Science.gov

Sample records for paramagnetic nmr spectroscopy

  1. Room Temperature Chiral Discrimination in Paramagnetic NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soncini, Alessandro; Calvello, Simone

    2016-04-01

    A recently proposed theory of chiral discrimination in NMR spectroscopy based on the detection of a molecular electric polarization P rotating in a plane perpendicular to the NMR magnetic field [A. D. Buckingham, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 011103 (2014)] is generalized here to paramagnetic systems. Our theory predicts new contributions to P , varying as the square of the inverse temperature. Ab initio calculations for ten Dy3 + complexes, at 293 K, show that, in strongly anisotropic paramagnetic molecules, P can be more than 1000 times larger than in diamagnetic molecules, making paramagnetic NMR chiral discrimination amenable to room temperature detection.

  2. Valence state alternation of copper species doped in HY zeolite as revealed by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lei; Li, Shenhui; Li, Jing; Wang, Qiang; Deng, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) solid-state NMR (ssNMR) was used to monitor the valence state alternation of copper species doped in HY zeolite during catalytic reaction processes. The combination of PRE ssNMR and in-situ NMR spectroscopy facilitates the detection of copper species as well as the monitoring of evolution from reactants, intermediates to products in heterogeneously catalyzed processes, which is of great importance for elucidating the detailed catalytic reaction mechanism. PMID:26970200

  3. The dynamic complex of cytochrome c6 and cytochrome f studied with paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Moreno, Irene; Hulsker, Rinske; Skubak, Pavol; Foerster, Johannes M; Cavazzini, Davide; Finiguerra, Michelina G; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; Rossi, Gian-Luigi; Ullmann, G Matthias; Pannu, Navraj S; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2014-08-01

    The rapid transfer of electrons in the photosynthetic redox chain is achieved by the formation of short-lived complexes of cytochrome b6f with the electron transfer proteins plastocyanin and cytochrome c6. A balance must exist between fast intermolecular electron transfer and rapid dissociation, which requires the formation of a complex that has limited specificity. The interaction of the soluble fragment of cytochrome f and cytochrome c6 from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7119 was studied using NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystal structures of wild type, M58H and M58C cytochrome c6 were determined. The M58C variant is an excellent low potential mimic of the wild type protein and was used in chemical shift perturbation and paramagnetic relaxation NMR experiments to characterize the complex with cytochrome f. The interaction is highly dynamic and can be described as a pure encounter complex, with no dominant stereospecific complex. Ensemble docking calculations and Monte-Carlo simulations suggest a model in which charge-charge interactions pre-orient cytochrome c6 with its haem edge toward cytochrome f to form an ensemble of orientations with extensive contacts between the hydrophobic patches on both cytochromes, bringing the two haem groups sufficiently close to allow for rapid electron transfer. This model of complex formation allows for a gradual increase and decrease of the hydrophobic interactions during association and dissociation, thus avoiding a high transition state barrier that would slow down the dissociation process. PMID:24685428

  4. Structural studies of proteins by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroniec, Christopher P.

    2015-04-01

    Paramagnetism-based nuclear pseudocontact shifts and spin relaxation enhancements contain a wealth of information in solid-state NMR spectra about electron-nucleus distances on the ∼20 Å length scale, far beyond that normally probed through measurements of nuclear dipolar couplings. Such data are especially vital in the context of structural studies of proteins and other biological molecules that suffer from a sparse number of experimentally-accessible atomic distances constraining their three-dimensional fold or intermolecular interactions. This perspective provides a brief overview of the recent developments and applications of paramagnetic magic-angle spinning NMR to biological systems, with primary focus on the investigations of metalloproteins and natively diamagnetic proteins modified with covalent paramagnetic tags.

  5. Analysis of the solution conformations of T4 lysozyme by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Liang; Yang, Yin; Zhang, Lin-Lin; Liang, Haobo; Huber, Thomas; Su, Xun-Cheng; Otting, Gottfried

    2016-02-17

    A large number of crystal structures of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme (T4-L) have shown that it contains two subdomains, which can arrange in a compact conformation (closed state) or, in mutants of T4-L, more extended structures (open state). In solution, wild-type T4-L displays only a single set of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals, masking any conformational heterogeneity. To probe the conformational space of T4-L, we generated a site-specific lanthanide binding site by attaching 4-mercaptomethyl dipicolinic acid via a disulfide bond to Cys44 in the triple-mutant C54T/C97A/S44C of T4-L and measured pseudocontact shifts (PCS) and magnetically induced residual dipolar couplings (RDC). The data indicate that, in solution and in the absence of substrate, the structure of T4-L is on average more open than suggested by the closed conformation of the crystal structure of wild-type T4-L. A slightly improved fit was obtained by assuming a population-weighted two-state model involving an even more open conformation and the closed state, but paramagnetic relaxation enhancements measured with Gd(3+) argue against such a conformational equilibrium. The fit could not be improved by including a third conformation picked from the hundreds of crystal structures available for T4-L mutants. PMID:26680012

  6. Electromagnetic susceptibility anisotropy and its importance for paramagnetic NMR and optical spectroscopy in lanthanide coordination chemistry.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Octavia A; Edkins, Robert M; Faulkner, Stephen; Kenwright, Alan M; Parker, David; Rogers, Nicola J; Shuvaev, Sergey

    2016-04-19

    The importance of the directional dependence of magnetic susceptibility in magnetic resonance and of electric susceptibility in the optical spectroscopy of lanthanide coordination complexes is assessed. A body of more reliable shift, relaxation and optical emission data is emerging for well-defined isostructural series of complexes, allowing detailed comparative analyses to be undertaken. Such work is highlighting the limitations of the current NMR shift and relaxation theories, as well as emphasising the absence of a compelling theoretical framework to explain optical emission phenomena. PMID:26898996

  7. High-resolution paramagnetically enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins at fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Ward, Meaghan E; Wang, Shenlin; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Hutchins, Howard; Fey, Michael; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) is well suited for the study of membrane proteins in membrane mimetic and native membrane environments. These experiments often suffer from low sensitivity, due in part to the long recycle delays required for magnetization and probe recovery, as well as detection of low gamma nuclei. In ultrafast MAS experiments sensitivity can be enhanced through the use of low power sequences combined with paramagnetically enhanced relaxation times to reduce recycle delays, as well as proton detected experiments. In this work we investigate the sensitivity of (13)C and (1)H detected experiments applied to 27 kDa membrane proteins reconstituted in lipids and packed in small 1.3 mm MAS NMR rotors. We demonstrate that spin diffusion is sufficient to uniformly distribute paramagnetic relaxation enhancement provided by either covalently bound or dissolved CuEDTA over 7TM alpha helical membrane proteins. Using paramagnetic enhancement and low power decoupling in carbon detected experiments we can recycle experiments ~13 times faster than under traditional conditions. However, due to the small sample volume the overall sensitivity per unit time is still lower than that seen in the 3.2 mm probe. Proton detected experiments, however, showed increased efficiency and it was found that the 1.3 mm probe could achieve sensitivity comparable to that of the 3.2 mm in a given amount of time. This is an attractive prospect for samples of limited quantity, as this allows for a reduction in the amount of protein that needs to be produced without the necessity for increased experimental time. PMID:24338448

  8. 1,3-Alternate calix[4]arene nitronyl nitroxide tetraradical and diradical: synthesis, X-ray crystallography, paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy, and magnetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rajca, Andrzej; Pink, Maren; Mukherjee, Sumit; Rajca, Suchada; Das, Kausik

    2008-04-02

    Calix[4]arenes constrained to 1,3-alternate conformation and functionalized at the upper rim with four and two nitronyl nitroxides have been synthesized, and characterized by X-ray crystallography, magnetic resonance (EPR and {sup 1}H NMR) spectroscopy, and magnetic studies. Such calix[4]arene tetraradicals and diradicals provide scaffolds for through-bond and through-space intramolecular exchange couplings.

  9. Formation of oxo-centered trinuclear chromium carboxylate complexes and hydrolysis of Cr3 as established by paramagnetic (2)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Royer, April C; Russell, Kathryn; Belmore, Ken; Vincent, John B

    2014-02-01

    Paramagnetic (2)H NMR techniques have been utilized to study the mechanism of formation of the oxo-bridged trinuclear Cr(III) carboxylate assembly [Cr3O(O2CCD3)6(H2O)3](+) from [Cr(H2O)6](3+) and d4-acetic acid. These studies reveal a complex mechanism dominated by the involvement of dinuclear intermediates. The oxo-bridged trinuclear Cr(III) carboxylate assembly [Cr3O(O2CCH2CH3)6(H2O)3](+) has been suggested for use as a chromium nutritional supplement and therapeutic agent as it is readily absorbed and has been proposed to enter cells intact. The paramagnetic (2)H NMR technique has been utilized to follow the stability of this Cr(III) carboxylate assembly in biologically relevant media; its stability is consistent with the assembly being able to enter cells intact. PMID:24239908

  10. Installation of a Rigid EDTA-Like Motif into a Protein ?-Helix for Paramagnetic NMR Spectroscopy with Cobalt(II) Ions.

    PubMed

    Swarbrick, James D; Ung, Phuc; Dennis, Matthew L; Lee, Michael D; Chhabra, Sandeep; Graham, Bim

    2016-01-01

    Coupling two copies of an iminodiacetic acid-cysteine hybrid ligand to a pair of cysteine residues positioned in an i, i+4 arrangement within a protein ?-helix leads to generation of an EDTA-like metal ion-binding motif. Rigid binding of a Co(II) ion by this motif produces pseudo-contact shifts suitable for paramagnetic NMR structural studies. PMID:26634335

  11. Paramagnetic NMR probes for characterization of the dynamic conformations and interactions of oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Kato, Koichi; Yamaguchi, Takumi

    2015-10-01

    Paramagnetism-assisted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques have recently been applied to a wide variety of biomolecular systems, using sophisticated immobilization methods to attach paramagnetic probes, such as spin labels and lanthanide-chelating groups, at specific sites of the target biomolecules. This is also true in the field of carbohydrate NMR spectroscopy. NMR analysis of oligosaccharides is often precluded by peak overlap resulting from the lack of variability of local chemical structures, by the insufficiency of conformational restraints from nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) data due to low proton density, and moreover, by the inherently flexible nature of carbohydrate chains. Paramagnetic probes attached to the reducing ends of oligosaccharides cause paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) and/or pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) resolve the peak overlap problem. These spectral perturbations can be sources of long-range atomic distance information, which complements the local conformational information derived from J couplings and NOEs. Furthermore, paramagnetic NMR approaches, in conjunction with computational methods, have opened up possibilities for the description of dynamic conformational ensembles of oligosaccharides in solution. Several applications of paramagnetic NMR techniques are presented to demonstrate their utility for characterizing the conformational dynamics of oligosaccharides and for probing the carbohydrate-recognition modes of proteins. These techniques can be applied to the characterization of transient, non-stoichiometric interactions and will contribute to the visualization of dynamic biomolecular processes involving sugar chains. PMID:26050258

  12. Paramagnetic relaxation of long-lived coherences in solution NMR.

    PubMed

    Singh, Maninder; Srinivas, Chinthalapalli; Deb, Mayukh; Kurur, Narayanan D

    2013-12-01

    Long-lived coherences (LLCs) are known to have lifetimes much longer than transverse magnetization or single quantum coherences (SQCs). The effect of paramagnetic ions on the relaxation of LLCs is not known. This is particularly important, as LLCs have potential applications in various fields like analytical NMR, in vivo NMR and MR imaging methods. We study here the behaviour of LLCs in the presence of paramagnetic relaxation agents. The stepwise increase in the concentration of the metal ion is followed by measuring various relaxation rates. The effect of paramagnetic ions is analysed in terms of the external random field's contribution to the relaxation of two coupled protons in 2,3,6-trichlorobenzaldehyde. The LLCs relax faster than ordinary SQCs in the presence of paramagnetic ions of varying character. This is explained on the basis of an increase in the contribution of the external random field to relaxation due to a paramagnetic relaxation mechanism. Comparison is also made with ordinary Zeeman relaxation rates like R1, R2, R1ρ and also with rate of relaxation of long-lived states RLLS which are known to be less sensitive to paramagnetically induced relaxation. Also, the extent of correlation of random fields at two proton sites is studied and is found to be strongly correlated with each other. The obtained correlation constant is found to be independent of the nature of added paramagnetic impurities. PMID:24151221

  13. Homogeneity of doping with paramagnetic ions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyu; Celinski, Vinicius R; Weber, Johannes; Kunkel, Nathalie; Kohlmann, Holger; Schmedt Auf der Günne, Jörn

    2016-04-14

    In NMR, paramagnetic dopants change the relaxation behavior and the chemical shift of the nuclei in their immediate environment. Based on the concept that the "immediate environment" in a diamagnetic host material can be described as a sphere with radius r0, we developed a function for the fraction of unperturbed nuclei (the fraction of nuclei outside the sphere) which gives a link between the effective radius and the doping concentration. In the case of a homogeneous doping scenario a characteristic dependence is observed in both theory and experiment. We validated the model on a sample series where paramagnetic Eu(ii) ions are doped into crystalline SrH2. The fraction of unperturbed nuclei was determined from the (1)H NMR signal and follows the predicted curve for a homogeneous doping scenario where the radius r0 is 17 Å. PMID:27003194

  14. Site-specific tagging proteins with a rigid, small and stable transition metal chelator, 8-hydroxyquinoline, for paramagnetic NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin; Huang, Feng; Huber, Thomas; Su, Xun-Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Design of a paramagnetic metal binding motif in a protein is a valuable way for understanding the function, dynamics and interactions of a protein by paramagnetic NMR spectroscopy. Several strategies have been proposed to site-specifically tag proteins with paramagnetic lanthanide ions. Here we report a simple approach of engineering a transition metal binding motif via site-specific labelling of a protein with 2-vinyl-8-hydroxyquinoline (2V-8HQ). The protein-2V-8HQ adduct forms a stable complex with transition metal ions, Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). The paramagnetic effects generated by these transition metal ions were evaluated by NMR spectroscopy. We show that 2V-8HQ is a rigid and stable transition metal binding tag. The coordination of the metal ion can be assisted by protein sidechains. More importantly, tunable paramagnetic tensors are simply obtained in an α-helix that possesses solvent exposed residues in positions i and i + 3, where i is the residue to be mutated to cysteine, i + 3 is Gln or Glu or i - 4 is His. The coordination of a sidechain carboxylate/amide or imidazole to cobalt(II) results in different structural geometries, leading to different paramagnetic tensors as shown by experimental data. PMID:26732873

  15. Paramagnetic materials and practical algorithmic cooling for NMR quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Jose M.; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2003-08-01

    Algorithmic cooling is a method devised by Boykin, Mor Rowchodhury, Vatan and Vrijen (PNAS Mar '02) for initializing NMR systems in general and NMR quantum computers in particular. The algorithm recursively employs two steps. The first is an adiabatic entropy compression of the computation qubits of the system. The second step is an isothermal heat transfer from the system to the environment through a set of reset qubits that reach thermal relaxation rapidly. To allow experimental algorithmic cooling, the thermalization time of the reset qubits must be much shorter than the thermalization time of the computation qubits. We investigated the effect of the paramagnetic material Chromium Acetylacetonate on the thermalization times of computation qubits (carbons) and reset qubit (hydrogen). We report here the accomplishment of an improved ratio of the thermalization times from T1(H)/T1(C) of approximately 5 to around 15. The magnetic ions from the Chromium Acetylacetonate interact with the reset qubit reducing their thermalization time, while their effect on the less exposed computation qubits is found to be weaker. An experimental demonstrating of non adiabatic cooling by thermalization and magnetic ion is currently performed by our group based on these results.

  16. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Written for chemists and biochemists who are not NMR spectroscopists, but who wish to use the new techniques of two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy, this book brings together for the first time much of the practical and experimental data needed. It also serves as information source for industrial, academic, and graduate student researchers who already use NMR spectroscopy, but not yet in two dimensions. The authors describe the use of 2-D NMR in a wide variety of chemical and biochemical fields, among them peptides, steroids, oligo- and poly-saccharides, nucleic acids, natural products (including terpenoids, alkaloids, and coal-derived heterocyclics), and organic synthetic intermediates. They consider throughout the book both the advantages and limitations of using 2-D NMR.

  17. Magnetic couplings in the chemical shift of paramagnetic NMR.

    PubMed

    Vaara, Juha; Rouf, Syed Awais; Mareš, Jiří

    2015-10-13

    We apply the Kurland-McGarvey (J. Magn. Reson. 1970, 2, 286) theory for the NMR shielding of paramagnetic molecules, particularly its special case limited to the ground-state multiplet characterized by zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction of the form S·D·S. The correct formulation for this problem was recently presented by Soncini and Van den Heuvel (J. Chem. Phys. 2013, 138, 054113). With the effective electron spin quantum number S, the theory involves 2S+1 states, of which all but one are low-lying excited states, between which magnetic couplings take place by Zeeman and hyperfine interactions. We investigate these couplings as a function of temperature, focusing on both the high- and low-temperature behaviors. As has been seen in work by others, the full treatment of magnetic couplings is crucial for a realistic description of the temperature behavior of NMR shielding up to normal measurement temperatures. At high temperatures, depending on the magnitude of ZFS, the effect of magnetic couplings diminishes, and the Zeeman and hyperfine interactions become effectively averaged in the thermally occupied states of the multiplet. At still higher temperatures, the ZFS may be omitted altogether, and the shielding properties may be evaluated using a doublet-like formula, with all the 2S+1 states becoming effectively degenerate at the limit of vanishing magnetic field. We demonstrate these features using first-principles calculations of Ni(II), Co(II), Cr(II), and Cr(III) complexes, which have ZFS of different sizes and signs. A non-monotonic inverse temperature dependence of the hyperfine shift is predicted for axially symmetric integer-spin systems with a positive D parameter of ZFS. This is due to the magnetic coupling terms that are proportional to kT at low temperatures, canceling the Curie-type 1/kT prefactor of the hyperfine shielding in this case. PMID:26574272

  18. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic…

  19. Modern NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinski, Lynn W.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses direct chemical information that can be obtained from modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, concentrating on the types of problems that can be solved. Shows how selected methods provide information about polymers, bipolymers, biochemistry, small organic molecules, inorganic compounds, and compounds oriented in a magnetic

  20. Introduction to Spin Label Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melanson, Michelle; Sood, Abha; Torok, Fanni; Torok, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory exercise is described to demonstrate the biochemical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The beta93 cysteine residue of hemoglobin is labeled by the covalent binding of 3-maleimido-proxyl (5-MSL) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-3-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), respectively. The excess…

  1. Introduction to Spin Label Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melanson, Michelle; Sood, Abha; Torok, Fanni; Torok, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate laboratory exercise is described to demonstrate the biochemical applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The beta93 cysteine residue of hemoglobin is labeled by the covalent binding of 3-maleimido-proxyl (5-MSL) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-1-oxyl-3-methyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSL), respectively. The excess

  2. Detection of Nitric Oxide by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has been used in a number of ways to study nitric oxide chemistry and biology. As an intrinsically stable and relatively unreactive diatomic free radical, the challenges for detecting this species by EPR are somewhat different than those for transient radical species. This review gives a basic introduction to EPR spectroscopy and discusses its uses to assess and quantify nitric oxide formation in biological systems. PMID:20304044

  3. Structural Analysis of Protein-RNA Complexes in Solution Using NMR Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancements.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Janosch; Warner, Lisa R; Simon, Bernd; Geerlof, Arie; Mackereth, Cameron D; Sattler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Biological activity in the cell is predominantly mediated by large multiprotein and protein-nucleic acid complexes that act together to ensure functional fidelity. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the only method that can provide information for high-resolution three-dimensional structures and the conformational dynamics of these complexes in solution. Mapping of binding interfaces and molecular interactions along with the characterization of conformational dynamics is possible for very large protein complexes. In contrast, de novo structure determination by NMR becomes very time consuming and difficult for protein complexes larger than 30 kDa as data are noisy and sparse. Fortunately, high-resolution structures are often available for individual domains or subunits of a protein complex and thus sparse data can be used to define their arrangement and dynamics within the assembled complex. In these cases, NMR can therefore be efficiently combined with complementary solution techniques, such as small-angle X-ray or neutron scattering, to provide a comprehensive description of the structure and dynamics of protein complexes in solution. Particularly useful are NMR-derived paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs), which provide long-range distance restraints (ca. 20Å) for structural analysis of large complexes and also report on conformational dynamics in solution. Here, we describe the use of PREs from sample production to structure calculation, focusing on protein-RNA complexes. On the basis of recent examples from our own research, we demonstrate the utility, present protocols, and discuss potential pitfalls when using PREs for studying the structure and dynamic features of protein-RNA complexes. PMID:26068746

  4. Work in progress: potential oral and intravenous paramagnetic NMR contrast agents

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Stewart, R.G.; Clanton, J.A.; Jones, M.M.; Lukehart, C.M.; Partain, C.L.; James, A.E. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    The potential use of paramagnetic compounds as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) contrast agents was examined in vitro. The T1 relaxation times for serial dilutions of Cu/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 3 +/, Fe/sup 3 +/, and Mn/sup 2 +/ ions in saline, gadolinium oxalate (a potential oral contrast agent) in suspension, and chromium EDTA (a potential intravenous contrast agent) in solution were determined. The effect on T1 of increasing the concentration of oxygen in solution was also examined. The relative magnitude of the decrease in T1 was, as expected, proportional to both the concentration of the paramagnetic substance and its effective magnetic moment. Thus NMR has the potential to detect differences in tissue oxygenation. By incorporating paramagnetic metal ions into insoluble compounds or stable complexes, toxicity can be dramatically reduced while maintaining a significant paramagnetic effect. Highly insoluble paramagnetic compounds or stable paramagnetic ion complexes can thus be utilized as effective NMR contrast agents with significantly diminished toxicity.

  5. Structural proteomics by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joon; Lee, Woonghee; Lee, Weontae

    2008-08-01

    Structural proteomics is one of the powerful research areas in the postgenomic era, elucidating structure-function relationships of uncharacterized gene products based on the 3D protein structure. It proposes biochemical and cellular functions of unannotated proteins and thereby identifies potential drug design and protein engineering targets. Recently, a number of pioneering groups in structural proteomics research have achieved proof of structural proteomic theory by predicting the 3D structures of hypothetical proteins that successfully identified the biological functions of those proteins. The pioneering groups made use of a number of techniques, including NMR spectroscopy, which has been applied successfully to structural proteomics studies over the past 10 years. In addition, advances in hardware design, data acquisition methods, sample preparation and automation of data analysis have been developed and successfully applied to high-throughput structure determination techniques. These efforts ensure that NMR spectroscopy will become an important methodology for performing structural proteomics research on a genomic scale. NMR-based structural proteomics together with x-ray crystallography will provide a comprehensive structural database to predict the basic biological functions of hypothetical proteins identified by the genome projects. PMID:18761469

  6. Hyperpolarized 131Xe NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stupic, Karl F.; Cleveland, Zackary I.; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 131Xe with up to 2.2% spin polarization (i.e., 5000-fold signal enhancement at 9.4 T) was obtained after separation from the rubidium vapor of the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) process. The SEOP was applied for several minutes in a stopped-flow mode, and the fast, quadrupolar-driven T1 relaxation of this spin I = 3/2 noble gas isotope required a rapid subsequent rubidium removal and swift transfer into the high magnetic field region for NMR detection. Because of the xenon density dependent 131Xe quadrupolar relaxation in the gas phase, the SEOP polarization build-up exhibits an even more pronounced dependence on xenon partial pressure than that observed in 129Xe SEOP. 131Xe is the only stable noble gas isotope with a positive gyromagnetic ratio and shows therefore a different relative phase between hp signal and thermal signal compared to all other noble gases. The gas phase 131Xe NMR spectrum displays a surface and magnetic field dependent quadrupolar splitting that was found to have additional gas pressure and gas composition dependence. The splitting was reduced by the presence of water vapor that presumably influences xenon-surface interactions. The hp 131Xe spectrum shows differential line broadening, suggesting the presence of strong adsorption sites. Beyond hp 131Xe NMR spectroscopy studies, a general equation for the high temperature, thermal spin polarization, P, for spin I⩾1/2 nuclei is presented. PMID:21051249

  7. NMR Spectroscopy and Its Value: A Primer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is widely used by chemists. Furthermore, the use of NMR spectroscopy to solve structures of macromolecules or to examine protein-ligand interactions is popular. Yet, few students entering graduate education in biological sciences have been introduced to this method or its utility. Over the last six…

  8. Chiral discrimination in NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, A David

    2015-11-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance is the most important form of molecular spectroscopy in chemistry and biochemistry but it is normally blind to chirality. It was predicted in 2004 that precessing nuclear spins in chiral molecules in a liquid in a strong magnetic field induce a rotating electric polarization that is of opposite sign for enantiomers. This polarization arises from the distortion of the electronic structure by the nuclear magnetic moment in the presence of the strong magnetic field and is equivalent to the linear effect of an electric field on the nuclear shielding tensor. The polarization is strongly enhanced in dipolar molecules through the partial orientation of the permanent dipole through the antisymmetric part of the nuclear magnetic shielding tensor. Alternatively, an applied electric field will induce a chirally sensitive magnetization perpendicular to the field and to the nuclear spin. Progress towards the experimental realization of chiral discrimination by NMR is assessed. PMID:26537400

  9. Sensitivity and resolution enhanced solid-state NMR for paramagnetic systems and biomolecules under very fast magic angle spinning.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Sudhakar; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2013-09-17

    Recent research in fast magic angle spinning (MAS) methods has drastically improved the resolution and sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy of biomolecules and materials in solids. In this Account, we summarize recent and ongoing developments in this area by presenting (13)C and (1)H solid-state NMR (SSNMR) studies on paramagnetic systems and biomolecules under fast MAS from our laboratories. First, we describe how very fast MAS (VFMAS) at the spinning speed of at least 20 kHz allows us to overcome major difficulties in (1)H and (13)C high-resolution SSNMR of paramagnetic systems. As a result, we can enhance both sensitivity and resolution by up to a few orders of magnitude. Using fast recycling (?ms/scan) with short (1)H T1 values, we can perform (1)H SSNMR microanalysis of paramagnetic systems on the microgram scale with greatly improved sensitivity over that observed for diamagnetic systems. Second, we discuss how VFMAS at a spinning speed greater than ?40 kHz can enhance the sensitivity and resolution of (13)C biomolecular SSNMR measurements. Low-power (1)H decoupling schemes under VFMAS offer excellent spectral resolution for (13)C SSNMR by nominal (1)H RF irradiation at ?10 kHz. By combining the VFMAS approach with enhanced (1)H T1 relaxation by paramagnetic doping, we can achieve extremely fast recycling in modern biomolecular SSNMR experiments. Experiments with (13)C-labeled ubiquitin doped with 10 mM Cu-EDTA demonstrate how effectively this new approach, called paramagnetic assisted condensed data collection (PACC), enhances the sensitivity. Lastly, we examine (13)C SSNMR measurements for biomolecules under faster MAS at a higher field. Our preliminary (13)C SSNMR data of A? amyloid fibrils and GB1 microcrystals acquired at (1)H NMR frequencies of 750-800 MHz suggest that the combined use of the PACC approach and ultrahigh fields could allow for routine multidimensional SSNMR analyses of proteins at the 50-200 nmol level. Also, we briefly discuss the prospects for studying bimolecules using (13)C SSNMR under ultrafast MAS at the spinning speed of ?100 kHz. PMID:23889329

  10. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm2 silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  11. Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips.

    PubMed

    Ha, Dongwan; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Sun, Nan; Song, Yi-Qiao; Ham, Donhee

    2014-08-19

    State-of-the-art NMR spectrometers using superconducting magnets have enabled, with their ultrafine spectral resolution, the determination of the structure of large molecules such as proteins, which is one of the most profound applications of modern NMR spectroscopy. Many chemical and biotechnological applications, however, involve only small-to-medium size molecules, for which the ultrafine resolution of the bulky, expensive, and high-maintenance NMR spectrometers is not required. For these applications, there is a critical need for portable, affordable, and low-maintenance NMR spectrometers to enable in-field, on-demand, or online applications (e.g., quality control, chemical reaction monitoring) and co-use of NMR with other analytical methods (e.g., chromatography, electrophoresis). As a critical step toward NMR spectrometer miniaturization, small permanent magnets with high field homogeneity have been developed. In contrast, NMR spectrometer electronics capable of modern multidimensional spectroscopy have thus far remained bulky. Complementing the magnet miniaturization, here we integrate the NMR spectrometer electronics into 4-mm(2) silicon chips. Furthermore, we perform various multidimensional NMR spectroscopies by operating these spectrometer electronics chips together with a compact permanent magnet. This combination of the spectrometer-electronics-on-a-chip with a permanent magnet represents a useful step toward miniaturization of the overall NMR spectrometer into a portable platform. PMID:25092330

  12. A Guided Inquiry Approach to NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, Laura E.; Lisensky, George C.; Spencer, Brock

    1998-04-01

    We present a novel way to introduce NMR spectroscopy into the general chemistry curriculum as part of a week-long aspirin project in our one-semester introductory course. Aspirin is synthesized by reacting salicylic acid and acetic anhydride. Purity is determined by titration and IR and NMR spectroscopy. Students compare IR and NMR spectra of their aspirin product to a series of reference spectra obtained by the class. Students are able to interpret the IR spectra of their aspirin using IR data from previous experiments. NMR is introduced by having students collect 1H NMR spectra of a series of reference compounds chosen to include some of the structural features of aspirin and compare spectra and structures of the reference compounds to develop a correlation chart for chemical shifts. This process is done in small groups using shared class data and is guided by a series of questions designed to relate the different kinds of hydrogen atoms to number and position of peaks in the NMR spectrum. Students then identify the peaks in the NMR spectrum of their aspirin product and relate percent purity by titration with spectral results and percent yield. This is an enjoyable project that combines the synthesis of a familiar material with a guided inquiry-based introduction to NMR spectroscopy.

  13. Two-dimensional NMR measurement and point dipole model prediction of paramagnetic shift tensors in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walder, Brennan J.; Dey, Krishna K.; Davis, Michael C.; Baltisberger, Jay H.; Grandinetti, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    A new two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiment to separate and correlate the first-order quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions is described. This experiment, which we call the shifting-d echo experiment, allows a more precise determination of tensor principal components values and their relative orientation. It is designed using the recently introduced symmetry pathway concept. A comparison of the shifting-d experiment with earlier proposed methods is presented and experimentally illustrated in the case of 2H (I = 1) paramagnetic shift and quadrupolar tensors of CuCl2ṡ2D2O. The benefits of the shifting-d echo experiment over other methods are a factor of two improvement in sensitivity and the suppression of major artifacts. From the 2D lineshape analysis of the shifting-d spectrum, the 2H quadrupolar coupling parameters are = 118.1 kHz and <ηq> = 0.88, and the 2H paramagnetic shift tensor anisotropy parameters are <ζP> = - 152.5 ppm and <ηP> = 0.91. The orientation of the quadrupolar coupling principal axis system (PAS) relative to the paramagnetic shift anisotropy principal axis system is given by ( α , β , γ ) = ( /π 2 , /π 2 , 0 ) . Using a simple ligand hopping model, the tensor parameters in the absence of exchange are estimated. On the basis of this analysis, the instantaneous principal components and orientation of the quadrupolar coupling are found to be in excellent agreement with previous measurements. A new point dipole model for predicting the paramagnetic shift tensor is proposed yielding significantly better agreement than previously used models. In the new model, the dipoles are displaced from nuclei at positions associated with high electron density in the singly occupied molecular orbital predicted from ligand field theory.

  14. Two-dimensional NMR measurement and point dipole model prediction of paramagnetic shift tensors in solids.

    PubMed

    Walder, Brennan J; Dey, Krishna K; Davis, Michael C; Baltisberger, Jay H; Grandinetti, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    A new two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiment to separate and correlate the first-order quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions is described. This experiment, which we call the shifting-d echo experiment, allows a more precise determination of tensor principal components values and their relative orientation. It is designed using the recently introduced symmetry pathway concept. A comparison of the shifting-d experiment with earlier proposed methods is presented and experimentally illustrated in the case of (2)H (I = 1) paramagnetic shift and quadrupolar tensors of CuCl2⋅2D2O. The benefits of the shifting-d echo experiment over other methods are a factor of two improvement in sensitivity and the suppression of major artifacts. From the 2D lineshape analysis of the shifting-d spectrum, the (2)H quadrupolar coupling parameters are 〈Cq〉 = 118.1 kHz and 〈ηq〉 = 0.88, and the (2)H paramagnetic shift tensor anisotropy parameters are 〈ζP〉 = - 152.5 ppm and 〈ηP〉 = 0.91. The orientation of the quadrupolar coupling principal axis system (PAS) relative to the paramagnetic shift anisotropy principal axis system is given by (α,β,γ)=(π2,π2,0). Using a simple ligand hopping model, the tensor parameters in the absence of exchange are estimated. On the basis of this analysis, the instantaneous principal components and orientation of the quadrupolar coupling are found to be in excellent agreement with previous measurements. A new point dipole model for predicting the paramagnetic shift tensor is proposed yielding significantly better agreement than previously used models. In the new model, the dipoles are displaced from nuclei at positions associated with high electron density in the singly occupied molecular orbital predicted from ligand field theory. PMID:25573554

  15. Scalar Relativistic Computations and Localized Orbital Analyses of Nuclear Hyperfine Coupling and Paramagnetic NMR Chemical Shifts

    SciTech Connect

    Aquino, Fredy W.; Pritchard, Ben; Autschbach, Jochen

    2012-02-14

    A method is reported by which calculated hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) and paramagnetic NMR (pNMR) chemical shifts can be analyzed in a chemically intuitive way by decomposition into contributions from localized molecular orbitals (LMOs). A new module for density functional calculations with nonhybrid functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids, utilizing the two-component relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA), has been implemented in the parallel open-source NWChem quantum chemistry package. Benchmark results are reported for a test set of few-atom molecules with light and heavy elements. Finite nucleus effects on ¹⁹⁹Hg HFCCs are shown to be on the order of -11 to -15%. A proof of concept for the LMO analysis is provided for the metal and fluorine HFCCs of TiF₃ and NpF₆. Calculated pNMR chemical shifts are reported for the 2-methylphenyl-t-butylnitroxide radical and for five cyclopentadienyl (Cp) sandwich complexes with 3d metals. Nickelocene and vanadocene carbon pNMR shifts are analyzed in detail, demonstrating that the large carbon pNMR shifts calculated as +1540 for Ni (exptl.: +1514) and -443 for V (exptl.: -510) are caused by different spin-polarization mechanisms. For Ni, Cp to Ni π back-donation dominates the result, whereas for vanadocene, V to Cp σ donation with relaxation of the carbon 1s shells can be identified as the dominant mechanism.

  16. Accurate structure and dynamics of the metal-site of paramagnetic metalloproteins from NMR parameters using natural bond orbitals.

    PubMed

    Hansen, D Flemming; Westler, William M; Kunze, Micha B A; Markley, John L; Weinhold, Frank; Led, Jens J

    2012-03-14

    A natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis of unpaired electron spin density in metalloproteins is presented, which allows a fast and robust calculation of paramagnetic NMR parameters. Approximately 90% of the unpaired electron spin density occupies metal-ligand NBOs, allowing the majority of the density to be modeled by only a few NBOs that reflect the chemical bonding environment. We show that the paramagnetic relaxation rate of protons can be calculated accurately using only the metal-ligand NBOs and that these rates are in good agreement with corresponding rates measured experimentally. This holds, in particular, for protons of ligand residues where the point-dipole approximation breaks down. To describe the paramagnetic relaxation of heavy nuclei, also the electron spin density in the local orbitals must be taken into account. Geometric distance restraints for (15)N can be derived from the paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and the Fermi contact shift when local NBOs are included in the analysis. Thus, the NBO approach allows us to include experimental paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N nuclei as restraints in a structure optimization protocol. We performed a molecular dynamics simulation and structure determination of oxidized rubredoxin using the experimentally obtained paramagnetic NMR parameters of (15)N. The corresponding structures obtained are in good agreement with the crystal structure of rubredoxin. Thus, the NBO approach allows an accurate description of the geometric structure and the dynamics of metalloproteins, when NMR parameters are available of nuclei in the immediate vicinity of the metal-site. PMID:22329704

  17. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  18. High-resolution structural insights into bone: a solid-state NMR relaxation study utilizing paramagnetic doping.

    PubMed

    Mroue, Kamal H; MacKinnon, Neil; Xu, Jiadi; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H; Morris, Michael D; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2012-09-27

    The hierarchical heterogeneous architecture of bone imposes significant challenges to structural and dynamic studies conducted by traditional biophysical techniques. High-resolution solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy is capable of providing detailed atomic-level structural insights into such traditionally challenging materials. However, the relatively long data-collection time necessary to achieve a reliable signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) remains a major limitation for the widespread application of SSNMR on bone and related biomaterials. In this study, we attempt to overcome this limitation by employing the paramagnetic relaxation properties of copper(II) ions to shorten the (1)H intrinsic spin-lattice (T(1)) relaxation times measured in natural-abundance (13)C cross-polarization (CP) magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR experiments on bone tissues for the purpose of accelerating the data acquisition time in SSNMR. To this end, high-resolution solid-state (13)C CPMAS experiments were conducted on type I collagen (bovine tendon), bovine cortical bone, and demineralized bovine cortical bone, each in powdered form, to measure the (1)H T(1) values in the absence and in the presence of 30 mM Cu(II)(NH(4))(2)EDTA. Our results show that the (1)H T(1) values were successfully reduced by a factor of 2.2, 2.9, and 3.2 for bovine cortical bone, type I collagen, and demineralized bone, respectively, without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition. In addition, paramagnetic quenching of particular (13)C NMR resonances on exposure to Cu(2+) ions in the absence of mineral was also observed, potentially suggesting the relative proximity of three main amino acids in the protein backbone (glycine, proline, and alanine) to the bone mineral surface. PMID:22953757

  19. Medical applications of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy with stable isotopes. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1983-01-01

    The current status of NMR imaging and NMR spectroscopy are summarized. For the most part examples from the March 1983 Puerto Rico symposium are used to illustrate the utility of NMR in medicine. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Characterization of Hydrogenated Fullerenes by NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedenström, Mattias; Wågberg, Thomas; Johnels, Dan

    NMR spectroscopy is so far the only analytical technique that has been used to get a detailed structural characterization of hydrogenated fullerenes. A substantial amount of information derived from different NMR experiments can thus be found in the literature for a number of fullerenes hydrogenated to various degrees. These studies have benefitted from the fact that chemical shifts of 1H and 13C and in some cases also 3He can be used to obtain structural information of these compounds. Such results, together with discussions about different NMR experiments and general considerations regarding sample preparations, are summarized in this chapter. The unique information, both structural and physicochemical, that can be derived from different NMR experiments ensures that this technique will continue to be of central importance in characterization of hydrogenated fullerenes.

  1. Picoliter H-1 NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.); Wind, Robert A.)

    2002-02-01

    A RF probe that fits inside the bore of a small gradient coil package is described for routine 1H-NMR microscopy measurements on small samples. The probe operates at 500 MHz and houses a 267-um-diameter solenoid transceiver. When used in three dimensional chemical shift imaging (3D-CSI) experiments, the measured signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is shown to be within 20-30 percent of theoretical limits formulated by only considering the solenoid's resistive losses. This is illustrated using a 100-um-diameter globule of triacylglycerols ({approx}900mM) that may be an oocyte precursor in young Xenopus Laevis frogs, and water sample containing choline at a concentration often found in live cells ({approx}33mM). In chemical shift images generated using a few thousand scans, the choline methyl line is found to have an acceptable SNR in resolved from just 5 picoliters in the Xenopus globule. It is concluded that the probe's sensitivity is sufficient for performing 1H-NMR on picoliter-scale volumes in biological cells and tissues.

  2. An introduction to biological NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  3. An Introduction to Biological NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for biologists interested in the structure, dynamics, and interactions of biological macromolecules. This review aims at presenting in an accessible manner the requirements and limitations of this technique. As an introduction, the history of NMR will highlight how the method evolved from physics to chemistry and finally to biology over several decades. We then introduce the NMR spectral parameters used in structural biology, namely the chemical shift, the J-coupling, nuclear Overhauser effects, and residual dipolar couplings. Resonance assignment, the required step for any further NMR study, bears a resemblance to jigsaw puzzle strategy. The NMR spectral parameters are then converted into angle and distances and used as input using restrained molecular dynamics to compute a bundle of structures. When interpreting a NMR-derived structure, the biologist has to judge its quality on the basis of the statistics provided. When the 3D structure is a priori known by other means, the molecular interaction with a partner can be mapped by NMR: information on the binding interface as well as on kinetic and thermodynamic constants can be gathered. NMR is suitable to monitor, over a wide range of frequencies, protein fluctuations that play a crucial role in their biological function. In the last section of this review, intrinsically disordered proteins, which have escaped the attention of classical structural biology, are discussed in the perspective of NMR, one of the rare available techniques able to describe structural ensembles. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 16 MCP). PMID:23831612

  4. Two-dimensional NMR measurement and point dipole model prediction of paramagnetic shift tensors in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Walder, Brennan J.; Davis, Michael C.; Grandinetti, Philip J.; Dey, Krishna K.; Baltisberger, Jay H.

    2015-01-07

    A new two-dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiment to separate and correlate the first-order quadrupolar and chemical/paramagnetic shift interactions is described. This experiment, which we call the shifting-d echo experiment, allows a more precise determination of tensor principal components values and their relative orientation. It is designed using the recently introduced symmetry pathway concept. A comparison of the shifting-d experiment with earlier proposed methods is presented and experimentally illustrated in the case of {sup 2}H (I = 1) paramagnetic shift and quadrupolar tensors of CuCl{sub 2}⋅2D{sub 2}O. The benefits of the shifting-d echo experiment over other methods are a factor of two improvement in sensitivity and the suppression of major artifacts. From the 2D lineshape analysis of the shifting-d spectrum, the {sup 2}H quadrupolar coupling parameters are 〈C{sub q}〉 = 118.1 kHz and 〈η{sub q}〉 = 0.88, and the {sup 2}H paramagnetic shift tensor anisotropy parameters are 〈ζ{sub P}〉 = − 152.5 ppm and 〈η{sub P}〉 = 0.91. The orientation of the quadrupolar coupling principal axis system (PAS) relative to the paramagnetic shift anisotropy principal axis system is given by (α,β,γ)=((π)/2 ,(π)/2 ,0). Using a simple ligand hopping model, the tensor parameters in the absence of exchange are estimated. On the basis of this analysis, the instantaneous principal components and orientation of the quadrupolar coupling are found to be in excellent agreement with previous measurements. A new point dipole model for predicting the paramagnetic shift tensor is proposed yielding significantly better agreement than previously used models. In the new model, the dipoles are displaced from nuclei at positions associated with high electron density in the singly occupied molecular orbital predicted from ligand field theory.

  5. Temperature dependence of contact and dipolar NMR chemical shifts in paramagnetic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Bob; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-02-01

    Using a recently proposed equation for NMR nuclear magnetic shielding for molecules with unpaired electrons [A. Soncini and W. Van den Heuvel, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 021103 (2013)], equations for the temperature (T) dependent isotropic shielding for multiplets with an effective spin S equal to 1/2, 1, 3/2, 2, and 5/2 in terms of electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian parameters are derived and then expanded in powers of 1/T. One simplifying assumption used is that a matrix derived from the zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensor and the Zeeman coupling matrix (g-tensor) share the same principal axis system. The influence of the rhombic ZFS parameter E is only investigated for S = 1. Expressions for paramagnetic contact shielding (from the isotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) and pseudo-contact or dipolar shielding (from the anisotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) are considered separately. The leading order is always 1/T. A temperature dependence of the contact shielding as 1/T and of the dipolar shielding as 1/T2, which is sometimes assumed in the assignment of paramagnetic chemical shifts, is shown to arise only if S ≥ 1 and zero-field splitting is appreciable, and only if the Zeeman coupling matrix is nearly isotropic (Δg = 0). In such situations, an assignment of contact versus dipolar shifts may be possible based only on linear and quadratic fits of measured variable-temperature chemical shifts versus 1/T. Numerical data are provided for nickelocene (S = 1). Even under the assumption of Δg = 0, a different leading order of contact and dipolar shifts in powers of 1/T is not obtained for S = 3/2. When Δg is not very small, dipolar and contact shifts both depend in leading order in 1/T in all cases, with sizable contributions in order 1/Tn with n = 2 and higher.

  6. Temperature dependence of contact and dipolar NMR chemical shifts in paramagnetic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Bob; Autschbach, Jochen

    2015-02-07

    Using a recently proposed equation for NMR nuclear magnetic shielding for molecules with unpaired electrons [A. Soncini and W. Van den Heuvel, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 021103 (2013)], equations for the temperature (T) dependent isotropic shielding for multiplets with an effective spin S equal to 1/2, 1, 3/2, 2, and 5/2 in terms of electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian parameters are derived and then expanded in powers of 1/T. One simplifying assumption used is that a matrix derived from the zero-field splitting (ZFS) tensor and the Zeeman coupling matrix (g-tensor) share the same principal axis system. The influence of the rhombic ZFS parameter E is only investigated for S = 1. Expressions for paramagnetic contact shielding (from the isotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) and pseudo-contact or dipolar shielding (from the anisotropic part of the hyperfine coupling matrix) are considered separately. The leading order is always 1/T. A temperature dependence of the contact shielding as 1/T and of the dipolar shielding as 1/T{sup 2}, which is sometimes assumed in the assignment of paramagnetic chemical shifts, is shown to arise only if S ≥ 1 and zero-field splitting is appreciable, and only if the Zeeman coupling matrix is nearly isotropic (Δg = 0). In such situations, an assignment of contact versus dipolar shifts may be possible based only on linear and quadratic fits of measured variable-temperature chemical shifts versus 1/T. Numerical data are provided for nickelocene (S = 1). Even under the assumption of Δg = 0, a different leading order of contact and dipolar shifts in powers of 1/T is not obtained for S = 3/2. When Δg is not very small, dipolar and contact shifts both depend in leading order in 1/T in all cases, with sizable contributions in order 1/T{sup n} with n = 2 and higher.

  7. Ligand-driven conformational changes of MurD visualized by paramagnetic NMR

    PubMed Central

    Saio, Tomohide; Ogura, Kenji; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Kobashigawa, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Kazumi; Yokochi, Masashi; Kodama, Kota; Yamaguchi, Hiroto; Tsujishita, Hideki; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Proteins, especially multi-domain proteins, often undergo drastic conformational changes upon binding to ligands or by post-translational modifications, which is a key step to regulate their function. However, the detailed mechanisms of such dynamic regulation of the functional processes are poorly understood because of the lack of an efficient tool. We here demonstrate detailed characterization of conformational changes of MurD, a 47?kDa protein enzyme consisting of three domains, by the use of solution NMR equipped with paramagnetic lanthanide probe. Quantitative analysis of pseudocontact shifts has identified a novel conformational state of MurD, named semi-closed conformation, which is found to be the key to understand how MurD regulates the binding of the ligands. The modulation of the affinity coupled with conformational changes accentuates the importance of conformational state to be evaluated in drug design. PMID:26582338

  8. Interdomain orientation of cardiac Troponin C characterized by paramagnetic relaxation enhancement NMR reveals a compact state

    PubMed Central

    Cordina, Nicole M; Liew, Chu Kong; Gell, David A; Fajer, Piotr G; Mackay, Joel P; Brown, Louise J

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac troponin C (cTnC) is the calcium binding subunit of the troponin complex that triggers the thin filament response to calcium influx into the sarcomere. cTnC consists of two globular EF-hand domains (termed the N- and C-domains) connected by a flexible linker. While the conformation of each domain of cTnC has been thoroughly characterized through NMR studies involving either the isolated N-domain (N-cTnC) or C-domain (C-cTnC), little attention has been paid to the range of interdomain orientations possible in full-length cTnC that arises as a consequence of the flexibility of the domain linker. Flexibility in the domain linker of cTnC is essential for effective regulatory function of troponin. We have therefore utilized paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) NMR to assess the interdomain orientation of cTnC. Ensemble fitting of our interdomain PRE measurements reveals that isolated cTnC has considerable interdomain flexibility and preferentially adopts a bent conformation in solution, with a defined range of relative domain orientations. PMID:22811351

  9. Open-to-closed transition in apo maltose-binding protein observed by paramagnetic NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chun; Schwieters, Charles D.; Clore, G. Marius

    2008-09-08

    Large-scale domain rearrangements in proteins have long been recognized to have a critical function in ligand binding and recognition, catalysis and regulation. Crystal structures have provided a static picture of the apo (usually open) and holo (usually closed) states. The general question arises as to whether the apo state exists as a single species in which the closed state is energetically inaccessible and interdomain rearrangement is induced by ligand or substrate binding, or whether the predominantly open form already coexists in rapid equilibrium with a minor closed species. The maltose-binding protein (MBP), a member of the bacterial periplasmic binding protein family, provides a model system for investigating this problem because it has been the subject of extensive studies by crystallography, NMR and other biophysical techniques. Here we show that although paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) data for the sugar-bound form are consistent with the crystal structure of holo MBP, the PRE data for the apo state are indicative of a rapidly exchanging mixture (ns to {mu}s regime) of a predominantly ({approx}95%) open form (represented by the apo crystal structure) and a minor ({approx}5%) partially closed species. Using ensemble simulated annealing refinement against the PRE data we are able to determine a ensemble average structure of the minor apo species and show that it is distinct from the sugar-bound state.

  10. Nanoparticle dispersion in polymer nanocomposites by spin-diffusion-averaged paramagnetic enhanced NMR relaxometry: scaling relations and applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Leisen, Johannes; Beckham, Haskell W

    2014-08-21

    Scaling relationships are identified between NMR longitudinal relaxation times and clay dispersion quality in polymer-paramagnetic clay nanocomposites. Derived from a previously published analytical relationship developed from a lamella-based model, the scaling relationships are based on the enhancement of NMR relaxation rates with increasing exfoliation and dispersion homogeneity. The paramagnetic contribution to the NMR relaxation rate is inversely proportional to the square of the clay interparticle spacing, and directly proportional to the square of the clay weight fraction. These scaling relationships allow the prediction of relative exfoliation of clay particles for a given series of polymer-clay nanocomposites. With independent knowledge of clay exfoliation in a single sample (e.g., from transmission electron microscopy), NMR relaxometry data may be converted into absolute measures of exfoliation. These scaling relations are confirmed with samples of fully exfoliated poly(vinyl alcohol)-montmorillonite nanocomposites, and then used to reveal exfoliation and dispersion quality in a series of nylon-6-montmorillonite nanocomposites. This characterization route is advantageous because NMR relaxometry can more rapidly provide clay dispersion information that is averaged over larger sample volumes than transmission electron microscopy. PMID:25000915

  11. Magnetism, optical absorbance, and 19F NMR spectra of nafion films with self-assembling paramagnetic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, E. M.; Chen, Q.; Bud'ko, S. L.

    2012-01-15

    Magnetization, optical absorbance, and {sup 19}F NMR spectra of Nafion transparent films as received and doped with Mn{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, and Fe{sup 3+} ions with and without treatment in 1H-1,2,4-triazole (trz) have been studied. Doping of Nafion with Fe{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+} and their bridging to nitrogen of triazole yields a hybrid self-assembling paramagnetic system that exhibits interesting magnetic and optical properties. These include spin crossover phenomena between high-spin (HS) and low-spin (LS) states in Nafion-Fe{sup 2+}-trz and Nafion-Co{sup 2+}-trz accompanied by thermochromic effects in the visible range induced by temperature. A large shift of the magnetization curve induced by a magnetic field in the vicinity of the HS {leftrightarrow} LS, {approx}220 K, observed for Nafion-Fe{sup 2+}-trz has a rate of {approx}6 K/kOe, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that in bulk spin crossover Fe{sup 2+} materials. Selective response of {sup 19}F NMR signals on doping with paramagnetic ions demonstrates that NMR can be used as spatially resolved method to study Nafion film with paramagnetic network. Both chemical shift and width of {sup 19}F NMR signals show that SO groups of Nafion, Fe or Co ions, and nitrogen of triazole are bonded whereas they form a spin crossover system. Based on a model of nanosize cylinders proposed for Nafion [K. Schmidt-Rohr and Q. Chen, Nat Mater (2008), 75], we suggest that paramagnetic ions are located inside these cylinders, forming self-assembling magnetically and optically active nanoscale networks.

  12. Access to NMR Spectroscopy for Two-Year College Students: The NMR Site at Trinity University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nancy S.; Shanklin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Students at two-year colleges and small four-year colleges have often obtained their exposure to NMR spectroscopy through "canned" spectra because the cost of an NMR spectrometer, particularly a high-field spectrometer, is prohibitive in these environments. This article describes the design of a NMR site at Trinity University in which spectral…

  13. Gamma-irradiated ExtraVit M nutritive supplement studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrişor, Dina; Damian, Grigore; Simon, Simion

    2008-04-01

    An unirradiated and γ-irradiated nutritive supplement named ExtraVit M was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in order to detect stable paramagnetic species following improvement of hygienic quality by γ-radiation. Free radicals were induced by γ-radiation in the studied samples from low absorbed doses, showing a certain sensibility of these samples to the radiation treatment. The EPR spectrum of irradiated ExtraVit M is typical for drugs or nutritive supplements containing high levels of sugars, vitamin C and cellulose.

  14. Structure determination of helical filaments by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Lichun; Bardiaux, Benjamin; Ahmed, Mumdooh; Spehr, Johannes; König, Renate; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rand, Ulfert; Lührs, Thorsten; Ritter, Christiane

    2016-01-19

    The controlled formation of filamentous protein complexes plays a crucial role in many biological systems and represents an emerging paradigm in signal transduction. The mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) is a central signal transduction hub in innate immunity that is activated by a receptor-induced conversion into helical superstructures (filaments) assembled from its globular caspase activation and recruitment domain. Solid-state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy has become one of the most powerful techniques for atomic resolution structures of protein fibrils. However, for helical filaments, the determination of the correct symmetry parameters has remained a significant hurdle for any structural technique and could thus far not be precisely derived from ssNMR data. Here, we solved the atomic resolution structure of helical MAVS(CARD) filaments exclusively from ssNMR data. We present a generally applicable approach that systematically explores the helical symmetry space by efficient modeling of the helical structure restrained by interprotomer ssNMR distance restraints. Together with classical automated NMR structure calculation, this allowed us to faithfully determine the symmetry that defines the entire assembly. To validate our structure, we probed the protomer arrangement by solvent paramagnetic resonance enhancement, analysis of chemical shift differences relative to the solution NMR structure of the monomer, and mutagenesis. We provide detailed information on the atomic contacts that determine filament stability and describe mechanistic details on the formation of signaling-competent MAVS filaments from inactive monomers. PMID:26733681

  15. In vivo measurement of tissue oxygen using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with oxygen-sensitive paramagnetic particle, lithium phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Hyodo, F; Matsumoto, S; Hyodo, E; Matsumoto, A; Matsumoto, K; Krishna, M C

    2010-01-01

    The partial pressure of oxygen (pO(2)) plays a determining role in the energy metabolism of aerobic cells. However, low pO(2) level induces pathophysiological conditions such as tumor hypoxia, ischemia or reperfusion injury, and delayed/altered wound healing. Especially, pO(2) level in the tumor is known to be related to tumor progression and effectiveness of radiotherapy. To monitor the pO(2) levels in vivo, continuous wave (CW) and time-domain (TD) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy method was used, in which surface coil resonator and Lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) as oxygen sensor were crucial. Once LiPc particles are embedded in a desired location of organ/tissue, the pO(2) level can be monitored repeatedly and non-invasively. This method is based on the effect of oxygen concentration on the EPR spectra of LiPc which offers several advantages as follows: (1) high sensitivity, (2) minimum invasiveness, (3) repeated measurements, (4) absence of toxicity (non-toxic), and (5) measurement in a local region of the tissue with embedded LiPc. Therefore, in this chapter, we describe the method using CW and TD EPR spectroscopy with oxygen-sensitive particle, LiPc, for in vivo monitoring of oxygen. PMID:20013170

  16. Spatially resolved spectroscopy using tapered stripline NMR.

    PubMed

    Tijssen, Koen C H; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M; Janssen, J W G Hans; Kentgens, Arno P M; van Bentum, P Jan M

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic field B0 gradients are essential in modern Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Although RF/B1 gradients can be used to fulfill a similar role, this is not used in common practice because of practical limitations in the design of B1 gradient coils. Here we present a new method to create B1 gradients using stripline RF coils. The conductor-width of a stripline NMR chip and the strength of its radiofrequency field are correlated, so a stripline chip can be tapered to produce any arbitrary shaped B1 field gradient. Here we show the characterization of this tapered stripline configuration and demonstrate three applications: magnetic resonance imaging on samples with nL-μL volumes, reaction monitoring of fast chemical reactions (10(-2)-10(1)s) and the compensation of B0 field gradients to obtain high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields. PMID:26796112

  17. Spatially resolved spectroscopy using tapered stripline NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tijssen, Koen C. H.; Bart, Jacob; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Janssen, J. W. G. (Hans); Kentgens, Arno P. M.; van Bentum, P. Jan M.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic field B0 gradients are essential in modern Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Although RF/B1 gradients can be used to fulfill a similar role, this is not used in common practice because of practical limitations in the design of B1 gradient coils. Here we present a new method to create B1 gradients using stripline RF coils. The conductor-width of a stripline NMR chip and the strength of its radiofrequency field are correlated, so a stripline chip can be tapered to produce any arbitrary shaped B1 field gradient. Here we show the characterization of this tapered stripline configuration and demonstrate three applications: magnetic resonance imaging on samples with nL-μL volumes, reaction monitoring of fast chemical reactions (10-2-101 s) and the compensation of B0 field gradients to obtain high-resolution spectra in inhomogeneous magnetic fields.

  18. Tetrachloridocuprates(II)—Synthesis and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Alette; Zabel, André; Strauch, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) on the basis of metal containing anions and/or cations are of interest for a variety of technical applications e.g., synthesis of particles, magnetic or thermochromic materials. We present the synthesis and the results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic analyses of a series of some new potential ionic liquids based on tetrachloridocuprates(II), [CuCl4]2−, with different sterically demanding cations: hexadecyltrimethylammonium 1, tetradecyltrimethylammonium 2, tetrabutylammonium 3 and benzyltriethylammonium 4. The cations in the new compounds were used to achieve a reasonable separation of the paramagnetic Cu(II) ions for EPR spectroscopy. The EPR hyperfine structure was not resolved. This is due to the exchange broadening, resulting from still incomplete separation of the paramagnetic Cu(II) centers. Nevertheless, the principal values of the electron Zeemann tensor (g║ and g┴) of the complexes could be determined. Even though the solid substances show slightly different colors, the UV/Vis spectra are nearly identical, indicating structural changes of the tetrachloridocuprate moieties between solid state and solution. The complexes have a promising potential e.g., as high temperature ionic liquids, as precursors for the formation of copper chloride particles or as catalytic paramagnetic ionic liquids. PMID:22408411

  19. NMR Analysis of Unknowns: An Introduction to 2D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonso, David E.; Warren, Steven E.

    2005-01-01

    A study combined 1D (one-dimensional) and 2D (two-dimensional) NMR spectroscopy to solve structural organic problems of three unknowns, which include 2-, 3-, and 4-heptanone. Results showed [to the first power]H NMR and [to the thirteenth power]C NMR signal assignments for 2- and 3-heptanone were more challenging than for 4-heptanone owing to the…

  20. Multiplet-separated heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Malcolm H.; Sørensen, O. W.; Ernst, R. R.

    1983-02-01

    Techniques are described for the identification and separation of peaks of different multiplicity in heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The methods are applied to the two-dimensional 13C- 1H shift correlation spectrum of menthol.

  1. An Integrated Laboratory Project in NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Pendley, Bradford D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an advanced NMR project that can be done with a 60-MHz continuous-wave proton spectrometer. Points out the main purposes are to give students experience in second-order NMR analysis, the simplification of spectra by raising the frequency, and the effect of non-hydrogen nuclei on proton resonances. (MVL)

  2. Applications of NMR spectroscopy to systems biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Fan, Teresa W-M; Lane, Andrew N

    2016-02-01

    The past decades of advancements in NMR have made it a very powerful tool for metabolic research. Despite its limitations in sensitivity relative to mass spectrometric techniques, NMR has a number of unparalleled advantages for metabolic studies, most notably the rigor and versatility in structure elucidation, isotope-filtered selection of molecules, and analysis of positional isotopomer distributions in complex mixtures afforded by multinuclear and multidimensional experiments. In addition, NMR has the capacity for spatially selective in vivo imaging and dynamical analysis of metabolism in tissues of living organisms. In conjunction with the use of stable isotope tracers, NMR is a method of choice for exploring the dynamics and compartmentation of metabolic pathways and networks, for which our current understanding is grossly insufficient. In this review, we describe how various direct and isotope-edited 1D and 2D NMR methods can be employed to profile metabolites and their isotopomer distributions by stable isotope-resolved metabolomic (SIRM) analysis. We also highlight the importance of sample preparation methods including rapid cryoquenching, efficient extraction, and chemoselective derivatization to facilitate robust and reproducible NMR-based metabolomic analysis. We further illustrate how NMR has been applied in vitro, ex vivo, or in vivo in various stable isotope tracer-based metabolic studies, to gain systematic and novel metabolic insights in different biological systems, including human subjects. The pathway and network knowledge generated from NMR- and MS-based tracing of isotopically enriched substrates will be invaluable for directing functional analysis of other 'omics data to achieve understanding of regulation of biochemical systems, as demonstrated in a case study. Future developments in NMR technologies and reagents to enhance both detection sensitivity and resolution should further empower NMR in systems biochemical research. PMID:26952191

  3. Studies of organic paint binders by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyros, A.; Anglos, D.

    2006-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is applied to the study of aged binding media used in paintings, namely linseed oil, egg tempera and an acrylic medium. High resolution 1D and 2D NMR experiments establish the state of hydrolysis and oxidation of the linseed and egg tempera binders after five years of aging, by determining several markers sensitive to the hydrolytic and oxidative processes of the binder lipid fraction. The composition of the acrylic binder co-polymer is determined by 2D NMR spectroscopy, while the identification of a surfactant, poly(ethylene glycol), found in greater amounts in aged acrylic medium, is reported. The non-destructive nature of the proposed analytical NMR methodology, and minimization of the amount of binder material needed through the use of sophisticated cryoprobes and hyphenated LC-NMR techniques, make NMR attractive for the arts analyst, in view of its rapid nature and experimental simplicity.

  4. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and

  5. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinnun, Jacob J.; Leftin, Avigdor; Brown, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy finds growing application to inorganic and organic materials, biological samples, polymers, proteins, and cellular membranes. However, this technique is often neither included in laboratory curricula nor typically covered in undergraduate courses. On the other hand, spectroscopy and…

  6. High field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy under ultrahigh vacuum conditions—A multipurpose machine to study paramagnetic species on well defined single crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rocker, J.; Cornu, D.; Kieseritzky, E.; Hänsel-Ziegler, W.; Freund, H.-J.; Seiler, A.; Bondarchuk, O.

    2014-08-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 94 GHz to investigate paramagnetic centers on single crystal surfaces is described. It is particularly designed to study paramagnetic centers on well-defined model catalysts using epitaxial thin oxide films grown on metal single crystals. The EPR setup is based on a commercial Bruker E600 spectrometer, which is adapted to ultrahigh vacuum conditions using a home made Fabry Perot resonator. The key idea of the resonator is to use the planar metal single crystal required to grow the single crystalline oxide films as one of the mirrors of the resonator. EPR spectroscopy is solely sensitive to paramagnetic species, which are typically minority species in such a system. Hence, additional experimental characterization tools are required to allow for a comprehensive investigation of the surface. The apparatus includes a preparation chamber hosting equipment, which is required to prepare supported model catalysts. In addition, surface characterization tools such as low energy electron diffraction (LEED)/Auger spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) are available to characterize the surfaces. A second chamber used to perform EPR spectroscopy at 94 GHz has a room temperature scanning tunneling microscope attached to it, which allows for real space structural characterization. The heart of the UHV adaptation of the EPR experiment is the sealing of the Fabry-Perot resonator against atmosphere. To this end it is possible to use a thin sapphire window glued to the backside of the coupling orifice of the Fabry Perot resonator. With the help of a variety of stabilization measures reducing vibrations as well as thermal drift it is possible to accumulate data for a time span, which is for low temperature measurements only limited by the amount of liquid helium. Test measurements show that the system can detect paramagnetic species with a density of approximately 5 × 10{sup 11} spins/cm{sup 2}, which is comparable to the limit obtained for the presently available UHV-EPR spectrometer operating at 10 GHz (X-band). Investigation of electron trapped centers in MgO(001) films shows that the increased resolution offered by the experiments at W-band allows to identify new paramagnetic species, that cannot be differentiated with the currently available methodology.

  7. High field electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy under ultrahigh vacuum conditions—A multipurpose machine to study paramagnetic species on well defined single crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocker, J.; Cornu, D.; Kieseritzky, E.; Seiler, A.; Bondarchuk, O.; Hänsel-Ziegler, W.; Risse, T.; Freund, H.-J.

    2014-08-01

    A new ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer operating at 94 GHz to investigate paramagnetic centers on single crystal surfaces is described. It is particularly designed to study paramagnetic centers on well-defined model catalysts using epitaxial thin oxide films grown on metal single crystals. The EPR setup is based on a commercial Bruker E600 spectrometer, which is adapted to ultrahigh vacuum conditions using a home made Fabry Perot resonator. The key idea of the resonator is to use the planar metal single crystal required to grow the single crystalline oxide films as one of the mirrors of the resonator. EPR spectroscopy is solely sensitive to paramagnetic species, which are typically minority species in such a system. Hence, additional experimental characterization tools are required to allow for a comprehensive investigation of the surface. The apparatus includes a preparation chamber hosting equipment, which is required to prepare supported model catalysts. In addition, surface characterization tools such as low energy electron diffraction (LEED)/Auger spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) are available to characterize the surfaces. A second chamber used to perform EPR spectroscopy at 94 GHz has a room temperature scanning tunneling microscope attached to it, which allows for real space structural characterization. The heart of the UHV adaptation of the EPR experiment is the sealing of the Fabry-Perot resonator against atmosphere. To this end it is possible to use a thin sapphire window glued to the backside of the coupling orifice of the Fabry Perot resonator. With the help of a variety of stabilization measures reducing vibrations as well as thermal drift it is possible to accumulate data for a time span, which is for low temperature measurements only limited by the amount of liquid helium. Test measurements show that the system can detect paramagnetic species with a density of approximately 5 × 1011 spins/cm2, which is comparable to the limit obtained for the presently available UHV-EPR spectrometer operating at 10 GHz (X-band). Investigation of electron trapped centers in MgO(001) films shows that the increased resolution offered by the experiments at W-band allows to identify new paramagnetic species, that cannot be differentiated with the currently available methodology.

  8. Characterisation of ?-tricalcium phosphate-based bone substitute materials by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matkovi?, Ivo; Maltar-Strme?ki, Nadica; Babi?-Ivan?i?, Vesna; Dutour Sikiri?, Maja; Noethig-Laslo, Vesna

    2012-10-01

    ?-TCP based materials are frequently used as dental implants. Due to their resorption in the body and direct contact with tissues, in order to inactivate bacteria, fungal spores and viruses, they are usually sterilized by ?-irradiation. However, the current literature provides little information about effects of the ?-irradiation on the formation and stability of the free radicals in the bone graft materials during and after sterilization procedure. In this work five different bone graft substitution materials, composed of synthetic beta tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) present in the market were characterized by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Paramagnetic species Mn2+, Fe3+, trapped H-atoms and CO2- radicals were detected in the biphasic material (60% HAP, 40% ?-TCP), while in ?-TCP materials only Mn2+ andor trapped hydrogen atoms were detected. EPR analysis revealed the details of the structure of these materials at the atomic level. The results have shown that EPR spectroscopy is a method which can be used to improve the quality control of bone graft materials after syntering, processing and sterilization procedure.

  9. Membrane Protein Structure and Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Hu, Fanghao

    2012-05-01

    We review the current state of membrane protein structure determination using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Multidimensional magic-angle-spinning correlation NMR combined with oriented-sample experiments has made it possible to measure a full panel of structural constraints of membrane proteins directly in lipid bilayers. These constraints include torsion angles, interatomic distances, oligomeric structure, protein dynamics, ligand structure and dynamics, and protein orientation and depth of insertion in the lipid bilayer. Using solid-state NMR, researchers have studied potassium channels, proton channels, Ca2+ pumps, G protein-coupled receptors, bacterial outer membrane proteins, and viral fusion proteins to elucidate their mechanisms of action. Many of these membrane proteins have also been investigated in detergent micelles using solution NMR. Comparison of the solid-state and solution NMR structures provides important insights into the effects of the solubilizing environment on membrane protein structure and dynamics.

  10. Combining solid-state NMR spectroscopy with first-principles calculations - a guide to NMR crystallography.

    PubMed

    Ashbrook, Sharon E; McKay, David

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in the application of first-principles calculations of NMR parameters to periodic systems have resulted in widespread interest in their use to support experimental measurement. Such calculations often play an important role in the emerging field of "NMR crystallography", where NMR spectroscopy is combined with techniques such as diffraction, to aid structure determination. Here, we discuss the current state-of-the-art for combining experiment and calculation in NMR spectroscopy, considering the basic theory behind the computational approaches and their practical application. We consider the issues associated with geometry optimisation and how the effects of temperature may be included in the calculation. The automated prediction of structural candidates and the treatment of disordered and dynamic solids are discussed. Finally, we consider the areas where further development is needed in this field and its potential future impact. PMID:27117884

  11. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frédéric A.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities. Two-dimensional

  12. Quantitative structure parameters from the NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frederic A.

    2015-12-15

    Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most important characterization tools in chemistry, however, 3/4 of the NMR active nuclei are underutilized due to their quadrupolar nature. This short review centers on the development of methods that use solid-state NMR of quadrupolar nuclei for obtaining quantitative structural information. Namely, techniques using dipolar recoupling as well as the resolution afforded by double-rotation are presented for the measurement of spin–spin coupling between quadrupoles, enabling the measurement of internuclear distances and connectivities.

  13. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackowski, K.

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of some nuclei (e.g. 1H, 13C, 19F, 29Si or 31P, I=1/2) gives strong signals which allow analytical studies of gaseous compounds. The other magnetic nuclei have low natural abundance or/and contain an electric quadrupole moment and their NMR signals are rather weak. In our laboratory we have developed new experimental techniques, which permit us to monitor several micrograms of chemical compounds in gaseous matrices. Applying this approach we have observed magnetic shielding of various nuclei, including 17O and 33S at the natural abundance, in the gas phase as a function of density. Density-dependent spin-spin couplings were also found for many chemical compounds. It has been shown that NMR gas-phase studies can easily be extended on molecules, which exhibit strong intermolecular interactions and are liquids at room temperature. All the latter NMR experimental results obtained for gaseous matrices are reviewed in this paper.

  14. Nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and imaging of multiple nuclear species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devience, Stephen J.; Pham, Linh M.; Lovchinsky, Igor; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Bar-Gill, Nir; Belthangady, Chinmay; Casola, Francesco; Corbett, Madeleine; Zhang, Huiliang; Lukin, Mikhail; Park, Hongkun; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide non-invasive information about multiple nuclear species in bulk matter, with wide-ranging applications from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, the spatial resolution of conventional NMR and MRI is limited to several micrometres even at large magnetic fields (>1 T), which is inadequate for many frontier scientific applications such as single-molecule NMR spectroscopy and in vivo MRI of individual biological cells. A promising approach for nanoscale NMR and MRI exploits optical measurements of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres in diamond, which provide a combination of magnetic field sensitivity and nanoscale spatial resolution unmatched by any existing technology, while operating under ambient conditions in a robust, solid-state system. Recently, single, shallow NV centres were used to demonstrate NMR of nanoscale ensembles of proton spins, consisting of a statistical polarization equivalent to ˜100-1,000 spins in uniform samples covering the surface of a bulk diamond chip. Here, we realize nanoscale NMR spectroscopy and MRI of multiple nuclear species (1H, 19F, 31P) in non-uniform (spatially structured) samples under ambient conditions and at moderate magnetic fields (˜20 mT) using two complementary sensor modalities.

  15. Searching for protein binding sites from Molecular Dynamics simulations and paramagnetic fragment-based NMR studies.

    PubMed

    Bernini, Andrea; Henrici De Angelis, Lucia; Morandi, Edoardo; Spiga, Ottavia; Santucci, Annalisa; Assfalg, Michael; Molinari, Henriette; Pillozzi, Serena; Arcangeli, Annarosa; Niccolai, Neri

    2014-03-01

    Hotspot delineation on protein surfaces represents a fundamental step for targeting protein-protein interfaces. Disruptors of protein-protein interactions can be designed provided that the sterical features of binding pockets, including the transient ones, can be defined. Molecular Dynamics, MD, simulations have been used as a reliable framework for identifying transient pocket openings on the protein surface. Accessible surface area and intramolecular H-bond involvement of protein backbone amides are proposed as descriptors for characterizing binding pocket occurrence and evolution along MD trajectories. TEMPOL induced paramagnetic perturbations on (1)H-(15)N HSQC signals of protein backbone amides have been analyzed as a fragment-based search for surface hotspots, in order to validate MD predicted pockets. This procedure has been applied to CXCL12, a small chemokine responsible for tumor progression and proliferation. From combined analysis of MD data and paramagnetic profiles, two CXCL12 sites suitable for the binding of small molecules were identified. One of these sites is the already well characterized CXCL12 region involved in the binding to CXCR4 receptor. The other one is a transient pocket predicted by Molecular Dynamics simulations, which could not be observed from static analysis of CXCL12 PDB structures. The present results indicate how TEMPOL, instrumental in identifying this transient pocket, can be a powerful tool to delineate minor conformations which can be highly relevant in dynamic discovery of antitumoral drugs. PMID:24373878

  16. "In-plant" NMR: analysis of the intact plant Vesicularia dubyana by high resolution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kutyshenko, Viktor P; Beskaravayny, Peter; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-01-01

    We present here the concept of "in-plant" NMR and show that high-resolution NMR spectroscopy is suitable for the analysis of intact plants and can be used to follow the changes in the intraorganismal molecular composition over long time periods. The NMR-based analysis of the effect of different concentrations of heavy water on the aquatic plant Vesicularia dubyana revealed that due to the presence of specific adaptive mechanisms this plant can sustain the presence of up to 85% of D2O. However, it dies in 100% heavy water. PMID:25759953

  17. Polyoxomolybdate promoted hydrolysis of a DNA-model phosphoester studied by NMR and EXAFS spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Absillis, Gregory; Van Deun, Rik; Parac-Vogt, Tatjana N

    2011-11-21

    Hydrolysis of (p-nitrophenyl)phosphate (NPP), a commonly used phosphatase model substrate, was examined in molybdate solutions by means of (1)H, (31)P, and (95)Mo NMR spectroscopy and Mo K-edge Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. At 50 °C and pD 5.1 the cleavage of the phosphoester bond in NPP proceeds with a rate constant of 2.73 × 10(-5) s(-1) representing an acceleration of nearly 3 orders of magnitude as compared to the hydrolysis measured in the absence of molybdate. The pD dependence of k(obs) exhibits a bell-shaped profile, with the fastest cleavage observed in solutions where [Mo(7)O(24)](6-) is the major species in solution. Mixing of NPP and [Mo(7)O(24)](6-) resulted in formation of these two intermediate complexes that were detected by (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Complex A was characterized by a (31)P NMR resonance at -4.27 ppm and complex B was characterized by a (31)P NMR resonance at -7.42 ppm. On the basis of the previous results from diffusion ordered NMR spectroscopy, performed with the hydrolytically inactive substrate phenylphosphonate (PhP), the structure of these two complexes was deduced to be (NPP)(2)Mo(5)O(21)(4-) (complex A) and (NPP)(2)Mo(12)O(36)(H(2)O)(6)(4-) (complex B). The pH studies point out that both complexes are hydrolytically active and lead to the hydrolysis of phosphoester bond in NPP. The NMR spectra did not show evidence of any paramagnetic species, excluding the possibility of Mo(VI) reduction to Mo(V), and indicating that the cleavage of the phosphomonoester bond is purely hydrolytic. The Mo K-edge XANES region also did not show any sign of Mo(VI) to Mo(V) reduction during the hydrolytic reaction. (95)Mo NMR and Mo K-edge EXAFS spectra measured during different stages of the hydrolytic reaction showed a gradual disappearance of [Mo(7)O(24)](6-) during the hydrolytic reaction and appearance of [P(2)Mo(5)O(23)](6-), which was the final complex observed at the end of hydrolytic reaction. PMID:22029272

  18. Paramagnetic cobalt and nickel derivatives of Alcaligenes denitrificans azurin and its M121Q mutant. A 1H NMR study.

    PubMed

    Salgado, J; Jimnez, H R; Moratal, J M; Kroes, S; Warmerdam, G C; Canters, G W

    1996-02-13

    Using cobalt or nickel to replace copper in native azurin allows one to fingerprint the metal coordination site of the protein. The metal sites of wild type Alcaligenes denitrificans azurin and its M121Q mutant are clearly distinguishable through the paramagnetic 1H NMR spectra of the Ni(II) and Co(II) derivatives. In the wild type azurin, Gly45 coordinates to nickel or cobalt, while Met121 appears as a weak metal ligand. On the contrary, in the M121Q azurin mutant, the metal exhibits a clear preference for the Gln121, which coordinates through the side chain carbonyl oxygen, and Gly45 is not a ligand. Changes in the isotropic shifts and relaxation properties of signals from the Cys112, His46, and His117 metal ligands suggest a movement of the metal ion out of the equatorial plane, indicating that the metal site is tetrahedral. These effects are less pronounced in the Ni(II) M121Q azurin than in the Co(II) metalloderivative. The similarity between the NMR spectra of the Co(II) derivatives of stellacyanin and the M121Q azurin is in agreement with a very similar metal site in both proteins and supports the existence of a coordinated Gln in stellacyanin. PMID:8639662

  19. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. Applications for chemists and biochemists

    SciTech Connect

    Croasmun, W.R.; Carlson, R.M.K.

    1987-01-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2-D NMR) has become a very powerful class of experiments (in the hands of an adept scientist) with broad adaptability to new situations. It is the product of a happy marriage between modern pulse FT-NMR technology, with its large memory and high-speed computers, and the physicists and chemists who love to manipulate spin systems. Basic 2-D experiments are now a standard capability of modern NMR spectrometers, and this timely book intends to make 2-D NMR users of those who are familiar with normal 1-D NMR. The 2-D NMR goal is correlation of the lines of the observed NMR spectrum with other properties of the system. This book deals with applications to high-resolution spectrum analysis, utilizing either coupling between the NMR-active nuclei or chemical exchange to perform the correlation. The coupling can be scalar (through bonds) or direct through space (within 5 A). The coupling may be homonuclear (between like nuclei) or heteronuclear.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  1. Protein folding on the ribosome studied using NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Waudby, Christopher A.; Launay, Hélène; Cabrita, Lisa D.; Christodoulou, John

    2013-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the investigation of protein folding and misfolding, providing a characterization of molecular structure, dynamics and exchange processes, across a very wide range of timescales and with near atomic resolution. In recent years NMR methods have also been developed to study protein folding as it might occur within the cell, in a de novo manner, by observing the folding of nascent polypeptides in the process of emerging from the ribosome during synthesis. Despite the 2.3 MDa molecular weight of the bacterial 70S ribosome, many nascent polypeptides, and some ribosomal proteins, have sufficient local flexibility that sharp resonances may be observed in solution-state NMR spectra. In providing information on dynamic regions of the structure, NMR spectroscopy is therefore highly complementary to alternative methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy, which have successfully characterized the rigid core of the ribosome particle. However, the low working concentrations and limited sample stability associated with ribosome–nascent chain complexes means that such studies still present significant technical challenges to the NMR spectroscopist. This review will discuss the progress that has been made in this area, surveying all NMR studies that have been published to date, and with a particular focus on strategies for improving experimental sensitivity. PMID:24083462

  2. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy under the fume hood.

    PubMed

    Kster, Simon K; Danieli, Ernesto; Blmich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2011-08-01

    This work reports the possibility to acquire high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra with a fist-sized NMR magnet directly installed under the fume hood. The small NMR sensor based on permanent magnets was used to monitor the trimerization of propionaldehyde catalyzed by indium trichloride in real time by continuously circulating the reaction mixture through the magnet bore in a closed loop with the help of a peristaltic pump. Thanks to the chemical selectivity of NMR spectroscopy the progress of the reaction can be monitored on-line by determining the concentrations of both reactant and product from the area under their respective lines in the NMR spectra as a function of time. This in situ measurement demonstrates that NMR probes can be used in chemistry laboratories, e.g. for reaction optimization, or installed at specific points of interest along industrial process lines. Therefore, it will open the door for the implementation of feedback control based on spectroscopic NMR data. PMID:21698335

  3. Quantitative Determination of Methylcyclohexanone Mixtures Using 13C NMR Spectroscopy: A Project for an Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Joseph W.; Silveira, Augustine, Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The percentage composition of mixtures of four methylcyclohexanones was determined using 13C NMR spectroscopy as a quantitative analytical method. The data were acquired using standard broadband proton decoupling and inverse-gated decoupling, the latter done both with and without the paramagnetic relaxation reagent chromium(III) acetylacetonate [Cr(acac)3]. The standard broadband decoupled spectrum resulted in percentages far from the actual values owing to the varying nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1's) of the various carbon atoms. These effects were eliminated in the inverse-gated experiments, and the results were very close to the actual percentages. Before examining the mixtures, the students studied a pure sample of 2-methylcyclohexanone. They assigned the 13C spectrum and determined the T1 of the carbonyl group both with and without Cr(acac)3 using the inversion-recovery method. Then a five-times-T1 delay was inserted between pulses in all subsequent inverse-gated decoupling experiments. This project provides students with valuable experience with modern NMR techniques. These include COrrelated SpectroscopY (COSY), Distortionless Enhancement by Polarization Transfer (DEPT) spectroscopy, HETeronuclear CORrelated (HETCOR) spectroscopy, T1 determination, standard broadband versus inverse-gated decoupling, and the addition of a paramagnetic relaxation reagent to dramatically shorten both the T

  4. 31P MAS-NMR study of flux-grown rare-earth element orthophosphate (monazite/xenotime) solid solutions: Evidence of random cation distribution from paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Palke, A. C.; Stebbins, J. F.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We present 31P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectra of flux-grown solid solutions of La1-xCexPO4 ( x between 0.027 and 0.32) having the monoclinic monazite structure, and of Y1-xMxPO4 (M = Vn+, Ce3+, Nd3+, x between 0.001 and 0.014) having the tetragonal zircon structure. Paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances are observed in all samples due to the presence of paramagnetic Vn+, Ce3+, and Nd3+ in the diamagnetic LaPO4 or YPO4. As a first-order observation, the number and relative intensity of these peaks is related to the symmetry and structure of the diamagnetic host phase. The presence of paramagnetic shifts allows for increased resolution between NMR resonances for distinct atomic species which leads to the observation of low intensity peaks related to PO4 species having more than one paramagnetic neighbor two or four atomic bonds away. Through careful analysis of peak areas and comparison with predictions for simple models, it was determined that solid solutions in the systems examined here are characterized by complete disorder (random distribution) of diamagnetic La3+ or Y3+ with the paramagnetic substitutional species Ce3+ and Nd3+. The increased resolution given by the paramagnetic interactions also leads to the observation of splitting of specific resonances in the 31P NMR spectra that may be caused by local, small-scale distortions from the substitution of ions having dissimilar ionic radii.

  5. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy characterization of wheat grains from plants of different water stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    ?abanowska, Maria; Filek, Maria; Kurdziel, Magdalena; Bednarska, El?bieta; D?ubacz, Aleksandra; Hartikainen, Helina

    2012-09-01

    Grains of five genotypes of wheat (four Polish and one Finnish), differing in their tolerance to drought stress were chosen for this investigation. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy allowed observation of transition metal ions (Mn, Fe, Cu) and different types of stable radicals, including semiquinone centers, present in seed coats, as well as several types of carbohydrate radicals found mainly in the inner parts of grains. The content of paramagnetic metal centers was higher in sensitive genotypes (Radunia, Raweta) than in tolerant ones (Parabola, Nawra), whereas the Finnish genotype (Manu) exhibited intermediate amounts. Similarly, the concentrations of both types of radicals, carbohydrates and semiquinone were significantly higher in the grains originating from more sensitive wheat genotypes. The nature of carbohydrate radicals and their concentrations were confronted with the kinds and amounts of sugars found by the biochemical analyses and microscopy observations. It is suggested that some long lived radicals (semiquinone and starch radicals) occurring in grains could be indicators of stress resistance of wheat plants. PMID:22840996

  6. Screening of Small Molecule Interactor Library by Using In-Cell NMR Spectroscopy (SMILI-NMR)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jingjing; Thapa, Rajiv; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S.; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We developed an in-cell NMR assay for screening small molecule interactor libraries (SMILI-NMR) for compounds capable of disrupting or enhancing specific interactions between two or more components of a biomolecular complex. The method relies on the formation of a well-defined biocomplex and utilizes in-cell NMR spectroscopy to identify the molecular surfaces involved in the interaction at atomic scale resolution. Changes in the interaction surface caused by a small molecule interfering with complex formation are used as a read-out of the assay. The in-cell nature of the experimental protocol insures that the small molecule is capable of penetrating the cell membrane and specifically engaging the target molecule(s). Utility of the method was demonstrated by screening a small dipeptide library against the FKBP–FRB protein complex involved in cell cycle arrest. The dipeptide identified by SMILI-NMR showed biological activity in a functional assay in yeast. PMID:19422228

  7. Translational diffusion in paramagnetic liquids by 1H NMR relaxometry: Nitroxide radicals in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Meier, R.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-01-01

    For nitroxide radicals in solution one can identify three frequency regimes in which 1H spin-lattice relaxation rate of solvent molecules depend linearly on square root of the 1H resonance frequency. Combining a recently developed theory of nuclear (proton) spin-lattice relaxation in solutions of nitroxide radicals [D. Kruk et al., J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854 with properties of the spectral density function associated with translational dynamics, relationships between the corresponding linear changes of the relaxation rate (for 14N spin probes) and relative translational diffusion coefficient of the solvent and solute molecules have been derived (in analogy to 15N spin probes [E. Belorizky et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 3674 (1998)], 10.1021/jp980397h). This method allows a simple and straightforward determination of diffusion coefficients in spin-labeled systems, by means of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The approach has thoroughly been tested by applying to a large set of experimental data—1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion results for solutions of different viscosity (decalin, glycerol, propylene glycol) of 14N and 15N spin probes. The experiments have been performed versus temperature (to cover a broad range of translational diffusion coefficients) using field cycling spectrometer which covers three decades in 1H resonance frequency, 10 kHz-20 MHz. The limitations of NMR relaxometry caused by the time scale of the translational dynamics as well as electron spin relaxation have been discussed. It has been shown that for spin-labeled systems NMR relaxometry gives access to considerably faster diffusion processes than for diamagnetic systems.

  8. Quantitative detection of plasma-generated radicals in liquids by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresp, H.; Hammer, M. U.; Winter, J.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Reuter, S.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper the qualitative and quantitative detection of oxygen radicals in liquids after plasma treatment with an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy is investigated. Absolute values for ·OH and O_{2}^{\\cdot -} radical concentration and their net production rate in plasma-treated liquids are determined without the use of additional scavenging chemicals such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) or mannitol (D-MAN). The main oxygen-centred radical generation in PBS was found to originate from the superoxide radical. It is shown that hidden parameters such as the manufacturer of chemical components could have a big influence on the comparability and reproducibility of the results. Finally, the effect of a shielding gas device for the investigated plasma jet with a shielding gas composition of varying oxygen-to-nitrogen ratio on radical generation after plasma treatment of phosphate-buffered saline solution was investigated.

  9. Electron-spin relaxation phenomena in irradiated saccharides detected by pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kameya, Hiromi; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2012-10-01

    We measured the relaxation times of radicals in saccharides upon γ-irradiation by means of X-band pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. We found that the field-swept signal of irradiated fructose by pulsed EPR showed three to four peaks depending on the dose. The relaxation times (T1 and T2) of the side peaks were longer than those of the main peak(s) from each irradiation, indicating that the radicals showing side peaks interact less with the surrounding environment. From relaxation time measurements of several irradiated saccharides, we conclude that T2 relaxation times decrease with the increasing irradiation dose. In contrast, T1 relaxation times show no correlation with the irradiation dose.

  10. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Spectroscopy to Detect Reactive Oxygen Species in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Vinai Chittezham; Chaudhari, Sujata S.; Jones, Jocelyn; Zimmerman, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Under aerobic conditions, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) primarily metabolizes glucose to acetic acid. Although normally S. aureus is able to re-utilize acetate as a carbon source following glucose exhaustion, significantly high levels of acetate in the culture media may not only be growth inhibitory but also potentiates cell death in stationary phase cultures by a mechanism dependent on cytoplasmic acidification. One consequence of acetic acid toxicity is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The present protocol describes the detection of ROS in S. aureus undergoing cell death by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Using 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CMH) as a cell permeable spin probe, we demonstrate the detection of various oxygen radicals generated by bacteria. Although standardized for S. aureus, the methods described here should be easily adapted for other bacterial species. This protocol is adapted from Thomas et al. (2014) and Thomas et al. (2010).

  11. Electronic structure of polycrystalline polyamine copper dinitrate complexes investigated by photoacoustic and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guskos, N.; Papadopoulos, G. J.; Likodimos, V.; Majszczyk, J.; Typek, J.; Wabia, M.; Grech, E.; Dziembowska, T.; Perkowska, A.; Aidinis, K.

    2001-08-01

    Photoacoustic and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies have been applied to resolve the electronic structure in powder polycrystalline samples of three biogenic polyamine copper complexes, spermine copper dinitrate, aqua norspermine copper dinitrate, and homospermine copper dinitrate. The fine structure of the intense absorption band in the photoacoustic spectra is assigned to the d-d transitions between the crystal field split levels of copper ions, that cannot be discriminated in the UV/vis solution absorption spectra. Combination with the EPR results allows one to probe the variation of the electronic properties and bonding interaction at the copper site, consistent with the structural data for the crystalline complexes and further supports the reliability of the photoacoustic method to resolve the d-d transition band. A dominant contribution of the in-plane ligand field due to equatorial nitrogen atoms is deduced for the complexes of polyamines with copper salts.

  12. Acceleration of natural-abundance solid-state MAS NMR measurements on bone by paramagnetic relaxation from gadolinium-DTPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Zhang, Rongchun; Zhu, Peizhi; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2014-07-01

    Reducing the data collection time without affecting the signal intensity and spectral resolution is one of the major challenges for the widespread application of multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, especially in experiments conducted on complex heterogeneous biological systems such as bone. In most of these experiments, the NMR data collection time is ultimately governed by the proton spin-lattice relaxation times (T1). For over two decades, gadolinium(III)-DTPA (Gd-DTPA, DTPA = Diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid) has been one of the most widely used contrast-enhancement agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we demonstrate that Gd-DTPA can also be effectively used to enhance the longitudinal relaxation rates of protons in solid-state NMR experiments conducted on bone without significant line-broadening and chemical-shift-perturbation side effects. Using bovine cortical bone samples incubated in different concentrations of Gd-DTPA complex, the 1H T1 values were calculated from data collected by 1H spin-inversion recovery method detected in natural-abundance 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) NMR experiments. Our results reveal that the 1H T1 values can be successfully reduced by a factor of 3.5 using as low as 10 mM Gd-DTPA without reducing the spectral resolution and thus enabling faster data acquisition of the 13C CPMAS spectra. These results obtained from 13C-detected CPMAS experiments were further confirmed using 1H-detected ultrafast MAS experiments on Gd-DTPA doped bone samples. This approach considerably improves the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of NMR experiments applied to bone samples by reducing the experimental time required to acquire the same number of scans.

  13. Ultrafast 2D NMR: An Emerging Tool in Analytical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraudeau, Patrick; Frydman, Lucio

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR) spectroscopy is widely used in chemical and biochemical analyses. Multidimensional NMR is also witnessing increased use in quantitative and metabolic screening applications. Conventional 2D NMR experiments, however, are affected by inherently long acquisition durations, arising from their need to sample the frequencies involved along their indirect domains in an incremented, scan-by-scan nature. A decade ago, a so-called ultrafast (UF) approach was proposed, capable of delivering arbitrary 2D NMR spectra involving any kind of homo- or heteronuclear correlation, in a single scan. During the intervening years, the performance of this subsecond 2D NMR methodology has been greatly improved, and UF 2D NMR is rapidly becoming a powerful analytical tool experiencing an expanded scope of applications. This review summarizes the principles and main developments that have contributed to the success of this approach and focuses on applications that have been recently demonstrated in various areas of analytical chemistry—from the real-time monitoring of chemical and biochemical processes, to extensions in hyphenated techniques and in quantitative applications.

  14. 31P magic angle spinning NMR study of flux-grown rare-earth element orthophosphate (monazite/xenotime) solid solutions: evidence of random cation distribution from paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances.

    PubMed

    Palke, Aaron C; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-11-01

    We present (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of flux-grown solid solutions of La(1-x)Ce(x)PO4 (x between 0.027 and 0.32) having the monoclinic monazite structure, and of Y(1-x)M(x)PO4 (M = V(n+), Ce(3+), Nd(3+), x between 0.001 and 0.014) having the tetragonal zircon structure. Paramagnetically shifted NMR resonances are observed in all samples due to the presence of paramagnetic V(n+), Ce(3+), and Nd(3+) in the diamagnetic LaPO4 or YPO4. As a first-order observation, the number and relative intensities of these peaks are related to the symmetry and structure of the diamagnetic host phase. The presence of paramagnetic shifts allows for increased resolution between NMR resonances for distinct atomic species which leads to the observation of low intensity peaks related to PO4 species having more than one paramagnetic neighbor two or four atomic bonds away. Through careful analysis of peak areas and comparison with predictions for simple models, it was determined that solid solutions in the systems examined here are characterized by complete disorder (random distribution) of diamagnetic La(3+) or Y(3+) with the paramagnetic substitutional species Ce(3+) and Nd(3+). The increased resolution given by the paramagnetic interactions also leads to the observation of splitting of specific resonances in the (31)P NMR spectra that may be caused by local, small-scale distortions from the substitution of ions having dissimilar ionic radii. PMID:24131129

  15. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machinesindependent of their ability to crystallize and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies. PMID:25960310

  16. Characterization of radiation-induced damage in high performance polymers by electron paramagnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suleman, Naushadalli K.

    1992-01-01

    The potential for long-term human activity beyond the Earth's protective magnetosphere is limited in part by the lack of detailed information on the effectiveness and performance of existing structural materials to shield the crew and spacecraft from highly penetrating space radiations. The two radiations of greatest concern are high energy protons emitted during solar flares and galactic cosmic rays which are energetic ions ranging from protons to highly oxidized iron. Although the interactions of such high-energy radiations with matter are not completely understood at this time, the effects of the incident radiation are clearly expected to include the formation of paramagnetic spin centers via ionization and bond-scission reactions in the molecular matrices of structural materials. Since this type of radiation damage is readily characterized by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the NASA Langley Research Center EPR system was repaired and brought on-line during the 1991 ASEE term. A major goal of the 1992 ASEE term was to adapt the existing core of the LaRC EPR system to meet the requirements for EPR Imaging--a powerful new technique which provides detailed information on the internal structure of materials by mapping the spatial distribution of unpaired spin density in bulk media. Major impetus for this adaptation arises from the fact that information derived from EPRI complements other methods such as scanning electron microscopy which primarily characterize surface phenomena. The modification of the EPR system has been initiated by the construction of specially designed, counterwound Helmholtz coils which will be mounted on the main EPR electromagnet. The specifications of the coils have been set to achieve a static linear magnetic field gradient of 10 gauss/mm/amp along the principal (Z) axis of the Zeeman field. Construction is also in progress of a paramagnetic standard in which the spin distribution is known in all three dimensions. This sample will be used to assess the linearity of the magnetic field gradient and to ensure authentic image reconstruction. A second major task was to secure the computer capability to enable image reconstruction from projection data generated by the magnetic field gradients. To this end, commercially available and public domain software packages which perform inverse Fourier Transform and convoluted (filtered) back projection functions are being integrated into the existing EPR data processing system.

  17. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.; Hyde, James S.

    2014-10-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg2+ doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  18. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sidabras, Jason W; Varanasi, Shiv K; Mett, Richard R; Swarts, Steven G; Swartz, Harold M; Hyde, James S

    2014-10-01

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg(2+) doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown. PMID:25362434

  19. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2014-10-15

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 μM of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 Ω coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  20. Protein dynamics and function from solution state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kovermann, Michael; Rogne, Per; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that dynamics are central to protein function; their importance is implicitly acknowledged in the principles of the Monod, Wyman and Changeux model of binding cooperativity, which was originally proposed in 1965. Nowadays the concept of protein dynamics is formulated in terms of the energy landscape theory, which can be used to understand protein folding and conformational changes in proteins. Because protein dynamics are so important, a key to understanding protein function at the molecular level is to design experiments that allow their quantitative analysis. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is uniquely suited for this purpose because major advances in theory, hardware, and experimental methods have made it possible to characterize protein dynamics at an unprecedented level of detail. Unique features of NMR include the ability to quantify dynamics (i) under equilibrium conditions without external perturbations, (ii) using many probes simultaneously, and (iii) over large time intervals. Here we review NMR techniques for quantifying protein dynamics on fast (ps-ns), slow (μs-ms), and very slow (s-min) time scales. These techniques are discussed with reference to some major discoveries in protein science that have been made possible by NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27088887

  1. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shangjin; Han, Yun; Paramasivam, Sivakumar; Yan, Si; Siglin, Amanda E; Williams, John C; Byeon, In-Ja L; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are vital for many biological processes. These interactions often result in the formation of protein assemblies that are large in size, insoluble, and difficult to crystallize, and therefore are challenging to study by structure biology techniques, such as single crystal X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is emerging as a promising technique for studies of such protein assemblies because it is not limited by molecular size, solubility, or lack of long-range order. In the past several years, we have applied magic angle spinning SSNMR-based methods to study several protein complexes. In this chapter, we discuss the general SSNMR methodologies employed for structural and dynamics analyses of protein complexes with specific examples from our work on thioredoxin reassemblies, HIV-1 capsid protein assemblies, and microtubule-associated protein assemblies. We present protocols for sample preparation and characterization, pulse sequences, SSNMR spectra collection, and data analysis. PMID:22167681

  2. Single-sided sensor for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlo, J.; Casanova, F.; Blümich, B.

    2006-06-01

    The unavoidable spatial inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field generated by open sensors has precluded their use for high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. In fact, this application was deemed impossible because these field variations are usually orders of magnitude larger than those created by the microscopic structure of the molecules to be detected. Recently, chemical shift resolved NMR spectra were observed for the first time outside a portable single-sided magnet by implementing a method that exploits inhomogeneities in the rf field designed to reproduce variations of the static magnetic field [J. Perlo, V. Demas, F. Casanova, C.A. Meriles, J. Reimer, A. Pines, B. Blümich, High-resolution spectroscopy with a portable single-sided sensor, Science 308 (2005) 1279]. In this communication, we describe in detail the magnet system built from permanent magnets as well as the rf coil geometry used to compensate the static field variations.

  3. Ultra-wideline solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schurko, Robert W

    2013-09-17

    Although solid-state NMR (SSNMR) provides rich information about molecular structure and dynamics, the small spin population differences between pairs of spin states that give rise to NMR transitions make it an inherently insensitive spectroscopic technique in terms of signal acquisition. Scientists have continuously addressed this issue via improvements in NMR hardware and probes, increases in the strength of the magnetic field, and the development of innovative pulse sequences and acquisition methodologies. As a result, researchers can now study NMR-active nuclides previously thought to be unobservable or too unreceptive for routine examination via SSNMR. Several factors can make it extremely challenging to detect signal or acquire spectra using SSNMR: (i) low gyromagnetic ratios (i.e., low Larmor frequencies), (ii) low natural abundances or dilution of the nuclide of interest (e.g., metal nuclides in proteins or in organometallic catalysts supported on silica), (iii) inconvenient relaxation characteristics (e.g., very long longitudinal or very short transverse relaxation times), and/or (iv) extremely broad powder patterns arising from large anisotropic NMR interactions. Our research group has been particularly interested in efficient acquisition of broad NMR powder patterns for a variety of spin-1/2 and quadrupolar (spin > 1/2) nuclides. Traditionally, researchers have used the term "wideline" NMR to refer to experiments yielding broad (1)H and (2)H SSNMR spectra ranging from tens of kHz to ∼250 kHz in breadth. With modern FT NMR hardware, uniform excitation in these spectral ranges is relatively easy, allowing for the acquisition of high quality spectra. However, spectra that range in breadth from ca. 250 kHz to tens of MHz cannot be uniformly excited with conventional, high-power rectangular pulses. Rather, researchers must apply special methodologies to acquire such spectra, which have inherently low S/N because the signal intensity is spread across such large spectral breadths. We have suggested the term ultra-wideline NMR (UWNMR) spectroscopy to describe this set of methodologies. This Account describes recent developments in pulse sequences and strategies for the efficient acquisition of UWNMR spectra. After an introduction to anisotropically broadened NMR patterns, we give a brief history of methods used to acquire UWNMR spectra. We then discuss new acquisition methodologies, including the acquisition of CPMG echo trains and the application of pulses capable of broadband excitation and refocusing. Finally, we present several applications of UWNMR methods that use these broadband pulses. PMID:23745683

  4. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy study of fluence dependence of paramagnetic relaxation in Mn/Fe implanted ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masenda, H.; Geburt, S.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Naidoo, D.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Johnston, K.; Mantovan, R.; Mølholt, T. E.; Ncube, M.; Shayestehaminzadeh, S.; Gislason, H. P.; Langouche, G.; Ólafsson, S.; Ronning, C.

    2016-12-01

    Emission Mössbauer Spectroscopy following the implantation of radioactive precursor isotope 57Mn+ ( T 1/2= 1.5 min) into ZnO single crystals at ISOLDE/CERN shows that a large fraction of 57Fe atoms produced in the 57Mn beta decay is created as paramagnetic Fe3+ with relatively long spin-lattice relaxation times. Here we report on ZnO pre-implanted with 56Fe to fluences of 2×1013, 5×10 13 and 8 × 1013 ions/cm2 in order to investigate the dependence of the paramagnetic relaxation rate of Fe3+ on fluence. The spectra are dominated by magnetic features displaying paramagnetic relaxation effects. The extracted spin-lattice relaxation rates show a slight increase with increasing ion fluence at corresponding temperatures and the area fraction of Fe3+ at room temperature reaches a maximum contribution of 80(3)% in the studied fluence range.

  5. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  6. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  7. NMR spectroscopy to follow reaction progress in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Butler, Bradley J; Thomas, Donald S; Hook, James M; Harper, Jason B

    2016-06-01

    In order to understand reaction outcomes in ionic liquids, it is crucial to be able to follow the progress of these reactions. This review highlights the advantages of NMR spectroscopy over other analytical techniques in following reaction progress in ionic liquids, particularly addressing the practical aspects of the methodology and highlighting the range of processes that can be readily followed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25287592

  8. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy powered by a free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Brunel, L-C; Edwards, D T; van Tol, J; Ramian, G; Han, S; Sherwin, M S

    2012-09-20

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy interrogates unpaired electron spins in solids and liquids to reveal local structure and dynamics; for example, EPR has elucidated parts of the structure of protein complexes that other techniques in structural biology have not been able to reveal. EPR can also probe the interplay of light and electricity in organic solar cells and light-emitting diodes, and the origin of decoherence in condensed matter, which is of fundamental importance to the development of quantum information processors. Like nuclear magnetic resonance, EPR spectroscopy becomes more powerful at high magnetic fields and frequencies, and with excitation by coherent pulses rather than continuous waves. However, the difficulty of generating sequences of powerful pulses at frequencies above 100 gigahertz has, until now, confined high-power pulsed EPR to magnetic fields of 3.5 teslas and below. Here we demonstrate that one-kilowatt pulses from a free-electron laser can power a pulsed EPR spectrometer at 240 gigahertz (8.5 teslas), providing transformative enhancements over the alternative, a state-of-the-art ∼30-milliwatt solid-state source. Our spectrometer can rotate spin-1/2 electrons through π/2 in only 6 nanoseconds (compared to 300 nanoseconds with the solid-state source). Fourier-transform EPR on nitrogen impurities in diamond demonstrates excitation and detection of EPR lines separated by about 200 megahertz. We measured decoherence times as short as 63 nanoseconds, in a frozen solution of nitroxide free-radicals at temperatures as high as 190 kelvin. Both free-electron lasers and the quasi-optical technology developed for the spectrometer are scalable to frequencies well in excess of one terahertz, opening the way to high-power pulsed EPR spectroscopy up to the highest static magnetic fields currently available. PMID:22996555

  9. 1H to 13C Energy Transfer in Solid State NMR Spectroscopy of Natural Organic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berns, Anne E.; Conte, Pellegrino

    2010-05-01

    Cross polarization (CP) magic angle spinning (MAS) 13C-NMR spectroscopy is a solid state NMR technique widely used to study chemical composition of organic materials with low or no solubility in the common deuterated solvents used to run liquid state NMR experiments. Based on the magnetization transfer from abundant nuclei (with spin of 1 -2) having a high gyromagnetic ratio (γ), such as protons, to the less abundant 13C nuclei with low γ values, 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy is often applied in environmental chemistry to obtain quantitative information on the chemical composition of natural organic matter (NOM) (Conte et al., 2004), although its quantitative assessment is still matter of heavy debates. Many authors (Baldock et al., 1997; Conte et al., 1997, 2002; Dria et al., 2002; Kiem et al., 2000; Kögel-Knabner, 2000; Preston, 2001), reported that the application of appropriate instrument setup as well as the use of special pulse sequences and correct spectra elaboration may provide signal intensities that are directly proportional to the amount of nuclei creating a NMR signal. However, many other papers dealt with the quantitative unsuitability of 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Among those, Mao et al. (2000), Smernik and Oades (2000 a,b), and Preston (2001) reported that cross-polarized NMR techniques may fail in a complete excitation of the 13C nuclei. In fact, the amount of observable carbons via 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy appeared, in many cases, lower than that measured by a direct observation of the 13C nuclei. As a consequence, cross-polarized NMR techniques may provide spectra where signal distribution may not be representative of the quantitative distribution of the different natural organic matter components. Cross-polarization is obtained after application of an initial 90° x pulse on protons and a further spin lock pulse (along the y axis) having a fixed length (contact time) for both nuclei (1H and 13C) once the Hartmann-Hahn condition is matched. The Hartmann-Hahn condition can be expressed as γHB1H = γCB1C, where γH and γC are the gyromagnetic ratios of protons and carbons, whereas B1H and B1C are the 1H and 13C radio-frequency (r.f.) fields applied to the nuclei. The Hartmann-Hahn condition is affected by the H-C dipolar interaction strength (Stejskal & Memory, 1994). All the factors affecting dipolar interactions may mismatch the Hartmann-Hahn condition and prevent a quantitative representation of the NOM chemical composition (Conte et al., 2004). It has been reported that under low speed MAS conditions, broad matching profiles are centered around the Hartmann-Hahn condition....... With increasing spinning speed the Hartmann-Hahn matching profiles break down in a series of narrow matching bands separated by the rotor frequency (Stejskal & Memory, 1994). In order to account for the instability of the Hartmann-Hahn condition at higher rotor spin rates (>10 kHz), variable amplitude cross-polarization techniques (RAMP-CP) have been developed (Metz et al., 1996). So far, to our knowledge, the prevailing way used to obtain quantitative 13C-CPMAS NMR results was to optimize the 1H and 13C spin lock r.f. fields on simple standard systems such as glycine and to use those r.f. field values to run experiments on unknown organic samples. The aim of the present study was to experimentally evidence that the stability of the Hartmann-Hahn condition was different for different samples with a known structure. Moreover, Hartmann-Hahn profiles of four different humic acids (HAs) were also provided in order to show that the 1H/13C r.f. spin lock field strength must also be tested on the HAs prior to a quantitative evaluation of their 13C-CPMAS NMR spectra. Baldock, J.A., Oades, J.M., Nelson, P.N., Skene, T.M., Golchin, A. & Clarke, P., 1997. Assessing the extent of decomposition of natural organic materials using solid-state C-13 NMR spectroscopy. Australian Journal of Soil Research, 35, 1061-1083. Conte, P., Piccolo, A., van Lagen, B., Buurman, P. & de Jager, P.A., 1997. Quantitative Aspects of Solid-State 13C-NMR Spectra of Humic Substances from Soils of Volcanic Systems. Geoderma, 80, 327-338. Conte, P., Piccolo, A., van Lagen, B., Buurman, P. & Hemminga, M.A., 2002. Elemental quantitation of natural organic matter by CPMAS C-13 NMR spectroscopy. Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, 21, 158-170. Conte, P., Spaccini, R. & Piccolo, A., 2004. State of the art of CPMAS C-13-NMR spectroscopy applied to natural organic matter. Progress in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, 44, 215-223. Dria, K.J., Sachleben, J.R. & Hatcher, P.G., 2002. Solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance of humic acids at high magnetic field strengths. Journal of Environmental Quality, 31, 393-401. Kiem, R., Knicker, H., Korschens, M. & Kogel-Knabner, I., 2000. Refractory organic carbon in C-depleted arable soils, as studied by C-13 NMR spectroscopy and carbohydrate analysis. Organic Geochemistry, 31, 655-668. Kögel-Knabner, I., 2000. Analytical approaches for characterizing soil organic matter. Organic Geochemistry, 31, 609-625. Mao, J.D., Hu, W.G., Schmidt-Rohr, K., Davies, G., Ghabbour, E.A. & Xing, B., 2000. Quantitative characterization of humic substances by solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance. Soil Science Society of America Journal, 64, 873-884. Metz, G., Ziliox, M. & Smith, S.O., 1996. Towards quantitative CP-MAS NMR. Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, 7, 155-160. Preston, C.M., 2001. Carbon-13 solid-state NMR of soil organic matter - using the technique effectively. Canadian Journal of Soil Science, 81, 255-270. Smernik, R.J. & Oades, J.M., 2000a. The use of spin counting for determining quantitation in solid state C-13 NMR spectra of natural organic matter 1. Model systems and the effects of paramagnetic impurities. Geoderma, 96, 101-129. Smernik, R.J. & Oades, J.M., 2000b. The use of spin counting for determining quantitation in solid state C-13 NMR spectra of natural organic matter 2. HF-treated soil fractions. Geoderma, 96, 159-171. Stejskal, E.O. & Memory, J.D., 1994. High Resolution NMR in the Solid State. Fundamentals of CP/MAS. Oxford University Press, New York.

  10. Disulfide-Linked Dinitroxides for Monitoring Cellular Thiol Redox Status through Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Legenzov, Eric A; Sims, Stephen J; Dirda, Nathaniel D A; Rosen, Gerald M; Kao, Joseph P Y

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular thiol-disulfide redox balance is crucial to cell health, and may be a key determinant of a cancer's response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The ability to assess intracellular thiol-disulfide balance may thus be useful not only in predicting responsiveness of cancers to therapy, but in assessing predisposition to disease. Assays of thiols in biology have relied on colorimetry or fluorimetry, both of which require UV-visible photons, which do not penetrate the body. Low-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) is an emerging magnetic imaging technique that uses radio waves, which penetrate the body well. Therefore, in combination with tailored imaging agents, EPRI affords the opportunity to image physiology within the body. In this study, we have prepared water-soluble and membrane-permeant disulfide-linked dinitroxides, at natural isotopic abundance, and with D,(15)N-substitution. Thiols such as glutathione cleave the disulfides, with simple bimolecular kinetics, to yield the monomeric nitroxide species, with distinctive changes in the EPR spectrum. Using the D,(15)N-substituted disulfide-dinitroxide and EPR spectroscopy, we have obtained quantitative estimates of accessible intracellular thiol in cultured human lymphocytes. Our estimates are in good agreement with published measurements. This suggests that in vivo EPRI of thiol-disulfide balance is feasible. Finally, we discuss the constraints on the design of probe molecules that would be useful for in vivo EPRI of thiol redox status. PMID:26523485

  11. Anthocyanin composition of wild Colombian fruits and antioxidant capacity measurement by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Santacruz, Liliana; Carriazo, Jos G; Almanza, Ovidio; Osorio, Coralia

    2012-02-15

    The qualitative and quantitative anthocyanin composition of four wild tropical fruits from Colombia was studied. Compounds of "mora pequea" ( Rubus megalococcus Focke.), "uva de rbol" ( Myrciaria aff. cauliflora O. Berg), coral, and motiln ( Hyeronima macrocarpa Mull. Arg.) fruits were separately extracted with methanol-acetic acid (95:5, v/v). The anthocyanin-rich extracts (AREs) were obtained by selective adsorption on Amberlite XAD-7. Each extract was analyzed by HPLC-PDA and HPLC-HRESI-MS(n) with LCMS-IT-TOF equipment in order to characterize the anthocyanin pigments and the coinjection in HPLC using standards allowed identifying the major constituents in each extract. The antioxidant activity was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and UV-vis spectroscopy, using ABTS and DPPH free radicals. The ARE of motiln ( H. macrocarpa Mll. Arg) exhibited the highest radical scavenging activity in comparison to the other extracts. A second-order kinetic model was followed in all of the cases. These results suggested that the studied fruits are promising not only as source of natural pigments but also as antioxidant materials for food industry. PMID:22242913

  12. Analyzing Xanthine Dehydrogenase Iron-Sulfur Clusters Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hodson, R.

    2004-02-05

    Xanthine dehydrogenase is a metalloenzyme that is present in a variety of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. The oxidation of the xanthine occurs at the molybdenum site, and the catalytic cycle is completed by electron transfer to the iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters and finally the flavin, where they are accepted by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD). Since the site giving rise to the Fe/S I electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal is thought to be the initial recipient of the electrons from the Mo, we wish to understand which EPR signal is associated with which Fe/S cluster in the structure in order to develop an understanding of the electron flow within the molecule. Samples of xanthine dehydrogenase wild-type and mutant forms were analyzed with EPR spectroscopy techniques at low and high temperatures. The results showed an altered Fe/S I signal along with an unaltered Fe/S II signal. The converted Cysteine, in the mutant, did affect the Fe/S cluster immediately adjacent to it. Therefore, the Fe/S I signal arises from the Fe/S cluster closest to the Mo and immediately adjacent to the mutated amino acid, and the Fe/S II signal must arise from the more distant Fe/S cluster.

  13. Exploring intrinsically disordered proteins using site-directed spin labeling electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Le Breton, Nolwenn; Martinho, Marlène; Mileo, Elisabetta; Etienne, Emilien; Gerbaud, Guillaume; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Belle, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are highly variable biological systems, not only in their structures but also in their dynamics. The most extreme example of dynamics is encountered within the family of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins (IDPs), which are proteins lacking a well-defined 3D structure under physiological conditions. Among the biophysical techniques well-suited to study such highly flexible proteins, Site-Directed Spin Labeling combined with EPR spectroscopy (SDSL-EPR) is one of the most powerful, being able to reveal, at the residue level, structural transitions such as folding events. SDSL-EPR is based on selective grafting of a paramagnetic label on the protein under study and is limited neither by the size nor by the complexity of the system. The objective of this mini-review is to describe the basic strategy of SDSL-EPR and to illustrate how it can be successfully applied to characterize the structural behavior of IDPs. Recent developments aimed at enlarging the panoply of SDSL-EPR approaches are presented in particular newly synthesized spin labels that allow the limitations of the classical ones to be overcome. The potentialities of these new spin labels will be demonstrated on different examples of IDPs. PMID:26042221

  14. 33S NMR spectroscopy 3. Substituent effects on 33S NMR parameters in 2-substituted ethanesulfonates.

    PubMed

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2006-08-01

    33S NMR parameters (chemical shifts and linewidths) in 2-substituted sodium ethanesulfonates, XCH2CH2SO3Na (X = H, CH3, OH, SH, NH2, Cl, Br, NH3+) depend upon the electronic properties of substituents. To explain experimental results and obtain additional information on the origin of the observed substituent effect (SE), sulfur isotropic absolute shielding constants have been calculated at DFT level of theory (B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p)) by gauge-including atomic orbitals (GIAO) method. Data have been interpreted with the aid of natural bond orbital (NBO) method and natural chemical shielding (NCS) analysis. It has been demonstrated that in the class of compounds considered the diamagnetic contribution to sulfur-shielding constant is constant and the observed upfield shift of 33S resonance induced by electron-withdrawing substituents (reverse chemical shift effect) can be related to variations of the paramagnetic contribution. Substituents with different electronic properties cause variations in the polarization of S-C and S-O bonds of the -C-SO3- moiety thus determining changes of the electron density at sulfur nucleus and consequently the expansion or contraction of 3p sulfur orbitals. Also oxygen lone-pairs and sulfur core 2p electrons can play an active role in determining the paramagnetic contribution to sulfur shielding. With regard to linewidth variations, they can be ascribed primarily to changes in the nuclear quadrupole coupling constant values. B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,p) method allows obtaining a good reproducibility of SE on the electric field gradient (EFG) at sulfur, although its values tend to be underestimated significantly. Moreover, 17O shielding constants have been calculated. PMID:16741982

  15. Advancements in waste water characterization through NMR spectroscopy: review.

    PubMed

    Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Alexandre e Silva, Lorena M; Ferreira, Antonio G

    2015-09-01

    There are numerous organic pollutants that lead to several types of ecosystem damage and threaten human health. Wastewater treatment plants are responsible for the removal of natural and anthropogenic pollutants from the sewage, and because of this function, they play an important role in the protection of human health and the environment. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has proven to be a valuable analytical tool as a result of its versatility in characterizing both overall chemical composition as well as individual species in a wide range of mixtures. In addition, NMR can provide physical information (rigidity, dynamics, etc.) as well as permit in depth quantification. Hyphenation with other techniques such as liquid chromatography, solid phase extraction and mass spectrometry creates unprecedented capabilities for the identification of novel and unknown chemical species. Thus, NMR is widely used in the study of different components of wastewater, such as complex organic matter (fulvic and humic acids), sludge and wastewater. This review article summarizes the NMR spectroscopy methods applied in studies of organic pollutants from wastewater to provide an exhaustive review of the literature as well as a guide for readers interested in this topic. PMID:25280056

  16. 57Fe Mssbauer spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance studies of human liver ferritin, Ferrum Lek and Maltofer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alenkina, I. V.; Oshtrakh, M. I.; Klencsr, Z.; Kuzmann, E.; Chukin, A. V.; Semionkin, V. A.

    2014-09-01

    A human liver ferritin, commercial Ferrum Lek and Maltofer samples were studied using Mssbauer spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance. Two Mssbauer spectrometers have been used: (i) a high velocity resolution (4096 channels) at 90 and 295 K, (ii) and a low velocity resolution (250 channels) at 20 and 40 K. It is shown that the three studied materials have different superparamagnetic features at various temperatures. This may be caused by different magnetic anisotropy energy barriers, sizes (volume), structures and compositions of the iron cores. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the ferritin, Ferrum Lek and Maltofer were decomposed into multiple spectral components demonstrating the presence of minor ferro- or ferrimagnetic phases along with revealing marked differences among the studied substances. Mssbauer spectroscopy provides evidences on several components in the measured spectra which could be related to different regions, layers, nanocrystallites, etc. in the iron cores that coincides with heterogeneous and multiphase models for the ferritin iron cores.

  17. Perspectives on DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy in solutions.

    PubMed

    van Bentum, Jan; van Meerten, Bas; Sharma, Manvendra; Kentgens, Arno

    2016-03-01

    More than 60years after the seminal work of Albert Overhauser on dynamic nuclear polarization by dynamic cross relaxation of coupled electron-nuclear spin systems, the quest for sensitivity enhancement in NMR spectroscopy is as pressing as ever. In this contribution we will review the status and perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization in the liquid state. An appealing approach seems to be the use of supercritical solvents that may allow an extension of the Overhauser mechanism towards common high magnetic fields. A complementary approach is the use of solid state DNP on frozen solutions, followed by a rapid dissolution or in-situ melting step and NMR detection with substantially enhanced polarization levels in the liquid state. We will review recent developments in the field and discuss perspectives for the near future. PMID:26920831

  18. Perspectives on DNP-enhanced NMR spectroscopy in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bentum, Jan; van Meerten, Bas; Sharma, Manvendra; Kentgens, Arno

    2016-03-01

    More than 60 years after the seminal work of Albert Overhauser on dynamic nuclear polarization by dynamic cross relaxation of coupled electron-nuclear spin systems, the quest for sensitivity enhancement in NMR spectroscopy is as pressing as ever. In this contribution we will review the status and perspectives for dynamic nuclear polarization in the liquid state. An appealing approach seems to be the use of supercritical solvents that may allow an extension of the Overhauser mechanism towards common high magnetic fields. A complementary approach is the use of solid state DNP on frozen solutions, followed by a rapid dissolution or in-situ melting step and NMR detection with substantially enhanced polarization levels in the liquid state. We will review recent developments in the field and discuss perspectives for the near future.

  19. 19F NMR spectroscopy study of the metabolites of flucloxacillin in rat urine.

    PubMed

    Everett, J R; Jennings, K; Woodnutt, G

    1985-12-01

    19F NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor the metabolites of flucloxacillin in the urine of a rat dosed with its sodium salt. 19F NMR signals were detected and quantified from flucloxacillin and three metabolites. The 19F NMR method involves minimal sample preparation and is free from interference by endogenous urine components. High-field spin-echo 1H NMR spectroscopy and HPLC were used to confirm the results. PMID:2868093

  20. New generation NMR bioreactor coupled with high-resolution NMR spectroscopy leads to novel discoveries in Moorella thermoaceticum metabolic profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Junfeng; Isern, Nancy G.; Ewing, R James; Liyu, Andrey V.; Sears, Jesse A.; Knapp, Harlan; Iversen, Jens; Sisk, Daniel R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Majors, Paul D.

    2014-06-20

    An in-situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bioreactor was developed and employed to monitor microbial metabolism under batch-growth conditions in real time. We selected Moorella thermoacetica ATCC 49707 as a test case. M. thermoacetica (formerly Clostridium thermoaceticum) is a strictly anaerobic, thermophilic, acetogenic, gram-positive bacterium with potential for industrial production of chemicals. The metabolic profiles of M. thermoacetica were characterized during growth in batch mode on xylose (a component of lignocellulosic biomass) using the new generation NMR bioreactor in combination with high-resolution, high sensitivity NMR (HR-NMR) spectroscopy. In-situ NMR measurements were performed using water-suppressed H-1 NMR spectroscopy at an NMR frequency of 500 MHz, and aliquots of the bioreactor contents were taken for 600 MHz HR-NMR spectroscopy at specific intervals to confirm metabolite identifications and expand metabolite coverage. M. thermoacetica demonstrated the metabolic potential to produce formate, ethanol and methanol from xylose, in addition to its known capability of producing acetic acid. Real-time monitoring of bioreactor conditions showed a temporary pH decrease, with a concomitant increase in formic acid during exponential growth. Fermentation experiments performed outside of the magnet showed that the strong magnetic field employed for NMR detection did not significantly affect cell metabolism. Use of the in-situ NMR bioreactor facilitated monitoring of the fermentation process in real time, enabling identification of intermediate and end-point metabolites and their correlation with pH and biomass produced during culture growth. Real-time monitoring of culture metabolism using the NMR bioreactor in combination with the HR-NMR spectroscopy will allow optimization of the metabolism of microorganisms producing valuable bioproducts.

  1. Linking local environments and hyperfine shifts: a combined experimental and theoretical (31)P and (7)Li solid-state NMR study of paramagnetic Fe(III) phosphates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongsik; Middlemiss, Derek S; Chernova, Natasha A; Zhu, Ben Y X; Masquelier, Christian; Grey, Clare P

    2010-12-01

    Iron phosphates (FePO(4)) are among the most promising candidate materials for advanced Li-ion battery cathodes. This work reports upon a combined nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimental and periodic density functional theory (DFT) computational study of the environments and electronic structures occurring in a range of paramagnetic Fe(III) phosphates comprising FePO(4) (heterosite), monoclinic Li(3)Fe(2)(PO(4))(3) (anti-NASICON A type), rhombohedral Li(3)Fe(2)(PO(4))(3) (NASICON B type), LiFeP(2)O(7), orthorhombic FePO(4)·2H(2)O (strengite), monoclinic FePO(4)·2H(2)O (phosphosiderite), and the dehydrated forms of the latter two phases. Many of these materials serve as model compounds relevant to battery chemistry. The (31)P spin-echo mapping and (7)Li magic angle spinning NMR techniques yield the hyperfine shifts of the species of interest, complemented by periodic hybrid functional DFT calculations of the respective hyperfine and quadrupolar tensors. A Curie-Weiss-based magnetic model scaling the DFT-calculated hyperfine parameters from the ferromagnetic into the experimentally relevant paramagnetic state is derived and applied, providing quantitative finite temperature values for each phase. The sensitivity of the hyperfine parameters to the composition of the DFT exchange functional is characterized by the application of hybrid Hamiltonians containing admixtures 0%, 20%, and 35% of Fock exchange. Good agreement between experimental and calculated values is obtained, provided that the residual magnetic couplings persisting in the paramagnetic state are included. The potential applications of a similar combined experimental and theoretical NMR approach to a wider range of cathode materials are discussed. PMID:21053901

  2. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using a direct current-SQUID magnetometer directly coupled to an electron spin ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toida, Hiraku; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Zhu, Xiaobo; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Shiro

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate electron spin polarization detection and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy using a direct current superconducting quantum interference device (dc-SQUID) magnetometer. Our target electron spin ensemble is directly bonded to the dc-SQUID magnetometer that detects electron spin polarization induced by an external magnetic field or EPR in a micrometer-sized area. The minimum distinguishable number of polarized spins and sensing volume of the electron spin polarization detection and the EPR spectroscopy are estimated to be ˜106 and ˜10-10 cm3 (˜0.1 pl), respectively.

  3. Characterization of iron, manganese, and copper synthetic hydroxyapatites by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, B.; Wasowicz, T.; Howard, T.; Hossner, L. R.; Ming, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    The incorporation of micronutrients (e.g., Fe, Mn, Cu) into synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHA) is proposed for slow release of these nutrients to crops in NASA's Advanced Life Support (ALS) program for long-duration space missions. Separate Fe3+ (Fe-SHA), Mn2+ (Mn-SHA), and Cu2+ (Cu-SHA) containing SHA materials were synthesized by a precipitation method. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to determine the location of Fe3+, Mn2+, and Cu2+ ions in the SHA structure and to identify other Fe(3+)-, Mn(2+)-, and Cu(2+)-containing phases that formed during precipitation. The EPR parameters for Fe3+ (g=4.20 and 8.93) and for Mn2+ (g=2.01, A=9.4 mT, D=39.0 mT and E=10.5 mT) indicated that Fe3+ and Mn2+ possessed rhombic ion crystal fields within the SHA structure. The Cu2+ EPR parameters (g(z)=2.488, A(z)=5.2 mT) indicated that Cu2+ was coordinated to more than six oxygens. The rhombic environments of Fe3+ and Mn2+ along with the unique Cu2+ environment suggested that these metals substituted for the 7 or 9 coordinate Ca2+ in SHA. The EPR analyses also detected poorly crystalline metal oxyhydroxides or metal-phosphates associated with SHA. The Fe-, Mn-, and Cu-SHA materials are potential slow release sources of Fe, Mn, and Cu for ALS and terrestrial cropping systems.

  4. Study of nanostructural organization of ionic liquids by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Merunka, Dalibor; Peric, Mirna; Peric, Miroslav

    2015-02-19

    The X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) of a stable, spherical nitroxide spin probe, perdeuterated 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-1-oxyl (pDTO) has been used to study the nanostructural organization of a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquids (ILs) with alkyl chain lengths from two to eight carbons. By employing nonlinear least-squares fitting of the EPR spectra, we have obtained values of the rotational correlation time and hyperfine coupling splitting of pDTO to high precision. The rotational correlation time of pDTO in ILs and squalane, a viscous alkane, can be fit very well to a power law functionality with a singular temperature, which often describes a number of physical quantities measured in supercooled liquids. The viscosity of the ILs and squalane, taken from the literature, can also be fit to the same power law expression, which means that the rotational correlation times and the ionic liquid viscosities have similar functional dependence on temperature. The apparent activation energy of both the rotational correlation time of pDTO and the viscous flow of ILs and squalane increases with decreasing temperature; in other words, they exhibit strong non-Arrhenius behavior. The rotational correlation time of pDTO as a function of η/T, where η is the shear viscosity and T is the temperature, is well described by the Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) law, while the hydrodynamic probe radii are solvent dependent and are smaller than the geometric radius of the probe. The temperature dependence of hyperfine coupling splitting is the same in all four ionic liquids. The value of the hyperfine coupling splitting starts decreasing with increasing alkyl chain length in the ionic liquids in which the number of carbons in the alkyl chain is greater than four. This decrease together with the decrease in the hydrodynamic radius of the probe indicates a possible existence of nonpolar nanodomains. PMID:25594422

  5. Urinary metabolite quantification employing 2D NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gronwald, Wolfram; Klein, Matthias S; Kaspar, Hannelore; Fagerer, Stephan R; Nürnberger, Nadine; Dettmer, Katja; Bertsch, Thomas; Oefner, Peter J

    2008-12-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a fairly novel method for the quantification of metabolites in biological fluids and tissue extracts. We show in this contribution that, compared to 1D 1H spectra, superior quantification of human urinary metabolites is obtained from 2D 1H-13C heteronuclear single-quantum correlation (HSQC) spectra measured at natural abundance. This was accomplished by the generation of separate calibration curves for the different 2D HSQC signals of each metabolite. Lower limits of detection were in the low to mid micromolar range and were generally the lower the greater the number of methyl groups contained in an analyte. The quantitative 2D NMR data obtained for a selected set of 17 urinary metabolites were compared to those obtained independently by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of amino acids and hippurate as well as enzymatic and colorimetric measurements of creatinine. As a typical application, 2D-NMR was used for the investigation of urine from patients with inborn errors of metabolism. PMID:19551947

  6. Measurement of Free Radicals Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy During Open Aorto-Iliac Arterial Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Wacław; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Stanisić, Michał; Iskra, Maria; Krasiński, Zbigniew; Nowak, Marek; Dobosz, Bernadeta

    2014-01-01

    Background Aortic cross-clamping during abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) open repair leads to development of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) spin-trapping is a valuable method of direct measurement of free radicals. The objective of the study was to evaluate the results of EPR as a direct method of free radical measurement and degree of inflammatory response in open operative treatment of patients with AAA and aorto-iliac occlusive disease (AIOD). Material/Methods The study was performed on a group of 32 patients with AAA and 25 patients with AIOD scheduled for open repair. Peripheral venous blood for EPR spectroscopy and for SOD, GPx, ox-LDL, Il-6, TNF-alfa, CRP, and HO-1 were harvested. Selected parameters were established accordingly to specified EPR and immunohistochemical methods and analyzed between groups by Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test with Bonferroni correction. Results Free radicals level was correlated with the time of the aortic cross-clamping after the reperfusion of he first and second leg in AAA (r=0.7; r=0.47). ox-LDL in AAA decreased 5 min after reperfusion of the first leg (32.99 U/L, range: 14.09–77.12) and 5 min after reperfusion of the second leg (26.75 U/L, range: 11.56–82.12) and 24 h after the operation (25.85 U/L, range: 14.29–49.70). HO-1concentration increased to above the level before intervention 24 h after surgery. The activities of GPx and SOD decreased 5 min after the first-leg reperfusion in AAA. Twenty-four hours after surgery, inflammatory markers increased in AAA to CRP was 14.76 ml/l (0.23–38.55), IL-6 was 141.22 pg/ml (84.3–591.03), TNF-alfa was 6.82 pg/ml (1.76–80.01) and AIOD: CRP was 18.44 mg/l (2.56–33.14), IL-6: 184.1 pg/ml (128.46–448.03), TNF-alfa was 7.74 pg/ml (1.74–74.74). Conclusions EPR spin-trapping demonstrates temporarily elevated level of free radicals in early phase of reperfusion, leading to decrease antioxidants in AAA. Elevated free radical levels decreased 24 h after surgery due to various endogenous antioxidants and therapies. PMID:25429420

  7. Report on neptunium speciation by NMR and optical spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Tait, C.D.; Palmer, P.D.; Ekberg, S.A.; Clark, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    Hydrolysis and carbonate complexation reactions were examined for NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and NpO{sub 2}{sup +} ions by a variety of techniques including potentiometric titration, UV-Vis-NIR and NMR spectroscopy. The equilibrium constant for the reaction 3NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} + 3H{sup +} {rightleftharpoons} (NpO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} + 3HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} was determined to be logK = 19.7 ({plus_minus} 0.8) (I = 2.5 m). {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy of NpO{sub 2}{sup n+} ions (n = 1,2) reveals a readily observable {sup 17}O resonance for n = 2, but not for n = 1. The first hydrolysis constant for NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was studied as a function of temperature, and the functional form for the temperature-dependent equilibrium constant for the reaction written as NpO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} NpO{sub 2}OH + H{sup +} was found to be logK = 2.28 {minus} 3780/T, where T is in {degree}K. Finally, the temperature dependence of neptunium(V) carbonate complexation constants was studied. For the first carbonate complexation constant, the appropriate functional form was found to be log{beta}{sub 01} = 1.47 + 786/T.

  8. Investigating albendazole desmotropes by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chattah, Ana K; Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Pfund, Laura Y; Longhi, Marcela R; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Garnero, Claudia

    2015-03-01

    Characterization of the molecular structure and physicochemical solid-state properties of the solid forms of pharmaceutical compounds is a key requirement for successful commercialization as potential active ingredients in drug products. These properties can ultimately have a critical effect on the solubility and bioavailability of the final drug product. Here, the desmotropy of Albendazole forms I and II was investigated at the atomic level. Ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, together with powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, were performed on polycrystalline samples of the two solids in order to fully characterize and distinguish the two forms. High-resolution one-dimensional (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N together with two-dimensional (1)H/(1)H single quantum-single quantum, (1)H/(1)H single quantum-double quantum, and (1)H/(13)C chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR experiments under MAS conditions were extensively used to decipher the intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions present in both solid forms. These experiments enabled the unequivocal identification of the tautomers of each desmotrope. Our results also revealed that both solid forms may be described as dimeric structures, with different intermolecular hydrogen bonds connecting the tautomers in each dimer. PMID:25584993

  9. Structural characterization of titania by X-ray diffraction, photoacoustic, Raman spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, R. M.; Rajeswari, B.; Sengupta, Arijit; Achary, S. N.; Kshirsagar, R. J.; Natarajan, V.

    2015-02-01

    A titania mineral (obtained from East coast, Orissa, India) was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), Raman and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) studies. XRD studies indicated the presence of rutile (91%) and anatase (9%) phases in the mineral. Raman investigation supported this information. Both rutile and anatase phases have tetragonal structure (rutile: space group P42/mnm, a = 4.5946(1) Å, c = 2.9597(1) Å, V = 62.48(1) (Å)3, Z = 2; anatase: space group I41/amd, 3.7848(2) Å, 9.5098(11) Å, V = 136.22(2) (Å)3, Z = 4). The deconvoluted PAS spectrum showed nine peaks around 335, 370, 415,485, 555, 605, 659, 690,730 and 785 nm and according to the ligand field theory, these peaks were attributed to the presence of V4+, Cr3+, Mn4+ and Fe3+ species. EPR studies revealed the presence of transition metal ions V4+(d1), Cr3+(d3), Mn4+(d3) and Fe3+(d5) at Ti4+ sites. The EPR spectra are characterized by very large crystal filed splitting (D term) and orthorhombic distortion term (E term) for multiple electron system (s > 1) suggesting that the transition metal ions substitute the Ti4+ in the lattice which is situated in distorted octahedral coordination of oxygen. The possible reasons for observation of unusually large D and E term in the EPR spectra of transition metal ions (S = 3/2 and 5/2) are discussed.

  10. NMR analysis of carbohydrate-binding interactions in solution: an approach using analysis of saturation transfer difference NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hemmi, Hikaru

    2014-01-01

    One of the most commonly used ligand-based NMR methods for detecting ligand binding is saturation transfer difference (STD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The STD NMR method is an invaluable technique for assessing carbohydrate-lectin interactions in solution, because STD NMR can be used to detect weak ligand binding (Kd ca. 10(-3)-10(-8) M). STD NMR spectra identify the binding epitope of a carbohydrate ligand when bound to lectin. Further, the STD NMR method uses 1H-detected NMR spectra of only the carbohydrate, and so only small quantities of non-labeled lectin are required. In this chapter, I describe a protocol for the STD NMR method, including the experimental procedures used to acquire, process, and analyze STD NMR data, using STD NMR studies for methyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (β-Me-Gal) binding to the C-terminal domain of an R-type lectin from earthworm (EW29Ch) as an example. PMID:25117260

  11. Paramagnetic electrodes and bulk magnetic susceptibility effects in the in situ NMR studies of batteries: application to Li1.08Mn1.92O4 spinels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lina; Leskes, Michal; Ilott, Andrew J; Trease, Nicole M; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-01

    To date, in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of working batteries have been performed in static mode, i.e., in the absence of magic angle spinning (MAS). Thus, it is extremely challenging to apply the method to paramagnetic systems such as the cathodes spinels Li(1+x)Mn(2-x)O4 primarily due to three factors: (1) the resonance lines are broadened severely; (2) spectral analysis is made more complicated by bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) effects, which depend on the orientation and shape of the object under investigation; (3) the difficulty in untangling the BMS effects induced by the paramagnetic and metallic components on other (often diamagnetic) components in the system, which result in additional shifts and line broadening. Here we evaluate the orientation-dependence of the BMS effect of Li1.08Mn1.92O4, analyzing the experimental results by using a simple long-distance Li-electron dipolar coupling model. In addition, we discuss the shape and packing density dependence of the BMS effect and its influence on the observed frequencies of other components, such as the Li metal and the electrolyte in the battery. Finally, we show that by taking these effects into account we are able to minimize the BMS induced shift by orienting the cell at a rotation angle, αi=54.7° which facilitates the interpretation of the in situ NMR spectra of a working battery with the paramagnetic Li1.08Mn1.92O4 cathode. PMID:23838525

  12. Membrane topology of NS2B of dengue virus revealed by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Qingxin; Wong, Ying Lei; Liew, Lynette Sin Yee; Kang, CongBao

    2015-10-01

    Non-structural (NS) proteins of dengue virus (DENV) are important for viral replication. There are four membrane proteins that are coded by viral genome. NS2B was shown to be one of the membrane proteins and its main function was confirmed to regulate viral protease activity. Its membrane topology is still not known because only few studies have been conducted to understand its structure. Here we report the determination of membrane topology of NS2B from DENV serotype 4 using NMR spectroscopy. NS2B of DENV4 was expressed and purified in detergent micelles. The secondary structure of NS2B was first defined based on backbone chemical resonance assignment. Four helices were identified in NS2B. The membrane topology of NS2B was defined based on relaxation analysis and paramagnetic relaxation enhancement experiments. The last three helices were shown to be more stable than the first helix. The NS3 protease cofactor region between α2 and α3 is highly dynamic. Our results will be useful for further structural and functional analysis of NS2B. PMID:26072288

  13. Spin-Noise-Detected Two-Dimensional Fourier-Transform NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We introduce two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy detected by recording and processing the noise originating from nuclei that have not been subjected to any radio frequency excitation. The method relies on cross-correlation of two noise blocks that bracket the evolution and mixing periods. While the sensitivity of the experiment is low in conventional NMR setups, spin-noise-detected NMR spectroscopy has great potential for use with extremely small numbers of spins, thereby opening a way to nanoscale multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. PMID:24294412

  14. An Oil Spill in a Tube: An Accessible Approach for Teaching Environmental NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre J.; Mitchell, Perry J.; Masoom, Hussain; Mobarhan, Yalda Liaghati; Adamo, Antonio; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has great potential as an instrumental method for environmental chemistry research and monitoring but may be underused in teaching laboratories because of its complexity and the level of expertise required in operating the instrument and interpreting data. This laboratory experiment introduces environmental NMR spectroscopy to

  15. An Oil Spill in a Tube: An Accessible Approach for Teaching Environmental NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Andre´ J.; Mitchell, Perry J.; Masoom, Hussain; Mobarhan, Yalda Liaghati; Adamo, Antonio; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has great potential as an instrumental method for environmental chemistry research and monitoring but may be underused in teaching laboratories because of its complexity and the level of expertise required in operating the instrument and interpreting data. This laboratory experiment introduces environmental NMR spectroscopy to…

  16. 'Shim pulses' for NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous magneticfields

    SciTech Connect

    Topgaard, Daniel; Martin, Rachel W.; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Meriles, Carlos; Pines, Alexander

    2004-05-19

    NMR spectroscopy conveys information about chemical structure through ppm-scale shifts of the resonance frequency depending on the chemical environment. In order to observe these small shifts, magnets with highly homogeneous magnetic field B{sub 0} are used. The high cost and large size of these magnets are a consequence of the requirement for high homogeneity. In this contribution we introduce a new method for recording high-resolution NMR spectra from samples in inhomogeneous B{sub 0}, opening up the possibility of exploiting magnets of lower homogeneity and cost. Instead of using the traditional B{sub 0} ''shim coils'', adiabatic radiofrequency (RF) pulse sequences and modulated B{sub 0} gradients generated by coils in the probe are used to produce ''shim pulses''. A great deal of work has been devoted to finding methods for retrieving chemical shift information even when B{sub 0} is inhomogeneous. One class of methods relies on zero- or multiple quantum coherences which evolve independently of B{sub 0}. These methods are inherently two-dimensional and the high-resolution information is obtained indirectly. In order to minimize experimental time it is desirable to acquire a high-resolution spectrum directly just as for traditional NMR in homogeneous fields. A further advantage with direct acquisition is that modification of already existing multidimensional NMR techniques is facilitated. A fundamentally different approach utilizes inhomogeneity of the RF magnetic field to periodically refocus the phase dispersion from the inhomogeneous B{sub 0}. With this technique a high-resolution spectrum can indeed be acquired in a single shot. The main drawback is the requirement for spatial matching between the RF and B{sub 0} inhomogeneities. Based on this latter technique we propose the use of ''shim pulses'', i.e. modulated, spatially constant, B{sub 0} gradient pulses together with spatially homogeneous adiabatic frequency sweeps to induce non-linear phase shifts in three dimensions. An intuitive understanding of the approach can be obtained from the following: An adiabatic full passage applied to transverse magnetization effectively rotates the magnetization in the transverse plane with an amount that depends on the frequency offset. In homogeneous B{sub 0} this gives rise to a ''phase roll'' across the NMR spectrum. If the adiabatic full passage is applied in the presence of a constant B{sub 0} gradient, a phase shift approximately linear in space will be the result. A second adiabatic passage reverses this phase shift and the adiabatic double passage constitutes effectively a 360{sup o} pulse. However, if the amplitude of the B{sub 0} gradient is changing during the adiabatic passages, phase shifts, which are non-linear in space, can be achieved. With a proper choice of the RF and gradient modulation functions, the phase dispersion from the inhomogeneous B{sub 0} can be canceled. Application of a shim pulse between each detected point in the time-domain NMR signal yields an NMR spectrum free from the broadening caused by the B{sub 0} inhomogeneity.

  17. Multiplicative or t1 Noise in NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Granwehr, Josef

    2005-01-25

    The signal in an NMR experiment is highly sensitive to fluctuations of the environment of the sample. If, for example, the static magnetic field B{sub 0}, the amplitude and phase of radio frequency (rf) pulses, or the resonant frequency of the detection circuit are not perfectly stable and reproducible, the magnetic moment of the spins is altered and becomes a noisy quantity itself. This kind of noise not only depends on the presence of a signal, it is in fact proportional to it. Since all the spins at a particular location in a sample experience the same environment at any given time, this noise primarily affects the reproducibility of an experiment, which is mainly of importance in the indirect dimensions of a multidimensional experiment, when intense lines are suppressed with a phase cycle, or for difference spectroscopy techniques. Equivalently, experiments which are known to be problematic with regard to their reproducibility, like flow experiments or experiments with a mobile target, tend to be affected stronger by multiplicative noise. In this article it is demonstrated how multiplicative noise can be identified and characterized using very simple, repetitive experiments. An error estimation approach is developed to give an intuitive, yet quantitative understanding of its properties. The consequences for multidimensional NMR experiments are outlined, implications for data analysis are shown, and strategies for the optimization of experiments are summarized.

  18. Regularized Partial Least Squares with an Application to NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Genevera I.; Peterson, Christine; Vannucci, Marina; Maletić-Savatić, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    High-dimensional data common in genomics, proteomics, and chemometrics often contains complicated correlation structures. Recently, partial least squares (PLS) and Sparse PLS methods have gained attention in these areas as dimension reduction techniques in the context of supervised data analysis. We introduce a framework for Regularized PLS by solving a relaxation of the SIMPLS optimization problem with penalties on the PLS loadings vectors. Our approach enjoys many advantages including flexibility, general penalties, easy interpretation of results, and fast computation in high-dimensional settings. We also outline extensions of our methods leading to novel methods for non-negative PLS and generalized PLS, an adoption of PLS for structured data. We demonstrate the utility of our methods through simulations and a case study on proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy data. PMID:24511361

  19. Structure determination of uniformly (13)C, (15)N labeled protein using qualitative distance restraints from MAS solid-state (13)C-NMR observed paramagnetic relaxation enhancement.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Hajime; Egawa, Ayako; Kido, Kouki; Kameda, Tomoshi; Kamiya, Masakatsu; Kikukawa, Takashi; Aizawa, Tomoyasu; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Demura, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a powerful method for structure determination of insoluble biomolecules. However, structure determination by MAS solid-state NMR remains challenging because it is difficult to obtain a sufficient amount of distance restraints owing to spectral complexity. Collection of distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is a promising approach to alleviate this barrier. However, the precision of distance restraints provided by PRE is limited in solid-state NMR because of incomplete averaged interactions and intermolecular PREs. In this report, the backbone structure of the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1) has been successfully determined by combining the CS-Rosetta protocol and qualitative PRE restraints. The derived structure has a Cα RMSD of 1.49 Å relative to the X-ray structure. It is noteworthy that our protocol can determine the correct structure from only three cysteine-EDTA-Mn(2+) mutants because this number of PRE sites is insufficient when using a conventional structure calculation method based on restrained molecular dynamics and simulated annealing. This study shows that qualitative PRE restraints can be employed effectively for protein structure determination from a limited conformational sampling space using a protein fragment library. PMID:26728076

  20. Effects of stereoelectronic interactions on the relativistic spin-orbit and paramagnetic components of the (13)C NMR shielding tensors of dihaloethenes.

    PubMed

    Viesser, Renan V; Ducati, Lucas C; Autschbach, Jochen; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2015-07-15

    In this study, stereoelectronic interactions were considered to explain the experimental difference in the magnitude of the known heavy-atom effect on the (13)C NMR chemical shifts in cis- and trans-1,2-dihaloethene isomers (halo = F, Cl, Br or I). The experimental values were compared to the calculated values with various DFT functionals using both the nonrelativistic approach (NR) and the relativistic approximations SR-ZORA (SR) and SO-ZORA (SO). NBO and NLMO contributions to the (13)C NMR shielding tensors were determined to assess which stereoelectronic interactions have a more important effect on the shielding tensor in each principal axis system (PAS) coordinate. These analyses associated with the orbital rotation model and the HOMO-LUMO energy gap enable rationalization of trends between cis and trans isomers from fluorine to iodine derivatives. Both paramagnetic and SO shielding terms were responsible for the observed trends. It was possible to conclude that the steric interactions between the two iodine atoms and the hyperconjugative interactions involving the halogen lone pairs (LP(X)) and πC[double bond, length as m-dash]C*, σC[double bond, length as m-dash]C* and σC-X* antibonding orbitals are responsible for the lower (13)C NMR shielding for the cis isomers of the bromine and the iodine compounds than that of the trans isomers. PMID:26138131

  1. 2D zirconium fluorides: Synthesis, structure and NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Ali, A.; Body, M.; Leblanc, M.; Maisonneuve, V.

    2011-02-01

    Two new zirconium (IV) fluorides, [H 2dap]·(Zr 2F 10)·H 2O ( I) and [H meam] 2·(Zr 2F 10)·H 2O ( II), are synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal techniques and NMR spectroscopy. I is triclinic ( P1¯) with a = 6.805 (1) Å, b = 8.361(1) Å, and c = 11.853 (2) Å, α = 94.54(1)°, β = 105.44(1)°, γ = 108.75(1)°. II is monoclinic ( C2 /m) with a = 10.340(6) Å, b = 6.624(4) Å, c = 8.758(6) Å and β = 110.57(3)°. The structure determinations, performed from single crystal X-ray diffraction data, lead to the R/R w reliability factors 0.041/0.113 for I and 0.057/0.177 for II. The structures are built up from ZrF 7 and ZrF 8 units in I and only ZrF 8 units in II. The polyhedra share common edges in order to form two different ZrF 5 layers that are also found in [H 2C2H10N2]·(Zr 2F 10)·H 2O and (H 3O) 2·(Zr 2F 10)·H 2O. On heating at 145 °C, [H 2dap]·(Zr 2F 10)·H 2O decomposes to give the anhydrous form [H 2dap]·(Zr 2F 10) that undergoes two successive phase transformations at 220 °C and 290 °C. 19F NMR spectroscopy confirms the structural features of [H 2dap]·(Zr 2F 10)·H 2O ( I): two sets of three lines with a relative intensity 1:2:2 are attributed to five bridging fluorine atoms and to five nonbridging fluorine atoms. This spectroscopy demonstrates that a noticeable substitution of F - anions by hydroxyl OH - groups is excluded, together with the eventual substitution of H 2O by HF molecules.

  2. Detection of Taurine in Biological Tissues by 33S NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musio, Roberta; Sciacovelli, Oronzo

    2001-12-01

    The potential of 33S NMR spectroscopy for biochemical investigations on taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is explored. It is demonstrated that 33S NMR spectroscopy allows the selective and unequivocal identification of taurine in biological samples. 33S NMR spectra of homogenated and intact tissues are reported for the first time, together with the spectrum of a living mollusc. Emphasis is placed on the importance of choosing appropriate signal processing methods to improve the quality of the 33S NMR spectra of biological tissues.

  3. Ion counting in supercapacitor electrodes using NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Griffin, John M; Forse, Alexander C; Wang, Hao; Trease, Nicole M; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2014-01-01

    (19)F NMR spectroscopy has been used to study the local environments of anions in supercapacitor electrodes and to quantify changes in the populations of adsorbed species during charging. In the absence of an applied potential, anionic species adsorbed within carbon micropores (in-pore) are distinguished from those in large mesopores and spaces between particles (ex-pore) by a characteristic nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS). Adsorption experiments and two-dimensional exchange experiments confirm that anions are in dynamic equilibrium between the in- and ex-pore environments with an exchange rate in the order of tens of Hz. (19)F in situ NMR spectra recorded at different charge states reveal changes in the intensity and NICS of the in-pore resonances, which are interpreted in term of changes in the population and local environments of the adsorbed anions that arise due to the charge-storage process. A comparison of the results obtained for a range of electrolytes reveals that several factors influence the charging mechanism. For a tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, positive polarisation of the electrode is found to proceed by anion adsorption at a low concentration, whereas increased ion exchange plays a more important role for a high concentration electrolyte. In contrast, negative polarization of the electrode proceeds by cation adsorption for both concentrations. For a tetrabutylammonium tetrafluoroborate electrolyte, anion expulsion is observed in the negative charging regime; this is attributed to the reduced mobility and/or access of the larger cations inside the pores, which forces the expulsion of anions in order to build up ionic charge. Significant anion expulsion is also observed in the negative charging regime for alkali metal bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide electrolytes, suggesting that more subtle factors also affect the charging mechanism. PMID:25591456

  4. Mapping the landscape of RNA dynamics with NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rinnenthal, Jörg; Buck, Janina; Ferner, Jan; Wacker, Anna; Fürtig, Boris; Schwalbe, Harald

    2011-12-20

    Among the three major classes of biomacromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) RNA's pronounced dynamics are the most explicitly linked to its wide variety of functions, which include catalysis and the regulation of transcription, translation, and splicing. These functions are mediated by a range of RNA biomachinery, including such varied examples as macromolecular noncoding RNAs, microRNAs, small interfering RNAs, riboswitch RNAs, and RNA thermometers. In each case, the functional dynamics of an interconversion is characterized by an associated rate constant. In this Account, we provide an introduction to NMR spectroscopic characterization of the landscape of RNA dynamics. We introduce strategies for measuring NMR parameters at various time scales as well as the underlying models for describing the corresponding rate constants. RNA exhibits significant dynamic motion, which can be modulated by (i) intermolecular interactions, including specific and nonspecific binding of ions (such as Mg(2+) and tertiary amines), (ii) metabolites in riboswitches or RNA aptamers, and (iii) macromolecular interactions within ribonucleic protein particles, including the ribosome and the spliceosome. Our understanding of the nature of these dynamic changes in RNA targets is now being incorporated into RNA-specific approaches in the design of RNA inhibitors. Interactions of RNA with proteins, other RNAs, or small molecules often occur through binding mechanisms that follow an induced fit mechanism or a conformational selection mechanism, in which one of several populated RNA conformations is selected through ligand binding. The extent of functional dynamics, including the kinetic formation of a specific RNA tertiary fold, is dependent on the messenger RNA (mRNA) chain length. Thus, during de novo synthesis of mRNA, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, nascent mRNA of various lengths will adopt different secondary and tertiary structures. The speed of transcription has a critical influence on the functional dynamics of the RNA being synthesized. In addition to modulating the local dynamics of a conformational RNA ensemble, a given RNA sequence may adopt more than one global, three-dimensional structure. RNA modification is one way to select among these alternative structures, which are often characterized by nearly equal stability, but with high energy barriers for conformational interconversion. The refolding of different secondary and tertiary structures has been found to be a major regulatory mechanism for transcription and translation. These conformational transitions can be characterized with NMR spectroscopy, for any given RNA sequence, in response to external stimuli. PMID:21894962

  5. Investigation of Antioxidant Activity of Pomegranate Juices by Means of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and UV-Vis Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kozik, Violetta; Jarzembek, Krystyna; Jędrzejowska, Agnieszka; Bąk, Andrzej; Polak, Justyna; Bartoszek, Mariola; Pytlakowska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Pomegranate fruit (Punica granatum L.) is a source of numerous phenolic compounds, and it contains flavonoids such as anthocyanins, anthocyanidins, cyanidins, catechins and other complexes of flavonoids, ellagitannins, and hydrolyzed tannins. Pomegranate juice shows antioxidant, antiproliferative, and anti-atherosclerotic properties. The antioxidant capacity (TEAC) of the pomegranate juices was measured using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH•) as a source of free radicals, and the total phenolic (TP) content was measured using UV-Vis spectroscopy. All the examined pomegranate juices exhibited relatively high antioxidant properties. The TEAC values determined by means of EPR spectroscopy using Trolox (TE) as a free radical scavenger were in the range of 463.12 to 1911.91 μmol TE/100 mL juice. The TP content measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu method, using gallic acid (GA) as a free radical scavenger, widely varied in the investigated pomegranate juice samples and ranged from 1673.62 to 5263.87 mg GA/1 L juice. The strongest antioxidant properties were observed with the fresh pomegranate juices obtained from the fruits originating from Israel, Lebanon, and Azerbaijan. Correlation analysis of numerical data obtained by means of EPR spectroscopy (TEAC) and UV-Vis spectroscopy (TP) gave correlation coefficient (r)=0.90 and determination coefficient (r2)=0.81 (P<0.05). PMID:26268964

  6. Applications of Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy (DOSY-NMR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffusion-ordered NMR (DOSY-NMR) is a powerful, but under-utilized, technique for the investigation of mixtures based on translational diffusion rates. DOSY spectra allow for determination by NMR of components that may differ in molecular weight, geometry or complexation. Typical applications coul...

  7. Applications of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to study interactions of iron proteins in cells with nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammack, R.; Shergill, J. K.; Ananda Inalsingh, V.; Hughes, Martin N.

    1998-12-01

    Nitric oxide and species derived from it have a wide range of biological functions. Some applications of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy are reviewed, for observing nitrosyl species in biological systems. Nitrite has long been used as a food preservative owing to its bacteriostatic effect on spoilage bacteria. Nitrosyl complexes such as sodium nitroprusside, which are added experimentally as NO-generators, themselves produce paramagnetic nitrosyl species, which may be seen by EPR. We have used this to observe the effects of nitroprusside on clostridial cells. After growth in the presence of sublethal concentrations of nitroprusside, the cells show they have been converted into other, presumably less toxic, nitrosyl complexes such as (RS) 2Fe(NO) 2. Nitric oxide is cytotoxic, partly due to its effects on mitochondria. This is exploited in the destruction of cancer cells by the immune system. The targets include iron-sulfur proteins. It appears that species derived from nitric oxide such as peroxynitrite may be responsible. Addition of peroxynitrite to mitochondria led to depletion of the EPR-detectable iron-sulfur clusters. Paramagnetic complexes are formed in vivo from hemoglobin, in conditions such as experimental endotoxic shock. This has been used to follow the course of production of NO by macrophages. We have examined the effects of suppression of NO synthase using biopterin antagonists. Another method is to use an injected NO-trapping agent, Fe-diethyldithiocarbamate (Fe-DETC) to detect accumulated NO by EPR. In this way we have observed the effects of depletion of serum arginine by arginase. In brains from victims of Parkinson's disease, a nitrosyl species, identified as nitrosyl hemoglobin, has been observed in substantia nigra. This is an indication for the involvement of nitric oxide or a derived species in the damage to this organ.

  8. Solid phase extraction chromatography and NMR spectroscopy (SPEC-NMR) for the rapid identification of drug metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, I D; Nicholson, J K

    1988-01-01

    The use of solid phase extraction onto disposable columns containing a C18 bonded silica gel provides a rapid and simple procedure for the removal of interfering endogenous components from urine samples containing drug metabolites prior to detection and identification by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. In addition, these columns can be used to retain and concentrate the compounds of interest, thus improving the effective sensitivity of the NMR detection method. Using simple step gradients chromatographic separations can be performed, and metabolites may be rapidly fractionated. This approach (solid phase extraction chromatography with NMR or SPEC-NMR) utilises the multiparametric metabolite detection facility of a Fourier transform NMR spectrometer to monitor a chromatographic separation, as such it has some of the beneficial properties of a directly linked liquid chromatography-NMR system without any of the disadvantages. Applications of the SPEC-NMR method in the investigation of drug metabolism are illustrated here by reference to excretion studies on the drugs ibuprofen, paracetamol, aspirin, oxpentifylline and naproxen. PMID:16867428

  9. Coherence selection in double CP MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jen-Hsien; Chou, Fang-Chieh; Tzou, Der-Lii M.

    2008-11-01

    Applications of double cross-polarization (CP) magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy, via 1H/ 15N and then 15N/ 13C coherence transfers, for 13C coherence selection are demonstrated on a 15N/ 13C-labeled N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) compound. The 15N/ 13C coherence transfer is very sensitive to the settings of the experimental parameters. To resolve explicitly these parameter dependences, we have systematically monitored the 13C{ 15N/ 1H} signal as a function of the rf field strength and the MAS frequency. The data reveal that the zero-quantum coherence transfer, with which the 13C effective rf field is larger than that of the 15N by the spinning frequency, would give better signal sensitivity. We demonstrate in one- and two-dimensional double CP experiments that spectral editing can be achieved by tailoring the experimental parameters, such as the rf field strengths and/or the MAS frequency.

  10. Characterization of paramagnetic species in N-doped TiO2 powders by EPR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Di Valentin, Cristiana; Pacchioni, Gianfranco; Selloni, Annabella; Livraghi, Stefano; Giamello, Elio

    2005-06-16

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are combined for the first time in an effort to characterize the paramagnetic species present in N-doped anatase TiO2 powders obtained by sol-gel synthesis. The experimental hyperfine coupling constants are well reproduced by two structurally different nitrogen impurities: substitutional and interstitial N atoms in the TiO2 anatase matrix. DFT calculations show that the nitrogen impurities induce the formation of localized states in the band gap. Substitutional nitrogen states lie just above the valence band, while interstitial nitrogen states lie higher in the gap. Excitations from these localized states to the conduction band may account for the absorption edge shift toward lower energies (visible region) observed in the case of N-doped TiO2 with respect to pure TiO2 (UV region). Calculations also show that nitrogen doping leads to a substantial reduction of the energy cost to form oxygen vacancies in bulk TiO2. This suggests that nitrogen doping is likely to be accompanied by oxygen vacancy formation. Finally, we propose that the relative abundance of the two observed nitrogen-doping species depends on the preparation conditions, such as the oxygen concentration in the atmosphere and the annealing temperature during synthesis. PMID:16852395

  11. Development of a micro flow-through cell for high field NMR spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; McIntyre, Sarah K.

    2011-05-01

    A highly transportable micro flow-through detection cell for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been designed, fabricated and tested. This flow-through cell allows for the direct coupling between liquid chromatography (LC) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) resulting in the possibility of hyphenated LC-NMR and GPC-NMR. The advantage of the present flow cell design is that it is independent and unconnected to the detection probe electronics, is compatible with existing commercial high resolution NMR probes, and as such can be easily implemented at any NMR facility. Two different volumes were fabricated corresponding to between {approx}3.8 and 10 {micro}L detection volume. Examples of the performance of the cell on different NMR instruments, and using different NMR detection probes were demonstrated.

  12. Measurement of Solution Viscosity via Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy (DOSY)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weibin; Kagan, Gerald; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, the undergraduate chemistry curriculum includes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques are often taught including two-dimensional gradient-based experiments. An investigation of intermolecular forces including viscosity, by a variety of methods, is often integrated in the undergraduate physical and

  13. Measurement of Solution Viscosity via Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy (DOSY)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weibin; Kagan, Gerald; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, the undergraduate chemistry curriculum includes nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Advanced NMR techniques are often taught including two-dimensional gradient-based experiments. An investigation of intermolecular forces including viscosity, by a variety of methods, is often integrated in the undergraduate physical and…

  14. Stereochemistry Determination by Powder X-ray Diffraction Analysis and NMR Spectroscopy Residual Dipolar Couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.; Pagola, S; Navarro-Vasquez, A; Phillips, D; Gayathri, C; Krakauer, H; Stephens, P; Nicotra, V; Gil, R

    2009-01-01

    A matter of technique: For a new steroidal lactol, jaborosalactol 24 (1), isolated from Jaborosa parviflora, NMR spectroscopy residual dipolar couplings and powder X-ray diffraction analysis independently gave the same stereochemistry at C23-C26. Conventional NMR spectroscopic techniques, such as NOE and {sup 3}J coupling-constant analysis failed to unambiguously determine this stereochemistry.

  15. Mobility and Diffusion-Ordered Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Kevin Freeman

    Mobility and diffusion-ordered two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments have been developed for the analysis of mixtures. In the mobility -ordered experiments, the full range of positive and negative electrophoretic mobilities is displayed in one dimension and chemical shifts are displayed in the other. A concentric cylindrical tube electrophoresis chamber was designed to reduce the effective pathlength for current and to provide unidirectional flow for ions of interest. Techniques based upon the reverse precession method were also implemented to recover the signs of the mobilities and improved resolution in the mobility dimension was obtained by replacing Fourier transformation of truncated data sets with a linear prediction analysis. In the diffusion-ordered two-dimensional NMR experiments, the conventional chemical shift spectrum is resolved in one dimension and spectra of diffusion rates or molecular radii are resolved in the other. Diffusion dependent pulsed field gradient NMR data sets were inverted by means of the computer programs SPLMOD or DISCRETE, when discrete diffusion coefficients were present, and CONTIN when continuous distributions were present. Since the inversion is ill -conditioned, it was necessary to introduce additional information to limit the range of the solutions. In addition to prior knowledge of the decay kernels and non-negativity of amplitudes and damping constants, a set of rejection criteria was constructed for the discrete analysis case that took into account physical limits on diffusion coefficients, experimentally accessible values, and variations in effective decay kernels resulting from instrumental non-linearities. Examples of analyses of simulated data and experimental data for mixtures are presented as well as two-dimensional spectra generated by CONTIN for polydisperse polymer samples. Also, resolution in the diffusion dimension was increased by performing experiments on hydrophobic molecules in the presence of surfactant micelles. Finally, the diffusion-ordered experiment was used to study the polymer induced breakdown of micelles consisting of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium salicylate. Addition of the polymer poly(vinyl methyl ether) resulted in an increase in the micelle diffusion coefficient and at high polymer concentrations and elevated temperatures the polymer and micelle were observed to diffuse at the same rate.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy studies on carbon-doped MgB2 superconductor nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateni, Ali; Erdem, Emre; Repp, Sergej; Acar, Selcuk; Kokal, Ilkin; Häßler, Wolfgang; Weber, Stefan; Somer, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    Undoped and carbon-doped magnesium diboride (MgB2) samples were synthesized using two sets of mixtures prepared from the precursors, amorphous nanoboron, and as-received amorphous carbon-doped nanoboron. The microscopic defect structures of carbon-doped MgB2 samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mg vacancies and C-related dangling-bond active centers could be distinguished, and sp3-hybridized carbon radicals were detected. A strong reduction in the critical temperature Tc was observed due to defects and crystal distortion. The symmetry effect of the latter is also reflected on the vibrational modes in the Raman spectra.

  17. Investigating Functional DNA Grafted on Nanodiamond Surface Using Site-Directed Spin Labeling and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Akiel, Rana D; Zhang, Xiaojun; Abeywardana, Chathuranga; Stepanov, Viktor; Qin, Peter Z; Takahashi, Susumu

    2016-05-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are a new and attractive class of materials for sensing and delivery in biological systems. Methods for functionalizing ND surfaces are highly valuable in these applications, yet reported approaches for covalent modification with biological macromolecules are still limited, and characterizing behaviors of ND-tethered biomolecules is difficult. Here we demonstrated the use of copper-free click chemistry to covalently attach DNA strands at ND surfaces. Using site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we demonstrated that the tethered DNA strands maintain the ability to undergo repetitive hybridizations and behave similarly to those in solutions, maintaining a large degree of mobility with respect to the ND. The work established a method to prepare and characterize an easily addressable identity tag for NDs. This will open up future applications such as targeted ND delivery and developing sensors for investigating biomolecules. PMID:27058261

  18. STUDYING RNA USING SITE-DIRECTED SPIN-LABELING AND CONTINUOUS-WAVE ELECTRON PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Cekan, Pavol; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th.; Qin, Peter Z.

    2010-01-01

    In site-directed spin-labeling (SDSL), a stable nitroxide radical is attached to a specific location within a macromolecule and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is used to interrogate the local environment surrounding the nitroxide. The SDSL strategy enables probing site-specific structural and dynamic features of RNA in solution without being limited by the size of the molecule, thus serving as a unique tool in biophysical studies of RNA. This chapter describes the use of continuous-wave (cw)-EPR to study dynamic features of RNAs as well as to monitor interactions between them. Various approaches for attaching nitroxide spin labels to nucleic acids are described, followed by detailed descriptions of cw-EPR spectral acquisition and processing procedures. Specific examples are subsequently used to illustrate analysis of EPR spectra, showing how information regarding the parent RNA can be extracted. PMID:20946796

  19. Electron paramagnetic resonance and Raman spectroscopy studies on carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} superconductor nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Bateni, Ali; Somer, Mehmet E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Erdem, Emre E-mail: msomer@ku.edu.tr; Repp, Sergej; Weber, Stefan; Acar, Selcuk; Kokal, Ilkin; Häßler, Wolfgang

    2015-04-21

    Undoped and carbon-doped magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) samples were synthesized using two sets of mixtures prepared from the precursors, amorphous nanoboron, and as-received amorphous carbon-doped nanoboron. The microscopic defect structures of carbon-doped MgB{sub 2} samples were systematically investigated using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mg vacancies and C-related dangling-bond active centers could be distinguished, and sp{sup 3}-hybridized carbon radicals were detected. A strong reduction in the critical temperature T{sub c} was observed due to defects and crystal distortion. The symmetry effect of the latter is also reflected on the vibrational modes in the Raman spectra.

  20. Monitoring organic reactions by UF-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Fernández-Valle, Encarnación; Martínez-Álvarez, Roberto; Molero-Vílchez, Dolores; Pardo-Botero, Zulay D; Sáez-Barajas, Elena

    2015-11-01

    Standard 2D NMR experiments suffer from the many t1 increments needed for spectra with sufficient digital resolution in the indirect dimension. Despite the different methodological approaches to overcome this problem, these increments have prevented studies of fast reactions. The development of ultrafast NMR (UF-NMR) has decisively speeded up the time scale of standard NMR to allow the study of organic reactions as they happen in real time to reveal mechanistic details. This mini-review summarizes the results achieved in monitoring organic reactions through this exciting technique. PMID:25998506

  1. Paramagnetic NMR relaxation in polymeric matrixes: sensitivity enhancement and selective suppression of embedded species (1H and 13C PSR filter).

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Megia, Eduardo; Correa, Juan; Novoa-Carballal, Ramon; Riguera, Ricardo

    2007-12-12

    A study of the practical applications of the addition of paramagnetic spin relaxation (PSR) ions to a variety of polymers (PLL, PAA, PGA, PVP, and polysaccharides such as hyaluronic acid, chitosan, mannan, and dextran) in solution (D2O and DMSO-d6) is described. Use of Gd(III), Cu(II), and Mn(II) allows a reduction of up to 500% in the 1H longitudinal relaxation times (T1), and so in the time necessary for recording quantitative NMR spectra (sensitivity enhancement) neither an increase of the spectral line width nor chemical shift changes resulted from addition of any of the PSR agents tested. Selective suppression of the 1H and 13C NMR signals of certain components (low MW molecules and polymers) in the spectrum of a mixture was attained thanks to their different sensitivity [transverse relaxation times (T2)] to Gd(III) (PSR filter). Illustration of this strategy with block copolymers (PGA-g-PEG) and mixtures of polymers and low MW molecules (i.e., lactose-hyaluronic acid, dextran-PAA, PVP-glutamic acid) in 1D and 2D NMR experiments (COSY and HMQC) is presented. In those mixtures where PSR and CPMG filters alone failed in the suppression of certain components (i.e., PVP-mannan-hyaluronic acid) due to their similarity of 1H T2 values and sensitivities to Gd(III), use of the PSR filter in combination with CPMG sequences (PSR-CPMG filter) successfully resulted in the sequential suppression of the components (hyaluronic acid first and then mannan). PMID:18004845

  2. Charge trapping in TiO2 polymorphs as seen by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Mario; Paganini, Maria Cristina; Livraghi, Stefano; Giamello, Elio

    2013-06-28

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) techniques have been employed to investigate charge carrier trapping in the two main TiO2 polymorphs, anatase and rutile, with particular attention to the features of electron trapping sites (formally Ti(3+) ions). The classic CW-EPR technique in this case provides signals based on the g tensor only. Nevertheless a systematic analysis of the signals obtained in the various cases (anatase and rutile, surface and bulk centers, regular and defective sites) has been performed providing useful guidelines on a field affected by some confusion. The problem of the localization of the electron spin density has been tackled by means of Pulse-EPR hyperfine techniques on samples appositely enriched with (17)O. This approach has led to evidence of a substantial difference, in terms of wavefunction localization between anatase (electrons trapped in regular lattice sites exhibiting delocalized electron density) and rutile (interstitial sites showing localized electron density). PMID:23695705

  3. Recent advances in protein NMR spectroscopy and their implications in protein therapeutics research.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guifang; Zhang, Ze-Ting; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Xu; Li, Conggang; Liu, Maili

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography are the two main methods for protein three-dimensional structure determination at atomic resolution. According to the protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank, X-ray crystallography has become the dominant method for structure determination, particularly for large proteins and complexes. However, with the developments of isotope labeling, increase of magnetic field strength, common use of a cryogenic probe, and ingenious pulse sequence design, the applications of NMR spectroscopy have expanded in biological research, especially in characterizing protein dynamics, sparsely populated transient structures, weak protein interactions, and proteins in living cells at atomic resolution, which is difficult if not impossible by other biophysical methods. Although great advances have been made in protein NMR spectroscopy, its applications in protein therapeutics, which represents the fastest growing segment of the pharmaceutical industry, are still limited. Here we review the recent advances in the use of NMR spectroscopy in studies of large proteins or complexes, posttranslation modifications, weak interactions, and aggregation, and in-cell NMR spectroscopy. The potential applications of NMR spectroscopy in protein therapeutic assays are discussed. PMID:24309626

  4. Functional groups identified by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Animal manure is generally high in organic matter intensity so it is well suitable for 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. Solid-state 13C NMR techniques used in characterizing organic matter and its components include, but are not limited to, cross-polarization /magic angle spinning (CP...

  5. Characterization of protein hydration by solution NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wand, Joshua

    A comprehensive understanding of the interactions between protein molecules and hydration water remains elusive. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been proposed as a means to characterize these interactions but is plagued with artifacts when employed in bulk aqueous solution. Encapsulation of proteins in reverse micelles prepared in short chain alkane solvents can overcome these technical limitations. Application of this approach has revealed that the interaction of water with the surface of protein molecules is quite heterogeneous with some regions of the protein having long-lived interactions while other regions show relatively transient hydration. Results from several proteins will be presented including ubiquitin, staphylococcal nuclease, interleukin 1beta, hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and T4 lysozyme. Ubiquitin and interleukin 1beta are signaling proteins and interact with other proteins through formation of dry protein-protein interfaces. Interestingly, the protein surfaces of the free proteins show relatively slowed (restricted) motion at the surface, which is indicative of low residual entropy. Other regions of the protein surface have relatively high mobility water. These results are consistent with the idea that proteins have evolved to maximize the hydrophobic effect in optimization of binding with protein partners. As predicted by simulation and theory, we find that hydration of internal hydrophobic cavities of interleukin 1beta and T4 lysozyme is highly disfavored. In contrast, the hydrophilic polar cavity of HEWL is occupied by water. Initial structural correlations suggest that hydration of alpha helical structure is characterized by relatively mobile water while those of beta strands and loops are more ordered and slowed. These and other results from this set of proteins reveals that the dynamical and structural character of hydration of proteins is heterogeneous and complex. Supported by the National Science Foundation.

  6. The strengths and weaknesses of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry with particular focus on metabolomics research.

    PubMed

    Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have evolved as the most common techniques in metabolomics studies, and each brings its own advantages and limitations. Unlike MS spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy is quantitative and does not require extra steps for sample preparation, such as separation or derivatization. Although the sensitivity of NMR spectroscopy has increased enormously and improvements continue to emerge steadily, this remains a weak point for NMR compared with MS. MS-based metabolomics provides an excellent approach that can offer a combined sensitivity and selectivity platform for metabolomics research. Moreover, different MS approaches such as different ionization techniques and mass analyzer technology can be used in order to increase the number of metabolites that can be detected. In this chapter, the advantages, limitations, strengths, and weaknesses of NMR and MS as tools applicable to metabolomics research are highlighted. PMID:25677154

  7. Applications of quantitative 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy in drug analysis.

    PubMed

    Pieters, L A; Vlietinck, A J

    1989-01-01

    The usefulness of 1H and 13C Fourier transform (FT) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H- and 13C-NMR) as quantitative methods stems from the potential direct relationship between the area under an NMR peak and the number of the particular type of nuclei that give rise to the signal, though it is necessary, especially for quantitative 13C-NMR, to take some precautions. The experimental limitations that have to be overcome in order to obtain quantitative 13C-NMR spectra are associated with the relaxation time, the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE), and the NMR instrument itself (filter characteristics, power level of the exciting pulse, dynamic range, digital resolution). Practical problems aside, 13C-NMR has a greater potential than 1H-NMR for the study of organic systems. The sensitivity of 13C chemical shifts to small differences in molecular environment, coupled with a large chemical shift range, gives a "chromatographic" separation of resonances of interest, and has made 13C-NMR an attractive method for analysing complex mixtures. Some applications of quantitative 1H- and 13C-NMR spectroscopy in drug analysis are discussed. PMID:2490526

  8. Use of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Evaluate the Redox State In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    SWARTZ, HAROLD M.; KHAN, NADEEM; KHRAMTSOV, VALERY V.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an overview of how electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) can be used to measure redox-related parameters in vivo. The values of this approach include that the measurements are made under fully physiological conditions, and some of the measurements cannot be made by other means. Three complementary approaches are used with in vivo EPR: the rate of reduction or reactions of nitroxides, spin trapping of free radicals, and measurements of thiols. All three approaches already have produced unique and useful information. The measurement of the rate of decrease of nitroxides technically is the simplest, but difficult to interpret because the measured parameter, reduction in the intensity of the nitroxide signal, can occur by several different mechanisms. In vivo spin trapping can provide direct evidence for the occurrence of specific free radicals in vivo and reflect relative changes, but accurate absolute quantification remains challenging. The measurement of thiols in vivo also appears likely to be useful, but its development as an in vivo technique is at an early stage. It seems likely that the use of in vivo EPR to measure redox processes will become an increasingly utilized and valuable tool. PMID:17678441

  9. Copper Environment in Artificial Metalloproteins Probed by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flores, Marco; Olson, Tien L; Wang, Dong; Edwardraja, Selvakumar; Shinde, Sandip; Williams, JoAnn C; Ghirlanda, Giovanna; Allen, James P

    2015-10-29

    The design of binding sites for divalent metals in artificial proteins is a productive platform for examining the characteristics of metal-ligand interactions. In this report, we investigate the spectroscopic properties of small peptides and four-helix bundles that bind Cu(II). Three small peptides, consisting of 15 amino acid residues, were designed to have two arms, each containing a metal-binding site comprised of different combinations of imidazole and carboxylate side chains. Two four-helix bundles each had a binding site for a central dinuclear metal cofactor, with one design incorporating additional potential metal ligands at two identical sites. The small peptides displayed pH-dependent, metal-induced changes in the circular dichroism spectra, consistent with large changes in the secondary structure upon metal binding, while the spectra of the four-helix bundles showed a predominant ?-helix content but only small structural changes upon metal binding. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectra were measured at X-band revealing classic Cu(II) axial patterns with hyperfine coupling peaks for the small peptides and four-helix bundles exhibiting a range of values that were related to the specific chemical natures of the ligands. The variety of electronic structures allow us to define the distinctive environment of each metal-binding site in these artificial systems, including the designed additional binding sites in one of the four-helix bundles. PMID:26201933

  10. Characterization of molecular structure of DAST via NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zi-Bo; Meng, Da-Lei; Xu, Yong-Kuan; Wu, Cong

    2016-02-01

    4-N, N-dimethylamino-4‧-N‧-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) crystal has excellent properties of nonlinear optics and electro-optical effect, and it can be used in the fields of radiation and detection through wave bands from infrared to terahertz. Besides, DAST thin films have exhibited their excellent properties and have expanded application fields of DAST material. CD3OD was chosen as the solvent to conduct 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, 1H-13C HSQC and 1H-13C HMBC characterization of DAST respectively. All peaks in 1H and 13C NMR spectra of DAST were assigned with assistance of 2D NMR correlation peaks.

  11. Ultrafast high-resolution magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    André, Marion; Piotto, Martial; Caldarelli, Stefano; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-06-21

    We demonstrate the acquisition of ultrafast 2D NMR spectra of semi-solid samples, with a high-resolution magic-angle-spinning setup. Using a recent double-quantum NMR pulse sequence in optimised synchronisation conditions, high-quality 2D spectra can be recorded for a sample under magic-angle spinning. An illustration is given with a semi-solid sample of banana pulp. PMID:25946235

  12. ADAPT-NMR Enhancer: complete package for reduced dimensionality in protein NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Woonghee; Bahrami, Arash; Markley, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: ADAPT-nuclear magnetic resonance (ADAPT-NMR) offers an automated approach to the concurrent acquisition and processing of protein NMR data with the goal of complete backbone and side chain assignments. What the approach lacks is a useful graphical interface for reviewing results and for searching for missing peaks that may have prevented assignments or led to incorrect assignments. Because most of the data ADAPT-NMR collects are 2D tilted planes used to find peaks in 3D spectra, it would be helpful to have a tool that reconstructs the 3D spectra. The software package reported here, ADAPT-NMR Enhancer, supports the visualization of both 2D tilted planes and reconstructed 3D peaks on each tilted plane. ADAPT-NMR Enhancer can be used interactively with ADAPT-NMR to automatically assign selected peaks, or it can be used to produce PINE-SPARKY-like graphical dialogs that support atom-by-atom and peak-by-peak assignment strategies. Results can be exported in various formats, including XEASY proton file (.prot), PINE pre-assignment file (.str), PINE probabilistic output file, SPARKY peak list file (.list) and TALOS+ input file (.tab). As an example, we show how ADAPT-NMR Enhancer was used to extend the automated data collection and assignment results for the protein Aedes aegypti sterol carrier protein 2. Availability: The program, in the form of binary code along with tutorials and reference manuals, is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/adapt-nmr-enhancer. Contact: whlee@nmrfam.wisc.edu or markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu PMID:23220573

  13. High-resolution magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy for metabolic profiling of intact tissues.

    PubMed

    Beckonert, Olaf; Coen, Muireann; Keun, Hector C; Wang, Yulan; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Holmes, Elaine; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2010-06-01

    Metabolic profiling, metabolomic and metabonomic studies require robust study protocols for any large-scale comparisons and evaluations. Detailed methods for solution-state NMR spectroscopy have been summarized in an earlier protocol. This protocol details the analysis of intact tissue samples by means of high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy and we provide a detailed description of sample collection, preparation and analysis. Described here are (1)H NMR spectroscopic techniques such as the standard one-dimensional, relaxation-edited, diffusion-edited and two-dimensional J-resolved pulse experiments, as well as one-dimensional (31)P NMR spectroscopy. These are used to monitor different groups of metabolites, e.g., sugars, amino acids and osmolytes as well as larger molecules such as lipids, non-invasively. Through the use of NMR-based diffusion coefficient and relaxation times measurements, information on molecular compartmentation and mobility can be gleaned. The NMR methods are often combined with statistical analysis for further metabonomics analysis and biomarker identification. The standard acquisition time per sample is 8-10 min for a simple one-dimensional (1)H NMR spectrum, giving access to metabolite information while retaining tissue integrity and hence allowing direct comparison with histopathology and MRI/MRS findings or the evaluation together with biofluid metabolic-profiling data. PMID:20539278

  14. Quantitative Determination of Carthamin in Carthamus Red by 1H-NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takamitsu; Terasaka, Kazuyoshi; Kato, Setsuko; Bai, Fan; Sugimoto, Naoki; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Mizukami, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    Carthamus Red is a food colorant prepared from the petals of Carthamus tinctorius (Asteraceae) whose major pigment is carthamin. Since an authentic carthamin standard is difficult to obtain commercially for the preparation of calibration curves in HPLC assays, we applied (1)H-NMR spectroscopy to the quantitative determination of carthamin in commercial preparations of Carthamus Red. Carthamus Red was repeatedly extracted in methanol and the extract was dissolved in pyridine-d(5) containing hexamethyldisilane (HMD) prior to (1)H-NMR spectroscopic analysis. The carthamin contents were calculated from the ratios of singlet signal intensities at approximately σ: 9.3 derived from H-16 of carthamin to those of the HMD signal at σ: 0. The integral ratios exhibited good repeatability among NMR spectroscopic analyses. Both the intra-day and inter-day assay variations had coefficients of variation of <5%. Based on the coefficient of absorption, the carthamin contents of commercial preparations determined by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy correlated well with those determined by colorimetry, although the latter were always approximately 1.3-fold higher than the former, irrespective of the Carthamus Red preparations. In conclusion, the quantitative (1)H-NMR spectroscopy used in the present study is simple and rapid, requiring no carthamin standard for calibration. After HMD concentration has been corrected using certified reference materials, the carthamin contents determined by (1)H-NMR spectroscopy are System of Units (SI)-traceable. PMID:24436958

  15. Electron paramagnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersion X-ray spectrometry, X-ray powder diffraction, and NMR characterization of iron-rich fired clays.

    PubMed

    Presciutti, Federica; Capitani, Donatella; Sgamellotti, Antonio; Brunetti, Brunetto Giovanni; Costantino, Ferdinando; Viel, Stéphane; Segre, Annalaura

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study is to clarify the structure of an iron-rich clay and the structural changes involved in the firing process as a preliminary step to get information on ancient ceramic technology. To this purpose, illite-rich clay samples fired at different temperatures were characterized using a multitechnique approach, i.e., by electron paramagnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy with electron dispersion X-ray spectrometry, X-ray powder diffraction, magic angle spinning and multiple quantum magic angle spinning NMR. During firing, four main reaction processes occur: dehydration, dehydroxylation, structural breakdown, and recrystallization. When the results are combined from all characterization methods, the following conclusions could be obtained. Interlayer H2O is located close to aluminum in octahedral sites and is driven off at temperatures lower than 600 degrees C. Between 600 and 700 degrees C dehydroxylation occurs whereas, between 800 and 900 degrees C, the aluminum in octahedral sites disappears, due to the breakdown of the illite structure, and all iron present is oxidized to Fe3+. In samples fired at 1000 and 1100 degrees C iron clustering was observed as well as large single crystals of iron with the occurrence of ferro- or ferrimagnetic effects. Below 900 degrees C the aluminum in octahedral sites presents a continuous distribution of chemical shift, suggesting the presence of slightly distorted sites. Finally, over the whole temperature range, the presence of at least two tetrahedral aluminum sites was revealed, characterized by different values of the quadrupolar coupling constant. PMID:16853882

  16. GFT projection NMR spectroscopy for proteins in the solid state

    PubMed Central

    Franks, W. Trent; Atreya, Hanudatta S.; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Recording of four-dimensional (4D) spectra for proteins in the solid state has opened new avenues to obtain virtually complete resonance assignments and three-dimensional (3D) structures of proteins. As in solution state NMR, the sampling of three indirect dimensions leads per se to long minimal measurement time. Furthermore, artifact suppression in solid state NMR relies primarily on radio-frequency pulse phase cycling. For an n-step phase cycle, the minimal measurement times of both 3D and 4D spectra are increased n times. To tackle the associated ‘sampling problem’ and to avoid sampling limited data acquisition, solid state G-Matrix Fourier Transform (SS GFT) projection NMR is introduced to rapidly acquire 3D and 4D spectral information. Specifically, (4,3)D (HA)CANCOCX and (3,2)D (HACA)NCOCX were implemented and recorded for the 6 kDa protein GB1 within about 10% of the time required for acquiring the conventional congeners with the same maximal evolution times and spectral widths in the indirect dimensions. Spectral analysis was complemented by comparative analysis of expected spectral congestion in conventional and GFT NMR experiments, demonstrating that high spectral resolution of the GFT NMR experiments enables one to efficiently obtain nearly complete resonance assignments even for large proteins. PMID:21052779

  17. Ligand screening by saturation-transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, V V

    2005-04-26

    NMR based methods to screen for high-affinity ligands have become an indispensable tool for designing rationalized drugs, as these offer a combination of good experimental design of the screening process and data interpretation methods, which together provide unprecedented information on the complex nature of protein-ligand interactions. These methods rely on measuring direct changes in the spectral parameters, that are often simpler than the complex experimental procedures used to study structure and dynamics of proteins. The goal of this review article is to provide the basic details of NMR based ligand-screening methods, with particular focus on the saturation transfer difference (STD) experiment. In addition, we provide an overview of other NMR experimental methods and a practical guide on how to go about designing and implementing them.

  18. Forensic examination of electrical tapes using high resolution magic angle spinning ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schoenberger, Torsten; Simmross, Ulrich; Poppe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The application of high resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) (1)H NMR spectroscopy is ideally suited for the differentiation of plastics. In addition to the actual material composition, the different types of polymer architectures and tacticity provide characteristic signals in the fingerprint of the (1)H NMR spectra. The method facilitates forensic comparison, as even small amounts of insoluble but swellable plastic particles are utilized. The performance of HR-MAS NMR can be verified against other methods that were recently addressed in various articles about forensic tape comparison. In this study samples of the 90 electrical tapes already referenced by the FBI laboratory were used. The discrimination power of HR-MAS is demonstrated by the fact that more tape groups can be distinguished by NMR spectroscopy than by using the combined evaluation of several commonly used analytical techniques. An additional advantage of this robust and quick method is the very simple sample preparation. PMID:26558760

  19. Metabolic profiling of potential probiotic or synbiotic cheeses by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Dina; Santos, Claudio H; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Gomes, Ana M; Goodfellow, Brian J; Freitas, Ana C

    2011-05-11

    To assess ripening of potential probiotic cheeses (containing either Lactobacillus casei -01 or Bifidobacterium lactis B94) or synbiotic cheeses with fructooligosaccharides (FOS) or a 50:50 mix of FOS/inulin, metabolic profiles have been obtained via classical biochemical analyses and by NMR spectroscopy. The addition of prebiotics to the cheeses resulted in lower proteolysis indices, especially in those synbiotic cheeses inoculated with B. lactis B94. Among synbiotic cheeses the combination of FOS and inulin resulted in an increase in lipolytic activity. The metabolic profiles of the cheeses analyzed by NMR spectroscopy, combined with multivariate statistics, allowed profiles to be distinguished by maturation time, added probiotic bacteria, or, in the case of B. lactis B94 cheese, added prebiotic. The NMR results are in agreement with the biochemical analyses and demonstrate the potential of NMR for the study of metabolic processes in probiotic/synbiotic food matrices. PMID:21443163

  20. Localized double-quantum-filtered 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. A.; Hetherington, H. P.; Meyerhoff, D. J.; Twieg, D. B.

    The image-guided in vivo spectroscopic (ISIS) pulse sequence has been combined with a double-quantum-filter scheme in order to obtain localized and water-suppressed 1H NMR spectra of J-coupled metabolites. The coherence-transfer efficiency associated with the DQ filter for AX and A 3X spin systems is described. Phantom results of carnosine, alanine, and ethanol in aqueous solution are presented. For comparison, the 1H NMR spectrum of alanine in aqueous solution with the binomial (1331, 2662) spin-echo sequence is also shown.

  1. NMR spectroscopy of experimentally shocked single crystal quartz: A reexamination of the NMR shock barometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiske, P. S.; Gratz, A. J.; Nellis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cygan and others report a broadening of the Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) peak for synthetic quartz powders with increasing shock pressure which they propose as a shock wave barometer for natural systems. These results are expanded by studying single crystal quartz shocked to 12 and 33 GPa using the 6.5 m two-stage light-gas gun at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Our NMR results differ substantially from those of Cygan and others and suggest that the proposed shock wave barometer may require refinement. The difference in results between this study and that of Cygan and others is most likely caused by different starting materials (single crystal vs. powder) and different shock loading histories. NMR results from single crystal studies may be more applicable to natural systems.

  2. Structural elucidation of the capsular polysaccharide from Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 47A by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Bent O; Hindsgaul, Ole; Paulsen, Berit Smestad; Redondo, Antonio R; Skovsted, Ian C

    2014-03-11

    The structure of the serotype 47A (Danish nomenclature system) capsular polysaccharide from Streptococcus pneumoniae was elucidated by NMR spectroscopy. The following structure of the repeating heptasaccharide was deduced: [structure: see text]. The serotype 47A capsular polysaccharide is one of 91 structurally and serologically distinct capsular polysaccharides that have been recognized in S. pneumoniae, a significant human pathogenic bacterium and model system in medical microbiology. Structure and NMR spectra are compared to previously solved capsular polysaccharide structures of other serotypes. PMID:24486982

  3. Synthesis and characterization of polyphosphazene copolymers using phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, F.F.; Peterson, E.S.; Stone, M.L.; Singler, R.E.

    1997-01-01

    It was observed that competitive nucleophilic addition processes may be observed by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy. Methoxyethoxyethanol (MEE) and p-methoxyphenol readily substitute for chlorineonto phosphorus and the relative rates are generally comparable to each other. Sterically, the phenol presents is slightly larger than MEE but this does not appear to effect substitution judging by the observed PN(OAr){sub 2} NMR signal. These processes are still being studied.

  4. Magic-angle-spinning NMR spectroscopy applied to small molecules and peptides in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Ader, C; Schneider, R; Seidel, K; Etzkorn, M; Baldus, M

    2007-11-01

    ssNMR (solid-state NMR) spectroscopy provides increasing possibilities to study the structural and dynamic aspects of biological membranes. Here, we review recent ssNMR experiments that are based on MAS (magic angle spinning) and that provide insight into the structure and dynamics of membrane systems at the atomic level. Such methods can be used to study membrane architecture, domain formation or molecular complexation in a way that is highly complementary to other biophysical methods such as imaging or calorimetry. PMID:17956261

  5. NMR spectroscopy and perfusion of mammalian cells using surface microprobes.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Klaus; Pataky, Kristopher; Stettler, Matthieu; Wurm, Florian Maria; Brugger, Jürgen; Besse, Pierre-André; Popovic, Radivoje

    2007-03-01

    NMR spectra of mammalian cells are taken using surface microprobes that are based on microfabricated planar coils. The surface microprobe resembles a miniaturized Petri dish commonly used in biological research. The diameter of the planar coils is 1 mm. Chinese Hamster Ovaries are immobilized in a uniform layer on the microprobe surface or patterned by an ink-jet printer in the centre of the microcoil, where the rf-field of the planar microcoil is most uniform. The acquired NMR spectra show the prevalent metabolites found in mammalian cells. The volumes of the detected samples range from 25 nL to 1 nL (or 50,000 to 1800 cells). With an extended set-up that provides fluid inlets and outlets to the microprobe, the cells can be perfused within the NMR-magnet while constantly taking NMR spectra. Perfusion of the cells opens the way to increased cell viability for long acquisitions or to analysis of the cells' response to environmental change. PMID:17330170

  6. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of lactoperoxidase complexes: clarification of hyperfine splitting for the NO adduct of lactoperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lukat, G.S.; Rodgers, K.R.; Goff, H.M.

    1987-11-03

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of the nitrosyl adduct of ferrous lactoperoxidase (LPO) confirm that the fifth axial ligand in LPO is bound to the iron via a nitrogen atom. Complete reduction of the ferric LPO sample is required in order to observe the nine-line hyperfine splitting in the ferrous LPO/NO EPR spectrum. The ferrous LPO/NO complex does not exhibit a pH or buffer system dependence when examined by EPR. Interconversion of the ferrous LPO/NO complex and the ferric LPO/NO/sub 2//sup -/ complex is achieved by addition of the appropriate oxidizing or reducing agent. Characterization of the low-spin LPO/NO/sub 2//sup -/ complex by EPR and visible spectroscopy is reported. The pH dependence of the EPR spectra of ferric LPO and ferric LPO/CN/sup -/ suggests that a high-spin anisotrophic LPO complex is formed at high pH and an acid-alkaline transition of the protein conformation near the heme site does occur in LPO/CN/sup -/. The effect of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane buffer on the LPO EPR spectrum is also examined.

  7. Non-invasive in vivo characterization of release processes in biodegradable polymers by low-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mader, K; Gallez, B; Liu, K J; Swartz, H M

    1996-02-01

    Using stable free radicals (nitroxides) whose spectra reflect microviscosity and pH, low-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the release pattern of subcutaneous implants of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) continuously and non-invasively in living mice. No significant changes occurred during the first days after implantation. After about 1 week, the recorded EPR spectra gave direct evidence for the formation of compartments with high mobility and increasing acidity in the delivery system. The contribution of the mobile part of the spectrum increased with time, but no remarkable decay of the overall signal intensity was observed during the second week. The EPR signals decayed rapidly after 3 weeks. The experimental data are consistent with bulk hydrolysis as the dominating mechanism of release and are not consistent with a surface-controlled pattern of degradation. The formation of acidic compartments in the delivery system may have significant effects on drug stability, drug solubility, bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, and ultimately on therapeutic efficiency. In particular, the finding of areas of low pH within the polymer raise the possibility that hydrolysable drugs may undergo degradation in the implant prior to their release. Our results demonstrate that EPR is a valuable tool for characterizing such drug delivery systems in vivo. PMID:8938242

  8. Mn(II) Binding and Subsequent Oxidation by the Multicopper Oxidase MnxG Investigated by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lizhi; Stich, Troy A; Butterfield, Cristina N; Romano, Christine A; Spiro, Thomas G; Tebo, Bradley M; Casey, William H; Britt, R David

    2015-08-26

    The dynamics of manganese solid formation (as MnOx) by the multicopper oxidase (MCO)-containing Mnx protein complex were examined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Continuous-wave (CW) EPR spectra of samples of Mnx, prepared in atmosphere and then reacted with Mn(II) for times ranging from 7 to 600 s, indicate rapid oxidation of the substrate manganese (with two-phase pseudo-first-order kinetics modeled using rate coefficients of: k(1obs) = 0.205 0.001 s(-1) and k(2obs) = 0.019 0.001 s(-1)). This process occurs on approximately the same time scale as in vitro solid MnOx formation when there is a large excess of Mn(II). We also found CW and pulse EPR spectroscopic evidence for at least three classes of Mn(II)-containing species in the reaction mixtures: (i) aqueous Mn(II), (ii) a specifically bound mononuclear Mn(II) ion coordinated to the Mnx complex by one nitrogenous ligand, and (iii) a weakly exchange-coupled dimeric Mn(II) species. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of manganese mineralization. PMID:26244911

  9. Characterizing the conformational dynamics of metal-free PsaA using molecular dynamics simulations and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Deplazes, Evelyne; Begg, Stephanie L; van Wonderen, Jessica H; Campbell, Rebecca; Kobe, Bostjan; Paton, James C; MacMillan, Fraser; McDevitt, Christopher A; O'Mara, Megan L

    2015-12-01

    Prokaryotic metal-ion receptor proteins, or solute-binding proteins, facilitate the acquisition of metal ions from the extracellular environment. Pneumococcal surface antigen A (PsaA) is the primary Mn(2+)-recruiting protein of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae and is essential for its in vivo colonization and virulence. The recently reported high-resolution structures of metal-free and metal-bound PsaA have provided the first insights into the mechanism of PsaA-facilitated metal binding. However, the conformational dynamics of metal-free PsaA in solution remain unknown. Here, we use continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the relative flexibility of the structural domains in metal-free PsaA and its distribution of conformations in solution. The results show that the crystal structure of metal-free PsaA is a good representation of the dominant conformation in solution, but the protein also samples structurally distinct conformations that are not captured by the crystal structure. Further, these results suggest that the metal binding site is both larger and more solvent exposed than indicated by the metal-free crystal structure. Collectively, this study provides atomic-resolution insight into the conformational dynamics of PsaA prior to metal binding and lays the groundwork for future EPR and MD based studies of PsaA in solution. PMID:26379256

  10. Structural determination of larger proteins using stable isotope labeling and NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.; Hernandez, G.; Springer, P.; Trewhella, J.; Blumenthal, D.; Lidstrom, M.

    1996-04-01

    The project sought to employ stable isotope labeling and NMR spectroscopy to study protein structures and provide insight into important biochemical problems. A methylotrophic bacterial expression system has been developed for uniform deuterium and carbon-13 labeling of proteins for structural studies. These organisms grow using methanol as the sole source of carbon and energy. Because isotopically labeled methanol is relatively inexpensive, the methylotrophs are ideal for expressing proteins labeled uniformly with deuterium and/or carbon-13. This expression system has been employed to prepare deuterated troponin C. NMR spectroscopy measurements have been made on the inhibitory peptide from troponin I (residues 96--115), both as the free peptide and the peptide complexed with deuterated troponin C. Proton-NMR spectroscopy resonance-signal assignments have been made for the free peptide.

  11. Evaluation of nonpolar metabolites in plant extracts by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Palomino-Schätzlein, Martina; Escrig, Pablo V; Boira, Herminio; Primo, Jaime; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Cabedo, Nuria

    2011-11-01

    (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was explored as a simple and efficient technique for the quantitative analysis of nonpolar metabolites in plants. The method was first optimized with a mixture of known metabolites and then applied to the nonpolar leaf extracts of plants harvested in the Valencian community (eastern Spain) belonging to three different genera: Euphorbia (Euphorbiaceae), Araujia (Apocynaceae), and Morus (Moraceae). Furthermore, an exhaustive analysis of Euphorbia characias leaf and stem extracts from different geographic locations allowed that quantitative (13)C NMR spectroscopy is a suitable tool for metabolic profiling purpose. PMID:21955286

  12. DSP-based on-line NMR spectroscopy using an anti-Hebbian learning algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Razazian, K.; Dieckman, S.L.; Raptis, A.C.; Bobis, J.P. |

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system that uses an adaptive algorithm to carry out real-time NMR spectroscopy. The system employs a digital signal processor (DSP) chip to regulate the transmitted and received signal together with spectral analysis of the received signal to determine free induction decay (FID). To implement such a signal-processing routine for detection of the desired signal, an adaptive line enhancer filter that uses an anti-Hebbian learning algorithm is applied to the FID spectra. The results indicate that the adaptive filter can be a reliable technique for on-line spectroscopy study.

  13. Discovering [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR Spectroscopy in the General Chemistry Laboratory through a Sequence of Guided-Inquiry Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iler, H. Darrell; Justice, David; Brauer, Shari; Landis, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This sequence of three guided-inquiry labs is designed for a second-semester general chemistry course and challenges students to discover basic theoretical principles associated with [superscript 13]C NMR, [superscript 1]H NMR, and IR spectroscopy. Students learn to identify and explain basic concepts of magnetic resonance and vibrational…

  14. Probing oxidative degradation in polymers using {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, T.M.; Click, C.A.; Assink, R.A.

    1997-09-01

    Understanding the mechanism of oxidative degradation remains an important goal in being able to predict the aging process in polymer materials. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has previously been utilized to investigate polymer degradation, including both proton ({sup 1}H) and carbon ({sup 13}C) studies. These previous NMR studies, as well as other spectroscopic investigations, are complicated by the almost overwhelming signal arising from the native undegraded polymer. This makes the identification and quantification of degradation species at small concentrations difficult. In this note we discuss recent investigation into the use of oxygen ({sup 17}O) NMR spectroscopy to probe the oxidative degradation process in polymers at a molecular level. Due to the low natural abundance (0.037%) and a nuclear spin of I=5/2 possessing an appreciable quadrupolar moment, the use of {sup 17}O NMR in polymer investigations has been limited. By utilizing synthetically enriched oxygen gas during the accelerated aging process, both the difficulties of low natural abundance and background interference signals are eliminated. For enriched samples {sup 17}O NMR spectra now provide a unique probe since all of the observed NMR resonances are the direct result of oxidative degradation.

  15. Application of High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy to Define the Cell Uptake of MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabi, Luisella; Alfieri, Goffredo; Biondi, Luca; De Miranda, Mario; Paleari, Lino; Ghelli, Stefano

    2002-06-01

    A new method, based on proton high-resolution magic-angle spinning ( 1H HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy, has been employed to study the cell uptake of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (MRI-CAs). The method was tested on human red blood cells (HRBC) and white blood cells (HWBC) by using three gadolinium complexes, widely used in diagnostics, Gd-BOPTA, Gd-DTPA, and Gd-DOTA, and the analogous complexes obtained by replacing Gd(III) with Dy(III), Nd(III), and Tb(III) (i.e., complexes isostructural to the ones of gadolinium but acting as shift agents). The method is based on the evaluation of the magnetic effects, line broadening, or induced lanthanide shift (LIS) caused by these complexes on NMR signals of intra- and extracellular water. Since magnetic effects are directly linked to permeability, this method is direct. In all the tests, these magnetic effects were detected for the extracellular water signal only, providing a direct proof that these complexes are not able to cross the cell membrane. Line broadening effects (i.e., the use of gadolinium complexes) only allow qualitative evaluations. On the contrary, LIS effects can be measured with high precision and they can be related to the concentration of the paramagnetic species in the cellular compartments. This is possible because the HR-MAS technique provides the complete elimination of bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) shift and the differentiation of extra- and intracellular water signals. Thus with this method, the rapid quantification of the MRI-CA amount inside and outside the cells is actually feasible.

  16. Simultaneous (19)F-(1)H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-10-18

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a (1)H Larmor frequency of 43.32MHz and 40.68MHz for (19)F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating (19)F and (1)H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ ((1)H)=0.335molL(-1) and LOQ ((19)F)=0.130molL(-1) for trifluoroethanol in D2O (single scan)) and maximum quantitative flow rates up to 0.3mLmin(-1). Thus, a series of single scan (19)F and (1)H NMR spectra acquired with this simple set-up already presents a valuable basis for quantitative reaction monitoring. PMID:25462947

  17. Simultaneous 19F-1H medium resolution NMR spectroscopy for online reaction monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Kraume, Matthias; Guthausen, Gisela; Maiwald, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Medium resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (MR-NMR) spectroscopy is currently a fast developing field, which has an enormous potential to become an important analytical tool for reaction monitoring, in hyphenated techniques, and for systematic investigations of complex mixtures. The recent developments of innovative MR-NMR spectrometers are therefore remarkable due to their possible applications in quality control, education, and process monitoring. MR-NMR spectroscopy can beneficially be applied for fast, non-invasive, and volume integrating analyses under rough environmental conditions. Within this study, a simple 1/16″ fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tube with an ID of 0.04″ (1.02 mm) was used as a flow cell in combination with a 5 mm glass Dewar tube inserted into a benchtop MR-NMR spectrometer with a 1H Larmor frequency of 43.32 MHz and 40.68 MHz for 19F. For the first time, quasi-simultaneous proton and fluorine NMR spectra were recorded with a series of alternating 19F and 1H single scan spectra along the reaction time coordinate of a homogeneously catalysed esterification model reaction containing fluorinated compounds. The results were compared to quantitative NMR spectra from a hyphenated 500 MHz online NMR instrument for validation. Automation of handling, pre-processing, and analysis of NMR data becomes increasingly important for process monitoring applications of online NMR spectroscopy and for its technical and practical acceptance. Thus, NMR spectra were automatically baseline corrected and phased using the minimum entropy method. Data analysis schemes were designed such that they are based on simple direct integration or first principle line fitting, with the aim that the analysis directly revealed molar concentrations from the spectra. Finally, the performance of 1/16″ FEP tube set-up with an ID of 1.02 mm was characterised regarding the limit of detection (LOQ (1H) = 0.335 mol L-1 and LOQ (19F) = 0.130 mol L-1 for trifluoroethanol in D2O (single scan)) and maximum quantitative flow rates up to 0.3 mL min-1. Thus, a series of single scan 19F and 1H NMR spectra acquired with this simple set-up already presents a valuable basis for quantitative reaction monitoring.

  18. Slow-spinning low-sideband HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy: delicate analysis of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renault, Marie; Shintu, Laetitia; Piotto, Martial; Caldarelli, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy has become an extremely versatile analytical tool to study heterogeneous systems endowed with liquid-like dynamics. Spinning frequencies of several kHz are however required to obtain NMR spectra, devoid of spinning sidebands, with a resolution approaching that of purely isotropic liquid samples. An important limitation of the method is the large centrifugal forces that can damage the structure of the sample. In this communication, we show that optimizing the sample preparation, particularly avoiding air bubbles, and the geometry of the sample chamber of the HR-MAS rotor leads to high-quality low-sideband NMR spectra even at very moderate spinning frequencies, thus allowing the use of well-established solution-state NMR procedures for the characterization of small and highly dynamic molecules in the most fragile samples, such as live cells and intact tissues.

  19. Ultrasensitive anion detection by NMR spectroscopy: a supramolecular strategy based on modulation of chemical exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Perruchoud, Loïse H; Hadzovic, Alen; Zhang, Xiao-An

    2015-06-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for monitoring molecular interactions and is widely used to characterize supramolecular systems at the atomic level. NMR is limited for sensing purposes, however, due to low sensitivity. Dynamic processes such as conformational changes or binding events can induce drastic effects on NMR spectra in response to variations in chemical exchange (CE) rate, which can lead to new strategies in the design of supramolecular sensors through the control and monitoring of CE rate. Here, we present an indirect NMR anion sensing technique in which increased CE rate, due to anion-induced conformational flexibility of a relatively rigid structure of a novel sensor, allows ultrasensitive anion detection as low as 120 nM. PMID:25931372

  20. Characterization of proteins by in-cell NMR spectroscopy in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Letizia; Luchinat, Enrico; Banci, Lucia

    2016-06-01

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy is a unique tool for characterizing biological macromolecules in their physiological environment at atomic resolution. Recent progress in NMR instruments and sample preparation methods allows functional processes, such as metal uptake, disulfide-bond formation and protein folding, to be analyzed by NMR in living, cultured human cells. This protocol describes the necessary steps to overexpress one or more proteins of interest inside human embryonic kidney 293T (HEK293T) cells, and it explains how to set up in-cell NMR experiments. The cDNA is transiently transfected as a complex with a cationic polymer (DNA:PEI (polyethylenimine)), and protein expression is carried on for 2-3 d, after which the NMR sample is prepared. (1)H and (1)H-(15)N correlation NMR experiments (for example, using band-selective optimized flip-angle short-transient heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (SOFAST-HMQC)) can be carried out in <2 h, ensuring cell viability. Uniform (15)N labeling and amino-acid-specific (e.g., cysteine, methionine) labeling schemes are possible. The entire procedure takes 4 d from cell culture seeding to NMR data collection. PMID:27196722

  1. Automated sample preparation station for studying self-diffusion in porous solids with NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, Niklas; DeMartin, Gregory J.; Reyes, Sebastián C.

    2006-03-01

    In studies of gas diffusion in porous solids with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy the sample preparation procedure becomes very important. An apparatus is presented here that pretreats the sample ex situ and accurately sets the desired pressure and temperature within the NMR tube prior to its introduction in the spectrometer. The gas manifold that supplies the NMR tube is also connected to a microbalance containing another portion of the same sample, which is kept at the same temperature as the sample in the NMR tube. This arrangement permits the simultaneous measurement of the adsorption loading on the sample, which is required for the interpretation of the NMR diffusion experiments. Furthermore, to ensure a good seal of the NMR tube, a hybrid valve design composed of titanium, a Teflon® seat, and Kalrez® O-rings is utilized. A computer controlled algorithm ensures the accuracy and reproducibility of all the procedures, enabling the NMR diffusion experiments to be performed at well controlled conditions of pressure, temperature, and amount of gas adsorbed on the porous sample.

  2. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t = 0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t = 0 to - tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory enables one to accurately measure secondary phase shifts and amplitude imbalances. Application to constant time 2D [ 13C, 1H]-HSQC spectra recorded for a protein sample with canonical MHS/HS schemes showed that accurate CAM data acquisition can be readily implemented on modern spectrometers for experiments based on through-bond polarization transfer. Fourth, when moderate variations of secondary phase shifts with primary phase shift and/or sampling directionality are encountered, generalized theory allowed comparison of the robustness of different MHS/HS schemes for CAM data acquisition, and thus to identify the scheme best suited to suppress dispersive peak components and quadrature image peaks. Moreover, it is shown that for spectra acquired with several indirect evolution periods, the best suited scheme can be identified independently for each of the periods.

  3. Theory of mirrored time domain sampling for NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arindam; Wu, Yibing; He, Yunfen; Szyperski, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    A generalized theory is presented for novel mirrored hypercomplex time domain sampling (MHS) of NMR spectra. It is the salient new feature of MHS that two interferograms are acquired with different directionality of time evolution, that is, one is sampled forward from time t=0 to the maximal evolution time tmax, while the second is sampled backward from t=0 to -tmax. The sampling can be accomplished in a (semi) constant time or non constant-time manner. Subsequently, the two interferograms are linearly combined to yield a complex time domain signal. The manifold of MHS schemes considered here is defined by arbitrary settings of sampling phases ('primary phase shifts') and amplitudes of the two interferograms. It is shown that, for any two given primary phase shifts, the addition theorems of trigonometric functions yield the unique linear combination required to form the complex signal. In the framework of clean absorption mode (CAM) acquisition of NMR spectra being devoid of residual dispersive signal components, 'secondary phase shifts' represent time domain phase errors which are to be eliminated. In contrast, such secondary phase shifts may be introduced by experimental design in order to encode additional NMR parameters, a new class of NMR experiments proposed here. For generalization, it is further considered that secondary phase shifts may depend on primary phase shifts and/or sampling directionality. In order to compare with MHS theory, a correspondingly generalized theory is derived for widely used hypercomplex ('States') sampling (HS). With generalized theory it is shown, first, that previously introduced 'canonical' schemes, characterized by primary phases being multiples of π/4, afford maximal intensity of the desired absorptive signals in the absence of secondary phase shifts, and second, how primary phases can be adjusted to maximize the signal intensity provided that the secondary phase shifts are known. Third, it is demonstrated that theory enables one to accurately measure secondary phase shifts and amplitude imbalances. Application to constant time 2D [13C, 1H]-HSQC spectra recorded for a protein sample with canonical MHS/HS schemes showed that accurate CAM data acquisition can be readily implemented on modern spectrometers for experiments based on through-bond polarization transfer. Fourth, when moderate variations of secondary phase shifts with primary phase shift and/or sampling directionality are encountered, generalized theory allowed comparison of the robustness of different MHS/HS schemes for CAM data acquisition, and thus to identify the scheme best suited to suppress dispersive peak components and quadrature image peaks. Moreover, it is shown that for spectra acquired with several indirect evolution periods, the best suited scheme can be identified independently for each of the periods. PMID:21974999

  4. Antioxidant activity of hyaluronic acid investigated by means of chemiluminescence of equine neutrophil bursts and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Braga, P C; Dal Sasso, M; Lattuada, N; Greco, V; Sibilia, V; Zucca, E; Stucchi, L; Ferro, E; Ferrucci, F

    2015-02-01

    Activated neutrophils (PMNs), the ROS/RNS released by PMNs and the derived inflammatory processes are involved in the pathogenesis and progression of human inflammatory airway diseases. Similar diseases are also present in horses which suffer from recurrent airway obstruction (RAO), exercise-induced pulmonary haemorrhage (EIPH) and inflammatory airway diseases (IAD). Hyaluronic acid (HA) plays numerous roles in modulating inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to examine whether a preparation of HA (MW 900 000 Da) interferes with ROS/RNS during the course of equine PMN respiratory bursts, and to establish the lowest concentration at which it still has antioxidant activity by means of luminol-amplified chemiluminescence (LACL). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was also used to investigate the direct antiradical activity of HA. The hydroxyl radical was significantly scavenged in a concentration-dependent manner at HA concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 0.16 mg/mL. Superoxide anion, Tempol radical and the ABTS(•+) were significantly inhibited at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 0.62 mg/mL. The LACL of stimulated equine neutrophils showed that HA induced a statistically significant concentration-effect reduction from 5 mg/mL to 1.25 mg/mL. These findings were confirmed also when l-Arg was added to investigate the inhibition of the resulting peroxynitrite anion. Our findings indicate that, in addition to the human use, HA can also be used to antagonize the oxidative stress generated by free radicals in horses peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In order to achieve therapeutic concentrations, a direct aerosol administration to horses with horse respiratory diseases can be considered, as this route of application is also recommended in human medicine. PMID:25066541

  5. NMR difference spectroscopy with a dual saddle-coil difference probe.

    PubMed

    Macnaughtan, Megan A; Smith, Aaron P; Goldsbrough, Peter B; Santini, Robert E; Raftery, Daniel

    2004-03-01

    A new difference probe for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented. The difference probe uses two saddle-shaped coils to excite and detect two samples simultaneously. The samples are held in a specially modified 3-mm NMR tube with an Ultem plastic disk to separate the samples. The probe's resonant circuit contains two crossed diodes that passively switch the relative phase of each coil during the NMR experiment. The result is a difference spectrum from the two samples. The degree of cancellation of common signals was determined to be approximately 90%, and the application of the probe to relaxation-edited difference spectroscopy for identifying protein-ligand interactions was demonstrated using glutathione and glutathione S-transferase binding protein. PMID:15214412

  6. Chiral Recognition Studies of α-(Nonafluoro-tert-butoxy)carboxylic Acids by NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Anikó; Csóka, Tamás; Béni, Szabolcs; Farkas, Viktor; Rábai, József; Szabó, Dénes

    2015-06-19

    Three chiral α-(nonafluoro-tert-butoxy)carboxylic acids (R)-1, (RS)-2, (R)-3 were synthesized to examine their application as chiral solvating agents with amines. As a model compound, first (S)- and/or (RS)-α-phenylethylamine was used, and their diastereomeric salts were investigated by (1)H and (19)F NMR and ECD spectroscopy. The NMR spectroscopic studies were carried out at room temperature using the slightly polar CDCl3 and apolar C6D6 as solvents in 5 mM and 54 mM concentrations. The difference of the chemical shifts (Δδ) in the diastereomeric complexes is comparable with other, well-known chiral derivatizing and solvating agents (e.g., Mosher's acid, Pirkle's alcohol). Diastereomeric salts of racemic acids (RS)-1 and (RS)-2 with biologically active amines (1R,2S)-ephedrine and (S)-dapoxetine were also investigated by (19)F NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26024423

  7. Probing acid-amide intermolecular hydrogen bonding by NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N.

    2012-05-01

    Benzene carboxylic acids and benzamide act as their self-complement in molecular recognition to form inter-molecular hydrogen bonded dimers between amide and carboxylic acid groups, which have been investigated by 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Extensive NMR studies using diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), variable temperature 1D, 2D NMR, established the formation of heterodimers of benzamide with benzoic acid, salicylic acid and phenyl acetic acid in deuterated chloroform solution. Association constants for the complex formation in the solution state have been determined. The results are ascertained by X-ray diffraction in the solid state. Intermolecular interactions in solution and in solid state were found to be similar. The structural parameters obtained by X-ray diffraction studies are compared with those obtained by DFT calculations.

  8. NATURAL ABUNDANCE 13C NMR SPECTROSCOPY OF DOUBLE-STRANDED DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although 13C NMR spectroscopy has already proved extremely useful in studies of biopolymers, including t-RNA's, and single-stranded polynucleotides, no successful study of native double-stranded DNA has been reported. This failure is mainly due to extremely unfavorable 13C spin r...

  9. USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY TO INVESTIGATE PMDI REACTIONS WITH WOOD

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solution-state NMR spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for understanding the formation of chemical bonds between wood components and adhesives. Finely ground cell wall (CW) material fully dissolves in a solvent system containing dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6) and N-methyl¬imidazole (NMI-d6), keeping ...

  10. Introducing High School Students to NMR Spectroscopy through Percent Composition Determination Using Low-Field Spectrometers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonjour, Jessica L.; Pitzer, Joy M.; Frost, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Mole to gram conversions, density, and percent composition are fundamental concepts in first year chemistry at the high school or undergraduate level; however, students often find it difficult to engage with these concepts. We present a simple laboratory experiment utilizing portable nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) to determine the

  11. NMR Spectroscopy of Aqueous Extracts of Fenugreek ( Trigonella foenum- graecum L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skakovskii, E. D.; Tychinskaya, L. Yu.; Matveichuk, S. V.; Karankevich, E. G.; Agabalaeva, E. D.; Reshetnikov, V. N.

    2014-09-01

    The amino-acid and monosaccharide compositions of aqueous extracts of fenugreek herb were determined using PMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The content of identified extract constituents was >70 mol%, of which the dominant amino acid was 4-hydroxyisoleucine (26.5 mol%); the major carbohydrate, glucose (10.1 mol%).

  12. Introducing High School Students to NMR Spectroscopy through Percent Composition Determination Using Low-Field Spectrometers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonjour, Jessica L.; Pitzer, Joy M.; Frost, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Mole to gram conversions, density, and percent composition are fundamental concepts in first year chemistry at the high school or undergraduate level; however, students often find it difficult to engage with these concepts. We present a simple laboratory experiment utilizing portable nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) to determine the…

  13. NMR imaging and spectroscopy of the mammalian central nervous system after heavy ion radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, T.

    1984-09-01

    NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopic, and histopathologic techniques were used to study the proton relaxation time and related biochemical changes in the central nervous system after helium beam in vivo irradiation of the rodent brain. The spectroscopic observations reported in this dissertation were made possible by development of methods for measuring the NMR parameters of the rodent brain in vivo and in vitro. The methods include (1) depth selective spectroscopy using an optimization of rf pulse energy based on a priori knowledge of N-acetyl aspartate and lipid spectra of the normal brain, (2) phase-encoded proton spectroscopy of the living rodent using a surface coil, and (3) dual aqueous and organic tissue extraction technique for spectroscopy. Radiation induced increases were observed in lipid and p-choline peaks of the proton spectrum, in vivo. Proton NMR spectroscopy measurements on brain extracts (aqueous and organic solvents) were made to observe chemical changes that could not be seen in vivo. Radiation-induced changes were observed in lactate, GABA, glutamate, and p-choline peak areas of the aqueous fraction spectra. In the organic fraction, decreases were observed in peak area ratios of the terminal-methyl peaks, the N-methyl groups of choline, and at a peak at 2.84 ppM (phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine resonances) relative to TMS. With histology and Evans blue injections, blood-brain barrier alternations were seen as early as 4 days after irradiation. 83 references, 53 figures.

  14. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution

  15. Characterization of animal manure using advanced solid-state C-13 NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of chemical structure of animal manure is necessary for its effective utilization. However, characterization of animal manure is challenging since it is a complex mixture and partially soluble. Solid-state C-13 NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy is regarded as the best tool to i...

  16. Characterization of various fast pyrolysis bio-oils by NMR spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NMR spectroscopy, including 1H, 13 C and DEPT spectra were used to characterize fast pyrolysis oil from numerous energy crops and other agricultural feedstocks. The bio-oils studied were produced from swithchgrass, alfalfa stems, corn stover, guayule (whole plant and latex extracted bagasse) and ch...

  17. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  18. High-Resolution Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy: Characterization of Polymorphism in Cimetidine, a Pharmaceutical Compound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacilio, Julia E.; Tokarski, John T.; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Iuliucci, Robbie J.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy has many advantages as a tool to characterize solid-phase material that finds applications in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, materials science, biomolecular structure determination, and others, including the pharmaceutical industry. The technology associated with achieving high resolution…

  19. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible

  20. Water behavior in bacterial spores by deuterium NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Friedline, Anthony W; Zachariah, Malcolm M; Johnson, Karen; Thomas, Kieth J; Middaugh, Amy N; Garimella, Ravindranath; Powell, Douglas R; Vaishampayan, Parag A; Rice, Charles V

    2014-07-31

    Dormant bacterial spores are able to survive long periods of time without nutrients, withstand harsh environmental conditions, and germinate into metabolically active bacteria when conditions are favorable. Numerous factors influence this hardiness, including the spore structure and the presence of compounds to protect DNA from damage. It is known that the water content of the spore core plays a role in resistance to degradation, but the exact state of water inside the core is a subject of discussion. Two main theories present themselves: either the water in the spore core is mostly immobile and the core and its components are in a glassy state, or the core is a gel with mobile water around components which themselves have limited mobility. Using deuterium solid-state NMR experiments, we examine the nature of the water in the spore core. Our data show the presence of unbound water, bound water, and deuterated biomolecules that also contain labile deuterons. Deuterium-hydrogen exchange experiments show that most of these deuterons are inaccessible by external water. We believe that these unreachable deuterons are in a chemical bonding state that prevents exchange. Variable-temperature NMR results suggest that the spore core is more rigid than would be expected for a gel-like state. However, our rigid core interpretation may only apply to dried spores whereas a gel core may exist in aqueous suspension. Nonetheless, the gel core, if present, is inaccessible to external water. PMID:24950158

  1. Examination of amber and related materials by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Joseph B; Santiago-Blay, Jorge A; Wu, Yuyang; Levy, Allison J

    2015-01-01

    Examination of the solid-state (13)C and solution (1)H NMR spectra of fossilized resins (ambers) has generated five groupings of materials based on spectral characteristics. The worldwide Group A is associated with the botanical family of the Araucariaceae. The worldwide Group B is associated with the Dipterocarpaceae. Baltic amber or succinite (Group C) is related to Group A but with a disputed conifer source. Amber from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa is associated with the Fabaceae, the genus Hymenaea in particular. The minor Group E contains the rare fossil polystyrene. The spectra of jet indicate that it is a coal-like material with a rank between lignite and sub-bituminous coal. PMID:25176402

  2. Nonmicellar systems for solution NMR spectroscopy of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Raschle, Thomas; Hiller, Sebastian; Etzkorn, Manuel; Wagner, Gerhard

    2010-08-01

    Integral membrane proteins play essential roles in many biological processes, such as energy transduction, transport of molecules, and signaling. The correct function of membrane proteins is likely to depend strongly on the chemical and physical properties of the membrane. However, membrane proteins are not accessible to many biophysical methods in their native cellular membrane. A major limitation for their functional and structural characterization is thus the requirement for an artificial environment that mimics the native membrane to preserve the integrity and stability of the membrane protein. Most commonly employed are detergent micelles, which can however be detrimental to membrane protein activity and stability. Here, we review recent developments for alternative, nonmicellar solubilization techniques, with a particular focus on their application to solution NMR studies. We discuss the use of amphipols and lipid bilayer systems, such as bicelles and nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs). The latter show great promise for structural studies in near native membranes. PMID:20570504

  3. Urinary metabolic fingerprint of acute intermittent porphyria analyzed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carichon, Mickael; Pallet, Nicolas; Schmitt, Caroline; Lefebvre, Thibaud; Gouya, Laurent; Talbi, Neila; Deybach, Jean Charles; Beaune, Philippe; Vasos, Paul; Puy, Hervé; Bertho, Gildas

    2014-02-18

    (1)H NMR is a nonbiased technique for the quantification of small molecules that could result in the identification and characterization of potential biomarkers with prognostic value and contribute to better understand pathophysiology of diseases. In this study, we used (1)H NMR spectroscopy to analyze the urinary metabolome of patients with acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an inherited metabolic disorder of heme biosynthesis in which an accumulation of the heme precursors 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) and porphobilinogen (PBG) promotes sudden neurovisceral attacks, which can be life-threatening. Our objectives were (1) to demonstrate the usefulness of (1)H NMR to identify and quantify ALA and PBG in urines from AIP patients and (2) to identify metabolites that would predict the response to AIP crisis treatment and reflect differential metabolic reprogramming. Our results indicate that (1)H NMR can help to diagnose AIP attacks based on the identification of ALA and PBG. We also show that glycin concentration increases in urines from patients with frequent recurrences at the end of the treatment, after an initial decrease, whereas PBG concentration remains low. Although the reasons for this altered are elusive, these findings indicate that a glycin metabolic reprogramming occurs in AIPr patients and is associated with recurrence. Our results validate the proof of concept of the usefulness of (1)H NMR spectroscopy in clinical chemistry for the diagnosis of acute attack of AIP and identify urinary glycin as a potential marker of recurrence of AIP acute attacks. PMID:24437734

  4. Quantification of organic and amino acids in beer by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nord, Lars I; Vaag, Pia; Duus, Jens Ø

    2004-08-15

    The quantification of organic and amino acids in beer using 1H NMR spectroscopy is demonstrated. Quantification was made both by integration of signals in the spectra together with use of calibration references and by use of partial least-squares (PLS) regression. Results from the NMR quantifications were compared with those obtained from determinations by amino acid analysis on HPLC and organic acid analysis by capillary electrophoresis. The described NMR-based methods could satisfactorily be used for quantification of several of the investigated metabolites in beer down to approximately 10 mg/L and for most with a good to high accuracy compared to results obtained by HPLC and capillary electrophoresis (R2 0.90-0.99). This was achieved with a simple sample preparation and one-dimensional 1H NMR spectra obtained in a few minutes. The use of PLS clearly improves the accuracy of the quantifications, based on comparison to results obtained by HPLC and capillary electrophoresis, and furthermore permits the determination of components with partially overlapped signals in the spectrum. NMR spectroscopy in combination with PLS will be a useful tool for the quantification of metabolites, not only in beer but also in other beverages and biofluids. PMID:15307790

  5. Hadamard NMR spectroscopy for two-dimensional quantum information processing and parallel search algorithms.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, T; Kumar, Anil

    2006-12-01

    Hadamard spectroscopy has earlier been used to speed-up multi-dimensional NMR experiments. In this work, we speed-up the two-dimensional quantum computing scheme, by using Hadamard spectroscopy in the indirect dimension, resulting in a scheme which is faster and requires the Fourier transformation only in the direct dimension. Two and three qubit quantum gates are implemented with an extra observer qubit. We also use one-dimensional Hadamard spectroscopy for binary information storage by spatial encoding and implementation of a parallel search algorithm. PMID:17011221

  6. High-resolution heteronuclear multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Huang, Yuqing; Smith, Pieter E. S.; Wang, Kaiyu; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy is an extremely powerful tool for determining the structures of organic molecules and is of particular significance in the structural analysis of proteins. In order to leverage the method’s potential for structural investigations, obtaining high-resolution NMR spectra is essential and this is generally accomplished by using very homogeneous magnetic fields. However, there are several situations where magnetic field distortions and thus line broadening is unavoidable, for example, the samples under investigation may be inherently heterogeneous, and the magnet’s homogeneity may be poor. This line broadening can hinder resonance assignment or even render it impossible. We put forth a new class of pulse sequences for obtaining high-resolution heteronuclear spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations based on distant dipolar field modulations. This strategy’s capabilities are demonstrated with the acquisition of high-resolution 2D gHSQC and gHMBC spectra. These sequences’ performances are evaluated on the basis of their sensitivities and acquisition efficiencies. Moreover, we show that by encoding and decoding NMR observables spatially, as is done in ultrafast NMR, an extra dimension containing J-coupling information can be obtained without increasing the time necessary to acquire a heteronuclear correlation spectrum. Since the new sequences relax magnetic field homogeneity constraints imposed upon high-resolution NMR, they may be applied in portable NMR sensors and studies of heterogeneous chemical and biological materials.

  7. Kinetic studies of preactivated derivatives of cyclophosphamide by /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.

    1986-01-01

    Selected derivatives of cyclophosphamide (CP) metabolites were synthesized and the solution chemistry of each was studied by /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy under a standard set of reaction conditions at physiological pH (7.4) and temperature (37/sup 0/C). Complementary /sup 2/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectral data was obtained using isotopically (/sup 2/G and /sup 13/C) enriched CP metabolites. The CP derivatives were synthesized by the ozonolysis of substituted 3-butenyl phosphorodiamidates, and were isolated as analogues of either cis and trans 4-hydroperoxy-CP or aldophosphamide (AP). The relative ratios of the tautomeric species, 4-hydroxy-CP and AP, and their half-lives (T/sub 1/2/) were measured by /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy. The influence of CP metabolites on perfused U-937 cells, a CP-sensitive human lymphoma, was observed by high resolution /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy. In this manner, it was possible to measure, for the first time, a rate constant for the intracellular disappearance of phosphoramide mustard, the ultimate alkylating metabolite of CP.

  8. Membrane structure and dynamics as viewed by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Auger, M

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of the present study is the investigation of the structure and dynamics of biological membranes using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Two approaches are used in our laboratory. The first involves the measurement of high-resolution 13C and 1H spectra obtained by the magic angle spinning (MAS) technique while the second approach involves the measurement of 31P and 2H powder spectra in static samples. This paper will present some recent results obtained by high-resolution solid-state 1H NMR on the conformation of gramicidin A incorporated in a phosphatidylcholine bilayers. More specifically, we were able to observe changes in the gramicidin spectra as a function of the cosolubilization solvent initially used to prepare the samples. The interaction between lipid bilayers and an anticancer drug derived from chloroethylurea was also investigated using proton NMR spectroscopy. Finally, we have studied the interaction between cardiotoxin, a toxic protein extracted from snake venom, and negatively charged lipid bilayers using 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy. PMID:9468622

  9. Interplay between minor and major groove-binding transcription factors Sox2 and Oct1 in translocation on DNA studied by paramagnetic and diamagnetic NMR.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuki; Clore, G Marius

    2012-04-27

    The pathways whereby Sox2 scans DNA to locate its specific binding site are investigated by NMR in specific and nonspecific Sox2·DNA complexes and in a specific ternary complex with Oct1 on the Hoxb1 regulatory element. Direct transfer of Sox2 between nonspecific sites on different DNA molecules occurs without dissociation into free solution at a rate of ∼10(6) M(-1) s(-1), whereas one-dimensional sliding proceeds with a diffusion constant of ≥0.1 μm(2)·s(-1). Translocation of Sox2 from one specific DNA site to another occurs via jumping, involving complete dissociation into free solution (k(d) ∼5-6 s(-1)) followed by reassociation (k(a) ∼5 × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1)). In the presence of Oct1 bound to an adjacent specific site, k(d) is reduced by more than 10-fold. Paramagnetic relaxation measurements, however, demonstrate that sparsely populated (<1%), transient states involving nonspecifically bound Sox2 in rapid exchange with specifically bound Sox2 are sampled in both binary Sox2·DNA- and ternary Oct1·Sox2·Hoxb1-DNA-specific complexes. Moreover, Sox2 modulates the mechanism of translocation of Oct1. Both Sox2 and the Oct1 POU(HD) domain are transiently released from the specific ternary complex by sliding to an adjacent nonspecific site, followed by direct transfer to another DNA molecule, whereas the Oct1 POU(S) domain is fixed to its specific site through direct interactions with Sox2. Intermolecular translocation of POU(HD) results in the formation of a bridged intermediate spanning two DNA molecules, enhancing the probability of complete intermolecular translocation of Oct1. By way of contrast, in the specific Oct1·DNA binary complex, POU(S) undergoes direct intermolecular translocation, whereas POU(HD) scans the DNA by sliding. PMID:22396547

  10. Analyzing temperature-induced transitions in disordered proteins by NMR spectroscopy and secondary chemical shift analyses.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming M; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are abundant in nature and perform many important physiological functions. Multidimensional NMR spectroscopy has been crucial for the understanding of the conformational properties of disordered proteins and is increasingly used to probe their conformational ensembles. Compared to folded proteins, disordered proteins are more malleable and more easily perturbed by environmental factors. Accordingly, the experimental conditions and especially the temperature modify the structural and functional properties of disordered proteins. This chapter discusses practical aspects of NMR studies of temperature-induced structural changes in disordered proteins using chemical shifts. PMID:22821529

  11. Paramagnetic NMR study of Cu(2+)-IDA complex localization on a protein surface and its application to elucidate long distance information.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Makoto; Kobayashi, Toshitatsu; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Kenichiro; Tenno, Takeshi; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Ishizaki, Itsuko; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Mishima, Masaki; Kojima, Chojiro

    2004-05-21

    The paramagnetic metal chelate complex Cu(2+)-iminodiacetic acid (Cu(2+)-IDA) was mixed with ubiquitin, a small globular protein. Quantitative analyses of (1)H and (15)N chemical shift changes and line broadenings induced by the paramagnetic effects indicated that Cu(2+)-IDA was localized to a histidine residue (His68) on the ubiquitin surface. The distances between the backbone amide proton and the Cu(2+) relaxation center were evaluated from the proton transverse relaxation rates enhanced by the paramagnetic effect. These correlated well with the distances calculated from the crystal structure up to 20 A. Here, we show that a Cu(2+)-IDA is the first paramagnetic reagent that specifically localizes to a histidine residue on the protein surface and gives the long-range distance information. PMID:15147887

  12. Fermentanomics: monitoring mammalian cell cultures with NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Scott A; Ouyang, Anli; Purdie, Jennifer; Smitka, Tim A; Wang, Tongtong; Kaerner, Andreas

    2010-07-21

    As the number of therapeutic proteins produced by mammalian cell cultures in the pharmaceutical industry continues to increase, the need to improve productivity and ensure consistent product quality during process development activities becomes more significant. Rational medium design is known to improve cell culture performance, but an understanding of nutrient consumption and metabolite accumulation within the medium is required. To this end, we have developed a technique for using 1D (1)H NMR to quantitate nonprotein feed components and metabolites in mammalian cell cultures. We refer to the methodology as "Fermentanomics" to differentiate it from standard metabolomics. The method was found to generate spectra with excellent water suppression, signal-to-noise, and resolution. More importantly, nutrient consumption and metabolite accumulation was readily observed. In total, 50 media components have been identified and quantitated. The application of Fermentanomics to the optimization of a proprietary CHO basal medium yielded valuable insight regarding the nutrient levels needed to maintain productivity. While the focus here is on the extracellular milieu of CHO cell cultures, this methodology is generally applicable to quantitating intracellular concentrations and can be extended to other mammalian cell lines, as well as platforms such as yeasts, fungi, and Escherichia coli. PMID:20578691

  13. Broadband "Infinite-Speed" Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yan-Yan; Levin, E.M; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2009-06-02

    High-resolution magic-angle spinning NMR of high-Z spin- 1/2 nuclei such as {sup 125}Te, {sup 207}Pb, {sup 119}Sn, {sup 113}Cd, and {sup 195}Pt is often hampered by large (>1000 ppm) chemical-shift anisotropies, which result in strong spinning sidebands that can obscure the centerbands of interest. In various tellurides with applications as thermoelectrics and as phase-change materials for data storage, even 22-kHz magic-angle spinning cannot resolve the center- and sidebands broadened by chemical-shift dispersion, which precludes peak identification or quantification. For sideband suppression over the necessary wide spectral range (up to 200 kHz), radio frequency pulse sequences with few, short pulses are required. We have identified Gan's two-dimensional magic-angle-turning (MAT) experiment with five 90{sup o} pulses as a promising broadband technique for obtaining spectra without sidebands. We have adapted it to broad spectra and fast magic-angle spinning by accounting for long pulses (comparable to the dwell time in t{sub 1}) and short rotation periods. Spectral distortions are small and residual sidebands negligible even for spectra with signals covering a range of 1.5 {gamma}B{sub 1}, due to a favorable disposition of the narrow ranges containing the signals of interest in the spectral plane. The method is demonstrated on various technologically interesting tellurides with spectra spanning up to 170 kHz, at 22 kHz MAS.

  14. Deuterium NMR spectroscopy of biosynthetically deuterated mammalian tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Curatolo, W.; Jungalwala, F.B.; Sears, B.; Tuck, L.; Neuringer, L.J.

    1985-07-30

    The choline-containing phospholipids of mammalian membranes have been biosynthetically deuterated by raising rats on a diet supplemented with (HOCH2CH2N(CD3)3) Cl or (HOCD2CH2N(CH3)3) Cl . Deuterium NMR spectra have been obtained from excised deuterated brain, sciatic nerve, heart, and lung, from isolated brain myelin and brain microsomes, and from aqueous dispersions of lipid extracts. Measurements of residual quadrupole splittings for excised deuterated neural tissues demonstrate that the orientational order of the choline head group is similar to that observed in model membranes. The spin-lattice relaxation time of the choline head group in deuterated neural tissue is indistinguishable from that observed in model membranes. These results support the proposal that the conformation and motional dynamics of the choline head groups of the bulk choline-containing lipids of neural tissue are similar to those in model membranes. Spectra of biosynthetically deuterated brain myelin and brain microsomes exhibit similar quadrupole splittings. Since these membranes have significantly different protein contents, these results indicate that no strong polar interactions exist between membrane proteins and the choline head groups of choline-containing membrane lipids. Spectra of intact deuterated heart and lung exhibit broad lines and a range of quadrupole splittings.

  15. Rubredoxin as a paramagnetic relaxation-inducing probe.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rui M; Pauleta, Sofia R; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2009-09-01

    The paramagnetic effect due to the presence of a metal center with unpaired electrons is no longer considered a hindrance in protein NMR spectroscopy. In the present work, the paramagnetic effect due to the presence of a metal center with unpaired electrons was used to map the interface of an electron transfer complex. Desulfovibrio gigas cytochrome c(3) was chosen as target to study the effect of the paramagnetic probe, Fe-rubredoxin, which produced specific line broadening in the heme IV methyl resonances M2(1) and M18(1). The rubredoxin binding surface in the complex with cytochrome c(3) was identified in a heteronuclear 2D NMR titration. The identified heme methyls on cytochrome c(3) are involved in the binding interface of the complex, a result that is in agreement with the predicted complexes obtained by restrained molecular docking, which shows a cluster of possible solutions near heme IV. The use of a paramagnetic probe in (1)HNMR titration and the mapping of the complex interface, in combination with a molecular simulation algorithm proved to be a valuable strategy to study electron transfer complexes involving non-heme iron proteins and cytochromes. PMID:19651443

  16. SU-C-BRD-05: Non-Invasive in Vivo Biodosimetry in Radiotherapy Patients Using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, N; Roberts, K; Stabile, F; Mongillo, N; Decker, RD; Wilson, LD; Husain, Z; Contessa, J; Carlson, DJ; Williams, BB; Flood, AB; Swartz, HM

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical intervention following a major, unplanned radiation event can elevate the human whole body exposure LD50 from 3 to 7 Gy. On a large scale, intervention cannot be achieved effectively without accurate and efficient triage. Current methods of retrospective biodosimetry are restricted in capability and applicability; published human data is limited. We aim to further develop, validate, and optimize an automated field-deployable in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) instrument that can fill this need. Methods: Ionizing radiation creates highly-stable, carbonate-based free radicals within tooth enamel. Using a process similar to nuclear magnetic resonance, EPR directly measures the presence of radiation-induced free radicals. We performed baseline EPR measurements on one of the upper central incisors of total body irradiation (TBI) and head and neck (H&N) radiotherapy patients before their first treatment. Additional measurements were performed between subsequent fractions to examine the EPR response with increasing radiation dose. Independent dosimetry measurements were performed with optically-stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) and diodes to more accurately establish the relationship between EPR signal and delivered radiation dose. Results: 36 EPR measurements were performed over the course of four months on two TBI and four H & N radiotherapy patients. We observe a linear increase in EPR signal with increasing dose across the entirety of the tested range. A linear least squares-weighted fit of delivered dose versus measured signal amplitude yields an adjusted R-square of 0.966. The standard error of inverse prediction (SEIP) is 1.77 Gy. For doses up to 7 Gy, the range most relevant to triage, we calculate an SEIP of 1.29 Gy. Conclusion: EPR spectroscopy provides a promising method of retrospective, non-invasive, in vivo biodosimetry. Our preliminary data show an excellent correlation between predicted signal amplitude and delivered dose. With further development, a robust means of predicting delivered radiation dose from EPR measurements is expected. This project was funded by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services subcontracted through the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth and by the Dartmouth Physically-Based Biodosimetry Center for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiation (Dart-Dose CMCR) Pilot Program.

  17. Characterization of covalent protein conjugates using solid-state sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Garbow, J.R.; Fujiwara, Hideji; Sharp, C.R.; Logusch, E.W. )

    1991-07-23

    Cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CPMAS) {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy has been used to characterize covalent conjugates of alachlor, an {alpha}-chloroacetamide hapten, with glutathione (GSH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The solid-state NMR method demonstrates definitively the covalent nature of these conjugates and can also be used to characterize the sites of hapten attachment to proteins. Three different sites of alachlor binding are observed in the BSA system. Accurate quantitation of the amount of hapten covalently bound to GSH and BSA is reported. The solid-state {sup 13}C NMR technique can easily be generalized to study other small molecule/protein conjugates and can be used to assist the development and refinement of synthetic methods needed for the successful formation of such protein alkylation products.

  18. Fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectroscopy in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangjie; Wei, Zhiliang; Zeng, Qing; Yang, Jian; Lin, Yanqin; Chen, Zhong

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy plays an important role in chemical and biological analyses. In this study, we combine the J-coupling coherence transfer module with the echo-train acquisition technique for fast acquisition of high-resolution 2D NMR spectra in magnetic fields with unknown spatial variations. The proposed method shows satisfactory performance on a 5 mM ethyl 3-bromopropionate sample, under a 5-kHz (10 ppm at 11.7 T) B0 inhomogeneous field, as well as under varying degrees of pulse-flip-angle deviations. Moreover, a simulative ex situ NMR measurement is also conducted to show the effectiveness of the proposed pulse sequence.

  19. High-pressure NMR spectroscopy for characterizing folding intermediates and denatured states of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kamatari, Yuji O; Kitahara, Ryo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Akasaka, Kazuyuki

    2004-09-01

    Extensive structural studies using high-pressure NMR spectroscopy have recently been carried out on proteins, which potentially contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of protein folding. Pressure shifts the conformational equilibrium from higher to lower volume conformers. If the pressure is varied, starting from the folded native structure, in many cases we observe intermediate conformers before the onset of total unfolding. This enables the investigation of details of the structure and thermodynamic characteristics of various intermediate conformers of proteins under equilibrium conditions. We can also examine pressure effects on the structure and stability of some typical denatured states such as helical denatured, molten globule, and unfolded states. The high-pressure NMR method can also be used to investigate association/dissociation equilibria of oligomeric or aggregated proteins. Beside direct observation of kinetic intermediates upon pressure jump, NMR structural investigations of equilibrium conformers under pressure provide information about the structures of kinetic intermediates during folding/unfolding reactions. PMID:15283922

  20. Bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium: An investigation of weak interactions in solution using multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, D.J.

    1995-07-01

    NMR spectroscopy is ideal for studying weak interactions (formation enthalpy {le}20 kcal/mol) in solution. The metallocene bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)ytterbium, Cp*{sub 2}Yb, is ideal for this purpose. cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2}complexes (P = phosphine) were used to produce slow-exchange Cp*{sub 2}YbL adducts for NMR study. Reversible formation of (P{sub 2}PtH){sub 2} complexes from cis-P{sub 2}PtH{sub 2} complexes were also studied, followed by interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with phosphines, R{sub 3}PX complexes. A NMR study was done on the interactions of Cp*{sub 2}Yb with H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, Xe, CO, silanes, stannanes, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}, and toluene.

  1. Towards single-molecule NMR detection and spectroscopy using single spins in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perunicic, V. S.; Hall, L. T.; Simpson, D. A.; Hill, C. D.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2014-02-01

    Nanomagnetometry using the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has attracted a great deal of interest due to its unique combination of room temperature operation, nanoscale resolution, and high sensitivity. One of the important goals for nanomagnetometry is to be able to detect nanoscale nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in individual molecules. Our theoretical analysis details a method by which a single molecule on the surface of diamond, with characteristic NMR frequencies, can be detected using a proximate NV center on a time scale of an order of seconds with nanometer precision. We perform spatiotemporal resolution optimization and subsequently outline paths to greater sensitivity. Our method is suitable for application in low and relatively inhomogeneous background magnetic fields in contrast to both conventional liquid and solid state NMR spectroscopy.

  2. Application of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Comparative Examination of Different Groups of Free Radicals in Thermal Injuries Treated with Propolis and Silver Sulphadiazine

    PubMed Central

    Olczyk, Pawel; Ramos, Pawel; Bernas, Marcin; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Pilawa, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Different groups of free radicals expressed in burn wounds treated with propolis and silver sulphadiazine were examined. The thermal effect forms major types of free radicals in a wound because of the breaking of chemical bonds. Free radicals, located in the heated skin, were tested after 21 days of treating by these two substances. The aim of this work was to find the method for determination of types and concentrations of different groups of free radicals in wound after high temperature impact during burning. The effects of the therapy by propolis and silver sulphadiazine on free radicals were studied. Since the chemical methods of free radicals studies are destructive, the usefulness of the electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was tested in this work. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra measured with the microwave power of 2.2 mW were numerically fitted by theoretical curves of Gaussian and Lorentzian shapes. The experimental electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of tissue samples are best fitted by the sum of one Gauss and two Lorentz lines. An innovatory numerical procedure of spectroscopic skin analysis was presented. It is very useful in the alternative medicine studies. PMID:23762162

  3. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help prevent dendrite formation. The in situ method was also applied to monitor (by (11)B NMR) electrochemical double-layer formation in supercapacitors in real time. Though this method is useful, it comes with challenges. The separation of the contributions from the different cell components in the NMR spectra is not trivial because of overlapping resonances. In addition, orientation-dependent NMR interactions, including the spatial- and orientation-dependent bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) effects, can lead to resonance broadening. Efforts to understand and mitigate these BMS effects are discussed in this Account. The in situ NMR investigation of fuel cells initially focused on the surface electrochemistry at the electrodes and the electrochemical oxidation of methanol and CO to CO2 on the Pt cathode. On the basis of the (13)C and (195)Pt NMR spectra of the adsorbates and electrodes, CO adsorbed on Pt and other reaction intermediates and complete oxidation products were detected and their mode of binding to the electrodes investigated. Appropriate design and engineering of the NMR hardware has allowed researchers to integrate intact direct methanol fuel cells into NMR probes. Chemical transformations of the circulating methanol could be followed and reaction intermediates could be detected in real time by either (2)H or (13)C NMR spectroscopy. By use of the in situ NMR approach, factors that control fuel cell performance, such as methanol cross over and catalyst performance, were identified. PMID:24041242

  4. Defect structure in lithium-doped polymer-derived SiCN ceramics characterized by Raman and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Emre; Mass, Valentina; Gembus, Armin; Schulz, Armin; Liebau-Kunzmann, Verena; Fasel, Claudia; Riedel, Ralf; Eichel, Rüdiger-A

    2009-07-21

    Lithium-doped polymer-derived silicon carbonitride ceramics (SiCN:Li) synthesized at various pyrolysis temperatures, have been investigated by means of multifrequency and multipulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Raman spectroscopy in order to determine different defect states that may impact the materials electronic properties. In particular, carbon- and silicon-based 'dangling bonds' at elevated, as well as metallic networks containing Li0 in the order of 1 microm at low pyrolysis temperatures have been observed in concentrations ranging between 10(14) and 10(17) spins mg(-1). PMID:19842480

  5. Metabolic profiling, metabolomic and metabonomic procedures for NMR spectroscopy of urine, plasma, serum and tissue extracts.

    PubMed

    Beckonert, Olaf; Keun, Hector C; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Bundy, Jacob; Holmes, Elaine; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic profiling, metabolomic and metabonomic studies mainly involve the multicomponent analysis of biological fluids, tissue and cell extracts using NMR spectroscopy and/or mass spectrometry (MS). We summarize the main NMR spectroscopic applications in modern metabolic research, and provide detailed protocols for biofluid (urine, serum/plasma) and tissue sample collection and preparation, including the extraction of polar and lipophilic metabolites from tissues. 1H NMR spectroscopic techniques such as standard 1D spectroscopy, relaxation-edited, diffusion-edited and 2D J-resolved pulse sequences are widely used at the analysis stage to monitor different groups of metabolites and are described here. They are often followed by more detailed statistical analysis or additional 2D NMR analysis for biomarker discovery. The standard acquisition time per sample is 4-5 min for a simple 1D spectrum, and both preparation and analysis can be automated to allow application to high-throughput screening for clinical diagnostic and toxicological studies, as well as molecular phenotyping and functional genomics. PMID:18007604

  6. Differentiating and characterizing geminal silanols in silicas by (29)Si NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Murray, David K

    2010-12-01

    Single and geminal hydroxyl species in silicas have been characterized using solid-state (29)Si NMR spectroscopy. Differentiating hydroxyl types is important in understanding their roles in chemical toxicity mechanisms for inhaled crystalline silicas responsible for silicosis. (1)H-(29)Si cross polarization NMR spectroscopy has been employed to obtain (29)Si NMR chemical shift data and signal accrual and relaxation characteristics. Spectral deconvolution is used to examine relative single and geminal hydroxyl resonance areas for a series of representative silicas and silica gels. Silicon-containing materials examined include 1878a quartz, and 1879a cristobalite from the National Institute for Science and Technology, kaolin, and several widely used respirable silicas and silica gels. Geminal hydroxyls were observed in every case, with relative resonance areas accounting for 21-65% of total hydroxyl signals. Factors affecting relative areas measured as a function of contact time, relaxation, and surface area are discussed. Subsequent (29)Si and (31)P NMR studies of a silica coated with various sodium hydrogen phosphates show preferential single silanol-phosphate interaction for basic phosphates, and oligomerization products for acidic phosphates. Geminal hydroxyl resonance areas displayed significant error (4-17%) for low surface area silicas, limiting this method to studies exhibiting major changes in chemical or spectroscopic properties. PMID:20825948

  7. Proton-Detected Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Bone with Ultrafast Magic Angle Spinning

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Kumar Pandey, Manoj; Gong, Bo; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    While obtaining high-resolution structural details from bone is highly important to better understand its mechanical strength and the effects of aging and disease on bone ultrastructure, it has been a major challenge to do so with existing biophysical techniques. Though solid-state NMR spectroscopy has the potential to reveal the structural details of bone, it suffers from poor spectral resolution and sensitivity. Nonetheless, recent developments in magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR technology have made it possible to spin solid samples up to 110 kHz frequency. With such remarkable capabilities, 1H-detected NMR experiments that have traditionally been challenging on rigid solids can now be implemented. Here, we report the first application of multidimensional 1H-detected NMR measurements on bone under ultrafast MAS conditions to provide atomistic-level elucidation of the complex heterogeneous structure of bone. Our investigations demonstrate that two-dimensional 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectra for bone are obtainable using fp-RFDR (finite-pulse radio-frequency-driven dipolar recoupling) pulse sequence under ultrafast MAS. Our results infer that water exhibits distinct 1H−1H dipolar coupling networks with the backbone and side-chain regions in collagen. These results show the promising potential of proton-detected ultrafast MAS NMR for monitoring structural and dynamic changes caused by mechanical loading and disease in bone. PMID:26153138

  8. Monitoring the Electrochemical Processes in the Lithium–Air Battery by Solid State NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A multi-nuclear solid-state NMR approach is employed to investigate the lithium–air battery, to monitor the evolution of the electrochemical products formed during cycling, and to gain insight into processes affecting capacity fading. While lithium peroxide is identified by 17O solid state NMR (ssNMR) as the predominant product in the first discharge in 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) based electrolytes, it reacts with the carbon cathode surface to form carbonate during the charging process. 13C ssNMR provides evidence for carbonate formation on the surface of the carbon cathode, the carbonate being removed at high charging voltages in the first cycle, but accumulating in later cycles. Small amounts of lithium hydroxide and formate are also detected in discharged cathodes and while the hydroxide formation is reversible, the formate persists and accumulates in the cathode upon further cycling. The results indicate that the rechargeability of the battery is limited by both the electrolyte and the carbon cathode stability. The utility of ssNMR spectroscopy in directly detecting product formation and decomposition within the battery is demonstrated, a necessary step in the assessment of new electrolytes, catalysts, and cathode materials for the development of a viable lithium–oxygen battery. PMID:24489976

  9. Analysis and aging of unsaturated polyester resins in contemporary art installations by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stamatakis, Georgios; Knuutinen, Ulla; Laitinen, Kai; Spyros, Apostolos

    2010-12-01

    Two original art installations constructed from unsaturated polyester resins (UPR) and four different reference UPR products (before and after UVB aging) were analyzed by high-resolution 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Breaking strain studies were also conducted for the four UPR model products before and after different aging procedures (moisture, UVB exposure, melt/freeze). NMR analysis of the chemical composition of the UPR resin extracts showed they contain several low MW organic compounds and oligomers rich in polar -OH groups that play a significant role in the degradation behavior of the composite UPR materials. Statistical analysis of the NMR compositional data showed that styrene and benzaldehyde contents can be used to differentiate between fresh and aged UPR samples. The phthalate and propylene glycol unit speciation (esterified, primary or secondary -OH) of the extracts provided evidence that UPR resin C was used in the construction of the two art installations, and direct comparison of (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra verified this compositional similarity. UPR resin C was shown by both NMR and breaking strain studies to be the reference UPR most susceptible to degradation by different aging procedures, a characteristic attributed to the lower styrene content of resin C. PMID:20922516

  10. Proton-Detected Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Bone with Ultrafast Magic Angle Spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroue, Kamal H.; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Kumar Pandey, Manoj; Gong, Bo; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Morris, Michael D.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-07-01

    While obtaining high-resolution structural details from bone is highly important to better understand its mechanical strength and the effects of aging and disease on bone ultrastructure, it has been a major challenge to do so with existing biophysical techniques. Though solid-state NMR spectroscopy has the potential to reveal the structural details of bone, it suffers from poor spectral resolution and sensitivity. Nonetheless, recent developments in magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR technology have made it possible to spin solid samples up to 110 kHz frequency. With such remarkable capabilities, 1H-detected NMR experiments that have traditionally been challenging on rigid solids can now be implemented. Here, we report the first application of multidimensional 1H-detected NMR measurements on bone under ultrafast MAS conditions to provide atomistic-level elucidation of the complex heterogeneous structure of bone. Our investigations demonstrate that two-dimensional 1H/1H chemical shift correlation spectra for bone are obtainable using fp-RFDR (finite-pulse radio-frequency-driven dipolar recoupling) pulse sequence under ultrafast MAS. Our results infer that water exhibits distinct 1H-1H dipolar coupling networks with the backbone and side-chain regions in collagen. These results show the promising potential of proton-detected ultrafast MAS NMR for monitoring structural and dynamic changes caused by mechanical loading and disease in bone.

  11. Uroscopy in the 21st century: high-field NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Neild, G H; Foxall, P J; Lindon, J C; Holmes, E C; Nicholson, J K

    1997-03-01

    From the experiments described, it can be seen that there are different research approaches that can be taken and these are summarized in Table 1. Whereas much scientific research is principally hypothesis led, there remains, nevertheless, an important place for exploratory research. High resolution NMR can measure, directly and simultaneously, a wide range of endogenous metabolites in biological fluids and has the unique capability of providing structural information on the metabolites detected. It has proved to be a powerful research tool with which to study inherited metabolic diseases, renal disease, drug metabolism, and toxicity, and can be used to monitor the effects of drug therapy. For instance, by using a library of experimental toxins one can map the metabolic profile of site-specific nephron injury. With this approach in man one could eventually take an unknown disease such as Balkan nephropathy and predict the initial site of tubular injury, the mode of injury and therefore the kind of toxin capable of producing that injury. NMR spectroscopic techniques are still advancing rapidly, with ever increasing sensitivity and sophistication of NMR pulse sequences to enhance structural elucidation in complex mixtures. Given the advances in directly coupled HPLC-NMR and even HPLC-NMR-mass spectroscopy it is likely that these technologies in conjunction with pattern recognition will make major contribution to our understanding of renal processes and provide new diagnostic insights in the 21st century. PMID:9075117

  12. Structural characterization of selenosubtilisin by sup 77 Se-NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    House, K.L.; Dunlap, R.B.; Odom, J.D.; Wu, Z.P.; Hilvert. D. Research Inst. of Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA )

    1991-03-15

    Selenosubtilisin is an artificial enzyme containing an active site selenocysteine residue. In this environment the selenium atom is a valuable probe of structure-function relationships and also confers novel redox and hydrolytic properties to the original protease template. The authors have used {sup 77}Se NMR spectroscopy to characterize different oxidation states of {sup 77}Se isotopically enriched selenosubtilisin. The oxidized form of the enzyme exhibits a {sup 77}Se resonance at 1,189 ppm. This is in good agreement with the {sup 77}Se chemical shifts for model seleninic acids, confirming that the prosthetic group is in the seleninic acid oxidation state. On treatment of the oxidized enzyme with three equivalents of 3-carboxy-4-nitrobenzenethiol at pH 5.0, they observe the enzyme bound selenenyl sulfide at 388.5 ppm. This work demonstrates the utility of {sup 77}Se NMR spectroscopy for examining structure-function relationships of selenium containing proteins.

  13. Facile backbone structure determination of human membrane proteins by NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klammt, Christian; Maslennikov, Innokentiy; Bayrhuber, Monika; Eichmann, Cédric; Vajpai, Navratna; Chiu, Ellis Jeremy Chua; Blain, Katherine Y; Esquivies, Luis; Kwon, June Hyun Jung; Balana, Bartosz; Pieper, Ursula; Sali, Andrej; Slesinger, Paul A; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Riek, Roland; Choe, Senyon

    2013-01-01

    Although nearly half of today’s major pharmaceutical drugs target human integral membrane proteins (hIMPs), only 30 hIMP structures are currently available in the Protein Data Bank, largely owing to inefficiencies in protein production. Here we describe a strategy for the rapid structure determination of hIMPs, using solution NMR spectroscopy with systematically labeled proteins produced via cell-free expression. We report new backbone structures of six hIMPs, solved in only 18 months from 15 initial targets. Application of our protocols to an additional 135 hIMPs with molecular weight <30 kDa yielded 38 hIMPs suitable for structural characterization by solution NMR spectroscopy without additional optimization. PMID:22609626

  14. Structure-Independent Analysis of the Breadth of the Positional Distribution of Disordered Groups in Macromolecules from Order Parameters for Long Variable-Length Vectors using NMR Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Iwahara, Junji; Clore, G. Marius

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding structurally disordered groups is crucial for a complete understanding of the relationship between structure, dynamics and function in biological macromolecules. Experimental analysis, however, of the positional distribution of disordered groups in the macromolecular frame is extremely difficult. While NMR order parameters, S2, for fixed-length bond vectors such as N-H and C-H are commonly used for investigations of conformational dynamics of macromolecules, these order parameters only provide angular information about internal motions and are totally insensitive to translational motions. Although analysis of S2 for bond vectors permit identification of disordered groups in macromolecules, this type of order parameter cannot provide any information about the distribution radii of disordered groups. Here we describe an NMR approach to directly determine the distribution radius of a disordered group independent of any structural knowledge. This approach makes use of order parameters for long variable-length vectors (including proton-paramagnetic center and proton-proton vectors) between a disordered group and a rigid portion of the macromolecule. We demonstrate the application of this formalism to paramagnetic relaxation enhancement vectors. In addition, the potential utility of the same formalism to 1H-1H cross-relaxation rates is considered as an alternative approach for analyzing the breadth of the positional distribution of disordered groups. PMID:20795737

  15. INVESTIGATION INTO HOW WOOD CELL WALLS INTERACT WITH SYNTHETIC ADHESIVES USING HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the continued growth of the wood adhesive industry and the need to create durable and environmentally friendly adhesive systems, it is still unclear whether covalent bonds contribute to wood adhesive bond strength. In order to investigate this question, solid-state NMR spectroscopy (NMR) has be...

  16. Single-shot diffusion trace (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, R A; Braun, K P; Nicolay, K

    2001-05-01

    Ignoring diffusion anisotropy can severely hamper the quantitative determination of water and metabolite diffusion in complex tissues. The measurement of the trace of the diffusion tensor provides unambiguous and rotationally invariant ADC values, but usually requires three separate experiments. A single-shot technique developed earlier, originally designed for diffusion trace MR imaging (Mori and van Zijl, Magn Reson Med 1995;33:41-52), was improved and adapted for diffusion trace MR spectroscopy. A double spin-echo pulse sequence was incorporated with four pairs of bipolar gradients with specific predetermined relative signs in each of the three orthogonal directions. The combination of gradient directions leads to cancellation of all off-diagonal tensor elements while constructively adding the diagonal elements. Furthermore, the pulse scheme provides complete compensation for cross-terms between static magnetic field gradients and the applied diffusion gradients, while simultaneously avoiding cross-terms with localization gradients. The sequence was tested at 4.7 T in vivo on rat brain for MRI and on rat skeletal muscle and brain for MRS. It is shown that the average ADC as determined from the measurement of the ADCs in the three orthogonal directions is in close agreement with the ADC obtained along the trace of the diffusion tensor in a single acquisition, for both water and metabolite diffusion. The large differences in water and metabolite diffusion coefficients as measured in the individual orthogonal directions illustrate the need for diffusion trace measurements when accurate and rotationally invariant diffusion quantitation is required. The pulse scheme presented here may be applied for such purposes in MRS and MRI studies. PMID:11323799

  17. High-sensitivity multinuclear NMR spectroscopy of a smectite clay and of clay-intercalated polymer.

    PubMed

    Hou, S S; Beyer, F L; Schmidt-Rohr, K

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) properties of a smectite clay low in paramagnetic ions, and NMR experiments to detect organic material near the silicate surfaces with high sensitivity, have been explored by 1H, 29Si, and 13C NMR. In oven-dried hectorite clay, 1H NMR reveals a sharp signal at 0.35 ppm that narrows significantly with spinning speed. It is assigned to the "inner" OH protons of the silicate layers. In fluorohectorite, where the OH groups are replaced by fluorines, no such 1H peak is observed. The assignment is further confirmed by the efficient cross-polarization observed in two-dimensional (2D) 1H-29Si HETCOR spectra, and by 29Si-detected REDOR experiments with 1H-dephasing in the 29Si dipolar field, which yield a 1H-29Si distance of 2.9 + 0.4 A. In these 1H-29Si experiments, the sensitivity of the 29Si signal is enhanced at least fivefold by refocusing the decay resulting from the inhomogeneous broadening of the single 29Si peak, stretching the 29Si signal out over 80 ms. The small 1H linewidth of this signal at spinning frequencies exceeding 4 kHz is attributed to the large proton-proton distances in the clay. The upfield isotropic chemical shift of the OH groups is explained by their inaccessibility to hydrogen-bonding partners, as a result of their location in hexagonal "cavities" of the clay structure. The well-resolved, easily selectable OH-proton signal and the high-sensitivity 29Si detection open excellent perspectives for NMR studies of composites of clays with organic molecules. Two-dimensional 1H-29Si and 1H-1H chemical-shift correlation experiments enable efficient detection of the 1H spectrum of organic segments near the clay surface. Combined with 1H spin diffusion, the organic segments at up to several nanometers from the clay surfaces can be probed. A 2D 1H-13C correlation experiment yields the 13C spectrum of the organic species near the clay surfaces. A mobility gradient of intercalated poly(ethylene oxide), PEO, segments is proven in 1H-3Si WISE experiments with spin diffusion. PMID:12469807

  18. Probing structure and dynamics of protein assemblies by magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Si; Suiter, Christopher L; Hou, Guangjin; Zhang, Huilan; Polenova, Tatyana

    2013-09-17

    In living organisms, biological molecules often organize into multicomponent complexes. Such assemblies consist of various proteins and carry out essential functions, ranging from cell division, transport, and energy transduction to catalysis, signaling, and viral infectivity. To understand the biological functions of these assemblies, in both healthy and disease states, researchers need to study their three-dimensional architecture and molecular dynamics. To date, the large size, the lack of inherent long-range order, and insolubility have made atomic resolution studies of many protein assemblies challenging or impractical using traditional structural biology methods such as X-ray diffraction and solution NMR spectroscopy. In the past 10 years, we have focused our work on the development and application of magic angle spinning solid-state NMR (MAS NMR) methods to characterize large protein assemblies at atomic-level resolution. In this Account, we discuss the rapid progress in the field of MAS NMR spectroscopy, citing work from our laboratory and others on methodological developments that have facilitated the in-depth analysis of biologically important protein assemblies. We emphasize techniques that yield enhanced sensitivity and resolution, such as fast MAS (spinning frequencies of 40 kHz and above) and nonuniform sampling protocols for data acquisition and processing. We also discuss the experiments for gaining distance restraints and for recoupling anisotropic tensorial interactions under fast MAS conditions. We give an overview of sample preparation approaches when working with protein assemblies. Following the overview of contemporary MAS NMR methods, we present case studies into the structure and dynamics of two classes of biological systems under investigation in our laboratory. We will first turn our attention to cytoskeletal microtubule motor proteins including mammalian dynactin and dynein light chain 8. We will then discuss protein assemblies from the HIV-1 retrovirus. PMID:23402263

  19. Identification and quantitation of xenobiotics by 1H NMR spectroscopy in poisoning cases.

    PubMed

    Imbenotte, M; Azaroual, N; Cartigny, B; Vermeersch, G; Lhermitte, M

    2003-04-23

    In order to analyse a wide range of xenobiotics and their metabolites present in biological fluids, NMR spectroscopy can be used. A large variety of xenobiotics (therapeutic agents, pesticides, solvents, alcohols) can be characterized and quantitated directly, without sample preparation. NMR investigations were applied to acute poisoning cases, involving drugs such as salicylates and valproic acid (VPA). In a salicylate poisoning case, the three major metabolites of acetylsalicylic acid have been detected in crude urine, and rapid identification of lysine revealed the origin of the intoxication, namely lysine acetylsalicylate (Aspegic). Valproic acid as its glucuronide was identified in urine samples from two poisoned patients. 1H NMR was also used to identify and quantitate paraquat (Gramoxone) in urine owing to its two aromatic signals at 8.49 and 9.02 ppm, in two acutely poisoned patients (183 and 93 mg/l). An intentional poisoning case with tetrahydrofuran (THF) was also investigated. Serum and urine samples were collected. THF was characterized by its resonances at 1.90 and 3.76 ppm, and quantified at 813 and 850 mg/l in the two biological fluids, respectively. Moreover, two other compounds were detected: lactate and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). 1H NMR spectroscopic analysis of serum samples from three poisoned patients revealed methanol in one case and ethylene glycol in the two others. Moreover, in the same spectrum, the corresponding metabolites formate and glycolate were found. Compared with the reference chromatographic or spectrophotometric methods, requiring time-consuming extraction and/or derivatization steps, NMR spectroscopy allows the determination of many exogenous and endogenous compounds, without any pre-selection of the analytes. PMID:12742700

  20. Identifying metabolites related to nitrogen mineralisation using 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    . T McDonald, Noeleen; Graham, Stewart; Watson, Catherine; Gordon, Alan; Lalor, Stan; Laughlin, Ronnie; Elliott, Chris; . P Wall, David

    2015-04-01

    Exploring new analysis techniques to enhance our knowledge of the various metabolites within our soil systems is imperative. Principally, this knowledge would allow us to link key metabolites with functional influences on critical nutrient processes, such as the nitrogen (N) mineralisation in soils. Currently there are few studies that utilize proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) to characterize multiple metabolites within a soil sample. The aim of this research study was to examine the effectiveness of 1H NMR for isolating multiple metabolites that are related to the mineralizable N (MN) capacity across a range of 35 Irish grassland soils. Soils were measured for MN using the standard seven day anaerobic incubation (AI-7). Additionally, soils were also analysed for a range of physio-chemical properties [e.g. total N, total C, mineral N, texture and soil organic matter (SOM)]. Proton NMR analysis was carried on these soils by extracting with 40% methanol:water, lyophilizing and reconstituting in deuterium oxide and recording the NMR spectra on a 400MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer. Once the NMR data were spectrally processed and analysed using multivariate statistical analysis, seven metabolites were identified as having significant relationships with MN (glucose, trimethylamine, glutamic acid, serine, aspartic acid, 4-aminohippuirc acid and citric acid). Following quantification, glucose was shown to explain the largest percentage variability in MN (72%). These outcomes suggest that sources of labile carbon are essential in regulating N mineralisation and the capacity of plant available N derived from SOM-N pools in these soils. Although, smaller in concentration, the amino acids; 4-aminohippuirc acid, glutamic acid and serine also significantly (P<0.05) explained 43%, 27% and 19% of the variability in MN, respectively. This novel study highlights the effectiveness of using 1H NMR as a practical approach to profile multiple metabolites in soils simultaneously, and increasing the potential to identify those related to various soil processes.

  1. Structure and dynamics of paramagnetic transients by pulsed EPR and NMR detection of nuclear resonance. [Pulse radiolysis of methanol in D/sub 2/O

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of transient radicals in pulse radiolysis can be studied by time resolved EPR and NMR techniques. EPR study of kinetics and relaxation is illustrated. The NMR detection of nuclear resonance in transient radicals is a new method which allows the study of hyperfine coupling, population dynamics, radical kinetics, and reaction mechanism. 9 figures.

  2. Distinguishing Phosphate Structural Defects From Inclusions in Calcite and Aragonite by NMR Spectroscopy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B. L.; Mason, H. E.

    2010-12-01

    Variations in the concentration of minor and trace elements are being studied extensively for potential use as proxies to infer environmental conditions at the time of mineral deposition. Such proxies rely fundamentally on a relationship between the activities in the solution and in the solid that would seem to be simple only in the case that the species substitutes into the mineral structure. Other incorporation mechanisms are possible, including inclusions (both mineral and fluid) and occlusion of surface adsorbate complexes, that might be sensitive to other factors, such as crystallization kinetics, and difficult to distinguish analytically. For example, it is known from mineral adsorption studies that surface precipitates can be nanoscopic, and might not be apparent at resolutions typical of microchemical analysis. Techniques by which a structural relationship between the substituting element and the host mineral structure are needed to provide a sound basis for geochemical proxies. NMR spectroscopy offers methods for probing such spatial relationship. We are using solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate phosphate incorporation in calcium carbonate minerals, including calcite speleothems and coral skeletal aragonite, at concentrations of the order 100 μg P g -1. In 31P NMR spectra of most samples, narrow peaks arising from crystalline inclusions can be resolved, including apatite in coral aragonite and an unidentified phase in calcite. All samples studied yield also a broad 31P signal, centered near chemical shifts of +3 to +4 ppm, that could be assigned to phosphate defects in the host mineral and from which the fraction of P occurring in the carbonate mineral structure can be determined. To test this assignment we applied rotational-echo double-resonance (REDOR) NMR techniques that probe the molecular-scale proximity of carbonate groups to the phosphate responsible for the broad 31P peak. This method measures dipole-dipole coupling between 31P of phosphate and carbonate carbon, which varies with the inverse-cube of the internuclear distance. 31P{13C} REDOR NMR results for synthetic phosphate/(13C)-aragonite coprecipitates show that the broad peak is closely associated with carbonate, exhibiting a 31P-13C dipolar coupling qualitatively consistent with phosphate occupying an anion structural site (i.e., 6 C at 0.32 nm). 31P-detected 1H NMR spectra, which contain signal only from H located near P, show that structural water molecules help accommodate phosphate in the structure. Similar methods can be applied to other elements of potential paleo-proxy interest having NMR-active isotopes, including B, Mg, and Cd.

  3. Axial ligand modulation of the electronic structures of binuclear copper sites: analysis of paramagnetic 1H NMR spectra of Met160Gln Cu(A).

    PubMed

    Fernández, C O; Cricco, J A; Slutter, C E; Richards, J H; Gray, H B; Vila, A J

    2001-11-28

    Cu(A) is an electron-transfer copper center present in heme-copper oxidases and N2O reductases. The center is a binuclear unit, with two cysteine ligands bridging the metal ions and two terminal histidine residues. A Met residue and a peptide carbonyl group are located on opposite sides of the Cu2S2 plane; these weaker ligands are fully conserved in all known Cu(A) sites. The Met160Gln mutant of the soluble subunit II of Thermus thermophilus ba3 oxidase has been studied by NMR spectroscopy. In its oxidized form, the binuclear copper is a fully delocalized mixed-valence pair, as are all natural Cu(A) centers. The faster nuclear relaxation in this mutant suggests that a low-lying excited state has shifted to higher energies compared to that of the wild-type protein. The introduction of the Gln residue alters the coordination mode of His114 but does not affect His157, thereby confirming the proposal that the axial ligand-to-copper distances influence the copper-His interactions (Robinson, H.; Ang, M. C.; Gao, Y. G.; Hay, M. T.; Lu, Y.; Wang, A. H. Biochemistry 1999, 38, 5677). Changes in the hyperfine coupling constants of the Cys beta-CH2 groups are attributed to minor geometrical changes that affect the Cu-S-C(beta)-H(beta) dihedral angles. These changes, in addition, shift the thermally accessible excited states, thus influencing the spectral position of the Cys beta-CH2 resonances. The Cu-Cys bonds are not substantially altered by the Cu-Gln160 interaction, in contrast to the situation found in the evolutionarily related blue copper proteins. It is possible that regulatory subunits in the mitochondrial oxidases fix the relative positions of thermally accessible Cu(A) excited states by tuning axial ligand interactions. PMID:11716725

  4. 13C NMR spectroscopy for the differentiation of enantiomers using chiral solvating agents.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Trujillo, Míriam; Monteagudo, Eva; Parella, Teodor

    2013-11-19

    The utility of (13)C NMR spectroscopy for the differentiation of enantiomers using chiral solvating agents (CSA) is stated. Three examples involving the enantiodifferentiation of a drug, a metabolite and a reactant in aqueous and organic solutions have been chosen to show it. The intrinsic high dispersion of (13)C nucleus, as well as the singlet nature of the signals in standard experiments makes (13)C NMR experiments a powerful alternative or complement to (1)H NMR experiments; specially, when studying pure compounds with complex proton spectra or mixtures of compounds, as in chiral metabonomics, where severe overlapping exists in proton spectrum. To evaluate and compare the quality of the enantioresolution of a NMR signal we introduce the enantiodifferentiation quotient, E, that considers the complexity of (1)H multiplets (and in general the width) of the original signal. It has been observed that the error in the measurement of the enantiomeric molar ratio can be related to the E value. The sensitivity and experimental time of a wide range of chiral analyte concentrations were also assessed. PMID:24125534

  5. Structure-Correlation NMR Spectroscopy for Macromolecules Using Repeated Bidirectional Photoisomerization of Azobenzene.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Toshio; Ueda, Keisuke; Nishimura, Chiaki; Yamazaki, Toshio

    2015-11-17

    Control over macromolecular structure offers bright potentials for manipulation of macromolecular functions. We here present structure-correlation NMR spectroscopy to analyze the correlation between polymorphic macromolecular structures driven by photoisomerization of azobenzene. The structural conversion of azobenzene was induced within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment using a colored light source, and the reverse structural conversion was induced during the relaxation delay using a light source of another color. The correlation spectrum between trans- and cis-azobenzene was then obtained. To maximize the efficiency of the bidirectional photoisomerization of azobenzene-containing macromolecules, we developed a novel light-irradiation NMR sample tube and method for irradiating target molecules in an NMR radio frequency (rf) coil. When this sample tube was used for photoisomerization of an azobenzene derivative at a concentration of 0.2 mM, data collection with reasonable sensitivity applicable to macromolecules was achieved. We performed isomerization of an azobenzene-cross-linked peptide within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment that produced cross-peaks between helix and random-coil forms of the peptide. Thus, these results indicate that macromolecular structure manipulation can be incorporated into an NMR pulse sequence using an azobenzene derivative and irradiation with light of two types of wavelengths, providing a new method for structural analysis of metastable states of macromolecules. PMID:26479462

  6. NMR spectroscopy as a tool to close the gap on metabolite characterization under MIST.

    PubMed

    Caceres-Cortes, Janet; Reily, Michael D

    2010-07-01

    Withdrawals from the market due to unforeseen adverse events have triggered changes in the way therapeutics are discovered and developed. This has resulted in an emphasis on truly understanding the efficacy and toxicity profile of new chemical entities (NCE) and the contributions of their metabolites to on-target pharmacology and off-target receptor-mediated toxicology. Members of the pharmaceutical industry, scientific community and regulatory agencies have held dialogues with respect to metabolites in safety testing (MIST); and both the US FDA and International Conference on Harmonisation have issued guidances with respect to when and how to characterize metabolites for human safety testing. This review provides a brief overview of NMR spectroscopy as applied to the structure elucidation and quantification of drug metabolites within the drug discovery and development process. It covers advances in this technique, including cryogenic cooling of detection circuitry for enhanced sensitivity, hyphenated LC-NMR techniques, improved dynamic range through new solvent-suppression pulse sequences and quantitation. These applications add to the already diverse NMR toolkit and further anchor NMR as a technique that is directly applicable to meeting the requirements of MIST guidelines. PMID:21083239

  7. Fast and accurate quantitation of glucans in complex mixtures by optimized heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bøjstrup, Marie; Petersen, Bent O; Beeren, Sophie R; Hindsgaul, Ole; Meier, Sebastian

    2013-09-17

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a widely used technique for mixture analysis, but it has shortcomings in resolving carbohydrate mixtures due to the narrow chemical shift range of glycans in general and fragments of homopolymers in particular. Here, we suggest a protocol toward fast spectroscopic glycan mixture analysis. We show that a plethora of oligosaccharides comprising only α-glucopyranosyl residues can be resolved into distinct quantifiable signals with NMR experiments that are substantially faster than chromatographic runs. Conceptually, the approach fully exploits the narrow line widths of glycans (ν1/2 < 3 Hz) in the (13)C spectral dimension while disregarding superfluous spectral information in compound identification and quantitation. The acetal (H1C1) groups suffice to spectroscopically resolve ∼20 different starch fragments in optimized (1)H-(13)C NMR with a narrow (13)C spectral width (3 ppm) that allows sampling the indirect (13)C dimension at high resolution within 15 min. Rapid quantitations by high-resolution NMR data are achieved for glycans at concentrations as low as 10 μg/mL. For validation, comparisons were made with quantitations obtained by more time-consuming chromatographic methods and yielded coefficients of determination (R(2)) above 0.99. PMID:23952648

  8. High resolution sup 27 Al NMR spectroscopy of the aluminophosphate molecular sieve VPI-5

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Chmelka, B.F.; Pines, A. ); Davis, M.E. ); Grobet, P.J.; Jacobs, P.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Aluminium plays an important part in determining the properties of many materials, such as the catalytic behavior of zeolites. Aluminophosphate molecular sieves, in particular, have useful applications as superlattice hosts in the fabrication of quantum-effect devices. Although nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is often a sensitive probe of solids, the use of {sup 27}Al NMR to investigate the structure of aluminosilicates and aluminophosphates has been severely limited because anisotropic second-order quadrupolar interactions, responsible for spectral broadening, cannot be eliminated by conventional magic-angle-spinning or multiple-pulse techniques. Here the authors report the first high-resolution NMR spectra of {sup 27}Al in a solid using double rotation and demonstrate its usefulness for probing subtle structural perturbations in the aluminophosphate molecular sieve VPI-5. From their results, they conclude that high-resolution {sup 27}Al NMR is capable of resolving discrete framework aluminium sites, permitting quantitative investigation of site-specific adsorbate interactions with the VPI-5 host.

  9. μHigh resolution-magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy for metabolic phenotyping of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alan; Li, Xiaonan; Molin, Laurent; Solari, Florence; Elena-Herrmann, Bénédicte; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2014-06-17

    Analysis of model organisms, such as the submillimeter-size Caenorhabditis elegans, plays a central role in understanding biological functions across species and in characterizing phenotypes associated with genetic mutations. In recent years, metabolic phenotyping studies of C. elegans based on (1)H high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have relied on the observation of large populations of nematodes, requiring labor-intensive sample preparation that considerably limits high-throughput characterization of C. elegans. In this work, we open new platforms for metabolic phenotyping of C. elegans mutants. We determine rich metabolic profiles (31 metabolites identified) from samples of 12 individuals using a (1)H NMR microprobe featuring high-resolution magic-angle coil spinning (HR-MACS), a simple conversion of a standard HR-MAS probe to μHR-MAS. In addition, we characterize the metabolic variations between two different strains of C. elegans (wild-type vs slcf-1 mutant). We also acquire a NMR spectrum of a single C. elegans worm at 23.5 T. This study represents the first example of a metabolomic investigation carried out on a small number of submillimeter-size organisms, demonstrating the potential of NMR microtechnologies for metabolomics screening of small model organisms. PMID:24897622

  10. Natural abundance 17O DNP two-dimensional and surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-06-22

    Due to its extremely low natural abundance and quadrupolar nature, the 17O nuclide is very rarely used for spectroscopic investigation of solids by NMR without isotope enrichment. Additionally, the applicability of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which leads to sensitivity enhancements of 2 orders of magnitude, to 17O is wrought with challenges due to the lack of spin diffusion and low polarization transfer efficiency from 1H. Here, we demonstrate new DNP-based measurements that extend 17O solid-state NMR beyond its current capabilities. The use of the PRESTO technique instead of conventional 1H–17O cross-polarization greatly improves the sensitivity and enables the facile measurementmore » of undistorted line shapes and two-dimensional 1H–17O HETCOR NMR spectra as well as accurate internuclear distance measurements at natural abundance. This was applied for distinguishing hydrogen-bonded and lone 17O sites on the surface of silica gel; the one-dimensional spectrum of which could not be used to extract such detail. As a result, this greatly enhanced sensitivity has enabled, for the first time, the detection of surface hydroxyl sites on mesoporous silica at natural abundance, thereby extending the concept of DNP surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy to the 17O nuclide.« less

  11. Survey and qualification of internal standards for quantification by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rundlöf, Torgny; Mathiasson, Marie; Bekiroglu, Somer; Hakkarainen, Birgit; Bowden, Tim; Arvidsson, Torbjörn

    2010-09-01

    In quantitative NMR (qNMR) selection of an appropriate internal standard proves to be crucial. In this study, 25 candidate compounds considered to be potent internal standards were investigated with respect to the ability of providing unique signal chemical shifts, purity, solubility, and ease of use. The (1)H chemical shift (delta) values, assignments, multiplicities and number of protons (for each signal), appropriateness (as to be used as internal standards) in four different deuterated solvents (D(2)O, DMSO-d(6), CD(3)OD, CDCl(3)) were studied. Taking into account the properties of these 25 internal standards, the most versatile eight compounds (2,4,6-triiodophenol, 1,3,5-trichloro-2-nitrobenzene, 3,4,5-trichloropyridine, dimethyl terephthalate, 1,4-dinitrobenzene, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, maleic acid and fumaric acid) were qualified using both differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and NMR spectroscopy employing highly pure acetanilide as the reference standard. The data from these two methods were compared as well as utilized in the quality assessment of the compounds as internal standards. Finally, the selected internal standards were tested and evaluated in a real case of quantitative NMR analysis of a paracetamol pharmaceutical product. PMID:20207092

  12. Characterization of the insertase BamA in three different membrane mimetics by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Leonor; Zeth, Kornelius; Burmann, Björn M; Maier, Timm; Hiller, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    The insertase BamA is the central protein of the Bam complex responsible for outer membrane protein biogenesis in Gram-negative bacteria. BamA features a 16-stranded transmembrane β-barrel and five periplasmic POTRA domains, with a total molecular weight of 88 kDa. Whereas the structure of BamA has recently been determined by X-ray crystallography, its functional mechanism is not well understood. This mechanism comprises the insertion of substrates from a dynamic, chaperone-bound state into the bacterial outer membrane, and NMR spectroscopy is thus a method of choice for its elucidation. Here, we report solution NMR studies of different BamA constructs in three different membrane mimetic systems: LDAO micelles, DMPC:DiC7PC bicelles and MSP1D1:DMPC nanodiscs. The impact of biochemical parameters on the spectral quality was investigated, including the total protein concentration and the detergent:protein ratio. The barrel of BamA is folded in micelles, bicelles and nanodiscs, but the N-terminal POTRA5 domain is flexibly unfolded in the absence of POTRA4. Measurements of backbone dynamics show that the variable insertion region of BamA, located in the extracellular lid loop L6, features high local flexibility. Our work establishes biochemical preparation schemes for BamA, which will serve as a platform for structural and functional studies of BamA and its role within the Bam complex by solution NMR spectroscopy. PMID:25638436

  13. NMR Spectroscopy of Human Eye Tissues: A New Insight into Ocular Biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kryczka, Tomasz; Wylęgała, Edward; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Midelfart, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background. The human eye is a complex organ whose anatomy and functions has been described very well to date. Unfortunately, the knowledge of the biochemistry and metabolic properties of eye tissues varies. Our objective was to reveal the biochemical differences between main tissue components of human eyes. Methods. Corneas, irises, ciliary bodies, lenses, and retinas were obtained from cadaver globes 0-1/2 hours postmortem of 6 male donors (age: 44–61 years). The metabolic profile of tissues was investigated with HR MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. Results. A total of 29 metabolites were assigned in the NMR spectra of the eye tissues. Significant differences between tissues were revealed in contents of the most distant eye-tissues, while irises and ciliary bodies showed minimal biochemical differences. ATP, acetate, choline, glutamate, lactate, myoinositol, and taurine were identified as the primary biochemical compounds responsible for differentiation of the eye tissues. Conclusions. In this study we showed for the first time the results of the analysis of the main human eye tissues with NMR spectroscopy. The biochemical contents of the selected tissues seemed to correspond to their primary anatomical and functional attributes, the way of the delivery of the nutrients, and the location of the tissues in the eye. PMID:25525621

  14. Determination of the DNA sugar pucker using sup 13 C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, R.A.; Tang, P.; Harbison, G.S. )

    1989-11-28

    Solid-state {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy of a series of crystalline nucleosides and nucleotides allows direct measurement of the effect of the deoxyribose ring conformation on the carbon chemical shift. It is found that 3{prime}-endo conformers have 3{prime} and 5{prime} chemical shifts significantly (5-10 ppm) upfield of comparable 3{prime}-exo and 2{prime}-endo conformers. The latter two conformers may be distinguished by smaller but still significant differences in the carbon chemical shifts at the C-2{prime} and C-4{prime} positions. High-resolution solid-state NMR of three modifications of fibrous calf thymus DNA shows that these trends are maintained in high-molecular-weight DNA and confirms that the major ring pucker in A-DNA is 3{prime}-endo, while both B-DNA and C-DNA are largely 2{prime}-endo. The data show that {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy is a straightforward and useful probe of DNA ring pucker in both solution and the solid state.

  15. The study of transient protein-nanoparticle interactions by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Assfalg, Michael; Ragona, Laura; Pagano, Katiuscia; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Zanzoni, Serena; Tomaselli, Simona; Molinari, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of novel nanoscale materials for applications in biomedicine urges an improved characterization of the nanobio interfaces. Nanoparticles exhibit unique structures and properties, often different from the corresponding bulk materials, and the nature of their interactions with biological systems remains poorly characterized. Solution NMR spectroscopy is a mature technique for the investigation of biomolecular structure, dynamics, and intermolecular associations, however its use in protein-nanoparticle interaction studies remains scarce and highly challenging, particularly due to unfavorable hydrodynamic properties of most nanoscale assemblies. Nonetheless, recent efforts demonstrated that a number of NMR observables, such as chemical shifts, signal intensities, amide exchange rates and relaxation parameters, together with newly designed saturation transfer experiments, could be successfully employed to characterize the orientation, structure and dynamics of proteins adsorbed onto nanoparticle surfaces. This review provides the first survey and critical assessment of the contributions from solution NMR spectroscopy to the study of transient interactions between proteins and both inorganic (gold, silver, and silica) and organic (polymer, carbon and lipid based) nanoparticles. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions. PMID:25936778

  16. Qualitative and Quantitative Control of Carbonated Cola Beverages Using 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    1H Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy (400 MHz) was used in the context of food surveillance to develop a reliable analytical tool to differentiate brands of cola beverages and to quantify selected constituents of the soft drinks. The preparation of the samples required only degassing and addition of 0.1% of TSP in D2O for locking and referencing followed by adjustment of pH to 4.5. The NMR spectra obtained can be considered as “fingerprints” and were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA). Clusters from colas of the same brand were observed, and significant differences between premium and discount brands were found. The quantification of caffeine, acesulfame-K, aspartame, cyclamate, benzoate, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), sulfite ammonia caramel (E 150D), and vanillin was simultaneously possible using external calibration curves and applying TSP as internal standard. Limits of detection for caffeine, aspartame, acesulfame-K, and benzoate were 1.7, 3.5, 0.8, and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Hence, NMR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics is an efficient tool for simultaneous identification of soft drinks and quantification of selected constituents. PMID:22356160

  17. Ultrafast double-quantum NMR spectroscopy with optimized sensitivity for the analysis of mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rouger, Laetitia; Gouilleux, Boris; Pourchet-Gellez, Mariane; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2016-02-15

    Ultrafast (UF) 2D NMR enables the acquisition of 2D spectra within a single-scan. This methodology has become a powerful analytical tool, used in a large array of applications. However, UF NMR spectroscopy still suffers from the need to compromise between sensitivity, spectral width and resolution. With the commonly used UF-COSY pulse sequence, resolution issues are compounded by the presence of strong auto-correlation signals, particularly in the case of samples with high dynamic ranges. The recently proposed concept of UF Double Quantum Spectroscopy (DQS) allows a better peak separation as it provides a lower spectral peak density. This paper presents the detailed investigation of this new NMR tool in an analytical chemistry context. Theoretical calculations and numerical simulations are used to characterize the modulation of peak intensities as a function of pulse-sequence parameters, and thus enable a significant enhancement of the sensitivity. The analytical comparison of UF-COSY and UF-DQS shows similar performances, however the ultrafast implementation of the DQS approach is found to have some sensitivity advantages over its conventional counterpart. The analytical performance of the pulse sequence is illustrated by the quantification of taurine in complex mixtures (homemade and commercial energy drinks). The results demonstrate the high potential of this experiment, which forms a valuable alternative to UF-COSY spectra when the latter are characterized by strong overlaps and high dynamic ranges. PMID:26865359

  18. Low Temperature 65Cu NMR Spectroscopy of the Cu+ Site in Azurin

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Andrew S.; Heck, Robert W.; de Jong, Wibe A.; Gao, Amy R.; Wu, Xiongjian; Roehrich, Adrienne; Harbison, Gerard S.; Ellis, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    65Cu central-transition NMR spectroscopy of the blue copper protein azurin in the reduced Cu(I) state, conducted at 18.8 Tesla and 10 K, gave a strongly second order quadrupole perturbed spectrum, which yielded a 65Cu quadrupole coupling constant of ±71.2 ± 1 MHz, corresponding to an electric field gradient of ±1.49 atomic units at the copper site, and an asymmetry parameter of approximately 0.2. Quantum chemical calculations employing second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and large basis sets successfully reproduced these experimental results. Sensitivity and relaxation times were quite favorable, suggesting that NMR may be a useful probe of the electronic state of copper sites in proteins. PMID:19746904

  19. An instrument control and data analysis program for NMR imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, M.S.; Mushlin, R.A.; Veklerov, E.; Port, J.D.; Ladd, C.; Harrison, C.G.

    1988-01-01

    We describe a software environment created to support real-time instrument control and signal acquisition as well as array-processor based signal and image processing in up to five dimensions. The environment is configured for NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. It is designed to provide flexible tools for implementing novel NMR experiments in the research laboratory. Data acquisition and processing operations are programmed in macros which are loaded in assembled from to minimize instruction overhead. Data arrays are dynamically allocated for efficient use of memory and can be mapped directly into disk files. The command set includes primitives for real-time control of data acquisition, scalar arithmetic, string manipulation, branching, a file system and vector operations carried out by an array processor. 6 figs.

  20. N-15 NMR Spectroscopy as a Method for Comparing the Rates of Imidization of Several Diamines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. Christopher; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2006-01-01

    The relative rates of the conversion of amide-acid to imide was measured for a series or aromatic diamines that have been identified as potential replacements for 4,4'-methylene dianiline (MDA) in high-temperature polyimides and polymer composites. These rates were compared with the N-15 NMR resonances of the unreacted amines. The initial rates of imidization track with the difference in chemical shift between the amine nitrogens in MDA and those in the subject diamines. This comparison demonstrated that N-15 NMR spectroscopy is appropriate for the rapid screening of candidate diamines to determine their reactivity relative to MDA, and can serve to provide guidance to the process of creating the time-temperature profiles used in processing these materials into polymer matrix composites.

  1. Uncovering the triggers for GPCR activation using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Naoki; Reeves, Philip J; Smith, Steven O

    2015-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) span cell membranes with seven transmembrane helices and respond to a diverse array of extracellular signals. Crystal structures of GPCRs have provided key insights into the architecture of these receptors and the role of conserved residues. However, the question of how ligand binding induces the conformational changes that are essential for activation remains largely unanswered. Since the extracellular sequences and structures of GPCRs are not conserved between receptor subfamilies, it is likely that the initial molecular triggers for activation vary depending on the specific type of ligand and receptor. In this article, we describe NMR studies on the rhodopsin subfamily of GPCRs and propose a mechanism for how retinal isomerization switches the receptor to the active conformation. These results suggest a general approach for determining the triggers for activation in other GPCR subfamilies using NMR spectroscopy. PMID:25797010

  2. Isotope-Filtered 4D NMR Spectroscopy for Structure Determination of Humic Substances.

    PubMed

    Bell, Nicholle G A; Michalchuk, Adam A L; Blackburn, John W T; Graham, Margaret C; Uhrín, Dušan

    2015-07-13

    Humic substances, the main component of soil organic matter, could form an integral part of green and sustainable solutions to the soil fertility problem. However, their global-scale application is hindered from both scientific and regulatory perspectives by the lack of understanding of the molecular make-up of these chromatographically inseparable mixtures containing thousands of molecules. Here we show how multidimensional NMR spectroscopy of isotopically tagged molecules enables structure characterization of humic compounds. We illustrate this approach by identifying major substitution patterns of phenolic aromatic moieties of a peat soil fulvic acid, an operational fraction of humic substances. Our methodology represents a paradigm shift in the use of NMR active tags in structure determination of small molecules in complex mixtures. Unlike previous tagging methodologies that focused on the signals of the tags, we utilize tags to directly probe the identity of the molecules they are attached to. PMID:26036217

  3. Structural studies of pravastatin and simvastatin and their complexes with SDS micelles by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmatullin, I. Z.; Galiullina, L. F.; Klochkova, E. A.; Latfullin, I. A.; Aganov, A. V.; Klochkov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Conformational features of pravastatin and simvastatin molecules in solution and in their complexes with sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles (SDS) were studied by 2D NOESY NMR spectroscopy. On the basis of the nuclear magnetic resonance experiments it was established that pravastatin and simvastatin can form molecular complex with SDS micelles which were considered as the model of cell membrane. In addition, interatomic distances for studied compounds were calculated based on 2D NOESY NMR experiments. It was shown that pravastatin interacts only with a surface of model membrane. However, in contrast to pravastatin, simvastatin penetrates into the inner part of SDS micelles. Observed distinctions in the mechanisms of interaction of pravastatin and simvastatin with models of cell membranes could explain the differences in their pharmacological properties.

  4. 15N NMR Spectroscopy of Cyclotriphosphazenes and Polyphosphazenes Based on 31P, 15N HMQC Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peláez-Arango, Elvira; García-Alonso, Francisco J.; Carriedo, Gabino; López-Ortiz, Fernando

    A 31P and 15N NMR study of cyclotriphosphazenes 1-4 and polyphosphazene 5 has been carried out including solvent and substituent effects. 15N chemical shifts and 31P, 15N coupling constants are readily obtained through 1D and 2D 31P, 15N HMQC correlation spectroscopy on natural-abundance samples. This methodology combined with spectral simulation also yields 15N-induced isotope shifts. 31P and 15N are both relatively insensitive to changes in solvent polarity. Chemical shifts are reasonably explained in terms of electronic density variations, and 31P, 15N couplings are rationalized by considering their absolute sign, which depends on the substituent bonded to phosphorus. 15N proved to be more sensitive to structural modifications than 31P. Therefore, the availability of 15N NMR data on cyclotriphosphazenes can be considered a valuable tool in the design of model compounds for polyphosphazene synthesis.

  5. Structure of lysozyme dissolved in neat organic solvents as assessed by NMR and CD spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Knubovets, T.; Klibanov, A.M.; Osterhout, J.J.

    1999-04-20

    The structure of the model protein hen egg-white lysozyme dissolved in water and in five neat organic solvents (ethylene glycol, methanol, dimethylsufloxide (DMSO), formamide, and dimethylformamide (DMF)) has been examined by means of {sup 1}H NMR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. The NMR spectra of lysozyme reveal the lack of a defined tertiary structure in all five organic solvents, although the examination of line widths suggests the possibility of some ordered structure in ethylene glycol and in methanol. The near-UV CD spectra of the protein suggest no tertiary structure in lysozyme dissolved in DMSO, formamide, and DMF, while a distinctive tertiary structure is seen in ethylene glycol and a drastically changed one in methanol. A highly developed secondary structure was observed by far-UV CD in ethylene glycol and methanol; interestingly, the {alpha}-helix content of the protein in both was greater than in water, while the {beta}-structure content was lower.

  6. Determination of iodine value of lubricating oils by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarpal, A.S.; Kapur, G.S.; Mukherjee, S.

    1995-03-01

    A direct, quick and non-destructive method for estimating the iodine value of fats, fatty oils and their blends in mineral oils has been developed based on {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy. The method involves the determination of unsaturation content of the samples by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopic techniques. The iodine value of the sample is directly proportional to the unsaturated proton or carbon content. The value of the proportionality constant is independent of the nature of the fats and their blends in mineral oils for the limited samples studied. The iodine value determined by this method also includes the contribution from additives containing unsaturation. Saturated ingredients in the sample do not contribute to the iodine value as is the case with the standard IP-84 method. 5 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Uncovering the triggers for GPCR activation using solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimata, Naoki; Reeves, Philip J.; Smith, Steven O.

    2015-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) span cell membranes with seven transmembrane helices and respond to a diverse array of extracellular signals. Crystal structures of GPCRs have provided key insights into the architecture of these receptors and the role of conserved residues. However, the question of how ligand binding induces the conformational changes that are essential for activation remains largely unanswered. Since the extracellular sequences and structures of GPCRs are not conserved between receptor subfamilies, it is likely that the initial molecular triggers for activation vary depending on the specific type of ligand and receptor. In this article, we describe NMR studies on the rhodopsin subfamily of GPCRs and propose a mechanism for how retinal isomerization switches the receptor to the active conformation. These results suggest a general approach for determining the triggers for activation in other GPCR subfamilies using NMR spectroscopy.

  8. Linking Local Environments and Hyperfine Shifts: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical 31P and 7Li Solid–State NMR Study of Paramagnetic Fe(III) Phosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jonsik; Middlemiss, Derek S.; Chernova, Natasha; Zhu, Ben Y.H.; Masquelier, Christian; Grey, Clare P.

    2010-11-05

    Iron phosphates (FePO4) are among the most promising candidate materials for advanced Li-ion battery cathodes. This work reports upon a combined nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experimental and periodic density functional theory (DFT) computational study of the environments and electronic structures occurring in a range of paramagnetic Fe(III) phosphates comprising FePO4 (heterosite), monoclinic Li3Fe2(PO4)3 (anti-NASICON A type), rhombohedral Li3Fe2(PO4)3 (NASICON B type), LiFeP2O7, orthorhombic FePO4·2H2O (strengite), monoclinic FePO4·2H2O (phosphosiderite), and the dehydrated forms of the latter two phases. Many of these materials serve as model compounds relevant to battery chemistry. The 31P spin-echo mapping and 7Li magic angle spinning NMR techniques yield the hyperfine shifts of the species of interest, complemented by periodic hybrid functional DFT calculations of the respective hyperfine and quadrupolar tensors. A Curie-Weiss-based magnetic model scaling the DFT-calculated hyperfine parameters from the ferromagnetic into the experimentally relevant paramagnetic state is derived and applied, providing quantitative finite temperature values for each phase. The sensitivity of the hyperfine parameters to the composition of the DFT exchange functional is characterized by the application of hybrid Hamiltonians containing admixtures 0%, 20%, and 35% of Fock exchange. Good agreement between experimental and calculated values is obtained, provided that the residual magnetic couplings persisting in the paramagnetic state are included. The potential applications of a similar combined experimental and theoretical NMR approach to a wider range of cathode materials are discussed.

  9. Drug solubilization mechanism of α-glucosyl stevia by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junying; Higashi, Kenjirou; Ueda, Keisuke; Kadota, Kazunori; Tozuka, Yuichi; Limwikrant, Waree; Yamamoto, Keiji; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2014-04-25

    We investigated the drug solubilization mechanism of α-glucosyl stevia (Stevia-G) which was synthesized from stevia (rebaudioside-A) by transglycosylation. (1)H and (13)C NMR peaks of Stevia-G in water were assigned by two-dimensional (2D) NMR experiments including (1)H-(1)H correlation, (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear multiple bond correlation, and (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence spectroscopies. The (1)H and (13)C peaks clearly showed the incorporation of two glucose units into rebaudioside-A to produce Stevia-G, supported by steviol glycoside and glucosyl residue assays. The concentration-dependent chemical shifts of Stevia-G protons correlated well with a mass-action law model, indicating the self-association of Stevia-G molecules in water. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) was 12.0 mg/mL at 37°C. The aggregation number was 2 below the CMC and 12 above the CMC. Dynamic light scattering and 2D (1)H-(1)H nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) NMR experiments demonstrated that Stevia-G self-associated into micelles of a few nanometers in size with a core-shell structure, containing a kaurane diterpenoid-based hydrophobic core and a glucose-based shell. 2D (1)H-(1)H NOESY NMR measurements also revealed that a poorly water-soluble drug, naringenin, was incorporated into the hydrophobic core of the Stevia-G micelle. The Stevia-G self-assembly behavior and micellar drug inclusion capacity can achieve significant enhancement in drug solubility. PMID:24508331

  10. Microfabricated Inserts for Magic Angle Coil Spinning (MACS) Wireless NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Badilita, Vlad; Fassbender, Birgit; Kratt, Kai; Wong, Alan; Bonhomme, Christian; Sakellariou, Dimitris; Korvink, Jan G.; Wallrabe, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and testing of the first automatically microfabricated probes to be used in conjunction with the magic angle coil spinning (MACS) NMR technique. NMR spectroscopy is a versatile technique for a large range of applications, but its intrinsically low sensitivity poses significant difficulties in analyzing mass- and volume-limited samples. The combination of microfabrication technology and MACS addresses several well-known NMR issues in a concerted manner for the first time: (i) reproducible wafer-scale fabrication of the first-in-kind on-chip LC microresonator for inductive coupling of the NMR signal and reliable exploitation of MACS capabilities; (ii) improving the sensitivity and the spectral resolution by simultaneous spinning the detection microcoil together with the sample at the “magic angle” of 54.74° with respect to the direction of the magnetic field (magic angle spinning – MAS), accompanied by the wireless signal transmission between the microcoil and the primary circuit of the NMR spectrometer; (iii) given the high spinning rates (tens of kHz) involved in the MAS methodology, the microfabricated inserts exhibit a clear kinematic advantage over their previously demonstrated counterparts due to the inherent capability to produce small radius cylindrical geometries, thus tremendously reducing the mechanical stress and tearing forces on the sample. In order to demonstrate the versatility of the microfabrication technology, we have designed MACS probes for various Larmor frequencies (194, 500 and 700 MHz) testing several samples such as water, Drosophila pupae, adamantane solid and LiCl at different magic angle spinning speeds. PMID:22936994

  11. Functional assessment of skeletal muscle in intact mice lacking myostatin by concurrent NMR imaging and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Baligand, C; Gilson, H; Ménard, J C; Schakman, O; Wary, C; Thissen, J-P; Carlier, P G

    2010-03-01

    Inhibiting myostatin (mstn) causes spectacular increase in muscle mass, spurring research for therapeutic approaches against neuromuscular disorders. Yet, possible functional deterioration and compromised force production have been reported in isolated muscle of null mstn(-/-) mice. We analyzed vascular and metabolic response to repeated electro-stimulated exercise in vivo in mstn(-/-) mice compared with FVB wild-type controls (WT), using interleaved multi-parametric functional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and spectroscopy. At steady-state exercise, specific force of plantar flexion, phosphocreatine consumption measured by phosphorus spectroscopy and maximum perfusion measured by arterial spin-labeled (ASL) NMR imaging were identical in both groups. After exercise, phosphorus spectroscopy revealed reduced oxidative mitochondrial capacity in mstn(-/-), whereas early recovery perfusion was identical and oxygen extraction, estimated from the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, was decreased when compared with WT. Hyperemia was prolonged, indicating specific regulation of the perfusional response in mstn(-/-) mice. Histology showed an increased proportion of type IIb fibers in hypertrophied muscles, but the distribution of capillary contacts per fiber between oxidative and glycolytic fibers was unaltered in mstn(-/-) compared with WT. These integrated results formed coherent evidence of a congruous, non-pathologic shift toward a more glycolytic metabolism in this model of mstn(-/-). PMID:20010628

  12. Purification, crystallization, NMR spectroscopy and biochemical analyses of alpha-phycoerythrocyanin peptides.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Georg; Parbel, Axel; Seifert, Markus H J; Holak, Tad A; Reuter, Wolfgang

    2002-10-01

    The alpha-phycoerythrocyanin subunits of the different phycoerythrocyanin complexes of the phycobilisomes from the cyanobacterium Mastigocladus laminosus perform a remarkable photochemistry. Similar to phytochromes - the photoreceptors of higher plants - the spectral properties of the molecule reversibly change according to the irradiation wavelength. To enable extensive analyses, the protein has been produced at high yield by improving purification protocols. As a result, several comparative studies on the Z- and E-configurations of the intact alpha-subunit, and also on photoactive peptides originating from nonspecific degradations of the chromoprotein, were possible. The analyses comprise absorbance, fluorescence and CD spectroscopy, crystallization, preliminary X-ray measurements, mass spectrometry, N-terminal amino acid sequencing and 1D NMR spectroscopy. Intact alpha-phycoerythrocyanin aggregates significantly, due to hydrophobic interactions between the two N-terminal helices. Removal of these helices reduces the aggregation but also destabilizes the protein fold. The complete subunit could be crystallized in its E-configuration, but the X-ray measurement conditions must be improved. Nevertheless, NMR spectroscopy on a soluble photoactive peptide presents the first insight into the complex chromophore protein interactions that are dependent on the light induced state. The chromophore environment in the Z-configuration is rigid whereas other regions of the protein are more flexible. In contrast, the E-configuration has a mobile chromophore, especially the pyrrole ring D, while other regions of the protein rigidified compared to the Z-configuration. PMID:12383264

  13. Biophysical investigations of membrane perturbations by polypeptides using solid-state NMR spectroscopy (review).

    PubMed

    Bechinger, B

    2000-01-01

    Polypeptides have been prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis and labelled with 15N at single sites to be used for static or magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy. After reconstitution into oriented membranes, the alignment of polypeptide alpha-helices with respect to the bilayer surface is accessible by proton-decoupled 15N solid-state NMR spectroscopy. In addition, limiting values of rotational diffusion coefficients are obtained. The effects of membrane inserted peptides on the bilayer phospholipids have been investigated by 2H and 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Long hydrophobic peptides such as the channel-forming domains of Vpu of HIV-1 or M2 of influenza A adopt stable alignments approximately parallel to the bilayer normal in agreement with models suggesting transmembrane helical bundle formation. The 15N chemical shift data agree with tilt angles of approximately 20 degrees and 33 degrees, respectively. In contrast, multi-charged amphipathic alpha-helices adopt stable orientations parallel to the bilayer surface. In the presence of these peptides, decreased order parameters of the fatty acyl chains, membrane thinning, and the loss of long-range order are observed. Peptides that change topology in a pH dependent manner are more potent in antibiotic assays under experimental conditions where they show in-plane alignments. This result suggests that their detergent-like properties, rather than the formation of transmembrane helical bundles, are responsible for their cell-killing activities. Topological equilibria are also observed within proteins or for polypeptides that do not match the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer. PMID:11128972

  14. Heteronuclear dipolar couplings, total spin coherence, and bilinear rotations in NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Garbow, J.R.

    1983-07-01

    In Chapter 1 a variety of different introductory topics are presented. The potential complexity of the nuclear magnetic resonsnace (NMR) spectra of molecules dissolved in liquid crystal solvents serves to motivate the development of multiple quantum (MQ) spectroscopy. The basics of MQ NMR are reviewed in Chapter 2. An experimental search procedure for the optimization of MQ pulse sequences is introduced. Chapter 3 discusses the application of MQ NMR techniques to the measurement of dipolar couplings in heteronuclear spin systems. The advantages of MQ methods in such systems are developed and experimental results for partially oriented (1-/sup 13/C) benzene are presented. Several pulse sequences are introduced which employ a two-step excitation of heteronuclear MQ coherence. A new multiple pulse method, involving the simultaneous irradiation of both rare and abundant spin species, is described. The problem of the broadening of MQ transitions due to magnetic field inhomogeneity is considered in Chapter 4. The method of total spin coherence transfer echo spectroscopy (TSCTES) is presented, with experimets on partially oriented acetaldehyde serving to demonstrate this new technique. TSCTES results in MQ spectra which are sensitive to all chemical shifts and spin-spin couplings and which are free of inhomogeneous broadening. In Chapter 5 the spectroscopy of spin systems of several protons and a /sup 13/C nucleus in the isotropic phase is discussed. The usefulness of the heteronuclear bilinear rotation as a calculational tool is illustrated. Compensated bilinear ..pi.. rotations, which are relatively insensitive to timing parameter missets, are presented. A new technique for homonuclear proton decoupling, Bilinear Rotation Decoupling, is described and its success in weakly coupled systems is demonstrated.

  15. Correlating high-resolution magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy and gene analysis in osteoarthritic cartilage.

    PubMed

    Tufts, Lauren; Shet Vishnudas, Keerthi; Fu, Eunice; Kurhanewicz, John; Ries, Michael; Alliston, Tamara; Li, Xiaojuan

    2015-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common multifactorial and heterogeneous degenerative joint disease, and biochemical changes in cartilage matrix occur during the early stages of OA before morphological changes occur. Thus, it is desired to measure regional biochemical changes in the joint. High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy is a powerful method of observing cartilaginous biochemical changes ex vivo, including the concentrations of alanine and N-acetyl, which are markers of collagen and total proteoglycan content, respectively. Previous studies have observed significant changes in chondrocyte metabolism of OA cartilage via the altered gene expression profiles of ACAN, COL2A1 and MMP13, which encode aggrecan, type II collagen and matrix metalloproteinase 13 (a protein crucial in the degradation of type II collagen), respectively. Employing HRMAS, this study aimed to elucidate potential relationships between N-acetyl and/or alanine and ACAN, COL2A1 and/or MMP13 expression profiles in OA cartilage. Thirty samples from the condyles of five subjects undergoing total knee arthroplasty to treat OA were collected. HRMAS spectra were obtained at 11.7 T for each sample. RNA was subsequently extracted to determine gene expression profiles. A significant negative correlation between N-acetyl metabolite and ACAN gene expression levels was observed; this provides further evidence of N-acetyl as a biomarker of cartilage degeneration. The alanine doublet was distinguished in the spectra of 15 of the 30 specimens of this study. Alanine can only be detected with HRMAS NMR spectroscopy when the collagen framework has been degraded such that alanine is sufficiently mobile to form a distinguished peak in the spectrum. Thus, HRMAS NMR spectroscopy may provide unique localized measurements of collagenous degeneration in OA cartilage. The identification of imaging markers that could provide a link between OA pathology and chondrocyte metabolism will facilitate the development of more sensitive diagnostic techniques and will improve methods of monitoring treatment for patients suffering from OA. PMID:25761416

  16. Dynamic processes and chemical composition of Lepidium sativum seeds determined by means of field-cycling NMR relaxometry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rachocki, A; Latanowicz, L; Tritt-Goc, J

    2012-12-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques, such as field-cycling relaxometry, wide-line NMR spectroscopy, and magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, were applied to study the seeds of cress, Lepidium sativum. Field-cycling NMR relaxometry was used for the first time to investigate the properties of the whole molecular system of dry cress seeds. This method not only allowed the dynamics to be studied, but was also successful in the differentiation among the solid (i.e., carbohydrates, proteins, or fats forming a solid form of lipids) and liquid-like (oil compounds) components of the seeds. The (1)H NMR relaxation dispersion of oils was interpreted as a superposition of intramolecular and intermolecular contributions. The intramolecular part was described in terms of a Lorentzian spectral density function, whereas a log-Gaussian distribution of correlation times was applied for the intermolecular dipole-dipole contribution. The models applied led to very good agreement with the experimental data and demonstrate that the contribution of the intermolecular relaxation to the overall relaxation should not be disregarded, especially at low frequencies. A power-law frequency dependence of the proton relaxation dispersion was used for the interpretation of the solid components. From the analysis of the (1)H wide-line NMR spectra of the liquid-like component of hydrated cress seeds, we can conclude that the contribution of oil protons should always be taken into account when evaluating the spin-lattice relaxation times values or measuring the moisture and oil content. The application of (1)H magic angle spinning NMR significantly improves resolution in the liquid-like spectrum of seeds and allows the determination of the chemical composition of cress seeds. PMID:23001307

  17. Silica sol assisted chromatographic NMR spectroscopy for resolution of trans- and cis-isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Wu, Rui; Huang, Shaohua; Bai, Zhengwu

    2016-04-01

    Chromatographic NMR spectroscopy can separate the mixtures of species with significantly different molecular size, but generally fails for isomeric species. Herein, we reported the resolution of trans- and cis-isomers and their structural analogue, which are different in molecular shapes, but similar in mass, were greatly enhanced in the presence of silica sol. The mixtures of maleic acid, fumaric acid and succinic acid, and the mixtures of trans- and cis-1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acids, were distinguished by virtue of their different degrees of interaction with silica sol. Moreover, we found mixed solvents could improve the spectral resolution of DOSY spectra of mixtures.

  18. Silica sol assisted chromatographic NMR spectroscopy for resolution of trans- and cis-isomers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Wu, Rui; Huang, Shaohua; Bai, Zhengwu

    2016-04-01

    Chromatographic NMR spectroscopy can separate the mixtures of species with significantly different molecular size, but generally fails for isomeric species. Herein, we reported the resolution of trans- and cis-isomers and their structural analogue, which are different in molecular shapes, but similar in mass, were greatly enhanced in the presence of silica sol. The mixtures of maleic acid, fumaric acid and succinic acid, and the mixtures of trans- and cis-1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acids, were distinguished by virtue of their different degrees of interaction with silica sol. Moreover, we found mixed solvents could improve the spectral resolution of DOSY spectra of mixtures. PMID:26942864

  19. Probabilistic Interaction Network of Evidence Algorithm and its Application to Complete Labeling of Peak Lists from Protein NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Arash; Assadi, Amir H.; Markley, John L.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.

    2009-01-01

    The process of assigning a finite set of tags or labels to a collection of observations, subject to side conditions, is notable for its computational complexity. This labeling paradigm is of theoretical and practical relevance to a wide range of biological applications, including the analysis of data from DNA microarrays, metabolomics experiments, and biomolecular nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We present a novel algorithm, called Probabilistic Interaction Network of Evidence (PINE), that achieves robust, unsupervised probabilistic labeling of data. The computational core of PINE uses estimates of evidence derived from empirical distributions of previously observed data, along with consistency measures, to drive a fictitious system M with Hamiltonian H to a quasi-stationary state that produces probabilistic label assignments for relevant subsets of the data. We demonstrate the successful application of PINE to a key task in protein NMR spectroscopy: that of converting peak lists extracted from various NMR experiments into assignments associated with probabilities for their correctness. This application, called PINE-NMR, is available from a freely accessible computer server (http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu). The PINE-NMR server accepts as input the sequence of the protein plus user-specified combinations of data corresponding to an extensive list of NMR experiments; it provides as output a probabilistic assignment of NMR signals (chemical shifts) to sequence-specific backbone and aliphatic side chain atoms plus a probabilistic determination of the protein secondary structure. PINE-NMR can accommodate prior information about assignments or stable isotope labeling schemes. As part of the analysis, PINE-NMR identifies, verifies, and rectifies problems related to chemical shift referencing or erroneous input data. PINE-NMR achieves robust and consistent results that have been shown to be effective in subsequent steps of NMR structure determination. PMID:19282963

  20. Electrical and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy characterization of Mn-doped nanostructured TiO2 for capacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Reina, Rafael; Chao, Sheng; Petrovsky, Vladimir; Dogan, Fatih; Greenbaum, Steven

    2012-07-01

    Nanostructured TiO2 has shown promise as a dielectric material for high energy density ceramic capacitors because of its high dielectric breakdown strength and dielectric constant. Strategies to increase the insulation resistance or to reduce the leakage current of TiO2 include doping with transition metal ions. It is shown that Mn doping followed by an appropriate thermal treatment increases the grain boundary resistivity significantly and lowers the dielectric loss. Electrical measurements along with electron paramagnetic resonance and scanning electron microscopy of Mn-doped nanoscopic TiO2 demonstrate that sintering at 900 °C leads to optimal electrical properties that are correlated with a non-uniform distribution of dopant ions, concentrated at the grain boundaries. Nanostructured TiO2 dielectrics with improved insulation resistance are promising for the development of higher energy density capacitors.

  1. Interaction of the replication terminator protein of Bacillus subtilis with DNA probed by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Adam F.; Otting, Gottfried; Folmer, Rutger H.A.; Duggin, Iain G.; Wake, R. Gerry; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Wilce, Jacqueline A. . E-mail: Jackie.Wilce@med.monash.edu.au

    2005-09-23

    Termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis involves the polar arrest of replication forks by a specific complex formed between the dimeric 29 kDa replication terminator protein (RTP) and DNA terminator sites. We have used NMR spectroscopy to probe the changes in {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N correlation spectra of a {sup 15}N-labelled RTP.C110S mutant upon the addition of a 21 base pair symmetrical DNA binding site. Assignment of the {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N correlations was achieved using a suite of triple resonance NMR experiments with {sup 15}N,{sup 13}C,70% {sup 2}H enriched protein recorded at 800 MHz and using TROSY pulse sequences. Perturbations to {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N spectra revealed that the N-termini, {alpha}3-helices and several loops are affected by the binding interaction. An analysis of this data in light of the crystallographically determined apo- and DNA-bound forms of RTP.C110S revealed that the NMR spectral perturbations correlate more closely to protein structural changes upon complex formation rather than to interactions at the protein-DNA interface.

  2. Biological effects and physical safety aspects of NMR imaging and in vivo spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Budinger, T.F.

    1985-08-01

    An assessment is made of the biological effects and physical hazards of static and time-varying fields associated with the NMR devices that are being used for clinical imaging and in vivo spectroscopy. A summary is given of the current state of knowledge concerning the mechanisms of interaction and the bioeffects of these fields. Additional topics that are discussed include: (1) physical effects on pacemakers and metallic implants such as aneurysm clips, (2) human health studies related to the effects of exposure to nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, and (3) extant guidelines for limiting exposure of patients and medical personnel to the fields produced by NMR devices. On the basis of information available at the present time, it is concluded that the fields associated with the current generation of NMR devices do not pose a significant health risk in themselves. However, rigorous guidelines must be followed to avoid the physical interaction of these fields with metallic implants and medical electronic devices. 476 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Investigation of Oxidative Degradation in Polymers Using (17)O NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd M.; Celina, Mathew; Assink, Roger A.; Clough, Roger L.; Gillen, Kenneth T.; Wheeler David R.

    1999-07-20

    The thermal oxidation of pentacontane (C{sub 50}H{sub 102}), and of the homopolymer polyisoprene, has been investigated using {sup 17}O NMR spectroscopy. By performing the oxidation using {sup 17}O labeled O{sub 2} gas, it is possible to easily identify degradation products, even at relatively low concentrations. It is demonstrated that details of the degradation mechanism can be obtained from analysis of the {sup 17}O NMR spectra as a function of total oxidation. Pentacontane reveals the widest variety of reaction products, and exhibits changes in the relative product distributions with increasing O{sub 2} consumption. At low levels of oxygen incorporation, peroxides are the major oxidation product, while at later stages of degradation these species are replaced by increasing concentrations of ketones, alcohols, carboxylic acids and esters. Analyzing the product distribution can help in identification of the different free-radical decomposition pathways of hydroperoxides, including recombination, proton abstraction and chain scission, as well as secondary reactions. The {sup 17}O NMR spectra of thermally oxidized polyisoprene reveal fewer degradation functionalities, but exhibit an increased complexity in the type of observed degradation species due to structural features such as unsaturation and methyl branching. Alcohols and ethers formed from hydrogen abstraction and free radical termination.

  4. 60 MHz (1)H NMR spectroscopy for the analysis of edible oils.

    PubMed

    Parker, T; Limer, E; Watson, A D; Defernez, M; Williamson, D; Kemsley, E Kate

    2014-05-01

    We report the first results from a new 60 MHz (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bench-top spectrometer, Pulsar, in a study simulating the adulteration of olive oil with hazelnut oil. There were qualitative differences between spectra from the two oil types. A single internal ratio of two isolated groups of peaks could detect hazelnut oil in olive oil at the level of ∼13%w/w, whereas a whole-spectrum chemometric approach brought the limit of detection down to 11.2%w/w for a set of independent test samples. The Pulsar's performance was compared to that of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The Pulsar delivered comparable sensitivity and improved specificity, making it a superior screening tool. We also mapped NMR onto FTIR spectra using a correlation-matrix approach. Interpretation of this heat-map combined with the established annotations of the NMR spectra suggested a hitherto undocumented feature in the IR spectrum at ∼1130 cm(-1), attributable to a double-bond vibration. PMID:24850979

  5. Oil droplet size determination in complex flavor delivery systems by diffusion NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fieber, Wolfgang; Hafner, Valeria; Normand, Valéry

    2011-04-15

    Droplet size distribution of flavor oils in two different solid flavor delivery systems were determined with pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy: yeast encapsulation system, a spray dried flavor encapsulation system based on empty yeast cells, and glassy encapsulation system, an extruded solid water soluble carbohydrate delivery system. The oil droplet sizes are limited by the yeast cell walls in the yeast encapsulation system and the size distribution is unimodal according to images from transmission electron microscopy. The droplet size determination with diffusion NMR is based on the Murday and Cotts theory of restricted diffusion of liquids in geometrical confinements. Good fits of the diffusion data could be obtained by applying a unimodal, log-normal size distribution model and average droplet sizes of about 2 μm were found that correspond approximately to the inner diameter of the yeast cells. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a multimodal droplet size distribution in the glassy extruded delivery systems. To fit the NMR data a bimodal log-normal distribution function with five independent fitting parameters was implemented that yielded consistent and robust results. The two size populations were found in the micron and sub-micron range, respectively. The method was sufficiently accurate to depict variation of droplet size distributions in glassy encapsulation systems of different formulation. PMID:21316700

  6. Functional group analysis in coal and on coal surfaces by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Verkade, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    An accurate knowledge of the oxygen-bearing labile hydrogen functional groups (e.g., carboxylic acids, phenols and alcohols) in coal is required for today's increasingly sophisticated coal cleaning and beneficiation processes. Phospholanes (compounds having the general structure -POCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O (1)) are being investigated as reagents for the tagging of liable hydrogen functional groups in coal materials with the NMR-active {sup 31}P nucleus. Of twelve such reagents investigated so far, 2 (2-chloro-1,3-dioxaphospholane, ClPOCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O) and 8 (2-chloro-1,3-dithiaphospholane, ClPSCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}S) have been found to be useful in identifying and quantitating, by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy, labile hydrogen functional groups in an Illinois No. 6 coal condensate. Reagent 2 has also been used to quantitate moisture in pyridine extracts of Argonne Premium Coal Samples. Preliminary {sup 119}Sn NMR spectroscopic results on model compounds with the new reagent CF{sub 3}C(O)NHSnMe{sub 3} (N-trimethylstannyltrifluoroacetamide, 14) suggest that labile hydrogen functional groups in coal materials may be more precisely identified with 14 than with phospholanes. 14 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Quality assessment and authentication of virgin olive oil by NMR spectroscopy: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Dais, Photis; Hatzakis, Emmanuel

    2013-02-26

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy has been extensively used for the analysis of olive oil and it has been established as a valuable tool for its quality assessment and authenticity. To date, a large number of research and review articles have been published with regards to the analysis of olive oil reflecting the potential of the NMR technique in these studies. In this critical review, we cover recent results in the field and discuss deficiencies and precautions of the three NMR techniques ((1)H, (13)C, (31)P) used for the analysis of olive oil. The two methodological approaches of metabonomics, metabolic profiling and metabolic fingerprinting, and the statistical methods applied for the classification of olive oils will be discussed in critical way. Some useful information about sample preparation, the required instrumentation for an effective analysis, the experimental conditions and data processing for obtaining high quality spectra will be presented as well. Finally, a constructive criticism will be exercised on the present methodologies used for the quality control and authentication of olive oil. PMID:23410622

  8. Rapid Etiological Classification of Meningitis by NMR Spectroscopy Based on Metabolite Profiles and Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Himmelreich, Uwe; Malik, Richard; Kühn, Till; Daniel, Heide-Marie; Somorjai, Ray L.; Dolenko, Brion; Sorrell, Tania C.

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an acute disease with high mortality that is reduced by early treatment. Identification of the causative microorganism by culture is sensitive but slow. Large volumes of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are required to maximise sensitivity and establish a provisional diagnosis. We have utilised nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to rapidly characterise the biochemical profile of CSF from normal rats and animals with pneumococcal or cryptococcal meningitis. Use of a miniaturised capillary NMR system overcame limitations caused by small CSF volumes and low metabolite concentrations. The analysis of the complex NMR spectroscopic data by a supervised statistical classification strategy included major, minor and unidentified metabolites. Reproducible spectral profiles were generated within less than three minutes, and revealed differences in the relative amounts of glucose, lactate, citrate, amino acid residues, acetate and polyols in the three groups. Contributions from microbial metabolism and inflammatory cells were evident. The computerised statistical classification strategy is based on both major metabolites and minor, partially unidentified metabolites. This data analysis proved highly specific for diagnosis (100% specificity in the final validation set), provided those with visible blood contamination were excluded from analysis; 6–8% of samples were classified as indeterminate. This proof of principle study suggests that a rapid etiologic diagnosis of meningitis is possible without prior culture. The method can be fully automated and avoids delays due to processing and selective identification of specific pathogens that are inherent in DNA-based techniques. PMID:19390697

  9. 60MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy for the analysis of edible oils?

    PubMed Central

    Parker, T.; Limer, E.; Watson, A.D.; Defernez, M.; Williamson, D.; Kemsley, E. Kate

    2014-01-01

    We report the first results from a new 60MHz 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) bench-top spectrometer, Pulsar, in a study simulating the adulteration of olive oil with hazelnut oil. There were qualitative differences between spectra from the two oil types. A single internal ratio of two isolated groups of peaks could detect hazelnut oil in olive oil at the level of ?13%w/w, whereas a whole-spectrum chemometric approach brought the limit of detection down to 11.2%w/w for a set of independent test samples. The Pulsars performance was compared to that of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The Pulsar delivered comparable sensitivity and improved specificity, making it a superior screening tool. We also mapped NMR onto FTIR spectra using a correlation-matrix approach. Interpretation of this heat-map combined with the established annotations of the NMR spectra suggested a hitherto undocumented feature in the IR spectrum at ?1130cm?1, attributable to a double-bond vibration. PMID:24850979

  10. Solid-State 87Sr NMR Spectroscopy at Natural Abundance and High Magnetic Field Strength.

    PubMed

    Faucher, Alexandra; Terskikh, Victor V; Ye, Eric; Bernard, Guy M; Wasylishen, Roderick E

    2015-12-10

    Twenty-five strontium-containing solids were characterized via (87)Sr NMR spectroscopy at natural abundance and high magnetic field strength (B0 = 21.14 T). Strontium nuclear quadrupole coupling constants in these compounds are sensitive to the strontium site symmetry and range from 0 to 50.5 MHz. An experimental (87)Sr chemical shift scale is proposed, and available data indicate a chemical shift range of approximately 550 ppm, from -200 to +350 ppm relative to Sr(2+)(aq). In general, magnetic shielding increased with strontium coordination number. Experimentally measured chemical shift anisotropy is reported for stationary samples of solid powdered SrCl2·6H2O, SrBr2·6H2O, and SrCO3, with δaniso((87)Sr) values of +28, +26, and -65 ppm, respectively. NMR parameters were calculated using CASTEP, a gauge including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) DFT-based program, which addresses the periodic nature of solids using plane-wave basis sets. Calculated NMR parameters are in good agreement with those measured. PMID:26565918

  11. Analysis of trivalent cation complexation to functionalized mesoporous silica using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shusterman, Jennifer; Mason, Harris; Bruchet, Anthony; Zavarin, Mavrik; Kersting, Annie B; Nitsche, Heino

    2014-11-28

    Functionalized mesoporous silica has applications in separations science, catalysis, and sensors. In this work, we studied the fundamental interactions of trivalent cations with functionalized mesoporous silica. We contacted trivalent cations of varying ionic radii with N-[5-(trimethoxysilyl)-2-aza-1-oxopentyl]caprolactam functionalized mesoporous silica with the aim of probing the binding mechanism of the metal to the surface of the solid. We studied the functionalized silica using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy before and after contact with the metals of interest. We collected NMR spectra of the various metals, as well as of (29)Si and (13)C to probe the silica substrate and the ligand properties, respectively. The NMR spectra indicate that the metals bind to the functionalized silica via two mechanisms. Aluminum sorbed to both the silica and the ligand, but with different coordination for each. Scandium also sorbed to both the silica and the ligand, and unlike the aluminum, had the same coordination number. Additionally, the functionalized silica was susceptible to acid hydrolysis and two primary mechanisms of degradation were observed: detachment from the silica surface and opening of the seven-membered ring in the ligand. Opening of the seven-membered ring may be beneficial in that it decreases steric hindrance of the molecule for binding. PMID:25265419

  12. Novel monosaccharide fermentation products in Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus identified using NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Isern, Nancy G.; Xue, Junfeng; Rao, Jaya V.; Cort, John R.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    2013-04-03

    Profiles of metabolites produced by the thermophilic obligately anaerobic cellulose-degrading Gram-positive bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus DSM 8903 strain following growth on different monosaccharides (D-glucose, D-mannose, L-arabinose, D-arabinose, D-xylose, L-fucose, and D-fucose) as carbon sources revealed several unexpected fermentation products, suggesting novel metabolic capacities and unexplored metabolic pathways in this organism. Both 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to determine intracellular and extracellular metabolite profiles. Metabolite profiles were determined from 1-D 1H NMR spectra by curve fitting against spectral libraries provided in Chenomx software. To reduce uncertainties due to unassigned, overlapping, or poorly-resolved peaks, metabolite identifications were confirmed with 2-D homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR experiments. In addition to expected metabolites such as acetate, lactate, glycerol, and ethanol, several novel fermentation products were identified: ethylene glycol (from growth on D-arabinose, though not L-arabinose), acetoin and 2,3-butanediol (from D-glucose and L-arabinose), and hydroxyacetone (from D-mannose and L-arabinose). Production of ethylene glycol from D-arabinose was particularly notable, with around 10% of the substrate carbon converted into this uncommon fermentation product. The novel products have not previously been reported to be produced by C. saccharolyticus, nor would they be easily predicted from the current genome annotation, and show new potentials for using this strain for production of bioproducts.

  13. Siderochromes from Pseudomonas fluorescens. II. Structural homology as revealed by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Philson, S B; Llinás, M

    1982-07-25

    Ferribactin and the pyoverdines, siderochromes that are obtained from liquid cultures of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells, have been studied and compared by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The proton spectra of the iron-free compounds show that the pyoverdines share with ferribactin a common feature, formyl hydroxamic acid groups, that previously had only been observed in hadacidin, and antitumor antibiotic produced by Penicillium frequentans. The 1H and 13C NMR data confirm that ferribactin is a nonapeptide that contains two residues each of lysine and N6-formyl-N6-hydroxyornithine. This corrects an earlier report (Maurer, B., Müller, A., Keller-Schierlein, W., and Zähner, H. (1968) Arch. Mikrobiol. 60, 326-339) ascribing two acetyl hydroxamic acid groups and three lysyl residues to ferribactin. Similarly, the spectroscopic data show that pyoverdine lacks the Glx and Tyr residues present in ferribactin. On the basis of the compositional analogy exhibited by pyoverdine and ferribactin, it is suggested that the two siderochromes may be metabolically related. The 13C NMR spectra of pyoverdine indicate that its fluorescent component is a nine-carbon aromatic heterocycle, probably identical with an o-dihydroxyquinoline chromophore found in pseudobactin, a fluorescent siderophore produced by Pseudomonas B10. PMID:6211451

  14. Methylation patterns of aquatic humic substances determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Steelink, C.; Wershaw, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    13C NMR spectroscopy is used to examine the hydroxyl group functionality of a series of humic and fulvic acids from different aquatic environments. Samples first are methylated with 13C-labeled diazomethane. The NMR spectra of the diazomethylated samples allow one to distinguish between methyl esters of carboxylic acids, methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls, and methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls adjacent to two substituents. Samples are then permethylated with 13C-labeled methyl iodide/NaH. 13C NMR spectra of permethylated samples show that a significant fraction of the hydroxyl groups is not methylated with diazomethane alone. In these spectra methyl ethers of carbohydrate and aliphatic hydroxyls overlap with methyl ethers of phenolic hydroxyls. Side reactions of the methyltion procedure including carbon methylation in the CH3I/NaH procedure, are also examined. Humic and fulvic acids from bog, swamp, groundwater, and lake waters showssome differences in their distribution of hydroxyl groups, mainly in the concentrations of phenolic hydroxyls, which may be attributed to their different biogeochemical origins. ?? 1987.

  15. Characterization of silica catalyst supports by single and multiple quantum proton NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.J.; Uner, D.O.; King, T.S. |; Pruski, M.; Gerstein, B.C.

    1995-03-16

    Cab-O-Sil HS5, used as the support in silica supported ruthenium (Ru/SiO{sub 2}) catalysts, was characterized via single and multiple quantum (MQ) {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy. The samples were studied both in the presence and in the absence of ruthenium. Single quantum spin counting of protons on silica support with and without ruthenium metal indicated that the total number of hydroxyl groups decreased significantly with increasing reduction temperature over the range of 350-530{degree}C. Two different components shown in static {sup 1}H NMR were found to reveal homogeneous and inhomogenous broadening via spectral hole burning experiments. {sup 1}H MQ-NMR spin, counting, based on the number of MQ coherences observed, showed the existence of small clusters of proton spins on the silica surface. The maximum measured cluster size was 6-7, or less, spins. Segments of silica resembling the 100 face of cristobalite on the surface are postulated to be possible sites for the clusters. The clusters in pure silica became smaller as the reduction temperature increased over 500{degree}C. No such change was detected in the presence of ruthenium. 33 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Structure of Colloidal Quantum Dots from Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Surface Enhanced NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Piveteau, Laura; Ong, Ta-Chung; Rossini, Aaron J; Emsley, Lyndon; Copéret, Christophe; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the chemistry of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) is primarily hampered by the lack of analytical methods to selectively and discriminately probe the QD core, QD surface and capping ligands. Here, we present a general concept for studying a broad range of QDs such as CdSe, CdTe, InP, PbSe, PbTe, CsPbBr3, etc., capped with both organic and inorganic surface capping ligands, through dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) surface enhanced NMR spectroscopy. DNP can enhance NMR signals by factors of 10-100, thereby reducing the measurement times by 2-4 orders of magnitude. 1D DNP enhanced spectra acquired in this way are shown to clearly distinguish QD surface atoms from those of the QD core, and environmental effects such as oxidation. Furthermore, 2D NMR correlation experiments, which were previously inconceivable for QD surfaces, are demonstrated to be readily performed with DNP and provide the bonding motifs between the QD surfaces and the capping ligands. PMID:26473384

  17. Advanced Structural Determination of Diterpene Esters Using Molecular Modeling and NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nothias-Scaglia, Louis-Félix; Gallard, Jean-François; Dumontet, Vincent; Roussi, Fanny; Costa, Jean; Iorga, Bogdan I; Paolini, Julien; Litaudon, Marc

    2015-10-23

    Three new jatrophane esters (1-3) were isolated from Euphorbia amygdaloides ssp. semiperfoliata, including an unprecedented macrocyclic jatrophane ester bearing a hemiketal substructure, named jatrohemiketal (3). The chemical structures of compounds 1-3 and their relative configurations were determined by spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of compound 3 was determined unambiguously through an original strategy combining NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Conformational search calculations were performed for the four possible diastereomers 3a-3d differing in their C-6 and C-9 stereocenters, and the lowest energy conformer was used as input structure for geometry optimization. The prediction of NMR parameters ((1)H and (13)C chemical shifts and (1)H-(1)H coupling constants) by density functional theory (DFT) calculations allowed identifying the most plausible diastereomer. Finally, the stereostructure of 3 was solved by comparison of the structural features obtained by molecular modeling for 3a-3d with NMR-derived data (the values of dihedral angles deduced from the vicinal proton-proton coupling constants ((3)JHH) and interproton distances determined by ROESY). The methodology described herein provides an efficient way to solve or confirm structural elucidation of new macrocyclic diterpene esters, in particular when no crystal structure is available. PMID:26431312

  18. Structural characterization of lignins isolated from Caragana sinica using FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ling-Ping; Shi, Zheng-Jun; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang; Mohanty, Amar K

    2011-09-01

    In order to efficiently explore and use woody biomass, six lignin fractions were isolated from dewaxed Caragana sinica via successive extraction with organic solvents and alkaline solutions. The lignin structures were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and 1D and 2D Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). FT-IR spectra revealed that the "core" of the lignin structure did not significantly change during the treatment under the conditions given. The results of 1H and 13C NMR demonstrated that the lignin fraction L2, isolated with 70% ethanol containing 1% NaOH, was mainly composed of beta-O-4 ether bonds together with G and S units and trace p-hydroxyphenyl unit. Based on the 2D HSQC NMR spectrum, the ethanol organosolv lignin fraction L1, extracted with 70% ethanol, presents a predominance of beta-O-4' aryl ether linkages (61% of total side chains), and a low abundance of condensed carbon-carbon linked structures (such as beta-beta', beta-1', and beta-5') and a lower S/G ratio. Furthermore, a small percentage (ca. 9%) of the linkage side chain was found to be acylated at the gamma-carbon. PMID:22097829

  19. Directly Decoupled Diffusion-Ordered NMR Spectroscopy for the Analysis of Compound Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Glanzer, Simon; Zangger, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    For the analysis of compound mixtures by NMR spectroscopy, it is important to assign the different peaks to the individual constituents. Diffusion-ordered spectroscopy (DOSY) is often used for the separation of signals based on their self-diffusion coefficient. However, this method often fails in the case of signal overlap, which is a particular problem for 1H-detected DOSY spectra. Herein, an approach that allows the acquisition of homonuclear broadband-decoupled DOSY spectra without the introduction of an additional decoupling dimension, by instant decoupling during acquisition, is presented. It was demonstrated on a mixture of six alcohols, and the investigation of the binding of a dodecapeptide to membrane mimetics. PMID:25059845

  20. Confirming the 3D Solution Structure of a Short Double-Stranded DNA Sequence Using NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhayel, Rasha A.; Berners-Price, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectroscopy is routinely used to give information on the closeness of hydrogen atoms through space. This work is based on a 2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectrum of a 12 base-pair DNA duplex. This 6-h laboratory workshop aims to provide advanced-level chemistry students with a basic, yet solid, understanding of how…

  1. Confirming the 3D Solution Structure of a Short Double-Stranded DNA Sequence Using NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruhayel, Rasha A.; Berners-Price, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectroscopy is routinely used to give information on the closeness of hydrogen atoms through space. This work is based on a 2D [superscript 1]H NOESY NMR spectrum of a 12 base-pair DNA duplex. This 6-h laboratory workshop aims to provide advanced-level chemistry students with a basic, yet solid, understanding of how

  2. Phosphorus Speciation of Sequential Extracts of Organic Amendments using NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinremi, O.

    2009-04-01

    O.O. 1Akinremi Babasola Ajiboye and Donald N. Flaten 1Department of Soil Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, R3T 2NT, Canada We carried out this study in order to determine the forms of phosphorus in various organic amendments using state-of-the art spectroscopic technique. Anaerobically digested biosolids (BIO), hog (HOG), dairy (DAIRY), beef (BEEF) and poultry (POULTRY) manures were subjected to sequential extraction. The extracts were analyzed by solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Most of the total P analysed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) in the sequential extracts of organic amendments were orthophosphate, except POULTRY, which was dominated by organic P. The labile P fraction in all the organic amendments, excluding POULTRY, was mainly orthophosphate P from readily soluble calcium and some aluminum phosphates. In the poultry litter, however, Ca phytate was the main P species controlling P solubility. Such knowledge of the differences in the chemical forms of phosphorus in organic amendments are essential for proper management of these amendments for agro-environmental purposes Key words: organic amendments, solution NMR, sequential fractionation, labile phosphorus

  3. High Resolution NMR Spectroscopy of Nanocrystalline Proteins at Ultra-High Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Lindsay J.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Lipton, Andrew S.; Berthold, Deborah A.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2010-01-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy of uniformly-13C,15N labeled protein samples provides insight into atomic-resolution chemistry and structure. Data collection efficiency has advanced remarkably in the last decade; however, the study of larger proteins is still challenged by relatively low resolution in comparison to solution NMR. In this study, we present a systematic analysis of SSNMR protein spectra acquired at 11.7, 17.6 and 21.1 Tesla (1H frequencies of 500, 750, and 900 MHz). For two protein systems—GB1, a 6 kDa nanocrystalline protein and DsbA, a 21 kDa nanocrystalline protein—line narrowing is demonstrated in all spectral regions with increasing field. Resolution enhancement is greatest in the aliphatic region, including methine, methylene and methyl sites. The resolution for GB1 increases markedly as a function of field, and for DsbA, resolution in the C-C region increases by 42%, according to the number of peaks that can be uniquely picked and integrated in the 900 MHz spectra when compared to the 500 MHz spectra. Additionally, chemical exchange is uniquely observed in the highest field spectra for at least two isoleucine Cδ1 sites in DsbA. These results further illustrate the benefits of high-field MAS SSNMR spectroscopy for protein structural studies. PMID:19953303

  4. Secondary structure determination of human. beta. -endorphin by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtarge, O.; Jardetzky, O.; Li, C.H.

    1987-09-08

    The /sup 1/H NMR spectra of human ..beta..-endorphin indicate that the peptide exists in random-coil form in aqueous solution but becomes helical in mixed solvent. Thermal denaturation NMR experiments show that in water there is no transition between 24 and 75/sup 0/C, while a slow noncooperative thermal unfolding is observed in a 60% methanol-40% water mixed solvent in the same temperature range. These findings are consistent with circular dichroism studies by other workers concluding that ..beta..-endorphin is a random coil in water but that it forms 50% ..cap alpha..-helix or more in mixed solvents. The peptide in the mixed water-methanol solvent was further studied by correlated spectroscopy (COSY) and nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) experiments. These allow a complete set of assignments to be made and establish two distinct stretches over which the solvent induces formation of ..cap alpha..-helices: the first occurs between Tyr-1 and Thr-12 and the second between Leu-14 and extending to Lys-28. There is evidence that the latter is capped by a turn occurring between Lys-28 and Glu-31. These helices form at the enkephalin receptor binding site, which is at the amino terminus, and at the morphine receptor binding site, located at the carboxyl terminus. The findings suggest that these two receptors may specifically recognize ..cap alpha..-helices.

  5. Studying Lyotropic Crystalline Phases Using High-Resolution MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pampel, André; Volke, Frank

    There is a large area, both in basic science and in applied research, in which lamellar liquid-crystalline phases play in important role. Dispersions of lipids and water, forming such phases, serve as models for biological membranes or because of there unique physico-chemical properties, they have been used as drug delivery systems. In this chapter the reader will be introduced in NMR methods for studying such systems. The chapter focuses on an experimental approach that is based on techniques that were developed for investigations of liquid-crystalline phases in combination with MAS. These techniques unsheathe properties that are related to the dynamic, liquid character of liquid-crystalline phases. Their general applicability and their limits are discussed. Their use is demonstrated with some examples covering biophysical studies as well as practical applications. The major focus is on problems that are related to molecules interacting with the lipid-water interfaces. The methods discussed reach from two-dimensional NOE spectroscopy for structure determination, up to the latest development, the combination of MAS with pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy to study diffusion properties.

  6. Multiple conformations of SAM-II riboswitch detected with SAXS and NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Zuo, Xiaobing; Wang, Yun-Xing; Dayie, T. Kwaku

    2012-01-01

    Riboswitches are a newly discovered large family of structured functional RNA elements that specifically bind small molecule targets out of a myriad of cellular metabolites to modulate gene expression. Structural studies of ligand-bound riboswitches by X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have provided insights into detailed RNA–ligand recognition and interactions. However, the structures of ligand-free riboswitches remain poorly characterized. In this study, we have used a variety of biochemical, biophysical and computational techniques including small-angle X-ray scattering and NMR spectroscopy to characterize the ligand-free and ligand-bound forms of SAM-II riboswitch. Our data demonstrate that the RNA adopts multiple conformations along its folding pathway and suggest that the RNA undergoes marked conformational changes upon Mg2+ compaction and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) metabolite binding. Further studies indicated that Mg2+ ion is not essential for the ligand binding but can stabilize the complex by facilitating loop/stem interactions. In the presence of millimolar concentration of Mg2+ ion, the RNA samples a more compact conformation. This conformation is near to, but distinct from, the native fold and competent to bind the metabolite. We conclude that the formation of various secondary and tertiary structural elements, including a pseudoknot, occur to sequester the putative Shine–Dalgarno sequence of the RNA only after metabolite binding. PMID:22139931

  7. Understanding J-Modulation during Spatial Encoding for Sensitivity-Optimized Ultrafast NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gouilleux, Boris; Rouger, Laetitia; Charrier, Benoît; Kuprov, Ilya; Akoka, Serge; Dumez, Jean-Nicolas; Giraudeau, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Ultrafast (UF) NMR spectroscopy is an approach that yields 2D spectra in a single scan. This methodology has become a powerful analytical tool that is used in a large array of applications. However, UF NMR spectroscopy still suffers from an intrinsic low sensitivity, and from the need to compromise between sensitivity, spectral width, and resolution. In particular, the modulation of signal intensities by the spin-spin J-coupling interaction (J-modulation) impacts significantly on the intensities of the spectral peaks. This effect can lead to large sensitivity losses and even to missing spectral peaks, depending on the nature of the spin system. Herein, a general simulation package (Spinach) is used to describe J-modulation effects in UF experiments. The results from simulations match with experimental data and the results of product operator calculations. Several methods are proposed to optimize the sensitivity in UF COSY spectra. The potential and drawbacks of the different strategies are also discussed. These approaches provide a way to adjust the sensitivity of UF experiments for a large range of applications. PMID:26401975

  8. Labeling strategy and signal broadening mechanism of Protein NMR spectroscopy in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yansheng; Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Yanhua; Xu, Guohua; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Zeting; Yao, Chendie; Liu, Maili; Li, Conggang

    2015-06-01

    We used Xenopus laevis oocytes, a paradigm for a variety of biological studies, as a eukaryotic model system for in-cell protein NMR spectroscopy. The small globular protein GB1 was one of the first studied in Xenopus oocytes, but there have been few reports since then of high-resolution spectra in oocytes. The scarcity of data is at least partly due to the lack of good labeling strategies and the paucity of information on resonance broadening mechanisms. Here, we systematically evaluate isotope enrichment and labeling methods in oocytes injected with five different proteins with molecular masses of 6 to 54 kDa. (19) F labeling is more promising than (15) N, (13) C, and (2) H enrichment. We also used (19) F NMR spectroscopy to quantify the contribution of viscosity, weak interactions, and sample inhomogeneity to resonance broadening in cells. We found that the viscosity in oocytes is only about 1.2 times that of water, and that inhomogeneous broadening is a major factor in determining line width in these cells. PMID:25965532

  9. The Development of 460 GHz gyrotrons for 700 MHz DNP-NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, T.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Khutoryan, E. M.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Ueda, K.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-07-01

    Two demountable gyrotrons with internal mode converters were developded as sub-THz radiation sources for 700 MHz DNP (Dynamic Nuclear Polarization) enhanced NMR spectroscopy. Experimental study on the DNP-NMR spectroscopy will be carried out in Osaka University, Institute for Protein Research, as a collaboration with FIR UF. Both gyrotrons operate near 460 GHz and the output CW power measured at the end of transmission system made by circular waveguides is typically 20 to 30 watts. One of them named Gyrotron FU CW GVI (we are using "Gyrotron FU CW GO-1" as an official name in Osaka University) is designed to have a special function of high speed frequency modulation δ f within 100 MHz band. This will expand excitable band width of ESR and increase the number of electron spins contributing to DNP. The other gyrotron, Gyrotron FU CW GVIA ("Gyrotron FU CW GO-II") has a function of frequency tunability Δ f in the range of wider than 1.5 GHz, which is achieved in steady state by changing magnetic field intensity. This function should be used for adjusting the output frequency at the optimal value to achieve the highest enhancement factor of DNP.

  10. Identification and quantitative determination of lignans in Cedrus atlantica resins using 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Anne-Marie; Paoli, Mathieu; Castola, Vincent; Casanova, Joseph; Bighelli, Ange

    2011-03-01

    Identification and quantitative determination of individual components of resin collected on the trunk of 28 Cedrus atlantica trees, grown in Corsica, has been carried out using 13C NMR spectroscopy. Eight resin acids bearing either the pimarane or abietane skeleton, two monoterpene hydrocarbons and four oxygenated neutral diterpenes have been identified, as well as three lignans, scarcely found in resins. Three groups could be distinguished within the 28 resin samples. The nine samples of Group I had their composition dominated by diterpene acids (33.7-45.8%), with abietic acid (6.2-18.7%) and isopimaric acid (5.1-12.6%) being the major components. The four samples of Group II contained resin acids (main components) and lignans in moderate amounts (up to 10.3%). Conversely, lignans (38.8-63.8%) were by far the major components of the 15 samples of Group III. Depending on the sample, the major component was pinoresinol (18.1-38.9%), lariciresinol (17.2-33.7%) or lariciresinol 9'-acetate (16.9-29.1%). Finally, due to the high biological interest in lignans, a rapid procedure, based on 1H NMR spectroscopy, was developed for quantification of lignans in resins of C. atlantica. PMID:21485279

  11. Determination of RNA polymerase binding surfaces of transcription factors by NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Drögemüller, Johanna; Strauß, Martin; Schweimer, Kristian; Jurk, Marcel; Rösch, Paul; Knauer, Stefan H.

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria, RNA polymerase (RNAP), the central enzyme of transcription, is regulated by N-utilization substance (Nus) transcription factors. Several of these factors interact directly, and only transiently, with RNAP to modulate its function. As details of these interactions are largely unknown, we probed the RNAP binding surfaces of Escherichia coli (E. coli) Nus factors by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Perdeuterated factors with [1H,13C]-labeled methyl groups of Val, Leu, and Ile residues were titrated with protonated RNAP. After verification of this approach with the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NusG and RNAP we determined the RNAP binding site of NusE. It overlaps with the NusE interaction surface for the NusG C-terminal domain, indicating that RNAP and NusG compete for NusE and suggesting possible roles for the NusE:RNAP interaction, e.g. in antitermination and direct transcription:translation coupling. We solved the solution structure of NusA-NTD by NMR spectroscopy, identified its RNAP binding site with the same approach we used for NusG-NTD, and here present a detailed model of the NusA-NTD:RNAP:RNA complex. PMID:26560741

  12. Solid-State NMR Study of Paramagnetic Bis(alaninato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) and Bis(1-amino(cyclo)alkane-1-carboxylato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) Complexes: Reflection of Stereoisomerism and Molecular Mobility in (13)C and (2)H Fast Magic Angle Spinning Spectra.

    PubMed

    Szalontai, Gábor; Csonka, Róbert; Speier, Gábor; Kaizer, József; Sabolović, Jasmina

    2015-05-18

    Solid-state stereochemistry and mobility of paramagnetic copper(II) complexes formed by aliphatic amino acids (l-alanine, d,l-alanine, 1-amino-2-methyl-alanine) and 1-amino(cyclo)alkane-1-carboxylic acids (alkane = propane, butane, pentane, hexane) as bidentate ligands has been studied by (13)C and (2)H solid-state fast magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy. We examined the prospective method to characterize solid-state paramagnetic compounds in a routine way. Both (13)C and (2)H MAS spectra can distinguish d,l and l,l diastereomers of natural and polydeuterated bis([Dn]alaninato)copper(II) (n = 0, 2, 8) complexes with axial and/or equatorial methyl positions (conformations) primarily due to different Fermi-contact (FC) contributions. The three-bond hyperfine couplings clearly show Karplus-like dependence on the torsional angles which turned out to be a useful assignment aid. Density functional theory calculations of the FC term and crystal structures were also used to aid the final assignments. The correlations obtained for bis(alaninato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) complexes were successfully used to characterize other complexes. The usefulness of the (2)H MAS spectra of the deuterated complexes was underlined. Even the spectra of the easily exchangeable amine protons contained essential stereochemical information. In the case of a dimer structure of bis(1-aminohexane-1-carboxylato-κ(2)N,O)copper(II) both the (13)C and (2)H resolutions were good enough to confirm the presence of the cis and trans forms in the asymmetric unit. With regard to the internal solid-state motions in the crystal lattice, the obtained quadrupolar tensor parameters were similar for the d,l- and l,l-alaninato isomers and also for the cis-trans forms suggesting similar crystal packing effects, static amine deuterons involved in hydrogen bonding, and fast rotating methyl groups. PMID:25920900

  13. Reexamination of C-NMR13 in (TMTTF)2AsF6 : Comparison with infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, Shinji; Kawamoto, Atsushi; Matsunaga, Noriaki; Nomura, Kazushige; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Yakushi, Kyuya

    2010-05-01

    The charge order (CO) state can be observed by microprobe measurements such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared spectroscopy. We used the infrared spectroscopy to examine (TMTTF)2AsF6 and confirmed the CO transition seen in previous C13 -NMR studies. However we found the degree of charge disproportionation, Δρ=0.16 , to be smaller than that obtained from the analysis of T1 in C13 -NMR and the redistribution of charge density below spin Peierls transition predicted by C13 -NMR was not observed at low temperature. We estimated the degree of spin disproportionation to be 0.11 from the analysis of the NMR shift in previous NMR studies. This small disproportionation does not require the redistribution of charge density at low temperature. The different behaviors of T1 at charge-rich and charge-poor molecular sites observed by C13 -NMR can be examined by the contribution of the commensurate antiferromagnetic fluctuation with 4kF .

  14. Metabolic differentiations of Pueraria lobata and Pueraria thomsonii using ¹H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Gan; Song, Yue-Lin; Wang, Ying; Yuan, Yun-Fei; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Ye, Wen-Cai; Wang, Yi-Tao; Zhang, Qing-Wen

    2014-05-01

    Puerariae Radix was a widely used herbal medicine. Pueraria lobata (PL) and Pueraria thomsonii (PT) were the two authorized sources of Puerariae Radix (gegen) in China. In this study, metabolic differentiations between these two species were investigated using NMR spectroscopy followed by principal components analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The content of puerarin in PL and PT was also determined using quantitative (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Thirteen isoflavones were tentatively identified based on 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data in two species. The (1)H NMR spectra of PL and PT were obviously different. PL and PT could also be markedly discriminated from (1)H NMR spectroscopic data by PCA and PLS-DA. For the crude drug resources, isoflavones, in which puerarin is the most important one, were regarded as the reasonable markers for the discrimination of the two species. The contents of puerarin and total isoflavones in PL were quantitated much higher than those in PT. Above all, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, which can provide comprehensive profiles of the metabolites and achieve convenient determinations of puerarin and total isoflavones in a single run, is an efficient means for evaluating the medicinal samples and achieving a better quality control of Puerariae Radix. PMID:23746990

  15. Actinide(IV) and actinide(VI) carbonate speciation studies by PAS and NMR spectroscopies; Yucca Mountain Project: Milestone report 3031-WBS 1.2.3.4.1.3.1

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.; Ekberg, S.A.; Morris, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Tait, C.D.

    1994-09-01

    Pulsed-laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to study speciation of actinide(IV) and actinide(VI) ions (Np, Pu, Am) in aqueous carbonate solutions vs pH, carbonate content, actinide content, temperature. PAS focused on Pu(IV) speciation. Stability fields on a pH (8.4 to 12.0) versus total carbonate content (0.003 to 1.0 M) plot for dilute Pu(IV) carbonate species ([Pu]{sub tot} = 1 mM) were mapped. Four plutonium species, with absorption peaks at 486, 492, 500, and 512 nm were found. Loss of a single carbonate ligand does not account for the difference in speciation for the 486 and 492 nm absorption peaks, nor can any of the observed species be identified as colloidal Pu(IV). NMR data have been obtained for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and AmO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. This report focuses on results for PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The ligand exchange reaction between free and coordinated carbonate on the PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} systems has been examined by variable temperature {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. In each of the six different PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} samples, two NMR signals are present, one for the free carbonate ligand and one for the carbonate ligand coordinated to a paramagnetic plutonium metal center. The single{sup 13}C resonance line for coordinated carbonate is consistent with expectations of a monomeric PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} species in solution. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR pulse sequence was used for determining ligand exchange parameters for paramagnetic actinide complexes. Eyring analysis at standard conditions provided activation parameters of {Delta}H = 38 KJ/M and {Delta}S = {minus}60 J/K for the plutonyl triscarbonate system, suggesting an associative transition state for the plutonyl(VI) carbonate complex self-exchange reaction.

  16. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy Talk: Coherent Ultrafast Multidimensional Spectroscopy of Molecules; From NMR to X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukamel, Shaul

    2011-03-01

    Multidimensional spectroscopic techniques which originated with NMR in the 1970s have been extended over the past 15 years to the optical regime. NMR spectroscopists have developed methods for the design of pulse sequences that resolve otherwise congested spectra, enhance selected spectral features and reveal desired dynamical events. The major experimental and computational advances required for extending these ideas to study electronic and vibrational motions on the femtosecond timescale will be surveyed. The response of complex molecules and semiconductor nanostructures to sequences of optical pulses provides snapshots of their structure and dynamical processes. Two-dimensional correlation plots of the signals show characteristic cross-peak patterns which carry information about hydrogen bonding, secondary structure fluctuations of proteins and amyloid fibrils, and coherent and incoherent energy and charge transfer in photosynthetic complexes. Double quantum coherence signals that are induced by correlations among electrons or excitons allow the visualization of correlated wavefunctions. Future extensions to the attosecond regime using xray pulses will be discussed. Since core excitations are highly localized at selected atoms, such signals can monitor the motions of valence electron wavepackets in real space with atomic spatial resolution. Common principles underlying coherent spectroscopy techniques for spins, valence electrons, and core electronic excitations, spanning frequencies from radiowaves, infrared, ultraviolet all the way to hard X-rays will be discussed.

  17. Liposcale: a novel advanced lipoprotein test based on 2D diffusion-ordered 1H NMR spectroscopy[S

    PubMed Central

    Mallol, Roger; Amigó, Núria; Rodríguez, Miguel A.; Heras, Mercedes; Vinaixa, Maria; Plana, Núria; Rock, Edmond; Ribalta, Josep; Yanes, Oscar; Masana, Lluís; Correig, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Determination of lipoprotein particle size and number using advanced lipoprotein tests (ALTs) is of particular importance to improve cardiovascular risk prediction. Here we present the Liposcale test, a novel ALT based on 2D diffusion-ordered 1H NMR spectroscopy. Our method uses diffusion coefficients to provide a direct measure of the mean particle sizes and numbers. Using 177 plasma samples from healthy individuals and the concentration of ApoB and ApoA from isolated lipoprotein fractions, our test showed a stronger correlation between the NMR-derived lipoprotein particle numbers and apolipoprotein concentrations than the LipoProfile® test commercialized by Liposcience. We also converted LDL particle numbers to ApoB equivalents (milligrams per deciliter) and our test yielded similar values of LDL-ApoB to the LipoProfile® test (absolute mean bias of 8.5 and 7.4 mg/dl, respectively). In addition, our HDL particle number values were more concordant with the calibrated values determined recently using ion mobility. Finally, principal component analysis distinguished type 2 diabetic patients with and without atherogenic dyslipidemia (AD) on a second cohort of 307 subjects characterized using the Liposcale test (area under the curve = 0.88) and showed concordant relationships between variables explaining AD. Altogether, our method provides reproducible and reliable characterization of lipoprotein particles and it is applicable to pathological states such as AD. PMID:25568061

  18. Tannin fingerprinting in vegetable tanned leather by solid state NMR spectroscopy and comparison with leathers tanned by other processes.

    PubMed

    Romer, Frederik H; Underwood, Andrew P; Senekal, Nadine D; Bonnet, Susan L; Duer, Melinda J; Reid, David G; van der Westhuizen, Jan H

    2011-01-01

    Solid state ¹³C-NMR spectra of pure tannin powders from four different sources--mimosa, quebracho, chestnut and tara--are readily distinguishable from each other, both in pure commercial powder form, and in leather which they have been used to tan. Groups of signals indicative of the source, and type (condensed vs. hydrolyzable) of tannin used in the manufacture are well resolved in the spectra of the finished leathers. These fingerprints are compared with those arising from leathers tanned with other common tanning agents. Paramagnetic chromium (III) tanning causes widespread but selective disappearance of signals from the spectrum of leather collagen, including resonances from acidic aspartyl and glutamyl residues, likely bound to Cr (III) structures. Aluminium (III) and glutaraldehyde tanning both cause considerable leather collagen signal sharpening suggesting some increase in molecular structural ordering. The ²⁷Al-NMR signal from the former material is consistent with an octahedral coordination by oxygen ligands. Solid state NMR thus provides easily recognisable reagent specific spectral fingerprints of the products of vegetable and some other common tanning processes. Because spectra are related to molecular properties, NMR is potentially a powerful tool in leather process enhancement and quality or provenance assurance. PMID:21278677

  19. Discrimination of Basal Cell Carcinoma from Normal Skin Tissue Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mun, Je-Ho; Lee, Heonho; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Shukmann

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating the metabolism of various cancers. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer. However, to our knowledge, data on metabolic profiling of BCC have not been reported in the literature. The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolic profiling of cutaneous BCC using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity of histopathologically confirmed BCC tissues and normal skin tissue (NST) samples. The metabolic intensity normalized to the total spectral intensities in BCC and NST was compared, and multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Univariate analysis revealed 9 metabolites that showed statistically significant difference between BCC and NST. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with the HR-MAS NMR metabolic profiles revealed a clear separation of BCC from NST. The receiver operating characteristic curve generated from the results revealed an excellent discrimination of BCC from NST with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.961. The present study demonstrated that the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity differ between BCC and NST, and that HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of BCC. PMID:26934749

  20. Discrimination of Basal Cell Carcinoma from Normal Skin Tissue Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Je-Ho; Lee, Heonho; Yoon, Dahye; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Shukmann

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating the metabolism of various cancers. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common skin cancer. However, to our knowledge, data on metabolic profiling of BCC have not been reported in the literature. The objective of the present study was to investigate the metabolic profiling of cutaneous BCC using HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy. HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to analyze the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity of histopathologically confirmed BCC tissues and normal skin tissue (NST) samples. The metabolic intensity normalized to the total spectral intensities in BCC and NST was compared, and multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Univariate analysis revealed 9 metabolites that showed statistically significant difference between BCC and NST. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with the HR-MAS NMR metabolic profiles revealed a clear separation of BCC from NST. The receiver operating characteristic curve generated from the results revealed an excellent discrimination of BCC from NST with an area under the curve (AUC) value of 0.961. The present study demonstrated that the metabolite profile and metabolite intensity differ between BCC and NST, and that HR-MAS 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a valuable tool in the diagnosis of BCC. PMID:26934749

  1. The contribution of solid-state NMR spectroscopy to understanding biomineralization: Atomic and molecular structure of bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy has had a major impact on our understanding of the structure of mineralized tissues, in particular bone. Bone exemplifies the organic-inorganic composite structure inherent in mineralized tissues. The organic component of the extracellular matrix in bone is primarily composed of ordered fibrils of collagen triple-helical molecules, in which the inorganic component, calcium phosphate particles, composed of stacks of mineral platelets, are arranged around the fibrils. This perspective argues that key factors in our current structural model of bone mineral have come about through NMR spectroscopy and have yielded the primary information on how the mineral particles interface and bind with the underlying organic matrix. The structure of collagen within the organic matrix of bone or any other structural tissue has yet to be determined, but here too, this perspective shows there has been real progress made through application of solid-state NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with other techniques. In particular, NMR spectroscopy has highlighted the fact that even within these structural proteins, there is considerable dynamics, which suggests that one should be cautious when using inherently static structural models, such as those arising from X-ray diffraction analyses, to gain insight into molecular roles. It is clear that the NMR approach is still in its infancy in this area, and that we can expect many more developments in the future, particularly in understanding the molecular mechanisms of bone diseases and ageing.

  2. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Investigation of Radical Production by Gold Nanoparticles in Aqueous Solutions Under X-ray Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Joan; Taylor, Ryan D; Davidson, R Andrew; Sharmah, Arjun; Guo, Ting

    2016-05-12

    Nanomaterials can enhance the effect of X-rays, but the mechanisms of enhancement can be complicated. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used here to shed light on enhancement mechanisms by detecting the originally proposed physical enhancement of the effect of X-rays by as-made large gold nanoparticles. Specifically spin trap reagent 5-tert-butoxycarbonyl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (BMPO) was used to trap radicals produced in aqueous solutions under X-ray irradiation. Even though only BMPO hydroxyl adducts were detected at the time of EPR measurement, both hydroxyl and superoxide radicals were found to contribute to the enhancement. The measured total enhancement was 0.7-fold per weight percent (wp) of Au in water using unfiltered X-rays. The theoretically predicted physical enhancement is 0.49 fold per wp of gold in water. This information, together with scavenging experimental results and the fact that the G-values are close for both radicals, suggest that hydroxyl and superoxide radicals contributing almost equally to the total measured enhancement. Further, the enhancement was found to be linearly dependent on the amount of large gold nanoparticles in water and no additional radical was produced beyond the amount predicted by type 1 physical enhancement, indicating that hydroxyl or superoxide radicals were not produced via catalytic pathways. PMID:27124587

  3. Specific inclusion mode of guest compounds in the amylose complex analyzed by solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tozuka, Yuichi; Takeshita, Aya; Nagae, Ayako; Wongmekiat, Arpansiree; Moribe, Kunikazu; Oguchi, Toshio; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2006-08-01

    The inclusion compound formation between linear amylose of molecular weight 102500 (AS100) and p-aminobenzoic acid (PA) during the sealed-heating process was investigated by powder X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy and solid state NMR spectroscopy. Sealed-heating of AS100 and PA at 100 degrees C for 6 h provided an inclusion compound with 6(1)-helix structure, while a 7(1)-helix structure was found when sealed-heating was carried out at 150 degrees C for 1 h. The formation of an inclusion compound was not observed when sealed-heating was performed at 50 degrees C for 6 h. The 7(1)-helix inclusion compound maintained its structure even during storage at high temperature while the 6(1)-helix inclusion compound decomposed and returned to the original V(a)-amylose upon heating to 180 degrees C. Quantitative determination revealed that one PA molecule could be included per one helical turn of AS100 for both 6(1)-helix and 7(1)-helix inclusion compounds. Solid state NMR spectroscopy suggested that PA molecules were included in the amylose helix core in the 7(1)-helix inclusion compound, while in the case of 6(1)-helix inclusion compound, PA molecules were accommodated in the interstices between amylose helices. Moreover, the inclusion compound formation by sealed-heating of AS100 was also observed when using PA analogues as guest compounds. The binding ratio of AS100 and PA analogues varied depending on the size of guest molecules. PMID:16880651

  4. Heterogeneous ordered-disordered structure of the mesodomain in frozen sucrose-water solutions revealed by multiple electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hanlin; Sun, Li; Warncke, Kurt

    2013-04-01

    The microscopic structure of frozen aqueous sucrose solutions, over concentrations of 0-75% (w/v), is characterized by using multiple continuous-wave and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic and relaxation techniques and the paramagnetic spin probe, TEMPOL. The temperature dependence of the TEMPOL EPR line-shape anisotropy reveals a mobility transition, specified at 205 K in pure water and 255 ± 5 K for >1% (w/v) added sucrose. The transition temperature is >Tg, where Tg is the homogeneous water glass transition temperature, which shows that TEMPOL resides in the mesoscopic domain (mesodomain) at water-ice crystallite boundaries and that the mesodomain sucrose concentrations are comparable at >1% (w/v) added sucrose. Electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy of TEMPOL-(2)H2-sucrose hyperfine interactions also indicates comparable sucrose concentrations in mesodomains at >1% (w/v) added sucrose. Electron spin-echo (ESE) detected longitudinal and phase memory relaxation times (T1 and TM, respectively) at 6 K indicate a general trend of increased mesodomain volume with added sucrose, in three stages: 1-15, 20-50, and >50% (w/v). The calibrated TEMPOL concentrations indicate that the mesodomain volume is less than the predicted maximally freeze-concentrated value [80 (w/w); 120% (w/v)], with transitions at 15-20% and 50% (w/v) starting sucrose. An ordered sucrose hydrate phase, which excludes TEMPOL, and a disordered, amorphous sucrose-water glass phase, in which TEMPOL resides, are proposed to compose a heterogeneous mesodomain. The results show that the ratio of ordered and disordered volume fractions in the mesodomain is exquisitely sensitive to the starting sucrose concentration. PMID:23464733

  5. The use of election paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in early preformulation experiments: the impact of different experimental formulations on the release of a lipophilic spin probe into gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Bittner, B; Isel, H; Mountfield, R J

    2001-03-01

    The lipophilic spin probe TEMPOL-benzoate was dissolved in different experimental formulations, including polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG 400), Miglyol, glycerol monooleate (GMO), and Cremophor RH-40. Samples were measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy before and after addition to human gastric juice. The distance between the first and the third peak in the EPR spectrum (2a(N)) was measured to monitor the polarity of the spin probe's microenvironment. Moreover, the ratio between the signal amplitudes of the second and the third peak (a/b ratio) was used to monitor the mobility of the spin probe in a certain formulation. Thus, by calculating 2a(N) and the a/b ratio of the EPR spectra it was possible to determine a potential release of the spin probe from different formulations into gastric juice. It was found that oily and surface-active vehicles (Miglyol, Cremophor RH-40, and GMO) were more suitable to protect a lipophilic compound from being released within a gastric environment than PEG 400. Our results demonstrate that EPR spectroscopy seems to be a promising tool in early preformulation experiments to monitor the release of spin probes from formulations of different nature. This kind of experiment can be of value for the optimization of exploratory formulations. PMID:11226824

  6. Measuring “Free” Iron Levels in Caenorhabditis Elegans Using Low-Temperature Fe(III) Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pate, Kira T.; Rangel, Natalie A.; Fraser, Brian; Clement, Matthew H. S.; Srinivasan, Chandra

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stress, caused by free radicals within the body, has been associated with the process of aging and many human diseases. As free radicals, in particular superoxide, are difficult to measure, an alternative indirect method for measuring oxidative stress levels has been successfully used in E. coli and yeast. This method is based on a proposed connection between elevated superoxide levels and release of iron from solvent exposed [4Fe-4S] enzyme clusters, which eventually leads to an increase in hydroxyl radical production. In past studies using bacteria and yeast, a positive correlation was found between superoxide production or oxidative stress due to superoxide within the organism and EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) detectable “free” iron levels. In the present study, we have developed a reliable and an efficient method for measuring “free” iron levels in C. elegans using low temperature Fe(III) EPR at g = 4.3. This method utilizes synchronized worm cultures grown on plates, which are homogenized and treated with desferrioxamine, an Fe(III) chelator, prior to packing the EPR tube. Homogenization was found not to alter “free” iron levels, while desferrioxamine treatment significantly raised these levels, indicating presence of both Fe(II) and Fe(III) in the “free” iron pool. The correlation between free radical levels and the observed “free” iron levels was examined by using heat stress and paraquat treatment. The intensity of the Fe(III) EPR signal and thus, the concentration of the “free” iron pool, varied with the treatments that altered radical levels without changing the total iron levels. This study provides the groundwork needed to uncover the correlation between oxidative stress, “free” iron levels, and longevity in C. elegans. PMID:17010298

  7. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of (33)S-labeled molybdenum cofactor in catalytically active bioengineered sulfite oxidase.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eric L; Belaidi, Abdel Ali; Raitsimring, Arnold M; Davis, Amanda C; Krmer, Tobias; Astashkin, Andrei V; Neese, Frank; Schwarz, Gnter; Enemark, John H

    2014-01-21

    Molybdenum enzymes contain at least one pyranopterin dithiolate (molybdopterin, MPT) moiety that coordinates Mo through two dithiolate (dithiolene) sulfur atoms. For sulfite oxidase (SO), hyperfine interactions (hfi) and nuclear quadrupole interactions (nqi) of magnetic nuclei (I ? 0) near the Mo(V) (d(1)) center have been measured using high-resolution pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) methods and interpreted with the help of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. These have provided important insights about the active site structure and the reaction mechanism of the enzyme. However, it has not been possible to use EPR to probe the dithiolene sulfurs directly since naturally abundant (32)S has no nuclear spin (I = 0). Here we describe direct incorporation of (33)S (I = 3/2), the only stable magnetic sulfur isotope, into MPT using controlled in vitro synthesis with purified proteins. The electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra from (33)S-labeled MPT in this catalytically active SO variant are dominated by the "interdoublet" transition arising from the strong nuclear quadrupole interaction, as also occurs for the (33)S-labeled exchangeable equatorial sulfite ligand [ Klein, E. L., et al. Inorg. Chem. 2012 , 51 , 1408 - 1418 ]. The estimated experimental hfi and nqi parameters for (33)S (aiso = 3 MHz and e(2)Qq/h = 25 MHz) are in good agreement with those predicted by DFT. In addition, the DFT calculations show that the two (33)S atoms are indistinguishable by EPR and reveal a strong intermixing between their out-of-plane pz orbitals and the dxy orbital of Mo(V). PMID:24387640

  8. Elucidation of meso- and microporosity in soil components with 129-Xe NMR spectroscopy of adsorbed xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonova, Svetlana; Nossov, Andrey; Knicker, Heike; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2010-05-01

    Soil meso- and micropores (2-50 nm and <2 nm) are usually studied with the use of common adsorption methods. As a complementary technique, 129-Xe NMR spectroscopy of adsorbed xenon was only recently suggested for the use in soil science. In this present study, we applied both conventional, i.e. thermally polarised (TP), and hyperpolarised (HP) 129-Xe NMR for elucidating pore environments of a series of samples representing porous soil constituents. Aluminium (hydr)oxides, Al2O3 and AlOOH, both pure and subjected to the sorption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were chosen as model mineral systems. Charcoals were used for understanding adsorption behaviour of xenon within organic polymeric structures formed by thermally altered bio-macromolecules. Natural soil particle size fractions were obtained from a non-allophanic Andosol and from Arenosol, i.e. soils containing charred residues and also characterised by a high content of Al oxides (case of the Andosol). DOM sorption on the studied Al oxides occurred inhomogeneously as it was inferred from the existence of the "empty" pores and the pores coated with OM. The latter were evidenced by the different Xe adsorption enthalpies estimated from the temperature dependences of the chemical shift. The increased sensitivity of the HP 129-Xe NMR allowed us detecting micropores in the charcoals, where the N2 adsorption method underestimated porosity due to the restricted diffusion of N2 at 77 K. The observed differences between the HP and TP 129-Xe patterns were explained by the slow diffusion of xenon within an interconnected but highly constricted pore system of the charcoals. The estimated width of those constricted pore openings was of the order of one or two diameters of the Xe atom. Similar "bottle neck" effects may also exist in the natural soil particle size fractions, as it was inferred from the increased pore access for Xe adsorption performed at elevated pressures (2-4 bar). The unusually large 129-Xe shifts (up to 170 ppm) detected for the for the H2O2-treated clay fractions of the Andosol (Bw horizon) coincided with their large specific surface areas(up to 220 m2/g) and were attributed to the pores formed by agglomerates of the nano-sized Al - humus complexes with contribution from the charred residues. Micropores found in the Arenosol fractions were attributed to the charred residues. Briefly, 129-Xe NMR spectroscopy shows its potential for studying soil meso- and micropores due to: i) higher sensitivity for probing micropores within polymeric organic structures, e.g. charcoals, as compared to the N2 adsorption; ii) possibility to use elevated pressures of the adsorbate for increasing the pore accessibility; iii) evaluating not only the pore size range but also adsorption enthalpies that reflect the nature of Xe - pore surface interactions. On the other hand, a combination of the HP- and TP 129-Xe NMR was shown to be helpful for modelling the pore structures of solids, since relaxation phenomena determining appearance of the HP 129-Xe NMR patterns also relate to the pore attainability.

  9. Magnetization detecting electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using a dc-SQUID directly coupled to an electron spin ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toida, Hiraku; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Zhu, Xiaobo; Munro, William; Nemoto, Kae; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Shiro

    Electron parametric resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is one of the most widely-used tool to characterize materials containing unpaired electrons. In the case of conventional EPR spectrometers, the resonance is detected as a change of microwave transmittance of a cavity. In our method, on the other hand, magnetization of the sample induced by the resonance is detected by a direct current superconducting quantum interference device (dc-SQUID) magnetometer, which is bonded to the sample. Here, we report detection of electron spin polarization and EPR spectroscopy using a micrometer-sized dc-SQUID magnetometer. We measure temperature and in-plane magnetic field dependence of spin polarization ratio and it has good agreement to the hyperbolic tangent law. We also successfully demonstrate EPR spectroscopy by applying a continuous microwave signal to the sample with a on-chip microstrip. We estimate the sensing volume and the minimum distinguishable number of electron spins to be ~ 10-10 cm3 (~ 0.1 pl) and ~ 106, respectively. This result paves the way towards realizing highly sensitive EPR spectroscopy in nanometer-sized area. This work was supported by Commissioned Research of NICT and in part by MEXT KAKENHI (Grant No. 15648489 and 15H05869).

  10. In vivo 31P-NMR spectroscopy of right ventricle in pigs.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, G G; Steinman, S K; Weiner, M W; Matson, G B

    1992-06-01

    The energy metabolism of the right ventricle (RV) in vivo has been largely unexplored. The goal of this study was to develop and implement techniques for in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the RV free wall. A two-turn, crossover-design elliptical surface coil was constructed to provide high sensitivity across the thin RV wall but minimal sensitivity in the blood-filled RV cavity. In 36 open-chest, anesthetized pigs, 31P spectroscopy of the RV free wall was performed with this coil at a field strength of 2 Tesla. Spectra were obtained from 800 acquisitions in 24 min with an average signal-to-noise ratio of 13.2 for phosphocreatine (PCr). The PCr-to-ATP (PCr/ATP) ratio of porcine RV was 1.42 +/- 0.05 (mean +/- SE), uncorrected for saturation at a repetition time of 1.8 s. With the use of literature values of the time constant of longitudinal relaxation (T1) to correct for partial saturation, the RV PCr/ATP was estimated to lie between 1.7 and 2.3. Decreased RV PCr/ATP was observed during RV ischemia and pressure overload. Thus in vivo 31P spectroscopy of the RV is readily accomplished with an appropriate surface coil and can provide new information about RV energy metabolism. PMID:1621852

  11. Structure of a Conserved Retroviral RNA Packaging Element by NMR Spectroscopy and Cryo-Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Yasuyuki; Irobalieva, Rossitza N.; Tolbert, Blanton; Smalls-Mantey, Adjoa; Iyalla, Kilali; Loeliger, Kelsey; D’Souza, Victoria; Khant, Htet; Schmid, Michael F.; Garcia, Eric; Telesnitsky, Alice; Chiu, Wah; Summers, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    The 5′-untranslated regions (5′-UTRs) of all gammaretroviruses contain a conserved “double hairpin motif” (ΨCD) that is required for genome packaging. Both hairpins (SL-C and SL-D) contain GACG tetraloops that, in isolated RNAs, are capable of forming “kissing” interactions stabilized by two intermolecular G-C base pairs. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the double hairpin from the Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus (MoMuLV) ([ΨCD]2, 132-nucleotides, 42.8 kDaltons) using a 2H-edited NMR spectroscopy-based approach. This approach enabled the detection of 1H-1H dipolar interactions that were not observed in previous studies of isolated SL-C and SL-D hairpin RNAs using traditional 1H-1H correlated and 1H-13C-edited NMR methods. The hairpins participate in intermolecular cross-kissing interactions (SL-C to SL-D’ and SLC’ to SL-D), and stack in an end-to-end manner (SL-C to SL-D and SL-C’ to SL-D’) that gives rise to an elongated overall shape (ca. 95 Å by 45 Å by 25 Å). The global structure was confirmed by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET), making [ΨCD]2 simultaneously the smallest RNA to be structurally characterized to date by cryo-ET and among the largest to be determined by NMR. Our findings suggest that, in addition to promoting dimerization, [ΨCD]2 functions as a scaffold that helps initiate virus assembly by exposing a cluster of conserved UCUG elements for binding to the cognate nucleocapsid domains of assembling viral Gag proteins. PMID:20933521

  12. Organic solute changes with acidification in Lake Skjervatjern as shown by 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malcolm, R.L.; Hayes, T.

    1994-01-01

    1H-NMR spectroscopy has been found to be a useful tool to establish possible real differences and trends between all natural organic solute fractions (fulvic acids, humic acids, and XAD-4 acids) after acid-rain additions to the Lake Skjervatjern watershed. The proton NMR technique used in this study determined the spectral distribution of nonexchangeable protons among four peaks (aliphatic protons; aliphatic protons on carbon ?? or attached to electronegative groups; protons on carbons attached to O or N heteroatoms; and aromatic protons). Differences of 10% or more in the respective peak areas were considered to represent a real difference. After one year of acidification, fulvic acids decreased 13% (relative) in Peak 3 protons on carbon attached to N and O heteratoms and exhibited a decrease in aromatic protons between 27% and 31%. Humic acids also exhibited an 11% relative decrease in aromatic protons as a result of acidification. After one year of acidification, real changes were shown in three of the four proton assignments in XAD-4 acids. Peak 1 aliphatic protons increased by 14% (relative), Peak 3 protons on carbons attached to O and N heteroatoms decreased by 13% (relative), and aromatic protons (Peak 4) decreased by 35% (relative). Upon acidification, there was a trend in all solutes for aromatic protons to decrease and aliphatic protons to increase. The natural variation in organic solutes as shown in the Control Side B of the lake from 1990 to 1991 is perhaps a small limitation to the same data interpretations of acid rain changes at the Lake Skjervatjern site, but the proton NMR technique shows great promise as an independent scientific tool to detect and support other chemical techniques in establishing organic solute changes with different treatments (i.e., additions of acid rain).

  13. Synthesis and Resolution of the Atropisomeric 1,1'-Bi-2-Naphthol: An Experiment in Organic Synthesis and 2-D NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Kendrew K. W.

    2004-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy is presented. It is seen that the experiment regarding the synthesis and resolution of 1,1'-Bi-2-naphtol presents a good experiment for teaching organic synthesis and NMR spectroscopy and provides a strategy for obtaining enantiopure compounds from achiral starting materials.

  14. XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR Spectroscopy of In Situ Crystallization of Lithium Disilicate Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuss, T.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Ray, C. S.; Lesher, C. E.; Youngman, R.; Day, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a Li2O-2SiO2 (LS2) glass was investigated as a function of pressure and temperature up to 6 GPa and 750 C respectively, using XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. Glass densified at 6 GPa has an average Si-O-Si bond angle approx.7deg lower than that found in glass processed at 4.5 GPa. At 4.5 GPa, lithium disilicate crystallizes from the glass, while at 6 GPa a new high pressure form of lithium metasilicate crystallizes. The new phase, while having lithium metasilicate crystal symmetry, contains at least 4 different Si sites. NMR results for 6 GPa sample indicate the presence of Q4 species with (Q(sup 4))Si-O-Si(Q(sup 4)) bond angles of approx.157deg. This is the first reported occurrence of Q(sup 4) species with such large bond angles in alumina free alkali silicate glass. No five- or six- coordinated Si are found.

  15. In Situ and Ex Situ Low-Field NMR Spectroscopy and MRI Endowed by SABRE Hyperpolarization**

    PubMed Central

    Barskiy, Danila A.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Koptyug, Igor V.; He, Ping; Groome, Kirsten A.; Best, Quinn A.; Shi, Fan; Goodson, Boyd M.; Shchepin, Roman V.; Truong, Milton L.; Coffey, Aaron M.; Waddell, Kevin W.; Chekmenev, Eduard Y.

    2015-01-01

    By using 5.75 and 47.5 mT nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, up to 105-fold sensitivity enhancement through signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) was enabled, and subsecond temporal resolution was used to monitor an exchange reaction that resulted in the buildup and decay of hyperpolarized species after parahydrogen bubbling. We demonstrated the high-resolution low-field proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pyridine in a 47.5 mT magnetic field endowed by SABRE. Molecular imaging (i.e. imaging of dilute hyperpolarized substances rather than the bulk medium) was conducted in two regimes: in situ real-time MRI of the reaction mixture (in which pyridine was hyperpolarized), and ex situ MRI (in which hyperpolarization decays) of the liquid hyperpolarized product. Low-field (milli-Tesla range, e.g. 5.75 and 47.5 mT used in this study) parahydrogen-enhanced NMR and MRI, which are free from the limitations of high-field magnetic resonance (including susceptibility-induced gradients of the static magnetic field at phase interfaces), potentially enables new imaging applications as well as differentiation of hyperpolarized chemical species on demand by exploiting spin manipulations with static and alternating magnetic fields. PMID:25367202

  16. Authentication of beef versus horse meat using 60 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jakes, W; Gerdova, A; Defernez, M; Watson, A D; McCallum, C; Limer, E; Colquhoun, I J; Williamson, D C; Kemsley, E K

    2015-05-15

    This work reports a candidate screening protocol to distinguish beef from horse meat based upon comparison of triglyceride signatures obtained by 60 MHz (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Using a simple chloroform-based extraction, we obtained classic low-field triglyceride spectra from typically a 10 min acquisition time. Peak integration was sufficient to differentiate samples of fresh beef (76 extractions) and horse (62 extractions) using Naïve Bayes classification. Principal component analysis gave a two-dimensional "authentic" beef region (p=0.001) against which further spectra could be compared. This model was challenged using a subset of 23 freeze-thawed training samples. The outcomes indicated that storing samples by freezing does not adversely affect the analysis. Of a further collection of extractions from previously unseen samples, 90/91 beef spectra were classified as authentic, and 16/16 horse spectra as non-authentic. We conclude that 60 MHz (1)H NMR represents a feasible high-throughput approach for screening raw meat. PMID:25577043

  17. Low Temperature 1H MAS NMR Spectroscopy Studies of Proton Motion in Zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, H.; Peng, L; Grey, C

    2009-01-01

    Low temperature {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectroscopy is used to study protonic motion in zeolite HZSM-5 in both samples that have been dried using procedures that are standard in the literature and samples that have been more carefully dehydrated. A significant enhancement of proton mobility is seen for the ''standard'' dehydrated HZSM-5 sample in comparison to that seen for the much drier sample. This is ascribed to a vehicle-hopping mechanism involving the residual water that is present in these zeolites. A gradual change of the framework structure is observed on cooling to approximately 213 K, as monitored via the change in {sup 1}H chemical shift values of the Broensted acid resonances and by X-ray diffraction. A more sudden change in structure is seen by differential scanning calorimetry and NMR at approximately 220?230 K, which is associated with changes in both the mobility and the modes of binding of the residual water to the Broensted acid sites and the zeolite framework.

  18. In vivo 31P-NMR spectroscopy of chronically stimulated canine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Clark, B J; Acker, M A; McCully, K; Subramanian, H V; Hammond, R L; Salmons, S; Chance, B; Stephenson, L W

    1988-02-01

    Chronic stimulation converts skeletal muscle of mixed fiber type to a uniform muscle made up of type I, fatigue-resistant fibers. Here, the bioenergetic correlates of fatigue resistance in conditioned canine latissimus dorsi are assessed with in vivo phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopy. After chronic electrical stimulation, five dogs underwent 31P-NMR spectroscopic and isometric tension measurements on conditioned and contralateral control muscle during stimulation for 200, 300, 500, and 800 ms of an 1,100-ms duty cycle. With stimulation, phosphocreatine (PCr) fell proportional to the degree of stimulation in both conditioned and control muscle but fell significantly less in conditioned muscle at all but the least intense stimulation period (200 ms). Isometric tension, expressed as a tension time index per gram muscle, was significantly greater in the conditioned muscle at the two longest stimulation periods. The overall small change in PCr and the lack of a plateau in tension observed in the conditioned muscle are similar to that seen in cardiac muscle during increased energy demand. This study indicates that the conditioned muscle's markedly enhanced resistance to fatigue is in part the result of its increased capacity for oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:3348365

  19. Authentication of beef versus horse meat using 60 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jakes, W.; Gerdova, A.; Defernez, M.; Watson, A.D.; McCallum, C.; Limer, E.; Colquhoun, I.J.; Williamson, D.C.; Kemsley, E.K.

    2015-01-01

    This work reports a candidate screening protocol to distinguish beef from horse meat based upon comparison of triglyceride signatures obtained by 60 MHz 1H NMR spectroscopy. Using a simple chloroform-based extraction, we obtained classic low-field triglyceride spectra from typically a 10 min acquisition time. Peak integration was sufficient to differentiate samples of fresh beef (76 extractions) and horse (62 extractions) using Naïve Bayes classification. Principal component analysis gave a two-dimensional “authentic” beef region (p = 0.001) against which further spectra could be compared. This model was challenged using a subset of 23 freeze–thawed training samples. The outcomes indicated that storing samples by freezing does not adversely affect the analysis. Of a further collection of extractions from previously unseen samples, 90/91 beef spectra were classified as authentic, and 16/16 horse spectra as non-authentic. We conclude that 60 MHz 1H NMR represents a feasible high-throughput approach for screening raw meat. PMID:25577043

  20. Time-domain Bayesian detection and estimation of noisy damped sinusoidal signals applied to NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubtsov, Denis V.; Griffin, Julian L.

    2007-10-01

    The problem of model detection and parameter estimation for noisy signals arises in different areas of science and engineering including audio processing, seismology, electrical engineering, and NMR spectroscopy. We have adopted the Bayesian modeling framework to jointly detect and estimate signal resonances. This considers a model of the time-domain complex free induction decay (FID) signal as a sum of exponentially damped sinusoidal components. The number of model components and component parameters are considered unknown random variables to be estimated. A Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique is used to draw samples from the joint posterior distribution on the subspaces of different dimensions. The proposed algorithm has been tested on synthetic data, the 1H NMR FID of a standard of L-glutamic acid and a blood plasma sample. The detection and estimation performance is compared with Akaike information criterion (AIC), minimum description length (MDL) and the matrix pencil method. The results show the Bayesian algorithm superior in performance especially in difficult cases of detecting low-amplitude and strongly overlapping resonances in noisy signals.

  1. Characterization of alkyl carbon in forest soils by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy and dipolar dephasing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kogel-Knabner, I.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Samples obtained from forest soils at different stages of decomposition were treated sequentially with chloroform/methanol (extraction of lipids), sulfuric acid (hydrolysis), and sodium chlorite (delignification) to enrich them in refractory alkyl carbon. As revealed by NMR spectroscopy, this treatment yielded residues with high contents of alkyl carbon. In the NMR spectra of residues obtained from litter samples, resonances for carbohydrates are also present, indicating that these carbohydrates are tightly bound to the alkyl carbon structures. During decomposition in the soils this resistant carbohydrate fraction is lost almost completely. In the litter samples the alkyl carbon shows a dipolar dephasing behavior indicative of two structural components, a rigid and a more mobile component. As depth and decomposition increase, only the rigid component is observed. This fact could be due to selective degradation of the mobile component or to changes in molecular mobility during decomposition, e.g., because of an increase in cross linking or contact with the mineral matter of the soil.

  2. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy for differentiation of molecular configurations and solvent properties between acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Yuan-Chun; Kuo, Hsiao-Ching; Jia, Hsi-Wei

    2016-04-01

    The differences in molecular configuration and solvent properties between acetone and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were investigated using the developed technique of 1H, 13C, 17O, and 1H self-diffusion liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Acetone and DMSO samples in the forms of pure solution, ionic salt-added solution were used to deduce their active sites, relative dipole moments, dielectric constants, and charge separations. The NMR results suggest that acetone is a trigonal planar molecule with a polarized carbonyl double bond, whereas DMSO is a trigonal pyramidal-like molecule with a highly polarized S-O single bond. Both molecules use their oxygen atoms as the active sites to interact other molecules. These different molecular models explain the differences their physical and chemical properties between the two molecules and explain why DMSO is classified as an aprotic but highly dipolar solvent. The results are also in agreement with data obtained using X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and theoretical calculations.

  3. In vivo sup 31 P-NMR spectroscopy of chronically stimulated canine skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, B.J. III; McCully, A.K.; Subramanian, H.V.; Hammond, R.L.; Salmons, S.; Chance, B.; Stephenson, L.W. Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia Univ. of Birmingham )

    1988-02-01

    Chronic stimulation converts skeletal muscle of mixed fiber type to a uniform muscle made up of type I, fatigue-resistant fibers. Here, the bioenergetic correlates of fatigue resistance in conditioned canine latissimus dorsi are assessed with in vivo phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 31}P-NMR) spectroscopy. After chronic electrical stimulation, five dogs underwent {sup 31}P-NMR spectroscopic and isometric tension measurements on conditioned and contralateral control muscle during stimulation for 200, 300, 500, and 800 ms of an 1,100-ms duty cycle. With stimulation, phosphocreatine (PCr) fell proportional to the degree of stimulation in both conditioned and control muscle but fell significantly less in conditioned muscle at all the least intense stimulation period (200 ms). Isometric tension, expressed as a tension time index per gram muscle, was significantly greater in the conditioned muscle at the two longest stimulation periods. The overall small change in PCr and the lack of a plateau in tension observed in the conditioned muscle are similar to that seen in cardiac muscle during increased energy demand. This study indicates that the conditioned muscle's markedly enhanced resistance to fatigue is in part the result of its increased capacity for oxidative phosphorylation.

  4. The Interaction between tRNALys3 and the Primer Activation Signal Deciphered by NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brachet, Franck; Tisne, Carine

    2013-01-01

    The initiation of reverse transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires the opening of the three-dimensional structure of the primer tRNALys3 for its annealing to the viral RNA at the primer binding site (PBS). Despite the fact that the result of this rearrangement is thermodynamically more stable, there is a high-energy barrier that requires the chaperoning activity of the viral nucleocapsid protein. In addition to the nucleotide complementarity to the PBS, several regions of tRNALys3 have been described as interacting with the viral genomic RNA. Among these sequences, a sequence of the viral genome called PAS for “primer activation signal” was proposed to interact with the T-arm of tRNALys3, this interaction stimulating the initiation of reverse transcription. In this report, we investigate the formation of this additional interaction with NMR spectroscopy, using a simple system composed of the primer tRNALys3, the 18 nucleotides of the PBS, the PAS (8 nucleotides) encompassed or not in a hairpin structure, and the nucleocapsid protein. Our NMR study provides molecular evidence of the existence of this interaction and highlights the role of the nucleocapsid protein in promoting this additional RNA-RNA annealing. This study presents the first direct observation at a single base-pair resolution of the PAS/anti-PAS association, which has been proposed to be involved in the chronological regulation of the reverse transcription. PMID:23762248

  5. In situ and ex situ low-field NMR spectroscopy and MRI endowed by SABRE hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Barskiy, Danila A; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Koptyug, Igor V; He, Ping; Groome, Kirsten A; Best, Quinn A; Shi, Fan; Goodson, Boyd M; Shchepin, Roman V; Truong, Milton L; Coffey, Aaron M; Waddell, Kevin W; Chekmenev, Eduard Y

    2014-12-15

    By using 5.75 and 47.5 mT nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, up to 10(5)-fold sensitivity enhancement through signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE) was enabled, and subsecond temporal resolution was used to monitor an exchange reaction that resulted in the buildup and decay of hyperpolarized species after parahydrogen bubbling. We demonstrated the high-resolution low-field proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pyridine in a 47.5 mT magnetic field endowed by SABRE. Molecular imaging (i.e. imaging of dilute hyperpolarized substances rather than the bulk medium) was conducted in two regimes: in situ real-time MRI of the reaction mixture (in which pyridine was hyperpolarized), and ex situ MRI (in which hyperpolarization decays) of the liquid hyperpolarized product. Low-field (milli-Tesla range, e.g. 5.75 and 47.5 mT used in this study) parahydrogen-enhanced NMR and MRI, which are free from the limitations of high-field magnetic resonance (including susceptibility-induced gradients of the static magnetic field at phase interfaces), potentially enables new imaging applications as well as differentiation of hyperpolarized chemical species on demand by exploiting spin manipulations with static and alternating magnetic fields. PMID:25367202

  6. Zinc Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy of Human Carbonic Anhydrase: Implications for the Enzymatic Mechanism.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, Andrew S.; Heck, Robert W.; Ellis, Paul D.

    2004-04-14

    Many zinc enzymes utilize zinc bound water as a critical component of a catalytic reaction. The Zn2+ ion activates water through ionization, polarization, or simple displacement depending upon the mechanistic details. The fate of one proton from the bound water is determined primarily by the influence of directly bound Zn-ligands, as well as hydrogen bonding with a secondary coordination sphere of side chains and/or bound waters within the protein. We have employed low temperature solid-state 67Zn NMR spectroscopy to probe the nature of the bonding at Zn2+ in human carbonic anhydrase isozyme II (CAII). In particular we wanted to characterize the 67Zn NMR parameters of the metal with both water and hydroxide as the fourth ligand, but instead we show that hydroxide is bound to Zn2+ over the pH range of 5 to 8.5. These results suggest the accepted mechanism of action of CAII needs to be revised. These data serve to provide further understanding of the observed pH dependence of the activity of this well studied protein.

  7. Solid-State Ru-99 NMR Spectroscopy: A Useful Tool for Characterizing Prototypal Diamagnetic Ruthenium Compounds Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ooms, Kristopher J.; Wasylishen, Roderick E.

    2004-09-08

    The feasibility of 99Ru NMR spectroscopy as a tool to characterize solid compounds is demonstrated. Results of the first solid-state 99Ru NMR investigation of diamagnetic compounds are presented for Ru(NH3)6Cl2, K4Ru(CN)6 xH2O (x) 0, 3, LaKRu(CN)6, and Ru3(CO)12. The sensitivity of the ruthenium magnetic shielding tensor to subtle changes in the local structure about the ruthenium nucleus is highlighted by comparing the 99Ru isotropic chemical shift of Ru(NH3)6Cl2 in aqueous solutions and in the solid state. The narrow isotropic 99Ru NMR peak observed for solid Ru(NH3)6Cl2 indicates that this compound is an ideal secondary reference sample for solid-state 99Ru NMR studies.

  8. 13C NMR spectroscopy of D and B, D-ring seco-limonoids of Meliaceae family.

    PubMed

    Narender, T; Khaliq, T; Shweta

    2008-06-15

    The modified limonoids isolated from the Meliaceae are too complex or obtained in too small quantities to determine their structures by chemical and spectroscopic means, including 1H NMR. One method of dealing with such problem is direct crystallographic analysis, without or having a heavy atom, which requires an able crystallographic collaborator. The determination of the structure Utilin is one example. The analysis of the 13C NMR spectral data for different compounds has been very useful for the identification of the various skeletal types of limonoids and also for the determination of the substitution pattern. Owing to the great utilities that these data could help the scientific community, who are working in the area of limonoids, we here describe the application of NMR spectroscopy in the structure elucidation of D and B, D-ring seco-limonoids and a collection of 177 compound's 13C NMR spectral data. PMID:18569718

  9. Structures of glycans bound to receptors from saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy: quantitative analysis by using CORCEMA-ST.

    PubMed

    Enríquez-Navas, Pedro M; Guzzi, Cinzia; Muñoz-García, Juan C; Nieto, Pedro M; Angulo, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Glycan-receptor interactions are of fundamental relevance for a large number of biological processes, and their kinetics properties (medium/weak binding affinities) make them appropriated to be studied by ligand observed NMR techniques, among which saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy has been shown to be a very robust and powerful approach. The quantitative analysis of the results from a STD NMR study of a glycan-receptor interaction is essential to be able to translate the resulting spectral intensities into a 3D molecular model of the complex. This chapter describes how to carry out such a quantitative analysis by means of the Complete Relaxation and Conformational Exchange Matrix Approach for STD NMR (CORCEMA-ST), in general terms, and an example of a previous work on an antibody-glycan interaction is also shown. PMID:25753726

  10. Off-Resonance Nutation NMR Spectroscopy of Half-Integer Quadrupolar Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentgens, A. P. M.

    The possibilities of off-resonance irradiation in nutation experiments of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei are demonstrated experimentally and theoretically. Off-resonance irradiation extends the applicability of nutation NMR spectroscopy at a given radiofrequency field strength to a larger range of quadrupole coupling constants. Moreover, it is possible to obtain several spectra with different resonance offsets on one spectrometer, thus facilitating the determination of the quadrupole parameters. A loss of signal to the uninformative zero-frequency signal which accompanies off-resonance irradiation can be avoided by using a frequency-stepped adiabatic half-passage or a soft selective 90° pulse as preparation for the experiment. Simulated off-resonance nutation spectra are presented as a function of quadrupole coupling constant and resonance offsets. The technique is demonstrated experimentally for a number of sodium compounds.

  11. Quantitative analysis of sesquiterpene lactones in extract of Arnica montana L. by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Jordanka; Denkova, Pavletta; Todorova, Milka; Evstatieva, Ljuba

    2011-01-01

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy was used as a method for quantitative analysis of sesquiterpene lactones present in a crude lactone fraction isolated from Arnica montana. Eight main components - tigloyl-, methacryloyl-, isobutyryl- and 2-methylbutyryl-esters of helenalin (H) and 11α,13-dihydrohelenalin (DH) were identified in the studied sample. The method allows the determination of the total amount of sesquiterpene lactones and the quantity of both type helenalin and 11α,13-dihydrohelenalin esters separately. Furthermore, 6-O-tigloylhelenalin (HT, 1), 6-O-methacryloylhelenalin (HM, 2), 6-O-tigloyl-11α,13-dihydrohelenalin (DHT, 5), and 6-O-methacryloyl-11α,13-dihydrohelenalin (DHM, 6) were quantified as individual components. PMID:20837387

  12. Single-Quantum Coherence Filter for Strongly Coupled Spin Systems for Localized 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabesinger, Andreas H.; Mueller, D. Christoph; Boesiger, Peter

    2000-08-01

    A pulse sequence for localized in vivo1H NMR spectroscopy is presented, which selectively filters single-quantum coherence built up by strongly coupled spin systems. Uncoupled and weakly coupled spin systems do not contribute to the signal output. Analytical calculations using a product operator description of the strongly coupled AB spin system as well as in vitro tests demonstrate that the proposed filter produces a signal output for a strongly coupled AB spin system, whereas the resonances of a weakly coupled AX spin system and of uncoupled spins are widely suppressed. As a potential application, the detection of the strongly coupled AA‧BB‧ spin system of taurine at 1.5 T is discussed.

  13. Recent applications of /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy to biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Matwiyoff, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in conjunction with carbon-13 labelling, is a powerful new analytical technique for the study of metabolic pathways and structural components in intact organelles, cells, and tissues. The technique can provide, rapidly and non-destructively, unique information about: the architecture and dynamics of structural components; the nature of the intracellular environment; and metabolic pathways and relative fluxes of individual carbon atoms. With the aid of results recently obtained by us and those reported by a number of other laboratories, the problems and potentialities of the technique will be reviewed with emphasis on: the viscosities of intracellular fluids; the structure and dynamics of the components of membranes; and the primary and secondary metabolic pathways of carbon in microorganisms, plants, and mammalian cells in culture.

  14. Spatial structure of fibrinopeptide B in water solution with DPC micelles by NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, Dmitriy S.; Fayzullina, Adeliya R.; Filippov, Andrei V.; Karataeva, Farida Kh.; Klochkov, Vladimir V.

    2015-12-01

    Fibrinopeptide B (GluFib) is one of the factors of thrombosis. Normal blood protein soluble, fibrinogen (fibrinopeptide A and fibrinopeptide B), is transformed into the insoluble, fibrin, which in the form of filaments adheres to the vessel wall at the site of injury, forming a grid. However, the spatial structure of this peptide has not been established till now. In this article, GluFib peptide is investigated together with dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles which were used for mimicking the environment of peptide in blood vessels. The spatial structure was obtained by applying 1D and 2D 1H-1H NMR spectroscopy (TOCSY, NOESY). It was shown that the fibrinopeptide B does not have a secondary structure but we can distinguish the fragment Gly 9 - Arg 14 with a good convergence (the backbone RMSD for the Gly9 - Arg14 is 0.18 ± 0.08 Å).

  15. Studies of the complexation of sugars by diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Díaz, M D; Berger, S

    2000-10-20

    In the presence of lanthanide cations, some sugars with a special relationship between their hydroxyl groups are able to form complexes in water. Diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy (DOSY) can be used as a tool to distinguish between the complexed and noncomplexed forms in a mixture due to the differences in their relative diffusion coefficient values. The lowest diffusion was attributed to the complexed species because of the increase in both size and molecular weight when compared with the noncomplexed forms. Mixtures of sugars of the same molecular weight and also the isomers of a single monosaccharide can be 'separated' by DOSY on the basis of their different tendencies to form complexes with different diffusion coefficient values. PMID:11086680

  16. Photo-CIDNP NMR spectroscopy of a heme-containing protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Iain J.; Wain, Rachel; Tozawa, Kaeko; Smith, Lorna J.; Hore, P. J.

    2005-08-01

    There are relatively few examples of the application of photo-CIDNP NMR spectroscopy to chromophore-containing proteins. The most likely reason for this is that simultaneous absorption of light by the photosensitiser molecule and the protein chromophore reduces the effectiveness of the photochemical reaction that produces the observed nuclear polarisation. We present details of experiments performed on the air-oxidised form of a small cytochrome, from the thermophilic bacterium Hydrogenobacter thermophilus, using both the wild-type protein and apo and holo forms of a double alanine b-type mutant. We show that, along with the apo state, it is possible to generate CIDNP in the air-oxidised form of the b-type mutant, but not in the corresponding c-type cytochrome. This finding is supported by control experiments using horse-heart cytochrome c.

  17. Differentiation of enantiomers by 2D NMR spectroscopy at 1 T using residual dipolar couplings.

    PubMed

    Koos, Martin R M; Danieli, Ernesto; Casanova, Federico; Blümich, Bernhard; Luy, Burkhard

    2016-06-01

    Differentiating enantiomers using 2D bench-top NMR spectroscopy. Spectrometers working with permanent magnets at 1 T field strength allow the acquisition of 2D data sets. In conjunction with previously reported chiral alignment media, this setup allows the measurement of enantiomeric excess via residual dipolar couplings in stretched gelatine as a result of the reduced line width obtained by 2D J-resolved spectroscopy. PMID:25773020

  18. Reaction monitoring using online vs tube NMR spectroscopy: seriously different results.

    PubMed

    Foley, David A; Dunn, Anna L; Zell, Mark T

    2016-06-01

    We report findings from the qualitative evaluation of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) reaction monitoring techniques of how each relates to the kinetic profile of a reaction process. The study highlights key reaction rate differences observed between the various NMR reaction monitoring methods investigated: online NMR, static NMR tubes, and periodic inversion of NMR tubes. The analysis of three reaction processes reveals that rates derived from NMR analysis are highly dependent on monitoring method. These findings indicate that users must be aware of the effect of their monitoring method upon the kinetic rate data derived from NMR analysis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26248898

  19. NMR spectroscopy with force-gradient detection on a GaAs epitaxial layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexson, Dimitri A.; Smith, Doran D.

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on 35 μm3 of 69Ga in a GaAs epitaxial layer in vacuum at 5 K, and 5 T yielding a linewidth on the order of 10 kHz. This was achieved by a force-gradient magnetic resonance detection scheme, using the interaction between the force-gradient of a Ni sphere-tipped single crystal Si cantilever and the nuclear spins to register changes in the spin state as a change in the driven cantilever's natural resonant frequency. The dichotomy between the background magnetic field (B0) homogeneity requirements imposed by NMR spectroscopy and the magnetic particle's large magnetic field gradient is resolved via sample shuttling during the NMR pulse encoding. A GaAs sample is polarized in a B0 of 5 T for 3 * T1. The sample is shuttled away from the magnetic particle to a region of negligible magnetic field inhomogeneity. A (π/2)x pulse rotates the polarization to the xy-plane, the magnetization is allowed to precess for 2-200 μs before a (π/2)x or (π/2)y pulse stores the remaining spin along the z-axis that represents a single point of the free induction decay (FID). The sample is shuttled back to the established tip-sample distance. An adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) sweep inverts the spins in a volume of interest, causing the cantilever's natural resonance frequency to shift an amount proportional to the spin polarization in the volume. By varying the delay between the first and second (π/2) pulses the entire FID is measured.

  20. Aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing (ALCHIM): determining composition of complex lipid samples by ¹H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sachleben, Joseph R; Yi, Ruiyang; Volden, Paul A; Conzen, Suzanne D

    2014-07-01

    Quantifying the amounts and types of lipids present in mixtures is important in fields as diverse as medicine, food science, and biochemistry. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can quantify the total amounts of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in mixtures, but identifying the length of saturated fatty acid or the position of unsaturation by NMR is a daunting challenge. We have developed an NMR technique, aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing, to address this problem. Using a selective total correlation spectroscopy technique to excite and transfer magnetization from a resolved resonance, we demonstrate that the time dependence of this transfer to another resolved site depends linearly on the number of aliphatic carbons separating the two sites. This technique is applied to complex natural mixtures allowing the identification and quantification of the constituent fatty acids. The method has been applied to whole adipocytes demonstrating that it will be of great use in studies of whole tissues. PMID:24831341

  1. Aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing (ALCHIM): determining composition of complex lipid samples by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ruiyang; Volden, Paul A.; Conzen, Suzanne D.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the amounts and types of lipids present in mixtures is important in fields as diverse as medicine, food science, and biochemistry. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can quantify the total amounts of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in mixtures, but identifying the length of saturated fatty acid or the position of unsaturation by NMR is a daunting challenge. We have developed an NMR technique, aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing, to address this problem. Using a selective total correlation spectroscopy technique to excite and transfer magnetization from a resolved resonance, we demonstrate that the time dependence of this transfer to another resolved site depends linearly on the number of aliphatic carbons separating the two sites. This technique is applied to complex natural mixtures allowing the identification and quantification of the constituent fatty acids. The method has been applied to whole adipocytes demonstrating that it will be of great use in studies of whole tissues. PMID:24831341

  2. NMR and IR Spectroscopy for the Structural Characterization of Edible Fats and Oils: An Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Molly W.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an upper-level instrumental laboratory for undergraduates that explores the complementary nature of IR and NMR spectroscopy for analysis of several edible fats and oils that are structurally similar but differ in physical properties and health implications. Five different fats and oils are analyzed for average chain length,

  3. NMR and IR Spectroscopy for the Structural Characterization of Edible Fats and Oils: An Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowther, Molly W.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an upper-level instrumental laboratory for undergraduates that explores the complementary nature of IR and NMR spectroscopy for analysis of several edible fats and oils that are structurally similar but differ in physical properties and health implications. Five different fats and oils are analyzed for average chain length,…

  4. Response to the Letter to the Editor regarding "Determination of the fatty acid profile by 1H-NMR spectroscopy."

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In expansion of previous work (G. Knothe, J.A. Kenar, Determination of the fatty acid profile by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, Eur. J. Lipid Sci. Technol. 2004, 106, 88-96), an additional approach is discussed for quantitating saturated fatty acids in the fatty acid profiles of common vegetable oils by 1H-NM...

  5. Consortium to develop the medical uses of NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Pohost, G.M.

    1998-06-01

    The goal of this work is to, perform clinically relevant studies using a new whole-body 4.1 T NMR imaging spectrometer. Initially we will develop and approach for the assessment of the severity of skeletal muscle involvement in ischemic peripheral vascular disease.

  6. Effects of MnO doping on the electronic properties of zinc oxide: 406 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and Newman superposition model analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüksel Price, Berat; Hardal, Gökhan; Açıkgöz, Muhammed; Repp, Sergej; Erdem, Emre

    2015-11-01

    MnO-doped ZnO ceramics have been synthesized through the conventional ceramic processing route. Mn2+ ions have been incorporated into the ZnO lattice within the limits of solid solubility. By using X-band-frequency and high-field electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we have resolved some of the main electronic transitions for the S = 5/2, I = 5/2 high-spin system and have determined accurately the EPR spin-Hamiltonian parameters. By combining data from crystallographic X-ray diffraction and EPR with the semi-empirical Newman superposition model, we have found the local configurational position of Mn2+ and have confirmed the symmetry of the lattice. The results presented in this contribution indicate that Mn ions substitute at Zn sites in ZnO. The effect of Mn2+ ions on the intrinsic defects becomes remarkable, thus the vacancy related intrinsic defect signals cannot be visible in the EPR spectrum. MnO doping affects the band gap energy of ZnO system which was confirmed via UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  7. The “Beta-Clasp” model of apolipoprotein A-I - a lipid-free solution structure determined by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lagerstedt, Jens O.; Budamagunta, Madhu S.; Liu, Grace S.; DeValle, Nicole C.; Voss, John C.; Oda, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) is the major protein component of high density lipoproteins (HDL) and plays a central role in cholesterol metabolism. The lipid-free / lipid-poor form of apoA-I is the preferred substrate for the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1). The interaction of apoA-I with ABCA1 leads to the formation of cholesterol laden high density lipoprotein (HDL) particles, a key step in reverse cholesterol transport and the maintenance of cholesterol homeostasis. Knowledge of the structure of lipid-free apoA-I is essential to understanding its critical interaction with ABCA1 and the molecular mechanisms underlying HDL biogenesis. We therefore examined the structure of lipid-free apoA-I by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). Through site directed spin label EPR, we mapped the secondary structure of apoA-I and identified sites of spin coupling as residues 26, 44, 64, 167, 217 and 226. We capitalize on the fact that lipid-free apoA-I self-associates in an anti-parallel manner in solution. We employed these sites of spin coupling to define the central plane in the dimeric apoA-I complex. Applying both the constraints of dipolar coupling with the EPR-derived pattern of solvent accessibility, we assembled the secondary structure into a tertiary context, providing a solution structure for lipid-free apoA-I. PMID:22245143

  8. (1)H NMR spectroscopy for profiling complex carbohydrate mixtures in non-fractionated beer.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Bent O; Nilsson, Mathias; Bøjstrup, Marie; Hindsgaul, Ole; Meier, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    A plethora of biological and biotechnological processes involve the enzymatic remodelling of carbohydrates in complex mixtures whose compositions affect both the processes and products. In the current study, we employed high-resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy for the analysis of cereal-derived carbohydrate mixtures as exemplified on six beer samples of different styles. Structural assignments of more than 50 carbohydrate moieties were obtained using (1)H1-(1)H2 groups as structural reporters. Spectroscopically resolved carbohydrates include more than ''20 different'' small carbohydrates with more than 38 isomeric forms in addition to cereal polysaccharide fragments with suspected organoleptic and prebiotic function. Structural motifs at the cleavage sites of starch, β-glucan and arabinoxylan fragments were identified, showing different extent and specificity of enzymatic polysaccharide cleavage during the production of different beer samples. Diffusion ordered spectroscopy supplied independent size information for the characterisation and identification of polysaccharide fragments, indicating the presence especially of high molecular weight arabinoxylan fragments in the final beer. PMID:24360420

  9. State-of-the-Art Direct 13C and Indirect 1H-[13C] NMR Spectroscopy In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Robin A.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy in combination with 13C-labeled substrate infusion is a powerful technique to measure a large number of metabolic fluxes non-invasively in vivo. It has been used to quantify glycogen synthesis rates, establish quantitative relationships between energy metabolism and neurotransmission and evaluate the importance of different substrates. All measurements can, in principle, be performed through direct 13C NMR detection or via indirect 1H-[13C] NMR detection of the protons attached to 13C nuclei. The choice for detection scheme and pulse sequence depends on the magnetic field strength, whereas substrate selection depends on the metabolic pathways that are studied. 13C NMR spectroscopy remains a challenging technique that requires several non-standard hardware modifications, infusion of 13C-labeled substrates and sophisticated processing and metabolic modeling. Here the various aspects of direct 13C and indirect 1H-[13C] NMR are reviewed with the aim of providing a practical guide. PMID:21919099

  10. Molecular-level characterization of probucol nanocrystal in water by in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junying; Higashi, Kenjirou; Limwikrant, Waree; Moribe, Kunikazu; Yamamoto, Keiji

    2012-02-28

    The molecular state of colloidal probucol nanoparticles with additives was evaluated by (13)C in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The nanoparticles were obtained by dispersing a ternary co-ground mixture of probucol/polyvinylpyrrolidon (PVP)/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in water. Their mean particle size was found to be approximately 150 nm by dynamic light scattering and cryogenic-scanning electron microscopy measurements. The results of the (13)C in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy showed that probucol existed in the crystalline state (form I) in water. (13)C liquid-state NMR results indicated that PVP and SDS interacted with probucol in water. Their broad signals suggested that the surface interaction of the probucol nanocrystal with PVP and SDS stabilized the suspension. In addition, a freeze-dried sample of the suspension was studied by (13)C solid-state NMR and powder X-ray diffraction experiments, which confirmed the presence of the probucol nanocrystals. The combination of the in situ solid-state, solid-state, and liquid-state NMR measurement results provided molecular-level insights about the role of intermolecular interactions in the design of nanoformulations. PMID:22138607

  11. Correlating nuclear frequencies by two-dimensional ELDOR-detected NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminker, Ilia; Wilson, Tiffany D.; Savelieff, Masha G.; Hovav, Yonatan; Zimmermann, Herbert; Lu, Yi; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2014-03-01

    ELDOR (Electron Double Resonance)-detected NMR (EDNMR) is a pulse EPR experiment that is used to measure the transition frequencies of nuclear spins coupled to electron spins. These frequencies are further used to determine hyperfine and quadrupolar couplings, which are signatures of the electronic and spatial structures of paramagnetic centers. In recent years, EDNMR has been shown to be particularly useful at high fields/high frequencies, such as W-band (∼95 GHz, ∼3.5 T), for low γ quadrupolar nuclei. Although at high fields the nuclear Larmor frequencies are usually well resolved, the limited resolution of EDNMR still remains a major concern. In this work we introduce a two dimensional, triple resonance, correlation experiment based on the EDNMR pulse sequence, which we term 2D-EDNMR. This experiment allows circumventing the resolution limitation by spreading the signals in two dimensions and the observed correlations help in the assignment of the signals. First we demonstrate the utility of the 2D-EDNMR experiment on a nitroxide spin label, where we observe correlations between 14N nuclear frequencies. Negative cross-peaks appear between lines belonging to different MS electron spin manifolds. We resolved two independent correlation patterns for nuclear frequencies arising from the EPR transitions corresponding to the 14N mI = 0 and mI = -1 nuclear spin states, which severely overlap in the one dimensional EDNMR spectrum. The observed correlations could be accounted for by considering changes in the populations of energy levels that S = 1/2, I = 1 spin systems undergo during the pulse sequence. In addition to these negative cross-peaks, positive cross-peaks appear as well. We present a theoretical model based on the Liouville equation and use it to calculate the time evolution of populations of the various energy levels during the 2D-EDNMR experiment and generated simulated 2D-EDMR spectra. These calculations show that the positive cross-peaks appear due to off resonance effects and/or nuclear relaxation effects. These results suggest that the 2D-EDNMR experiment can be also useful for relaxation pathway studies. Finally we present preliminary results demonstrating that 2D-EDNMR can resolve overlapping 33S and 14N signals of type 1 Cu(II) center in 33S enriched Azurin.

  12. Correlating nuclear frequencies by two-dimensional ELDOR-detected NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kaminker, Ilia; Wilson, Tiffany D; Savelieff, Masha G; Hovav, Yonatan; Zimmermann, Herbert; Lu, Yi; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2014-03-01

    ELDOR (Electron Double Resonance)-detected NMR (EDNMR) is a pulse EPR experiment that is used to measure the transition frequencies of nuclear spins coupled to electron spins. These frequencies are further used to determine hyperfine and quadrupolar couplings, which are signatures of the electronic and spatial structures of paramagnetic centers. In recent years, EDNMR has been shown to be particularly useful at high fields/high frequencies, such as W-band (∼95 GHz, ∼3.5 T), for low γ quadrupolar nuclei. Although at high fields the nuclear Larmor frequencies are usually well resolved, the limited resolution of EDNMR still remains a major concern. In this work we introduce a two dimensional, triple resonance, correlation experiment based on the EDNMR pulse sequence, which we term 2D-EDNMR. This experiment allows circumventing the resolution limitation by spreading the signals in two dimensions and the observed correlations help in the assignment of the signals. First we demonstrate the utility of the 2D-EDNMR experiment on a nitroxide spin label, where we observe correlations between (14)N nuclear frequencies. Negative cross-peaks appear between lines belonging to different MS electron spin manifolds. We resolved two independent correlation patterns for nuclear frequencies arising from the EPR transitions corresponding to the (14)N mI=0 and mI=-1 nuclear spin states, which severely overlap in the one dimensional EDNMR spectrum. The observed correlations could be accounted for by considering changes in the populations of energy levels that S=1/2, I=1 spin systems undergo during the pulse sequence. In addition to these negative cross-peaks, positive cross-peaks appear as well. We present a theoretical model based on the Liouville equation and use it to calculate the time evolution of populations of the various energy levels during the 2D-EDNMR experiment and generated simulated 2D-EDMR spectra. These calculations show that the positive cross-peaks appear due to off resonance effects and/or nuclear relaxation effects. These results suggest that the 2D-EDNMR experiment can be also useful for relaxation pathway studies. Finally we present preliminary results demonstrating that 2D-EDNMR can resolve overlapping (33)S and (14)N signals of type 1 Cu(II) center in (33)S enriched Azurin. PMID:24530956

  13. High field NMR spectroscopy and FTICR mass spectrometry: powerful discovery tools for the molecular level characterization of marine dissolved organic matter from the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertkorn, N.; Harir, M.; Koch, B. P.; Michalke, B.; Grill, P.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.

    2012-01-01

    Non target high resolution organic structural spectroscopy of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolated on 27 November 2008 by means of solid phase extraction (SPE) from four different depths in the South Atlantic Ocean off the Angola coast (3.1° E; -17.7° S; Angola basin) provided molecular level information of complex unknowns with unprecedented coverage and resolution. The sampling was intended to represent major characteristic oceanic regimes of general significance: 5 m (FISH; near surface photic zone), 48 m (FMAX; fluorescence maximum), 200 m (upper mesopelagic zone) and 5446 m (30 m above ground). 800 MHz proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) 1H NMR, spectra were least affected by fast and differential transverse NMR relaxation and produced at first similar looking, rather smooth bulk NMR envelopes reflecting intrinsic averaging from massive signal overlap. Visibly resolved NMR signatures were most abundant in surface DOM but contributed at most a few percent to the total 1H NMR integral and were mainly limited to unsaturated and singly oxygenated carbon chemical environments. The relative abundance and variance of resolved signatures between samples was maximal in the aromatic region; in particular, the aromatic resolved NMR signature of the deep ocean sample at 5446 m was considerably different from that of all other samples. When scaled to equal total NMR integral, 1H NMR spectra of the four marine DOM samples revealed considerable variance in abundance for all major chemical environments across the entire range of chemical shift. Abundance of singly oxygenated CH units and acetate derivatives declined from surface to depth whereas aliphatics and carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules (CRAM) derived molecules increased in abundance. Surface DOM contained a remarkably lesser abundance of methyl esters than all other marine DOM, likely a consequence of photodegradation from direct exposure to sunlight. All DOM showed similar overall 13C NMR resonance envelopes typical of an intricate mixture of natural organic matter with noticeable peaks of anomerics and C-aromatics carbon whereas oxygenated aromatics and ketones were of too low abundance to result in noticeable humps at the S/N ratio provided. Integration according to major substructure regimes revealed continual increase of carboxylic acids and ketones from surface to deep marine DOM, reflecting a progressive oxygenation of marine DOM, with concomitant decline of carbohydrate-related substructures. Isolation of marine DOM by means of SPE likely discriminated against carbohydrates but produced materials with beneficial NMR relaxation properties: a substantial fraction of dissolved organic molecules present allowed the acquisition of two-dimensional NMR spectra with exceptional resolution. JRES, COSY and HMBC NMR spectra were capable to depict resolved molecular signatures of compounds exceeding a certain minimum abundance. Here, JRES spectra suffered from limited resolution whereas HMBC spectra were constrained because of limited S/N ratio. Hence, COSY NMR spectra appeared best suited to depict organic complexity in marine DOM. The intensity and number of COSY cross peaks was found maximal for sample FMAX and conformed to about 1500 molecules recognizable in variable abundance. Surface DOM (FISH) produced a slightly (~25%) lesser number of cross peaks with remarkable positional accordance to FMAX (~80% conforming COSY cross peaks were found in FISH and FMAX). With increasing water depth, progressive attenuation of COSY cross peaks was caused by fast transverse NMR relaxation of yet unknown origin. However, most of the faint COSY cross peak positions of deep water DOM conformed to those observed in the surface DOM, suggesting the presence of a numerous set of identical molecules throughout the entire ocean column even if the investigated water masses belonged to different oceanic regimes and currents. Aliphatic chemical environments of methylene (CH2) and methyl (CH3) in marine DOM were nicely discriminated in DEPT HSQC NMR spectra. Classical methyl groups terminating aliphatic chains represented only ~15% of total methyl in all marine DOM investigated. Chemical shift anisotropy from carbonyl derivatives (i.e. most likely carboxylic acids) displaced aliphatic methyl 1H NMR resonances up to δH ~1.6 ppm, indicative of alicyclic geometry which furnishes more numerous short range connectivities for any given atom pairs. A noticeable fraction of methyl (~2%) was bound to olefinic carbon. The comparatively large abundance of methyl ethers in surface marine DOM contrasted with DOM of freshwater and soil origin. The chemical diversity of carbohydrates as indicated by H2CO-groups (δC ~ 62 ± 2 ppm) and anomerics (δC ~ 102 ± 7 ppm) exceeded that of freshwater and soil DOM considerably. HSQC NMR spectra were best suited to identify chemical environments of methin carbon (CH) and enabled discrimination of olefinic and aromatic cross peaks (δC > 110 ppm) and those of doubly oxygenated carbon (δC < 110 ppm). The abundance of olefinic protons exceeded that of aromatic protons; comparison of relative HSQC cross peak integrals indicated larger abundance of olefinic carbon than aromatic carbon in all marine DOM as well. A considerable fraction of olefins seemed isolated and likely sterically constrained as judged from small nJHH couplings associated with those olefins. High S/N ratio and fair resolution of TOCSY and HSQC cross peaks enabled unprecedented depiction of sp2-hybridized carbon chemical environments in marine DOM with discrimination of isolated and conjugated olefins as well as α, β-unsaturated double bonds. However, contributions from five-membered heterocycles (furan, pyrrol and thiophene derivatives) even if very unlikely from given elemental C/N and C/S ratios and upfield proton NMR chemical shift (δH < 6.5 ppm) could not yet been ruled out entirely. In addition to classical aromatic DOM, like benzene derivatives and phenols, six-membered nitrogen heterocycles were found prominent contributors to the downfield region of proton chemical shift (δH > 8 ppm). Specifically, a rather confined HSQC cross peak at δH/δC = 8.2/164 ppm indicated a limited set of nitrogen heterocycles with several nitrogen atoms in analogy to RNA derivatives present in all four marine DOM. Appreciable amounts of extended HSQC and TOCSY cross peaks derived from various key polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon substructures suggested the presence of previously proposed but NMR invisible thermogenic organic matter (TMOC) in marine DOM at all water depths. Eventually, olefinic unsaturation in marine DOM will be more directly traceable to ultimate biogenic precursors than aromatic unsaturation of which a substantial fraction originates from an aged material which from the beginning was subjected to complex and less specific biogeochemical reactions like thermal decomposition. The variance in molecular mass as indicated from Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectra was limited and could not satisfactorily explain the observed disparity in NMR transverse relaxation of the four marine DOM samples. Likewise, the presence of metal ions in isolated marine DOM remained near constant or declined from surface to depth for important paramagnetic ions like Mn, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu. Iron in particular, a strong complexing paramagnetic ion, was found most abundant by a considerable margin in surface (FISH) marine DOM for which well resolved COSY cross peaks were observed. Hence, facile relationships between metal content of isolated DOM (which does not reflect authentic marine DOM metal content) and transverse NMR relaxation were not observed. High field (12 T) negative electrospray ionization FTICR mass spectra showed at first view rather conforming mass spectra for all four DOM samples with abundant CHO, CHNO, CHOS and CHNOS molecular series with slightly increasing numbers of mass peaks from surface to bottom DOM and similar fractions (~50%) of assigned molecular compositions throughout all DOM samples. The average mass increased from surface to bottom DOM by about 10 Dalton. The limited variance of FTICR mass spectra probably resulted from a rather inherent conformity of marine DOM at the mandatory level of intrinsic averaging provided by FTICR mass spectrometry, when many isomers unavoidably project on single nominal mass peaks. In addition, averaging from ion suppression added to the accordance observed. The proportion of CHO and CHNO molecular series increased from surface to depth whereas CHOS and especially CHNOS molecular series markedly declined. The abundance of certain aromatic CHOS compounds declined with water depth. For future studies, COSY NMR spectra appear best suited to assess organic molecular complexity of marine DOM and to define individual DOM molecules of yet unknown structure and function. Non-target organic structural spectroscopy at the level demonstrated here covered nearly all carbon present in marine DOM. The exhaustive characterization of complex unknowns in marine DOM will reveal a meaningful assessment of individual marine biogeosignatures which carry the holistic memory of the oceanic water masses (Koch et al., 2011).

  14. Multiple Acquisition/Multiple Observation Separated Local Field/Chemical Shift Correlation Solid-state Magic Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bibhuti B.; Opella, Stanley J.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple acquisition spectroscopy (MACSY) experiments that enable multiple free induction decays to be recorded during individual experiments are demonstrated. In particular, the experiments incorporate separated local field spectroscopy into homonuclear and heteronuclear correlation spectroscopy. The measured heteronuclear dipolar couplings are valuable in structure determination as well as in enhancing resolution by providing an additional frequency axis. In one example four different three-dimensional spectra are obtained in a single experiment, demonstrating that substantial potential saving in experimental time is available when multiple multi-dimensional spectra are required as part of solid-state NMR studies. PMID:25023566

  15. A structural study of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-50) and its cyclic dithiocarbonate derivative using NMR spectroscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Hamzah, Rosniza; Bakar, Mohamad Abu; Khairuddean, Melati; Mohammed, Issam Ahmed; Adnan, Rohana

    2012-01-01

    A structural study of epoxidized natural rubber (ENR-50) and its cyclic dithiocarbonate derivative was carried out using NMR spectroscopy techniques. The overlapping (1)H-NMR signals of ENR-50 at δ 1.56, 1.68-1.70, 2.06, 2.15-2.17 ppm were successfully assigned. In this work, the <(13)C-NMR chemical shift assignments of ENR-50 were consistent to the previously reported work. A cyclic dithiocarbonate derivative of ENR-50 was synthesized from the reaction of purified ENR-50 with carbon disulfide (CS(2)), in the presence of 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) as catalyst at reflux temperature. The cyclic dithiocarbonate formation involved the epoxide ring opening of the ENR-50. This was followed by insertion of the C-S moiety of CS(2) at the oxygen attached to the quaternary carbon and methine carbon of epoxidized isoprene unit, respectively. The bands due to the C=S and C-O were clearly observed in the FTIR spectrum while the (1)H-NMR spectrum of the derivative revealed the peak attributed to the methylene protons had split. The (13)C-NMR spectrum of the derivative further indicates two new carbon peaks arising from the >C=S and quaternary carbon of cyclic dithiocarbonate. All other (1)H- and (13)C-NMR chemical shifts of the derivative remain unchanged with respect to the ENR-50. PMID:22971583

  16. Metabolic Characterization of Advanced Liver Fibrosis in HCV Patients as Studied by Serum 1H-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Embade, Nieves; Mariño, Zoe; Diercks, Tammo; Cano, Ainara; Lens, Sabela; Cabrera, Diana; Navasa, Miquel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan M.; Caballería, Joan; Castro, Azucena; Bosch, Jaume; Mato, José M.; Millet, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Several etiologies result in chronic liver diseases including chronic hepatitis C virus infection (HCV). Despite its high incidence and the severe economic and medical consequences, liver disease is still commonly overlooked due to the lack of efficient non-invasive diagnostic methods. While several techniques have been tested for the detection of fibrosis, the available biomarkers still present severe limitations that preclude their use in clinical diagnostics. Liver diseases have also been the subject of metabolomic analysis. Here, we demonstrate the suitability of 1H NMR spectroscopy for characterizing the metabolism of liver fibrosis induced by HCV. Serum samples from HCV patients without fibrosis or with liver cirrhosis were analyzed by NMR spectroscopy and the results were submitted to multivariate and univariate statistical analysis. PLS-DA test was able to discriminate between advanced fibrotic and non-fibrotic patients and several metabolites were found to be up or downregulated in patients with cirrhosis. The suitability of the most significantly regulated metabolites was validated by ROC analysis. Our study reveals that choline, acetoacetate and low-density lipoproteins are the most informative biomarkers for predicting cirrhosis in HCV patients. Our results demonstrate that statistical analysis of 1H-NMR spectra is able to distinguish between fibrotic and non-fibrotic patients suffering from HCV, representing a novel diagnostic application for NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27158896

  17. Improvements in localized proton NMR spectroscopy of human brain. Water suppression, short echo times, and 1 ml resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, J.; Michaelis, T.; Merboldt, K. D.; Bruhn, H.; Gyngell, M. L.; Hänicke, W.

    Considerable technical improvements are reported for localized proton NMR spectroscopy using stimulated echoes. When compared to previous results, proton NMR spectra of the human brain are now obtainable (i) with in vivo water suppression factors of ⩾1000, (ii) with only minor T2 losses and negligible distortions due to J modulation at short echo times of 10-20 ms, and (iii) from volumes of interest as small as 1-8 ml within measuring times of 1-10 min. As a consequence, the detection of cerebral metabolites is greatly facilitated. This particularly applies to the assignment of those resonances (e.g., glutamate, taurine, inositols) that suffer from strong spin-spin coupling at the field strengths commonly in use for NMR in man. Studies of regional metabolite differences, tissue heterogeneity, and focal lesions in patients benefit from the increased spatial resolution and a concomitant reduction of partial volume effects. Localized proton NMR spectroscopy was performed on young healthy volunteers. Experiments were carried out on a 2.0 T whole-body MRI/MRS system using the standard headcoil for both imaging and spectroscopy.

  18. The use of high-resolution ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in the clinical diagnosis of Acanthamoeba.

    PubMed

    Hauber, Sandra; Parkes, Hary; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2011-12-01

    Acanthamoeba are opportunistic protozoan pathogens that can produce sight-threatening keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The successful prognosis requires early diagnosis and differentiation of pathogenic Acanthamoeba spp. followed by aggressive treatment regimen. In this study, we tested the use of high-resolution (1)H NMR spectroscopy in the clinical diagnosis of Acanthamoeba. Using NMR spectroscopy combined with Pattern Recognition Analysis (PRA), we analysed variations in the biochemical 'fingerprint' of invasive and non-invasive Acanthamoeba, its closely related genus, Balamuthia mandrillaris, neuropathogenic Escherichia coli K1 strain E44, a laboratory strain of E. coli K-12, HB101, mammalian cells including human brain microvascular endothelial cells and monkey kidney cells. The findings revealed significant variations in the metabolites of amoebae, mammalian cells and bacteria. Interestingly, (1)H NMR spectra provided distinct biochemical profiles of clinical and non-clinical Acanthamoeba isolates highlighting the potential of (1)H NMR spectroscopy combined with PRA for the development of a novel diagnostic test that could rapidly identify pathogenic Acanthamoeba isolates with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:21556684

  19. Characterization of Cu Mordenite deNOx Catalysts at Variable Si/Al Ratios, by NMR, TPD and Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzke, Robert F.; Petranovskii, Vitalii P.; Bogdanchikova, Nina E.

    2002-03-01

    Cu mordenite is an effective catalyst for nitrogen oxide removal (deNOx), which is readily produced from H mordenite at various silica-to-alumina (Si/Al) ratios by ion exchange. We have characterized a set of H and Cu mordenite catalysts prepared from material originally supplied by the TOSOH Corp. (Japan), using NMR, TPD and optical Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy. The nuclei observed in NMR were Silicon-29, Aluminum-27 and protons. Resulst show strong effects of Si/Al ratio, upon both framework and extra-framework structures of the mordenites. Information about the state of the Cu ion in the catalysts will be reviewed.

  20. Triterpenes in the hexane extract of leaves of Olea europaea L.: analysis using 13C-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, Emilie; Castola, Vincent; Casanova, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Two neutral triterpenes and a triterpene acid were identified and quantified directly, in the absence of any purification steps, in a precipitate obtained during the industrial extraction of the leaves of Olea europaea L. using 13C-NMR spectroscopy (spectrometer operating at 4.7 T equipped with a 10 mm probe). The method was optimised in order to reduce the duration of analysis with a routine NMR spectrometer. Together with long-chain linear compounds, erythrodiol, uvaol and oleanolic acid accounted for 27.3, 18.3 and 12.5% of the precipitate, respectively. PMID:17623370

  1. Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced MAS NMR Spectroscopy for Structural Analysis of HIV-1 Protein Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupal; Lu, Manman; Hou, Guangjin; Caporini, Marc A; Rosay, Melanie; Maas, Werner; Struppe, Jochem; Suiter, Christopher; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L; Franks, W Trent; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Bertarello, Andrea; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-01-21

    Mature infectious HIV-1 virions contain conical capsids composed of CA protein, generated by the proteolytic cleavage cascade of the Gag polyprotein, termed maturation. The mechanism of capsid core formation through the maturation process remains poorly understood. We present DNP-enhanced MAS NMR studies of tubular assemblies of CA and Gag CA-SP1 maturation intermediate and report 20-64-fold sensitivity enhancements due to DNP at 14.1 T. These sensitivity enhancements enabled direct observation of spacer peptide 1 (SP1) resonances in CA-SP1 by dipolar-based correlation experiments, unequivocally indicating that the SP1 peptide is unstructured in assembled CA-SP1 at cryogenic temperatures, corroborating our earlier results. Furthermore, the dependence of DNP enhancements and spectral resolution on magnetic field strength (9.4-18.8 T) and temperature (109-180 K) was investigated. Our results suggest that DNP-based measurements could potentially provide residue-specific dynamics information by allowing for the extraction of the temperature dependence of the anisotropic tensorial or relaxation parameters. With DNP, we were able to detect multiple well-resolved isoleucine side-chain conformers; unique intermolecular correlations across two CA molecules; and functionally relevant conformationally disordered states such as the 14-residue SP1 peptide, none of which are visible at ambient temperatures. The detection of isolated conformers and intermolecular correlations can provide crucial constraints for structure determination of these assemblies. Overall, our results establish DNP-based MAS NMR spectroscopy as an excellent tool for the characterization of HIV-1 assemblies. PMID:26709853

  2. Intracellular free calcium concentration measured with /sup 19/F NMR spectroscopy in intact ferret hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Marban, E.; Kitakaze, M.; Kusuoka, H.; Porterfield, J.K.; Yue, D.T.; Chacko, V.P.

    1987-08-01

    Changes in the intracellular free Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration, (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/, mediate excitation-contraction coupling in the heart and contribute to cellular injury during ischemia and reperfusion. To study these processes directly, the authors measured (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ in perfused ferret (Mustela putorius furo) hearts using /sup 19/F NMR spectroscopy to detect the 5,5'-difluoro derivative of the Ca/sup 2 +/ chelator, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). To load cells, hearts were perfused with the acetoxymethyl ester derivative of 5,5'-F/sub 2/-BAPTA. They measured /sup 19/F NMR spectra and left ventricular pressure simultaneously,at rest and during pacing at various external Ca concentrations ((Ca)/sub 0/). Although contractile force was attenuated by the Ca/sup 2 +/ buffering properties of 5,5'-F/sup 2/-BAPTA, the decrease in pressure could be overcome by raising (Ca)/sub 0/. The mean value of 104 nM for (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ at rest in the perfused heart agrees well with previous measurements in isolated ventricular muscle. During pacing at 0.6-4 Hz, time-averaged (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ increased; the effect of pacing was augmented by increasing (Ca)/sub 0/. (Ca/sup 2 +/)/sub i/ more than tripled during 10-20 min of global ischemia, and returned toward control levels upon reperfusion. This approach promises to be particularly useful in investigating the physiology of intact hearts and the pathophysiology of alterations in the coronary circulation

  3. Dynamic nuclear polarization-enhanced 13C NMR spectroscopy of static biological solids

    PubMed Central

    Potapov, Alexey; Yau, Wai-Ming; Tycko, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) to enhance signals in structural studies of biological solids by solid state NMR without sample spinning. Specifically, we use 2D 13C-13C exchange spectroscopy to probe the peptide backbone torsion angles (ϕ,ψ) in a series of selectively 13C-labeled 40-residue β-amyloid (Aβ1–40) samples, in both fibrillar and non-fibrillar states. Experiments are carried out at 9.39 T and 8 K, using a static double-resonance NMR probe and low-power microwave irradiation at 264 GHz. In frozen solutions of Aβ1–40 fibrils doped with DOTOPA-TEMPO, we observe DNP signal enhancement factors of 16–21. We show that the orientation- and frequency-dependent spin polarization exchange between sequential backbone carbonyl 13C labels can be simulated accurately using a simple expression for the exchange rate, after experimentally determined homogeneous 13C lineshapes are incorporated in the simulations. The experimental 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra place constraints on the ϕ and ψ angles between the two carbonyl labels. Although the data are not sufficient to determine ϕ and ψ uniquely, the data do provide non-trivial constraints that could be included in structure calculations. With DNP at low temperatures, 2D 13C-13C exchange spectra can be obtained from a 3.5 mg sample of Aβ1–40 fibrils in 4 hr or less, despite the broad 13C chemical shift anisotropy line shapes that are observed in static samples. PMID:23562665

  4. Higher Order Amyloid Fibril Structure by MAS NMR and DNP Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Debelouchina, Galia T.; Bayro, Marvin J.; Fitzpatrick, Anthony W.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Colvin, Michael T.; Caporini, Marc A.; Jaroniec, Christopher P.; Bajaj, Vikram S.; Rosay, Melanie; MacPhee, Cait E.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Maas, Werner E.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has generated structural models of several amyloid fibril systems, thus providing valuable information regarding the forces and interactions that confer the extraordinary stability of the amyloid architecture. Despite these advances, however, obtaining atomic resolution information describing the higher levels of structural organization within the fibrils remains a significant challenge. Here, we detail MAS NMR experiments and sample labeling schemes designed specifically to probe such higher order amyloid structure and we have applied them to the fibrils formed by an eleven-residue segment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin (TTR(105-115)). These experiments have allowed us to define unambiguously not only the arrangement of the peptide β-strands into β-sheets but also the β-sheet interfaces within each protofilament, and in addition to identify the nature of the protofilament-to-protofilament contacts that lead to the formation of the complete fibril. Our efforts have resulted in 111 quantitative distance and torsion angle restraints (10 per residue) that describe the various levels of structure organization. The experiments benefited extensively from the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which in some cases allowed us to shorten the data acquisition time from days to hours and to improve significantly the signal-to-noise ratios of the spectra. The β-sheet interface and protofilament interactions identified here revealed local variations in the structure that result in multiple peaks for the exposed N- and C-termini of the peptide and in inhomogeneous line-broadening for the side-chains buried within the interior of the fibrils. PMID:24304221

  5. Higher order amyloid fibril structure by MAS NMR and DNP spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Debelouchina, Galia T; Bayro, Marvin J; Fitzpatrick, Anthony W; Ladizhansky, Vladimir; Colvin, Michael T; Caporini, Marc A; Jaroniec, Christopher P; Bajaj, Vikram S; Rosay, Melanie; Macphee, Cait E; Vendruscolo, Michele; Maas, Werner E; Dobson, Christopher M; Griffin, Robert G

    2013-12-26

    Protein magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy has generated structural models of several amyloid fibril systems, thus providing valuable information regarding the forces and interactions that confer the extraordinary stability of the amyloid architecture. Despite these advances, however, obtaining atomic resolution information describing the higher levels of structural organization within the fibrils remains a significant challenge. Here, we detail MAS NMR experiments and sample labeling schemes designed specifically to probe such higher order amyloid structure, and we have applied them to the fibrils formed by an eleven-residue segment of the amyloidogenic protein transthyretin (TTR(105-115)). These experiments have allowed us to define unambiguously not only the arrangement of the peptide β-strands into β-sheets but also the β-sheet interfaces within each protofilament, and in addition to identify the nature of the protofilament-to-protofilament contacts that lead to the formation of the complete fibril. Our efforts have resulted in 111 quantitative distance and torsion angle restraints (10 per residue) that describe the various levels of structure organization. The experiments benefited extensively from the use of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which in some cases allowed us to shorten the data acquisition time from days to hours and to improve significantly the signal-to-noise ratios of the spectra. The β-sheet interface and protofilament interactions identified here revealed local variations in the structure that result in multiple peaks for the exposed N- and C-termini of the peptide and in inhomogeneous line-broadening for the residues buried within the interior of the fibrils. PMID:24304221

  6. Acid epimerization of 20-keto pregnane glycosides is determined by 2D-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Garca, Vctor P

    2011-05-01

    Carbohydrates influence many essential biological events such as apoptosis, differentiation, tumor metastasis, cancer, neurobiology, immunology, development, host-pathogen interactions, diabetes, signal transduction, protein folding, and many other contexts. We now report on the structure determination of pregnane glycosides isolated from the aerial parts of Ceropegia fusca Bolle (Asclepiadaceae). The observation of cicatrizant, vulnerary and cytostatic activities in some humans and animals of Ceropegia fusca Bolle, a species endemic to the Canary Islands, encouraged us to begin a pharmacological study to determine their exact therapeutic properties. High resolution (1)H-NMR spectra of pregnane glycosides very often display well-resolved signals that can be used as starting points in several selective NMR experiments to study scalar (J coupling), and dipolar (NOE) interactions. ROESY is especially suited for molecules such that ??(c) ~ 1, where ?(c) are the motional correlation times and ? is the angular frequency. In these cases the NOE is nearly zero, while the rotating-frame Overhauser effect spectroscopy (ROESY) is always positive and increases monotonically for increasing values of ?(c). The ROESY shows dipolar interactions cross peaks even in medium-sized molecules which are helpful in unambiguous assignment of all the interglycosidic linkages. Selective excitation was carried out using a double pulsed-field gradient spin-echo sequence (DPFGSE) in which 180 Gaussian pulses are sandwiched between sine shaped z-gradients. Scalar interactions were studied by homonuclear DPFGSE-COSY and DPFGSE-TOCSY experiments, while DPFGSE-ROESY was used to monitor the spatial environment of the selectively excited proton. Dipolar interactions between nuclei close in space can be detected by the 1D GROESY experiment, which is a one-dimensional counterpart of the 2D ROESY method. The C-12 and C-17 configurations were determined by ROESY experiments. PMID:21431831

  7. Skeletal muscle metabolism in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD): an in-vitro proton NMR spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Uma; Atri, Surinder; Sharma, M C; Sarkar, Chitra; Jagannathan, N R

    2003-02-01

    The metabolic differences in the skeletal muscle of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and normal subjects (controls) were investigated using in-vitro high-resolution proton NMR spectroscopy. In all, 56 metabolites were unambiguously identified in the perchloric acid extract of muscle tissue using one- and two-dimensional NMR. The concentrations of glycolytic substrate glucose (Glc; p < 0.05), gluconeogenic amino acids such as glutamine (Gln; p < 0.05) and alanine (Ala; p < 0.05) and the glycolytic product lactate (Lac; p < 0.05) were statistically significantly lower in DMD patients as compared to controls. A significant reduction in the concentrations of total creatine (TCr; p < 0.05), glycerophosphoryl choline + phosphoryl choline + carnitine (GPC/PC/Car; p < 0.05), choline (Cho; p < 0.05) and acetate (Ace; p < 0.05) was also observed in these patients. Decrease in the level of glucose may be attributed to the reduction in the concentrations of gluconeogenic substrates or membrane abnormalities in degenerated muscle of DMD patients. Lower levels of choline containing compounds indicate membrane abnormalities. Decrease in the concentration of lactate in the muscle of DMD patients may be due to the reduction in anaerobic glycolytic activity or lower substrate concentration. The decrease in the concentration of acetate may reflect reduced transport of fatty acids into mitochondria due to decreased concentration of carnitine in DMD patients. Kreb's cycle intermediate alpha-ketoglutarate was observed only in the diseased muscle, which is suggestive of predominant oxidative metabolism for energy generation. PMID:12670601

  8. High-Speed Frequency Modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron for Enhancement of 700-MHz DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, T.; Khutoryan, E. M.; Tatematsu, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Dumbrajs, O.; Matsuki, Y.; Fujiwara, T.

    2015-09-01

    The high-speed frequency modulation of a 460-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GVI (the official name in Osaka University is Gyrotron FU CW GOI) was achieved by modulation of acceleration voltage of beam electrons. The modulation speed f m can be increased up to 10 kHz without decreasing the modulation amplitude δ f of frequency. The amplitude δ f was increased almost linearly with the modulation amplitude of acceleration voltage Δ V a. At the Δ V a = 1 kV, frequency spectrum width df was 50 MHz in the case of f m < 10 kHz. The frequency modulation was observed as both the variation of the IF frequency in the heterodyne detection system measured by a high-speed oscilloscope and the widths of frequency spectra df measured on a frequency spectrum analyzer. Both results well agree reasonably. When f m exceeds 10 kHz, the amplitude δ f is decreased gradually with increasing f m because of the degradation of the used amplifier in response for high-speed modulation. The experiment was performed successfully for both a sinusoidal wave and triangle wave modulations. We can use the high-speed frequency modulation for increasing the enhancement factor of the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which is one of effective and attractive methods for the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy, for example, at 700 MHz. Because the sensitivity of NMR is inversely proportional to the frequency, high-speed frequency modulation can compensate the decreasing the enhancement factor in the high-frequency DNP-NMR spectroscopy and keep the factor at high value. In addition, the high-speed frequency modulation is useful for frequency stabilization by a PID control of an acceleration voltage by feeding back of the fluctuation of frequency. The frequency stabilization in long time is also useful for application of a DNP-NMR spectroscopy to the analysis of complicated protein molecules.

  9. Development of a combined NMR paramagnetic ion-induced line-broadening/dynamic light scattering method for permeability measurements across lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Xiang, T X; Anderson, B D

    1995-11-01

    A combined method using NMR line-broadening for permeant lifetime determination and dynamic light scattering for vesicle size determination has been developed for the measurement of permeability coefficients of ionizable permeants across phospholipid:cholesterol large unilamellar vesicles. The method has been validated by examining its reproducibility and the influence of various factors that might affect the permeability measurements. The vesicle hydrodynamic diameter was varied between 0.1 and 0.2 micron by extruding multilamellar vesicles through polycarbonate membranes with different pore sizes (0.03-0.2 microns). For these large unilamellar vesicles, the normalized size distributions analyzed by the CONTIN method had standard deviations < 0.36, which led to errors in permeability coefficients < 10% as predicted from a theoretical model developed here. The permeability coefficient for acetic acid is independent of its concentration, vesicle hydrodynamic diameter, the concentration of Pr3+, and ionic strength over the ranges 0.01-0.2 M, 0.1-0.2 microns, 0.004-0.04 M, and 0.03-0.3, respectively. Membrane/water and decane/water partition coefficient measurements of acetic acid indicate that the effects of permeant binding onto the bilayer membrane and self-association are negligible within the permeant concentration range 0.01-0.2 M. The addition of Pr3+ ions induces vesicle fusion with rates increasing with temperature and decreasing with cholesterol concentration in the membranes. While the intravesicular resonance intensity for acetic acid decreases continuously with time due to vesicle fusion under certain conditions, the corresponding line width and chemical shift remain constant over the same period, highlighting an important advantage of this NMR method over those based on detecting net flux in response to a concentration gradient as there is no means in the latter experiments of discerning vesicle leakiness from passive diffusion rates. The effective chemical nature of a dimristoylphosphatidylcholine:cholesterol bilayer barrier microenvironment was explored by comparing the transport of two permeants, D-(-)-mandelic acid and phenylacetic acid, to their relative bulk solvent/water partition coefficients using three reference solvents (n-decane, 1,9-decadiene, and isoamyl alcohol). Using the NMR line-broadening method, the permeability coefficients for these two permeants were determined to be (2.9 +/- 0.4) x 10(-4) cm/s and (3.9 +/- 0.7) x 10(-2) cm/s, respectively, at 294 K and Xchol = 0.3. The incremental free energy of transport for the additional OH group in D-(-)-mandelic acid, delta delta G0 = +2.9 kcal/mol, resembles most closely that for the transfer of this group from water to 1,9-decadiene, suggesting that the barrier domain resides in the acyl chain region and is slightly more polar/polarizable than a saturated hydrocarbon, possibly due to the presence of a double bond in cholesterol and/or the proximity of the barrier domain to the hydrophilic interface. PMID:8587048

  10. Conformational solution studies of neuropeptide gamma using CD and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rodziewicz-Motowidło, Sylwia; Brzozowskl, Krzysztof; Legowska, Anna; Liwo, Adam; Silbering, Jerzy; Smoluch, Marek; Rolka, Krzysztof

    2002-05-01

    Neuropeptide gamma is one of the largest members of the tachykinin family of peptides, exhibiting strong agonistic activity towards the NK-2 tachykinin receptor. This peptide was synthesized by the solid-phase method using the Fmoc chemistry. Circular-dichroism spectroscopy (CD) investigations of this peptide were performed in phosphate buffer, in the presence of sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) micelles and trifluoroethanol (TFE) solutions and in DMSO-d6 using the 2D NMR technique in conjunction with two different theoretical approaches. The first assumes multiconformational equilibrium of the peptide studied characterized by the values of statistical weights of low-energy conformations. These calculations were performed using three different force fields ECEPP/3, AMBER4.1 and CHARMM (implemented in the X-PLOR program). The second method incorporates interproton distance and dihedral angle constraints into the starting conformation using the Simulated Annealing algorithm (X-PLOR program). The CD experiments revealed that although the peptide studied is flexible in polar solvents, a tendency to adopt a helical structure was observed in the hydrophobic environment. The NMR data (NOE effects) indicate a helical or reverse structure in the Ile7-His12 fragment of the peptide studied in DMSO-d6 solution. The results obtained cannot be interpreted in terms of a single conformation. Most of the conformations obtained with the ECEPP/3 force field possess a high content of a helical structure. None of the conformers, obtained with the AMBER4.1 and CHARMM force fields, can be considered as the dominant one. In all conformations several beta-turns were detected and in some cases gamma-turns were also found. But in fact, it is rather difficult to select the position of the secondary element(s) present in the structure of NPgamma in solution. All conformers calculated with the X-PLOR program (with using NMR derived distance and torsion angle constraints) are stabilized by several beta-turns. Common structural motives are a type IV beta-turn in the Gln6-His12 fragment. All conformations obtained using two approaches adopt very similar turn shapes in the middle region of molecule and a random structure on the N- and C-terminal fragments. PMID:12043996

  11. Indirectly detected chemical shift correlation NMR spectroscopy in solids under fast magic angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Kanmi

    2011-08-15

    The development of fast magic angle spinning (MAS) opened up an opportunity for the indirect detection of insensitive low-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N) via the sensitive high-{gamma} nuclei (e.g., {sup 1}H and {sup 19}F) in solid-state NMR, with advanced sensitivity and resolution. In this thesis, new methodology utilizing fast MAS is presented, including through-bond indirectly detected heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectroscopy, which is assisted by multiple RF pulse sequences for {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling. Also presented is a simple new strategy for optimization of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H homonuclear decoupling. As applications, various classes of materials, such as catalytic nanoscale materials, biomolecules, and organic complexes, are studied by combining indirect detection and other one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) NMR techniques. Indirectly detected through-bond HETCOR spectroscopy utilizing refocused INEPT (INEPTR) mixing was developed under fast MAS (Chapter 2). The time performance of this approach in {sup 1}H detected 2D {sup 1}H{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} spectra was significantly improved, by a factor of almost 10, compared to the traditional {sup 13}C detected experiments, as demonstrated by measuring naturally abundant organic-inorganic mesoporous hybrid materials. The through-bond scheme was demonstrated as a new analytical tool, which provides complementary structural information in solid-state systems in addition to through-space correlation. To further benefit the sensitivity of the INEPT transfer in rigid solids, the combined rotation and multiple-pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS) was implemented for homonuclear {sup 1}H decoupling under fast MAS (Chapter 3). Several decoupling schemes (PMLG5{sub m}{sup {bar x}}, PMLG5{sub mm}{sup {bar x}x} and SAM3) were analyzed to maximize the performance of through-bond transfer based on decoupling efficiency as well as scaling factors. Indirect detection with assistance of PMLG{sub m}{sup {bar x}} during INEPTR transfer proved to offer the highest sensitivity gains of 3-10. In addition, the CRAMPS sequence was applied under fast MAS to increase the {sup 1}H resolution during t{sub 1} evolution in the traditional, {sup 13}C detected HETCOR scheme. Two naturally abundant solids, tripeptide N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (f-MLF-OH) and brown coal, with well ordered and highly disordered structures, respectively, are studied to confirm the capabilities of these techniques. Concomitantly, a simple optimization of {sup 1}H homonuclear dipolar decoupling at MAS rates exceeding 10 kHz was developed (Chapter 4). The fine-tuned decoupling efficiency can be obtained by minimizing the signal loss due to transverse relaxation in a simple spin-echo experiment, using directly the sample of interest. The excellent agreement between observed decoupling pattern and earlier theoretical predictions confirmed the utility of this strategy. The properties of naturally abundant surface-bound fluorocarbon groups in mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) were investigated by the above-mentioned multidimensional solid-state NMR experiments and theoretical modeling (Chapter 5). Two conformations of (pentafluorophenyl)propyl groups (abbreviated as PFP) were determined as PFP-prone and PFP-upright, whose aromatic rings are located above the siloxane bridges and in roughly upright position, respectively. Several 1D and 2D NMR techniques were implemented in the characterizations, including indirectly detected {sup 1}H{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} and {sup 19}F{l_brace}{sup 13}C{r_brace} 2D HETCOR, Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) assisted {sup 29}Si direct polarization and {sup 29}Si{sup 19}F 2D experiments, 2D double-quantum (DQ) {sup 19}F MAS NMR spectra and spin-echo measurements. Furthermore, conformational details of two types of PFP were confirmed by theoretical calculation, operated by Dr. Takeshi Kobayashi. Finally, the arrangement of two surfactants, cetyltrimetylammoium bromide (CTAB) and cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB), mixed inside the MSN pores, was studied by solid-state NMR (Chapter 6). By analyzing the {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H DQMAS and NOESY correlation spectra, the CTAB and CPB molecules were shown to co-exist inside the pores without forming significant monocomponent domains. A 'folded-over' conformation of CPB headgroups was proposed according to the results from {sup 1}H-{sup 29}Si 2D HETCOR.

  12. Automatic Tuning Matching Cycler (ATMC) in situ NMR spectroscopy as a novel approach for real-time investigations of Li- and Na-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecher, Oliver; Bayley, Paul M.; Liu, Hao; Liu, Zigeng; Trease, Nicole M.; Grey, Clare P.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed and explored the use of a new Automatic Tuning Matching Cycler (ATMC) in situ NMR probe system to track the formation of intermediate phases and investigate electrolyte decomposition during electrochemical cycling of Li- and Na-ion batteries (LIBs and NIBs). The new approach addresses many of the issues arising during in situ NMR, e.g., significantly different shifts of the multi-component samples, changing sample conditions (such as the magnetic susceptibility and conductivity) during cycling, signal broadening due to paramagnetism as well as interferences between the NMR and external cycler circuit that might impair the experiments. We provide practical insight into how to conduct ATMC in situ NMR experiments and discuss applications of the methodology to LiFePO4 (LFP) and Na3V2(PO4)2F3 cathodes as well as Na metal anodes. Automatic frequency sweep 7Li in situ NMR reveals significant changes of the strongly paramagnetic broadened LFP line shape in agreement with the structural changes due to delithiation. Additionally, 31P in situ NMR shows a full separation of the electrolyte and cathode NMR signals and is a key feature for a deeper understanding of the processes occurring during charge/discharge on the local atomic scale of NMR. 31P in situ NMR with "on-the-fly" re-calibrated, varying carrier frequencies on Na3V2(PO4)2F3 as a cathode in a NIB enabled the detection of different P signals within a huge frequency range of 4000 ppm. The experiments show a significant shift and changes in the number as well as intensities of 31P signals during desodiation/sodiation of the cathode. The in situ experiments reveal changes of local P environments that in part have not been seen in ex situ NMR investigations. Furthermore, we applied ATMC 23Na in situ NMR on symmetrical Na-Na cells during galvanostatic plating. An automatic adjustment of the NMR carrier frequency during the in situ experiment ensured on-resonance conditions for the Na metal and electrolyte peak, respectively. Thus, interleaved measurements with different optimal NMR set-ups for the metal and electrolyte, respectively, became possible. This allowed the formation of different Na metal species as well as a quantification of electrolyte consumption during the electrochemical experiment to be monitored. The new approach is likely to benefit a further understanding of Na-ion battery chemistries.

  13. QUANTITATIVE SOLID-STATE 13C NMR SPECTROSCOPY OF ORGANIC MATTER FRACTIONS IN LOWLAND RICE SOILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spin counting on solid-state **13C cross-polarization (CP) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of two humic fractions isolated from tropical lowland soils showed that only 32-81% of potential **13C NMR signal was detected. The observability of **13C NMR signal (Cobs) was higher in the mobile h...

  14. Direct detection of ligand binding to Sepharose-immobilised protein using saturation transfer double difference (STDD) NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Haselhorst, Thomas; Muenster-Kuehnel, Anja K.; Oschlies, Melanie; Tiralongo, Joe; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Itzstein, Mark von . E-mail: m.vonitzstein@griffith.edu.au

    2007-08-10

    We report an easy and direct application of 'Saturation Transfer Double Difference' (STDD) NMR spectroscopy to identify ligands that bind to a Sepharose-immobilised target protein. The model protein, cytidine 5'-monophosphate sialic acid (CMP-Sia) synthetase, was expressed as a Strep-Tag II fusion protein and immobilised on Strep-Tactin Sepharose. STD NMR experiments of the protein-enriched Sepharose matrix in the presence of a binding ligand (cytidine 5'-triphosphate, CTP) and a non-binding ligand ({alpha}/{beta}-glucose) clearly show that CTP binds to the immobilised enzyme, whereas glucose has no affinity. This approach has three major advantages: (a) only low quantities of protein are required, (b) no specialised NMR technology or the application of additional data analysis by non-routine methods is required, and (c) easy multiple use of the immobilised protein is available.

  15. Characterization of Al30 in commercial poly-aluminum chlorohydrate by solid-state (27)Al NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brian L; Vaughn, John S; Smart, Scott; Pan, Long

    2016-08-15

    Investigation of commercially produced hydrolysis salts of aluminum by solid-state (27)Al NMR spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) reveals well-defined and distinct Al environments that can be related to physicochemical properties. (27)Al MAS and MQ-MAS NMR spectroscopic data show that the local structure of the solids is dominated by moieties that closely resemble the Al30 polyoxocation (Al30O8(OH)56(H2O)26(18+)), accounting for 72-85% of the total Al. These Al30-like clusters elute as several size fractions by SEC. Comparison of the SEC and NMR results indicates that the Al30-like clusters includes intact isolated clusters, moieties of larger polymers or aggregates, and possibly fragments resembling δ-Al13 Keggin clusters. The coagulation efficacy of the solids appears to correlate best with the abundance of intact Al30-like clusters and of smaller species available to promote condensation reactions. PMID:27232539

  16. Enhanced detection of aldehydes in Extra-Virgin Olive Oil by means of band selective NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugo, Giacomo; Rotondo, Archimede; Mallamace, Domenico; Cicero, Nicola; Salvo, Andrea; Rotondo, Enrico; Corsaro, Carmelo

    2015-02-01

    High resolution Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a very powerful tool for comprehensive food analyses and especially for Extra-Virgin Olive Oils (EVOOs). We use the NMR technique to study the spectral region of aldehydes (8-10 ppm) for EVOOs coming from the south part of Italy. We perform novel experiments by using mono and bidimensional band selective spin-echo pulse sequences and identify four structural classes of aldehydes in EVOOs. For the first time such species are identified in EVOOs without any chemical treatment; only dilution with CDCl3 is employed. This would allow the discrimination of different EVOOs for the aldehydes content increasing the potentiality of the NMR technique in the screening of metabolites for geographical characterization of EVOOs.

  17. Complex mixture analysis of organic compounds in green coffee bean extract by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wei, Feifei; Furihata, Kazuo; Hu, Fangyu; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2010-11-01

    A complex mixture analysis by one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was carried out for the first time for the identification and quantification of organic compounds in green coffee bean extract (GCBE). A combination of (1)H-(1)H DQF-COSY, (1)H-(13)C HSQC, and (1)H-(13)C CT-HMBC two-dimensional sequences was used, and 16 compounds were identified. In particular, three isomers of caffeoylquinic acid were identified in the complex mixture without any separation. In addition, GCBE components were quantified by the integration of carbon signals by use of a relaxation reagent and an inverse-gated decoupling method without a nuclear Overhauser effect. This NMR methodology provides detailed information about the kinds and amounts of GCBE components, and in our study, the chemical makeup of GCBE was clarified by the NMR results. PMID:20818806

  18. Investigation of Local Structures in Layered Niobates by Solid-state NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting

    Research on ion-exchangeable layered niobates has attracted great attention due to their unique structures and corresponding variations in properties and applications, such as ion conductors, solid acids, and water splitting catalysts. Families of layered niobates include double-layered or triple-layered Dion-Jacobson type perovskites (ALaNb2O7, A = Cs, Rb, K, H; AM2Nb3O10, A = Rb, K, H; M = Sr, Ca), layered niobates with both edge and corner sharing of NbO6 octahedra (KNb3O8, HNb3O6, Nb 6O17 and H4Nb6O17) and many others. Lately, more developments in the layered niobates through a variety of topochemical manipulations have been achieved. The topochemical reactions include ion exchange, exfoliation, substitution, and etc. As a result, many new materials have been successfully prepared, for example, solid solutions (ALa2NbTi2O10, ACaLaNb2TiO 10 and ACa2Nb3-xTaxO10, etc.), nanosheets (HNb3O8, H4Nb6O17, HLaNb2O7, HCa2Nb3O10, etc., to intercalate with organic molecules such as tetrabutylammonium hydroxide or n-butylamines), and nanoscrolls (from H2K2Nb 6O17). While these structural modifications often induce improvements in properties, the fundamental mechanisms of improvements in properties upon the modifications, especially local structural arrangements are poorly understood, which is often limited by structural characterizations. Particularly, the characterizations of the exfoliated nanosheets can be difficult by conventional X-ray diffraction (XRD) method due to disordered structures. Alternatively, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a useful tool to study local structures in solids. The structural information can be extracted by examining intrinsic interactions, such as quadrupolar, chemical shielding, and dipolar interactions, which are all associated with local environments surrounding a specific nucleus, 1H or 93Nb in layered niobates. The ultimate goal of this dissertation is to understand the relationships between local structures of layered niobates and their chemical or physical properties, and provide insights into further modifications and improvements. The primary objectives of this work are summarized below: I. Synthesis of series of layered niobates (ALaNb2O7 , A = Cs, Rb, K; KNb3O8; K4Nb 6O17; RbLa2NbTi2O10 and RbCaLaNb2TiO10) by microwave heating or cation exchange methods, their protonated forms by acid exchange (HLaNb2O 7, H3ONb3O8 and HNb3O 8, H4Nb8O17, HLa2NbTi 2O10 and HCaLaNb2TiO10), and three nanosheet niobates by exfoliation (HNb3O8, H4Nb 6O17 and HLaNb2O7 nanosheets). II. Structural characterizations of all niobates by powder XRD and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Powder XRD is used to determine lattice constants and long-range structural ordering. Solid-state NMR is used to determine the electric field gradient parameters, chemical shift anisotropy parameters and dipolar coupling constants. Solid-state NMR techniques include 93Nb MQMAS, wide-line VOCS echo and WURST-echo; 1H{93Nb} CP, TRAPDOR, S-RESPDOR and iS-RESPDOR experiments. III. Understanding the trends of changes in NMR parameters with respect to cation exchange, exfoliation and compositional alteration, and correlation of the NMR parameters with local environments and possible structural rearrangements. IV. Identification of proton locations in the acid-exchanged niobates and surface acidity for the exfoliated nanosheets, based on 1H chemical shifts and dipolar coupling information from CP, S-RESPDOR and iS-RESPDOR experiments.

  19. The Stoichiometry of Synthetic Alunite as a Function of Hydrothermal Aging Investigated by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy, Powder X-ray Diffraction and Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Grube, Elisabeth; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2015-05-01

    The stoichiometry of a series of synthetic alunite [nominally KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6] samples prepared by hydrothermal methods as a function of reaction time (1–31 days) has been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as well as solid-state 1H and 27Al magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 1H MAS NMR spectra recorded at high magnetic field (21.1 T, 900 MHz) allowed for a clear separation of the different proton environments and for quantitative determination of the aluminum vacancy concentration as a function of time. The concentration of structural defects determined from, i.e., aluminum vacancies was reduced from 4 to 1 %, as the reaction time was extended from one to 31 days based on 1H MAS NMR. This was further supported by an increase of the unit cell parameter c, which is indicative of the relative concentration of potassium defects present, from 17.261(1) to 17.324(5) Å. Solid-state 27Al MAS NMR revealed a decrease in the defect concentration as a function of time and showed the presence of 7–10 % impurities in the samples.

  20. The stoichiometry of synthetic alunite as a function of hydrothermal aging investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grube, Elisabeth; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2015-05-01

    The stoichiometry of a series of synthetic alunite [nominally KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6] samples prepared by hydrothermal methods as a function of reaction time (1-31 days) has been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as well as solid-state 1H and 27Al magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 1H MAS NMR spectra recorded at high magnetic field (21.1 T, 900 MHz) allowed for a clear separation of the different proton environments and for quantitative determination of the aluminum vacancy concentration as a function of time. The concentration of structural defects determined from, i.e., aluminum vacancies was reduced from 4 to 1 %, as the reaction time was extended from one to 31 days based on 1H MAS NMR. This was further supported by an increase of the unit cell parameter c, which is indicative of the relative concentration of potassium defects present, from 17.261(1) to 17.324(5) Å. Solid-state 27Al MAS NMR revealed a decrease in the defect concentration as a function of time and showed the presence of 7-10 % impurities in the samples.

  1. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the. gamma. -carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, D.G.; Sudmeier, J.L.; Bachovchin, W.W.; Kanagy, C.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. )

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational {gamma}-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing {alpha}-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues {minus}13 to {minus}3 form an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site, four residues ({minus}18, {minus}17, {minus}16, and {minus}15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue ({minus}10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic {alpha}-helix in the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site is discussed.

  2. Secondary organic aerosol formation from multiphase oxidation of limonene by ozone: mechanistic constraints via two-dimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maksymiuk, Christina S; Gayahtri, Chakicherla; Gil, Roberto R; Donahue, Neil M

    2009-09-28

    Because it is doubly unsaturated, gaseous limonene and ozone reactions exhibit considerable potential for not only a large quantity of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), but also a diverse and complicated product mixture influenced by reactant conditions. We explore the chemistry of limonene ozonolysis and provide evidence that under low-NOx conditions, the endocyclic double bond is oxidized in the gas phase, while under excess ozone conditions, the residual exocyclic double bond in condensed-phase products is heterogeneously oxidized by ozone. We use regular and multinuclear-multidimensional NMR spectroscopy, in particular 1D 1H-NMR, 1H,1H-COSY correlation spectroscopy, and 1H,13C-HSQC (heteronuclear single quantum coherence). For structural assignments we simulate 1H and 13C NMR spectra with ACDLabs online, relying representative products consistent with the postulated reaction mechanism. The 1-D 1H-NMR data allow us to quantify the extent to which the residual unsaturation is oxidized with rising ozone, confirming our hypothesis that the residual unsaturation is oxidized via heterogeneous uptake of ozone to fresh SOA particles. PMID:19727487

  3. Diffusion in Model Networks as Studied by NMR and Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the diffusion of small solvent molecules (octane) and larger hydrophobic dye probes in octane-swollen poly(dimethyl siloxane) linear-chain solutions and end-linked model networks, using pulsed-gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), respectively, focusing on diffusion in the bulk polymer up to the equilibrium degree of swelling of the networks, that is, 4.8 at most. The combination of these results allows for new conclusions on the feasibility of different theories describing probe diffusion in concentrated polymer systems. While octane diffusion shows no cross-link dependence, the larger dyes are increasingly restricted by fixed chemical meshes. The simple Fujita free-volume theory proved most feasible to describe probe diffusion in linear long-chain solutions with realistic parameters, while better fits were obtained assuming a stretched exponential dependence on concentration. Importantly, we have analyzed the cross-link specific effect on probe diffusion independently of any specific model by comparing the best-fit interpolation of the solution data with the diffusion in the networks. The most reasonable description is obtained by assuming that the cross-link effect is additive in the effective friction coefficient of the probes. The concentration dependences as well as the data compared at the equilibrium degrees of swelling indicate that swelling heterogeneities and diffusant shape have a substantial influence on small-molecule diffusion in networks. PMID:19812716

  4. Application of NMR Spectroscopy in the Assessment of Radiation Dose in Human Primary Cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Mo; Seong Hyeon, Jin; Ra Kim, So; Kyeong Lee, Eun; Jin Yun, Hyun; Young Kim, Sun; Kee Chae, Young

    2015-11-01

    We employed the primary cell model system as a first step toward establishing a method to assess the influence of ionizing radiation by using a combination of common and abundant metabolites. We applied X-ray irradiation amounts of 0, 1, and 5 Gy to the cells that were harvested 24, 48, or 72 h later, and profiled metabolites by 2D-NMR spectroscopy to sort out candidate molecules that could be used to distinguish the samples under different irradiation conditions. We traced metabolites stemming from the input ¹³C-glucose, identified twelve of them from the cell extracts, and applied statistical analysis to find out that all the metabolites, including glycine, alanine, and gluatamic acid, increased upon irradiation. The combinatorial use of the selected metabolites showed promising results where the product of signal intensities of alanine and lactate could differentiate samples according to the dose of X-ray irradiation. We hope that this work can form a base for treating radiation-poisoned patients in the future. PMID:26567947

  5. Near constant loss regime in fast ionic conductors analyzed by impedance and NMR spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Bucheli, Wilmer; Arbi, Kamel; Sanz, Jesús; Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Kamba, Stanislav; Várez, Alejandro; Jimenez, Ricardo

    2014-08-01

    Universal dielectric response (UDR) and nearly constant loss (NCL) dispersive regimes have been investigated in fast ion conductors with perovskite and NASICON structure by using NMR and impedance spectroscopy (IS). In this study, the electrical behavior of La(0.5)Li(0.5)TiO3 (LLTO-05) perovskite and Li(1.2)Ti(1.8)Al(0.2)(PO4)3 (LTAP0-02) NASICON compounds was investigated. In both systems a three-dimensional network of conduction paths is present. In the Li-rich LLTO-05 sample, lithium and La are randomly distributed on A-sites of perovskites, but in LTAP0-02 Li and cation vacancies are preferentially disposed at M1 and M2 sites. In perovskite compounds, local motions produced inside unit cells are responsible for the large "near constant loss" regime detected at low temperatures, however, in the case of NASICON compounds, local motions not participating in long-range charge transport were not detected. In both analyzed systems long-range correlated motions are responsible for dc-conductivity values of ceramic grains near 10(-3) S cm(-1) at room temperature, indicating that low-temperature local motions, producing large NCL contribution, are not required to achieve the highest ionic conductivities. PMID:24944081

  6. Structural investigations of borosilicate glasses containing MoO 3 by MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caurant, D.; Majérus, O.; Fadel, E.; Quintas, A.; Gervais, C.; Charpentier, T.; Neuville, D.

    2010-01-01

    High molybdenum concentration in glass compositions may lead to alkali and alkaline-earth molybdates crystallization during melt cooling that must be controlled particularly during the preparation of highly radioactive nuclear glassy waste forms. To understand the effect of molybdenum addition on the structure of a simplified nuclear glass and to know how composition changes can affect molybdates crystallization tendency, the structure of two glass series belonging to the SiO 2-B 2O 3-Na 2O-CaO-MoO 3 system was studied by 29Si, 11B, 23Na MAS NMR and Raman spectroscopies by increasing MoO 3 or B 2O 3 concentrations. Increasing MoO 3 amount induced an increase of the silicate network reticulation but no significant effect was observed on the proportion of BO4- units and on the distribution of Na + cations in glass structure. By increasing B 2O 3 concentration, a strong evolution of the distribution of Na + cations was observed that could explain the evolution of the nature of molybdate crystals (CaMoO 4 or Na 2MoO 4) formed during melt cooling.

  7. Hetergeneous tumour response to photodynamic therapy assessed by in vivo localised 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ceckler, T. L.; Gibson, S. L.; Kennedy, S. D.; Hill, R.; Bryant, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is efficacious in the treatment of small malignant lesions when all cells in the tumour receive sufficient drug, oxygen and light to induce a photodynamic effect capable of complete cytotoxicity. In large tumours, only partial effectiveness is observed presumably because of insufficient light penetration into the tissue. The heterogeneity of the metabolic response in mammary tumours following PDT has been followed in vivo using localised phosphorus NMR spectroscopy. Alterations in nucleoside triphosphates (NTP), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and pH within localised regions of the tumour were monitored over 24-48 h following PDT irradiation of the tumour. Reduction of NTP and increases in Pi were observed at 4-6 h after PDT irradiation in all regions of treated tumours. The uppermost regions of the tumours (those nearest the skin surface and exposed to the greatest light fluence) displayed the greatest and most prolonged reduction of NTP and concomitant increase in Pi resulting in necrosis. The metabolite concentrations in tumour regions located towards the base of the tumour returned a near pre-treatment levels by 24-48 h after irradiation. The ability to follow heterogeneous metabolic responses in situ provides one means to assess the degree of metabolic inhibition which subsequently leads to tumour necrosis. Images Figure 4 PMID:1829953

  8. Conformational studies on five octasaccharides isolated from chondroitin sulfate using NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Véronique; Chevalier, Franck; Imberty, Anne; Leeflang, Bas R; Basappa; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Kamerling, Johannis P

    2007-02-01

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CS-PG) are involved in the regulation of the central nervous system in vertebrates due to their presence on cell surfaces and in the extracellular matrix of tissues. The CS moieties are built up from repeating -4)GlcA(beta1-3)GalNAc(beta1- disaccharide units, partly O-sulfated at different positions. The presence of the disulfated disaccharide D-unit, GlcA2S(beta1-3)GalNAc6S, in the CS moiety of the proteoglycan DSD-1-PG/phosphacan, correlates with neurite outgrowth promotion. The binding of monoclonal antibody (mAb) 473HD to DSD-1-PG, reducing neuronal stimulation, is inhibited by shark cartilage CS-D. CS-D is also recognized by two other mAbs, MO-225 and CS-56. Conformational studies were performed using NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling on five octasaccharides isolated from shark cartilage CS-D. These octasaccharides present different binding properties toward the three mAbs. The combination of the experimental and theoretical approaches revealed that the sulfate group at position 2 of GlcA in disaccharide D and the presence of an exocyclic negative tail in disaccharides C [GlcA(beta1-3)GalNAc6S] and DeltaC [Delta4,5HexA(alpha1-3)GalNAc6S] are important for antibody recognition. PMID:17260946

  9. Thermodynamic Study on the Protonation Reactions of Glyphosate in Aqueous Solution: Potentiometry, Calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bijun; Dong, Lan; Yu, Qianhong; Li, Xingliang; Wu, Fengchang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Luo, Shunzhong

    2016-03-10

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] has been described as the ideal herbicide because of its unique properties. There is some conflicting information concerning the structures and conformations involved in the protonation process of glyphosate. Protonation may influence the chemical and physical properties of glyphosate, modifying its structure and the chemical processes in which it is involved. To better understand the species in solution associated with changes in pH, thermodynamic study (potentiometry, calorimetry and NMR spectroscopy) about the protonation pathway of glyphosate is performed. Experimental results confirmed that the order of successive protonation sites of totally deprotonated glyphosate is phosphonate oxygen, amino nitrogen, and finally carboxylate oxygen. This trend is in agreement with the most recent theoretical work in the literature on the subject ( J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, , 119 , 5241 - 5249 ). The result is important because it confirms that the protonated site of glyphosate in pH range 7-8, is not on the amino but on the phosphonate group instead. This corrected information can improve the understanding of the glyphosate chemical and biochemical action. PMID:26862689

  10. Unraveling complex small-molecule binding mechanisms by using simple NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Quinternet, Marc; Starck, Jean-Philippe; Delsuc, Marc-André; Kieffer, Bruno

    2012-03-26

    Heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy provides a unique way to obtain site-specific information about protein-ligand interactions. Usually, such studies rely on the availability of isotopically labeled proteins, thereby allowing both editing of the spectra and ligand signals to be filtered out. Herein, we report that the use of the methyl SOFAST correlation experiment enables the determination of site-specific equilibrium binding constants by using unlabeled proteins. By using the binding of L- and D-tryptophan to serum albumin as a test case, we determined very accurate dissociation constants for both the high- and low-affinity sites present at the protein surface. The values of site-specific dissociation constants were closer to those obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry than those obtained from ligand-observed methods, such as saturation transfer difference. The possibility of measuring ligand binding to serum albumin at physiological concentrations with unlabeled proteins may open up new perspectives in the field of drug discovery. PMID:22336999

  11. 1H NMR Spectroscopy and MVA Analysis of Diplodus sargus Eating the Exotic Pest Caulerpa cylindracea

    PubMed Central

    De Pascali, Sandra A.; Del Coco, Laura; Felline, Serena; Mollo, Ernesto; Terlizzi, Antonio; Fanizzi, Francesco P.

    2015-01-01

    The green alga Caulerpa cylindracea is a non-autochthonous and invasive species that is severely affecting the native communities in the Mediterranean Sea. Recent researches show that the native edible fish Diplodus sargus actively feeds on this alga and cellular and physiological alterations have been related to the novel alimentary habits. The complex effects of such a trophic exposure to the invasive pest are still poorly understood. Here we report on the metabolic profiles of plasma from D. sargus individuals exposed to C. cylindracea along the southern Italian coast, using 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis (Principal Component Analysis, PCA, Orthogonal Partial Least Square, PLS, and Orthogonal Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis, OPLS-DA). Fish were sampled in two seasonal periods from three different locations, each characterized by a different degree of algal abundance. The levels of the algal bisindole alkaloid caulerpin, which is accumulated in the fish tissues, was used as an indicator of the trophic exposure to the seaweed and related to the plasma metabolic profiles. The profiles appeared clearly influenced by the sampling period beside the content of caulerpin, while the analyses also supported a moderate alteration of lipid and choline metabolism related to the Caulerpa-based diet. PMID:26058009

  12. Detection of Anisotropy in Cartilage Using 2H Double-Quantum-Filtered NMR-Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharf, Y.; Eliav, U.; Shinar, H.; Navon, G.

    Double-quantum-filtered (DQF) NMR spectroscopy of I = 1 spin systems is a diagnostic tool for the detection of anisotropy in macroscopically disordered systems. For deuterium, this method reveals the presence of a residual quadrupolar interaction for D 2O in bovine nasal cartilage. This tissue is not macroscopically ordered and the quadrupolar splitting is not resolved. Fitting the calculated spectral lineshapes to the experimental results was possible only when a distribution of the residual quadrupolar interaction, omega(q), was assumed. The series of DQF lineshapes obtained for different creation times in the DQF experiment could be fitted using a single set of three parameters: the average residual quadrupolar interaction overlineω q/2π = 110 Hz, its standard deviation Δω q/2π = 73 Hz, and the transverse relaxation rate of 63 s -1. Separate deuterium DQF measurements for the constituents of the cartilage, collagen, and chondroitin sulfate indicated that the DQF spectra of cartilage are the result of anisotropic motion of D 2O due to binding to the fibrous collagen in the tissue.

  13. 1H NMR Spectroscopy and MVA Analysis of Diplodus sargus Eating the Exotic Pest Caulerpa cylindracea.

    PubMed

    De Pascali, Sandra A; Del Coco, Laura; Felline, Serena; Mollo, Ernesto; Terlizzi, Antonio; Fanizzi, Francesco P

    2015-06-01

    The green alga Caulerpa cylindracea is a non-autochthonous and invasive species that is severely affecting the native communities in the Mediterranean Sea. Recent researches show that the native edible fish Diplodus sargus actively feeds on this alga and cellular and physiological alterations have been related to the novel alimentary habits. The complex effects of such a trophic exposure to the invasive pest are still poorly understood. Here we report on the metabolic profiles of plasma from D. sargus individuals exposed to C. cylindracea along the southern Italian coast, using 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis (Principal Component Analysis, PCA, Orthogonal Partial Least Square, PLS, and Orthogonal Partial Least Square Discriminant Analysis, OPLS-DA). Fish were sampled in two seasonal periods from three different locations, each characterized by a different degree of algal abundance. The levels of the algal bisindole alkaloid caulerpin, which is accumulated in the fish tissues, was used as an indicator of the trophic exposure to the seaweed and related to the plasma metabolic profiles. The profiles appeared clearly influenced by the sampling period beside the content of caulerpin, while the analyses also supported a moderate alteration of lipid and choline metabolism related to the Caulerpa-based diet. PMID:26058009

  14. Evaluation of characteristic deuterium distributions of ephedrines and methamphetamines by NMR spectroscopy for drug profiling.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Teruki; Urano, Yasuteru; Makino, Yukiko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Kawahara, Nobuo; Goda, Yukihiro; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2008-02-15

    We have established a method for quantitative analysis of the deuterium contents (D/H) at the phenyl, methine, benzyl, N-methyl and methyl groups of l-ephedrine/HCl, d-pseudoephedrine/HCl and methamphetamine/HCl by 2H NMR spectroscopy. Comparison of the 5 position-specific D/H values of l-ephedrine/HCl and d-pseudoephedrine/HCl prepared by three methods (chemical synthesis, semichemical synthesis, and biosynthesis) showed that chemically synthesized ephedrines and semisynthetic ephedrines have highly specific distributions of deuterium at the methine position and at the benzyl position, compared with the other positions. The classification of several methamphetamine samples seized in Japan in terms of the D/H values at these two positions clearly showed that the methamphetamine samples had been synthesized from ephedrines extracted from Ephedra plants or semisynthetic ephedrines but not from synthetic ephedrine. This isotope ratio analysis method should be useful to trace the origins of seized methamphetamine in Southeast Asia. PMID:18271510

  15. Probing the structural details of xylan degradation by real-time NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Bent Ole; Lok, Finn; Meier, Sebastian

    2014-11-01

    The biodegradation of abundantly available cell wall polysaccharides has recently received much attention, not least because cell wall polysaccharides are substrates for the human gut microbiota and for environmentally sustainable processes of biomass conversion to value-added compounds. A major fraction of cereal cell wall polysaccharides consists of arabinoxylans. Arabinoxylan and its degradation products are therefore present in a variety of agro-industrial residues and products. Here, we undertook to track the structural details of wheat arabinoxylan degradation with high resolution NMR spectroscopy. More than 15 carbohydrate residues were distinguished in the substrate and more than 20 residues in partially degraded samples without any sample cleanup. The resolution of a plethora of structural motifs in situ permits the readout of persisting structures in degradation processes and in products. Reaction progress was visualized for the biodegradation of arabinoxylan by different crude microbial enzyme preparations. The direct observation of structural details in complex mixtures containing arabinoxylan fragments is significant, as such structural details reportedly modulate the health-promoting functions of arabinoxylan fragments. PMID:25129786

  16. Direct measurement of brain glucose concentrations in humans by 13C NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Gruetter, R; Novotny, E J; Boulware, S D; Rothman, D L; Mason, G F; Shulman, G I; Shulman, R G; Tamborlane, W V

    1992-01-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in the normal human brain. It is generally assumed that glucose transport into the brain is not rate-limiting for metabolism. Since brain glucose concentrations cannot be determined directly by radiotracer techniques, we used 13C NMR spectroscopy after infusing enriched D-[1-13C]glucose to measure brain glucose concentrations at euglycemia and at hyperglycemia (range, 4.5-12.1 mM) in six healthy children (13-16 years old). Brain glucose concentrations averaged 1.0 +/- 0.1 mumol/ml at euglycemia (4.7 +/- 0.3 mM plasma) and 1.8-2.7 mumol/ml at hyperglycemia (7.3-12.1 mM plasma). Michaelis-Menten parameters of transport were calculated to be Kt = 6.2 +/- 1.7 mM and Tmax = 1.2 +/- 0.1 mumol/g.min from the relationship between plasma and brain glucose concentrations. The brain glucose concentrations and transport constants are consistent with transport not being rate-limiting for resting brain metabolism at plasma levels greater than 3 mM. PMID:1736294

  17. 31P NMR spectroscopy for quantification of moieties present in the backbone of poly(aryloxycyclotriphosphazene)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Shukri, Salah Mahdi

    2015-03-01

    A new method for semi-quantification of the moieties present in the back bone of poly(aryloxycyclotriphosphazene) using 31P NMR spectroscopy was proposed based on integral values and number of phosphorus atoms of the representative resonance. Poly(m-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazenes with a different degree of crosslink were synthesized from the reaction of hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene (NPCl2)3 with 1,3-benzenediol and triethylamine in five different mole ratios, afforded structurally different products designated as PI-PV. The structures of these products and their isomeric compositions were identified based on the correlation between chemical shifts and JPP coupling constants. The data clearly demonstrated presence of a mixture contains different substitution modes and isomers. When the mole ratio of the reactants is in equal amount, the non-geminal mode is predominantly formed of about 89.03% and also geminal mode of about 10.95% has been observed. The formation of the later increased to 52.19% when the ratio of substituent was raised at the tris and tetra stage of chlorine replacement.

  18. Analysis of the hydrolysis of inulin using real time 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, Thomas; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Johnston, Martin R.; Cooper, Peter D.; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis of various carbohydrates was investigated under acidic conditions in real time by 1H NMR spectroscopy, with a focus on the polysaccharide inulin. Sucrose was used as a model compound to illustrate the applicability of this technique. The hydrolysis of sucrose was shown to follow pseudo first order kinetics and have an activation energy of 107.0 kJ.mol−1 (s.d. 1.7 kJ.mol−1). Inulin, pullulan and glycogen also all followed pseudo first order kinetics, but had an initiation phase at least partially generated by the protonation of the glycosidic bonds. It was also demonstrated that polysaccharide chain length has an effect on the hydrolysis of inulin. For short chain inulin (DPn 18, s.d. 0.70) the activation energy calculated for the hydrolytic cleavage of glucose was similar to sucrose at 108.5 kJ.mol−1 (std. dev. 0.60). For long chain inulin (DPn 30, s.d. 1.3) the activation energy for the hydrolytic cleavage of glucose was reduced to 80.5 kJ.mol−1 (s.d. 2.3 kJ.mol−1). This anomaly has been attributed to varied conformations for the two different lengths of inulin chain in solution. PMID:22464225

  19. Copper doping of ZnO crystals by transmutation of {sup 64}Zn to {sup 65}Cu: An electron paramagnetic resonance and gamma spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Recker, M. C.; McClory, J. W. Holston, M. S.; Golden, E. M.; Giles, N. C.; Halliburton, L. E.

    2014-06-28

    Transmutation of {sup 64}Zn to {sup 65}Cu has been observed in a ZnO crystal irradiated with neutrons. The crystal was characterized with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) before and after the irradiation and with gamma spectroscopy after the irradiation. Major features in the gamma spectrum of the neutron-irradiated crystal included the primary 1115.5 keV gamma ray from the {sup 65}Zn decay and the positron annihilation peak at 511 keV. Their presence confirmed the successful transmutation of {sup 64}Zn nuclei to {sup 65}Cu. Additional direct evidence for transmutation was obtained from the EPR of Cu{sup 2+} ions (where {sup 63}Cu and {sup 65}Cu hyperfine lines are easily resolved). A spectrum from isolated Cu{sup 2+} (3d{sup 9}) ions acquired after the neutron irradiation showed only hyperfine lines from {sup 65}Cu nuclei. The absence of {sup 63}Cu lines in this Cu{sup 2+} spectrum left no doubt that the observed {sup 65}Cu signals were due to transmuted {sup 65}Cu nuclei created as a result of the neutron irradiation. Small concentrations of copper, in the form of Cu{sup +}-H complexes, were inadvertently present in our as-grown ZnO crystal. These Cu{sup +}-H complexes are not affected by the neutron irradiation, but they dissociate when a crystal is heated to 900 °C. This behavior allowed EPR to distinguish between the copper initially in the crystal and the copper subsequently produced by the neutron irradiation. In addition to transmutation, a second major effect of the neutron irradiation was the formation of zinc and oxygen vacancies by displacement. These vacancies were observed with EPR.

  20. An electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy investigation of the retention mechanisms of Mn and Cu in the nanopore channels of three zeolite minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Daniel R.; Schulthess, Cristian P.; Amonette, James E.; Walter, Eric D.

    2012-12-01

    The adsorption mechanisms of divalent cations in zeolite nanopore channels can vary as a function of their pore dimensions. The nanopore inner-sphere enhancement (NISE) theory predicts that ions may dehydrate inside small nanopore channels in order to adsorb more closely to the mineral surface if the nanopore channel is sufficiently small. The results of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy study of Mn and Cu adsorption on the zeolite minerals zeolite Y (large nanopores), ZSM-5 (intermediate nanopores), and mordenite (small nanopores) are presented. The Cu and Mn cations both adsorbed via an outer-sphere mechanism on zeolite Y based on the similarity between the adsorbed spectra and the aqueous spectra. Conversely, Mn and Cu adsorbed via an inner-sphere mechanism on mordenite based on spectrum asymmetry and peak broadening of the adsorbed spectra. However, Mn adsorbed via an outer-sphere mechanism on ZSM-5, whereas Cu adsorbed on ZSM-5 shows a high degree of surface interaction that indicates that it is adsorbed closer to the mineral surface. Evidence of dehydration and immobility was more readily evident in the spectrum of mordenite than ZSM-5, indicating that Cu was not as close to the surface on ZSM-5 as it was when adsorbed on mordenite. Divalent Mn cations are strongly hydrated and are held strongly only in zeolites with small nanopore channels. Divalent Cu cations are also strongly hydrated, but can dehydrate more easily, presumably due to the Jahn-Teller effect, and are held strongly in zeolites with medium sized nanopore channels or smaller.

  1. Structural and functional modifications of the manganese cluster in Ca(2+)-depleted S1 and S2 states: electron paramagnetic resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies.

    PubMed

    Ono, T; Kusunoki, M; Matsushita, T; Oyanagi, H; Inoue, Y

    1991-07-16

    The effect of extraction of weakly bound Ca2+ by low-pH treatment on the O2-evolving apparatus was studied by use of low-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In low-pH-treated PSII membranes, an S2 EPR multiline signal with modified line shape was induced by illumination at 0 degrees C, but its signal amplitude decreased upon lowering the excitation temperature with concomitant oxidation of cytochrome (cyt) b-559 in place of Mn. The half-inhibition temperature for formation of the modified multiline signal was found at -33 degrees C, which was much higher than that for formation of the normal S2 state in untreated control membranes. Signal IIf was normally induced down to -30 degrees C, but its dependence on excitation temperature was different from that for modified S2. This was interpreted as indicating that the low-temperature blockage of modified S2 formation is due to the incapability of electron abstraction from the Mn cluster. The Mn K-edge of X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectrum shifted to lower energy by 0.8 eV after low-pH treatment, but the shift was reversed by addition of Ca2+. Upon illumination at 0 degrees C of treated membranes, the K-edge energy was up-shifted by 0.8 eV, but was not upon illumination at 210 K. These results were interpreted as indicating that extraction of weakly bound Ca2+ by low-pH treatment gives rise to structural and functional modulations of the Mn cluster. PMID:1648962

  2. Multiple structural states exist throughout the helical nucleation sequence of the intrinsically disordered protein stathmin, as reported by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chui, Ashley J; López, Carlos J; Brooks, Evan K; Chua, Katherina C; Doupey, Tonia G; Foltz, Gretchen N; Kamel, Joseph G; Larrosa, Estefania; Sadiki, Amissi; Bridges, Michael D

    2015-03-10

    The intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) stathmin plays an important regulatory role in cytoskeletal maintenance through its helical binding to tubulin and microtubules. However, it lacks a stable fold in the absence of its binding partner. Although stathmin has been a focus of research over the past two decades, the solution-phase conformational dynamics of this IDP are poorly understood. It has been reported that stathmin is purely monomeric in solution and that it bears a short helical region of persistent foldedness, which may act to nucleate helical folding in the C-terminal direction. Here we report a comprehensive study of the structural equilibria local to this region in stathmin that contradicts these two claims. Using the technique of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy on spin-labeled stathmin mutants in the solution-phase and when immobilized on Sepharose solid support, we show that all sites in the helical nucleation region of stathmin exhibit multiple spectral components that correspond to dynamic states of differing mobilities and stabilities. Importantly, a state with relatively low mobility dominates each spectrum with an average population greater than 50%, which we suggest corresponds to an oligomerized state of the protein. This is in contrast to a less populated, more mobile state, which likely represents a helically folded monomeric state of stathmin, and a highly mobile state, which we propose is the random coil conformer of the protein. Our interpretation of the EPR data is confirmed by further characterization of the protein using the techniques of native and SDS PAGE, gel filtration chromatography, and multiangle and dynamic light scattering, all of which show the presence of oligomeric stathmin in solution. Collectively, these data suggest that stathmin exists in a diverse equilibrium of states throughout the purported helical nucleation region and that this IDP exhibits a propensity toward oligomerization. PMID:25715079

  3. Characterizing mixed phosphonic acid ligand capping on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots using ligand exchange and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Davidowski, Stephen K; Lisowski, Carmen E; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2016-03-01

    The ligand capping of phosphonic acid functionalized CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) was investigated with a combination of solution and solid-state (31) P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Two phosphonic acid ligands were used in the synthesis of the QDs, tetradecylphosphonic acid and ethylphosphonic acid. Both alkyl phosphonic acids showed broad liquid and solid-state (31) P NMR resonances for the bound ligands, indicative of heterogeneous binding to the QD surface. In order to quantify the two ligand populations on the surface, ligand exchange facilitated by phenylphosphonic acid resulted in the displacement of the ethylphosphonic acid and tetradecylphosphonic acid and allowed for quantification of the free ligands using (31) P liquid-state NMR. After washing away the free ligand, two broad resonances were observed in the liquids' (31) P NMR corresponding to the alkyl and aromatic phosphonic acids. The washed samples were analyzed via solid-state (31) P NMR, which confirmed the ligand populations on the surface following the ligand exchange process. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26639792

  4. Fragment-Linking Approach Using (19)F NMR Spectroscopy To Obtain Highly Potent and Selective Inhibitors of β-Secretase.

    PubMed

    Jordan, John B; Whittington, Douglas A; Bartberger, Michael D; Sickmier, E Allen; Chen, Kui; Cheng, Yuan; Judd, Ted

    2016-04-28

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a widely used tool in small-molecule drug discovery efforts. One of the most commonly used biophysical methods in detecting weak binding of fragments is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In particular, FBDD performed with (19)F NMR-based methods has been shown to provide several advantages over (1)H NMR using traditional magnetization-transfer and/or two-dimensional methods. Here, we demonstrate the utility and power of (19)F-based fragment screening by detailing the identification of a second-site fragment through (19)F NMR screening that binds to a specific pocket of the aspartic acid protease, β-secretase (BACE-1). The identification of this second-site fragment allowed the undertaking of a fragment-linking approach, which ultimately yielded a molecule exhibiting a more than 360-fold increase in potency while maintaining reasonable ligand efficiency and gaining much improved selectivity over cathepsin-D (CatD). X-ray crystallographic studies of the molecules demonstrated that the linked fragments exhibited binding modes consistent with those predicted from the targeted screening approach, through-space NMR data, and molecular modeling. PMID:26978477

  5. Interpretation of NMR spectroscopy human brain data with a multi-compartment computational model of cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Rossana; Somersalo, Erkki; Calvetti, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    One of the main difficulties in studying human brain metabolism at rest and during neuronal stimulation is that direct quantitative information of metabolite and intermediate concentrations in real time from in vivo and in situ brain cells is extremely difficult to obtain. We present a new six compartment dynamic computational model of the astrocyte-glutamatergic neuron cellular complex, previously used and validated for steady state investigations [1],which utilizes Michaelis-Menten type kinetic expressions for the reaction fluxes and transport rates. The model is employed to interpret experimental data (total tissue concentrations of glucose, lactate, aspartate, and glutamate) collected via NMR spectroscopy [2] in terms of compartmentalized metabolism. By integrating numerical methods with Bayesian statistics, we obtain an ensemble of models in statistical agreement with the data. Moreover, our preliminary results seem to suggest that NMR spectroscopy detects the time profile of the concentrations of glucose, lactate and aspartate in glutamatergic neuron. PMID:21445794

  6. Solution-State (17) O?Quadrupole Central-Transition NMR Spectroscopy in the Active Site of Tryptophan Synthase.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert P; Caulkins, Bethany G; Borchardt, Dan; Bulloch, Daryl N; Larive, Cynthia K; Dunn, Michael F; Mueller, Leonard J

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is an essential participant in the acid-base chemistry that takes place within many enzyme active sites, yet has remained virtually silent as a probe in NMR spectroscopy. Here, we demonstrate the first use of solution-state (17) O?quadrupole central-transition NMR spectroscopy to characterize enzymatic intermediates under conditions of active catalysis. In the 143?kDa pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme tryptophan synthase, reactions of the ?-aminoacrylate intermediate with the nucleophiles indoline and 2-aminophenol correlate with an upfield shift of the substrate carboxylate oxygen resonances. First principles calculations suggest that the increased shieldings for these quinonoid intermediates result from the net increase in the charge density of the substrate-cofactor ?-bonding network, particularly at the adjacent ?-carbon site. PMID:26661504

  7. Cherry tomatoes metabolic profile determined by ¹H-High Resolution-NMR spectroscopy as influenced by growing season.

    PubMed

    Masetti, Olimpia; Ciampa, Alessandra; Nisini, Luigi; Valentini, Massimiliano; Sequi, Paolo; Dell'Abate, Maria Teresa

    2014-11-01

    The content of the most valuable metabolites present in the lipophilic fraction of Protected Geographical Indication cherry tomatoes produced in Pachino (Italy) was observed for 2 cultivated varieties, i.e. cv. Naomi and cv. Shiren, over a period of 3 years in order to observe variations due to relevant climatic parameters, e.g. solar radiation and average temperature, characterising different seasons. (1)H-NMR spectroscopy was applied and spectral data were processed by means of Principal Component Analysis (PCA). We found that the metabolic profile was different for the two considered cultivated varieties and they were differently affected by climatic conditions. Major metabolites influenced by cropping period were α-tocopherol and the unsaturated lipid fraction in Naomi cherry tomatoes, and chlorophylls and phospholipids in Shiren variety, respectively. These results furnished useful information on seasonal dynamics of such important nutritional metabolites contained in tomatoes, confirming also NMR spectroscopy as powerful tool to define a complete metabolic profiling. PMID:24874378

  8. Rapid approach to identify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Monakhova, Yulia B; Ruge, Winfried; Kuballa, Thomas; Ilse, Maren; Winkelmann, Ole; Diehl, Bernd; Thomas, Freddy; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2015-09-01

    NMR spectroscopy was used to verify the presence of Arabica and Robusta species in coffee. Lipophilic extracts of authentic roasted and green coffees showed the presence of established markers for Robusta (16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC)) and for Arabica (kahweol). The integration of the 16-OMC signal (δ 3.165 ppm) was used to estimate the amount of Robusta in coffee blends with an approximate limit of detection of 1-3%. The method was successfully applied for the analysis of 77 commercial coffee samples (coffee pods, coffee capsules, and coffee beans). Furthermore, principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the spectra of lipophilic and aqueous extracts of 20 monovarietal authentic samples. Clusters of the two species were observed. NMR spectroscopy can be used as a rapid prescreening tool to discriminate Arabica and Robusta coffee species before the confirmation applying the official method. PMID:25842325

  9. Solid state NMR spectroscopy investigation of the molecular structure of epoxy based materials cured in different conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alessi, S.; Spinella, A.; Caponetti, E.; Sabatino, Maria Antonietta; Spadaro, G.

    2012-07-01

    In this work two epoxy resin model systems, whose monomers are typically used in structural composites, were thermally cured in different cure conditions in order to obtain different cross-linking densities. Their molecular structures were investigated through solid state NMR spectroscopy in order to correlate them to the cure process conditions used and the results were discussed in the light of the dynamical mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) performed.

  10. Method of Continuous Variation: Characterization of Alkali Metal Enolates Using 1H and 19F NMR Spectroscopies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The method of continuous variation in conjunction with 1H and 19F NMR spectroscopies was used to characterize lithium and sodium enolates solvated by N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylethyldiamine (TMEDA) and tetrahydrofuran (THF). A strategy developed using lithium enolates was then applied to the more challenging sodium enolates. A number of sodium enolates solvated by TMEDA or THF afford exclusively tetramers. Evidence suggests that TMEDA chelates sodium on cubic tetramers. PMID:24915602

  11. Determination of the time course of an enzymatic reaction by 1H NMR spectroscopy: hydroxynitrile lyase catalysed transhydrocyanation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickel, A.; Gradnig, G.; Griengl, H.; Schall, M.; Sterk, H.

    1996-01-01

    The time course of the enzyme catalysed transhydrocyanation of benzaldehyde to give ( S)-mandelonitrile was investigated using a hydroxynitrile lyase from Hevea brasiliensis as catalyst and acetone cyanohydrin as cyanide donor. Employing special techniques it was possible to apply 1H NMR spectroscopy in aqueous medium to monitor the concentration changes of all substrates and products. By this technique strong evidence for inhibition of the enzyme at higher substrate concentrations was obtained.

  12. Use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for the analysis of chemical warfare agents and their degradation products in enviornmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Szafraniec, L.L.; Beaudry, W.T.

    1995-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most powerful analytical techniques for elucidating the molecular structure of organic compounds. In environmental samples, the identification and detection of chemical warfare related compounds is best accomplished using high field high resolution NMR. This paper describes the experimental procedures.

  13. High sensitivity 1H-NMR spectroscopy of homeopathic remedies made in water

    PubMed Central

    Anick, David J

    2004-01-01

    Background The efficacy of homeopathy is controversial. Homeopathic remedies are made via iterated shaking and dilution, in ethanol or in water, from a starting substance. Remedies of potency 12 C or higher are ultra-dilute (UD), i.e. contain zero molecules of the starting material. Various hypotheses have been advanced to explain how a UD remedy might be different from unprepared solvent. One such hypothesis posits that a remedy contains stable clusters, i.e. localized regions where one or more hydrogen bonds remain fixed on a long time scale. High sensitivity proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has not previously been used to look for evidence of differences between UD remedies and controls. Methods Homeopathic remedies made in water were studied via high sensitivity proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A total of 57 remedy samples representing six starting materials and spanning a variety of potencies from 6 C to 10 M were tested along with 46 controls. Results By presaturating on the water peak, signals could be reliably detected that represented H-containing species at concentrations as low as 5 ?M. There were 35 positions where a discrete signal was seen in one or more of the 103 spectra, which should theoretically have been absent from the spectrum of pure water. Of these 35, fifteen were identified as machine-generated artifacts, eight were identified as trace levels of organic contaminants, and twelve were unexplained. Of the unexplained signals, six were seen in just one spectrum each. None of the artifacts or unexplained signals occurred more frequently in remedies than in controls, using a p < .05 cutoff. Some commercially prepared samples were found to contain traces of one or more of these small organic molecules: ethanol, acetate, formate, methanol, and acetone. Conclusion No discrete signals suggesting a difference between remedies and controls were seen, via high sensitivity 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The results failed to support a hypothesis that remedies made in water contain long-lived non-dynamic alterations of the H-bonding pattern of the solvent. PMID:15518588

  14. Metabolomics-Based Study of Logarithmic and Stationary Phases of Promastigotes in Leishmania major by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arjmand, Mohammad; Madrakian, Azadeh; Khalili, Ghader; Najafi, Ali; Zamani, Zahra; Akbari, Ziba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cutaneous leishmaniasis is one of the most important parasitic diseases in humans. In this disease, one of the responsible organisms is Leishmania major, which is transmitted by sandfly vector. There are specific differences in biochemical profiles and metabolite pathways in logarithmic and stationary phases of Leishmania parasites. In the present study, 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to examine the metabolites outliers in the logarithmic and stationary phases of promastigotes in L. major to enlighten more about the transmission mechanism in metacyclogenesis of L. major. Methods: Promastigote was cultured, logarithmic and stationary phases were separated by the peanut agglutinin, and cell metabolites were extracted. 1H NMR spectroscopy was applied, and outliers were analyzed using principal component analysis. Results: The most altered metabolites in stationary and logarithmic phases were limited to citraconic acid, isopropylmalic acid, L-leucine, ornithine, caprylic acid, capric acid, and acetic acid. Conclusion: 1H NMR spectroscopy could play an important role in the characterization of metabolites in biochemical pathways during a metacyclogenesis process. These metabolites and their pathways can help in exploiting a transmission mechanism in metacyclogenesis, and outcoming data might be used in the metabolic network reconstruction of L. major modeling. PMID:26592771

  15. Proton chemical shift tensors determined by 3D ultrafast MAS double-quantum NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-10-01

    Proton NMR spectroscopy in the solid state has recently attracted much attention owing to the significant enhancement in spectral resolution afforded by the remarkable advances in ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) capabilities. In particular, proton chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) has become an important tool for obtaining specific insights into inter/intra-molecular hydrogen bonding. However, even at the highest currently feasible spinning frequencies (110-120 kHz), 1H MAS NMR spectra of rigid solids still suffer from poor resolution and severe peak overlap caused by the strong 1H-1H homonuclear dipolar couplings and narrow 1H chemical shift (CS) ranges, which render it difficult to determine the CSA of specific proton sites in the standard CSA/single-quantum (SQ) chemical shift correlation experiment. Herein, we propose a three-dimensional (3D) 1H double-quantum (DQ) chemical shift/CSA/SQ chemical shift correlation experiment to extract the CS tensors of proton sites whose signals are not well resolved along the single-quantum chemical shift dimension. As extracted from the 3D spectrum, the F1/F3 (DQ/SQ) projection provides valuable information about 1H-1H proximities, which might also reveal the hydrogen-bonding connectivities. In addition, the F2/F3 (CSA/SQ) correlation spectrum, which is similar to the regular 2D CSA/SQ correlation experiment, yields chemical shift anisotropic line shapes at different isotropic chemical shifts. More importantly, since the F2/F1 (CSA/DQ) spectrum correlates the CSA with the DQ signal induced by two neighboring proton sites, the CSA spectrum sliced at a specific DQ chemical shift position contains the CSA information of two neighboring spins indicated by the DQ chemical shift. If these two spins have different CS tensors, both tensors can be extracted by numerical fitting. We believe that this robust and elegant single-channel proton-based 3D experiment provides useful atomistic-level structural and dynamical information for a variety of solid systems that possess high proton density.

  16. Improving Assessment of Lipoprotein Profile in Type 1 Diabetes by 1H NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brugnara, Laura; Mallol, Roger; Ribalta, Josep; Vinaixa, Maria; Murillo, Serafín; Casserras, Teresa; Guardiola, Montse; Vallvé, Joan Carles; Kalko, Susana G.; Correig, Xavier; Novials, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) present increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study is to improve the assessment of lipoprotein profile in patients with T1D by using a robust developed method 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR), for further correlation with clinical factors associated to CVD. Thirty patients with T1D and 30 non-diabetes control (CT) subjects, matched for gender, age, body composition (DXA, BMI, waist/hip ratio), regular physical activity levels and cardiorespiratory capacity (VO2peak), were analyzed. Dietary records and routine lipids were assessed. Serum lipoprotein particle subfractions, particle sizes, and cholesterol and triglycerides subfractions were analyzed by 1H NMR. It was evidenced that subjects with T1D presented lower concentrations of small LDL cholesterol, medium VLDL particles, large VLDL triglycerides, and total triglycerides as compared to CT subjects. Women with T1D presented a positive association with HDL size (p<0.005; R = 0.601) and large HDL triglycerides (p<0.005; R = 0.534) and negative (p<0.005; R = -0.586) to small HDL triglycerides. Body fat composition represented an important factor independently of normal BMI, with large LDL particles presenting a positive correlation to total body fat (p<0.005; R = 0.505), and total LDL cholesterol and small LDL cholesterol a positive correlation (p<0.005; R = 0.502 and R = 0.552, respectively) to abdominal fat in T1D subjects; meanwhile, in CT subjects, body fat composition was mainly associated to HDL subclasses. VO2peak was negatively associated (p<0.005; R = -0.520) to large LDL-particles only in the group of patients with T1D. In conclusion, patients with T1D with adequate glycemic control and BMI and without chronic complications presented a more favourable lipoprotein profile as compared to control counterparts. In addition, slight alterations in BMI and/or body fat composition showed to be relevant to provoking alterations in lipoproteins profiles. Finally, body fat composition appears to be a determinant for cardioprotector lipoprotein profile. PMID:26317989

  17. Cholesterol in oriented bilayers: Determination of order parameters by proton detected local field NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massou, S.; Tropis, M.; Milon, A.

    1999-10-01

    Cholesterol order parameters are usually determined by deuterium NMR using specifically deuterated cholesterol. We demonstrate herein that the same information may be obtained from the C-H dipolar couplings using 2D experiments correlating 13C chemical shifts and H-C dipolar couplings (PDLF spectroscopy) which we have performed for the first time on oriented lipid bilayers. The order parameters of C4-Ha and C4-He vectors calculated from this experiment are in agreement with those previously determined on the same sample from deuterium NMR. This experiment opens the way to the simultaneous determination of order parameters of all C-H vectors without the need of specific labeling. La détermination des paramètres d'ordre du cholestérol dans une bicouche lipidique est possible par RMN du deutérium après synthèse de cholestérol spécifiquement marqué. Nous montrons dans cet article que la même information peut être extraite à partir des constantes de couplage dipolaire C-H à l'aide d'expériences 2D de corrélation déplacement chimique 13C - couplage dipolaire 13C-H, appelées PDLF, qui ont été réalisées pour la première fois sur des bicouches lipidiques orientées. Les paramètres d'ordre des vecteurs C4-Ha et C4-He issus de cette expérience sont en accord avec ceux déterminés précédemment, sur le même échantillon, par RMN du deutérium. Cette approche permet d'envisager la détermination en une seule expérience des couplages dipolaires de tous les vecteurs C-H sans avoir recours au marquage spécifique.

  18. The microporous structure of coals and a microporous carbon studied using xenon-129 NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Stasia A.

    sp{129}Xe nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of xenon gas adsorbed in coal is used to describe coal microporous structure. Emphasis is on establishing micropore diameter, whether pores are open, the type of connectivity, and changes associated with coal rank. Pressure dependent sp{129}Xe NMR spectra were acquired for a rank-varied set of coals. Micropore diameters calculated from the spectra range from 5.6 to 7.5 A and are related to coal rank. Signal linewidths decrease with increasing coal rank. The packing density of powdered coal affected the spectral appearance. Micropore diameters were also calculated for a microporous carbon before and after pore-size alteration. Selective low power presaturation of the adsorbed xenon signal for four coals produces a hole-burning effect in the spectra indicating that the signal is composed of a series of overlapped chemical shifts. Saturation transfer to the external gas signal, (which most likely originates from xenon in large pores) is observed as presaturation time is increased. Saturation transfer occurs significantly faster in two low-rank than in two higher-rank coals. The process of xenon adsorption was monitored by acquisition of sp{129}Xe NMR during adsorption. Equilibrium is achieved faster in smaller particle size anthracite than in larger, and for either, the time is slower than for the microporous carbon. The external xenon is observed only in the larger particle size and loses intensity as the internally-adsorbed xenon increases. No intermediate signal location is indicated prior to equilibrium. These experiments indicate coal porosity is open and that it constitutes a constricted network. The degree of constriction is higher in coals over ˜89% carbon. Microporosity in low-rank coals is consistent with a dendritic pore structure. For higher rank coals over 89% carbon, the microporosity is more isolated and is open via constricted micropores but lacks a route through larger pores. Smaller particle size anthracite has less constriction in its porosity than larger particle size, and may also have less larger porosity or fracture.

  19. Lithium ion diffusion in Li β-alumina single crystals measured by pulsed field gradient NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Tareque Takekawa, Reiji; Iwai, Yoshiki; Kuwata, Naoaki; Kawamura, Junichi

    2014-03-28

    The lithium ion diffusion coefficient of a 93% Li β-alumina single crystal was measured for the first time using pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR spectroscopy with two different crystal orientations. The diffusion coefficient was found to be 1.2 × 10{sup −11} m{sup 2}/s in the direction perpendicular to the c axis at room temperature. The Li ion diffusion coefficient along the c axis direction was found to be very small (6.4 × 10{sup −13} m{sup 2}/s at 333 K), which suggests that the macroscopic diffusion of the Li ion in the β-alumina crystal is mainly two-dimensional. The diffusion coefficient for the same sample was also estimated using NMR line narrowing data and impedance measurements. The impedance data show reasonable agreement with PFG-NMR data, while the line narrowing measurements provided a lower value for the diffusion coefficient. Line narrowing measurements also provided a relatively low value for the activation energy and pre-exponential factor. The temperature dependent diffusion coefficient was obtained in the temperature range 297–333 K by PFG-NMR, from which the activation energy for diffusion of the Li ion was estimated. The activation energy obtained by PFG-NMR was smaller than that obtained by impedance measurements, which suggests that thermally activated defect formation energy exists for 93% Li β-alumina single crystals. The diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient was observed for the Li ion in the 93% Li β-alumina single crystal by means of PFG-NMR experiments. Motion of Li ion in fractal dimension might be a possible explanation for the observed diffusion time dependence of the diffusion coefficient in the 93% Li β–alumina system.

  20. Statistical total correlation spectroscopy: an exploratory approach for latent biomarker identification from metabolic 1H NMR data sets.

    PubMed

    Cloarec, Olivier; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Craig, Andrew; Barton, Richard H; Trygg, Johan; Hudson, Jane; Blancher, Christine; Gauguier, Dominique; Lindon, John C; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy

    2005-03-01

    We describe here the implementation of the statistical total correlation spectroscopy (STOCSY) analysis method for aiding the identification of potential biomarker molecules in metabonomic studies based on NMR spectroscopic data. STOCSY takes advantage of the multicollinearity of the intensity variables in a set of spectra (in this case 1H NMR spectra) to generate a pseudo-two-dimensional NMR spectrum that displays the correlation among the intensities of the various peaks across the whole sample. This method is not limited to the usual connectivities that are deducible from more standard two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic methods, such as TOCSY. Moreover, two or more molecules involved in the same pathway can also present high intermolecular correlations because of biological covariance or can even be anticorrelated. This combination of STOCSY with supervised pattern recognition and particularly orthogonal projection on latent structure-discriminant analysis (O-PLS-DA) offers a new powerful framework for analysis of metabonomic data. In a first step O-PLS-DA extracts the part of NMR spectra related to discrimination. This information is then cross-combined with the STOCSY results to help identify the molecules responsible for the metabolic variation. To illustrate the applicability of the method, it has been applied to 1H NMR spectra of urine from a metabonomic study of a model of insulin resistance based on the administration of a carbohydrate diet to three different mice strains (C57BL/6Oxjr, BALB/cOxjr, and 129S6/SvEvOxjr) in which a series of metabolites of biological importance can be conclusively assigned and identified by use of the STOCSY approach. PMID:15732908

  1. Organic Spectroscopy Laboratory: Utilizing IR and NMR in the Identification of an Unknown Substance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glagovich, Neil M.; Shine, Timothy D.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that emphasizes the interpretation of both infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra in the elucidation of the structure of an unknown compound was developed. The method helps students determine [to the first power]H- and [to the thirteenth power]C-NMR spectra from the structures of compounds and to

  2. Establishing resolution-improved NMR spectroscopy in high magnetic fields with unknown spatiotemporal variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Smith, Pieter E. S.; Cai, Shuhui; Zheng, Zhenyao; Lin, Yulan; Chen, Zhong

    2015-12-01

    A half-century quest for higher magnetic fields has been an integral part of the progress undergone in the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) study of materials' structure and dynamics. Because 2D NMR relies on systematic changes in coherences' phases as a function of an encoding time varied over a series of independent experiments, it generally cannot be applied in temporally unstable fields. This precludes most NMR methods from being used to characterize samples situated in hybrid or resistive magnets that are capable of achieving extremely high magnetic field strength. Recently, "ultrafast" NMR has been developed into an effective and widely applicable methodology enabling the acquisition of a multidimensional NMR spectrum in a single scan; it can therefore be used to partially mitigate the effects of temporally varying magnetic fields. Nevertheless, the strong interference of fluctuating fields with the spatial encoding of ultrafast NMR still severely restricts measurement sensitivity and resolution. Here, we introduce a strategy for obtaining high resolution NMR spectra that exploits the immunity of intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) to field instabilities and inhomogeneities. The spatial encoding of iZQCs is combined with a J-modulated detection scheme that removes the influence of arbitrary field inhomogeneities during acquisition. This new method can acquire high-resolution one-dimensional NMR spectra in large inhomogeneous and fluctuating fields, and it is tested with fields experimentally modeled to mimic those of resistive and resistive-superconducting hybrid magnets.

  3. Organic Spectroscopy Laboratory: Utilizing IR and NMR in the Identification of an Unknown Substance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glagovich, Neil M.; Shine, Timothy D.

    2005-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that emphasizes the interpretation of both infrared (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra in the elucidation of the structure of an unknown compound was developed. The method helps students determine [to the first power]H- and [to the thirteenth power]C-NMR spectra from the structures of compounds and to…

  4. Solution secondary structure of calcium-saturated troponin C monomer determined by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Slupsky, C. M.; Reinach, F. C.; Smillie, L. B.; Sykes, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    The solution secondary structure of calcium-saturated skeletal troponin C (TnC) in the presence of 15% (v/v) trifluoroethanol (TFE), which has been shown to exist predominantly as a monomer (Slupsky CM, Kay CM, Reinach FC, Smillie LB, Sykes BD, 1995, Biochemistry 34, forthcoming), has been investigated using multidimensional heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The 1H, 15N, and 13C NMR chemical shift values for TnC in the presence of TFE are very similar to values obtained for calcium-saturated NTnC (residues 1-90 of skeletal TnC), calmodulin, and synthetic peptide homodimers. Moreover, the secondary structure elements of TnC are virtually identical to those obtained for calcium-saturated NTnC, calmodulin, and the synthetic peptide homodimers, suggesting that 15% (v/v) TFE minimally perturbs the secondary and tertiary structure of this stably folded protein. Comparison of the solution structure of calcium-saturated TnC with the X-ray crystal structure of half-saturated TnC reveals differences in the phi/psi angles of residue Glu 41 and in the linker between the two domains. Glu 41 has irregular phi/psi angles in the crystal structure, producing a kink in the B helix, whereas in calcium-saturated TnC, Glu 41 has helical phi/psi angles, resulting in a straight B helix. The linker between the N and C domains of calcium-saturated TnC is flexible in the solution structure. PMID:7670371

  5. Improving the resolution in proton-detected through-space heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ming; Trbosc, J; Lafon, O; Pourpoint, F; Hu, Bingwen; Chen, Qun; Amoureux, J-P

    2014-08-01

    Connectivities and proximities between protons and low-gamma nuclei can be probed in solid-state NMR spectroscopy using two-dimensional (2D) proton-detected heteronuclear correlation, through Heteronuclear Multiple Quantum Correlation (HMQC) pulse sequence. The indirect detection via protons dramatically enhances the sensitivity. However, the spectra are often broadened along the indirect F1 dimension by the decay of heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherences under the strong (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings. This work presents a systematic comparison of the performances of various decoupling schemes during the indirect t1 evolution period of dipolar-mediated HMQC (D-HMQC) experiment. We demonstrate that (1)H-(1)H dipolar decoupling sequences during t1, such as symmetry-based schemes, phase-modulated Lee-Goldburg (PMLG) and Decoupling Using Mind-Boggling Optimization (DUMBO), provide better resolution than continuous wave (1)H irradiation. We also report that high resolution requires the preservation of (1)H isotropic chemical shifts during the decoupling sequences. When observing indirectly broad spectra presenting numerous spinning sidebands, the D-HMQC sequence must be fully rotor-synchronized owing to the rotor-synchronized indirect sampling and dipolar recoupling sequence employed. In this case, we propose a solution to reduce artefact sidebands caused by the modulation of window delays before and after the decoupling application during the t1 period. Moreover, we show that (1)H-(1)H dipolar decoupling sequence using Smooth Amplitude Modulation (SAM) minimizes the t1-noise. The performances of the various decoupling schemes are assessed via numerical simulations and compared to 2D (1)H-{(13)C} D-HMQC experiments on [U-(13)C]-L-histidine?HCl?H2O at various magnetic fields and Magic Angle spinning (MAS) frequencies. Great resolution and sensitivity enhancements resulting from decoupling during t1 period enable the detection of heteronuclear correlation between aliphatic protons and ammonium (14)N sites in L-histidine?HCl?H2O. PMID:24929867

  6. Metabotyping of long-lived mice using 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Selman, Colin; Barton, Richard H; Holmes, Elaine; Nicholson, Jeremy K; Withers, Dominic J

    2012-04-01

    Significant advances in understanding aging have been achieved through studying model organisms with extended healthy lifespans. Employing 1H NMR spectroscopy, we characterized the plasma metabolic phenotype (metabotype) of three long-lived murine models: 30% dietary restricted (DR), insulin receptor substrate 1 null (Irs1-/-), and Ames dwarf (Prop1df/df). A panel of metabolic differences were generated for each model relative to their controls, and subsequently, the three long-lived models were compared to one another. Concentrations of mobile very low density lipoproteins, trimethylamine, and choline were significantly decreased in the plasma of all three models. Metabolites including glucose, choline, glycerophosphocholine, and various lipids were significantly reduced, while acetoacetate, d-3-hydroxybutyrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide levels were increased in DR compared to ad libitum fed controls. Plasma lipids and glycerophosphocholine were also decreased in Irs1-/- mice compared to controls, as were methionine and citrate. In contrast, high density lipoproteins and glycerophosphocholine were increased in Ames dwarf mice, as were methionine and citrate. Pairwise comparisons indicated that differences existed between the metabotypes of the different long-lived mice models. Irs1-/- mice, for example, had elevated glucose, acetate, acetone, and creatine but lower methionine relative to DR mice and Ames dwarfs. Our study identified several potential candidate biomarkers directionally altered across all three models that may be predictive of longevity but also identified differences in the metabolic signatures. This comparative approach suggests that the metabolic networks underlying lifespan extension may not be exactly the same for each model of longevity and is consistent with multifactorial control of the aging process. PMID:22225495

  7. Natural Abundance 17O NMR Spectroscopy of Rat Brain In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Robin A.; Brown, Peter B.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Behar, Kevin L.

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen is an abundant element that is present in almost all biologically relevant molecules. NMR observation of oxygen has been relatively limited since the NMR-active isotope, oxygen-17, is only present at a 0.037% natural abundance. Furthermore, as a spin 5/2 nucleus oxygen-17 has a moderately strong quadrupole moment which leads to fairly broad resonances (T2* = 1 - 4 ms). However, the similarly short T1 relaxation constants allow substantial signal averaging, whereas the large chemical shift range (> 300 ppm) improves the spectral resolution of 17O NMR. Here it is shown that high-quality, natural abundance 17O NMR spectra can be obtained from rat brain in vivo at 11.74 T. The chemical shifts and line widths of more than 20 oxygen-containing metabolites are established and the sensitivity and potential for 17O-enriched NMR studies are estimated. PMID:18456525

  8. Dissolution mechanism of crystalline cellulose in H3PO4 as assessed by high-field NMR spectroscopy and fast field cycling NMR relaxometry.

    PubMed

    Conte, Pellegrino; Maccotta, Antonella; De Pasquale, Claudio; Bubici, Salvatore; Alonzo, Giuseppe

    2009-10-14

    Many processes have been proposed to produce glucose as a substrate for bacterial fermentation to obtain bioethanol. Among others, cellulose degradation appears as the most convenient way to achieve reliable amounts of glucose units. In fact, cellulose is the most widespread biopolymer, and it is considered also as a renewable resource. Due to extended intra- and interchain hydrogen bonds that provide a very efficient packing structure, however, cellulose is also a very stable polymer, the degradation of which is not easily achievable. In the past decade, researchers enhanced cellulose reactivity by increasing its solubility in many solvents, among which concentrated phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)) played the major role because of its low volatility and nontoxicity. In the present study, the solubilization mechanism of crystalline cellulose in H(3)PO(4) has been elucidated by using high- and low-field NMR spectroscopy. In particular, high-field NMR spectra showed formation of direct bonding between phosphoric acid and dissolved cellulose. On the other hand, molecular dynamics studies by low-field NMR with a fast field cycling (FFC) setup revealed two different H(3)PO(4) relaxing components. The first component, described by the fastest longitudinal relaxation rate (R(1)), was assigned to the H(3)PO(4) molecules bound to the biopolymer. Conversely, the second component, characterized by the slowest R(1), was attributed to the bulk solvent. The understanding of cellulose dissolution in H(3)PO(4) represents a very important issue because comprehension of chemical mechanisms is fundamental for process ameliorations to produce bioenergy from biomasses. PMID:19769370

  9. Analyzing the adsorption of blood plasma components by means of fullerene-containing silica gels and NMR spectroscopy in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melenevskaya, E. Yu.; Mokeev, M. V.; Nasonova, K. V.; Podosenova, N. G.; Sharonova, L. V.; Gribanov, A. V.

    2012-10-01

    The results from studying the adsorption of blood plasma components (e.g., protein, triglycerides, cholesterol, and lipoproteins of low and high density) using silica gels modified with fullerene molecules (in the form of C60 or the hydroxylated form of C60(OH) x ) and subjected to hydration (or, alternatively, dehydration) are presented. The conditions for preparing adsorbents that allow us to control the adsorption capacity of silica gel and the selectivity of adsorption toward the components of blood plasma, are revealed. The nature and strength of the interactions of the introduced components (fullerene molecules and water) with functional groups on the silica surface are studied by means of solid state NMR spectroscopy (NMR-SS). Conclusions regarding the nature of the centers that control adsorption are drawn on the basis of NMR-SS spectra in combination with direct measurements of adsorption. The interaction of the oxygen of the hydroxyl group of silica gel with fullerene, leading to the formation of electron-donor complexes of C60-H, C60-OH, or C60-OSi type, is demonstrated by the observed changes in the NMR-SS spectra of silica gels in the presence of fullerene.

  10. Natural abundance 17O DNP two-dimensional and surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Perras, Frédéric A.; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Pruski, Marek

    2015-06-22

    Due to its extremely low natural abundance and quadrupolar nature, the 17O nuclide is very rarely used for spectroscopic investigation of solids by NMR without isotope enrichment. Additionally, the applicability of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), which leads to sensitivity enhancements of 2 orders of magnitude, to 17O is wrought with challenges due to the lack of spin diffusion and low polarization transfer efficiency from 1H. Here, we demonstrate new DNP-based measurements that extend 17O solid-state NMR beyond its current capabilities. The use of the PRESTO technique instead of conventional 1H–17O cross-polarization greatly improves the sensitivity and enables the facile measurement of undistorted line shapes and two-dimensional 1H–17O HETCOR NMR spectra as well as accurate internuclear distance measurements at natural abundance. This was applied for distinguishing hydrogen-bonded and lone 17O sites on the surface of silica gel; the one-dimensional spectrum of which could not be used to extract such detail. As a result, this greatly enhanced sensitivity has enabled, for the first time, the detection of surface hydroxyl sites on mesoporous silica at natural abundance, thereby extending the concept of DNP surface-enhanced NMR spectroscopy to the 17O nuclide.

  11. Reconstitution of the Cytb5 -CytP450 Complex in Nanodiscs for Structural Studies using NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Huang, Rui; Ackermann, Rose; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Schwendeman, Anna; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2016-03-24

    Cytochrome P450s (P450s) are a superfamily of enzymes responsible for the catalysis of a wide range of substrates. Dynamic interactions between full-length membrane-bound P450 and its redox partner cytochrome b5 (cytb5 ) have been found to be important for the enzymatic activity of P450. However, the stability of the circa 70 kDa membrane-bound complex in model membranes renders high-resolution structural NMR studies particularly difficult. To overcome these challenges, reconstitution of the P450-cytb5 complex in peptide-based nanodiscs, containing no detergents, has been demonstrated, which are characterized by size exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. In addition, NMR experiments are used to identify the binding interface of the P450-cytb5 complex in the nanodisc. This is the first successful demonstration of a protein-protein complex in a nanodisc using NMR structural studies and should be useful to obtain valuable structural information on membrane-bound protein complexes. PMID:26924779

  12. Precision high-throughput proton NMR spectroscopy of human urine, serum, and plasma for large-scale metabolic phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Dona, Anthony C; Jiménez, Beatriz; Schäfer, Hartmut; Humpfer, Eberhard; Spraul, Manfred; Lewis, Matthew R; Pearce, Jake T M; Holmes, Elaine; Lindon, John C; Nicholson, Jeremy K

    2014-10-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolic phenotyping of urine and blood plasma/serum samples provides important prognostic and diagnostic information and permits monitoring of disease progression in an objective manner. Much effort has been made in recent years to develop NMR instrumentation and technology to allow the acquisition of data in an effective, reproducible, and high-throughput approach that allows the study of general population samples from epidemiological collections for biomarkers of disease risk. The challenge remains to develop highly reproducible methods and standardized protocols that minimize technical or experimental bias, allowing realistic interlaboratory comparisons of subtle biomarker information. Here we present a detailed set of updated protocols that carefully consider major experimental conditions, including sample preparation, spectrometer parameters, NMR pulse sequences, throughput, reproducibility, quality control, and resolution. These results provide an experimental platform that facilitates NMR spectroscopy usage across different large cohorts of biofluid samples, enabling integration of global metabolic profiling that is a prerequisite for personalized healthcare. PMID:25180432

  13. Role of the Proximal Cysteine Hydrogen Bonding Interaction in Cytochrome P450 2B4 Studied by Cryoreduction, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance, and Electron-Nuclear Double Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Davydov, Roman; Im, Sangchoul; Shanmugam, Muralidharan; Gunderson, William A; Pearl, Naw May; Hoffman, Brian M; Waskell, Lucy

    2016-02-16

    Crystallographic studies have shown that the F429H mutation of cytochrome P450 2B4 introduces an H-bond between His429 and the proximal thiolate ligand, Cys436, without altering the protein fold but sharply decreases the enzymatic activity and stabilizes the oxyferrous P450 2B4 complex. To characterize the influence of this hydrogen bond on the states of the catalytic cycle, we have used radiolytic cryoreduction combined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and (electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy to study and compare their characteristics for wild-type (WT) P450 2B4 and the F429H mutant. (i) The addition of an H-bond to the axial Cys436 thiolate significantly changes the EPR signals of both low-spin and high-spin heme-iron(III) and the hyperfine couplings of the heme-pyrrole (14)N but has relatively little effect on the (1)H ENDOR spectra of the water ligand in the six-coordinate low-spin ferriheme state. These changes indicate that the H-bond introduced between His and the proximal cysteine decreases the extent of S → Fe electron donation and weakens the Fe(III)-S bond. (ii) The added H-bond changes the primary product of cryoreduction of the Fe(II) enzyme, which is trapped in the conformation of the parent Fe(II) state. In the wild-type enzyme, the added electron localizes on the porphyrin, generating an S = (3)/2 state with the anion radical exchange-coupled to the Fe(II). In the mutant, it localizes on the iron, generating an S = (1)/2 Fe(I) state. (iii) The additional H-bond has little effect on g values and (1)H-(14)N hyperfine couplings of the cryogenerated, ferric hydroperoxo intermediate but noticeably slows its decay during cryoannealing. (iv) In both the WT and the mutant enzyme, this decay shows a significant solvent kinetic isotope effect, indicating that the decay reflects a proton-assisted conversion to Compound I (Cpd I). (v) We confirm that Cpd I formed during the annealing of the cryogenerated hydroperoxy intermediate and that it is the active hydroxylating species in both WT P450 2B4 and the F429H mutant. (vi) Our data also indicate that the added H-bond of the mutation diminishes the reactivity of Cpd I. PMID:26750753

  14. 1H HR-MAS NMR Spectroscopy and the Metabolite Determination of Typical Foods in Mediterranean Diet

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Dugo, Giacomo; Cicero, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy has become an experimental technique widely used in food science. The experimental procedures that allow precise and quantitative analysis on different foods are relatively simple. For a better sensitivity and resolution, NMR spectroscopy is usually applied to liquid sample by means of extraction procedures that can be addressed to the observation of particular compounds. For the study of semisolid systems such as intact tissues, High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HR-MAS) has received great attention within the biomedical area and beyond. Metabolic profiling and metabolism changes can be investigated both in animal organs and in foods. In this work we present a proton HR-MAS NMR study on the typical vegetable foods of Mediterranean diet such as the Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) cherry tomato of Pachino, the PGI Interdonato lemon of Messina, several Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) extra virgin olive oils from Sicily, and the Traditional Italian Food Product (PAT) red garlic of Nubia. We were able to identify and quantify the main metabolites within the studied systems that can be used for their characterization and authentication. PMID:26495154

  15. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter in glacial ice: coupling natural abundance 1H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Brent G; Woods, Gwen C; Dubnick, Ashley; Simpson, André J; Sharp, Martin J; Fitzsimons, Sean J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2012-04-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets are the second largest freshwater reservoir in the global hydrologic cycle, and the onset of global climate warming has necessitated an assessment of their contributions to sea-level rise and the potential release of nutrients to nearby aquatic environments. In particular, the release of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from glacier melt could stimulate microbial activity in both glacial ecosystems and adjacent watersheds, but this would largely depend on the composition of the material released. Using fluorescence and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, we characterize DOM at its natural abundance in unaltered samples from a number of glaciers that differ in geographic location, thermal regime, and sample depth. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modeling of DOM fluorophores identifies components in the ice that are predominantly proteinaceous in character, while (1)H NMR spectroscopy reveals a mixture of small molecules that likely originate from native microbes. Spectrofluorescence also reveals a terrestrial contribution that was below the detection limits of NMR; however, (1)H nuclei from levoglucosan was identified in Arctic glacier ice samples. This study suggests that the bulk of the DOM from these glaciers is a mixture of biologically labile molecules derived from microbes. PMID:22385100

  16. Use of residual dipolar couplings in structural analysis of protein-ligand complexes by solution NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nitin U

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of structure-function relationships in protein complexes, specifically protein-ligand interactions, carry great significance in elucidating the structural and mechanistic bases of molecular recognition events and their role in regulating cell processes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the leading structural and analytical techniques in in-depth studies of protein-ligand interactions. Recent advances in NMR methodology such as transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) measured in liquid crystalline alignment medium, offer a viable alternative to traditional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE)-based approaches for structure determination of large protein complexes. RDCs provide a way to constrain the relative orientation of two molecules in complex with each other by aligning their independently determined order tensors. The potential for utilization of RDCs can be extended to proteins with multiple ligands or even multimeric protein-ligand complexes, where symmetry properties of the protein can be taken advantage of. Availability of effective RDC data collection and analysis protocols can certainly aid this process by their incorporation into structure calculation protocols using intramolecular and intermolecular orientational restraints. This chapter discusses in detail some of these protocols including methods for sample preparation in liquid crystalline media, NMR experiments for RDC data collection, as well as software tools for RDC data analysis and protein-ligand complex structure determination. PMID:19488703

  17. Use of Residual Dipolar Couplings in Structural Analysis of Protein-Ligand Complexes by Solution NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Nitin U.

    Investigation of structure-function relationships in protein complexes, specifically protein-ligand interactions, carry great significance in elucidating the structural and mechanistic bases of molecular recognition events and their role in regulating cell processes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the leading structural and analytical techniques in in-depth studies of protein-ligand interactions. Recent advances in NMR methodology such as transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) measured in liquid crystalline alignment medium, offer a viable alternative to traditional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE)-based approaches for structure determination of large protein complexes. RDCs provide a way to constrain the relative orientation of two molecules in complex with each other by aligning their independently determined order tensors. The potential for utilization of RDCs can be extended to proteins with multiple ligands or even multimeric protein-ligand complexes, where symmetry properties of the protein can be taken advantage of. Availability of effective RDC data collection and analysis protocols can certainly aid this process by their incorporation into structure calculation protocols using intramolecular and intermolecular orientational restraints. This chapter discusses in detail some of these protocols including methods for sample preparation in liquid crystalline media, NMR experiments for RDC data collection, as well as software tools for RDC data analysis and protein-ligand complex structure determination.

  18. A metabonomic approach to the investigation of drug-induced phospholipidosis: an NMR spectroscopy and pattern recognition study.

    PubMed

    Andrew W Nicholls Jeremy K Nicholson John N Haselden Catherine J Waterfield

    2000-01-01

    (1)H NMR spectroscopy of urine and pattern recognition analysis have been used to study the metabolic perturbations caused following dosing of five novel drug candidates, two of which (GWA, GWB) caused mild lung and liver phospholipidosis, whilst the rest (GWC-GWE) did not cause any detectable toxicity. Urine samples were collected predose, 0-8 h, 8-16 h, 16-24 h and 24-32 h after single, oral dosing with each compound to Han Wistar rats (n = 3 per group), and liver and lung samples for were taken at 48 h for histology. (1)H NMR spectra of whole urine were acquired, processed and subsequently analysed using principal component analysis. All animals administered the drug candidates showed a significant reduction in serum triglycerides and those animals administered either GWA or GWB were observed to have foamy alveolar macrophages and the presence of multilamellar bodies in hepatocytes by electron microscopy. In the plot of the first two principal components, urinary spectra of those animals dosed with GWA or GWB mapped separately to controls, all pre-dose samples and animals dosed with GWC-GWE. Inspection of the principal components loadings indicated an increase in urinary phenylacetylglycine with a concomitant decrease in urinary citrate and 2-oxoglutarate, possibly constituting a novel urinary biomarker set for phospholipidosis. This work exemplifies the use of NMR spectroscopy and pattern recognition methods for the detection of novel biomarker combinations for poorly understood toxicity types and the potential in screening novel drugs for toxicity. PMID:23898812

  19. Observation of the keto tautomer of D-fructose in D2O using 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, Thomas; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Johnston, Martin R.; Cooper, Peter; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2011-01-01

    D-Fructose was analysed by NMR spectroscopy and previously unidentified 1H NMR resonances were assigned to the keto and α-pyranose tautomers. The full assignment of shifts for the various fructose tautomers enabled the use of 1H NMR spectroscopy in studies of the mutarotation (5 – 25 °C) and tautomeric composition at equilibrium (5 – 50 °C). The mutarotation of β-pyranose to furanose tautomers in D2O at a concentration of 0.18 M was found to have an activation energy of 62.6 kJ.mol−1. At tautomeric equilibrium (20 °C in D2O) the distribution of the β-pyranose, β-furanose, α-furanose, α-pyranose and the keto tautomers was found to be 68.23%, 22.35%, 6.24%, 2.67% and 0.50%, respectively. This tautomeric composition was not significantly affected by varying concentration between 0.089 and 0.36 M or acidification to pH 3. Upon equilibrating at 6 temperatures between 5 and 50 °C there was a linear relationship between the change in concentration and temperature for all forms. PMID:22129837

  20. Assessing the fate and transformation of plant residues in the terrestrial environment using HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelleher, Brian P.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Simpson, Andre J.

    2006-08-01

    Plant litter decomposition plays a fundamental role in carbon and nitrogen cycles, provides key nutrients to the soil environment and represents a potentially large positive feedback to atmospheric CO 2. However, the full details of decomposition pathways and products are unknown. Here we present the first application of HR-MAS NMR spectroscopy on 13C and 15N labeled plant materials, and apply this approach in a preliminary study to monitor the environmental degradation of the pine and wheatgrass residues over time. In HR-MAS, is it possible to acquire very high resolution NMR data of plant biomass, and apply the vast array of multidimensional experiments available in conventional solution-state NMR. High levels of isotopic enrichment combined with HR-MAS significantly enhance the detection limits, and provide a wealth of information that is unattainable by any other method. Diffusion edited HR-MAS NMR data reveal the rapid loss of carbohydrate structures, while two-dimensional (2-D) HR-MAS NMR spectra demonstrate the relatively fast loss of both hydrolysable and condensed tannin structures from all plant tissues studied. Aromatic (partially lignin) and aliphatic components (waxes, cuticles) tend to persist, along with a small fraction of carbohydrate, and become highly functionalized over time. While one-dimensional (1-D) 13C HR-MAS NMR spectra of fresh plant tissue reflect compositional differences between pine and grass, these differences become negligible after decomposition suggesting that recalcitrant carbon may be similar despite the plant source. Two-dimensional 1H- 15N HR-MAS NMR analysis of the pine residue suggests that nitrogen from specific peptides is either selectively preserved or used for the synthesis of what appears to be novel structures. The amount of relevant data generated from plant components in situ using HR-MAS NMR is highly encouraging, and demonstrates that complete assignment will yield unprecedented structural knowledge of plant cell components, and provide a powerful tool with which to assess carbon sequestration and transformation in the environment.

  1. Mixing and Matching Detergents for Membrane Protein NMR Structure Determination

    PubMed Central

    Columbus, Linda; Lipfert, Jan; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Fox, Daniel A.; Sim, Adelene Y. L.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lesley, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    One major obstacle to membrane protein structure determination is the selection of a detergent micelle that mimics the native lipid bilayer. Currently, detergents are selected by exhaustive screening because the effects of protein-detergent interactions on protein structure are poorly understood. In this study, the structure and dynamics of an integral membrane protein in different detergents is investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results suggest that matching of the micelle dimensions to the protein’s hydrophobic surface avoids exchange processes that reduce the completeness of the NMR observations. Based on these dimensions, several mixed micelles were designed that improved the completeness of NMR observations. These findings provide a basis for the rational design of mixed micelles that may advance membrane protein structure determination by NMR. PMID:19425578

  2. Mixing and Matching Detergents for Membrane Protein NMR Structure Determination

    SciTech Connect

    Columbus, Linda; Lipfert, Jan; Jambunathan, Kalyani; Fox, Daniel A.; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Doniach, Sebastian; Lesley, Scott A.

    2009-10-21

    One major obstacle to membrane protein structure determination is the selection of a detergent micelle that mimics the native lipid bilayer. Currently, detergents are selected by exhaustive screening because the effects of protein-detergent interactions on protein structure are poorly understood. In this study, the structure and dynamics of an integral membrane protein in different detergents is investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The results suggest that matching of the micelle dimensions to the protein's hydrophobic surface avoids exchange processes that reduce the completeness of the NMR observations. Based on these dimensions, several mixed micelles were designed that improved the completeness of NMR observations. These findings provide a basis for the rational design of mixed micelles that may advance membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

  3. NMR Spectroscopy Using a Chiral Lanthanide Shift Reagent to Assess the Optical Purity of 1-Phenylethylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Tito; Toland, Alan

    1995-10-01

    Enantiomeric forms of 1-phenylethylamine cannot be distinguished by 1H or 13C-NMR because the groups attached to the stereocenter are in an enantiopic environment. However, the chemical shifts of the protons in the groups attached to the stereocenter can be differentially altered to appear as distinct peaks in the NMR spectrum. This is accomplished by the use of a commercially available chiral lanthanide shift reagent, Yb(tfC)3. The NMR spectrum after the addition of a chiral shift reagent allows one to assess the optical purity of the sample.

  4. Si-29 NMR spectroscopy of naturally-shocked quartz from Meteor Crater, Arizona: Correlation to Kieffer's classification scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boslough, M. B.; Cygan, R. T.; Kirkpatrick, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    We have applied solid state Si-29 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to five naturally-shocked Coconino Sandstone samples from Meteor Crater, Arizona, with the goal of examining possible correlations between NMR spectral characteristics and shock level. This work follows our observation of a strong correlation between the width of a Si-29 resonance and peak shock pressure for experimentally shocked quartz powders. The peak width increase is due to the shock-induced formation of amorphous silica, which increases as a function of shock pressure over the range that we studied (7.5 to 22 GPa). The Coconino Sandstone spectra are in excellent agreement with the classification scheme of Kieffer in terms of presence and approximate abundances of quartz, coesite, stishovite, and glass. We also observe a new resonance in two moderately shocked samples that we have tentatively identified with silicon in tetrahedra with one hydroxyl group in a densified form of amorphous silica.

  5. Metabolic discrimination of mango juice from various cultivars by band-selective NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koda, Masanori; Furihata, Kazuo; Wei, Feifei; Miyakawa, Takuya; Tanokura, Masaru

    2012-02-01

    NMR-based metabolic analysis of foods has been widely applied in food science. In this study, we performed discrimination of five different mango cultivars, Awin, Carabao, Keitt, Kent, and Nam Dok Mai, using metabolic analysis with band-selective excitation NMR spectra. A combination of unsupervised principal component analysis (PCA) with low-field region (1)H NMR spectra obtained by band-selective excitation provided a good discriminant model of the five mango cultivars. Using F(2)-selective 2D NMR spectra, we also identified various minor components in the mango juice. Signal assignment of the minor components facilitated the interpretation of the loading plot, and it was found that arginine, histidine, phenylalanine, glutamine, shikimic acid, and trigonelline were important for classification of the five mango cultivars. PMID:22242555

  6. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Applications: Proton NMR In Biological Objects Subjected To Magic Angle Spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

    2005-01-01

    Proton NMR in Biological Objects Submitted to Magic Angle Spinning, In Encyclopedia of Analytical Science, Second Edition (Paul J. Worsfold, Alan Townshend and Colin F. Poole, eds.), Elsevier, Oxford 6:333-342. Published January 1, 2005. Proposal Number 10896.

  7. Titration of Alanine Monitored by NMR Spectroscopy: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Francis J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The experiment described here involves simultaneous monitoring of pH and NMR chemical shifts during an aqueous titration of alpha- and beta-alanine. This experiment is designed for use in an undergraduate biochemistry course. (MR)

  8. Structural effects of insulin-loading into HII mesophases monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), small angle X-ray spectroscopy (SAXS), and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR).

    PubMed

    Mishraki, Tehila; Ottaviani, Maria Francesca; Shames, Alexander I; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-06-30

    Insulin entrapment within a monoolein-based reverse hexagonal (H(II)) mesophase was investigated under temperature-dependent conditions at acidic (pH 3) and basic (pH 8) conditions. Studying the structure of the host H(II) system and the interactions of insulin under temperature-dependent conditions has great impact on the enhancement of its thermal stabilization and controlled release for the purposes of transdermal delivery. Small angle X-ray spectroscopy (SAXS) measurements show that pH variation and/or insulin entrapment preserve the hexagonal structure and do not influence the lattice parameter. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) spectra indicate that, although insulin interacts with hydroxyl groups of GMO in the interface region, it is not affected by pH variations. Hence different microenvironments within the H(II) mesophase were monitored by a computer-aided electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis using 5-doxylstearic acid (5-DSA) as a pH-dependent probe. The microviscosity, micropolarity, order of systems, and distribution of the probes in different microenvironments were influenced by three factors: temperature, pH, and insulin solubilization. When the temperature is increased, microviscosity and order parameters decreased at both pH 3 and 8, presenting different decrease trends. It was found that, at pH 3, the protein perturbs the lipid structure while "pushing aside" the un-ionized 5-DSA probe to fit into the narrow water cylinders. At the interface region (pH 8), the probe was distributed in two differently structured environments that significantly modifies by increasing temperature. Insulin loading within the H(II) mesophase decreased the order and microviscosity of both the microenvironments and increased their micropolarity. Finally, the EPR analysis also provides information about the unfolding/denaturation of insulin within the channel at high temperatures. PMID:21591776

  9. Powder-XRD and (14) N magic angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy of some metal nitrides.

    PubMed

    Kempgens, Pierre; Britton, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    Some metal nitrides (TiN, ZrN, InN, GaN, Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 ) have been studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and (14) N magic angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR spectroscopy. For Ca3 N2 , Mg3 N2 , and Ge3 N4 , no (14) N NMR signal was observed. Low speed (νr  = 2 kHz for TiN, ZrN, and GaN; νr  = 1 kHz for InN) and 'high speed' (νr  = 15 kHz for TiN; νr  = 5 kHz for ZrN; νr  = 10 kHz for InN and GaN) MAS NMR experiments were performed. For TiN, ZrN, InN, and GaN, powder-XRD was used to identify the phases present in each sample. The number of peaks observed for each sample in their (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectrum matches perfectly well with the number of nitrogen-containing phases identified by powder-XRD. The (14) N MAS solid-state NMR spectra are symmetric and dominated by the quadrupolar interaction. The envelopes of the spinning sidebands manifold are Lorentzian, and it is concluded that there is a distribution of the quadrupolar coupling constants Qcc 's arising from structural defects in the compounds studied. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26687421

  10. Metabolism of 3-chloro-4-fluoroaniline in rat using [14C]-radiolabelling, 19F-NMR spectroscopy, HPLC-MS/MS, HPLC-ICPMS and HPLC-NMR.

    PubMed

    Duckett, C J; Lindon, J C; Walker, H; Abou-Shakra, F; Wilson, I D; Nicholson, J K

    2006-01-01

    The metabolic fate of 3-chloro-4-fluoroaniline was investigated in rat following intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration at 5 and 50 mg kg(-1) using a combination of HPLC-MS, HPLC-MS/MS, (19)F-NMR spectroscopy, HPLC-NMR spectroscopy and high-pressure liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS) with (35)Cl and (34)S detection. The metabolism of 3-chloro-4-fluoroaniline at both doses was rapid and extensive, to a large number of metabolites, with little unchanged compound excreted via the urine. Dosing at 5 mg kg(-1) with [(14)C]-labelled compound enabled the comparison of standard radioassay analysis methods with (19)F-NMR spectroscopy. (19)F-NMR resonances were only readily detectable in the 0-12 h post-dose samples. Dosing at 50 mg kg(-1) allowed the facile and specific detection and quantification of metabolites by (19)F-NMR spectroscopy. Metabolite profiling was also possible at this dose level using HPLC-ICPMS with (35)Cl-specific detection. The principal metabolites of 3-chloro-4-fluoroaniline were identified as 2-amino-4-chloro-5-fluorophenyl sulfate and 2-acetamido-4-chloro-5-fluorophenyl glucuronide. N-acetylation and hydroxylation followed by O-sulfation were the major metabolic transformations observed. PMID:16507513

  11. Recent developments and applications of saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Jane L; Taylor, Samantha L; Howard, Mark J

    2013-04-01

    This review aims to illustrate that STD NMR is not simply a method for drug screening and discovery, but has qualitative and quantitative applications that can answer fundamental and applied biological and biomedical questions involving molecular interactions between ligands and proteins. We begin with a basic introduction to the technique of STD NMR and report on recent advances and biological applications of STD including studies to follow the interactions of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, minimum binding requirements for virus infection and understating inhibition of amyloid fibre formation. We expand on this introduction by reporting recent STD NMR studies of live-cell receptor systems, new methodologies using scanning STD, magic-angle spinning STD and approaches to use STD NMR in a quantitative fashion for dissociation constants and group epitope mapping (GEM) determination. We finish by outlining new approaches that have potential to influence future applications of the technique; NMR isotope-editing, heteronuclear multidimensional STD and (19)F STD methods that are becoming more amenable due to the latest NMR equipment technologies. PMID:23232937

  12. Method for accurate measurements of nuclear-spin optical rotation for applications in correlated optical-NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Savukov, I M; Chen, H-Y; Karaulanov, T; Hilty, C

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear-spin optical rotation (NSOR) effect recently attracted much attention due to potential applications in combined optical-NMR spectroscopy and imaging. Currently, the main problem with applications of NSOR is low SNR and accuracy of measurements. In this work we demonstrate a new method for data acquisition and analysis based on a low-power laser and an emphasis on software based processing. This method significantly reduces cost and is suitable for application in most NMR spectroscopy laboratories for exploration of the NSOR effect. Despite the use of low laser power, SNR can be substantially improved with fairly simple strategies including the use of short wavelength and a multi-pass optical cell with in-flow pre-polarization in a 7 T magnet. Under these conditions, we observed that NSOR signal can be detected in less than 1 min and discuss strategies for further improvement of signal. With higher SNR than previously reported, NSOR constants can be extracted with improved accuracy. On the example of water, we obtained measurements at a level of accuracy of 5%. We include a detailed theoretical analysis of the geometrical factors of the experiment, which is required for accurate quantification of NSOR. This discussion is particularly important for relatively short detection cells, which will be necessary to use in spectroscopy or imaging applications that impose geometrical constraints. PMID:23685716

  13. Paramagnetism of Honeybees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Seishi

    1995-11-01

    The magnetic properties of honeybees have been investigated bymeasuring their susceptibility, magnetization andelectron-spin-resonance (ESR) absorption. The abdomen of adult workerhoneybees shows typical paramagnetism with small magnetic remanencedown to 4.2 K, while the other parts of the honeybees are apparentlydiamagnetic. The paramagnetism of the abdomen seems to develop not inthe pupal stage but after coming out of comb. Drones show noparamagnetism, but a queen bee seems to have some paramagnetic speciesin her abdomen.

  14. NMR spectroscopy and structural characterization of dithiophosphinate ligands relevant to minor actinide extraction processes.

    PubMed

    Daly, Scott R; Klaehn, John R; Boland, Kevin S; Kozimor, Stosh A; MacInnes, Molly M; Peterman, Dean R; Scott, Brian L

    2012-02-21

    Synthetic routes to alkyl and aryl substituted dithiophosphinate salts that contain non-coordinating PPh(4)(+) counter cations are reported. In general, these compounds can be prepared via a multi-step procedure that starts with reacting secondary phosphines, i.e. HPR(2), with two equivalents of elemental S. The synthetic transformation proceeds by oxidation of the phosphine followed by insertion of S into the H-P bond. This approach was used to synthesize a series of dithiophosphinic acids that were fully characterized, namely HS(2)P(p-CF(3)C(6)H(4))(2), HS(2)P(m-CF(3)C(6)H(4))(2), HS(2)P(o-MeC(6)H(4))(2) and HS(2)P(o-MeOC(6)H(4))(2). Although the insertion step was found to be much slower than the oxidation reaction, the formation of (NH(4))S(2)PR(2) from HPSR(2) occurred rapidly upon addition of NH(4)OH. Subsequent cation exchange reactions proceeded readily with PPh(4)Cl in water, under air and at ambient conditions to provide analytically pure samples of [PPh(4)][S(2)PR(2)] (R = p-CF(3)C(6)H(4), m-CF(3)C(6)H(4), o-CF(3)C(6)H(4), o-MeC(6)H(4), o-MeOC(6)H(4), Ph, and Me, 1b-7b, respectively), which were characterized by elemental analysis, multinuclear NMR, and IR spectroscopy. In addition, S(2)PPh(2)(-) and dithiophosphinates with ortho-substituted aryl groups (3b-6b) were characterized by X-ray crystallography. As opposed to the acids, which have short P=S double bonds and long P-SH single bonds, the metric parameters for the S atoms in S(2)PR(2)(-) are equivalent. In addition, the presence of large non-coordinating PPh(4)(+) cations guard against intermolecular P-S···X interactions and ensure that the P-S bond is isolated. These S(2)PR(2)(-) anions, which can be prepared in large quantities and isolated in crystalline form, are attractive for spectroscopic and theoretical studies because the P-S interaction can be probed independently in the absence of intermolecular interactions. PMID:22175060

  15. Area per Lipid and Cholesterol Interactions in Membranes from Separated Local-Field 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leftin, Avigdor; Molugu, Trivikram R.; Job, Constantin; Beyer, Klaus; Brown, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of lipid membranes using NMR spectroscopy generally require isotopic labeling, often precluding structural studies of complex lipid systems. Solid-state 13C magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy at natural isotopic abundance gives site-specific structural information that can aid in the characterization of complex biomembranes. Using the separated local-field experiment DROSS, we resolved 13C-1H residual dipolar couplings that were interpreted with a statistical mean-torque model. Liquid-disordered and liquid-ordered phases were characterized according to membrane thickness and average cross-sectional area per lipid. Knowledge of such structural parameters is vital for molecular dynamics simulations, and provides information about the balance of forces in membrane lipid bilayers. Experiments were conducted with both phosphatidylcholine (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)) and egg-yolk sphingomyelin (EYSM) lipids, and allowed us to extract segmental order parameters from the 13C-1H residual dipolar couplings. Order parameters were used to calculate membrane structural quantities, including the area per lipid and bilayer thickness. Relative to POPC, EYSM is more ordered in the ld phase and experiences less structural perturbation upon adding 50% cholesterol to form the lo phase. The loss of configurational entropy is smaller for EYSM than for POPC, thus favoring its interaction with cholesterol in raftlike lipid systems. Our studies show that solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy is applicable to investigations of complex lipids and makes it possible to obtain structural parameters for biomembrane systems where isotope labeling may be prohibitive. PMID:25418296

  16. Metabolic Study of Breast MCF-7 Tumor Spheroids after Gamma Irradiation by 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Alessandra; Grande, Sveva; Luciani, Anna Maria; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Guidoni, Laura; Viti, Vincenza; Rosi, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are an important model system to investigate the response of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. They share more properties with the original tumor than cells cultured as 2D monolayers do, which helps distinguish the intrinsic properties of monolayer cells from those induced during cell aggregation in 3D spheroids. The paper investigates some metabolic aspects of small tumor spheroids of breast cancer and their originating MCF-7 cells, grown as monolayer, by means of high–resolution (HR) 1H NMR spectroscopy and MR microimaging before and after gamma irradiation. The spectra of spheroids were characterized by higher intensity of mobile lipids, mostly neutral lipids, and glutamine (Gln) signals with respect to their monolayer cells counterpart, mainly owing to the lower oxygen supply in spheroids. Morphological changes of small spheroids after gamma-ray irradiation, such as loss of their regular shape, were observed by MR microimaging. Lipid signal intensity increased after irradiation, as evidenced in both MR localized spectra of the single spheroid and in HR NMR spectra of spheroid suspensions. Furthermore, the intense Gln signal from spectra of irradiated spheroids remained unchanged, while the low Gln signal observed in monolayer cells increased after irradiation. Similar results were observed in cells grown in hypoxic conditions. The different behavior of Gln in 2D monolayers and in 3D spheroids supports the hypothesis that a lower oxygen supply induces both an upregulation of Gln synthetase and a downregulation of glutaminases with the consequent increase in Gln content, as already observed under hypoxic conditions. The data herein indicate that 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a useful tool for monitoring cell response to different constraints. The use of spheroid suspensions