advantage of our method lies in the prediction of possible genes for orphan enzyme reactions where any associated gene sequences are not determined yet. We believe that this approach will facilitate experimental identification of genes for orphan enzymes. PMID:26822930

  7. [BIOINFORMATIC SEARCH AND PHYLOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE CELLULOSE SYNTHASE GENES OF FLAX (LINUM USITATISSIMUM)].

    PubMed

    Pydiura, N A; Bayer, G Ya; Galinousky, D V; Yemets, A I; Pirko, Ya V; Podvitski, T A; Anisimova, N V; Khotyleva, L V; Kilchevsky, A V; Blume, Ya B

    2015-01-01

    A bioinformatic search of sequences encoding cellulose synthase genes in the flax genome, and their comparison to dicots orthologs was carried out. The analysis revealed 32 cellulose synthase gene candidates, 16 of which are highly likely to encode cellulose synthases, and the remaining 16--cellulose synthase-like proteins (Csl). Phylogenetic analysis of gene products of cellulose synthase genes allowed distinguishing 6 groups of cellulose synthase genes of different classes: CesA1/10, CesA3, CesA4, CesA5/6/2/9, CesA7 and CesA8. Paralogous sequences within classes CesA1/10 and CesA5/6/2/9 which are associated with the primary cell wall formation are characterized by a greater similarity within these classes than orthologous sequences. Whereas the genes controlling the biosynthesis of secondary cell wall cellulose form distinct clades: CesA4, CesA7, and CesA8. The analysis of 16 identified flax cellulose synthase gene candidates shows the presence of at least 12 different cellulose synthase gene variants in flax genome which are represented in all six clades of cellulose synthase genes. Thus, at this point genes of all ten known cellulose synthase classes are identify in flax genome, but their correct classification requires additional research. PMID:26638491

  8. Identification and characterization of the GhHsp20 gene family in Gossypium hirsutum

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wei; Zhao, Ting; Li, Jie; Liu, Bingliang; Fang, Lei; Hu, Yan; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2016-01-01

    In higher plants, Heat Shock Protein 20 (Hsp20) plays crucial roles in growth, development and responses to abiotic stresses. In this study, 94 GhHsp20 genes were identified in G. hirsutum, and these genes were phylogenetically clustered into 14 subfamilies. Out of these, 73 paralogous gene pairs remained in conserved positions on segmental duplicated blocks and only 14 genes clustered into seven tandem duplication event regions. Transcriptome analysis showed that 82 GhHsp20 genes were expressed in at least one tested tissues, indicating that the GhHsp20 genes were involved in physiological and developmental processes of cotton. Further, expression profiles under abiotic stress exhibited that two-thirds of the GhHsp20 genes were responsive to heat stress, while 15 genes were induced by multiple stresses. In addition, qRT-PCR confirmed that 16 GhHsp20 genes were hot-induced, and eight genes were up-regulated under multiple abiotic stresses and stress-related phytohormone treatments. Taken together, our results presented here would be helpful in laying the foundation for understanding the complex mechanisms of GhHsp20 mediated developmental processes and abiotic stress signaling transduction pathways in cotton. PMID:27580529

  9. Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy and Tracking of Bacterial Flotillin (Reggie) Paralogs Provide Evidence for Defined-Sized Protein Microdomains within the Bacterial Membrane but Absence of Clusters Containing Detergent-Resistant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dempwolff, Felix; Schmidt, Felix K.; Hervás, Ana B.; Stroh, Alex; Rösch, Thomas C.; Riese, Cornelius N.; Dersch, Simon; Heimerl, Thomas; Lucena, Daniella; Hülsbusch, Nikola; Stuermer, Claudia A. O.; Takeshita, Norio; Fischer, Reinhard; Graumann, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes have been proposed to contain microdomains of a specific lipid composition, in which distinct groups of proteins are clustered. Flotillin-like proteins are conserved between pro—and eukaryotes, play an important function in several eukaryotic and bacterial cells, and define in vertebrates a type of so-called detergent-resistant microdomains. Using STED microscopy, we show that two bacterial flotillins, FloA and FloT, form defined assemblies with an average diameter of 85 to 110 nm in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Interestingly, flotillin microdomains are of similar size in eukaryotic cells. The soluble domains of FloA form higher order oligomers of up to several hundred kDa in vitro, showing that like eukaryotic flotillins, bacterial assemblies are based in part on their ability to self-oligomerize. However, B. subtilis paralogs show significantly different diffusion rates, and consequently do not colocalize into a common microdomain. Dual colour time lapse experiments of flotillins together with other detergent-resistant proteins in bacteria show that proteins colocalize for no longer than a few hundred milliseconds, and do not move together. Our data reveal that the bacterial membrane contains defined-sized protein domains rather than functional microdomains dependent on flotillins. Based on their distinct dynamics, FloA and FloT confer spatially distinguishable activities, but do not serve as molecular scaffolds. PMID:27362352

  10. In with the Old, in with the New: The Promiscuity of the Duplication Process Engenders Diverse Pathways for Novel Gene Creation

    PubMed Central

    Katju, Vaishali

    2012-01-01

    The gene duplication process has exhibited far greater promiscuity in the creation of paralogs with novel exon-intron structures than anticipated even by Ohno. In this paper I explore the history of the field, from the neo-Darwinian synthesis through Ohno's formulation of the canonical model for the evolution of gene duplicates and culminating in the present genomic era. I delineate the major tenets of Ohno's model and discuss its failure to encapsulate the full complexity of the duplication process as revealed in the era of genomics. I discuss the diverse classes of paralogs originating from both DNA- and RNA-mediated duplication events and their evolutionary potential for assuming radically altered functions, as well as the degree to which they can function unconstrained from the pressure of gene conversion. Lastly, I explore theoretical population-genetic considerations of how the effective population size (Ne) of a species may influence the probability of emergence of genes with radically altered functions. PMID:23008799

  11. Duplication of floral regulatory genes in the Lamiales.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, Jan E; Olmstead, Richard G; Willis, John H; Phillips, Patrick C

    2005-08-01

    Duplication of some floral regulatory genes has occurred repeatedly in angiosperms, whereas others are thought to be single-copy in most lineages. We selected three genes that interact in a pathway regulating floral development conserved among higher tricolpates (LFY/FLO, UFO/FIM, and AP3/DEF) and screened for copy number among families of Lamiales that are closely related to the model species Antirrhinum majus. We show that two of three genes have duplicated at least twice in the Lamiales. Phylogenetic analyses of paralogs suggest that an ancient whole genome duplication shared among many families of Lamiales occurred after the ancestor of these families diverged from the lineage leading to Veronicaceae (including the single-copy species A. majus). Duplication is consistent with previous patterns among angiosperm lineages for AP3/DEF, but this is the first report of functional duplicate copies of LFY/FLO outside of tetraploid species. We propose Lamiales taxa will be good models for understanding mechanisms of duplicate gene preservation and how floral regulatory genes may contribute to morphological diversity. PMID:21646149

  12. A human TAPBP (TAPASIN)-related gene, TAPBP-R.

    PubMed

    Teng, Michelle S; Stephens, Richard; Du Pasquier, Louis; Freeman, Tom; Lindquist, Jonathan A; Trowsdale, John

    2002-04-01

    TAPASIN, a V-C1 (variable-constant) immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) molecule that links MHC class I molecules to the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is encoded by the TAPBP gene, located near to the MHC at 6p21.3. A related gene was identified at chromosome position 12p13.3 between the CD27 and VAMP1 genes near a group of MHC-paralogous loci. The gene, which we have called TAPBP-R (R for related), also encodes a member of the IgSF, TAPASIN-R. Its putative product contains similar structural motifs to TAPASIN, with some marked differences, especially in the V domain, transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions. By using the mouse ortholog to screen tissue, we revealed that the TAPBP-R gene was broadly expressed. Sub-cellular localization showed that the bulk of TAPASIN-R is located within the ER but biotinylation experiments were consistent with some expression at thecell surface. TAPASIN-R lacks an obvious ER retention signal. The function of TAPASIN-R will be of interest in regards to the evolution of the immune system as well as antigen processing. PMID:11920573

  13. Divergent evolution of two corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) genes in teleost fishes

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2015-01-01

    Genome duplication, thought to have happened twice early in vertebrate evolution and a third time in teleost fishes, gives rise to gene paralogs that can evolve subfunctions or neofunctions via sequence and regulatory changes. To explore the evolution and functions of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), we searched sequenced teleost genomes for CRH paralogs. Our phylogenetic and synteny analyses indicate that two CRH genes, crha and crhb, evolved via duplication of crh1 early in the teleost lineage. We examined the expression of crha and crhb in two teleost species from different orders: an African cichlid, Burton's mouthbrooder, (Astatotilapia burtoni; Order Perciformes) and zebrafish (Danio rerio; Order Cypriniformes). Furthermore, we compared expression of the teleost crha and crhb genes with the crh1 gene of an outgroup to the teleost clade: the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus). In situ hybridization for crha and crhb mRNA in brains and eyes revealed distinct expression patterns for crha in different teleost species. In the cichlid, crha mRNA was found in the retina but not in the brain. In zebrafish, however, crha mRNA was not found in the retina, but was detected in the brain, restricted to the ventral hypothalamus. Spotted gar crh1 was found in the retina as well as the brain, suggesting that the ancestor of teleost fishes likely had a crh1 gene expressed in both retina and brain. Thus, genome duplication may have freed crha from constraints, allowing it to evolve distinct sequences, expression patterns, and likely unique functions in different lineages. PMID:26528116

  14. The Lineage-Specific Evolution of Aquaporin Gene Clusters Facilitated Tetrapod Terrestrial Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Roderick Nigel; Chauvigné, François; Hlidberg, Jón Baldur; Cutler, Christopher P.; Cerdà, Joan

    2014-01-01

    A major physiological barrier for aquatic organisms adapting to terrestrial life is dessication in the aerial environment. This barrier was nevertheless overcome by the Devonian ancestors of extant Tetrapoda, but the origin of specific molecular mechanisms that solved this water problem remains largely unknown. Here we show that an ancient aquaporin gene cluster evolved specifically in the sarcopterygian lineage, and subsequently diverged into paralogous forms of AQP2, -5, or -6 to mediate water conservation in extant Tetrapoda. To determine the origin of these apomorphic genomic traits, we combined aquaporin sequencing from jawless and jawed vertebrates with broad taxon assembly of >2,000 transcripts amongst 131 deuterostome genomes and developed a model based upon Bayesian inference that traces their convergent roots to stem subfamilies in basal Metazoa and Prokaryota. This approach uncovered an unexpected diversity of aquaporins in every lineage investigated, and revealed that the vertebrate superfamily consists of 17 classes of aquaporins (Aqp0 - Aqp16). The oldest orthologs associated with water conservation in modern Tetrapoda are traced to a cluster of three aqp2-like genes in Actinistia that likely arose >500 Ma through duplication of an aqp0-like gene present in a jawless ancestor. In sea lamprey, we show that aqp0 first arose in a protocluster comprised of a novel aqp14 paralog and a fused aqp01 gene. To corroborate these findings, we conducted phylogenetic analyses of five syntenic nuclear receptor subfamilies, which, together with observations of extensive genome rearrangements, support the coincident loss of ancestral aqp2-like orthologs in Actinopterygii. We thus conclude that the divergence of sarcopterygian-specific aquaporin gene clusters was permissive for the evolution of water conservation mechanisms that facilitated tetrapod terrestrial adaptation. PMID:25426855

  15. Genes and gene regulation

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, N.

    1988-01-01

    Genetics has long been a central topic for biologists, and recent progress has captured the public imagination as well. This book addresses questions that are at the leading edge of this continually advancing discipline. In tune with the increasing emphasis on molecular biology and genetic engineering, this text emphasizes the molecular aspects of gene expression, and the evolution of gene sequence organization and control. It reviews the genetic material of viruses, bacteria, and of higher organisms. Cells and organisms are compared in terms of gene numbers, their arrangements within a cell, and the control mechanisms which regulate the activity of genes.

  16. Spatio-temporal expression patterns of anterior Hox genes during Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Lyon, R Stewart; Davis, Adam; Scemama, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Hox genes encode transcription factors that function to pattern regional tissue identities along the anterior-posterior axis during animal embryonic development. Divergent nested Hox gene expression patterns within the posterior pharyngeal arches may play an important role in patterning morphological variation in the pharyngeal jaw apparatus (PJA) between evolutionarily divergent teleost fishes. Recent gene expression studies have shown the expression patterns from all Hox paralog group (PG) 2-6 genes in the posterior pharyngeal arches (PAs) for the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and from most genes of these PGs for the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). While several orthologous Hox genes exhibit divergent spatial and temporal expression patterns between these two teleost species in the posterior PAs, several tilapia Hox gene expression patterns from PG3-6 must be documented for a full comparative study. Here we present the spatio-temporal expression patterns of hoxb3b, c3a, b4a, a5a, b5a, b5b, b6a and b6b in the neural tube and posterior PAs of the Nile tilapia. We show that several of these tilapia Hox genes exhibit divergent expression patterns in the posterior PAs from their medaka orthologs. We also compare these gene expression patterns to orthologs in other gnathostome vertebrates, including the dogfish shark. PMID:23376031

  17. Neuropeptide evolution: Chelicerate neurohormone and neuropeptide genes may reflect one or more whole genome duplications.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Jan A

    2016-04-01

    Four genomes and two transcriptomes from six Chelicerate species were analyzed for the presence of neuropeptide and neurohormone precursors and their GPCRs. The genome from the spider Stegodyphus mimosarum yielded 87 neuropeptide precursors and 120 neuropeptide GPCRs. Many neuropeptide transcripts were also found in the transcriptomes of three other spiders, Latrodectus hesperus, Parasteatoda tepidariorum and Acanthoscurria geniculata. For the scorpion Mesobuthus martensii the numbers are 79 and 93 respectively. The very small genome of the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae, on the other hand contains a much smaller number of such genes. A few new putative Arthropod neuropeptide genes were discovered. Thus, both spiders and the scorpion have an achatin gene and in spiders there are two different genes encoding myosuppressin-like peptides while spiders also have two genes encoding novel LGamides. Another finding is the presence of trissin in spiders and scorpions, while neuropeptide genes that seem to be orthologs of Lottia LFRYamide and Platynereis CCRFamide were also found. Such genes were also found in various insect species, but seem to be lacking from the Holometabola. The Chelicerate neuropeptide and neuropeptide GPCR genes often have paralogs. As the large majority of these are probably not due to local gene duplications, is plausible that they reflect the effects of one or more ancient whole genome duplications. PMID:26928473

  18. Birth of a new gene on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Antonio Bernardo; Vicoso, Beatriz; Russo, Claudia A M; Swenor, Bonnielin; Clark, Andrew G

    2015-10-01

    Contrary to the pattern seen in mammalian sex chromosomes, where most Y-linked genes have X-linked homologs, the Drosophila X and Y chromosomes appear to be unrelated. Most of the Y-linked genes have autosomal paralogs, so autosome-to-Y transposition must be the main source of Drosophila Y-linked genes. Here we show how these genes were acquired. We found a previously unidentified gene (flagrante delicto Y, FDY) that originated from a recent duplication of the autosomal gene vig2 to the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Four contiguous genes were duplicated along with vig2, but they became pseudogenes through the accumulation of deletions and transposable element insertions, whereas FDY remained functional, acquired testis-specific expression, and now accounts for ∼20% of the vig2-like mRNA in testis. FDY is absent in the closest relatives of D. melanogaster, and DNA sequence divergence indicates that the duplication to the Y chromosome occurred ∼2 million years ago. Thus, FDY provides a snapshot of the early stages of the establishment of a Y-linked gene and demonstrates how the Drosophila Y has been accumulating autosomal genes. PMID:26385968

  19. Birth of a new gene on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Antonio Bernardo; Vicoso, Beatriz; Russo, Claudia A. M.; Swenor, Bonnielin; Clark, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    Contrary to the pattern seen in mammalian sex chromosomes, where most Y-linked genes have X-linked homologs, the Drosophila X and Y chromosomes appear to be unrelated. Most of the Y-linked genes have autosomal paralogs, so autosome-to-Y transposition must be the main source of Drosophila Y-linked genes. Here we show how these genes were acquired. We found a previously unidentified gene (flagrante delicto Y, FDY) that originated from a recent duplication of the autosomal gene vig2 to the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Four contiguous genes were duplicated along with vig2, but they became pseudogenes through the accumulation of deletions and transposable element insertions, whereas FDY remained functional, acquired testis-specific expression, and now accounts for ∼20% of the vig2-like mRNA in testis. FDY is absent in the closest relatives of D. melanogaster, and DNA sequence divergence indicates that the duplication to the Y chromosome occurred ∼2 million years ago. Thus, FDY provides a snapshot of the early stages of the establishment of a Y-linked gene and demonstrates how the Drosophila Y has been accumulating autosomal genes. PMID:26385968

  20. CYP701A8: A Rice ent-Kaurene Oxidase Paralog Diverted to More Specialized Diterpenoid Metabolism1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiang; Hillwig, Matthew L.; Wu, Yisheng; Peters, Reuben J.

    2012-01-01

    All higher plants contain an ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), as such a cytochrome P450 (CYP) 701 family member is required for gibberellin (GA) phytohormone biosynthesis. While gene expansion and functional diversification of GA-biosynthesis-derived diterpene synthases into more specialized metabolism has been demonstrated, no functionally divergent KO/CYP701 homologs have been previously identified. Rice (Oryza sativa) contains five CYP701A subfamily members in its genome, despite the fact that only one (OsKO2/CYP701A6) is required for GA biosynthesis. Here we demonstrate that one of the other rice CYP701A subfamily members, OsKOL4/CYP701A8, does not catalyze the prototypical conversion of the ent-kaurene C4α-methyl to a carboxylic acid, but instead carries out hydroxylation at the nearby C3α position in a number of related diterpenes. In particular, under conditions where OsKO2 catalyzes the expected conversion of ent-kaurene to ent-kaurenoic acid required for GA biosynthesis, OsKOL4 instead efficiently reacts with ent-sandaracopimaradiene and ent-cassadiene to produce the corresponding C3α-hydroxylated diterpenoids. These compounds are expected intermediates in biosynthesis of the oryzalexin and phytocassane families of rice antifungal phytoalexins, respectively, and can be detected in rice plants under the appropriate conditions. Thus, it appears that OsKOL4 plays a role in the more specialized diterpenoid metabolism of rice, and our results provide evidence for divergence of a KO/CYP701 family member from GA biosynthesis. This further expands the range of enzymes recruited from the ancestral GA primary pathway to the more complex and specialized labdane-related diterpenoid metabolic network found in rice. PMID:22247270

  1. Differentiation of Function among the RsbR Paralogs in the General Stress Response of Bacillus subtilis with Regard to Light Perception

    PubMed Central

    van der Steen, Jeroen B.; Ávila-Pérez, Marcela; Knippert, Doreen; Vreugdenhil, Angie; van Alphen, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The general stress response of Bacillus subtilis can be activated by a wide range of signals, including low intensities of visible light. It is regulated by a dedicated σ factor via a complex signal transduction pathway that makes use of stressosomes: hetero-oligomeric complexes that include one or more of the RsbR proteins (RsbRA, RsbRB, RsbRC, and RsbRD). The response to blue light is mediated by the photoreceptor YtvA. We show here which of the four RsbR proteins are necessary for the activation of the σB response by blue light. Experiments performed with single-, double-, and triple-deletion strains in the rsbR genes show that RsbRB and RsbRA function antagonistically, with the former being a negative regulator and the latter a positive regulator of the YtvA-dependent light activation of the stress response. A strain with RsbRB as the only RsbR protein is unable to respond to light-activation of σB. Furthermore, RsbRC and RsbRD can replace RsbRA's function only in the absence of RsbRB. This differentiation of function is confined to light stress, since strains with RsbRA or RsbRB as the only RsbR protein behave similarly in our experimental conditions in response to physicochemical stresses. Interestingly, RsbRB's absence is sufficient to result in light activation of the general stress response at wild-type expression levels of ytvA, while it was previously reported that YtvA could only activate σB when overproduced, or when cells are supplemented with an additional environmental stress. PMID:22287516

  2. The Generation Challenge Programme comparative plant stress-responsive gene catalogue.

    PubMed

    Wanchana, Samart; Thongjuea, Supat; Ulat, Victor Jun; Anacleto, Mylah; Mauleon, Ramil; Conte, Matthieu; Rouard, Mathieu; Ruiz, Manuel; Krishnamurthy, Nandini; Sjolander, Kimmen; van Hintum, Theo; Bruskiewich, Richard M

    2008-01-01

    The Generation Challenge Programme (GCP; www.generationcp.org) has developed an online resource documenting stress-responsive genes comparatively across plant species. This public resource is a compendium of protein families, phylogenetic trees, multiple sequence alignments (MSA) and associated experimental evidence. The central objective of this resource is to elucidate orthologous and paralogous relationships between plant genes that may be involved in response to environmental stress, mainly abiotic stresses such as water deficit ('drought'). The web-based graphical user interface (GUI) of the resource includes query and visualization tools that allow diverse searches and browsing of the underlying project database. The web interface can be accessed at http://dayhoff.generationcp.org. PMID:17933772

  3. Studying Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Area What are genes? Genes are sections of DNA that contain instructions for making the molecules—many ... material in an organism. This includes genes and DNA elements that control the activity of genes. Does ...

  4. Reptin and Pontin function antagonistically with PcG and TrxG complexes to mediate Hox gene control

    PubMed Central

    Diop, Soda Balla; Bertaux, Karine; Vasanthi, Dasari; Sarkeshik, Ali; Goirand, Benjamin; Aragnol, Denise; Tolwinski, Nicholas S; Cole, Michael D; Pradel, Jacques; Yates, John R; Mishra, Rakesh K; Graba, Yacine; Saurin, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    Pontin (Pont) and Reptin (Rept) are paralogous ATPases that are evolutionarily conserved from yeast to human. They are recruited in multiprotein complexes that function in various aspects of DNA metabolism. They are essential for viability and have antagonistic roles in tissue growth, cell signalling and regulation of the tumour metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, indicating that the balance of Pont and Rept regulates epigenetic programmes critical for development and cancer progression. Here, we describe Pont and Rept as antagonistic mediators of Drosophila Hox gene transcription, functioning with Polycomb group (PcG) and Trithorax group proteins to maintain correct patterns of expression. We show that Rept is a component of the PRC1 PcG complex, whereas Pont purifies with the Brahma complex. Furthermore, the enzymatic functions of Rept and Pont are indispensable for maintaining Hox gene expression states, highlighting the importance of these two antagonistic factors in transcriptional output. PMID:18259215

  5. Recurrent Gene Duplication Diversifies Genome Defense Repertoire in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Levine, Mia T; Vander Wende, Helen M; Hsieh, Emily; Baker, EmilyClare P; Malik, Harmit S

    2016-07-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) comprise large fractions of many eukaryotic genomes and imperil host genome integrity. The host genome combats these challenges by encoding proteins that silence TE activity. Both the introduction of new TEs via horizontal transfer and TE sequence evolution requires constant innovation of host-encoded TE silencing machinery to keep pace with TEs. One form of host innovation is the adaptation of existing, single-copy host genes. Indeed, host suppressors of TE replication often harbor signatures of positive selection. Such signatures are especially evident in genes encoding the piwi-interacting-RNA pathway of gene silencing, for example, the female germline-restricted TE silencer, HP1D/Rhino Host genomes can also innovate via gene duplication and divergence. However, the importance of gene family expansions, contractions, and gene turnover to host genome defense has been largely unexplored. Here, we functionally characterize Oxpecker, a young, tandem duplicate gene of HP1D/rhino We demonstrate that Oxpecker supports female fertility in Drosophila melanogaster and silences several TE families that are incompletely silenced by HP1D/Rhino in the female germline. We further show that, like Oxpecker, at least ten additional, structurally diverse, HP1D/rhino-derived daughter and "granddaughter" genes emerged during a short 15-million year period of Drosophila evolution. These young paralogs are transcribed primarily in germline tissues, where the genetic conflict between host genomes and TEs plays out. Our findings suggest that gene family expansion is an underappreciated yet potent evolutionary mechanism of genome defense diversification. PMID:26979388

  6. The duplication of the Hox gene clusters in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Prohaska, Sonja J; Stadler, Peter F

    2004-06-01

    Higher teleost fishes, including zebrafish and fugu, have duplicated their Hox genes relative to the gene inventory of other gnathostome lineages. The most widely accepted theory contends that the duplicate Hox clusters orginated synchronously during a single genome duplication event in the early history of ray-finned fishes. In this contribution we collect and re-evaluate all publicly available sequence information. In particular, we show that the short Hox gene fragments from published PCR surveys of the killifish Fundulus heteroclitus, the medaka Oryzias latipes and the goldfish Carassius auratus can be used to determine with little ambiguity not only their paralog group but also their membership in a particular cluster.Together with a survey of the genomic sequence data from the pufferfish Tetraodon nigroviridis we show that at least percomorpha, and possibly all eutelosts, share a system of 7 or 8 orthologous Hox gene clusters. There is little doubt about the orthology of the two teleost duplicates of the HoxA and HoxB clusters. A careful analysis of both the coding sequence of Hox genes and of conserved non-coding sequences provides additional support for the "duplication early" hypothesis that the Hox clusters in teleosts are derived from eight ancestral clusters by means of subsequent gene loss; the data remain ambiguous, however, in particular for the HoxC clusters.Assuming the "duplication early" hypothesis we use the new evidence on the Hox gene complements to determine the phylogenetic positions of gene-loss events in the wake of the cluster duplication. Surprisingly, we find that the resolution of redundancy seems to be a slow process that is still ongoing. A few suggestions on which additional sequence data would be most informative for resolving the history of the teleostean Hox genes are discussed. PMID:18202881

  7. Functional conservation and diversification of APETALA1/FRUITFULL genes in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Wang, Ye; Wang, Fuxiang; Guo, Yuyu; Duan, Xueqing; Sun, Jinhao; An, Hailong

    2016-08-01

    The duplicated grass APETALA1/FRUITFULL (AP1/FUL) genes have distinct but overlapping patterns of expression, suggesting their discrete roles in transition to flowering, specification of spikelet meristem identity and specification of floral organ identity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns and functions of four AP1/FUL paralogs (BdVRN1, BdFUL2, BdFUL3 and BdFUL4) in Brachypodium distachyon, a model plant for the temperate cereals and related grasses. Among the four genes tested, only BdVRN1 could remember the prolonged cold treatment. The recently duplicated BdVRN1 and BdFUL2 genes were expressed in a highly consistent manner and ectopic expressions of them caused similar phenotypes such as extremely early flowering and severe morphological alterations of floral organs, indicating their redundant roles in floral transition, inflorescence development and floral organ identity. In comparison, ectopic expressions of BdFUL3 and BdFUL4 only caused a moderate early flowering phenotype, suggesting their divergent function. In yeast two-hybrid assay, both BdVRN1 and BdFUL2 physically interact with SEP proteins but only BdFUL2 is able to form a homodimer. BdVRN1 also interacts weakly with BdFUL2. Our results indicate that, since the separation of AP1/FUL genes in grasses, the process of sub- or neo-functionalization has occurred and paralogs function redundantly and/or separately in flowering competence and inflorescence development. PMID:26856680

  8. Divergent RNA Localisation Patterns of Maternal Genes Regulating Embryonic Patterning in the Butterfly Pararge aegeria

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jean-Michel; Gibbs, Melanie; Breuker, Casper J.

    2015-01-01

    The maternal effect genes responsible for patterning the embryo along the antero-posterior (AP) axis are broadly conserved in insects. The precise function of these maternal effect genes is the result of the localisation of their mRNA in the oocyte. The main developmental mechanisms involved have been elucidated in Drosophila melanogaster, but recent studies have shown that other insect orders often diverge in RNA localisation patterns. A recent study has shown that in the butterfly Pararge aegeria the distinction between blastodermal embryonic (i.e. germ band) and extra-embryonic tissue (i.e. serosa) is already specified in the oocyte during oogenesis in the ovariole, long before blastoderm cellularisation. To examine the extent by which a female butterfly specifies and patterns the AP axis within the region fated to be the germ band, and whether she specifies a germ plasm, we performed in situ hybridisation experiments on oocytes in P. aegeria ovarioles and on early embryos. RNA localisation of the following key maternal effect genes were investigated: caudal (cad), orthodenticle (otd), hunchback (hb) and four nanos (nos) paralogs, as well as TDRD7 a gene containing a key functional domain (OST-HTH/LOTUS) shared with oskar. TDRD7 was mainly confined to the follicle cells, whilst hb was exclusively zygotically transcribed. RNA of some of the nos paralogs, otd and cad revealed complex localisation patterns within the cortical region prefiguring the germ band (i.e. germ cortex). Rather interestingly, otd was localised within and outside the anterior of the germ cortex. Transcripts of nos-O formed a distinct granular ring in the middle of the germ cortex possibly prefiguring the region where germline stem cells form. These butterfly RNA localisation patterns are highly divergent with respect to other insects, highlighting the diverse ways in which different insect orders maternally regulate early embryogenesis of their offspring. PMID:26633019

  9. Molecular Evolution of the TET Gene Family in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Akahori, Hiromichi; Guindon, Stéphane; Yoshizaki, Sumio; Muto, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins, a family of Fe2+- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, are involved in DNA demethylation. They also help regulate various cellular functions. Three TET paralogs have been identified (TET1, TET2, and TET3) in humans. This study focuses on the evolution of mammalian TET genes. Distinct patterns in TET1 and TET2 vs. TET3 were revealed by codon-based tests of positive selection. Results indicate that TET1 and TET2 genes have experienced positive selection more frequently than TET3 gene, and that the majority of codon sites evolved under strong negative selection. These findings imply that the selective pressure on TET3 may have been relaxed in several lineages during the course of evolution. Our analysis of convergent amino acid substitutions also supports the different evolutionary dynamics among TET gene subfamily members. All of the five amino acid sites that are inferred to have evolved under positive selection in the catalytic domain of TET2 are localized at the protein’s outer surface. The adaptive changes of these positively selected amino acid sites could be associated with dynamic interactions between other TET-interacting proteins, and positive selection thus appears to shift the regulatory scheme of TET enzyme function. PMID:26633372

  10. Evolution of the Class IV HD-Zip Gene Family in Streptophytes

    PubMed Central

    Zalewski, Christopher S.; Floyd, Sandra K.; Furumizu, Chihiro; Sakakibara, Keiko; Stevenson, Dennis W.; Bowman, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Class IV homeodomain leucine zipper (C4HDZ) genes are plant-specific transcription factors that, based on phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana, play an important role in epidermal development. In this study, we sampled all major extant lineages and their closest algal relatives for C4HDZ homologs and phylogenetic analyses result in a gene tree that mirrors land plant evolution with evidence for gene duplications in many lineages, but minimal evidence for gene losses. Our analysis suggests an ancestral C4HDZ gene originated in an algal ancestor of land plants and a single ancestral gene was present in the last common ancestor of land plants. Independent gene duplications are evident within several lineages including mosses, lycophytes, euphyllophytes, seed plants, and, most notably, angiosperms. In recently evolved angiosperm paralogs, we find evidence of pseudogenization via mutations in both coding and regulatory sequences. The increasing complexity of the C4HDZ gene family through the diversification of land plants correlates to increasing complexity in epidermal characters. PMID:23894141

  11. Functional Analysis of the Arabidopsis TETRASPANIN Gene Family in Plant Growth and Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Muto, Antonella; Van de Velde, Jan; Neyt, Pia; Himanen, Kristiina; Vandepoele, Klaas; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    TETRASPANIN (TET) genes encode conserved integral membrane proteins that are known in animals to function in cellular communication during gamete fusion, immunity reaction, and pathogen recognition. In plants, functional information is limited to one of the 17 members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) TET gene family and to expression data in reproductive stages. Here, the promoter activity of all 17 Arabidopsis TET genes was investigated by pAtTET::NUCLEAR LOCALIZATION SIGNAL-GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN/β-GLUCURONIDASE reporter lines throughout the life cycle, which predicted functional divergence in the paralogous genes per clade. However, partial overlap was observed for many TET genes across the clades, correlating with few phenotypes in single mutants and, therefore, requiring double mutant combinations for functional investigation. Mutational analysis showed a role for TET13 in primary root growth and lateral root development and redundant roles for TET5 and TET6 in leaf and root growth through negative regulation of cell proliferation. Strikingly, a number of TET genes were expressed in embryonic and seedling progenitor cells and remained expressed until the differentiation state in the mature plant, suggesting a dynamic function over developmental stages. The cis-regulatory elements together with transcription factor-binding data provided molecular insight into the sites, conditions, and perturbations that affect TET gene expression and positioned the TET genes in different molecular pathways; the data represent a hypothesis-generating resource for further functional analyses. PMID:26417009

  12. Activation of Hox genes during caudal regeneration of the polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Kathrin; Dorresteijn, Adriaan W C; Fröbius, Andreas C

    2012-05-01

    The capability of regenerating posterior segments and pygidial structures is ancestral for annelids and has been lost only a few times within this phylum. As one of the three major segmented taxa, annelids enable us to monitor reconstruction of lost tissues and organs. During regeneration, regional identities have to be imprinted onto the newly formed segments. In this study, we show spatial and temporal localization of expression of nine Hox genes during caudal regeneration of the polychaete annelid Platynereis dumerilii. Hox genes are homeodomain genes encoding transcriptional regulators of axial patterning in bilaterian animals during development. We demonstrate that five Platynereis Hox genes belonging to paralog groups (PG) 1, 4, 5, 6, and 9-14 are expressed in domains of the regenerating nervous system consistent with providing positional information along the anteroposterior axis of the regenerate. We report that expression in regenerating neuromeres is limited to varying subsets of perikarya, called gangliosomes. Four of nine genes analyzed do not appear to be involved in axial patterning. Two genes, Pdu-Hox2 and Pdu-Hox3, are predominantly expressed in the growth zone region. For some Hox genes expression in newly formed coelomic epithelia can be observed. Platynereis Hox genes do not exhibit temporal or spatial colinearity. Although there are some similarities to previously reported expression patterns during larval and postlarval development in Nereididae (Kulakova et al. 2007), expression patterns observed during caudal regeneration also show unique patterns. PMID:22569931

  13. Functional Analysis of the Arabidopsis TETRASPANIN Gene Family in Plant Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Muto, Antonella; Van de Velde, Jan; Neyt, Pia; Himanen, Kristiina; Vandepoele, Klaas; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2015-11-01

    TETRASPANIN (TET) genes encode conserved integral membrane proteins that are known in animals to function in cellular communication during gamete fusion, immunity reaction, and pathogen recognition. In plants, functional information is limited to one of the 17 members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) TET gene family and to expression data in reproductive stages. Here, the promoter activity of all 17 Arabidopsis TET genes was investigated by pAtTET::NUCLEAR LOCALIZATION SIGNAL-GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN/β-GLUCURONIDASE reporter lines throughout the life cycle, which predicted functional divergence in the paralogous genes per clade. However, partial overlap was observed for many TET genes across the clades, correlating with few phenotypes in single mutants and, therefore, requiring double mutant combinations for functional investigation. Mutational analysis showed a role for TET13 in primary root growth and lateral root development and redundant roles for TET5 and TET6 in leaf and root growth through negative regulation of cell proliferation. Strikingly, a number of TET genes were expressed in embryonic and seedling progenitor cells and remained expressed until the differentiation state in the mature plant, suggesting a dynamic function over developmental stages. The cis-regulatory elements together with transcription factor-binding data provided molecular insight into the sites, conditions, and perturbations that affect TET gene expression and positioned the TET genes in different molecular pathways; the data represent a hypothesis-generating resource for further functional analyses. PMID:26417009

  14. Evolution of the Structure and Chromosomal Distribution of Histidine Biosynthetic Genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fani, Renato; Mori, Elena; Tamburini, Elena; Lazcano, Antonio

    1998-10-01

    A database of more than 100 histidine biosynthetic genes from different organisms belonging to the three primary domains has been analyzed, including those found in the now completely sequenced genomes of Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Synechocystis sp., Methanococcus jannaschii, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ubiquity of his genes suggests that it is a highly conserved pathway that was probably already present in the last common ancestor of all extant life. The chromosomal distribution of the his genes shows that the enterobacterial histidine operon structure is not the only possible organization, and that there is a diversity of gene arrays for the his pathway. Analysis of the available sequences shows that gene fusions (like those involved in the origin of the Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium hisIE and hisB gene structures) are not universal. In contrast, the elongation event that led to the extant hisA gene from two homologous ancestral modules, as well as the subsequent paralogous duplication that originated hisF, appear to be irreversible and are conserved in all known organisms. The available evidence supports the hypothesis that histidine biosynthesis was assembled by a gene recruitment process.

  15. Disruption of Individual Members of Arabidopsis Syntaxin Gene Families Indicates Each Has Essential Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sanderfoot, Anton A.; Pilgrim, Marsha; Adam, Luc; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2001-01-01

    Syntaxins are a large group of proteins found in all eukaryotes involved in the fusion of transport vesicles to target membranes. Twenty-four syntaxins grouped into 10 gene families are found in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, each group containing one to five paralogous members. The Arabidopsis SYP2 and SYP4 gene families contain three members each that share 60 to 80% protein sequence identity. Gene disruptions of the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) orthologs of the SYP2 and SYP4 gene families (Pep12p and Tlg2p, respectively) indicate that these syntaxins are not essential for growth in yeast. However, we have isolated and characterized gene disruptions in two genes from each family, finding that disruption of individual syntaxins from these families is lethal in the male gametophyte of Arabidopsis. Complementation of the syp21-1 gene disruption with its cognate transgene indicated that the lethality is linked to the loss of the single syntaxin gene. Thus, it is clear that each syntaxin in the SYP2 and SYP4 families serves an essential nonredundant function. PMID:11251103

  16. Attacin gene sequence variations in different ecoraces of tasar silkworm Antheraea mylitta

    PubMed Central

    Sudha, Rati; Murthy, Geetha N; Awasthi, Arvind K; Ponnuvel, Kangayam M

    2015-01-01

    Attacin gene exists as paralogous conversion and is being used for identification of strain variations in insects based on the sequence variation. Hence, a study was undertaken to analyze the sequence variation of the attacin gene isoforms in the tasar silkworm Anthereae mylitta that exists in the form of different ecoraces depending upon the environment, food plant and location. Comparison of the previously reported attacin sequences with the DNA sequences of attacin A and B genes revealed six amino acid substitutions among the sequences of the ecoraces which however did not affect the functional domain of Attacin. The generated dendrogram clearly indicated unique branches for each ecorace with two separate gene clusters for attacin A and B. The Sarihan ecorace formed a separate sub-group under both the gene clusters. The present study also revealed the presence of Attacin_N Superfamily domain exclusively in Exon I separated from the Attacin_C Superfamily domain that was present in Exon II and part of Exon III, a prominent character of attacin gene. The phylogenetic reconstruction analysis of attacin gene in A.mylitta supported the common evolutionary origin of attacin genes belonging to the Lepidoteran and Dipteran families that formed two separate clusters. PMID:26664033

  17. Rapidly evolving R genes in diverse grass species confer resistance to rice blast disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sihai; Li, Jing; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Qijun; Huang, Ju; Chen, Jian-Qun; Hartl, Daniel L.; Tian, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    We show that the genomes of maize, sorghum, and brachypodium contain genes that, when transformed into rice, confer resistance to rice blast disease. The genes are resistance genes (R genes) that encode proteins with nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains (NBS–LRR proteins). By using criteria associated with rapid molecular evolution, we identified three rapidly evolving R-gene families in these species as well as in rice, and transformed a randomly chosen subset of these genes into rice strains known to be sensitive to rice blast disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The transformed strains were then tested for sensitivity or resistance to 12 diverse strains of M. oryzae. A total of 15 functional blast R genes were identified among 60 NBS–LRR genes cloned from maize, sorghum, and brachypodium; and 13 blast R genes were obtained from 20 NBS–LRR paralogs in rice. These results show that abundant blast R genes occur not only within species but also among species, and that the R genes in the same rapidly evolving gene family can exhibit an effector response that confers resistance to rapidly evolving fungal pathogens. Neither conventional evolutionary conservation nor conventional evolutionary convergence supplies a satisfactory explanation of our findings. We suggest a unique mechanism termed “constrained divergence,” in which R genes and pathogen effectors can follow only limited evolutionary pathways to increase fitness. Our results open avenues for R-gene identification that will help to elucidate R-gene vs. effector mechanisms and may yield new sources of durable pathogen resistance. PMID:24145399

  18. Preservation of duplicate genes by complementary, degenerative mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Force, A; Lynch, M; Pickett, F B; Amores, A; Yan, Y L; Postlethwait, J

    1999-01-01

    The origin of organismal complexity is generally thought to be tightly coupled to the evolution of new gene functions arising subsequent to gene duplication. Under the classical model for the evolution of duplicate genes, one member of the duplicated pair usually degenerates within a few million years by accumulating deleterious mutations, while the other duplicate retains the original function. This model further predicts that on rare occasions, one duplicate may acquire a new adaptive function, resulting in the preservation of both members of the pair, one with the new function and the other retaining the old. However, empirical data suggest that a much greater proportion of gene duplicates is preserved than predicted by the classical model. Here we present a new conceptual framework for understanding the evolution of duplicate genes that may help explain this conundrum. Focusing on the regulatory complexity of eukaryotic genes, we show how complementary degenerative mutations in different regulatory elements of duplicated genes can facilitate the preservation of both duplicates, thereby increasing long-term opportunities for the evolution of new gene functions. The duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC) model predicts that (1) degenerative mutations in regulatory elements can increase rather than reduce the probability of duplicate gene preservation and (2) the usual mechanism of duplicate gene preservation is the partitioning of ancestral functions rather than the evolution of new functions. We present several examples (including analysis of a new engrailed gene in zebrafish) that appear to be consistent with the DDC model, and we suggest several analytical and experimental approaches for determining whether the complementary loss of gene subfunctions or the acquisition of novel functions are likely to be the primary mechanisms for the preservation of gene duplicates. For a newly duplicated paralog, survival depends on the outcome of the race between

  19. Genome-wide identification and comparative expression analysis reveal a rapid expansion and functional divergence of duplicated genes in the WRKY gene family of cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiu-Yang; Xia, En-Hua; Liu, Fei-Hu; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2015-02-15

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs), one of the ten largest TF families in higher plants, play important roles in regulating plant development and resistance. To date, little is known about the WRKY TF family in Brassica oleracea. Recently, the completed genome sequence of cabbage (B. oleracea var. capitata) allows us to systematically analyze WRKY genes in this species. A total of 148 WRKY genes were characterized and classified into seven subgroups that belong to three major groups. Phylogenetic and synteny analyses revealed that the repertoire of cabbage WRKY genes was derived from a common ancestor shared with Arabidopsis thaliana. The B. oleracea WRKY genes were found to be preferentially retained after the whole-genome triplication (WGT) event in its recent ancestor, suggesting that the WGT event had largely contributed to a rapid expansion of the WRKY gene family in B. oleracea. The analysis of RNA-Seq data from various tissues (i.e., roots, stems, leaves, buds, flowers and siliques) revealed that most of the identified WRKY genes were positively expressed in cabbage, and a large portion of them exhibited patterns of differential and tissue-specific expression, demonstrating that these gene members might play essential roles in plant developmental processes. Comparative analysis of the expression level among duplicated genes showed that gene expression divergence was evidently presented among cabbage WRKY paralogs, indicating functional divergence of these duplicated WRKY genes. PMID:25481634

  20. Human sterile alpha motif domain 9, a novel gene identified as down-regulated in aggressive fibromatosis, is absent in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Catherine F; MacDonald, Jeffrey R; Wei, Robert Y; Ray, Jocelyn; Lau, Kimberly; Kandel, Christopher; Koffman, Rachel; Bell, Sherilyn; Scherer, Stephen W; Alman, Benjamin A

    2007-01-01

    Background Neoplasia can be driven by mutations resulting in dysregulation of transcription. In the mesenchymal neoplasm, aggressive fibromatosis, subtractive hybridization identified sterile alpha motif domain 9 (SAMD9) as a substantially down regulated gene in neoplasia. SAMD9 was recently found to be mutated in normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis. In this study, we studied the gene structure and function of SAMD9, and its paralogous gene, SAMD9L, and examined these in a variety of species. Results SAMD9 is located on human chromosome 7q21.2 with a paralogous gene sterile alpha motif domain 9 like (SAMD9L) in the head-to-tail orientation. Although both genes are present in a variety of species, the orthologue for SAMD9 is lost in the mouse lineage due to a unique genomic rearrangement. Both SAMD9 and SAMD9L are ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. SAMD9 is expressed at a lower level in a variety of neoplasms associated with β-catenin stabilization, such as aggressive fibromatosis, breast, and colon cancers. SAMD9 and SAMD9L contain an amino-terminal SAM domain, but the remainder of the predicted protein structure does not exhibit substantial homology to other known protein motifs. The putative protein product of SAMD9 localizes to the cytoplasm. In vitro data shows that SAMD9 negatively regulates cell proliferation. Over expression of SAMD9 in the colon cancer cell line, SW480, reduces the volume of tumors formed when transplanted into immune-deficient mice. Conclusion SAMD9 and SAMD9L are a novel family of genes, which play a role regulating cell proliferation and suppressing the neoplastic phenotype. This is the first report as far as we know about a human gene that exists in rat, but is lost in mouse, due to a mouse specific rearrangement, resulting in the loss of the SAMD9 gene. PMID:17407603

  1. Expression of two CYP1A genes in {beta}NF and TCDD-treated rainbow trout primary hepatocyte culture

    SciTech Connect

    Rabergh, C.M.; Lipsky, M.M.; Vroliijk, N.H.; Chen, T.T.

    1995-12-31

    In mammalian systems, it is well known that two CYP1A genes are expressed in response to environmental toxicants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and TCDD (2,3,7,3-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin). The presence of two CYP1A genes in fish has been previously reported, though expression of these two genes has not been characterized. In this study, the authors examined the expression of these two genes in primary culture of rainbow trout hepatocytes treated with {beta}NF and TCDD. Hepatocytes were isolated by a modified two-step collagenase perfusion of the liver and cultured on polylysine coated dishes. The optimum time and concentration of induction was determined for both chemicals. The expression of the genes was also studied in long-term cultures up to 20 days. RNA was isolated by the method of Chomzynski and Sacchi and the RNase protection assay was used to detect the expression of the CYP1A genes by using antisense riboprobes specific for the MRNA of each gene. A differential concentration- and time-dependent expression of the two genes was observed in cells treated with {beta}NF and TCDD. Whether these two genes are paralogous, i.e., produced by gene duplication within the species, or whether one of them may in fact be an orthologue to a mammalian counterpart within the CYP1A family, remains to be determined.

  2. Structural, Functional, and Evolutionary Analysis of the Unusually Large Stilbene Synthase Gene Family in Grapevine1[W

    PubMed Central

    Parage, Claire; Tavares, Raquel; Réty, Stéphane; Baltenweck-Guyot, Raymonde; Poutaraud, Anne; Renault, Lauriane; Heintz, Dimitri; Lugan, Raphaël; Marais, Gabriel A.B.; Aubourg, Sébastien; Hugueney, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Stilbenes are a small family of phenylpropanoids produced in a number of unrelated plant species, including grapevine (Vitis vinifera). In addition to their participation in defense mechanisms in plants, stilbenes, such as resveratrol, display important pharmacological properties and are postulated to be involved in the health benefits associated with a moderate consumption of red wine. Stilbene synthases (STSs), which catalyze the biosynthesis of the stilbene backbone, seem to have evolved from chalcone synthases (CHSs) several times independently in stilbene-producing plants. STS genes usually form small families of two to five closely related paralogs. By contrast, the sequence of grapevine reference genome (cv PN40024) has revealed an unusually large STS gene family. Here, we combine molecular evolution and structural and functional analyses to investigate further the high number of STS genes in grapevine. Our reannotation of the STS and CHS gene families yielded 48 STS genes, including at least 32 potentially functional ones. Functional characterization of nine genes representing most of the STS gene family diversity clearly indicated that these genes do encode for proteins with STS activity. Evolutionary analysis of the STS gene family revealed that both STS and CHS evolution are dominated by purifying selection, with no evidence for strong selection for new functions among STS genes. However, we found a few sites under different selection pressures in CHS and STS sequences, whose potential functional consequences are discussed using a structural model of a typical STS from grapevine that we developed. PMID:22961129

  3. A Brassica Exon Array for Whole-Transcript Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Love, Christopher G.; Graham, Neil S.; Ó Lochlainn, Seosamh; Bowen, Helen C.; May, Sean T.; White, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays are used widely to study transcriptional changes in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. GeneChip® arrays comprise multiple 25-mer oligonucleotide probes per gene and retain certain advantages over direct sequencing. For plants, there are several public GeneChip® arrays whose probes are localised primarily in 3′ exons. Plant whole-transcript (WT) GeneChip® arrays are not yet publicly available, although WT resolution is needed to study complex crop genomes such as Brassica, which are typified by segmental duplications containing paralogous genes and/or allopolyploidy. Available sequence data were sampled from the Brassica A and C genomes, and 142,997 gene models identified. The assembled gene models were then used to establish a comprehensive public WT exon array for transcriptomics studies. The Affymetrix GeneChip® Brassica Exon 1.0 ST Array is a 5 µM feature size array, containing 2.4 million 25-base oligonucleotide probes representing 135,201 gene models, with 15 probes per gene distributed among exons. Discrimination of the gene models was based on an E-value cut-off of 1E−5, with ≤98% sequence identity. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array was validated by quantifying transcriptome differences between leaf and root tissue from a reference Brassica rapa line (R-o-18), and categorisation by Gene Ontologies (GO) based on gene orthology with Arabidopsis thaliana. Technical validation involved comparison of the exon array with a 60-mer array platform using the same starting RNA samples. The 135 k Brassica Exon Array is a robust platform. All data relating to the array design and probe identities are available in the public domain and are curated within the BrassEnsembl genome viewer at http://www.brassica.info/BrassEnsembl/index.html. PMID:20862292

  4. Duplication, divergence and persistence in the Phytochrome photoreceptor gene family of cottons (Gossypium spp.)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Phytochromes are a family of red/far-red photoreceptors that regulate a number of important developmental traits in cotton (Gossypium spp.), including plant architecture, fiber development, and photoperiodic flowering. Little is known about the composition and evolution of the phytochrome gene family in diploid (G. herbaceum, G. raimondii) or allotetraploid (G. hirsutum, G. barbadense) cotton species. The objective of this study was to obtain a preliminary inventory and molecular-evolutionary characterization of the phytochrome gene family in cotton. Results We used comparative sequence resources to design low-degeneracy PCR primers that amplify genomic sequence tags (GSTs) for members of the PHYA, PHYB/D, PHYC and PHYE gene sub-families from A- and D-genome diploid and AD-genome allotetraploid Gossypium species. We identified two paralogous PHYA genes (designated PHYA1 and PHYA2) in diploid cottons, the result of a Malvaceae-specific PHYA gene duplication that occurred approximately 14 million years ago (MYA), before the divergence of the A- and D-genome ancestors. We identified a single gene copy of PHYB, PHYC, and PHYE in diploid cottons. The allotetraploid genomes have largely retained the complete gene complements inherited from both of the diploid genome ancestors, with at least four PHYA genes and two genes encoding PHYB, PHYC and PHYE in the AD-genomes. We did not identify a PHYD gene in any cotton genomes examined. Conclusions Detailed sequence analysis suggests that phytochrome genes retained after duplication by segmental duplication and allopolyploidy appear to be evolving independently under a birth-and-death-process with strong purifying selection. Our study provides a preliminary phytochrome gene inventory that is necessary and sufficient for further characterization of the biological functions of each of the cotton phytochrome genes, and for the development of 'candidate gene' markers that are potentially useful for cotton improvement via

  5. A Comparative Epigenomic Analysis of Polyploidy-Derived Genes in Soybean and Common Bean1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Do; El Baidouri, Moaine; Abernathy, Brian; Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Chavarro, Carolina; Gonzales, Michael; Libault, Marc; Grimwood, Jane; Jackson, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) share a paleopolyploidy (whole-genome duplication [WGD]) event, approximately 56.5 million years ago, followed by a genus Glycine-specific polyploidy, approximately 10 million years ago. Cytosine methylation is an epigenetic mark that plays an important role in the regulation of genes and transposable elements (TEs); however, the role of DNA methylation in the fate/evolution of genes following polyploidy and speciation has not been fully explored. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing was used to produce nucleotide resolution methylomes for soybean and common bean. We found that, in soybean, CG body-methylated genes were abundant in WGD genes, which were, on average, more highly expressed than single-copy genes and had slower evolutionary rates than unmethylated genes, suggesting that WGD genes evolve more slowly than single-copy genes. CG body-methylated genes were also enriched in shared single-copy genes (single copy in both species) that may be responsible for the broad and high expression patterns of this class of genes. In addition, diverged methylation patterns in non-CG contexts between paralogs were due mostly to TEs in or near genes, suggesting a role for TEs and non-CG methylation in regulating gene expression post polyploidy. Reference methylomes for both soybean and common bean were constructed, providing resources for investigating epigenetic variation in legume crops. Also, the analysis of methylation patterns of duplicated and single-copy genes has provided insights into the functional consequences of polyploidy and epigenetic regulation in plant genomes. PMID:26149573

  6. Early vertebrate chromosome duplications and the evolution of the neuropeptide Y receptor gene regions

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background One of the many gene families that expanded in early vertebrate evolution is the neuropeptide (NPY) receptor family of G-protein coupled receptors. Earlier work by our lab suggested that several of the NPY receptor genes found in extant vertebrates resulted from two genome duplications before the origin of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and one additional genome duplication in the actinopterygian lineage, based on their location on chromosomes sharing several gene families. In this study we have investigated, in five vertebrate genomes, 45 gene families with members close to the NPY receptor genes in the compact genomes of the teleost fishes Tetraodon nigroviridis and Takifugu rubripes. These correspond to Homo sapiens chromosomes 4, 5, 8 and 10. Results Chromosome regions with conserved synteny were identified and confirmed by phylogenetic analyses in H. sapiens, M. musculus, D. rerio, T. rubripes and T. nigroviridis. 26 gene families, including the NPY receptor genes, (plus 3 described recently by other labs) showed a tree topology consistent with duplications in early vertebrate evolution and in the actinopterygian lineage, thereby supporting expansion through block duplications. Eight gene families had complications that precluded analysis (such as short sequence length or variable number of repeated domains) and another eight families did not support block duplications (because the paralogs in these families seem to have originated in another time window than the proposed genome duplication events). RT-PCR carried out with several tissues in T. rubripes revealed that all five NPY receptors were expressed in the brain and subtypes Y2, Y4 and Y8 were also expressed in peripheral organs. Conclusion We conclude that the phylogenetic analyses and chromosomal locations of these gene families support duplications of large blocks of genes or even entire chromosomes. Thus, these results are consistent with two early vertebrate tetraploidizations forming a

  7. Insights into the dN/dS ratio heterogeneity between brain specific genes and widely expressed genes in species of different complexity.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Kakali; Chakraborty, Sandip; Podder, Soumita; Ghosh, Tapash Chandra

    2016-07-01

    In mammals, it has long been suggested that brain-specific genes (BSGs) and widely expressed genes (WEGs) have seemingly lower dN/dS ratio than any other gene sets. However, to what extent these genes differ in their dN/dS ratio has still remained controversial. Here, we have revealed lower dN/dS ratio of BSGs than WEGs in human-mouse, human-orangutan, human-chimpanzee and mouse-rat orthologous pair. The significance level of dN/dS ratio difference indicates a trend of decreasing difference as complexity of compared pairs increases. Further studies with the human-mouse pair revealed that, removal of the duplicated genes from both the dataset has nullified this difference which dictates a vital role of duplicated genes in governing the selection pressure. Conclusively, higher paralog number, expression level, and longer regulatory region length of BSGs allow fewer nucleotide substitutions within them. Our results show for the first time to our knowledge lower dN/dS ratio of BSGs than WEGs. PMID:27126306

  8. The human SUMF1 gene, required for posttranslational sulfatase modification, defines a new gene family which is conserved from pro- to eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Landgrebe, Jobst; Dierks, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; von Figura, Kurt

    2003-10-16

    Recently, the human C(alpha)-formylglycine (FGly)-generating enzyme (FGE), whose deficiency causes the autosomal-recessively transmitted lysosomal storage disease multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), has been identified. In sulfatases, FGE posttranslationally converts a cysteine residue to FGly, which is part of the catalytic site and is essential for sulfatase activity. FGE is encoded by the sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) gene, which defines a new gene family comprising orthologs from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The genomes of E. coli, S. cerevisiae and C. elegans lack SUMF1, indicating a phylogenetic gap and the existence of an alternative FGly-generating system. The genomes of vertebrates including mouse, man and pufferfish contain a sulfatase modifying factor 2 (SUMF2) gene encoding an FGE paralog of unknown function. SUMF2 evolved from a single exon SUMF1 gene as found in diptera prior to divergent intron acquisition. In several prokaryotic genomes, the SUMF1 gene is cotranscribed with genes encoding sulfatases which require FGly modification. The FGE protein contains a single domain that is made up of three highly conserved subdomains spaced by nonconserved sequences of variable lengths. The similarity among the eukaryotic FGE orthologs varies between 72% and 100% for the three subdomains and is highest for the C-terminal subdomain, which is a hotspot for mutations in MSD patients. PMID:14563551

  9. Salmonid genomes have a remarkably expanded akirin family, coexpressed with genes from conserved pathways governing skeletal muscle growth and catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kristjánsson, Bjarni K.; Johnston, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    Metazoan akirin genes regulate innate immunity, myogenesis, and carcinogenesis. Invertebrates typically have one family member, while most tetrapod and teleost vertebrates have one to three. We demonstrate an expanded repertoire of eight family members in genomes of four salmonid fishes, owing to paralog preservation after three tetraploidization events. Retention of paralogs secondarily lost in other teleosts may be related to functional diversification and posttranslational regulation. We hypothesized that salmonid akirins would be transcriptionally regulated in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during activation of conserved pathways governing catabolism and growth. The in vivo nutritional state of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus L.) was experimentally manipulated, and transcript levels for akirin family members and 26 other genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), allowing the establishment of a similarity network of expression profiles. In fasted muscle, a class of akirins was upregulated, with one family member showing high coexpression with catabolic genes coding the NF-κB p65 subunit, E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and IGF-I receptors. Another class of akirin was upregulated with subsequent feeding, coexpressed with 14-3-3 protein genes. There was no similarity between expression profiles of akirins with IGF hormones or binding protein genes. The level of phylogenetic relatedness of akirin family members was not a strong predictor of transcriptional responses to nutritional state, or differences in transcript abundance levels, indicating a complex pattern of regulatory evolution. The salmonid akirins epitomize the complexity linking the genome to physiological phenotypes of vertebrates with a history of tetraploidization. PMID:20388840

  10. Salmonid genomes have a remarkably expanded akirin family, coexpressed with genes from conserved pathways governing skeletal muscle growth and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Macqueen, Daniel J; Kristjánsson, Bjarni K; Johnston, Ian A

    2010-06-01

    Metazoan akirin genes regulate innate immunity, myogenesis, and carcinogenesis. Invertebrates typically have one family member, while most tetrapod and teleost vertebrates have one to three. We demonstrate an expanded repertoire of eight family members in genomes of four salmonid fishes, owing to paralog preservation after three tetraploidization events. Retention of paralogs secondarily lost in other teleosts may be related to functional diversification and posttranslational regulation. We hypothesized that salmonid akirins would be transcriptionally regulated in fast-twitch skeletal muscle during activation of conserved pathways governing catabolism and growth. The in vivo nutritional state of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus L.) was experimentally manipulated, and transcript levels for akirin family members and 26 other genes were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), allowing the establishment of a similarity network of expression profiles. In fasted muscle, a class of akirins was upregulated, with one family member showing high coexpression with catabolic genes coding the NF-kappaB p65 subunit, E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, E3 ubiquitin ligases, and IGF-I receptors. Another class of akirin was upregulated with subsequent feeding, coexpressed with 14-3-3 protein genes. There was no similarity between expression profiles of akirins with IGF hormones or binding protein genes. The level of phylogenetic relatedness of akirin family members was not a strong predictor of transcriptional responses to nutritional state, or differences in transcript abundance levels, indicating a complex pattern of regulatory evolution. The salmonid akirins epitomize the complexity linking the genome to physiological phenotypes of vertebrates with a history of tetraploidization. PMID:20388840

  11. The complete inventory of receptors encoded by the rat natural killer cell gene complex

    PubMed Central

    Flornes, Line M.; Nylenna, Øyvind; Saether, Per C.; Daws, Michael R.; Dissen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    The natural killer cell gene complex (NKC) encodes receptors belonging to the C-type lectin superfamily expressed primarily by NK cells and other leukocytes. In the rat, the chromosomal region that starts with the Nkrp1a locus and ends with the Ly49i8 locus is predicted to contain 67 group V C-type lectin superfamily genes, making it one of the largest congregation of paralogous genes in vertebrates. Based on physical proximity and phylogenetic relationships between these genes, the rat NKC can be divided into four major parts. We have previously reported the cDNA cloning of the majority of the genes belonging to the centromeric Nkrp1/Clr cluster and the two telomeric groups, the Klre1–Klri2 and the Ly49 clusters. Here, we close the gap between the Nkrp1/Clr and the Klre1–Klri2 clusters by presenting the cDNA cloning and transcription patterns of eight genes spanning from Cd69 to Dectin1, including the novel Clec2m gene. The definition, organization, and evolution of the rat NKC are discussed. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00251-010-0455-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20544345

  12. Evolution and significance of the Lon gene family in Arabidopsis organelle biogenesis and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rigas, Stamatis; Daras, Gerasimos; Tsitsekian, Dikran; Alatzas, Anastasios; Hatzopoulos, Polydefkis

    2014-01-01

    Lon is the first identified ATP-dependent protease highly conserved across all kingdoms. Model plant species Arabidopsis thaliana has a small Lon gene family of four members. Although these genes share common structural features, they have distinct properties in terms of gene expression profile, subcellular targeting and substrate recognition motifs. This supports the notion that their functions under different environmental conditions are not necessarily redundant. This article intends to unravel the biological role of Lon proteases in energy metabolism and plant growth through an evolutionary perspective. Given that plants are sessile organisms exposed to diverse environmental conditions and plant organelles are semi-autonomous, it is tempting to suggest that Lon genes in Arabidopsis are paralogs. Adaptive evolution through repetitive gene duplication events of a single archaic gene led to Lon genes with complementing sets of subfunctions providing to the organism rapid adaptability for canonical development under different environmental conditions. Lon1 function is adequately characterized being involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, modulating carbon metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation and energy supply, all prerequisites for seed germination and seedling establishment. Lon is not a stand-alone proteolytic machine in plant organelles. Lon in association with other nuclear-encoded ATP-dependent proteases builds up an elegant nevertheless, tight interconnected circuit. This circuitry channels properly and accurately, proteostasis and protein quality control among the distinct subcellular compartments namely mitochondria, chloroplasts, and peroxisomes. PMID:24782883

  13. Evolution of the APETALA2 Gene Lineage in Seed Plants.

    PubMed

    Zumajo-Cardona, Cecilia; Pabón-Mora, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Gene duplication is a fundamental source of functional evolutionary change and has been associated with organismal diversification and the acquisition of novel features. The APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-BINDING FACTOR (AP2/ERF) genes are exclusive to vascular plants and have been classified into the AP2-like and ERF-like clades. The AP2-like clade includes the AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) and the euAPETALA2 (euAP2) genes, both regulated by miR172 Arabidopsis has two paralogs in the euAP2 clade, namely APETALA2 (AP2) and TARGET OF EAT3 (TOE3) that control flowering time, meristem determinacy, sepal and petal identity and fruit development. euAP2 genes are likely functionally divergent outside Brassicaceae, as they control fruit development in tomato, and regulate inflorescence meristematic activity in maize. We studied the evolution and expression patterns of euAP2/TOE3 genes to assess large scale and local duplications and evaluate protein motifs likely related with functional changes across seed plants. We sampled euAP2/TOE3 genes from vascular plants and have found three major duplications and a few taxon-specific duplications. Here, we report conserved and new motifs across euAP2/TOE3 proteins and conclude that proteins predating the Brassicaceae duplication are more similar to AP2 than TOE3. Expression data show a shift from restricted expression in leaves, carpels, and fruits in non-core eudicots and asterids to a broader expression of euAP2 genes in leaves, all floral organs and fruits in rosids. Altogether, our data show a functional trend where the canonical A-function (sepal and petal identity) is exclusive to Brassicaceae and it is likely not maintained outside of rosids. PMID:27030733

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Glutathione S-Transferase Gene Family in Capsella rubella: Identification, Expression, and Biochemical Functions

    PubMed Central

    He, Gang; Guan, Chao-Nan; Chen, Qiang-Xin; Gou, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Qing-Yin; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Extensive subfunctionalization might explain why so many genes have been maintained after gene duplication, which provides the engine for gene family expansion. However, it is still a particular challenge to trace the evolutionary dynamics and features of functional divergences in a supergene family over the course of evolution. In this study, we identified 49 Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes from the Capsella rubella, a close relative of Arabidopsis thaliana and a member of the mustard family. Capsella GSTs can be categorized into eight classes, with tau and phi GSTs being the most numerous. The expansion of the two classes mainly occurs through tandem gene duplication, which results in tandem-arrayed gene clusters on chromosomes. By integrating phylogenetic analysis, expression patterns, and biochemical functions of Capsella and Arabidopsis GSTs, functional divergence, both in gene expression and enzymatic properties, were clearly observed in paralogous gene pairs in Capsella (even the most recent duplicates), and orthologous GSTs in Arabidopsis/Capsella. This study provides functional evidence for the expansion and organization of a large gene family in closely related species.

  15. The effect of environmental conditions on expression of Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron C10 protease genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are members of the normal human intestinal microbiota. However, both organisms are capable of causing opportunistic infections, during which the environmental conditions to which the bacteria are exposed change dramatically. To further explore their potential for contributing to infection, we have characterized the expression in B. thetaiotaomicron of four homologues of the gene encoding the C10 cysteine protease SpeB, a potent extracellular virulence factor produced by Streptococcus pyogenes. Results We identified a paralogous set of genes (btp genes) in the B. thetaiotaomicron genome, that were related to C10 protease genes we recently identified in B. fragilis. Similar to C10 proteases found in B. fragilis, three of the B. thetaiotaomicron homologues were transcriptionally coupled to genes encoding small proteins that are similar in structural architecture to Staphostatins, protease inhibitors associated with Staphopains in Staphylococcus aureus. The expression of genes for these C10 proteases in both B. fragilis and B. thetaiotaomicron was found to be regulated by environmental stimuli, in particular by exposure to oxygen, which may be important for their contribution to the development of opportunistic infections. Conclusions Genes encoding C10 proteases are increasingly identified in operons which also contain genes encoding proteins homologous to protease inhibitors. The Bacteroides C10 protease gene expression levels are responsive to different environmental stimuli suggesting they may have distinct roles in the bacterial-host interaction. PMID:22943521

  16. Evolution of the tbx6/16 subfamily genes in vertebrates: insights from zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Daegwon; You, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Cheol-Hee

    2012-12-01

    In any comparative studies striving to understand the similarities and differences of the living organisms at the molecular genetic level, the crucial first step is to establish the homology (orthology and paralogy) of genes between different organisms. Determination of the homology of genes becomes complicated when the genes have undergone a rapid divergence in sequence or when the involved genes are members of a gene family that has experienced a differential gain or loss of its constituents in different taxonomic groups. Organisms with duplicated genomes such as teleost fishes might have been especially prone to these problems because the functional redundancies provided by the duplicate copies of genes would have allowed a rapid divergence or loss of genes during evolution. In this study, we will demonstrate that much of the ambiguities in the determination of the homology between fish and tetrapod genes resulting from the problems like these can be eliminated by complementing the sequence-based phylogenies with nonsequence information, such as the exon-intron structure of a gene or the composition of a gene's genomic neighbors. We will use the Tbx6/16 subfamily genes of zebrafish (tbx6, tbx16, tbx24, and mga genes), which have been well known for the ambiguity of their evolutionary relationships to the Tbx6/16 subfamily genes of tetrapods, as an illustrative example. We will show that, despite the similarity of sequence and expression to the tetrapod Tbx6 genes, zebrafish tbx6 gene is actually a novel T-box gene more closely related to the tetrapod Tbx16 genes, whereas the zebrafish tbx24 gene, hitherto considered to be a novel gene due to the high level of sequence divergence, is actually an ortholog of tetrapod Tbx6 genes. We will also show that, after their initial appearance by the multiplication of a common ancestral gene at the beginning of vertebrate evolution, the Tbx6/16 subfamily of vertebrate T-box genes might have experienced differential losses of

  17. Evolutionary analysis of multidrug resistance genes in fungi - impact of gene duplication and family conservation.

    PubMed

    Gossani, Cristiani; Bellieny-Rabelo, Daniel; Venancio, Thiago M

    2014-11-01

    Although the emergence of bacterial drug resistance is of great concern to the scientific community, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon systematically in fungi by using genome-wide datasets. In the present study, we assembled a large compendium of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemical genetic data to study the evolution of multidrug resistance genes (MDRs) in the fungal lineage. We found that MDRs typically emerge in widely conserved families, most of which containing homologs from pathogenic fungi, such as Candida albicans and Coccidioides immitis, which could favor the evolution of drug resistance in those species. By integrating data from chemical genetics with protein family conservation, genetic and protein interactions, we found that gene families rarely have more than one MDR, indicating that paralogs evolve asymmetrically with regard to multidrug resistance roles. Furthermore, MDRs have more genetic and protein interaction partners than non-MDRs, supporting their participation in complex biochemical systems underlying the tolerance to multiple bioactive molecules. MDRs share more chemical genetic interactions with other MDRs than with non-MDRs, regardless of their evolutionary affinity. These results suggest the existence of an intricate system involved in the global drug tolerance phenotypes. Finally, MDRs are more likely to be hit repeatedly by mutations in laboratory evolution experiments, indicating that they have great adaptive potential. The results presented here not only reveal the main genomic features underlying the evolution of MDRs, but also shed light on the gene families from which drug resistance is more likely to emerge in fungi. PMID:25220072

  18. A comparison of reptilian and avian olfactory receptor gene repertoires: Species-specific expansion of group γ genes in birds

    PubMed Central

    Steiger, Silke S; Kuryshev, Vladimir Y; Stensmyr, Marcus C; Kempenaers, Bart; Mueller, Jakob C

    2009-01-01

    Background The detection of odorants is mediated by olfactory receptors (ORs). ORs are G-protein coupled receptors that form a remarkably large protein superfamily in vertebrate genomes. We used data that became available through recent sequencing efforts of reptilian and avian genomes to identify the complete OR gene repertoires in a lizard, the green anole (Anolis carolinensis), and in two birds, the chicken (Gallus gallus) and the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata). Results We identified 156 green anole OR genes, including 42 pseudogenes. The OR gene repertoire of the two bird species was substantially larger with 479 and 553 OR gene homologs in the chicken and zebra finch, respectively (including 111 and 221 pseudogenes, respectively). We show that the green anole has a higher fraction of intact OR genes (~72%) compared with the chicken (~66%) and the zebra finch (~38%). We identified a larger number and a substantially higher proportion of intact OR gene homologs in the chicken genome than previously reported (214 versus 82 genes and 66% versus 15%, respectively). Phylogenetic analysis showed that lizard and bird OR gene repertoires consist of group α, θ and γ genes. Interestingly, the vast majority of the avian OR genes are confined to a large expansion of a single branch (the so called γ-c clade). An analysis of the selective pressure on the paralogous genes of each γ-c clade revealed that they have been subjected to adaptive evolution. This expansion appears to be bird-specific and not sauropsid-specific, as it is lacking from the lizard genome. The γ-c expansions of the two birds do not intermix, i.e., they are lineage-specific. Almost all (group γ-c) OR genes mapped to the unknown chromosome. The remaining OR genes mapped to six homologous chromosomes plus three to four additional chromosomes in the zebra finch and chicken. Conclusion We identified a surprisingly large number of potentially functional avian OR genes. Our data supports recent

  19. Multiple sulfatase deficiency is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the human C(alpha)-formylglycine generating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Thomas; Schmidt, Bernhard; Borissenko, Ljudmila V; Peng, Jianhe; Preusser, Andrea; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; von Figura, Kurt

    2003-05-16

    C(alpha)-formylglycine (FGly) is the catalytic residue in the active site of eukaryotic sulfatases. It is posttranslationally generated from a cysteine in the endoplasmic reticulum. The genetic defect of FGly formation causes multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), a lysosomal storage disorder. We purified the FGly generating enzyme (FGE) and identified its gene and nine mutations in seven MSD patients. In patient fibroblasts, the activity of sulfatases is partially restored by transduction of FGE encoding cDNA, but not by cDNA carrying an MSD mutation. The gene encoding FGE is highly conserved among pro- and eukaryotes and has a paralog of unknown function in vertebrates. FGE is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and is predicted to have a tripartite domain structure. PMID:12757705

  20. Micronuclear and macronuclear forms of beta-tubulin genes in the ciliate Chilodonella uncinata reveal insights into genome processing and protein evolution.

    PubMed

    Zufall, Rebecca A; Katz, Laura A

    2007-01-01

    Chilodonella uncinata, like all ciliates, contains two distinct nuclei in every cell: a germline micronucleus and a somatic macronucleus. During development of the macronucleus from a zygotic nucleus, the genome is processed in several ways, including elimination of internal sequences. In this study, we analyze micronuclear and macronuclear copies of beta-tubulin in C. uncinata and find at least four divergent paralogs of beta-tubulin in the macronucleus. We characterize the micronuclear version of one paralog and compare its internally eliminated sequences (IESs) with previously described IESs in this species. These comparisons reveal the presence of a conserved sequence motif within IESs. In addition, we compare the sequences of beta-tubulin from C. uncinata with other ciliates and to other alveolates in order to test the hypothesis that the mode of molecular evolution in ciliates obscures phylogenetic signal in protein-coding genes. We find that heterogeneous rates of substitution in beta-tubulin across ciliates result in unstable genealogies that are inconsistent with phylogenies based on small subunit rDNA genes and on ultrastructure. We discuss the implications of our findings for genome processing and protein evolution in ciliates. PMID:17552983

  1. Multiple Genetic Processes Result in Heterogeneous Rates of Evolution within the Major Cluster Disease Resistance Genes in LettuceW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Hanhui; Woo, Sung-Sick; Meyers, Blake C.; Nevo, Eviatar; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2004-01-01

    Resistance Gene Candidate2 (RGC2) genes belong to a large, highly duplicated family of nucleotide binding site–leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR) encoding disease resistance genes located at a single locus in lettuce (Lactuca sativa). To investigate the genetic events occurring during the evolution of this locus, ∼1.5- to 2-kb 3′ fragments of 126 RGC2 genes from seven genotypes were sequenced from three species of Lactuca, and 107 additional RGC2 sequences were obtained from 40 wild accessions of Lactuca spp. The copy number of RGC2 genes varied from 12 to 32 per genome in the seven genotypes studied extensively. LRR number varied from 40 to 47; most of this variation had resulted from 13 events duplicating two to five LRRs because of unequal crossing-over within or between RGC2 genes at one of two recombination hot spots. Two types of RGC2 genes (Type I and Type II) were initially distinguished based on the pattern of sequence identities between their 3′ regions. The existence of two types of RGC2 genes was further supported by intron similarities, the frequency of sequence exchange, and their prevalence in natural populations. Type I genes are extensive chimeras caused by frequent sequence exchanges. Frequent sequence exchanges between Type I genes homogenized intron sequences, but not coding sequences, and obscured allelic/orthologous relationships. Sequencing of Type I genes from additional wild accessions confirmed the high frequency of sequence exchange and the presence of numerous chimeric RGC2 genes in nature. Unlike Type I genes, Type II genes exhibited infrequent sequence exchange between paralogous sequences. Type II genes from different genotype/species within the genus Lactuca showed obvious allelic/orthologous relationships. Trans-specific polymorphism was observed for different groups of orthologs, suggesting balancing selection. Unequal crossover, insertion/deletion, and point mutation events were distributed unequally through the gene. Different

  2. Neofunctionalization of a Duplicate dachshund Gene Underlies the Evolution of a Novel Leg Segment in Arachnids.

    PubMed

    Turetzek, Natascha; Pechmann, Matthias; Schomburg, Christoph; Schneider, Julia; Prpic, Nikola-Michael

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of a novel function, or neofunctionalization, protects duplicated genes from redundancy and subsequent loss, and is a major force that drives adaptive evolution. Neofunctionalization has been inferred for many duplicated genes based on differences in regulation between the parental gene and its duplicate. However, only few studies actually link the new function of a duplicated gene to a novel morphological or physiological character of the organism. Here we show that the duplication of dachshund (dac) in arachnids (spiders and allies) is linked with the evolution of a novel leg segment, the patella. We have studied dac genes in two distantly related spider species, the entelegyne spider Parasteatoda tepidariorum and the haplogyne spider Pholcus phalangioides. Both species possess two paralogous dac genes that duplicated before the split between entelegyne and haplogyne spiders. In contrast to the evolutionarily highly conserved dac1, its duplicate dac2 is strongly expressed in the patella leg segment during embryogenesis in both species. Using parental RNA interference in P. tepidariorum we show that dac2 is required for the development of the patella segment. If dac2 function is impaired, then the patella is fused with the tibia into a single leg segment. Thus, removing the function of dac2 experimentally reverts P. tepidariorum leg morphology into a stage before the duplication of dac and the evolution of the patella segment. Our results indicate that the origin of the patella is the result of the duplication and subsequent neofunctionalization of dac in the arachnid lineage. PMID:26443673

  3. Evolution and expression of chimeric POTE–actin genes in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoomi; Ise, Tomoko; Ha, Duc; Saint Fleur, Ashley; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Liu, Xiu-Fen; Nagata, Satoshi; Lee, Byungkook; Bera, Tapan K.; Pastan, Ira

    2006-01-01

    We previously described a primate-specific gene family, POTE, that is expressed in many cancers but in a limited number of normal organs. The 13 POTE genes are dispersed among eight different chromosomes and evolved by duplications and remodeling of the human genome from an ancestral gene, ANKRD26. Based on sequence similarity, the POTE gene family members can be divided into three groups. By genome database searches, we identified an actin retroposon insertion at the carboxyl terminus of one of the ancestral POTE paralogs. By Northern blot analysis, we identified the expected 7.5-kb POTE–actin chimeric transcript in a breast cancer cell line. The protein encoded by the POTE–actin transcript is predicted to be 120 kDa in size. Using anti-POTE mAbs that recognize the amino-terminal portion of the POTE protein, we detected the 120-kDa POTE–actin fusion protein in breast cancer cell lines known to express the fusion transcript. These data demonstrate that insertion of a retroposon produced an altered functional POTE gene. This example indicates that new functional human genes can evolve by insertion of retroposons. PMID:17101985

  4. Comparative analysis of genome-wide Mlo gene family in Cajanus cajan and Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Reena; Singh, V K; Singh, B D

    2016-04-01

    The Mlo gene was discovered in barley because the mutant 'mlo' allele conferred broad-spectrum, non-race-specific resistance to powdery mildew caused by Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. The Mlo genes also play important roles in growth and development of plants, and in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The Mlo gene family has been characterized in several crop species, but only a single legume species, soybean (Glycine max L.), has been investigated so far. The present report describes in silico identification of 18 CcMlo and 20 PvMlo genes in the important legume crops Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. and Phaseolus vulgaris L., respectively. In silico analysis of gene organization, protein properties and conserved domains revealed that the C. cajan and P. vulgaris Mlo gene paralogs are more divergent from each other than from their orthologous pairs. The comparative phylogenetic analysis classified CcMlo and PvMlo genes into three major clades. A comparative analysis of CcMlo and PvMlo proteins with the G. max Mlo proteins indicated close association of one CcMlo, one PvMlo with two GmMlo genes, indicating that there was no further expansion of the Mlo gene family after the separation of these species. Thus, most of the diploid species of eudicots might be expected to contain 15-20 Mlo genes. The genes CcMlo12 and 14, and PvMlo11 and 12 are predicted to participate in powdery mildew resistance. If this prediction were verified, these genes could be targeted by TILLING or CRISPR to isolate powdery mildew resistant mutants. PMID:26961357

  5. Molecular Evolution, Functional Variation, and Proposed Nomenclature of the Gene Family That Includes Sphingomyelinase D in Sicariid Spider Venoms

    PubMed Central

    Bodner, Melissa R.; Cordes, Matthew H.J.; Baldwin, Katherine L.; Rynerson, Melody R.; Burns, Scott N.; Zobel-Thropp, Pamela A.

    2009-01-01

    The venom enzyme sphingomyelinase D (SMase D) in the spider family Sicariidae (brown or fiddleback spiders [Loxosceles] and six-eyed sand spiders [Sicarius]) causes dermonecrosis in mammals. SMase D is in a gene family with multiple venom-expressed members that vary in functional specificity. We analyze molecular evolution of this family and variation in SMase D activity among crude venoms using a data set that represents the phylogenetic breadth of Loxosceles and Sicarius. We isolated a total of 190 nonredundant nucleotide sequences encoding 168 nonredundant amino acid sequences of SMase D homologs from 21 species. Bayesian phylogenies support two major clades that we name α and β, within which we define seven and three subclades, respectively. Sequences in the α clade are exclusively from New World Loxosceles and Loxosceles rufescens and include published genes for which expression products have SMase D and dermonecrotic activity. The β clade includes paralogs from New World Loxosceles that have no, or reduced, SMase D and no dermonecrotic activity and also paralogs from Sicarius and African Loxosceles of unknown activity. Gene duplications are frequent, consistent with a birth-and-death model, and there is evidence of purifying selection with episodic positive directional selection. Despite having venom-expressed SMase D homologs, venoms from New World Sicarius have reduced, or no, detectable SMase D activity, and Loxosceles in the Southern African spinulosa group have low SMase D activity. Sequence conservation mapping shows >98% conservation of proposed catalytic residues of the active site and around a plug motif at the opposite end of the TIM barrel, but α and β clades differ in conservation of key residues surrounding the apparent substrate binding pocket. Based on these combined results, we propose an inclusive nomenclature for the gene family, renaming it SicTox, and discuss emerging patterns of functional diversification. PMID:19042943

  6. Cloning and characterization of aquaglyceroporin genes from rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) and transcript expression in response to cold temperature.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jennifer R; Clow, Kathy A; Rise, Matthew L; Driedzic, William R

    2015-09-01

    Aquaglyceroporins (GLPs) are integral membrane proteins that facilitate passive movement of water, glycerol and urea across cellular membranes. In this study, GLP-encoding genes were characterized in rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax mordax), an anadromous teleost that accumulates high glycerol and modest urea levels in plasma and tissues as an adaptive cryoprotectant mechanism in sub-zero temperatures. We report the gene and promoter sequences for two aqp10b paralogs (aqp10ba, aqp10bb) that are 82% identical at the predicted amino acid level, and aqp9b. Aqp10bb and aqp9b have the 6 exon structure common to vertebrate GLPs. Aqp10ba has 8 exons; there are two additional exons at the 5' end, and the promoter sequence is different from aqp10bb. Molecular phylogenetic analysis suggests that the aqp10b paralogs arose from a gene duplication event specific to the smelt lineage. Smelt GLP transcripts are ubiquitously expressed; however, aqp10ba transcripts were highest in kidney, aqp10bb transcripts were highest in kidney, intestine, pyloric caeca and brain, and aqp9b transcripts were highest in spleen, liver, red blood cells and kidney. In cold-temperature challenge experiments, plasma glycerol and urea levels were significantly higher in cold- compared to warm-acclimated smelt; however, GLP transcript levels were generally either significantly lower or remained constant. The exception was significantly higher aqp10ba transcript levels in kidney. High aqp10ba transcripts in smelt kidney that increase significantly in response to cold temperature in congruence with plasma urea suggest that this gene duplicate may have evolved to allow the re-absorption of urea to concomitantly conserve nitrogen and prevent freezing. PMID:25981700

  7. Differential Expression Patterns and Developmental Roles of Duplicated Scinderin-Like Genes in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Sujuan; Nakaya, Naoki; Piatigorsky, Joram

    2011-01-01

    Scinderin, the closest homologue of the actin-severing protein, gelsolin, has two similar paralogs (Scinla and Scinlb) in zebrafish. Scinla is abundant in the adult cornea; Scinlb comprises considerably less corneal protein. Here we show that scinla is expressed in the nose, lens, brain, cornea and annular ligament of the iridocorneal angle; by contrast, scinlb is expressed in the hatching gland, floor plate, notochord, otic vesicle, brain, pharynx, cartilage, swim bladder and cornea. Activity of scinla and scinlb promoter fragments driving the EGFP reporter gene in transgenic zebrafish resembled scinla or scinlb expression. Previously, we showed that reduction of scinla by injection of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides ventralized embryos; here specific reduction of scinlb expression led to subtle brain abnormalities associated with increased cell death, decreased shhb expression in the floor plate, and slightly reduced eye distance. Thus, scinla and scinlb have different expression patterns and developmental roles during zebrafish development. PMID:19681161

  8. Molecular cloning, sequencing and tissue expression of vasotocin and isotocin precursor genes from Ostariophysian catfishes: phylogeny and evolutionary considerations in teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Putul; Chaube, Radha; Joy, Keerikkattil P.

    2015-01-01

    Basic and neutral neurohypophyseal (NH) nonapeptides have evolved from vasotocin (VT) by a gene duplication at the base of the gnathostome lineage. In teleosts, VT and IT are the basic and neutral peptides, respectively. In the present study, VT and IT precursor genes of Heteropneustes fossilis and Clarias batrachus (Siluriformes, Ostariophysi) were cloned and sequenced. The channel catfish Icatalurus punctatus NH precursor sequences were obtained from EST database. The catfish NH sequences were used along with the available Acanthopterygii and other vertebrate NH precursor sequences to draw phylogenetic inference on the evolutionary history of the teleost NH peptides. Synteny analysis of the NH gene loci in various teleost species was done to complement the phylogenetic analysis. In H. fossilis, the NH transcripts were also sequenced from the ovary. The cloned genes and the deduced precursor proteins showed conserved characteristics of the NH nonapeptide precursors. The genes are expressed in brain and ovary (follicular envelope) of H. fossilis with higher transcript abundance in the brain. The addition of the catfish sequences in the phylogenetic analysis revealed that the VT and IT precursors of the species-rich superorders of teleosts have a distinct phylogenetic history with the Acanthopterygii VT and IT precursors sharing a less evolutionary distance and the Ostariophysi VT and IT having a greater evolutionary distance. The genomic location of VT and IT precursors, and synteny analysis of the NH loci lend support to the phylogenetic inference and suggest a footprint of fish- specific whole genome duplication (3R) and subsequent diploidization in the NH loci. The VT and IT precursor genes are most likely lineage-specific paralogs resulting from differential losses of the 3R NH paralogs in the two superorders. The independent yet consistent retention of VT and IT in the two superorders might be directed by a stringent ligand-receptor selectivity. PMID:26029040

  9. Ortho2ExpressMatrix—a web server that interprets cross-species gene expression data by gene family information

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    the light of orthology, paralogy and structure of gene families up to the point of ambiguity analyses. Results can be used for filtering and prioritization in functional genomic, biomedical and systems biology applications. The web server is freely accessible at http://bioinf-data.charite.de/o2em/cgi-bin/o2em.pl. PMID:21970648

  10. Development of genome-specific primers for homoeologous genes in allopolyploid species: the waxy and starch synthase II genes in allohexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) as examples

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    populations of both hexaploid wheat and cultivated tetraploid wheat. The strategies used in this paper can be used to develop genome-specific primers for homoeologous genes in any allopolypoid species. They may be also suitable for (i) the development of gene-specific primers for duplicated paralogous genes in any diploid species, and (ii) the development of allele-specific primers at the same gene locus. PMID:20497560

  11. PGDD: a database of gene and genome duplication in plants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Tang, Haibao; Wang, Xiyin; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2013-01-01

    Genome duplication (GD) has permanently shaped the architecture and function of many higher eukaryotic genomes. The angiosperms (flowering plants) are outstanding models in which to elucidate consequences of GD for higher eukaryotes, owing to their propensity for chromosomal duplication or even triplication in a few cases. Duplicated genome structures often require both intra- and inter-genome alignments to unravel their evolutionary history, also providing the means to deduce both obvious and otherwise-cryptic orthology, paralogy and other relationships among genes. The burgeoning sets of angiosperm genome sequences provide the foundation for a host of investigations into the functional and evolutionary consequences of gene and GD. To provide genome alignments from a single resource based on uniform standards that have been validated by empirical studies, we built the Plant Genome Duplication Database (PGDD; freely available at http://chibba.agtec.uga.edu/duplication/), a web service providing synteny information in terms of colinearity between chromosomes. At present, PGDD contains data for 26 plants including bryophytes and chlorophyta, as well as angiosperms with draft genome sequences. In addition to the inclusion of new genomes as they become available, we are preparing new functions to enhance PGDD. PMID:23180799

  12. Isolation, structural analysis, and expression characteristics of the maize nuclear factor Y gene families.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongbao; Li, Xianglong; Zhang, Chun; Zou, Huawen; Wu, Zhongyi

    2016-09-16

    NUCLEAR FACTOR-Y (NF-Y) has been shown to play an important role in growth, development, and response to environmental stress. A NF-Y complex, which consists of three subunits, NF-YA, NF-YB, and, NF-YC, binds to CCAAT sequences in a promoter to control the expression of target genes. Although NF-Y proteins have been reported in Arabidopsis and rice, a comprehensive and systematic analysis of ZmNF-Y genes has not yet been performed. To examine the functions of ZmNF-Y genes in this family, we isolated and characterized 50 ZmNF-Y (14 ZmNF-YA, 18 ZmNF-YB, and 18 ZmNF-YC) genes in an analysis of the maize genome. The 50 ZmNF-Y genes were distributed on all 10 maize chromosomes, and 12 paralogs were identified. Multiple alignments showed that maize ZmNF-Y family proteins had conserved regions and relatively variable N-terminal or C-terminal domains. The comparative syntenic map illustrated 40 paralogous NF-Y gene pairs among the 10 maize chromosomes. Microarray data showed that the ZmNF-Y genes had tissue-specific expression patterns in various maize developmental stages and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. The results suggested that ZmNF-YB2, 4, 8, 10, 13, and 16 and ZmNF-YC6, 8, and 15 were induced, while ZmNF-YA1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 12, and 13, ZmNF-YB15, and ZmNF-YC3 and 9 were suppressed by drought stress. ZmNF-YA3, ZmNF-YA8 and ZmNF-YA12 were upregulated after infection by the three pathogens, while ZmNF-YA1 and ZmNF-YB2 were suppressed. These results indicate that the ZmNF-Ys may have significant roles in the response to abiotic and biotic stresses. PMID:27498027

  13. Identification and expression analysis of the SQUAMOSA promoter-binding protein (SBP)-box gene family in Prunus mume.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zongda; Sun, Lidan; Zhou, Yuzhen; Yang, Weiru; Cheng, Tangren; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Qixiang

    2015-10-01

    SQUAMOSA promoter-binding protein (SBP)-box family genes encode plant-specific transcription factors that play crucial roles in plant development, especially flower and fruit development. However, little information on this gene family is available for Prunus mume, an ornamental and fruit tree widely cultivated in East Asia. To explore the evolution of SBP-box genes in Prunus and explore their functions in flower and fruit development, we performed a genome-wide analysis of the SBP-box gene family in P. mume. Fifteen SBP-box genes were identified, and 11 of them contained an miR156 target site. Phylogenetic and comprehensive bioinformatics analyses revealed that different groups of SBP-box genes have undergone different evolutionary processes and varied in their length, structure, and motif composition. Purifying selection has been the main selective constraint on both paralogous and orthologous SBP-box genes. In addition, the sequences of orthologous SBP-box genes did not diverge widely after the split of P. mume and Prunus persica. Expression analysis of P. mume SBP-box genes revealed their diverse spatiotemporal expression patterns. Three duplicated SBP-box genes may have undergone subfunctionalization in Prunus. Most of the SBP-box genes showed high transcript levels in flower buds and young fruit. The four miR156-nontargeted genes were upregulated during fruit ripening. Together, these results provide information about the evolution of SBP-box genes in Prunus. The expression analysis lays the foundation for further research on the functions of SBP-box genes in P. mume and other Prunus species, especially during flower and fruit development. PMID:25810323

  14. Duplication and Diversification of Dipteran Argonaute Genes, and the Evolutionary Divergence of Piwi and Aubergine

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Samuel H.; Salmela, Heli; Obbard, Darren J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies of Drosophila melanogaster have provided a paradigm for RNA interference (RNAi) in arthropods, in which the microRNA and antiviral pathways are each mediated by a single Argonaute (Ago1 and Ago2) and germline suppression of transposable elements is mediated by a trio of Piwi-subfamily Argonaute proteins (Ago3, Aub, and Piwi). Without a suitable evolutionary context, deviations from this can be interpreted as derived or idiosyncratic. Here we analyze the evolution of Argonaute genes across the genomes and transcriptomes of 86 Dipteran species, showing that variation in copy number can occur rapidly, and that there is constant flux in some RNAi mechanisms. The lability of the RNAi pathways is illustrated by the divergence of Aub and Piwi (182–156 Ma), independent origins of multiple Piwi-family genes in Aedes mosquitoes (less than 25Ma), and the recent duplications of Ago2 and Ago3 in the tsetse fly Glossina morsitans. In each case the tissue specificity of these genes has altered, suggesting functional divergence or innovation, and consistent with the action of dynamic selection pressures across the Argonaute gene family. We find there are large differences in evolutionary rates and gene turnover between pathways, and that paralogs of Ago2, Ago3, and Piwi/Aub show contrasting rates of evolution after duplication. This suggests that Argonautes undergo frequent evolutionary expansions that facilitate functional divergence. PMID:26868596

  15. Two Lamprey Hedgehog Genes Share Non-Coding Regulatory Sequences and Expression Patterns with Gnathostome Hedgehogs

    PubMed Central

    Ekker, Marc; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Müller, Ferenc; Casane, Didier; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE) with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional) changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences. PMID:20967201

  16. Blueprint for a High-Performance Biomaterial: Full-Length Spider Dragline Silk Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Nadia A.; Garb, Jessica E.; Tinghitella, Robin M.; Collin, Matthew A.; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.

    2007-01-01

    Spider dragline (major ampullate) silk outperforms virtually all other natural and manmade materials in terms of tensile strength and toughness. For this reason, the mass-production of artificial spider silks through transgenic technologies has been a major goal of biomimetics research. Although all known arthropod silk proteins are extremely large (>200 kiloDaltons), recombinant spider silks have been designed from short and incomplete cDNAs, the only available sequences. Here we describe the first full-length spider silk gene sequences and their flanking regions. These genes encode the MaSp1 and MaSp2 proteins that compose the black widow's high-performance dragline silk. Each gene includes a single enormous exon (>9000 base pairs) that translates into a highly repetitive polypeptide. Patterns of variation among sequence repeats at the amino acid and nucleotide levels indicate that the interaction of selection, intergenic recombination, and intragenic recombination governs the evolution of these highly unusual, modular proteins. Phylogenetic footprinting revealed putative regulatory elements in non-coding flanking sequences. Conservation of both upstream and downstream flanking sequences was especially striking between the two paralogous black widow major ampullate silk genes. Because these genes are co-expressed within the same silk gland, there may have been selection for similarity in regulatory regions. Our new data provide complete templates for synthesis of recombinant silk proteins that significantly improve the degree to which artificial silks mimic natural spider dragline fibers. PMID:17565367

  17. Sim2 contributes to neuroendocrine hormone gene expression in the anterior hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Goshu, Eleni; Jin, Hui; Lovejoy, John; Marion, Jean-François; Michaud, Jacques L; Fan, Chen-Ming

    2004-05-01

    Paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus maintain homeostasis by modulating pituitary hormonal output. PVN and supraoptic nuclei contain five major cell types: oxytocin-, vasopressin-, CRH-, somatostatin-, and TRH-secreting neurons. Sim1, Arnt2, and Otp genes are essential for terminal differentiation of these neurons. One of their common downstream genes, Brn2, is necessary for oxytocin, vasopressin, and CRH cell differentiation. Here we show that Sim2, a paralog of Sim1, contributes to the expression of Trh and Ss genes in the dorsal preoptic area, anterior-periventricular nucleus, and PVN. Sim2 expression overlaps with Trh- and Ss-expressing cells, and Sim2 mutants contain reduced numbers of Trh and Ss cells. Genetically, Sim1 acts upstream of Sim2 and partially compensates for the loss of Sim2. Comparative expression studies at the anterior hypothalamus at early stages reveal that there are separate pools of Trh cells with distinctive molecular codes defined by Sim1 and Sim2 expression. Together with previous reports, our results demonstrate that Sim1 and Otp utilize two common downstream genes, Brn2 and Sim2, to mediate distinctive sets of neuroendocrine hormone gene expression. PMID:14988428

  18. Functional roles of a predicted branched chain aminotransferase encoded by the LkBAT1 gene of the yeast Lachancea kluyveri.

    PubMed

    Montalvo-Arredondo, Javier; Jiménez-Benítez, Ángel; Colón-González, Maritrini; González-Flores, James; Flores-Villegas, Mirelle; González, Alicia; Riego-Ruiz, Lina

    2015-12-01

    Branched chain amino acid aminotransferases (BCATs) catalyze the last step of the biosynthesis and the first step of the catabolism of branched chain amino acids. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, BCATs are encoded by the ScBAT1 and ScBAT2 paralogous genes. Analysis of Lachancea kluyveri genome sequence, allowed the identification of the LkBAT1 locus, which could presumably encode a BCAT. A second unlinked locus (LkBAT1bis), exhibiting sequence similarity to LkBAT1 was also identified. To determine the function of these putative BCATs, L. kluyveri mutant strains lacking LkBAT1, LkBAT1bis or both genes were generated and tested for VIL metabolism. LkBat1 displayed branched chain aminotransferase activity and is required for VIL biosynthesis and catabolism. However, Lkbat1Δ mutant is a valine and isoleucine auxotroph and a leucine bradytroph indicating that L. kluyveri harbors an alternative enzyme(s) involved in leucine biosynthesis. Additionally, heterologous reciprocal gene complementation between S. cerevisiae and L. kluyveri orthologous LkBAT1, ScBAT1 and ScBAT2 genes, confirmed that the mitochondrial LkBat1 functions as BCAT in S. cerevisiae, restoring wild type phenotype to the ScBAT1 null mutant. Conversely, LkBAT1bis did not display a role in BCAAs metabolism. However, when ethanol was used as carbon source, deletion of LkBAT1bis in an Lkbat1Δ null strain resulted in an extended 'lag' growth phase, pointing to a potential function of LkBAT1 and LkBAT1bis in the aerobic metabolism of L. kluyveri. These results confirm the BCAT function of LkBAT1 in L. kluyveri, and further support the proposition that the BCAT function in ancestral-type yeasts has been distributed in the two paralogous genes present in S. cerevisiae. PMID:26563416

  19. The RNA polymerase III-dependent family of genes in hemiascomycetes: comparative RNomics, decoding strategies, transcription and evolutionary implications

    PubMed Central

    Marck, Christian; Kachouri-Lafond, Rym; Lafontaine, Ingrid; Westhof, Eric; Dujon, Bernard; Grosjean, Henri

    2006-01-01

    We present the first comprehensive analysis of RNA polymerase III (Pol III) transcribed genes in ten yeast genomes. This set includes all tRNA genes (tDNA) and genes coding for SNR6 (U6), SNR52, SCR1 and RPR1 RNA in the nine hemiascomycetes Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces castellii, Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces waltii, Kluyveromyces lactis, Eremothecium gossypii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Candida albicans, Yarrowia lipolytica and the archiascomycete Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We systematically analysed sequence specificities of tRNA genes, polymorphism, variability of introns, gene redundancy and gene clustering. Analysis of decoding strategies showed that yeasts close to S.cerevisiae use bacterial decoding rules to read the Leu CUN and Arg CGN codons, in contrast to all other known Eukaryotes. In D.hansenii and C.albicans, we identified a novel tDNA-Leu (AAG), reading the Leu CUU/CUC/CUA codons with an unusual G at position 32. A systematic ‘p-distance tree’ using the 60 variable positions of the tRNA molecule revealed that most tDNAs cluster into amino acid-specific sub-trees, suggesting that, within hemiascomycetes, orthologous tDNAs are more closely related than paralogs. We finally determined the bipartite A- and B-box sequences recognized by TFIIIC. These minimal sequences are nearly conserved throughout hemiascomycetes and were satisfactorily retrieved at appropriate locations in other Pol III genes. PMID:16600899

  20. Accelerated Evolution of Schistosome Genes Coding for Proteins Located at the Host–Parasite Interface

    PubMed Central

    Philippsen, Gisele S.; Wilson, R. Alan; DeMarco, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Study of proteins located at the host–parasite interface in schistosomes might provide clues about the mechanisms utilized by the parasite to escape the host immune system attack. Micro-exon gene (MEG) protein products and venom allergen-like (VAL) proteins have been shown to be present in schistosome secretions or associated with glands, which led to the hypothesis that they are important components in the molecular interaction of the parasite with the host. Phylogenetic and structural analysis of genes and their transcripts in these two classes shows that recent species-specific expansion of gene number for these families occurred separately in three different species of schistosomes. Enrichment of transposable elements in MEG and VAL genes in Schistosoma mansoni provides a credible mechanism for preferential expansion of gene numbers for these families. Analysis of the ratio between synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates (dN/dS) in the comparison between schistosome orthologs for the two classes of genes reveals significantly higher values when compared with a set of a control genes coding for secreted proteins, and for proteins previously localized in the tegument. Additional analyses of paralog genes indicate that exposure of the protein to the definitive host immune system is a determining factor leading to the higher than usual dN/dS values in those genes. The observation that two genes encoding S. mansoni vaccine candidate proteins, known to be exposed at the parasite surface, also display similar evolutionary dynamics suggests a broad response of the parasite to evolutionary pressure imposed by the definitive host immune system. PMID:25567667

  1. Combining Phylogenetic and Syntenic Analyses for Understanding the Evolution of TCP ECE Genes in Eudicots

    PubMed Central

    Citerne, Hélène L.; Le Guilloux, Martine; Sannier, Julie; Nadot, Sophie; Damerval, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    TCP ECE genes encode transcription factors which have received much attention for their repeated recruitment in the control of floral symmetry in core eudicots, and more recently in monocots. Major duplications of TCP ECE genes have been described in core eudicots, but the evolutionary history of this gene family is unknown in basal eudicots. Reconstructing the phylogeny of ECE genes in basal eudicots will help set a framework for understanding the functional evolution of these genes. TCP ECE genes were sequenced in all major lineages of basal eudicots and Gunnera which belongs to the sister clade to all other core eudicots. We show that in these lineages they have a complex evolutionary history with repeated duplications. We estimate the timing of the two major duplications already identified in the core eudicots within a timeframe before the divergence of Gunnera and after the divergence of Proteales. We also use a synteny-based approach to examine the extent to which the expansion of TCP ECE genes in diverse eudicot lineages may be due to genome-wide duplications. The three major core-eudicot specific clades share a number of collinear genes, and their common evolutionary history may have originated at the γ event. Genomic comparisons in Arabidopsis thaliana and Solanumlycopersicum highlight their separate polyploid origin, with syntenic fragments with and without TCP ECE genes showing differential gene loss and genomic rearrangements. Comparison between recently available genomes from two basal eudicots Aquilegiacoerulea and Nelumbonucifera suggests that the two TCP ECE paralogs in these species are also derived from large-scale duplications. TCP ECE loci from basal eudicots share many features with the three main core eudicot loci, and allow us to infer the makeup of the ancestral eudicot locus. PMID:24019982

  2. Large-scale identification of human genes implicated in epidermal barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Toulza, Eve; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R; Galliano, Marie-Florence; Jonca, Nathalie; Dossat, Carole; Jacob, Daniel; de Daruvar, Antoine; Wincker, Patrick; Serre, Guy; Guerrin, Marina

    2007-01-01

    Background During epidermal differentiation, keratinocytes progressing through the suprabasal layers undergo complex and tightly regulated biochemical modifications leading to cornification and desquamation. The last living cells, the granular keratinocytes (GKs), produce almost all of the proteins and lipids required for the protective barrier function before their programmed cell death gives rise to corneocytes. We present here the first analysis of the transcriptome of human GKs, purified from healthy epidermis by an original approach. Results Using the ORESTES method, 22,585 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were produced that matched 3,387 genes. Despite normalization provided by this method (mean 4.6 ORESTES per gene), some highly transcribed genes, including that encoding dermokine, were overrepresented. About 330 expressed genes displayed less than 100 ESTs in UniGene clusters and are most likely to be specific for GKs and potentially involved in barrier function. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the relative expression of 73 genes in the basal and granular layers of epidermis by quantitative RT-PCR. Among these, 33 were identified as new, highly specific markers of GKs, including those encoding a protease, protease inhibitors and proteins involved in lipid metabolism and transport. We identified filaggrin 2 (also called ifapsoriasin), a poorly characterized member of the epidermal differentiation complex, as well as three new lipase genes clustered with paralogous genes on chromosome 10q23.31. A new gene of unknown function, C1orf81, is specifically disrupted in the human genome by a frameshift mutation. Conclusion These data increase the present knowledge of genes responsible for the formation of the skin barrier and suggest new candidates for genodermatoses of unknown origin. PMID:17562024

  3. Systematic expression analysis of Hox genes at adulthood reveals novel patterns in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hutlet, Bertrand; Theys, Nicolas; Coste, Cécile; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Doshishti-Agolli, Konstantin; Lizen, Benoît; Gofflot, Françoise

    2016-04-01

    Hox proteins are key regulators of animal development, providing positional identity and patterning information to cells along the rostrocaudal axis of the embryo. Although their embryonic expression and function are well characterized, their presence and biological importance in adulthood remains poorly investigated. We provide here the first detailed quantitative and neuroanatomical characterization of the expression of the 39 Hox genes in the adult mouse brain. Using RT-qPCR we determined the expression of 24 Hox genes mainly in the brainstem of the adult brain, with low expression of a few genes in the cerebellum and the forebrain. Using in situ hybridization (ISH) we have demonstrated that expression of Hox genes is maintained in territories derived from the early segmental Hox expression domains in the hindbrain. Indeed, we show that expression of genes belonging to paralogy groups PG2-8 is maintained in the hindbrain derivatives at adulthood. The spatial colinearity, which characterizes the early embryonic expression of Hox genes, is still observed in sequential antero-posterior boundaries of expression. Moreover, the main mossy and climbing fibres precerebellar nuclei express PG2-8 Hox genes according to their migration origins. Second, ISH confirms the presence of Hox gene transcripts in territories where they are not detected during development, suggesting neo-expression in these territories in adulthood. Within the forebrain, we have mapped Hoxb1, Hoxb3, Hoxb4, Hoxd3 and Hoxa5 expression in restricted areas of the sensory cerebral cortices as well as in specific thalamic relay nuclei. Our data thus suggest a requirement of Hox genes beyond their role of patterning genes, providing a new dimension to their functional relevance in the central nervous system. PMID:25527350

  4. Evolutionary analysis of the APA genes in the Phaseolus genus: wild and cultivated bean species as sources of lectin-related resistance factors?

    PubMed

    Lioi, L; Galasso, I; Lanave, C; Daminati, M G; Bollini, R; Sparvoli, F

    2007-11-01

    The APA (Arcelin/Phytohemagglutinin/alpha-Amylase inhibitor) gene family is composed of various members, present in Phaseolus species and coding for lectin and lectin-related seed proteins having the double role of storage and defense proteins. Here members of the APA family have been identified by immunological, functional, and molecular analyses and representative genes were sequenced in nine wild species of Phaseolus. All taxa possessed at least one member of the true lectin gene. No arcelin type sequences have been isolated from the species examined. Among the wild species studied, only P. costaricensis contained an alpha-amylase inhibitor (alpha-AI). In addition P. augusti, P. maculatus, P. microcarpus, and P. oligospermus showed the presence of the lectin-related alpha-amylase inhibitor-like (AIL) genes and alpha-AI activity. Data from Southern blot analysis indicated the presence of only one lectin gene in P. parvulus and P. filiformis, while an extensive gene duplication of the APA locus was found in the other Phaseolus species. Phylogenetic analysis carried out on the nucleotide sequences showed the existence of two main clusters and clearly indicated that lectin-related genes originated from a paralogous duplication event preceding the development of the ancestor to the Phaseolus genus. The finding of detectable alpha-AI activity in species containing AIL genes suggests that exploiting APA genes variability in the Phaseolus genus may represent a valuable tool to find new members that may have acquired insecticidal activities. PMID:17701394

  5. Genome-wide identification, classification, and expression analysis of sHSP genes in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp pekinensis).

    PubMed

    Tao, P; Guo, W L; Li, B Y; Wang, W H; Yue, Z C; Lei, J L; Zhong, X M

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are essential for the plant's normal development and stress responses, especially the heat stress response. The information regarding sHSP genes in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp pekinensis) is sparse, hence we performed a genome-wide analysis to identify sHSP genes in this species. We identified 26 non-redundant sHSP genes distributed on all chromosomes, except chromosome A7, with one additional sHSP gene identified from an expressed sequence tag library. Chinese cabbage was found to contain more sHSP genes than Arabidopsis. The 27 sHSP genes were classified into 11 subfamilies. We identified 22 groups of sHSP syntenic orthologous genes between Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis. In addition, eight groups of paralogous genes were uncovered in Chinese cabbage. Protein structures of the 27 Chinese cabbage sHSPs were modeled using Phyre2, which revealed that all of them contain several conserved β strands across different subfamilies. In general, gene structure was conserved within each subfamily between Chinese cabbage and Arabidopsis, except for peroxisome sHSP. Analysis of promoter motifs showed that most sHSP genes contain heat shock elements or variants. We also found that biased gene loss has occurred during the evolution of the sHSP subfamily in Chinese cabbage. Expression analysis indicated that the greatest transcript abundance of most Chinese cabbage sHSP genes was found in siliques and early cotyledon embryos. Thus, genome-wide identification and characterization of sHSP genes is a first and important step in the investigation of sHSPs in Chinese cabbage. PMID:26505345

  6. Transcriptome-based analysis of kidney gene expression changes associated with diabetes in OVE26 mice, in the presence and absence of losartan treatment.

    PubMed

    Komers, Radko; Xu, Bei; Fu, Yi; McClelland, Aaron; Kantharidis, Phillip; Mittal, Amit; Cohen, Herbert T; Cohen, David M

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is among the most common causes of end-stage renal disease, although its pathophysiology is incompletely understood. We performed next-generation sequencing-based transcriptome analysis of renal gene expression changes in the OVE26 murine model of diabetes (age 15 weeks), relative to non-diabetic control, in the presence and absence of short-term (seven-day) treatment with the angiotensin receptor blocker, losartan (n = 3-6 biological replicates per condition). We detected 1438 statistically significant changes in gene expression across conditions. Of the 638 genes dysregulated in diabetes relative to the non-diabetic state, >70% were downregulation events. Unbiased functional annotation of genes up- and down-regulated by diabetes strongly associated (p<1 × 10(-8)) with terms for oxidative stress and for endoplasmic reticulum stress/protein folding. Most of the individual gene products up- or down-regulated with diabetes were unaffected by losartan treatment; however, of the gene products dysregulated in diabetes and influenced by losartan treatment, the vast majority of changes were in the direction of amelioration rather than exacerbation of the diabetic dysregulation. This group of losartan-protected genes associated strongly with annotation terms for endoplasmic reticulum stress, heat shock proteins, and chaperone function, but not oxidative stress; therefore, the losartan-unaffected genes suggest avenues for additional therapeutic opportunity in diabetes. Interestingly, the gene product most highly upregulated by diabetes (>52-fold), encoded by the cationic amino acid transporter Slc7a12, and the gene product most highly downregulated by diabetes (>99%)--encoded by the "pseudogene" Gm6300--are adjacent in the murine genome, are members of the SLC7 gene family, and are likely paralogous. Therefore, diabetes activates a near-total genetic switch between these two paralogs. Other individual-level changes in gene expression are potentially relevant to

  7. Transcriptome-Based Analysis of Kidney Gene Expression Changes Associated with Diabetes in OVE26 Mice, in the Presence and Absence of Losartan Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Komers, Radko; Xu, Bei; Fu, Yi; McClelland, Aaron; Kantharidis, Phillip; Mittal, Amit; Cohen, Herbert T.; Cohen, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is among the most common causes of end-stage renal disease, although its pathophysiology is incompletely understood. We performed next-generation sequencing-based transcriptome analysis of renal gene expression changes in the OVE26 murine model of diabetes (age 15 weeks), relative to non-diabetic control, in the presence and absence of short-term (seven-day) treatment with the angiotensin receptor blocker, losartan (n = 3–6 biological replicates per condition). We detected 1438 statistically significant changes in gene expression across conditions. Of the 638 genes dysregulated in diabetes relative to the non-diabetic state, >70% were downregulation events. Unbiased functional annotation of genes up- and down-regulated by diabetes strongly associated (p<1×10−8) with terms for oxidative stress and for endoplasmic reticulum stress/protein folding. Most of the individual gene products up- or down-regulated with diabetes were unaffected by losartan treatment; however, of the gene products dysregulated in diabetes and influenced by losartan treatment, the vast majority of changes were in the direction of amelioration rather than exacerbation of the diabetic dysregulation. This group of losartan-protected genes associated strongly with annotation terms for endoplasmic reticulum stress, heat shock proteins, and chaperone function, but not oxidative stress; therefore, the losartan-unaffected genes suggest avenues for additional therapeutic opportunity in diabetes. Interestingly, the gene product most highly upregulated by diabetes (>52-fold), encoded by the cationic amino acid transporter Slc7a12, and the gene product most highly downregulated by diabetes (>99%) – encoded by the “pseudogene” Gm6300 – are adjacent in the murine genome, are members of the SLC7 gene family, and are likely paralogous. Therefore, diabetes activates a near-total genetic switch between these two paralogs. Other individual-level changes in gene expression are potentially

  8. The Dca gene involved in cold adaptation in Drosophila melanogaster arose by duplication of the ancestral regucalcin gene.

    PubMed

    Arboleda-Bustos, Carlos E; Segarra, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    The Drosophila cold acclimation gene (Dca) is involved in the adaptive response to low temperatures. This gene is upregulated at the transcriptional level when D. melanogaster flies are exposed 1 day to 15 °C. Dca (or smp-30) is a member of the SMP-30/Gluconolactonase/LRE-like family. In the current study, we characterized the members of this gene family in the 12 Drosophila species with available complete genomes sequences. Two paralogous genes, Dca and regucalcin, were identified in all the Sophophora subgenus species (9 of the 12 species), and their presence was further confirmed in three other species of the subgenus (D. subobscura, D. madeirensis, and D. guanche). However, only regucalcin was present in the species of the Drosophila subgenus (D. grimshawi, D. virilis, and D. mojavensis). The phylogenetic analysis and the molecular organization of Dca that is a nested intronic gene support that Dca arose by a duplication event from the ancestral regucalcin gene after the split of the Sophophora and Drosophila subgenera but before the Sophophora radiation. After the duplication event, the nonsynonymous fixation rate increased in the branch leading to Dca (but not to regucalcin), suggesting the neofunctionalization of the former duplicate. Thus, regucalcin would have maintained the ancestral gene function, and Dca would have acquired a new function likely related to Ca²⁺ homeostasis and cold acclimation. Molecular evolution of Dca has been affected by its implication in the adaptive response to cold temperatures. Indeed, the gene has evolved under stronger purifying selection in the temperate than in the tropical Sophophora species, as reflected by the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions. This result is consistent with functional constraints acting on the DCA protein to keep species adaptation to temperate climates. Dca and regucalcin also differ in their expression patterns. The expression profile of regucalcin is similar to that of the

  9. Differential expression of the seven-pass transmembrane cadherin genes Celsr1-3 and distribution of the Celsr2 protein during mouse development.

    PubMed

    Shima, Yasuyuki; Copeland, Neal G; Gilbert, Debra J; Jenkins, Nancy A; Chisaka, Osamu; Takeichi, Masatoshi; Uemura, Tadashi

    2002-03-01

    Drosophila Flamingo (Fmi) is an evolutionally conserved seven-pass transmembrane receptor of the cadherin superfamily. Fmi plays multiple roles in patterning neuronal processes and epithelial planar cell polarity. To explore the in vivo roles of Fmi homologs in mammals, we previously cloned one of the mouse homologs, mouse flamingo1/Celsr2. Here, we report the results of our study of its embryonic and postnatal expression patterns together with those of two other paralogs, Celsr1 and Celsr3. Celsr1-3 expression was initiated broadly in the nervous system at early developmental stages, and each paralog showed characteristic expression patterns in the developing CNS. These genes were also expressed in several other organs, including the cochlea, where hair cells develop planar polarity, the kidney, and the whisker. The Celsr2 protein was distributed at intercellular boundaries in the whisker and on processes of neuronal cells such as hippocampal pyramidal cells, Purkinje cells, and olfactory neurons. Celsr2 is mapped to a distal region of the mouse chromosome 3. We discussed possible functions of seven-pass transmembrane cadherins in mouse development. PMID:11891983

  10. A tripartite clustering analysis on microRNA, gene and disease model.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chengcheng; Liu, Ying

    2012-02-01

    Alteration of gene expression in response to regulatory molecules or mutations could lead to different diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been discovered to be involved in regulation of gene expression and a wide variety of diseases. In a tripartite biological network of human miRNAs, their predicted target genes and the diseases caused by altered expressions of these genes, valuable knowledge about the pathogenicity of miRNAs, involved genes and related disease classes can be revealed by co-clustering miRNAs, target genes and diseases simultaneously. Tripartite co-clustering can lead to more informative results than traditional co-clustering with only two kinds of members and pass the hidden relational information along the relation chain by considering multi-type members. Here we report a spectral co-clustering algorithm for k-partite graph to find clusters with heterogeneous members. We use the method to explore the potential relationships among miRNAs, genes and diseases. The clusters obtained from the algorithm have significantly higher density than randomly selected clusters, which means members in the same cluster are more likely to have common connections. Results also show that miRNAs in the same family based on the hairpin sequences tend to belong to the same cluster. We also validate the clustering results by checking the correlation of enriched gene functions and disease classes in the same cluster. Finally, widely studied miR-17-92 and its paralogs are analyzed as a case study to reveal that genes and diseases co-clustered with the miRNAs are in accordance with current research findings. PMID:22809308

  11. Gene duplication, genome duplication, and the functional diversification of vertebrate globins

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Jay F.; Opazo, Juan C.; Hoffmann, Federico G.

    2015-01-01

    The functional diversification of the vertebrate globin gene superfamily provides an especially vivid illustration of the role of gene duplication and whole-genome duplication in promoting evolutionary innovation. For example, key globin proteins that evolved specialized functions in various aspects of oxidative metabolism and oxygen signaling pathways (hemoglobin [Hb], myoglobin [Mb], and cytoglobin [Cygb]) trace their origins to two whole-genome duplication events in the stem lineage of vertebrates. The retention of the proto-Hb and Mb genes in the ancestor of jawed vertebrates permitted a physiological division of labor between the oxygen-carrier function of Hb and the oxygen-storage function of Mb. In the Hb gene lineage, a subsequent tandem gene duplication gave rise to the proto α- and β-globin genes, which permitted the formation of multimeric Hbs composed of unlike subunits (α2β2). The evolution of this heteromeric quaternary structure was central to the emergence of Hb as a specialized oxygen-transport protein because it provided a mechanism for cooperative oxygen-binding and allosteric regulatory control. Subsequent rounds of duplication and divergence have produced diverse repertoires of α- and β-like globin genes that are ontogenetically regulated such that functionally distinct Hb isoforms are expressed during different stages of prenatal development and postnatal life. In the ancestor of jawless fishes, the proto Mb and Hb genes appear to have been secondarily lost, and the Cygb homolog evolved a specialized respiratory function in blood-oxygen transport. Phylogenetic and comparative genomic analyses of the vertebrate globin gene superfamily have revealed numerous instances in which paralogous globins have convergently evolved similar expression patterns and/or similar functional specializations in different organismal lineages. PMID:22846683

  12. The Arabidopsis homeodomain-leucine zipper II gene family: diversity and redundancy.

    PubMed

    Ciarbelli, Angela Raffaella; Ciolfi, Andrea; Salvucci, Samanta; Ruzza, Valentino; Possenti, Marco; Carabelli, Monica; Fruscalzo, Alberto; Sessa, Giovanna; Morelli, Giorgio; Ruberti, Ida

    2008-11-01

    The Arabidopsis genome contains 10 genes belonging to the HD-Zip II family including ATHB2 and HAT2. Previous work has shown that ATHB2 is rapidly and strongly induced by light quality changes that provoke the shade avoidance response whereas HAT2 expression responds to auxin. Here, we present a genome-wide analysis of the HD-Zip II family. Phylogeny reconstruction revealed that almost all of the HD-Zip II genes can be subdivided into 4 clades (alpha-delta), each clade comprising 2-3 paralogs. Gene expression studies demonstrated that all the gamma and delta genes are regulated by light quality changes. Kinetics of induction, low R/FR/high R/FR reversibility and auxin response analyses strongly suggested that HAT1, HAT3 and ATHB4, as ATHB2, are under the control of the phytochrome system whereas HAT2 is up-regulated by low R/FR as a consequence of the induction of the auxin signaling pathway provoked by FR-rich light. Root and shoot digital in situ revealed that gamma and delta genes are also tightly regulated during plant development with both distinct and overlapping patterns. Phenotypes of gain of function and dominant negative lines demonstrated that one or more of the HD-Zip II gamma genes negatively regulate cell proliferation during leaf development in a high R/FR light environment. Finally, target gene analysis using a chimeric transcription factor (HD-Zip2-V-G), known to activate ATHB2 target genes in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner, revealed that all the 10 HD-Zip II genes can be recognized by the HD-Zip 2 domain in vivo, implying an intricate negative feedback network. PMID:18758690

  13. Refinement of light-responsive transcript lists using rice oligonucleotide arrays: evaluation of gene-redundancy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ki-Hong; Dardick, Christopher; Bartley, Laura E; Cao, Peijian; Phetsom, Jirapa; Canlas, Patrick; Seo, Young-Su; Shultz, Michael; Ouyang, Shu; Yuan, Qiaoping; Frank, Bryan C; Ly, Eugene; Zheng, Li; Jia, Yi; Hsia, An-Ping; An, Kyungsook; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Rocke, David; Lee, Geun Cheol; Schnable, Patrick S; An, Gynheung; Buell, C Robin; Ronald, Pamela C

    2008-01-01

    Studies of gene function are often hampered by gene-redundancy, especially in organisms with large genomes such as rice (Oryza sativa). We present an approach for using transcriptomics data to focus functional studies and address redundancy. To this end, we have constructed and validated an inexpensive and publicly available rice oligonucleotide near-whole genome array, called the rice NSF45K array. We generated expression profiles for light- vs. dark-grown rice leaf tissue and validated the biological significance of the data by analyzing sources of variation and confirming expression trends with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We examined trends in the data by evaluating enrichment of gene ontology terms at multiple false discovery rate thresholds. To compare data generated with the NSF45K array with published results, we developed publicly available, web-based tools (www.ricearray.org). The Oligo and EST Anatomy Viewer enables visualization of EST-based expression profiling data for all genes on the array. The Rice Multi-platform Microarray Search Tool facilitates comparison of gene expression profiles across multiple rice microarray platforms. Finally, we incorporated gene expression and biochemical pathway data to reduce the number of candidate gene products putatively participating in the eight steps of the photorespiration pathway from 52 to 10, based on expression levels of putatively functionally redundant genes. We confirmed the efficacy of this method to cope with redundancy by correctly predicting participation in photorespiration of a gene with five paralogs. Applying these methods will accelerate rice functional genomics. PMID:18836531

  14. Evolution of Cis-Regulatory Elements and Regulatory Networks in Duplicated Genes of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xu Qiu; Adams, Keith L.

    2015-01-01

    Plant genomes contain large numbers of duplicated genes that contribute to the evolution of new functions. Following duplication, genes can exhibit divergence in their coding sequence and their expression patterns. Changes in the cis-regulatory element landscape can result in changes in gene expression patterns. High-throughput methods developed recently can identify potential cis-regulatory elements on a genome-wide scale. Here, we use a recent comprehensive data set of DNase I sequencing-identified cis-regulatory binding sites (footprints) at single-base-pair resolution to compare binding sites and network connectivity in duplicated gene pairs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that duplicated gene pairs vary greatly in their cis-regulatory element architecture, resulting in changes in regulatory network connectivity. Whole-genome duplicates (WGDs) have approximately twice as many footprints in their promoters left by potential regulatory proteins than do tandem duplicates (TDs). The WGDs have a greater average number of footprint differences between paralogs than TDs. The footprints, in turn, result in more regulatory network connections between WGDs and other genes, forming denser, more complex regulatory networks than shown by TDs. When comparing regulatory connections between duplicates, WGDs had more pairs in which the two genes are either partially or fully diverged in their network connections, but fewer genes with no network connections than the TDs. There is evidence of younger TDs and WGDs having fewer unique connections compared with older duplicates. This study provides insights into cis-regulatory element evolution and network divergence in duplicated genes. PMID:26474639

  15. Identification of transcriptional regulatory elements for Ntng1 and Ntng2 genes in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Higher brain function is supported by the precise temporal and spatial regulation of thousands of genes. The mechanisms that underlie transcriptional regulation in the brain, however, remain unclear. The Ntng1 and Ntng2 genes, encoding axonal membrane adhesion proteins netrin-G1 and netrin-G2, respectively, are paralogs that have evolved in vertebrates and are expressed in distinct neuronal subsets in a complementary manner. The characteristic expression patterns of these genes provide a part of the foundation of the cortical layer structure in mammals. Results We used gene-targeting techniques, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-aided transgenesis techniques, and in vivo enhancer assays to examine transcriptional mechanisms in vivo to gain insight into how the characteristic expression patterns of these genes are acquired. Analysis of the gene expression patterns in the presence or absence of netrin-G1 and netrin-G2 functional proteins allowed us to exclude the possibility that a feedback or feedforward mechanism mediates their characteristic expression patterns. Findings from the BAC deletion series revealed that widely distributed combinations of cis-regulatory elements determine the differential gene expression patterns of these genes and that major cis-regulatory elements are located in the 85–45 kb upstream region of Ntng2 and in the 75–60 kb upstream region and intronic region of Ntng1. In vivo enhancer assays using 2-kb evolutionarily conserved regions detected enhancer activity in the distal upstream regions of both genes. Conclusions The complementary expression patterns of Ntng1 and Ntng2 are determined by transcriptional cis-regulatory elements widely scattered in these loci. The cis-regulatory elements characterized in this study will facilitate the development of novel genetic tools for functionally dissecting neural circuits to better understand vertebrate brain function. PMID:24642214

  16. Evolution of Dopamine Receptor Genes of the D1 Class in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kei; Mirabeau, Olivier; Bureau, Charlotte; Blin, Maryline; Michon-Coudouel, Sophie; Demarque, Michaël; Vernier, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The receptors of the dopamine neurotransmitter belong to two unrelated classes named D1 and D2. For the D1 receptor class, only two subtypes are found in mammals, the D1A and D1B, receptors, whereas additional subtypes, named D1C, D1D, and D1X, have been found in other vertebrate species. Here, we analyzed molecular phylogeny, gene synteny, and gene expression pattern of the D1 receptor subtypes in a large range of vertebrate species, which leads us to propose a new view of the evolution of D1 dopamine receptor genes. First, we show that D1C and D1D receptor sequences are encoded by orthologous genes. Second, the previously identified Cypriniform D1X sequence is a teleost-specific paralog of the D1B sequences found in all groups of jawed vertebrates. Third, zebrafish and several sauropsid species possess an additional D1-like gene, which is likely to form another orthology group of vertebrate ancestral genes, which we propose to name D1E. Ancestral jawed vertebrates are thus likely to have possessed four classes of D1 receptor genes—D1A, D1B(X), D1C(D), and D1E—which arose from large-scale gene duplications. The D